WorldWideScience

Sample records for group conclusions implications

  1. Conclusions Regarding Cross-Group Differences in Happiness Depend on Difficulty of Reaching Respondents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffetz, Ori; Rabin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature explores differences in subjective well-being across demographic groups, often relying on surveys with high nonresponse rates. By using the reported number of call attempts made to participants in the University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers, we show that comparisons among easy-to-reach respondents differ from comparisons among hard-to-reach ones. Notably, easy-to-reach women are happier than easy-to-reach men, but hard-to-reach men are happier than hard-to-reach women, and conclusions of a survey could reverse with more attempted calls. Better alternatives to comparing group sample averages might include putting greater weight on hard-to-reach respondents or even extrapolating trends in responses. PMID:26316655

  2. Conclusions Regarding Cross-Group Differences in Happiness Depend on Difficulty of Reaching Respondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffetz, Ori; Rabin, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    A growing literature explores differences in subjective well-being across demographic groups, often relying on surveys with high nonresponse rates. By using the reported number of call attempts made to participants in the University of Michigan's Surveys of Consumers, we show that comparisons among easy-to-reach respondents differ from comparisons among hard-to-reach ones. Notably, easy-to-reach women are happier than easy-to-reach men, but hard-to-reach men are happier than hard-to-reach women, and conclusions of a survey could reverse with more attempted calls. Better alternatives to comparing group sample averages might include putting greater weight on hard-to-reach respondents or even extrapolating trends in responses.

  3. Reevaluating the carcinogenicity of ortho-toluidine: a new conclusion and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, C; Markowitz, S

    1992-12-01

    The aromatic amine ortho-toluidine has been recognized by IARC as an animal carcinogen for the past decade. Three recent epidemiological studies of worker populations have now implicated this chemical as a human bladder carcinogen. In a study by E. Ward, A. Carpenter, S. Markowitz, D. Roberts, and W. Halperin ((1991), J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 83, 501-506), workers definitely exposed to ortho-toluidine for at least 10 years experienced a Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) of 27.2 (90% CI = 11.8-53.7). The other major exposure was to aniline, which significant epidemiological studies have failed to confirm as a human carcinogen. In retrospect, studies by G. F. Rubino, G. Scansetti, G. Piolatto ((1982) Environ. Res. 27, 241-254) and M. J. Stasik ((1988) Int. Arch. Occup. Environ. Health 60, 21-24) also support the hypothesis that ortho-toluidine is a human bladder carcinogen. Animal studies of both ortho-toluidine and its possible confounders in these epidemiological investigations further confirm this hypothesis. When evaluated in a suitably comprehensive way, according to the traditional standards for assessing causality outlined by A. B. Hill ((1977) A Short Textbook of Medical Statistics, pp. 288-294, Lippincott, Philadelphia) the evidence that ortho-toluidine causes human bladder cancer has become much more conclusive. In this case, animal tests have proven a good predictor of human carcinogenicity.

  4. Understanding Successful School-University Collaboration: Drawing Conclusions through Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Arlene C.; Stirling, Terry; Nauman, April D.; Bishop, Grace; Mayer, Nancy J.

    In research begun in 1999, participant perceptions of the elements required for successful school-university partnerships were explored. All participants were involved in partnerships of the Chicago Public Schools with a university partner. This study asked participants, through a series of focus groups, to examine, discuss, and draw their own…

  5. July 2004 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentation, Summary of Comments, and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Ross, J; Heineck, J; Storms, B; Walker, S; Leonard, A; Roy, C; Whitfield, D; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Englar, R; Funk, R

    2004-08-17

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held in Portland, Oregon on July 1, 2004. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a summary of achievements, discuss pressing issues, present a general overview of future plans, and to provide a forum for dialogue with the Department of Energy (DOE) and industry representatives. The meeting was held in Portland, because the DOE Aero Team participated in an exclusive session on Heavy Truck Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit in Portland on the morning of July 1st, just preceding our Working Group meeting. Even though the paper session was on the last day of the Conference, the Team presented to a full room of interested attendees.

  6. Mirror neurons: their implications for group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Victor L

    2010-10-01

    Recently discovered mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the brain register the actions and intentions of both the organism and others in the environment. As such, they may play a significant role in social behavior and groups. This paper considers the potential implications of mirror neurons and related neural networks for group therapists, proposing that mirror neurons and mirror systems provide "hard-wired" support for the group therapist's belief in the centrality of relationships in the treatment process and exploring their value in accounting for group-as-a-whole phenomena. Mirror neurons further confirm the holistic, social nature of perception, action, and intention as distinct from a stimulus-response behaviorism. The implications of mirror neurons and mirroring processes for the group therapist role, interventions, and training are also discussed.

  7. Sweet Conclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Britt M.; Wooldridge, Barbara Ross; Camp, Kerri M.

    2012-01-01

    Jen Harrington is the owner and pastry chef of Sweet Conclusion, a bakery in Tampa, Florida. Most of Harrington's business comes from baking wedding cakes, but she has been attempting to attract customers to her retail bakery, where she sells cupcakes, pies, ice cream, and coffee. Nearly four years she opened Sweet Conclusion, the retail part of…

  8. May 2003 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T Y; Arcas, D; Leoard, A; Chatelain, P; Rubel, M; Roy, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Ross, J; Satran, D; Walker, S; Heineck, J T; Englar, R; Pointer, D; Sofu, T

    2003-05-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on May 29-30, 2003. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss suggested guidance and direction for the design of drag reduction devices determined from experimental and computational studies. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Clarkson University, and PACCAR participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, provides some highlighted items, and outlines the future action items.

  9. March 2001 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenman, R; Dunn, T; Owens, J; Laskowski, G; Flowers, D; Browand, F; Knight, A; Hammache, M; Leoard, A; Rubel, M; Salari, K; Rutledge, W; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Driver, D; Storms, B

    2001-05-14

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 28 and 29, 2001. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Due to the large participation from industry and other research organizations, a large portion of the meeting (all of the first day and part of the second day) was devoted to the presentation and discussion of industry's perspective and work being done by other organizations on the demonstration of commercial software and the demonstration of a drag reduction device. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  10. April 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salari, K; Dunn, T; Ortega, J; Yen-Nakafuji, D; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Jammache, M; Leoard, A; Chatelain, P; Rubel, M; Rutledge, W; McWherter-Payne, M; Roy, Ca; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Storms, B; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Weber, D; Chu, E; Hancock, P; Bundy, B; Englar, B

    2002-08-22

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on April 3 and 4, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center, University of Southern California (USC), and California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Volvo Trucks, and Freightliner Trucks presented and participated in discussions. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  11. March 1999 working group meeting on heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag: presentations and summary of comments and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M; Browand, F; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Salari, K

    1999-03-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California on March 11, 1999. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in obtaining experimental results, model developments, and simulations. The focus of the meeting was a review of the experimental results for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Sandia Model in the NASA Ames 7 ft x 10 ft wind tunnel. The present and projected budget and funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center.This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items.

  12. March 2000 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic DragL Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R.; Flowers, D.; Dunn, T.; Owens, J.; Browand, F.; Hammache, M.; Loenard, A.; Brady, M.; Salari, K.; Rutledge, W.; Scheckler, R.; Ross, J.; Storms, B.; Heineck, J.T.; Arledge, T

    2000-05-15

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on March 16, 2000. The purpose of the meeting was to present technical details on the experimental and computational plans and approaches and provide an update on progress in the analysis of experimental results, model developments, simulations, and an investigation of an aerodynamic device. The focus of the meeting was a review of University of Southern California's (USC) experimental plans and results, NASA Ames experimental plans, the computational results from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the integrated tractor-trailer benchmark geometry called the Ground Transportation System (GTS) Model, and turbulence model development and benchmark simulation for a rounded cube from California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Much of the meeting discussion involved deficiencies in commercial software, needed modeling improvements, and the importance of detailed data for code validation. The present and projected budget and funding situation was also discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), LLNL, SNL, NASA Ames, USC, and Caltech. Representatives from Argonne National Laboratory also participated via telephone. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. There were 3 major issues raised at the meeting. (1) Our funding is inadequate to satisfy industries request for high Reynolds number experimentation and computation. Plans are to respond to the DOD and DOE requests for proposals, which require a 50-50 cost share with industry, to acquire funding for high Reynolds number experiments at NASA Ames. (2) The deficiencies in commercial software, the

  13. September 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R

    2002-09-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 23, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Freightliner, and Portland State University participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. The meeting began with an introduction by the Project Lead Rose McCallen of LLNL, where she emphasized that the world energy consumption is predicted to relatively soon exceed the available resources (i.e., fossil, hydro, non-breeder fission). This short fall is predicted to begin around the year 2050. Minimizing vehicle aerodynamic drag will significantly reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign oil resources and help with our world-wide fuel shortage. Rose also mentioned that educating the populace and researchers as to our world energy issues is important and that our upcoming United Engineering Foundation (UEF) Conference on ''The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles: Trucks, Busses, and Trains'' was one way our DOE Consortium was doing this. Mentioned were the efforts of Fred Browand from USC in organizing and attracting internationally recognized speakers to the Conference. Rose followed with an overview of the DOE project goals, deliverables, and FY03 activities. The viewgraphs are attached at the end of this

  14. September 2002 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R

    2002-09-01

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 23, 2002. The purpose of the meeting was to present and discuss technical details on the experimental and computational work in progress and future project plans. Representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy/Office of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), NASA Ames Research Center (NASA), University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Freightliner, and Portland State University participated in the meeting. This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions, and outlines the future action items. The meeting began with an introduction by the Project Lead Rose McCallen of LLNL, where she emphasized that the world energy consumption is predicted to relatively soon exceed the available resources (i.e., fossil, hydro, non-breeder fission). This short fall is predicted to begin around the year 2050. Minimizing vehicle aerodynamic drag will significantly reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign oil resources and help with our world-wide fuel shortage. Rose also mentioned that educating the populace and researchers as to our world energy issues is important and that our upcoming United Engineering Foundation (UEF) Conference on ''The Aerodynamics of Heavy Vehicles: Trucks, Busses, and Trains'' was one way our DOE Consortium was doing this. Mentioned were the efforts of Fred Browand from USC in organizing and attracting internationally recognized speakers to the Conference. Rose followed with an overview of the DOE project goals, deliverables, and FY03 activities. The viewgraphs are attached at the end of this

  15. Training in basic Internet skills for special target groups in non-formal educational settings – conclusions from three pilot projects

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Andrea; Croll, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative Internet erfahren, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has accompanied three pilot projects and researched the hindrances and motivations of specific target groups including young migrants from Russia, women in the low-wage ...

  16. Training in Basic Internet Skills for Special Target Groups in Non-Formal Educational Settings--Conclusions from Three Pilot Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Andrea; Croll, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative "Internet erfahren", funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has…

  17. Training in basic Internet skills for special target groups in non-formal educational settings – conclusions from three pilot projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Berger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative Internet erfahren, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has accompanied three pilot projects and researched the hindrances and motivations of specific target groups including young migrants from Russia, women in the low-wage sector and disabled elderly people, regarding their use of information and communication technology and related skills. This article describes the teaching methodologies in the training provided in non-formal education settings, exposes the different evaluation methods and sums up the results. A special focus in the discussion is given to the role of the teacher and the relationship between teacher and students as there turned out to be similarities in all three target groups. Understanding the balance between the training and abilities and preferences of the learners will facilitate the further development of training appropriate to those who are still digitally excluded.

  18. Conclusion: Special issue on genetic and alcohol use disorder research with diverse racial/ethnic groups: Key findings and potential next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Hesselbrock, Michie N; Hesselbrock, Victor M

    2017-08-01

    This special issue brings together papers focusing on a wide range of topics relevant to the research and understanding of the role of race/ethnicity and genetic variation for the susceptibility of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). The key findings from the issue's 10 articles are reviewed and organized here around three topics: I: addictive behaviors and potential environmental influences; II: a focus on four racial/ethnic groups; and III: special methodologies. Several potential next steps in improving effective research strategies are highlighted: (1) implementing best practices for outreach and community engagement may reduce reluctance to participate; (2) recruiting adequately sized and racially/ethnically diverse samples will require new collaborations with investigators who successfully work in diverse communities; (3) identifying and assessing environmental influences that are both unique to, and common among, racial/ethnic groups may inform preventions for AUD; (4) use of standardized measures will facilitate the generation of larger samples and meta-analysis of research findings; and (5) use of better analytic approaches and experimental methods will improve replication in gene finding research and help advance new areas of research. Genetic research of AUD in diverse racial/ethnic populations is advancing. The articles in this issue examined the general theme of including diverse population groups in genetic studies and offered potential strategies for addressing some common problems. Greater inclusion of diverse racial/ethnic populations in this research is important to ensure that the benefits of new knowledge and technology are equally shared. (Am J Addict 2017;26:532-537). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  19. Implications of malnutrition and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, D M; Anderson, E J; Laramee, S H

    1989-10-01

    The implications of malnutrition on the Medicare Prospective Payment System of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) were examined in 185 Medicare patients, aged 65 to 69 years, admitted to an acute-care tertiary hospital. Upon admission, patients were classified as malnourished if they were below the acceptable level in at least two of four parameters: serum albumin concentration, total lymphocyte count, percent ideal body weight, and percent weight loss. On the basis of that criterion, 8.6% (no. = 16) of the 185 patients were classified as malnourished. Although patients were classified as malnourished, malnutrition was among several comorbidity and complication (CC) factors, and, therefore, coding for malnutrition in any of these cases would not have increased hospital reimbursement. If malnutrition had been the only CC factor, hospital reimbursement would have been enhanced.

  20. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

  1. Conclusion: The balanced company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This concluding chapter brings together the various research findings of the book "The balanced company - organizing for the 21st Century" and develops a general overview of their implications for our understanding of the balancing processes unfolding in companies and organizations....

  2. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3 -- Appendix B: Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. Sections B1.1 through B1.4 present an overview of the environmental setting of WAG 5, including location, population, land uses, ecology, and climate, and Sects. B1.5 through B1.7 give site-specific details (e.g., topography, soils, geology, and hydrology). The remediation investigation (RI) of WAG 5 did not entail en exhaustive characterization of all physical attributes of the site; the information presented here focuses on those most relevant to the development and verification of the WAG 5 conceptual model. Most of the information presented in this appendix was derived from the RI field investigation, which was designed to complement the existing data base from earlier, site-specific studies of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and related areas.

  3. The (Biological or Cultural) Essence of Essentialism: Implications for Policy Support among Dominant and Subordinated Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Yalcinkaya, Nur; Estrada-Villalta, Sara; Adams, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Most research links (racial) essentialism to negative intergroup outcomes. We propose that this conclusion reflects both a narrow conceptual focus on biological/genetic essence and a narrow research focus from the perspective of racially dominant groups. We distinguished between beliefs in biological and cultural essences, and we investigated the implications of this distinction for support of social justice policies (e.g., affirmative action) among people with dominant (White) and subordinated (e.g., Black, Latino) racial identities in the United States. Whereas, endorsement of biological essentialism may have similarly negative implications for social justice policies across racial categories, we investigated the hypothesis that endorsement of cultural essentialism would have different implications across racial categories. In Studies 1a and 1b, we assessed the properties of a cultural essentialism measure we developed using two samples with different racial/ethnic compositions. In Study 2, we collected data from 170 participants using an online questionnaire to test the implications of essentialist beliefs for policy support. Consistent with previous research, we found that belief in biological essentialism was negatively related to policy support for participants from both dominant and subordinated categories. In contrast, the relationship between cultural essentialism and policy support varied across identity categories in the hypothesized way: negative for participants from the dominant category but positive for participants from subordinated categories. Results suggest that cultural essentialism may provide a way of identification that subordinated communities use to mobilize support for social justice.

  4. Group decisions in biodiversity conservation: implications from game theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Decision analysis and game theory have proved useful tools in various biodiversity conservation planning and modeling contexts. This paper shows how game theory may be used to inform group decisions in biodiversity conservation scenarios by modeling conflicts between stakeholders to identify Pareto-inefficient Nash equilibria. These are cases in which each agent pursuing individual self-interest leads to a worse outcome for all, relative to other feasible outcomes. Three case studies from biodiversity conservation contexts showing this feature are modeled to demonstrate how game-theoretical representation can inform group decision-making. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The mathematical theory of games is used to model three biodiversity conservation scenarios with Pareto-inefficient Nash equilibria: (i a two-agent case involving wild dogs in South Africa; (ii a three-agent raptor and grouse conservation scenario from the United Kingdom; and (iii an n-agent fish and coral conservation scenario from the Philippines. In each case there is reason to believe that traditional mechanism-design solutions that appeal to material incentives may be inadequate, and the game-theoretical analysis recommends a resumption of further deliberation between agents and the initiation of trust--and confidence--building measures. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Game theory can and should be used as a normative tool in biodiversity conservation contexts: identifying scenarios with Pareto-inefficient Nash equilibria enables constructive action in order to achieve (closer to optimal conservation outcomes, whether by policy solutions based on mechanism design or otherwise. However, there is mounting evidence that formal mechanism-design solutions may backfire in certain cases. Such scenarios demand a return to group deliberation and the creation of reciprocal relationships of trust.

  5. Presentation of conclusions of the 9. meeting of the working group on the division by four of the greenhouse gases emissions in France for 2050, called factor 4; Releve de conclusions de la 9. reunion du groupe de travail sur la division par quatre des emissions de gaz a effet de serre de la France a l'horizon 2050, dit Facteur 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamblin, V

    2006-05-15

    This document provides opinions and recommendations of the working group on the factor 4. It deals with the individual behaviors and their positive evolution, the part of the public policies, the actions of the CITEPA, the scientific context about the greenhouse gases decrease objectives, the works of the factor 4 and the long dated reduction aboard. (A.L.B.)

  6. Conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Mark; Nielsen, Julie Hassing

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on the findings of the previous chapters, we assess whether it continues to be helpful for European Parliament (EP) elections to be termed “second order” and/or “second rate”. The 2014 EP elections were indeed still second rate and also predominantly second order. Being “about Europe”, wh...... EP elections is likely to be reflected in later national elections and the circumstances in which those results could lead to substantial policy and/or membership changes in the European Union (EU)....

  7. Conclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Dubasque, François

    2015-01-01

    Lorsque Jean Hennessy entre en politique, rien ne laisse présager un parcours si complexe et déroutant ! Les étapes marquantes d’un itinéraire politique Issu de la grande bourgeoisie négociante, il bénéficie d’un capital d’influence politique, économique et social légué par sa famille. Or, le processus de démocratisation du recrutement du personnel politique dans la première moitié du xxe siècle aboutit à la marginalisation progressive de ceux pour qui le moyen d’accéder aux échelons du pouvo...

  8. Conclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Guibet-Lafaye, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    L’ensemble de ces analyses a permis de montrer que « le bonheur n’est ni une course effrénée au toujours plus et toujours tournée vers l’avenir, ni l’unique nostalgie du passé » (Proust) pas plus qu’il n’est la simple somme des plaisirs de la vie à laquelle seraient soustraits les maux subis. Le bonheur est bien plutôt un état – c’est-à-dire pas seulement un sentiment – de bien-être dépendant d’une pluralité de facteurs. Selon la perspective à partir de laquelle on l’appréhende (la psychologi...

  9. Conclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bart, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Résumons notre démonstration : La découverte des Beatles rend possibles des expériences intimes de plongée en soi. Le passionné a le sentiment de se découvrir au contact de la musique. Cette passion, à ce stade discrète, le singularise par rapport à son environnement immédiat (famille, amis…). On parlera de stratégie de différenciation. Cette stratégie peut conduire au sentiment d’une certaine incompréhension, d’une certaine solitude. La rencontre d’autres passionnés rassure dans un premier t...

  10. Conclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Félix, Joël

    2013-01-01

    La politique économique et financière de L’Averdy s’est fortement inspirée des réflexions de l’administration et des idées des économistes du milieu du xviiie siècle. Sa principale ambition fut d’améliorer les réformes financières de Machault d’Arnouville pour justifier, d’abord, le principe de l’imposition des rentes et doter, ensuite, la monarchie d’une structure d’amortissement de ses dettes pour greffer le financement des dépenses publiques sur la croissance économique. Les contraintes fi...

  11. Conclusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ ASEAN has become one of the centers in India's foreign policies, strategic concerns and economic interest, and also an outpost for India to go east to the Asia Pacific Area.19 The first phase of India's "Look East" policy is to fully restore its engagement with ASEAN and concentrate on forging trade and investment ties with the ASEAN countries, this task has already been fulfilled.

  12. Conclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wong, Terry T.

    2011-01-01

    This compilation of papers in this book represents approximately half of the works discussed at the MS&T 2010 symposium entitled Tools, Models, Databases, and Simulation Tools Developed and Needed to Realize the Vision of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering at Materials Science & Technology wherein five sessions comprised of 33 presentations was organized. The goal of the symposium was two fold To provide a forum in which current state-of-the-art methods for ICME (e.g., information informatics, experimentation, and modeling) could be openly discussed and critiqued by not only materials scientist but also structural engineers/researchers, component designers, industrial leaders and government program managers. To leave the symposium and in particular the panel discussion with a clear idea of the gaps and barriers (both technical, cultural and economical) that must be addressed in order for ICME to fully succeed. The organizers felt that these goals were met, as particularly evident by the standing room only attendance during a lively panel discussion session at the end of the Symposium. However it is the firm belief of the editors of this book that this symposium was merely a start in the right direction, and that subsequent conferences/symposium (e.g., First World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering to be held July 10-14, 2011 at Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Pennsylvania) must work hard to ensure that a truly diverse, multidisciplinary, community of researchers and practitioners are present and have ample opportunity for interaction. This will ensure that a proper balance between push and pull disciplines and technologies is maintained so that this emerging focus area, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME), has the greatest potential for success and impact on "system-level" payoffs. Similarly, a pro-active approach is required to reform historical modes of operation in industry, government and the academic sectors so as to facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration and to clearly articulate the vision and scope of ICME.

  13. Conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Wallo, Andreas; Toiviainen, Hanna;

    2015-01-01

    production and knowledge-work offer growing learning opportunities to people throughout their active working life. In contrast to the stable and standardised modes of Fordist production, modern working life is characterised by rapid changes and employees interacting across globally distributed professional...... and spatial production networks. Based on continuous relationships of mutual exchange and knowledge building between customers, suppliers and producers, these kinds of learning environments are essentially different from those offered in a school setting. More research is needed to explore the opportunities...

  14. Conclusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ One of the major contributions of economic integration to European unification lies in its transformation of traditional European balance concepts and structures. This unification model shows that mere economic and trade ties cannot basically change state relations.

  15. Conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøy, Helge; Kristiansen, Tore

    2010-01-01

    1. Comparing empirical findings with the “mountain peak model” In the introduction to this volume, we presented a “mountain peak model” of Nordic purism based on evidence showing that language scholars and lay people are very much in agreement as to where we find the more purist languages and com...

  16. Conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøy, Helge; Kristiansen, Tore

    2010-01-01

    1. Comparing empirical findings with the “mountain peak model” In the introduction to this volume, we presented a “mountain peak model” of Nordic purism based on evidence showing that language scholars and lay people are very much in agreement as to where we find the more purist languages...

  17. Conclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Strubell

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this brief document, the director of the UOC's Humanities degree, Miquel Strubell, concludes the Dossier focusing on the subject that acted as the catalyst for the 1st Conference on "Humanities Professions in the Knowledge Society", highlighting those areas for debate that, from his point of view, are most interesting and attractive in terms of setting limits and facing up to the problems the degree has at this time of the coming together to form a European university space.

  18. Evolution of public cooperation in a monitored society with implicated punishment and within-group enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojie; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-11-24

    Monitoring with implicated punishment is common in human societies to avert freeriding on common goods. But is it effective in promoting public cooperation? We show that the introduction of monitoring and implicated punishment is indeed effective, as it transforms the public goods game to a coordination game, thus rendering cooperation viable in infinite and finite well-mixed populations. We also show that the addition of within-group enforcement further promotes the evolution of public cooperation. However, although the group size in this context has nonlinear effects on collective action, an intermediate group size is least conductive to cooperative behaviour. This contradicts recent field observations, where an intermediate group size was declared optimal with the conjecture that group-size effects and within-group enforcement are responsible. Our theoretical research thus clarifies key aspects of monitoring with implicated punishment in human societies, and additionally, it reveals fundamental group-size effects that facilitate prosocial collective action.

  19. Evolution of public cooperation in a monitored society with implicated punishment and within-group enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojie; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring with implicated punishment is common in human societies to avert freeriding on common goods. But is it effective in promoting public cooperation? We show that the introduction of monitoring and implicated punishment is indeed effective, as it transforms the public goods game to a coordination game, thus rendering cooperation viable in infinite and finite well-mixed populations. We also show that the addition of within-group enforcement further promotes the evolution of public cooperation. However, although the group size in this context has nonlinear effects on collective action, an intermediate group size is least conductive to cooperative behaviour. This contradicts recent field observations, where an intermediate group size was declared optimal with the conjecture that group-size effects and within-group enforcement are responsible. Our theoretical research thus clarifies key aspects of monitoring with implicated punishment in human societies, and additionally, it reveals fundamental group-size effects that facilitate prosocial collective action.

  20. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  1. Philosophical Implications of Kadanoff's Work on the Renormalization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterman, Robert W.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the consequences for our understanding of physical theories as a result of the development of the renormalization group. Kadanoff's assessment of these consequences is discussed. What he called the "extended singularity theorem" (that phase transitons only can occur in infinite systems) poses serious difficulties for philosophical interpretation of theories. Several responses are discussed. The resolution demands a philosophical rethinking of the role of mathematics in physical theorizing.

  2. 也谈Sn与An的群图——质疑《群图的基本理论及置换群图的构造》[1]中某些结论%Also Talking about Group Graph of Sn and An: Queries about Some Conclusions in The Basic Theory of Group Graph and the Construction of Permutation Group Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王积社

    2011-01-01

    This article studies the group graph of Sn and An in detail, and revises some incorrect conclusions in The Basic Theory of Group Graph and the Construction of Permutation Group Graph". Parts of group graph of S4 and A4 are made by computer.%详细研究了Sn与An的群图,修正了《群图的基本理论及置换群图的构造》一文中某些错误的结论,并用计算机作出了S4与A4的部分群图.

  3. Implications of the remarkable homogeneity of galaxy groups and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    We measure the diversity of galaxy groups and clusters with mass M>1E13/h Msun, in terms of the star formation history of their galaxy populations, for the purpose of constraining the mass scale at which environmentally-important processes play a role in galaxy evolution. We consider three different group catalogues, selected in different ways, with photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each system we measure the fraction of passively-evolving galaxies within R200 and brighter than either Mr=-18 (and with z<0.05) or Mr=-20 (and z<0.1). We use the (u-g) and (r-i) galaxy colours to distinguish between star-forming and passively-evolving galaxies. By considering the binomial distribution expected from the observed number of members in each cluster, we are able to either recover the intrinsic scatter in this fraction, or put robust 95% confidence upper-limits on its value. The intrinsic standard deviation in the fraction of passive galaxies is consistent with a small value of &l...

  4. Mental Health Support Groups, Stigma, and Self-Esteem : Positive and Negative Implications of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabtree, Jason W.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases

  5. Mental Health Support Groups, Stigma, and Self-Esteem : Positive and Negative Implications of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabtree, Jason W.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases r

  6. [SENTIERI Project: discussion and conclusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirastu, Roberta; Ricci, Paolo; Comba, Pietro; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Biggeri, Annibale; Conti, Susanna; Fazzo, Lucia; Forastiere, Francesco; Iavarone, Ivano; Martuzzi, Marco; Musmeci, Loredana; Pasetto, Roberto; Zona, Amerigo; Crocetti, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The SENTIERI Project represents the first comprehensive analysis of the health impact of residence in National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs). For the first time, it considers three distinct health outcomes: mortality (2003-2010), cancer incidence (1996- 2005) and hospital discharges (2005-2010). The Report includes a commentary explaining methodology and approach, as well as remarks on the causal association between environmental exposures and investigated health outcomes based on the a priori assessments of the epidemiological evidence; the main implications for public health and scientific research priorities are also presented. The approach put forward by SENTIERI was among those sanctioned by the World Health Organization to conduct an initial description of the health status of residents of contaminated sites. Results relating to individual diseases that can be traced back to a single agent, such as asbestiform fibres, can be easily analysed. The Biancavilla NPCS (where the fluoro-edenite asbestiform fibre was found) displays excesses of pleural mesothelioma and its proxy, malignant pleural tumours, as does Priolo, where asbestos coexists with other pollutants. Increased risk was also recorded in NPCSs adjacent to the coast hosting harbour areas (such as Trieste, Taranto and Venice) or comprising industrial areas specialising in the production of chemicals (Laguna di Grado e Marano, Priolo and Venezia) and steel (Taranto, Terni, Trieste). Increases of pathologies, such as cancer and respiratory diseases, connected to more than one agent, in industrial sites with multiple and diverse sources of exposures, prove harder to interpret. There are also more complex cases in which results do not appear consistent in the three databases or by gender (such as lung cancer in Venice, where mortality and hospital discharges have only increased among women). In order to adequately examine these we must consider factors such as the appropriateness of the health outcome

  7. Reference group theory with implications for information studies: a theoretical essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Murell Dawson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role and implications of reference group theory in relation to the field of library and information science. Reference group theory is based upon the principle that people take the standards of significant others as a basis for making self-appraisals, comparisons, and choices regarding need and use of information. Research that applies concepts of reference group theory to various sectors of library and information studies can provide data useful in enhancing areas such as information-seeking research, special populations, and uses of information. Implications are promising that knowledge gained from like research can be beneficial in helping information professionals better understand the role theory plays in examining ways in which people manage their information and social worlds.

  8. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Streptococcus illuminates evolutionary implications of species groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Gao

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into "species groups". However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups.

  9. Comparative Genomics of the Bacterial Genus Streptococcus Illuminates Evolutionary Implications of Species Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into “species groups”. However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  10. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  11. 2010年4月免疫策略咨询专家组会议——结论和建议%Meeting of the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization, April 2010-conclusions and recommendations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武文娣

    2010-01-01

    @@ 免疫策略咨询专家组(The Strategic Advisory Group of Experts, SAGE)向世界卫生组织(WHO)总干事汇报了从疫苗研发到预防接种实施等各方面内容.SAGE会议于2010年4月13~15日在瑞士日内瓦召开.

  12. Congruencies between photoautotrophic groups in springs of the Italian Alps: implications for conservation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco CANTONATI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Even though a number of studies have demonstrated the importance of photoautotrophic organisms in spring habitats, investigations that consider several photoautotrophic taxonomic groups are lacking. Within the framework of a multidisciplinary project on springs of the south-eastern Alps, we studied algae, diatoms, lichens, and bryophytes and (1 compared the alpha, beta and gamma diversity, and the composition of the studied groups between carbonate and siliceous springs, (2 estimated the nonrandomness of species combinations within organismal groups, and (3 examined the congruence in species assemblage patterns across taxonomic groups. In 40 springs, 69 species of algae, 110 species of diatoms, 29 species of lichens, and 62 species of bryophytes were found. Diatoms, lichens and bryophytes had higher species-richness in siliceous springs, while other algae had higher richness in carbonate springs. For all taxonomic groups, carbonate and siliceous springs host different assemblages, indicating that both types of substrata contribute to the overall regional diversity of spring photoautotrophs. In individual springs, the photoautotroph groups are characterised by a similar proportion of species of their regional pool, and form relatively speciespoor communities with a high turnover of species among springs. This pattern has important implications for conservation, suggesting that the protection of single sites might not be effective, and that a biodiversity conservation plan for spring habitats should be developed at the regional level, and include a network of sites. Interestingly, the co-occurrence indices suggested that, in individual springs, stochastic processes might the most important mechanisms in the establishment of local assemblages. A weak cross-taxon congruency was found, suggesting that a single taxon surrogate will not adequately represent other photoautotrophic groups. Therefore, spring conservation plans for photoautotrophs should

  13. Success in Low Intensity Conflict: Conclusions and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-07

    North PORT A Zf A TURKEY Ocear, 4190#’a 5 Uns WALTA -0 Robot ftw- cyp Modaeftanoan Saocassol’once rMool. --MOROCCO Alexandn C-󈧋 ’s Sn9ha El Awu LI YA...contribution of disciplined, well trained individual soldiers cannot be overemphasized. Precise application of f• repower rather than indiscriminate

  14. Six new species of the Anopheles leucosphyrus group, reinterpretation of An. elegans and vector implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallum, M A M; Peyton, E L; Wilkerson, R C

    2005-06-01

    Among Oriental anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), several major vectors of forest malaria belong to the group of Anopheles (Cellia) leucosphyrus Dönitz. We have morphologically examined representative material (> 8000 specimens from seven countries) for taxonomic revision of the Leucosphyrus Group. Six new species are here described from adult, pupal and larval stages (with illustrations of immature stages) and formally named as follows: An. latens n. sp. (= An. leucosphyrus species A of Baimai et al., 1988b), An. cracens n. sp., An. scanloni n. sp., An. baimaii n. sp. (formerly An. dirus species B, C, D, respectively), An. mirans n. sp. and An. recens n. sp. Additionally, An. elegans (James) is redescribed and placed in the complex of An. dirus Peyton & Harrison (comprising An. baimaii, An. cracens, An. dirus, An. elegans, An. nemophilous Peyton and Ramalingam, An. scanloni and An. takasagoensis Morishita) of the Leucosphyrus Subgroup, together with An. baisasi Colless and the An. leucosphyrus complex (comprising An. balabacensis Baisas, An. introlatus Baisas, An. latens and An. leucosphyrus). Hence, the former Elegans Subgroup is renamed the Hackeri Subgroup (comprising An. hackeri Edwards, An. pujutensis Colless, An. recens and An. sulawesi Waktoedi). Distribution data and bionomics of the newly defined species are given, based on new material and published records, with discussion of morphological characters for species distinction and implications for ecology and vector roles of such species. Now these and other members of the Leucosphyrus Group are identifiable, it should be possible to clarify the medical importance and distribution of each species. Those already regarded as vectors of human malaria are: An. baimaii[Bangladesh, China (Yunnan), India (Andamans, Assam, Meghalaya, West Bengal), Myanmar, Thailand]; An. latens[Borneo (where it also transmits Bancroftian filariasis), peninsular Malaysia, Thailand]; probably An. cracens (Sumatra

  15. [Primary health care reform and implications for the organizational culture of Health Center Groups in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Claudia; Dussault, Gilles; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2014-01-01

    The health sector's increasing complexity poses major challenges for administrators. There is considerable consensus on workforce quality as a key determinant of success for any health reform. This study aimed to explore the changes introduced by an action-training intervention in the organizational culture of the 73 executive directors of Health Center Groups (ACES) in Portugal during the primary health care reform. The study covers two periods, before and after the one-year ACES training, during which the data were collected and analyzed. The Competing Values Framework allowed observing that after the ACES action-training intervention, the perceptions of the executive directors regarding their organizational culture were more aligned with the practices and values defended by the primary health care reform. The study highlights the need to continue monitoring results over different time periods to elaborate further conclusions.

  16. Political Violence and Adolescent Out-group Attitudes and Prosocial Behaviors: Implications for Positive Inter-group Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Laura K; Merrilees, Christine E; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Shirlow, Peter; Cairns, Ed; Cummings, E Mark

    2014-11-01

    The negative impact of political violence on adolescent adjustment is well-established. Less is known about factors that affect adolescents' positive outcomes in ethnically-divided societies, especially influences on prosocial behaviors toward the outgroup, which may promote constructive relations. For example, understanding how intergroup experiences and attitudes motivate outgroup helping may foster intergroup cooperation and help to consolidate peace. The current study investigated adolescents' overall and outgroup prosocial behaviors across two time points in Belfast, Northern Ireland (N = 714 dyads; 49% male; Time 1: M = 14.7, SD = 2.0, years old). Controlling for Time 1 prosocial behaviors, age and gender, multivariate structural equation modeling showed that experience with intergroup sectarian threat predicted fewer outgroup prosocial behaviors at Time 2 at the trend level. On the other hand, greater experience of intragroup nonsectarian threat at Time 1 predicted more overall and outgroup prosocial behaviors at Time 2. Moreover, positive outgroup attitudes strengthened the link between intragroup threat and outgroup prosocial behaviors one year later. Finally, experience with intragroup nonsectarian threat and outgroup prosocial behaviors at Time 1 was related to more positive outgroup attitudes at Time 2. The implications for youth development and intergroup relations in post-accord societies are discussed.

  17. Application of Focal Conflict Theory to Psychoeducational Groups: Implications for Process, Content, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Group psychoeducation is a common group type used for a range of purposes. The literature presents balancing content and process as a challenge for psychoeducational group leaders. While the significance of group psychoeducation is supported, practitioners are given little direction for addressing process in these groups. Focal Conflict Theory…

  18. The Use of Group Work in ESL Classrooms-Discourse Features and Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭奕奕

    2003-01-01

    Group work has many advantages from language acquisition point of view. However, some teachers are unwilling to introduce group work in their own classroom because group work is very difficult to manage. The author of this essay explores the discourse features of successful and unsuccessful group work using discourse analysis in the hope that the results of this language classroom research can help language teachers gain some insight into the use of group work and make more informed decisions about group work management.

  19. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug P. Aubrey; David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus...

  20. Only one simple conclusion about the climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, G.

    2000-07-24

    Findings concerning climate change, by a three-man team of scientists from the North Dakota Geological Survey, which were presented in a paper read at the Eight International Williston Basin Horizontal Well Workshop, are discussed. The survey by the three scientists covered more than 6,000 scholarly publications. It reported that while the rise in the Earth's temperature is beyond argument, there is anything but agreement as to the causes, or whether the trend is unusual enough to justify concerted and costly actions to change lifestyles. It is shown by direct instrumental measurements that the average temperature at the Earth's surface increased about 0.8 degree Celsius between 1866 and 1998. During that time the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increased from 280 to 353 parts per million. While it is generally assumed that the global warming was caused by human activities, new techniques of measurement such as glacier ice coring, dendrochronology (tree-growth rings), lichenometry (measuring the diameter of lichens) and counting concentrations of oxygen 18 and 16 (isotopes whose presence in marine fossils varies depending on temperature) suggest that most of the global warming took place before the increase in carbon dioxide concentration occurred, raising the possibility that the increase in average temperature had causes other than the increase in greenhouse gases. Some of the studies reviewed by the group show that in Europe between ice ages during the Eemian period, some 135,000 to 110,000 years ago, temperature variations of seven degrees Celsius took place; they dropped from two degree Celsius warmer than today to five degree Celsius colder than today. Based on these findings the group's only firm conclusion was that climate is in a continual flux.

  1. Distributional pattern of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in the shelf region off Mangalore: Environmental implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Sinha, R.; Rai, A.K.; Nigam, R.

    , the population was further placed into two broad morpho-groups namely, angular-asymmetrical and rounded-symmetrical. The surficial distribution of these groups revealed that angular-asymmetrical forms are abundant in relatively deeper region whereas rounded...

  2. Intergroup Contact and Social Change: Implications of Negative and Positive Contact for Collective Action in Advantaged and Disadvantaged Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Nils Karl; Becker, Julia C; Benz, Angelika; Christ, Oliver; Dhont, Kristof; Klocke, Ulrich; Neji, Sybille; Rychlowska, Magdalena; Schmid, Katharina; Hewstone, Miles

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that (a) positive intergroup contact with an advantaged group can discourage collective action among disadvantaged-group members and (b) positive intergroup contact can encourage advantaged-group members to take action on behalf of disadvantaged outgroups. Two studies investigated the effects of negative as well as positive intergroup contact. Study 1 ( n = 482) found that negative but not positive contact with heterosexual people was associated with sexual-minority students' engagement in collective action (via group identification and perceived discrimination). Among heterosexual students, positive and negative contacts were associated with, respectively, more and less LGB (lesbian, gay, bisexual) activism. Study 2 ( N = 1,469) found that only negative contact (via perceived discrimination) predicted LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) students' collective action intentions longitudinally while only positive contact predicted heterosexual/cisgender students' LGBT activism. Implications for the relationship between intergroup contact, collective action, and social change are discussed.

  3. Item Construction Using Reflective, Formative, or Rasch Measurement Models: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Gischlar, Karen L.; Peterson, N. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Measures that accurately capture the phenomenon are critical to research and practice in group work. The vast majority of group-related measures were developed using the reflective measurement model rooted in classical test theory (CTT). Depending on the construct definition and the measure's purpose, the reflective model may not always be the…

  4. Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reaction in a Patient with Bombay Phenotype: Implications for ABO Grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Jain, Ashish; Sachdev, Suchet; Marwaha, Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Bombay blood group is a rare phenotype that is characterized serologically by absence of H, A and B antigens on red cell surface and presence of corresponding antibodies in the serum. We report a case of 45-year old patient having Bombay blood group phenotype who experienced an acute reaction due to transfusion of mismatched blood unit.

  5. The Nonsignificant Impact of an Agenda Setting Treatment for Groups: Implications for Future Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridbord, Karen; DeLucia-Waack, Janice L.; Jones, Edlyn; Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study compared the effect of two writing techniques, Agenda Setting and Group Focus, to a cognitive technique, reading process notes at the start of a group session, to examine their impact on social climate, member involvement, and behavior. Theoretically an intervention that helps members to focus directly on their goals and potential…

  6. Life of Pizza Pie: The Implications of Sub-Group Comparisons in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tara N.

    2013-01-01

    Current educational statistics have pitted subgroups against one another without consideration of the actual population sizes of each group. This paper is intended to provided a clearer understanding of the current usage of sub-group comparisons in American education. (Contains 4 figures.)

  7. Systematic biases in group decision-making: implications for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Thompson, Carl

    2014-12-01

    Key decisions in modern health care systems are often made by groups of people rather than lone individuals. However, group decision-making can be imperfect and result in organizational and clinical errors which may harm patients-a fact highlighted graphically in recent (and historical) health scandals and inquiries such as the recent report by Sir Robert Francis into the serious failures in patient care and safety at Mid Staffordshire Hospitals NHS Trust in the English NHS. In this article, we draw on theories from organization studies and decision science to explore the ways in which patient safety may be undermined or threatened in health care contexts as a result of four systematic biases arising from group decision-making: 'groupthink', 'social loafing', 'group polarization' and 'escalation of commitment'. For each group bias, we describe its antecedents, illustrate how it can impair group decisions with regard to patient safety, outline a range of possible remedial organizational strategies that can be used to attenuate the potential for adverse consequences and look forward at the emerging research agenda in this important but hitherto neglected area of patient safety research.

  8. The Fossils in Shangxi Group and Its Implication for Tectonics, Southern Anhui, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐树桐; 陈冠宝; 陶正; 石永红; 孙枢; Kenneth J.Hsu; 尹磊明; 欧阳舒; 廖卓庭

    1994-01-01

    The Shangxi Group is the local name in southern Anhui Province and it is believed to be the equivalence of the well-known Banxi Group in Hunan Province, southern China. So the area occupied by the Shangxi Group was regarded as a part of the "Jiangnan old land" of Presinian till it was challenged by the present authors years ago. After we postulated that there may be some strata of Palaeozoic Era in Shangxi Group, some microfossils and then macrofossils of Palaeozoic were found in some part of it. The macrof os-sils, Lingula sp. , Conulariid and the microfossils indicate that most units of the Shangxi Group are Palaeozoic strata. Based on the discovery of these fossils and the recognition of the tectonic-setting of the different tectono-petrologic units in the Shangxi Group, three different stratigraphic sequences (island-arc volcanics, back-arc sediments and the cover of passive margin of Yangtze Continental Plate) are established and the tectonic evolution of them is postulated in the present paper. Al

  9. The Lifetime of FRIIs in Groups and Clusters: Implications for Radio-Mode Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Jonathan C; Kaiser, Christian R

    2007-01-01

    We determine the maximum lifetime t_max of 58 FRII radio jets found in 29 central group galaxies from cross correlation of the Berlind SDSS group catalog with the VLA FIRST survey. Mock catalogs of FRII sources were produced to match the selection criteria of FIRST and the redshift distribution of our parent sample, while an analytical model was used to calculate source sizes and luminosities. The maximum lifetime of FRII jets was then determined via a comparison of the observed and model projected length distributions. We estimate the average FRII lifetime is 1.2x10^7 years and the duty cycle is ~7x10^8 years. Degeneracies between t_max and the model parameters: jet power distribution, axial ratio, energy injection index, and ambient density introduce at most a factor of two uncertainty in our lifetime estimate. The radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) fraction in central group galaxies was calculated as a function of several group and host galaxy properties. We find greater group galaxy number, redder central...

  10. Phylogenetic relationships within the Callicebus cupreus species group (Pitheciidae: Primates): Biogeographic and taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Manuel; Bloor, Paul; Defler, Thomas; Vermeer, Jan; Röhe, Fabio; Farias, Izeni

    2016-09-01

    The genus Callicebus (Thomas, 1903) is one of the most diverse of Neotropical primate genera and the only extant member of the Callicebinae subfamily. It has a widespread distribution from Colombia to Brazil, Bolivia, Peru and northern Paraguay. Coat colouring and colour pattern vary substantially within the genus, and this has led to the description of numerous species and subspecies, as well as numerous species groups. However, a lack of molecular phylogenetic analyses on the genus means that phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history of species are poorly understood. Here, we examined phylogenetic relationships and patterns of diversification within the Callicebus cupreus species Group (sensu Kobayashi, 1995) using complete mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequence. Analyses indicate that the Callicebus cupreus Group underwent recent and extensive diversification. The common ancestor appears to have emerged some 2.3 million years ago (Ma) from a centre of origin in the western Amazon region, followed by diversification of the group between about 1.5 and 1.2Ma. Phylogenetic analyses were able to recover most previously described species (including the recently described Colombian endemic Callicebus caquetensis). However, there are some notable inconsistences between the obtained phylogeny and current taxonomy. Some previously recognized taxa were not separated by our data (e.g., Callicebus caligatus and Callicebus dubius), while currently unrecognized species diversity was uncovered within C. cupreus in the form of two divergent lineages: one of which exhibited greater phylogenetic similarity to species from the C. moloch Group. Based on the present study, we challenge current taxonomic arrangements for the C. cupreus species Group and call for a thorough taxonomic revision within the genus Callicebus.

  11. Refined stratigraphy and its paleogeographic implication of the Mungyeong Group (Cambrian-Ordovician), Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inhye; Kwon, Yoojin; Kwon, Yikyun

    2016-04-01

    The Mungyeong Group is a typical lower Paleozoic carbonate-dominated succession regarded as a lithologic subunit of the Joseon Supergroup in the mid-eastern part of the Korean peninsula. This succession was strongly affected by a series of diagenetic processes and tectonic deformation, so it is not easy to realize its sedimentary fabric and structure on outcrops. In addition, due to rare occurrence of fossils, its biostratigraphic information has been restricted. As a result, this group has exposed a lot of debates on its stratigraphy and consequently has failed to establish stratigraphy until now. Through the detailed outcrop description and geologic mapping, this study recognized two lithologically-distinct basin fills (western Gaeun and eastern Hogye basins) suggesting a refined lithostratigraphic framework on the group. The Gaeun basin is filled by the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession (Gaeun Subgroup) of the Mungyeong Group, comprising six lithologic formations: Gurangri, Maseong, Hanaeri, Seokgyori, Jeongri and Dotan formation in ascending order. The basal Gurangri Formation is the siliciclastic-dominated unit, containing abundant lower Paleozoic trilobite fossils, conformably overlain by other carbonate-dominated successions characterized by repetitions of limestone and marlstone with intercalations of dolostone beds. On the other hand, the Hogye Subgroup occurs in the eastern basin, divided into five lithostatigraphic units: Gadori, Seonamri, Urori, Yugok and Byeolamri formations in ascending order. This subgroup consists mainly of severely deformed limestone and dolostone successions, intercalated with shale beds. In the Hogye Subgroup, the basal siliciclastic-dominated succession (like as the Gurangri Formation in the Gaeun Subgroup) is not present. This study reveals that the Gaeun and Hogye subgroups in the Mungyeong Group have a distinctive lithology and stratigraphy with each other and compared with the adjacent Yeongweol and Taebaek groups

  12. Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography of Gujarat region, Western India and its implications to mantle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Michele, Maddalena; Emolo, Antonio; Tallarico, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, fundamental Rayleigh waves with varying period from 10 to 80 s are used to obtain group velocity maps in the northwest Deccan Volcanic Province of India. About 350 paths are obtained using 53 earthquakes (4.8 ≤ M ≥ 7.9) recorded by the SeisNetG (Seismic Network of Gujarat). Individual dispersion curves of group velocity of Rayleigh wave for each source-station path are estimated using multiple filter technique. These curves are used to determine lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocity by tomographic inversion method. Our estimated Rayleigh group velocity at varying depths showed conspicuous corroboration with three tectonic blocks [Kachchh Rift Basin (KRB), Saurashtra Horst (SH), and Mainland Gujarat (MG)] in the region. The seismically active KRB with a thicker crust is characterized as a low velocity zone at a period varying from 10 to 30 s as indicative of mantle downwarping or sagging of the mantle beneath the KRB, while the SH and MG are found to be associated with higher group velocities, indicating the existence of the reduced crustal thickness. The trend of higher group velocity was found prevailed adjacent to the Narmada and Cambay rift basins that also correspond to the reduced crust, suggesting the processes of mantle upwarping or uplifting due to mantle upwelling. The low velocities at periods longer than 40 s beneath the KRB indicate thicker lithosphere. The known Moho depth correlates well with the observed velocities at a period of about 30 s in the Gujarat region. Our estimates of relatively lower group velocities at periods varying from 70 to 80 s may correspond to the asthenospheric flow beneath the region. It is interesting to image higher group velocity for the thinner crust beneath the Arabian Sea adjacent to the west coast of Gujarat at the period of 40 s that may correspond to the upwarped or upwelled mantle beneath the Arabian Sea. Our results have better resolution estimated by a radius of equivalent

  13. Treatment fairness and group norms in times of turmoil : Implications for employee well-beini

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, P.

    2010-01-01

    Employee well-being is important for individual employees and for the organizations they work for. However, current difficult economic times cause employees to experience unfavorable conditions (e.g., uncertainty, unfair outcomes and low cohesive groups) and this thesis attempts to provide organizat

  14. Focus Group Research on the Implications of Adopting the Unified English Braille Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Robin; Knowlton, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Five focus groups explored concerns about adopting the Unified English Braille Code. The consensus was that while the proposed changes to the literary braille code would be minor, those to the mathematics braille code would be much more extensive. The participants emphasized that "any code that reduces the number of individuals who can access…

  15. The sizes of elephant groups in zoos: implications for elephant welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the distribution of 495 Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and 336 African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in 194 zoos, most of which were located in Europe (49.1%) and North America (32.6%). Cows outnumbered bulls 4 to 1 (Loxodonta) and 3 to 1 (Elephas). Groups contained 7 or fewer: mean, 4.28 (sigma = 5.73). One fifth of elephants lived alone or with one conspecific. Forty-six elephants (5.5%) had no conspecific. Many zoos ignore minimum group sizes of regional zoo association guidelines. The American Zoo and Aquarium Association recommends that breeding facilities keep herds of 6 to 12 elephants. The British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums recommends keeping together at least 4 cows over 2 years old. Over 69% Asian and 80% African cow groups-including those under 2 years-consisted of fewer than 4 individuals. Recently, Europe and North America have made progress with some zoos no longer keeping elephants and with others investing in improved facilities and forming larger herds. The welfare of individual elephants should outweigh all other considerations; zoos should urgently seek to integrate small groups into larger herds.

  16. How group factors affect adolescent change talk and substance use outcomes: implications for motivational interviewing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osilla, Karen Chan; Ortiz, J Alexis; Miles, Jeremy N V; Pedersen, Eric R; Houck, Jon M; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Clients who verbalize statements arguing for change (change talk [CT]) in psychotherapy are more likely to decrease alcohol and other drug use (AOD) compared with clients who voice statements in opposition of change (sustain talk [ST]). Little is known about how CT and ST are expressed in groups in which adolescents may vary in their AOD use severity and readiness to change. First, we examined how session content was associated with CT/ST, and then we looked at whether different subtypes of CT/ST were associated with subsequent AOD outcomes 3 months later. Audio recordings (N = 129 sessions) of a 6-session group motivational interviewing (MI) intervention, Free Talk, were coded. Session content was not associated with CT; however, some session content was associated with higher percentages of ST (e.g., normative feedback). Subtypes of CT (Commitment and Reason) were associated with improved AOD outcomes, whereas Ability subtype remarks were related to increased marijuana use, intentions, and consequences. Findings offer helpful guidance for clinical training and narrow in on the type of CT to try to elicit in Group MI sessions. Regardless of session content, adolescents can benefit from hearing CT during the group.

  17. U-Pb (Zircon Ages of Metavolcanic Rocks From the Itaiacoca Group: Tectonic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Siga Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work is to present and discuss the U-Pb ages obtained for zircon grains from metavolcanic rocks of theItaiacoca Group. The Itaiacoca Group is a metavolcano-sedimentary sequence, which occurs as a narrow belt between theCunhaporanga granitic batholith to the northwest and the Itapirapuã shear zone to the south and southwest, which separates thesequence from the Três Córregos granite batholith and metasedimentary rocks of the Açungui Group. Geological studies of thesouthern part of the Itaiacoca belt led to the recognition of three units, represented (from base to top by metawackes with animportant volcanic component, metacarbonate, and metapelitic and metapsammitic rocks. The U-Pb geochronological analyses ofzircon grains from two outcrops of metavolcanic rocks yield ages of 628 ± 18 Ma (SHRIMP and 636 ± 30 Ma (conventional multigrainanalyses. These ages are quite close to the metamorphic event recorded in the Itaiacoca Group (628 – 610 Ma, suggesting ashort interval between the formation of these rocks and closure of the basin. Furthermore, this volcanism is very close to the age offormation of the Três Córregos (630 Ma and Cunhaporanga (590 Ma granitic batholiths, admitted as associated with a probablemagmatic arc. Such an isotopic pattern characterizes a Neoproterozoic tectonic scenario involving volcanism, metamorphism andgranitic plutonism, interpreted here as the final stages in the evolution of the Itaiacoca Basin.

  18. Treatment fairness and group norms in times of turmoil : Implications for employee well-beini

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, P.

    2010-01-01

    Employee well-being is important for individual employees and for the organizations they work for. However, current difficult economic times cause employees to experience unfavorable conditions (e.g., uncertainty, unfair outcomes and low cohesive groups) and this thesis attempts to provide

  19. New Tools for Examining Undergraduate Students' STEM Stereotypes: Implications for Women and Other Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.; Wyer, Mary; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria; Schneider, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Although both domestic U.S. and international statistics on population demographics within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields indicate overall gains and more even representation among various groups, caution must be taken to interpret these gains as suggesting blanket improvement in underrepresentation issues. When…

  20. Promoting Resilience through Social Work Practice with Groups: Implications for the Practice and Field Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Alex; Knight, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The realities of contemporary social work practice often push social workers toward a deficit-focused orientation. The article begins with an overview of the major tenets of resiliency and adversarial growth theories and related research findings. We suggest that the group modality epitomizes the application of resiliency theory and adversarial…

  1. Evolution and function of fossoriality in the carnivora: implications for group-living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Noonan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The societies of group-living carnivores that neither hunt nor interact cooperatively may arise due to ecological drivers and/or constraints. In this study we evaluate whether group-living may be intrinsically associated with fossoriality; a link that is well supported in other taxa, but hitherto under-evaluated in the Carnivora. We make two over-arching predictions: i that fossoriality will be associated with carnivoran sociality; and ii that this association will be most evident in those species making extended use of subterranean dens. From a meta-analysis of key behavioural, ecological, ontological, and trophic traits, we demonstrate that three quarters of carnivore species exhibit some reliance on underground dens. Congruence between life-history traits and metrics of fossoriality evidenced that: 1 there are phylogenetic, and morphological constraints on wholly fossorial life-histories; 2 fossoriality correlated positively with the extent of offspring altriciality, linked to the use of natal dens; 3 burrow use increased with latitude; and 4 insectivorous carnivores were more fossorial than predatory carnivores. Corroborating work in the Rodentia, fossorial traits associated strongly with carnivoran group-living tendencies, where species utilising subterranean natal dens are 2.5 times more likely to form groups than those that do not. Furthermore, using comparative analyses, we evidence support for an evolutionary relationship between diet, fossoriality and sociality. We propose that fossorial dens act as a safe haven, promoting fitness benefits, territorial inheritance and cooperative breeding. We conclude that, among smaller (<15kg den-using carnivores, and especially for omnivorous/ insectivorous species for which food resource dispersion is favorable, continued cohabitation at natal dens can promote cohabitation among adults; that is, philopatric benefits leading to (not necessarily cooperative spatial groups.

  2. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  3. Physical Implications of the X-ray Properties of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Babul, A; Lewis, G F; Poole, G B; Babul, Arif; Balogh, Michael L.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Poole, Gregory B.

    2002-01-01

    Within the standard framework of structure formation, where clusters and groups of galaxies are built up from the merging of smaller systems, the physical properties of the intracluster medium, such as the gas temperature and the total X-ray luminosity, are predicted to possess well defined self-similar scaling relations. Observed clusters and groups, however, show strong deviations from these predicted relations. We argue that these deviations are unlikely to be entirely due to observational biasses; we assume they are physically based, due to the presence of excess entropy in the intracluster medium in addition to that generated by accretion shocks during the formation of the cluster. Several mechanisms have been suggested as a means of generating this entropy. Focussing on those mechanisms that preheat the gas before it becomes a constituent of the virialized cluster environment, we present a simple, intuitive, physically motivated, analytic model that successfully captures the important physics associated...

  4. Characterization and evolutionary implications of the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu in group II phosphopantetheinyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Li, Yu-Dong; Liu, Jian-Bo; Ran, Xin-Xin; Guo, Yuan-Yang; Ren, Ni-Ni; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases), which play an essential role in both primary and secondary metabolism, are magnesium binding enzymes. In this study, we characterized the magnesium binding residues of all known group II PPTases by biochemical and evolutionary analysis. Our results suggested that group II PPTases could be classified into two subgroups, two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu and three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases containing the triad Asp-Glu-Glu. Mutations of two three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases and one two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTase indicate that the first and the third residues in the triads are essential to activities; the second residues in the triads are non-essential. Although variations of the second residues in the triad Asp-Xxx-Glu exist throughout the whole phylogenetic tree, the second residues are conserved in animals, plants, algae, and most prokaryotes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that: the animal group II PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant two-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may originate from one common ancestor; the plant three-magnesium-binding-residue-PPTases may derive from horizontal gene transfer from prokaryotes.

  5. X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic study of wiluite: implications for the vesuvianite-group nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Mazur, Anton S.; Bazai, Ayya V.; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V.; Galuskin, Evgeny V.; Chukanov, Nikita V.; Rusakov, Vyacheslav S.; Zhukov, Yurii M.; Avdontseva, Evgenia Yu.; Aksenov, Sergey M.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.

    2017-09-01

    Two wiluite samples from the Wiluy River, Yakutia, Russia have been investigated by means of single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, 1H, 27Al, 11B, and 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (DSC/TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at the Si2p, Ca2p, Al2p, Mg1s, B1s and Fe2p core levels, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy and optical measurements. The crystal structures have been refined in the P4/ nnc space group [ a = 15.7027(3), c = 11.7008(3) Å, V = 2885.1(1) Å3 for 1 and a = 15.6950(2), c = 11.6787(4) Å, V = 2876.9(1) Å3 for 2] to R 1 = 0.022 and R 1 = 0.021, respectively. In the crystal structure of wiluite, five-coordinated Y1 site is predominantly occupied by Mg. IR spectra of wiluite substantially different from those of vesuvianite, in particular, by the presence of additional bands in the range 1080‒1415 cm-1, which correspond to symmetric B‒O stretching vibrations of the BO 3 3- and BO 4 5- groups. According to the MAS NMR data, tetrahedrally coordinated T1 site is occupied by B3+ with minor amounts of Al3+. The general formula of wiluite can be written as follows ( Z = 2): Ca19Mg(Al,Mg,Fe,Ti,Mn)12(B,Al,◻)5(Si2O7)4(SiO4)10(O,OH)9O2-3. The diversity of vesuvianite-group minerals is largely determined by the population of the Y1 sites. However, wiluite is characterized by the presence of additional T1 and T2 sites and should be considered as special among other vesuvianite-group minerals. The reasonability of subdivision of the wiluite subgroup within the vesuvianite group is discussed.

  6. Results and conclusion; Resultados e conclusoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This chapter shows the results and conclusions of the ordered studies by the Science and Technology Ministry from Brazil to the Center of Management and Strategic Studies (CGEE), executed by a multidisciplinary team, most of UNICAMP - State University of Campinas, SP - for evaluation of Brazilian capacity and potential in the production of fuel bioethanol.

  7. Vibrational and electronic optical activity of the chiral disulphide group: implications for disulphide bridge conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednárová, Lucie; Bour, Petr; Malon, Petr

    2010-05-15

    Using dihydrogendisulphide (H(2)S(2)), dimethyl- ((CH(3))(2)S(2)), and diethyldisulphide ((CH(3)CH(2))(2)S(2))as model molecules, theoretical ECD, VCD, and ROA spectra of nonplanar disulphides were calculated by DFT methods. Most of the calculated electronic and vibrational chiroptical features suffer an equivocal relation between calculatedsigns of ECD, VCD, or ROA and the sense of disulphide nonplanarity as noted earlier for low-lying ECD bands. This is a consequence of local C(2) symmetry of a disulphide group causing most electronic and vibrational transitions to occur as pairs falling to alternative A, B symmetry species, which become degenerate and switch their succession (and consequently the observed chiroptical sign pattern) at the energetically most favorable perpendicular conformation. According to present calculations, the key to resolving this ambiguity may involve the S-S stretching vibrational mode at approximately 500 cm(-1). The relation of signs of the relevant VCD and ROA features to sense of disulphide chirality seems simpler and less ambiguous. The right-handed arrangement of the S-S group (0 < chi(S-S) < 180 degrees) results in mostly negative VCD signals. Although relation to ROA still suffers some ambiguity, it gets clearer along the series H(2)S(2)-(CH(3))(2)S(2)-(CH(3)CH(2))(2)S(2). ROA is also attractive for the analysis of disulphide-containing peptides and proteins, because applying it to aqueous solutions is not problematic.

  8. High prevalence of hypertension among an ethnic group in Sudan: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elsugud, Nada A; Bushara, Sarra O; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is an emerging non-communicable disease in developing countries. Due to its silent nature and serious complications, active screening is essential in order to prevent complications. For instance, premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases could be prevented by the effective control of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension among Nuba ethnic group living in Atbara city, north Sudan and to identify the associated risk factors. All consenting 500 adults from Nuba tribe who live in El Wihda District, Atbara were included. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index were measured. Standard interviewing procedures were used to record medical history, socio-demographic data, and lifestyle characteristics. Among the 500 participants, females were 364 (72.8%) and males were 136 (27.2%). The overall prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 49.4% (30.8% stage 1 hypertension and 18.6% stage 2 hypertension). In addition, 41% of the population was having prehypertension. The significant risk factors for high BP were: male sex, age above 45 years, overweight, illiteracy, and alcohol consumption. Undiagnosed high BP is very common among Nuba ethnic group; therefore, active screening and early management are recommended to prevent complications.

  9. Evolution of group I introns in Porifera: new evidence for intron mobility and implications for DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Astrid; Lopez, Jose V; Becking, Leontine E; Kelly, Michelle; Pomponi, Shirley A; Wörheide, Gert; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Cárdenas, Paco

    2017-03-20

    Mitochondrial introns intermit coding regions of genes and feature characteristic secondary structures and splicing mechanisms. In metazoans, mitochondrial introns have only been detected in sponges, cnidarians, placozoans and one annelid species. Within demosponges, group I and group II introns are present in six families. Based on different insertion sites within the cox1 gene and secondary structures, four types of group I and two types of group II introns are known, which can harbor up to three encoding homing endonuclease genes (HEG) of the LAGLIDADG family (group I) and/or reverse transcriptase (group II). However, only little is known about sponge intron mobility, transmission, and origin due to the lack of a comprehensive dataset. We analyzed the largest dataset on sponge mitochondrial group I introns to date: 95 specimens, from 11 different sponge genera which provided novel insights into the evolution of group I introns. For the first time group I introns were detected in four genera of the sponge family Scleritodermidae (Scleritoderma, Microscleroderma, Aciculites, Setidium). We demonstrated that group I introns in sponges aggregate in the most conserved regions of cox1. We showed that co-occurrence of two introns in cox1 is unique among metazoans, but not uncommon in sponges. However, this combination always associates an active intron with a degenerating one. Earlier hypotheses of HGT were confirmed and for the first time VGT and secondary losses of introns conclusively demonstrated. This study validates the subclass Spirophorina (Tetractinellida) as an intron hotspot in sponges. Our analyses confirm that most sponge group I introns probably originated from fungi. DNA barcoding is discussed and the application of alternative primers suggested.

  10. Millian superiorities and the repugnant conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2008-01-01

    James Griffin has considered a form of superiority in value that is weaker than lexical priority as a possible remedy to the Repugnant Conclusion. In this article, I demonstrate that, in a context where value is additive, this weaker form collapses into the stronger form of superiority. And in a ......James Griffin has considered a form of superiority in value that is weaker than lexical priority as a possible remedy to the Repugnant Conclusion. In this article, I demonstrate that, in a context where value is additive, this weaker form collapses into the stronger form of superiority...... of these results for different interpretations of Griffin's suggestion regarding population ethics. None of them comes out very successful, but perhaps they nevertheless retain some interest....

  11. Power and Democracy in Denmark. Conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Goul; Christiansen, Peter Munk; Beck Jørgensen, Torben

    In 1997, the Danish Parliament decided to launch a power study, officially An Analysis of Democracy and Power in Denmark. A steering committee consisting of five independent researchers was assigned responsibility for the project. The Steering Committee has gathered the overall conclusions from...... the numerous projects under the Power Study, and this book is a short presentation of these conclusions.The main focus of the book is the state of democracy in Denmark at the dawn of the 21st century. How has democracy fared, has the development made things better or worse, and to which extent does...... contemporary democracy live up to our democratic ideals? The answer is that in many ways democracy is doing better than we might have expected, considering the intense pressure on the nation state and the democratic institutions in the postwar period. The Danish population is still full of democratic life...

  12. Changing dietary habits of ethnic groups in Europe and implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penelope A; Khokhar, Santosh

    2008-04-01

    A systematic review of the literature suggests the dietary habits of some ethnic groups living in Europe are likely to become less healthy as individuals increase consumption of processed foods that are energy dense and contain high levels of fat, sugar, and salt. Such products often replace healthy dietary components of the native diet, such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains. Mixed food habits are emerging mainly amongst younger people in the second and third generations, most likely due to acculturation and adoption of a Western lifestyle. Age and immigrant generation are the major factors accounting for changes in dietary habits, whilst income, level of education, dietary laws, religion, and food beliefs are also important factors. Obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension present major problems for the mainstream European population. However, the risk of chronic disease is reported to be higher in ethnic populations, particularly South Asians, African Caribbeans, and Mexicans.

  13. Isotopic study on the volcanics of the Rooiberg group - age implications and a potential exploration tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Harmer, RE

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Sample Rb(ppm) Sr(ppm) 87Rb/86Sr 8VSr/86Sr 2~176 2~176 z~176 Precision Dullstroom Formation (Basalt: High-T Group) D-139a b 44.5 383 0.3363 0.71322 5 D-139c b 47.9 374 0.3711 0.71468 7 D-139d b 47.6 397 0.3477 0....25) 2007+90/-96 Pb 10.5 + 0.2 5.3/9 (2.17) 2018+58/-6o Pb 10.4 + 0,1 0.77/8 (2.25) 2075+19/-51 Pb 10.4 _+ 0.2 4.7/29 (1.67) Exclude D-14, D-143i, D-143K Exclude D92K Exclude DF-1 Exclude DF-1, L193, L201, RB-152, RB-95...

  14. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection and Vaccine Implications, Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Atheer; Stewart, Joanna; Trenholme, Adrian; Drinkovic, Dragana; Peat, Briar; Taylor, Susan; Read, Kerry; Roberts, Sally; Voss, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection and the potential effects of a multivalent GAS vaccine in New Zealand. During January 2005–December 2006, we conducted prospective population-based laboratory surveillance of Auckland residents admitted to all public hospitals with isolation of GAS from normally sterile sites. Using emm typing, we identified 225 persons with confirmed invasive GAS infection (median 53 years of age; range 0–97 years). Overall incidence was 8.1 cases per 100,00 persons per year (20.4/100,000/year for Maori and Pacific Islanders; 24.4/100,000/year for persons >65 years of age; 33/100,000/year for infants <1 year of age). Nearly half (49%) of all cases occurred in Auckland’s lowest socioeconomic quintile. Twenty-two persons died, for an overall case-fatality rate of 10% (63% for toxic shock syndrome). Seventy-four percent of patients who died had an underlying condition. To the population in our study, the proposed 26-valent vaccine would provide limited benefit. PMID:21749758

  15. Implications of Antibiotic Resistance in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Canadian Helicobacter Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of Helicobacter pylori from the gastric and duodenal mucosa is an important clinical goal in the treatment of infected patients with peptic ulcer disease and other H pylori-associated conditions. Although several oral drug combination regimens are associated with eradication rates of approximately 85% in controlled trials, the success rate in patients infected with a resistant strain of H pylori is closer to 75%. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin, which are common components of combination treatment regimens, is of greatest concern. Reported rates of H pylori resistance to various antibiotics vary considerably. In Canada, the data documenting H pylori susceptibility are limited but suggest that resistance to these antibiotics varies geographically and within specific treatment groups. Although susceptibility testing is not a prerequisite for initial treatment of individual patients infected with H pylori, formal efforts to identify and monitor both the causes and prevalence of antibiotic resistance across Canada are a much needed step in the ongoing management of this important infection. Recommended treatment regimens may be useful, even for treating apparently resistant H pylori strains. However, it is important to understand the mechanisms of the development of resistant strains to manage patients with treatment failure better.

  16. Dark matter in Draco and the Local Group Implications for direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, B; Stadel, J; Quinn, T; Lake, G; Ghigna, S; Governato, F; Moore, Ben; Calcaneo-Roldan, Carlos; Stadel, Joachim; Quinn, Tom; Lake, George; Ghigna, Sebastiano; Governato, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the Local Group to make quantitative and speculative predictions for direct detection experiments. Cold dark matter (CDM) halos form via a complex series of mergers, accretion events and violent relaxation which precludes the formation of significant caustic features predicted by axially symmetric collapse. The halo density profiles are combined with observational constraints on the galactic mass distribution to constrain the local density of cold dark matter to lie in the range 0.18 <~ rho_CDM(R_solar)/GeV cm^-3 <~ 0.30. In velocity space, coherent streams of dark matter from tidally disrupted halos fill the halo and provide a tracer of the merging hierarchy. The particle velocities within triaxial CDM halos cannot be approximated by a simple Maxwellian distribution and is radially biased at the solar position. The detailed phase space structure within the solar system will depend on the early merger history of the progenitor halos and the importance of major mergers...

  17. Detrital mineral chronology of the Uinta Mountain Group: Implications for the Grenville flood in southwestern Laurentia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, P.A.; Foster, D.A.; Mogk, D.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Kamenov, George D.; Vogl, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that large quantities of Grenville-age detritus dominate Neo-proterozoic to Cambrian arenites in southwest Laurentia (southwestern United States). U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons and 40Ar/39Ar ages of white mica from clastic sedimentary rocks of the Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group also indicate significant Mesoproterozoic detritus mixed with a variably abundant Archean component. Zircons with ages representative of the Paleoproterozoic basement in the eastern Uinta Mountains or the younger Paleoproterozoic rocks of the adjacent Yavapai-Mazatzal terranes were not observed. A limited range of initial ??Hf (???90% between -3 and +3) for Mesoproterozoic zircons suggests derivation from a source region (or regions) characterized by mixing between juvenile and reworked older crust during Grenville orogenesis. The enriched Grenville-age basement proposed to underlie much of southeastern North America may be this source based on similarities of Hf isotopic data from Mesoproterozoic zircons in Mississippi River sand and available paleocurrent data. If so, then disruption of this supply in the Cambrian may be related to Iapetan rifting and, perhaps, the separation of the Precordillera terrane from Laurentia. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  18. Superiority in value and the repugnant conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    James Griffin has considered a weak form of superiority in value a possible remedy to the Repugnant Conclusion. In this paper, I demonstrate that, in a context where value is additive, this weaker form collapses into a stronger form of superiority. And in a context where value is non-additive, weak...... superiority does not amount to a radical value difference at all. I then spell out the consequences of these results for different interpretations of Griffin's suggestion regarding population ethics. None of them comes out very successful, but perhaps they nevertheless retain some interest....

  19. Antibiotic resistance of canine Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG)--practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, D; Kizerwetter-Swida, M; Rzewuska, M; Binek, M

    2011-01-01

    A total of 221 SIG strains were isolated from clinical samples of canine origin submitted to the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Division of Bacteriology and Molecular Biology at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences in Warsaw during the period 2006-2010. The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency of prevalence of methicillin-resistant SIG strains and to determine the MIC values of cephalotin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, mupirocin for a collection of randomly selected 79 strains belonging to Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG), including 23 mecA-positive and 56 mecA-negative strains. All isolates were identified as belonging to SIG based on their phenotypic properties and PCR amplification of S. intermedius-specific fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. The mecA gene was detected in 26 (12%) of 221 SIG strains. All tested mecA-negative SIG strains were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cephalotin. One of the 56 mecA-negative SIG strains was resistant to ciprofloxacin, six (11%) to gentamicin. It was found that sixteen (29%) of 56 mecA-negative SIG strains were resistant to clindamycin. Most of the mecA-positive SIG strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (96%), clindamycin (96%), and gentamicin (96%). Only one MRSIG strain was resistant to chloramphenicol. All examined mecA-positive SIG strains were found to be susceptible to mupirocin. Our results imply that staphylococcal multidrug resistance has become more prevalent, which could lead to difficulties in effective treatment. With some resistant strains the only therapeutic possibility are antimicrobial agents important in human medicine. New regulations for veterinary medicine concerning appropriate therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistat staphylococci are needed.

  20. Crystal structure of tarocystatin-papain complex: implications for the inhibition property of group-2 phytocystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ming-Hung; Liu, Kai-Lun; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Tarocystatin (CeCPI) from taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Kaohsiung no. 1), a group-2 phytocystatin, shares a conserved N-terminal cystatin domain (NtD) with other phytocystatins but contains a C-terminal cystatin-like extension (CtE). The structure of the tarocystatin-papain complex and the domain interaction between NtD and CtE in tarocystatin have not been determined. We resolved the crystal structure of the phytocystatin-papain complex at resolution 2.03 Å. Surprisingly, the structure of the NtD-papain complex in a stoichiometry of 1:1 could be built, with no CtE observed. Only two remnant residues of CtE could be built in the structure of the CtE-papain complex. Therefore, CtE is easily digested by papain. To further characterize the interaction between NtD and CtE, three segments of tarocystatin, including the full-length (FL), NtD and CtE, were used to analyze the domain-domain interaction and the inhibition ability. The results from glutaraldehyde cross-linking and yeast two-hybrid assay indicated the existence of an intrinsic flexibility in the region linking NtD and CtE for most tarocystatin molecules. In the inhibition activity assay, the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fused FL showed the highest inhibition ability without residual peptidase activity, and GST-NtD and FL showed almost the same inhibition ability, which was higher than with NtD alone. On the basis of the structures, the linker flexibility and inhibition activity of tarocystatins, we propose that the overhangs from the cystatin domain may enhance the inhibition ability of the cystatin domain against papain.

  1. The coevolution of cooperation and dispersal in social groups and its implications for the emergence of multicellularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochberg Michael E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work on the complexity of life highlights the roles played by evolutionary forces at different levels of individuality. One of the central puzzles in explaining transitions in individuality for entities ranging from complex cells, to multicellular organisms and societies, is how different autonomous units relinquish control over their functions to others in the group. In addition to the necessity of reducing conflict over effecting specialized tasks, differentiating groups must control the exploitation of the commons, or else be out-competed by more fit groups. Results We propose that two forms of conflict – access to resources within groups and representation in germ line – may be resolved in tandem through individual and group-level selective effects. Specifically, we employ an optimization model to show the conditions under which different within-group social behaviors (cooperators producing a public good or cheaters exploiting the public good may be selected to disperse, thereby not affecting the commons and functioning as germ line. We find that partial or complete dispersal specialization of cheaters is a general outcome. The propensity for cheaters to disperse is highest with intermediate benefit:cost ratios of cooperative acts and with high relatedness. An examination of a range of real biological systems tends to support our theory, although additional study is required to provide robust tests. Conclusion We suggest that trait linkage between dispersal and cheating should be operative regardless of whether groups ever achieve higher levels of individuality, because individual selection will always tend to increase exploitation, and stronger group structure will tend to increase overall cooperation through kin selected benefits. Cheater specialization as dispersers offers simultaneous solutions to the evolution of cooperation in social groups and the origin of specialization of germ and soma in

  2. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carmel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core

  3. Epistemology applied to conclusions of expert reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Molina, Jose-Juan

    2016-07-01

    It is believed that to build a robust reasoning logic to make probabilistic inferences in forensic science from a merely mathematical or logistical viewpoint is not enough. Mathematical logic is the positive science of reasoning and as for that it is only interested in the positive calculus of its validity, regardless any prior ontological assumption. But without a determined ontology and epistemology which imply to define the concepts that they will use, it seems difficult that the proposed scientifically correct mathematical solution be successful as a European standard for making conclusions in forensic reports because it has to be based on judicial language. Forensic experts and Courts are not interested in the development of a positive science but in a practical science: in clarifying whether certain known facts are related to a possible crime. Therefore, not only the coherence of the demonstrative logic reasoning used (logic of propositions) is important, but also the precision of the concepts used by language and consistency among them in reasoning (logic of concepts). There is a linguistic level essential for a successful communication between the forensic practitioner and the Court which is mainly related, in our opinion, to semantics and figures of speech. The first one is involved because words used in forensic conclusions often have different meanings - it is said that they are polysemic - and the second one because there is often metonymy as well. Besides, semantic differences among languages regarding words with the same etymological root add another difficulty for a better mutual understanding. The two main European judicial systems inherit a wide and deep culture related to evidence in criminal proceedings and each of them has coined their own terminology but there are other two more abstract levels such as logical and epistemological, where we can find solid arguments by which terms used at legal level on conclusions of forensic reports could be

  4. Screening Analysis : Volume 1, Description and Conclusions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Corps of Engineers; Bureau of Reclamation

    1992-08-01

    The SOR consists of three analytical phases leading to a Draft EIS. The first phase Pilot Analysis, was performed for the purpose of testing the decision analysis methodology being used in the SOR. The Pilot Analysis is described later in this chapter. The second phase, Screening Analysis, examines all possible operating alternatives using a simplified analytical approach. It is described in detail in this and the next chapter. This document also presents the results of screening. The final phase, Full-Scale Analysis, will be documented in the Draft EIS and is intended to evaluate comprehensively the few, best alternatives arising from the screening analysis. The purpose of screening is to analyze a wide variety of differing ways of operating the Columbia River system to test the reaction of the system to change. The many alternatives considered reflect the range of needs and requirements of the various river users and interests in the Columbia River Basin. While some of the alternatives might be viewed as extreme, the information gained from the analysis is useful in highlighting issues and conflicts in meeting operating objectives. Screening is also intended to develop a broad technical basis for evaluation including regional experts and to begin developing an evaluation capability for each river use that will support full-scale analysis. Finally, screening provides a logical method for examining all possible options and reaching a decision on a few alternatives worthy of full-scale analysis. An organizational structure was developed and staffed to manage and execute the SOR, specifically during the screening phase and the upcoming full-scale analysis phase. The organization involves ten technical work groups, each representing a particular river use. Several other groups exist to oversee or support the efforts of the work groups.

  5. Clinical Implications for Muscle Strength Differences in Women of Different Age and Racial Groups: The WIN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Ferro, Emerenciana; Morrow, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduction in muscle strength is strongly associated with functional decline in women, and women with lower quadriceps strength adjusted for body weight are more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis. Objective To compare body weight--adjusted strength among women of different age/racial groups. Study Design Cross-sectional study of muscle strength in 918 women aged 20--83 (M ± SD = 52 ± 13). Methods An orthopedic examination was conducted including measurement of handgrip and lower extremity strength (hip abductors/external rotators, knee flexors/extensors). Data were grouped into young (20--39 years, n = 139), middle (40--54 years, n = 300), and older (55+ years, n = 424) ages for white (n = 699) and African American (AA) (n = 164) women. Means and standard deviations for strength adjusted for body weight were calculated for each age and racial group and compared using 2-way multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc tests. Results No significant age-by-race interaction (P = .092) but significant main effects for age and race (P < .001). Pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences in knee extensor and flexor strength between all age groups. For grip and hip external rotator strength, significant differences were found between the middle and older groups. Differences in hip abductor strength were found between the young and middle-aged groups. AA women had lower strength than white women in all muscle groups (P < .05) except hip external rotators. Conclusions Strength decreased with age in all muscle groups but magnitude of decrease varied by muscle. Strengthening programs should target different muscles, depending on a woman's age and race. PMID:21666779

  6. Validating justifications in preschool girls' and boys' friendship group talk: implications for linguistic and socio-cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyratzis, Amy; Ross, Tamara Shuqum; Koymen, S Bahar

    2010-01-01

    Children are believed to construct their causal theories through talk and interaction, but with the exception of a few studies, little or nothing is known about how young children justify and build theories of the world together with same-age peers through naturally occurring interaction, Children's sensitivity to when a pair or group of interlocutors who interact frequently together feel that a justification is needed, is an index of developing pragmatic competence (Goetz & Shatz, 1999) and may be influenced by interactive goals and gender identity positioning. Studies suggest that salient contexts for justifications for young children are disagreement and control (e.g. Veneziano & Sinclair, 1995) but researchers have been less recognizant of 'situations in which partners verbally assist in the construction of justifications as a means to maintain contact or create solidarity' (Goetz & Shatz, 1999: 722) as contexts for justifications. The present study examined the spontaneously produced justification constructions in the naturally occurring free play of five friendship groups of preschool-aged children (aged from 3 ; 6 to 5 ; 4), in terms of the motivating context of the justification, marking of the causal relationship with a connective, and causal theories accessed in the talk. Partner expansion (validating justifications) was a salient motivating context for justifications, especially in the talk of friendship groups of girls, and seemed to privilege greater marking of the causal relationship with a connective and less arbitrary reasoning. One group of girls varied their use of validating justifications depending on the theme of play. Results are discussed in terms of the implications of use of validating justifications for children's causal theory building with peers, linguistic development, and pragmatic development.

  7. Immunophenotyping at the Time of Diagnosis Distinguishes Two Groups of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: Implications for Adoptive Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li, Qiu-yan Chen, Haoyuan Mo, Yi-lan Zhang, Zhou-feng Huang, Yi-xin Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adoptive immunotherapy with EBV-specific CTLs (EBV-CTL has been used to treat EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC but only a fraction of the patients shows noticeable clinical response.Patients and Methods: Sixty-seven newly diagnosed NPC patients from 2005 to 2007 and 21 healthy donors were collected. Immunological parameters and immune function of PBMCs and EBV-CTL were analyzed by flow cytometer analysis (FACS and 51Cr releasing experiment; Molecular characteristics on NPC tumor cells were investigated by immunochemical staining and statistic analysis.Results: NPC patients can be classified into two groups based on the percentage of CD3+ T cells in peripheral blood before accepted any treatment, (>52.6%, mean-2SE from healthy controls, NPC Group 1; <52.6%, NPC Group 2. The patients in Group 2 showed a significant decrease of CD3+CD8+ T-cells, CD3+CD4+ T-cells and CD3+CD45RO+ memory T cells, and increase of CD3-CD16+ NK cells compared to Group 1 patients and healthy controls (P<0.001. EBV-specific T cell responses, were weaker in this group of patients and their tumor cells expressed lower levels of the EBV encoded latent membrane protein (LMP-1 and HLA class II protein compared with the patients of NPC Group 1 (P<0.05 .Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that NPC patients could be distinguished on the basis of their immune status which will affect the efficacy of EBV-CTL immunotherapy.

  8. Conclusiones y recomendaciones Conclusions and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Saquero Martínez

    2006-12-01

    following technical conclusions and recommendations.This document, which is intended to be practical and operational, has been reviewed and agreed by all speakers and by the Scientific Committee of the Conference, and is written in the key of pending tasks to be addressed by both public authorities and companies in the sector and holders hazard installations.

  9. Conclusions: environmental change, wildlife conservation and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, William V; Brown, Janine L; Comizzoli, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Our intention when planning this book was to explore the diverse ways that reproductive science is inextricably tied to many aspects of biodiversity conservation, using the opportunity to present a vast amount of specialised information in a way that forms a coherent and important body of work. Some of the chapters were therefore concerned with understanding how taxonomic groups and species are being affected by globally important environmental changes, mostly caused through anthropogenic influences. Others were more focused on monitoring and understanding the physiology of wild species, with the aim of better understanding mechanisms underlying responses to captive conditions and environmental change, in both wild and captive animals. We also wanted to review advances in technological measures that are being actively developed to support the breeding and management of wildlife. In a few cases we have presented specific case studies that highlight the amount of effort required for the successful development of assisted reproductive technologies for wild species. Viewed overall, the outcome is spectacular; the last decade has seen enormous progress in many aspects of the sciences and technologies relevant to the topic. It is also clear that the boundaries between different scientific disciplines are becoming ever more blurred, and it is no longer easy or even possible to remain focused on a highly specialized topic in reproduction or conservation, without having at least some understanding of allied subjects. Here we present a few concluding comments about what we have learnt, and how the various topics interact with each other. We also emphasize that, as far as we know, no similarly comprehensive consideration of the contribution of reproductive science to wildlife conservation has been published within the last decade.

  10. Everyday life with rheumatoid arthritis and implications for patient education and clinical practice: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg; Primdahl, Jette; Antoft, Rasmus; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to explore how everyday life is affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in order to inform patient education and clinical practice and generate further research. Six focus group interviews were conducted with, in total, 32 participants. Interview data were analysed using content analysis methods. The study showed that RA affected almost every aspect of participants' everyday lives, particularly self-identity, social relationships, work and relationships with health and social care professionals. A small number of the participants did not have these experiences, due to receiving fast diagnosis and effective medical treatment. The findings point to a need to increase knowledge about RA, support symptom management and reduce the physical, social and psychological challenges posed by RA in everyday life. An individualized and engaged approach to patient education, taking the individual experiences as the point of departure, is suggested. The results indicate directions for further research. The general implications for patient education that emerge from this study might not address the support needs of those who did not experience significant changes in everyday life. A more detailed and in-depth understanding about living with RA in the first years after diagnosis would provide a valuable supplement to the many retrospective studies, and useful knowledge in the design of patient education tailored to those who are newly diagnosed with RA. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pattern of injury mortality by age-group in children aged 0–14 years in Scotland, 2002–2006, and its implications for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone David H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the epidemiology of injuries in children is essential for the planning, implementation and evaluation of preventive measures but recent epidemiological information on injuries in children both in general and by age-group in Scotland is scarce. This study examines the recent pattern of childhood mortality from injury by age-group in Scotland and considers its implications for prevention. Methods Routine mortality data for the period 2002–2006 were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland and were analysed in terms of number of deaths, mean annual mortality rates per 100,000 population, leading causes of death, and causes of injury death. Mid-year population estimates were used as the denominator. Chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance. Results 186 children aged 0–14 died from an injury in Scotland during 2002–06 (MR 4.3 per 100,000. Injuries were the leading cause of death in 1–14, 5–9 and 10–14 year-olds (causing 25%, 29% and 32% of all deaths respectively. The leading individual causes of injury death (0–14 years were pedestrian and non-pedestrian road-traffic injuries and assault/homicide but there was variation by age-group. Assault/homicide, fire and suffocation caused most injury deaths in young children; road-traffic injuries in older ones. Collectively, intentional injuries were a bigger threat to the lives of under-15s than any single cause of unintentional injury. The mortality rate from assault/homicide was highest in infants ( Conclusion Injuries continue to be a leading cause of death in childhood in Scotland. Variation in causes of injury death by age-group is important when targeting preventive efforts. In particular, the threats of assault/homicide in infants, fire in 1–4 year-olds, pedestrian injury in 5–14 year-olds, and suicide in 10–14 year-olds need urgent consideration for preventive action.

  12. Significance of grooming behavior in two polygynous groups of western black crested gibbons: Implications for understanding social relationships among immigrant and resident group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhen-Hua; Huang, Bei; Ning, Wen-He; Ni, Qing-Yong; Sun, Guo-Zheng; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2013-12-01

    In primates, grooming is considered among the most common behaviors for maintaining social bonds; however, to date, few studies have examined grooming behavior in gibbon species in detail. We used both a 5-min interval scan method and social network analysis to study grooming in two groups of polygynous western black-crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) in Wuliang Mountain, Central Yunnan, China. Individuals in both groups spent little time in social grooming (1.45% and 1.97% of active time). We compared the two groups' grooming networks and found that the group that maintained a more stable social unit had a more complex grooming network while the group with new immigrants had a grooming network characterized by fewer grooming pairs. Females in both groups played important roles in the grooming network. A newly immigrant female spent the most time grooming others and chose the resident adult female as her main adult grooming partner. Other females from both groups chose the adult male as their primary grooming partner (except their offspring). A sub-adult male who had resided in his natal group for 2 years after maturing into an adult also groomed more and was at the center of the network. This male finally replaced the breeding male in his group 3 years after our data collection period ended. We hypothesize that the immigrant female and the resident young adult male engaged in more extensive grooming interactions as a behavioral strategy to gain tolerance from long-term residents. Our results suggest that female gibbons in polygynous groups actively cooperate in maintaining social relationships rather than co-exist through tolerance or avoidance. Our observations indicate that grooming networks in crested gibbons reflect individual dynamics and partly support the social cohesion hypothesis for primate grooming. In this regard, we suggest that changes in gibbon grooming networks can be used to predict social change.

  13. CHANDRA observations of the NGC 1550 galaxy group: Implication for the temperature and entropy profiles of 1 keV galaxy groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, M.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed Chandra study of the galaxy group NGC 1550. For its temperature (1.37 +/- 0.01 keV) and velocity dispersion (similar to300 km s(-1)), the NGC 1550 group is one of the most luminous known galaxy groups (L-bol = 1.65 x 10(43) ergs s(-1) within 200 kpc, or 0.2r(vir)). We find...... that within similar to 60 kpc, where the gas cooling time is less than a Hubble time, the gas temperature decreases continuously toward the center, implying the existence of a cooling core. The temperature also declines beyond similar to 100 kpc (or 0.1r(vir)). The temperature pro. le of NGC 1550...

  14. The Mesoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary Serra do Itaberaba Group of the Central Ribeira Belt, Sao Paulo State, Brazil: implications for the age of the overlying Sao Roque Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juliani, Caetano [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: cjuliani@usp.br; Hackspacher, Peter; Fetter, Allen Hutchenson [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas]. E-mail: phack@rc.unesp.br; fetter@rc.unesp.br; Dantas, Elton Luiz [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: elton@unb.br

    2000-03-01

    One of the fundamental problems to understanding the evolution of volcano-sedimentary sequences in southeastern Brazil is constraining their depositional ages. Brasiliano tectonic and metamorphic either obscured or destroyed primary features, such as unconformities, as well as other geologic relationships. This problem is exemplified by the Serra do Itaberaba and Sao Roque groups, where the lack of data about the timing of their deposition has prevented resolution of proposed one-and two-stage geotectonic/depositional models. Recent U-Pb zircon data obtained from metavolcanic rocks in the Sao Roque Group indicate that it was deposited between 628 and 607 Ma. New U-Pb zircon data of 1395{+-} 10 Ma for a metandesite in the basal Morro da Pedra Preta Formation (Serra do Itaberaba Group) indicate the maximum age for the beginning of the deposition of the pelites overlying MORB-like basalt. A metarhyolite of the upper unit, the Nhangucu Formation, contains two zircon populations. One yielded an age of 619 {+-}3 Ma, which defines the crystallization age of the rock, and the other an age of 1449 {+-}3 Ma, interpreted as inherited xenocrystal grains from older units of the Serra do Itaberaba Group. The younger metarhyolite was affected only by the S{sub 2} foliation, generated during the Brasiliano orogenesis, whereas the Middle Proterozoic metavolcano-sedimentary sequence records additional metamorphic and deformational events, confirming the presence of two different geotectonic cycles. (author)

  15. Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies in an ethnic minority group in Central Vietnam: implications to health burden and relationship between two ethnic minority groups

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN, Nga Thi; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Sanchaisuriya, Pattara; Nguyen, Van Hoa; Phan, Hoa Thi Thuy; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan

    2017-01-01

    Thalassemia is a genetic condition that can result in long and expensive treatments, and severe thalassemia may lead to death if left untreated. Couples contributing two genes for thalassemia place their children at particular risk for severe thalassemia. Gene frequency of thalassemia varies in Vietnam, but presents remarkably high levels among some ethnic minority groups. Limited information about thalassemia frequency makes prevention and control of thalassemia difficult. This study aimed t...

  16. 神宁煤业集团实施品牌营销战略的思考%Thinking of Implicating Brand Marketing in Shenhua Ningxia Coal Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁瑞民

    2013-01-01

    从3个方面阐述了煤炭企业实施品牌营销战略的必要性,分析了当前形势下神宁煤业集团实施品牌营销战略的优势和紧迫性,围绕树立品牌意识、宣传意识、质量意识、服务意识、创新意识,提出了实施品牌营销战略的具体举措。%This paper puts forward specific measures of implicating brand marketing strategies centering on building consciousness of brand, advertise, quality, service and innovation after analyzing urgencies and superiorities of brand marketing strategies of current positions in Shenhua Ningxia Coal Group and discussing necessities of implication in coal enterprises from three aspects.

  17. The fault pattern in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel and its hydrogeological implications for groundwater flow in the Judea Group aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, G.; Rosenthal, E.

    1994-03-01

    On the basis of a broadly expanding data base, the hydrogeological properties of the Judea Group sequence in the northern Negev and southern Coastal Plain of Israel have been reassessed. The updated subsurface model is based on data derived from water- and oil-wells and on recent large-scale geophysical investigations. A new regional pattern of the reassessed geological through the subsurface of the study area has been revealed. In view of the reassessed geological and hydrological subsurface setting, it appears that the Judea Group aquifer should not be regarded as one continuous and undisturbed hydrological unit; owing to the occurrence of regional faults, its subaquifers are locally interconnected. These subaquifers, which contain mainly high-quality water, are juxtaposed, as a result of faulting, against Kurnub Group sandstones containing brackish paleowater. The latter Group is faulted against late Jurassic formations containing highly saline groundwater. In the Beer Sheva area, the Judea Group aquifer is vertically displaced against the Senonian and Eocene Mt. Scopus and Avdat Groups, which also contain brackish and saline water. In the southern Coastal Plain, major faults locally dissect also the Pleistocene Kurkar Group, facilitating inflow of Mg-rich groundwater deriving from Judea Group dolomites. The new geological evidence and its hydrogeological implications provide new solutions for previously unexplained salinization phenomena.

  18. Sniffing around oxytocin: review and meta-analyses of trials in healthy and clinical groups with implications for pharmacotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, M J; van I Jzendoorn, M H

    2013-01-01

    ... (perceived threat of the 'out-group'), personality and childhood experiences. In individuals with untoward childhood experiences, positive behavioral or neurobiological effects seem lowered or absent...

  19. Ideological constructions in column titles by two age groups in the Philippines: Implications in language teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor Legarte Guinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an exploratory research which sought to discover ideological constructions in column titles by contributors of Philippine Daily Inquirer’s (PDI Youngblood and Highblood columns. By unveiling ideological constructs in the title, certain pedagogical implications were reviewed on the premise that samples of these columns may have found their way in the education system as models of quality personal essay. Analysis was done through the examination of process types and lexicalization. Fairclaugh’s Critical Discourse Analysis and Halliday’s Process Types and lexicalization served as the theoretical foundations of the study. Data used in the analysis were those published in PDI’s website from October, 2011- October 2012. It was found that young and old contributors write about experiences pertaining to concrete actions, contradicting earlier studies on Filipino youth and the elderly. Moreover, lexical choices of young contributors point to themselves as being goal-oriented, adventure-driven, and assertive, yet weak, frustrated and dependent. Consequently, the elderly contributors portray themselves as energetic, politically- and socially-aware, wise, yet nostalgic, sickly, and age-conscious. Out of these results, implications to language teaching and learning are underscored.

  20. Thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies in an ethnic minority group in Central Vietnam: implications to health burden and relationship between two ethnic minority groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga Thi; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Sanchaisuriya, Pattara; Van Nguyen, Hoa; Phan, Hoa Thi Thuy; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan

    2017-07-01

    Thalassemia is a genetic condition that can result in long and expensive treatments, and severe thalassemia may lead to death if left untreated. Couples contributing two genes for thalassemia place their children at particular risk for severe thalassemia. Gene frequency of thalassemia varies in Vietnam, but presents remarkably high levels among some ethnic minority groups. Limited information about thalassemia frequency makes prevention and control of thalassemia difficult. This study aimed to determine gene frequency of certain types of thalassemia among 390 women of reproductive age of the Ta-Oi ethnic minority. Hemoglobin and DNA analyses were carried out to diagnose thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies. Of the total participants, 56.1% (95% CI = 51.1-61.1) carried thalassemia genes. A remarkably high frequency of hemoglobin Constant Spring (Hb CS) of 23.8% (95% CI = 19.7-28.4) was noted. The frequency of α(+)-thalassemia (-3.7 kb deletion) was 26.4% (95% CI = 22.1-31.1), while hemoglobin E (Hb E) and hemoglobin Paksé (Hb Ps) were identified at frequencies of 14.6 (95% CI = 11.2-18.5) and 2.6% (95% CI = 1.4-5.0), respectively. Further analysis of α-globin gene haplotype revealed the same Hb CS haplotype (+ - M + + -) as of the Co-Tu minority, a neighboring minority of the Ta-Oi, indicating that these two minorities may share the same ancestors. This information will be helpful for further studies in population genetics, as well as the development prevention and control program in the region.

  1. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  2. CT Examination of Nose and Paranasal Sinuses of Egyptian Mummies and Three Distinct Human Population Groups: Anthropological and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Samuel; Lawson, William; Mowbray, Kenneth; Delman, Bradley N; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of nasal morphology and climatic conditions has resulted in diverse hard- and soft-tissue configurations across human population groups. While the processes of skull pneumatization are not fully understood, the invasions of the paranasal sinuses [PNS] into the cranium have contributed to assorted morphologies. Human migratory patterns and the strong association with climatic variables through time and space may explain this diversity. This study examined four multiregional populations of which two are from Egypt but of widely divergent eras. Three Egyptian mummies [EG-M] from the middle kingdom were CT scanned providing a unique opportunity to investigate the status of PNS anatomy within a time frame from 1567 BCE to 600 CE and compare it to a contemporary Egyptian [EG] (n = 12) population. Dry skulls of Inuit [IT] (n = 10) and East African [EA] (n = 8) provide out-group comparisons, as one group represents an isolated geographic environment far different from that of Egypt and the other group inhabiting distinct environmental conditions albeit located within the same continent. Results showed EG-M and EG frontal sinus volumes were diminutive in size with no statistically significant difference between them. Maxillary sinus size values of EG-M and EG clustered together while IT and EA significantly differed from each other (P = 0.002). The multiregional groups exhibited population specific morphologies in their PNS anatomy. Ecogeographic localities revealed anatomical differences among IT and EA, while the potential time span of about 3,500 years produced only a negligible difference between the Egyptian groups. The small sample sizes incorporated into this research requires confirmation of the results by analyses of larger samples from each geographic region and with the integration of a larger group of Egyptian mummified remains.

  3. The use of focus groups to examine pubertal concerns in preteen girls: initial findings and implications for practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doswell, W M; Vandestienne, G

    1996-01-01

    This article presents the findings of four focus groups aimed at discovering the concerns a group of 9- to 12-year-old African American and Hispanic girls (N = 38) had about puberty, the transition to adolescence, and growing up. Among the factors these girls liked about growing up were increasing independence from parents, widening social relations with same- and opposite-sex friends, and an increase in decision making regarding clothes and activities. What they reported as not liking about growing up were an increase in peer pressure, high parental expectations, and more responsibility for their actions in home, school, and recreational activities. Health care for this group must include systematic monitoring of pubertal development and concerns in order to aggressively educate preadolescents to negotiate this period smoothly and to avoid high-risk behaviors that could have negative health and social sequelae during adolescence and adulthood.

  4. The implications of different developmental patterns of disruptive behavior problems for school adjustment. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormshak, E A; Bierman, K L

    1998-01-01

    Based upon developmental models of disruptive behavior problems, this study examined the hypothesis that the nature of a child's externalizing problems at home may be important in predicting the probability of and nature of school adjustment problems at school entry. Parent ratings were collected for a sample of 631 behaviorally disruptive children using the Child Behavior Checklist. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed differentiated ratings of oppositional, aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive behaviors at home. Teacher and peer nominations assessed school adjustment at the end of first grade. As expected from a developmental perspective, aggressive behaviors indicated more severe dysfunction and were more likely to generalize to the school setting than were oppositional behaviors. Hyperactive/inattentive behaviors at home led to more classroom disruption than did aggressive or oppositional behaviors. Co-occurring patterns of oppositional/aggressive and hyperactive/inattentive behaviors were more common than were single-problem patterns, and were associated with broad dysfunction in the social and classroom contexts. The results were interpreted within a developmental framework, in which oppositional, aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive behaviors may reflect distinct (as well as shared) developmental processes that have implications for the home-to-school generalization of behavior problems and subsequent school adjustment.

  5. The Role of Community, Family, Peer, and School Factors in Group Bullying: Implications for School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Smith, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although an ecological perspective suggests the importance of multiple levels of intervention, most bullying research has emphasized individual- and school-focused strategies. This study investigated community and family factors that influence school efforts to reduce odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. Methods: We used…

  6. Implications of Social Practice Theory for the Development of a Numeracy Programme for the Gusilay People Group in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerger, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I present research on some traditional numeracy practices of the Gusilay people group in Senegal and make recommendations for developing a numeracy programme for women. Based on a strong foundation of traditional knowledge and practices, the programme will aim to meet felt needs of women who are faced with new numeracy related…

  7. Implications of Changing Ethnic-Group Representation in Indiana's Population. Part 1: Highlights and Summary. Manpower Report 86-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisack, J. P.; Shell, Kevin D.

    From 1970 to 1980, Indiana's population grew 5.7 percent, with the white population growing less than 4 percent as opposed to a 30 percent growth rate for minority groups. Nearly 64.4 of the state's minority population resided in Marion and Lake counties as of 1980. Except for Asian Americans, Indiana residents who belong to ethnic minority groups…

  8. Minimum Competency Standards Set by Three Divergent Groups of Raters Using Three Judgmental Procedures: Implications for Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Gerald; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Although arbitrary, whenever multiple judgmental standard-setting procedures are utilized by different groups concurrently, stability across raters can be achieved and decisions can be made in a relatively judicious manner. Greater stability across methods (Ebel, Nedelsky, Angoff) may be effected by slightly modifying the Ebel approach. (Author/PN)

  9. Effect of verapamil on ischemia and ventricular arrhythmias after an acute myocardial infarction: prognostic implications. The Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaage-Nilsen, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Hansen, J F

    1991-01-01

    This article is a review of presented subsets of the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II (DAVIT II) regarding the effect of verapamil on postinfarction ischemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart rate (HR), and the prognostic implications of these findings. Patients underwent Holter monitoring...... for 24-48 h at 1 week, i.e., before randomization to long-term treatment with placebo or verapamil, and after 1 month and about 1 year of study treatment. Ischemia: 18% of the patients had transient ST-segment deviation before randomization; 24% of the placebo- and 8% of the verapamil-treated patients (p......: In the placebo group the prevalence and incidence of many ventricular ectopic beats (VEBs), i.e., more than 10 VEBs/h, increased significantly during the first years after infarction; this was not the case in the verapamil patients group. The mean HR was significantly reduced by verapamil treatment after 1 month...

  10. An Examination of Which Implications New Media Platforms Can Have on Study Group Work and Learning Opportunities in the Environment of the Course Information Systems for Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Simone Quach; Trankjær, Mie Bohn; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2014-01-01

    for our analysis, three focus group interviews were conducted during February 2014 at Aarhus University among first semester Marketing and Management Communication students who had participated in the ISB course. Based on the findings it is evident that the use of New Media platforms is widely used......The Information Society is characterised by its technological development; the many New Media platforms offered on the World Wide Web have changed the communication culture from a traditional one-way transaction to a co-creation culture (Mangold and Faulds 2009). This paper investigates which...... implications New Media platforms – with special emphasis on Blackboard, Facebook, Google Docs and Dropbox – have on study group work in the environment of the course Information Systems for Business (ISB) at Aarhus University. Additionally, it is investigated which opportunities these platforms potentially...

  11. Multiple group I introns in the small-subunit rDNA of Botryosphaeria dothidea: implication for intraspecific genetic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xu

    Full Text Available Botryosphaeria dothidea is a widespread and economically important pathogen on various fruit trees, and it often causes die-back and canker on limbs and fruit rot. In characterizing intraspecies genetic variation within this fungus, group I introns, rich in rDNA of fungi, may provide a productive region for exploration. In this research, we analysed complete small subunit (SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequences of 37 B. dothidea strains, and found four insertions, designated Bdo.S943, Bdo.S1199-A, Bdo.S1199-B and Bdo.S1506, at three positions. Sequence analysis and structure prediction revealed that both Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506 belonged to subgroup IC1 of group I introns, whereas Bdo.S1199-A and Bdo.S1199-B corresponded to group IE introns. Moreover, Bdo.S1199-A was found to host an open reading frame (ORF for encoding the homing endonuclease (HE, whereas Bdo.S1199-B, an evolutionary descendant of Bdo.S1199-A, included a degenerate HE. The above four introns were novel, and were the first group I introns observed and characterized in this species. Differential distribution of these introns revealed that all strains could be separated into four genotypes. Genotype III (no intron and genotype IV (Bdo.S1199-B were each found in only one strain, whereas genotype I (Bdo.S1199-A and genotype II (Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506 occurred in 95% of the strains. There is a correlation between B. dothidea genotypes and hosts or geographic locations. Thus, these newly discovered group I introns can help to advance understanding of genetic differentiation within B. dothidea.

  12. Personality-Informed Interventions for Healthy Aging: Conclusions from a National Institute on Aging Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Hampson, Sarah; Clarkin, John

    2014-01-01

    We describe 2 frameworks in which personality dimensions relevant to health, such as Conscientiousness, can be used to inform interventions designed to promote health aging. First, contemporary data and theory do not suggest that personality is "immutable," but instead focus on questions of who changes, in what way, why, when, and how.…

  13. Personality-Informed Interventions for Healthy Aging: Conclusions from a National Institute on Aging Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Hampson, Sarah; Clarkin, John

    2014-01-01

    We describe 2 frameworks in which personality dimensions relevant to health, such as Conscientiousness, can be used to inform interventions designed to promote health aging. First, contemporary data and theory do not suggest that personality is "immutable," but instead focus on questions of who changes, in what way, why, when, and how.…

  14. The Use of Case Based Multiple Choice Questions for Assessing Large Group Teaching: Implications on Student's Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Donnelly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The practice of assessments in third level education is extremely important and a rarely disputed part of the university curriculum as a method to demonstrate a student’s learning. However, assessments to test a student’s knowledge and level of understanding are challenging to apply given recent trends which are showing that student numbers are increasing, student demographics are wide ranging and resources are being stretched. As a result of these emerging challenges, lecturers are required to develop a comprehensive assessment to effectively demonstrate student learning, whilst efficiently managing large class sizes. One form of assessment which has been used for efficient assessment is multiple choice questions (MCQs; however this method has been criticised for encouraging surface learning, in comparison to other methods such as essays or case studies. This research explores the impact of blended assessment methods on student learning. This study adopts a rigorous three-staged qualitative methodology to capture third level lecturers’ and students’ perception to (1 the level of learning when using MCQs; (2 the level of learning when blended assessment in the form of case based MCQs are used. The findings illuminate the positive impact of cased based MCQs as students and lecturers suggest that it leads to a higher level of learning and deeper information processing over that of MCQs without case studies. 2 The implications of this research is that this type of assessment contributes to the current thinking within literature on the use of assessments methods, as well as the blending of assessment methods to reach a higher level of learning. It further serves to reinforce the belief that assessments are the greatest influence on students’ learning, and the requirement for both universities and lecturers to reflect on the best form of assessment to test students’ level of understanding, whilst also balancing the real challenges of

  15. Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, John P; Trevor, Charlie O; Howard, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers' service quality perceptions. On the basis of a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of 3 moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover's negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers.

  16. Unequal representation of women and men in energy company boards and management groups. Are there implications for mitigation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson-Kanyama, A. [Swedish Defence Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Ripa Julia, Isabel [Consultoria Ambiental, Logrono (Spain); Roehr, Ulrike [LIFE e.V, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This survey shows that female representation in boards and management groups of large energy companies in Germany, Spain and Sweden is far from being gender-equal. Of the 464 companies surveyed, 295 (64%) had no women at all in boards or management groups and only 5% could be considered gender-equal by having 40% or more women in such positions. Interviews with energy companies confirmed current trends that gender equality efforts within decision-making in business are weak or non-existent. The findings are discussed against the background of differences in risk perceptions among women and men, evidence of women's impact on boards and companies' performance and the substantial risks related to unabated climate change. Research is suggested for exploring potential impacts on energy companies' performance with more women in the boards when it comes to mitigation activities. (author)

  17. Unequal representation of women and men in energy company boards and management groups: Are there implications for mitigation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson-Kanyama, A., E-mail: carlsson@foi.s [Swedish Defence Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Ripa Julia, Isabel [Consultoria Ambiental, Logrono (Spain); Roehr, Ulrike [LIFE e.V, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    This survey shows that female representation in boards and management groups of large energy companies in Germany, Spain and Sweden is far from being gender-equal. Of the 464 companies surveyed, 295 (64%) had no women at all in boards or management groups and only 5% could be considered gender-equal by having 40% or more women in such positions. Interviews with energy companies confirmed current trends that gender equality efforts within decision-making in business are weak or non-existent. The findings are discussed against the background of differences in risk perceptions among women and men, evidence of women's impact on boards and companies' performance and the substantial risks related to unabated climate change. Research is suggested for exploring potential impacts on energy companies' performance with more women in the boards when it comes to mitigation activities.

  18. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes of three geographical topmouth culter (Culter alburnus) groups and implications for their phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwu; Wang, Dexia; Wang, Junhua; Sheng, Junqing; Peng, Kou; Hu, Beijuan; Zeng, Liugen; Xiao, Minghe; Hong, Yijiang

    2017-03-01

    Topmouth culter (C. alburnus) is an important commercial fish in China. We compared the nucleotide variations in the mtDNA genomes among three geographical groups of Culter alburnus: Liangzi Lake, Hubei Province (referred to as LZH); Taihu Lake, Jiangsu Province (TH); and Poyang Lake, Jiangxi Province (PYH). The similarity of whole mtDNA genomes ranged from 0.992 to 0.999. The similarity among 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and the D-loop sequences was found to range from 0.982 to 0.996. This is useful data for future designing work for making specific molecular marker for distinguishing individuals of C. alburnus from the three geographical groups. An extended termination-associated sequence (ETAS) and several conserved blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3) were identified in the mtDNA control regions. A phylogenetic analysis shows a monophyletic relationship of the LZF-female and the LZF-male. However, the analysis also showed paraphyletic relationships for the other two geological groups. This result will be useful for the future breeding work of C. alburnus.

  20. Microfossils from the Neoarchean Campbell Group, Griqualand West Sequence of the Transvaal Supergroup, and their paleoenvironmental and evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermann, W.; Schopf, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The oldest filament- and colonial coccoid-containing microbial fossil assemblage now known is described here from drill core samples of stromatolitic cherty limestones of the Neoarchean, approximately 2600-Ma-old Campbell Group (Ghaap Plateau Dolomite, Lime Acres Member) obtained at Lime Acres, northern Cape Province, South Africa. The assemblage is biologically diverse, including entophysalidacean (Eoentophysalis sp.), probable chroococcacean (unnamed colonial coccoids), and oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria (Eomycetopsis cf. filiformis, and Siphonophycus transvaalensis), as well as filamentous fossil bacteria (Archaeotrichion sp.); filamentous possible microfossils (unnamed hematitic filaments) also occur. The Campbell Group microorganisms contributed to the formation of stratiform and domical to columnar stromatolitic reefs in shallow subtidal to intertidal environments of the Transvaal intracratonic sea. Although only moderately to poorly preserved, they provide new evidence regarding the paleoenvironmental setting of the Campbell Group sediments, extend the known time-range of entophysalidacean cyanobacteria by more than 400 million years, substantiate the antiquity and role in stromatolite formation of Archean oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria, and document the exceedingly slow (hypobradytelic) evolutionary rate characteristic of this early evolving prokaryotic lineage.

  1. Public opinion and interest group positions on open-space issues in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Implications for resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannery, Thomas Allan

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to elicit and compare the open-space preferences of citizens and openspace experts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. A randomly selected sample of 492 citizens and 35 open-space experts participated in a telephone survey during May 5 18, 1986. The following hypothesis was tested and used as a guideline for the study: HO1: There is no significant difference between respondents' status and preference for open space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis was rejected. Findings confirmed respondents' status affected preference for open space. Of the eight issues on which the citizen and expert groups were compared, five recorded significant differences in response profiles. The open-space expert group was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate offroad vehicle facilities, wildlife preserves, a citywide recreational trail, and a trail system along the arroyos and city ditches. The citizen sample was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate overnight camping facilities. Both groups equally supported using open space to accommodate an outdoor amphitheater, outdoor education facilities, and rafting, kayaking, and canoeing facilities. The finding indicated that expert preferences did not represent an aggregate of citizen preferences for managing open-space resources. Understanding both expert and citizen positions will facilitate decision-making processes and help resolve environmental disputes.

  2. P-T-t path of metamorphism for the Julin Group and its geodynamical implications in Yuanmou, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The metamorphic complex of the Julin Group occurs in the Yuanmou area of Yunnan Province on the western margin of the Yangtze Platform, and connects with the Kangdian metamorphic complex to the north. Based on the detailed petrographic observations and studies of garnet growth zoning, a P-T-t path has been reconstructed for the staurolite-kyanite zone in the Julin Group. This path is characterized by (1) a counter-clockwise evolutional trend, (2) a quicker increase of temperature than that of pressure in the initial prograde metamorphism, but slower near the peak, then temperature and pressure simultaneously reaching the peak metamorphic conditions, and (3) a slow near-isobaric cooling during the retrograde process. The P-T-t path for prograde metamorphism is closely related to magmatic accretion in the arc setting. The magmatic accretion model, metamorphism type and tectonic setting may be compared with the global Grenville tectono-metamorphic events, and related to the assembly of the Rodinia at the late Meso-proterozoic-early Neoproterozoic (~1.0 Ga). The retrograde P-T-t path shows a slow near-isobaric cooling, indicating sustained heat supplies from the upper mantle and no rapid erosion. This heat source may be originated from the Neoproterozoic (~0.82 Ga) breakup of the Rodinia.

  3. Implications of the nutrition transition for vitamin D intake and status in Aboriginal groups in the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hayek Fares, Jessy; Weiler, Hope A

    2016-09-01

    Aboriginal Canadians have low intakes of vitamin D and are shifting away from consumption of traditional foods. Higher body mass index, skin pigmentation, and geographic latitude of residence further predispose Canadian Aboriginal populations to low vitamin D status. Low vitamin D status could compromise bone health and other health outcomes. Studies assessing vitamin D status of different Aboriginal groups are limited. The aim of this review is to examine the literature on vitamin D status and intakes of Canadian Aboriginal populations living in the Arctic. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published from 1983 to 2013. The prevalence of 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency ranged from 13.9% to 76.0% among children and adults in the summer. Furthermore, mean vitamin D intakes among all age groups were below the estimated average requirement. As vitamin D deficiency has been recently associated with chronic diseases, and Aboriginal populations living in the Arctic are at high risk for low vitamin D status, their vitamin D status should be assessed regularly across seasons.

  4. Discrimination, attribution, and racial group identification: implications for psychological distress among Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (2001-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Lincoln, Karen D; Jackson, James S

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that experiencing discrimination may contribute to poor mental health among Black Americans. However, few studies have distinguished between discrimination attributed to race versus other forms of discrimination or have compared differences in their psychological implications. Using nationally representative data on 5,191 Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (NSAL; 2001-2003), this study examined serious psychological distress (SPD) in relation to discrimination attributed to racial versus nonracial causes and also investigated whether racial group identification may be a buffer. We found that discrimination was associated with greater odds of SPD, regardless of attribution. Racial attributions were associated with higher odds of SPD compared with attributions to nonracial causes for each level of discrimination. High racial group identification buffered the negative effect of moderate levels of both racially and nonracially attributed discrimination. Our results provide evidence for the negative influence of discrimination on SPD among Black Americans and indicate that high racial group identification may somewhat mitigate their negative mental health effects. Our study suggests that discrimination and racial group identification should be addressed to protect against psychological distress among Black Americans. © 2011 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  5. Natural Arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, Florida: Wide Ranging Implications for ASR, Phosphate Mining, Private Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, O. V.; Pichler, T.

    2004-12-01

    In order to understand the mineralogical association and distribution of arsenic (As) in the Hawthorn Group we examined in detail the chemical and mineralogical composition of 370 samples that were collected from 16 cores in central Florida. In our study area the Hawthorn group consists primarily of a basal carbonate unit (the Arcadia Formation) and an upper siliciclastic unit (The Peace River Formation). The Peace River Formation contains appreciable amounts of phosphate and is currently being exploited for phosphate ore. Samples were taken for each Formation at intervals of 25ft. In addition to the interval samples we also took samples that contained visible pyrite crystals, iron oxides, green clays, phosphatic and organic material. These additional samples were collected because of their potential of high As concentrations. Arsenic concentrations were determined by hydride generation - atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) after digestion with aqua regia (3:1 HCl and HNO3). The elements Fe, Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca, S, P, and K were measured on the same solutions by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The identification of discrete minerals was aided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical compositions were obtained by electron-probe microanalyses (EMPA). Our study indicates that the average As concentrations significantly change from 9.0 ppm in the Peace River Formation to 3.0 ppm in the Tampa Member of the Arcadia Formation. As concentrations for all Hawthorn samples vary from 0.07 to 68.98 ppm ( μ = 5.6, σ = 7.1). Our detailed mineralogical and geochemical study demonstrates that: (1) The As in the Hawthorn group varies from the formation to formation and is mostly concentrated in trace minerals, such as pyrite; (2) Concentrations of the As in pyrite crystals can vary drastically from a minimum of 0 ppm to a maximum of 8260 ppm; (3) Pyrite is an unevenly distributed throughout the Hawthorn Group; (4) Phosphate and

  6. P-T-t path of metamorphism for the Julin Group and its geodynamical implications in Yuanmou, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Shangxian

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liu, T. S., Loess and the Environment, Beijing: China Ocean Press, 1985, 1-251.[2]Chen, L. X., Zhu, Q. G., Luo, H. B. et al., East Asian Monsoon, Beijing: China Meteorology Press, 1991, 28-61.[3]An, Z. S., Liu, T. S., Lu, Y. C. et al., The long-term palaeomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-palaeosol sequence in central China, Quaternary International, 1990, (7/8): 91-95.[4]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Shift of the monsoon intensity on the Loess Plateau at ca. 0.85 MaBP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1993, 38(2): 586-591.[5]Chen, J., An, Z. S., Wang, Y. J. et al., Distributions of Rb and Sr in the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence of China during the last 800 ka: Implications for paleomonsoon variations, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(3): 225-232.[6]Chen, J., Wang, Y. J., Ji, J. F. et al., Rb/Sr variations and its climatic stratigraphical significance of a loess-paleosol profile from Luochuan, Shaanxi Province, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(4): 350-356.[7]Guo, Z. T.,Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Climate extremes in loess of China coupled with the strength of deep-water for-mation in the North Atlantic, Global and Planetary Change, 1998, 18: 113-128.[8]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., An, Z. S., Paleosols of the last 0.15 Ma in the Weinan loess section and their paleoclimate signifi-cance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1994, 14(3): 256-269.[9]Guo, Z, T,, Fedoroff, N., Liu, T. S., Micromorphology of the loess-paleosol sequence of the last 130 ka in China and pa-leoclimatic event, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(3): 392-398.[10]Guo, Z., Liu, T., Guiot, J., et al., High frequency pulses of East Asian monsoon climate in the last two glaciations: Link with the North Atlantic, Climate Dynamics, 1996, 12: 701-709.[11]Guo, Z. T., Peng, S. Z., Wei, L. Y. et al., Weathering signals of Millennial-Scale oscillations of the East Asian Summer monsoon over the last 220 ka, Chinese Science

  7. Earthquake event deposits in Mesoproterozoic Kunyang Group in central Yunnan Province and its geological impli-cations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU; Yuansheng

    2001-01-01

    [1]Liu, T. S., Loess and the Environment, Beijing: China Ocean Press, 1985, 1-251.[2]Chen, L. X., Zhu, Q. G., Luo, H. B. et al., East Asian Monsoon, Beijing: China Meteorology Press, 1991, 28-61.[3]An, Z. S., Liu, T. S., Lu, Y. C. et al., The long-term palaeomonsoon variation recorded by the loess-palaeosol sequence in central China, Quaternary International, 1990, (7/8): 91-95.[4]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Shift of the monsoon intensity on the Loess Plateau at ca. 0.85 MaBP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1993, 38(2): 586-591.[5]Chen, J., An, Z. S., Wang, Y. J. et al., Distributions of Rb and Sr in the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence of China during the last 800 ka: Implications for paleomonsoon variations, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(3): 225-232.[6]Chen, J., Wang, Y. J., Ji, J. F. et al., Rb/Sr variations and its climatic stratigraphical significance of a loess-paleosol profile from Luochuan, Shaanxi Province, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(4): 350-356.[7]Guo, Z. T.,Liu, T. S., Fedoroff, N. et al., Climate extremes in loess of China coupled with the strength of deep-water for-mation in the North Atlantic, Global and Planetary Change, 1998, 18: 113-128.[8]Guo, Z. T., Liu, T. S., An, Z. S., Paleosols of the last 0.15 Ma in the Weinan loess section and their paleoclimate signifi-cance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1994, 14(3): 256-269.[9]Guo, Z, T,, Fedoroff, N., Liu, T. S., Micromorphology of the loess-paleosol sequence of the last 130 ka in China and pa-leoclimatic event, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(3): 392-398.[10]Guo, Z., Liu, T., Guiot, J., et al., High frequency pulses of East Asian monsoon climate in the last two glaciations: Link with the North Atlantic, Climate Dynamics, 1996, 12: 701-709.[11]Guo, Z. T., Peng, S. Z., Wei, L. Y. et al., Weathering signals of Millennial-Scale oscillations of the East Asian Summer monsoon over the last 220 ka, Chinese Science

  8. Implications of dietary therapy into the 21st century: conclusion to special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    The concept of dietary therapy for epilepsy has played an important role in the approach to the treatment of seizures for centuries--particularly with the development and utilization of the classic ketogenic diet over the past 90 years. Recently, there has been developing interest in the utilization of diet in other medical disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, degenerative neurologic disorders, and cancer. As the utilization of dietary therapy expands, there are several issues that need to be addressed and better characterized to better understand the role of diet in the treatment of epilepsy and other disease.

  9. rs12512631 on the Group Specific Complement (Vitamin D-Binding Protein GC) Implicated in Melanoma Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Chilet, Maria; Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Martin-González, Manuel; Feito, Marta; Gomez-Fernandez, Cristina; Planelles, Dolores; Carretero, Gregorio; Lluch, Ana; Nagore, Eduardo; Ribas, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Background Solar radiation should be avoided in melanoma patients. Nevertheless, this is the main means by which the body produces vitamin D. Evidence suggests a protective role against cancer for vitamin D. Since vitamin D performs its function by binding the receptor encoded by the vitamin D-receptor gene (VDR), most studies have focused on polymorphisms (SNPs) within this gene. However, the gene encoding the vitamin D-binding protein (GC) appears in recent studies as a major player in the role of a serum vitamin D level regulator and in Cutaneous Melanoma (CM) predisposition. Methods We performed a case-control study of 12 polymorphisms on GC and 9 on VDR among 530 cases and 314 controls from Spanish population. Results We found association between SNP rs12512631, located 3′downstream of GC, and risk of CM that seems to fit a dominant model (OR 1.63 95%CI 1.23–2.17 p-value 7×10−4). This association remained Bonferroni’s correction and after adjustment for potential confounders (p-value 3×10−3) and even after increasing the sample size to 1729 individuals (p-value 0.0129). Moreover, we confirmed evidence of an association between CM susceptibility and the linkage disequilibrium block marked by tag-SNP rs222016 (p-value 0.032). This block covers the GC intron 1 region, with probable regulatory functions. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first vitamin D pathway-related polymorphism study in melanoma risk conducted in the Spanish population. Furthermore, we show an association between polymorphisms in GC and melanoma risk, confirming recent studies in different populations. PMID:23544077

  10. rs12512631 on the group specific complement (vitamin D-binding protein GC implicated in melanoma susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Peña-Chilet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Solar radiation should be avoided in melanoma patients. Nevertheless, this is the main means by which the body produces vitamin D. Evidence suggests a protective role against cancer for vitamin D. Since vitamin D performs its function by binding the receptor encoded by the vitamin D-receptor gene (VDR, most studies have focused on polymorphisms (SNPs within this gene. However, the gene encoding the vitamin D-binding protein (GC appears in recent studies as a major player in the role of a serum vitamin D level regulator and in Cutaneous Melanoma (CM predisposition. METHODS: We performed a case-control study of 12 polymorphisms on GC and 9 on VDR among 530 cases and 314 controls from Spanish population. RESULTS: We found association between SNP rs12512631, located 3'downstream of GC, and risk of CM that seems to fit a dominant model (OR 1.63 95%CI 1.23-2.17 p-value 7×10(-4. This association remained Bonferroni's correction and after adjustment for potential confounders (p-value 3×10(-3 and even after increasing the sample size to 1729 individuals (p-value 0.0129. Moreover, we confirmed evidence of an association between CM susceptibility and the linkage disequilibrium block marked by tag-SNP rs222016 (p-value 0.032. This block covers the GC intron 1 region, with probable regulatory functions. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first vitamin D pathway-related polymorphism study in melanoma risk conducted in the Spanish population. Furthermore, we show an association between polymorphisms in GC and melanoma risk, confirming recent studies in different populations.

  11. A Multilingual Approach: Conclusions and Future Perspectives--Afterword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Durk; Cenoz, Jasone

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the individual contributions to this special issue and discusses the advantages and implications of adopting a multilingual approach. The advantages include the possibility of examining language practices in context and providing insights about the way languages are acquired and used. This multilingual approach also opens…

  12. Palaeoenvironmental drivers of vertebrate community composition in the Belly River Group (Campanian) of Alberta, Canada, with implications for dinosaur biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Thomas M; Evans, David C

    2016-11-15

    The Belly River Group of southern Alberta is one of the best-sampled Late Cretaceous terrestrial faunal assemblages in the world. This system provides a high-resolution biostratigraphic record of terrestrial vertebrate diversity and faunal turnover, and it has considerable potential to be a model system for testing hypotheses of dinosaur palaeoecological dynamics, including important aspects of palaeoecommunity structure, trophic interactions, and responses to environmental change. Vertebrate fossil microsites (assemblages of small bones and teeth concentrated together over a relatively short time and thought to be representative of community composition) offer an unparalleled dataset to better test these hypotheses by ameliorating problems of sample size, geography, and chronostratigraphic control that hamper other palaeoecological analyses. Here, we assembled a comprehensive relative abundance dataset of microsites sampled from the entire Belly River Group and performed a series of analyses to test the influence of environmental factors on site and taxon clustering, and assess the stability of faunal assemblages both temporally and spatially. We also test the long-held idea that populations of large dinosaur taxa were particularly sensitive to small-scale environmental gradients, such as the paralic (coastal) to alluvial (inland) regimes present within the time-equivalent depositional basin of the upper Oldman and lower Dinosaur Park Formations. Palaeoenvironment (i.e. reconstructed environmental conditions, related to relative amount of alluvial, fluvial, and coastal influence in associated sedimentary strata) was found to be strongly associated with clustering of sites by relative-abundance faunal assemblages, particularly in relation to changes in faunal assemblage composition and marine-terrestrial environmental transitions. Palaeogeography/palaeolandscape were moderately associated to site relative abundance assemblage clustering, with depositional setting

  13. Platinum Group Elements (PGE) geochemistry of komatiites and boninites from Dharwar Craton, India: Implications for mantle melting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhishek; Manikyamba, C.; Santosh, M.; Ganguly, Sohini; Khelen, Arubam C.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.

    2015-06-01

    High MgO volcanic rocks having elevated concentrations of Ni and Cr are potential hosts for platinum group elements (PGE) owing to their primitive mantle origin and eruption at high temperatures. Though their higher PGE abundance is economically significant in mineral exploration studies, their lower concentrations are also valuable geochemical tools to evaluate petrogenetic processes. In this paper an attempt has been made to evaluate the PGE geochemistry of high MgO volcanic rocks from two greenstone belts of western and eastern Dharwar Craton and to discuss different mantle processes operative at diverse geodynamic settings during the Neoarchean time. The Bababudan greenstone belt of western and Gadwal greenstone belt of eastern Dharwar Cratons are dominantly composed of high MgO volcanic rocks which, based on distinct geochemical characteristics, have been identified as komatiites and boninites respectively. The Bababudan komatiites are essentially composed of olivine and clinopyroxene with rare plagioclase tending towards komatiitic basalts. The Gadwal boninites contain clinopyroxene, recrystallized hornblende with minor orthopyroxene, plagioclase and sulphide minerals. The Bababudan komatiites are Al-undepleted type (Al2O3/TiO2 = 23-59) with distinctly high MgO (27.4-35.8 wt.%), Ni (509-1066 ppm) and Cr (136-3036 ppm) contents. These rocks have low ΣPGE (9-42 ppb) contents with 0.2-2.4 ppb Iridium (Ir), 0.2-1.4 ppb Osmium (Os) and 0.4-4.4 ppb Ruthenium (Ru) among Iridium group PGE (IPGE); and 1.4-16.2 ppb Platinum (Pt), 2.8-19 ppb Palladium (Pd) and 0.2-9.8 ppb Rhodium (Rh) among Platinum group PGE (PPGE). The Gadwal boninites are high-Ca boninites with CaO/Al2O3 ratios varying between 0.8 and 1.0, with 12-24 wt.% MgO, 821-1168 ppm Ni and 2307-2765 ppm Cr. They show higher concentration of total PGE (82-207 ppb) with Pt concentration ranging from 13 to 19 ppb, Pd between 65 and 180 ppb and Rh in the range of 1.4-3 ppb compared to the Bababudan komatiites. Ir

  14. Carbonate facies of the Upper Triassic Ojo Huelos Member, San Pedro Arroyo Formation (Chinle Group), southern New Mexico: Paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Lawrence H.; Lucas, Spencer G.

    2012-10-01

    The Upper Triassic (Adamanian LVF) Ojo Huelos Member of the San Pedro Arroyo Formation (Chinle Group) is a distinctive, carbonate-rich unit that occurs in the lower Chinle section of central New Mexico. The member consists mainly of micritic lime mudstones, ostracodal wackestones to grainstones, peloidal grainstones and distinctive pisolitic rudstones, interbedded with fine-grained siliciclastic mudstones. Most limestones exhibit some evidence of pedogenic brecciation and root penetration, and porous fabrics similar to those of modern limestone tufas occur locally. The interbedded mudstones are typically lenticular and commonly display a blocky ped fabric in which subequant peds are separated by sparry calcite veins. Fossils from the Ojo Huelos Member are freshwater (darwinulid) ostracodes, various freshwater fishes and aquatic/amphibious tetrapods-metoposaurs and phytosaurs. We interpret the carbonate facies as the deposits of carbonate lakes, ponds and wetlands that were partly spring-fed, whereas the interbedded and surrounding mudstones were alluvial in origin. The groundwater and overland hydrology of the region was likely controlled by the relative proximity to an upland recharge area in the Mogollon Highlands to the south, but sedimentary fabrics record strong overprinting by desiccation and pedogenic reworking. Consequently, we interpret the Ojo Huelos Member as recording a climate that varied from subhumid to semi-arid, which caused episodic falls in the hydrologic base-level. This resulted in landscape degradation, exemplified by significant pedogenic and erosional reworking of the carbonate sediments and fluvial incision.

  15. Exploring Differences in Commuting Behaviour among Various Income Groups during Polycentric Urban Development in China: New Evidence and Its Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Income status is an important variable that is strongly associated with certain commuting behaviours of workers. This paper presents new evidence on how polycentric development impacts on workers’ commuting behaviour among various income groups in Beijing, China. This study suggests that three key influencing factors—the public transport network, the location of affordable housing projects and the process of employment decentralisation—have played significant roles in affecting workers’ commuting behaviour. The results of regression analysis indicate that subway and bus transport significantly and negatively influenced the commuting times of low- and middle-income workers, but the two transport modes did not have a significant influence on the commuting times of high-income workers. The findings from this research suggest that policies for promoting employment decentralisation during polycentric development have the potential to reduce workers’ commuting times through promoting jobs-housing balance in the sub-centres. The results of this study indicate that a balanced jobs-housing relationship can be achieved through adjustment of affordable housing locations, and this can be effective in shortening low-income workers’ commuting times in the sub-centres of Beijing.

  16. Number of objectives and conclusions in dissertations and thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebano Richard Eloin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze the number of objectives and conclusions presented in dissertations and thesis defended at Federal University of São Paulo - Paulista School of Medicine (UNIFESP - EPM. METHODS: It was realized a search in the master degree dissertations and doctor degree thesis defended at Federal University of São Paulo - Paulista School of Medicine in the years 2002 and 2003 that were found available in the central library of this university. RESULTS: From 723 master dissertations analyzed, 62 (8,57% presented only one objective and one conclusion, 134 (18,53% presented one objective and more than one conclusion and 527 (72,89% had more than one objective and more than one conclusion. From 502 doctor thesis analyzed, 23 (4,58% presented only one objective and one conclusion, 123 (24,50% presented one objective and more than one conclusion and 376 (74,90% had more than one objective and more than one conclusion.. CONCLUSIONS: It wasn't found in researched literature the number of objectives and conclusions a scientific work must have. A highest number of thesis and dissertations presented more than one objective and more than one conclusion.

  17. Conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999: translating results into nutrition policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Juan A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This article presents and overview of the main results and conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999 and the principal nutrition policy implications of the findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The NNS-1999 was conducted on a national probabilistic sample of almost 18 000 households, representative of the national, regional, as well as urban and rural levels in Mexico. Subjects included were children <12 years and women 12-49 years. Anthropometry, blood specimens, diet and socioeconomic information of the family were collected. RESULTS: The principal public nutrition problems are stunting in children < 5 years of age; anemia, iron and zinc deficiency, and low serum vitamin C concentrations at all ages; and vitamin A deficiency in children. Undernutrition (stunting and micronutrient deficiencies was generally more prevalent in the lower socioeconomic groups, in rural areas, in the south and in Indigenous population. Overweight and obesity are serious public health problems in women and are already a concern in school-age children. CONCLUSIONS: A number of programs aimed at preventing undernutrition are currently in progress; several of them were designed or modified as a result of the NNS-1999 findings. Most of them have an evaluation component that will inform adjustments or modifications of their design and implementation. However, little is being done for the prevention and control of overweight and obesity and there is limited experience on effective interventions. The design and evaluation of prevention strategies for controlling obesity in the population, based on existing evidence, is urgently needed and success stories should be brought to scale quickly to maximize impact.

  18. Post-breeding movements of Ancient Murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus family groups, subsequent migration of adults and implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuriko; Wilson, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Increased shipping in British Columbia (BC) waters poses risks for marine birds from marine oil spills. Ancient Murrelets (Synthliboramphus antiquus), small marine diving birds of which half of the world’s population breeds in BC, are especially susceptible to oiling immediately after departing from their breeding colonies, as their offspring are flightless, constraining their parents to remain with them. In 2014 we deployed geolocator loggers on Ancient Murrelets at four breeding colonies, two on the east and two on the west coast of Haida Gwaii to investigate patterns of post-breeding dispersal and subsequent migratory movements. Birds from east coast colonies moved south and east after leaving their colonies, remaining in Queen Charlotte Sound and adjacent waters for 4–6 weeks, whereas those from west coast colonies moved steadily north and west, so that they left BC waters earlier than those from east coast colonies. These movements were consistent with being driven by surface currents. In June, all birds moved rapidly to the eastern Aleutians, SE Bering Sea, and waters off Kamchatka, where they probably moulted. In August, most moved north, some passing through Bering Straits into the Chukchi Sea. In October-November some birds returned to waters off western N America (33%) and the remainder carried on westwards to waters off Japan, Korea and NE China. For the former group the movement to the Bering Sea in June constituted a moult migration and, as such, is the first described for an auk. Those birds wintering in Asia began moving east in February and arrived off BC in March, when observations at colonies show that burrow visits begin in Haida Gwaii. Our data suggest that, immediately after colony departure, birds from the east coast colonies (about half the population of Haida Gwaii) are at higher risk from potential oil spills in northern British Columbia waters than those breeding on the west coast. PMID:28235033

  19. Deep-water microbialites of the Mesoproterozoic Dismal Lakes Group: microbial growth, lithification, and implications for coniform stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, J K; Kah, L C; Frank, T D; Lyons, T W

    2015-01-01

    Offshore facies of the Mesoproterozoic Sulky Formation, Dismal Lakes Group, arctic Canada, preserve microbialites with unusual morphology. These microbialites grew in water depths greater than several tens of meters and correlate with high-relief conical stromatolites of the more proximal September Lake reef complex. The gross morphology of these microbial facies consists of ridge-like vertical supports draped by concave-upward, subhorizontal elements, resulting in tent-shaped cuspate microbialites with substantial primary void space. Morphological and petrographic analyses suggest a model wherein penecontemporaneous upward growth of ridge elements and development of subhorizontal draping elements initially resulted in a buoyantly supported, unlithified microbial form. Lithification began via precipitation within organic elements during microbialite growth. Mineralization either stabilized or facilitated collapse of initially neutrally buoyant microbialite forms. Microbial structures and breccias were then further stabilized by precipitation of marine herringbone cement. During late-stage diagenesis, remaining void space was occluded by ferroan dolomite cement. Cuspate microbialites are most similar to those found in offshore facies of Neoarchean carbonate platforms and to unlithified, buoyantly supported microbial mats in modern ice-covered Antarctic lakes. We suggest that such unusual microbialite morphologies are a product of the interaction between motile and non-motile communities under nutrient-limiting conditions, followed by early lithification, which served to preserve the resultant microbial form. The presence of marine herringbone cement, commonly associated with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low O2 conditions, also suggests growth in association with reducing environments at or near the seafloor or in conjunction with a geochemical interface. Predominance of coniform stromatolite forms in the Proterozoic--across a variety of depositional

  20. 1420 Ma diabasic intrusives from the Mesoproterozoic Singhora Group, Chhattisgarh Supergroup, India: Implications towards non-plume intrusive activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyabrata Das; Kaushik Das; Partha Pratim Chakraborty; S Balakrishnan

    2011-04-01

    Besides offering significant clues towards tracking the geochemical evolution of the mantle and architectural reconstruction of different ‘supercontinent’, geochronological and geochemical appraisal of igneous inputs are also important to bracket the depositional time frame of any lithopackage, particularly, the unfossiliferous sedimentary successions. The present study deals with diabasic intrusive within Mesoproterozoic Saraipalli Formation, which is an argillaceous constituent present at the basal part of nearly 400 m thick four-tiered unmetamorphosed but deformed sedimentary succession of Singhora Group, Chhattisgarh Supergroup, central India. The SE–NW trending intrusive comprises mainly of plagioclase and augite together with minor orthopyroxene, biotite and opaque minerals. Though some plagioclase laths are partially sericitized, the ophitic-to-subophitic texture of the rock is well preserved. Major and trace element geochemical data indicate that this intrusive is basalt-to-basaltic andesite in character and of subalkaline basalt affinity. Multi-element plot shows overall LILE-enrichment and enrichment of Pb and slight depletion of Nb and P, coupled with moderate La/Nb and Th/Nb ratios. Zr, Y and Nb ternary diagrams plot in the fields of within plate basalt. Selected HFSE ratios indicate a non-plume source with crustal assimilation/sediment mixing. Sm–Nd and Rb–Sr isotope data show that the intrusive has Srinitial and Ndinitial of 0.709377–0.706672 and 0.510919–0.510815, respectively. Positive tNd [t = 1420 Ma] values (+0.3 to + 2.3) indicate depleted isotopic nature of their protolith. The calculated DM age is 1.7–1.9 Ga. The mineral-whole rock isochron data (Sm–Nd systematics) of the intrusive implies an emplacement age of ca. 1420 Ma. Considering synchronous terrain boundary shear zone development in Bastar craton on the southeastern part of the Singhora basin, mafic magmatism in Eastern Ghats and large-scale basic intrusion in Sausar

  1. Feasibility studies for final disposal of low and intermediate radioactive waste - summary with main conclusions and recommendations from three parallel studies. Report to the cross-departmental working group for preparing a decision basis for establishing a Danish radioactive waste disposal facility; Forstudier til slutdepot for lav- og mellemaktivt affald - sammendrag indeholdende hovedkonklusionerne og anbefalinger fra tre parallelle studier. Rapport til den tvaerministerielle arbejdsgruppe vedr. udarbejdelse af beslutningsgrundlag med henblik paa etablering af et dansk slutdepot for lav- og mellemaktivt affald

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-05-15

    In 2003, the Danish Parliament in resolution No. B 48 on the dismantling of the nuclear facilities at Risoe gave consent to the government to begin preparation of a decision basis for a Danish final repository for low and intermediate level waste. As a result, a working group under the Ministry of Health and Prevention in 2008 prepared the report 'Decision basis for a Danish final repository for low and medium level radioactive waste'. In this report it was recommended to prepare three parallel preliminary studies: one about the repository concepts with the aim to obtain the necessary decision-making basis for selecting which concepts to analyze within the process of establishing a final repository, one on transportation of radioactive waste to the depot and one about regional mapping with the aim to characterize areas as suitable or unsuitable for locating a repository. The present report contains the main conclusions of each of the three parallel studies in relation to the further localization process. The preliminary studies suggest 22 areas, of which it is recommended to proceed with six in the selection process. The preliminary studies also show that all investigated storage concepts will be possible solutions from a security standpoint. However, there will be greater risks associated with depots near the surface, because they are more subjected to intentional or accidental intrusion. Overall, a medium deep repository will be the most appropriate solution, but it is also a more expensive solution than the near-surface repository. Both subsurface and the deep repositories may be reversible, but it is estimated to increase overall costs and may increase risk related to accidents. The preliminary studies establishes a set of conclusions and recommendations concerning future studies related to repository concepts and safety analyses, including in relation to the specific geology at the selected locations. The transportation studies show that radio

  2. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section 111.68 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions....

  3. Writing to Climax: Strategies for Creating Effective Conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen G.

    1996-01-01

    Provides pointers for incorporating the use of metaphors, alliteration, restating of the thesis, answering questions by reiteration of the thesis, and other ideas for writing an effective conclusion in high school and college papers. (PA)

  4. Clinical Implications of the 2016 International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery Definition and Grading of Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula on 775 Consecutive Pancreatic Resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, Alessandra; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Pea, Antonio; Allegrini, Valentina; Esposito, Alessandro; Casetti, Luca; Landoni, Luca; Malleo, Giuseppe; Salvia, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio

    2017-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical implications of the 2016 International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition and classification of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) using a single high-volume institutional cohort of patients undergone pancreatic surgery. The ISGPS definition and grading system of POPF has been recently updated. Although the rationale for the changes was supported by previous studies, the effect of the new definition and classification scheme on surgical series has not been established. A total of 775 patients undergone pancreatic surgery in our institute from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. The parameters modified in the ISGPS classification were analyzed according to postoperative outcomes. Finally the classification was validated by external clinical and economical outcomes. Applying the 2016 scheme, 17.5% of patients changed classification group compared to the 2015 system. Grade B increased from 11.5% to 22.1%, whereas grade C decreased from 15.2% to 4.6%. Biochemical leak occurred in 7% of patients, and it did not differ from the non-POPF condition in terms of surgical outcomes. Non-POPF group, grades B and C POPF differed significantly in terms of intensive care unit staying (P < 0.001), length of stay (P < 0.001), readmission rate (P < 0.001), and hospital costs (P < 0.001). The present study has confirmed the pertinence of the changes introduced in the 2016 ISGPS POPF definition and grading. This updated classification is effective in identifying three conditions that differ in terms of clinical and economic outcomes. These results suggested the reliability of the new definition and scheme in classifying POPF-related outcomes.

  5. Qualitative exploration of the benefits of group-based memory rehabilitation for people with neurological disabilities: implications for rehabilitation delivery and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliara, Niki; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify patient-perceived benefits of memory rehabilitation and draw transferrable lessons for the delivery and evaluation of similar interventions for people with neurological disabilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted as part of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial comparing 2 memory rehabilitation approaches with a self-help control group. Postintervention interviews were conducted with 20 participants with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis or stroke. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Results Participants receiving memory rehabilitation reported that the sessions responded to previously unmet needs for information on brain injury and memory function and developed their insight along with a sense of self-efficacy and control over the management of their memory problems. Although they did not experience major improvements in their memory function per se, they reported that rehabilitation gave them the skills to effectively cope with the residual deficits. Respondents in the control groups did not report similar benefits. The opportunities for interaction offered by the group setting were greatly valued by all respondents. Mixed aetiology groups were received positively; however, marked differences in cognitive performance were frustrating for some participants. Conclusions The study highlighted important patient-perceived outcomes that should be considered by researchers and rehabilitation professionals when evaluating the effects of memory rehabilitation. The use of domain-specific outcome measures which reflect these areas is recommended. Qualitative changes in the use of memory aids may be achieved which cannot be captured by frequency indices alone. The benefits of the group-based rehabilitation approach were stressed by participants, suggesting that a combination of group and individual sessions might be a good practice. Trial registration number ISRCTN92582254; Results

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF ABO AND RH-D BLOOD GROUPS IN THE CACHAR DISTRICT OF BARAK VALLEY OF ASSAM: IMPLICATION FOR REGIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmakanta Kumbhakar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND ABO and Rhesus (Rh-D blood group antigens are integrated parts of the red blood cell membranes. They are hereditary characters and are useful in population genetic studies, in resolving medico-legal issues and more importantly in compatibility test in blood transfusion and organ transplant practices. They show a wide geographical and racial variation. The knowledge of the distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups among different population is essential in health care and transfusion practices. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups amongst the population of Cachar district of Barak valley of Assam. MATERIALS AND METHODS We did a retrospective analysis of records of 1,60,500 blood samples grouped for ABO and Rh-D typing at Silchar Medical College and Hospital Blood Bank, Silchar, over a period of 10 years from 1st January 1999 to 31st December 2008. RESULTS AND OBSERVATIONS Out of total 1,60,500 blood samples grouped for ABO and Rh-D typing during the period in the centre, the distribution of phenotype A, B, AB and O were 24.80% (39,804, 32.00% (51,360, 5.60% (8,986 and 37.60% (60,350 respectively. The Rh-D positive phenotype was 95.40% (1, 53,117 and remaining 4.60% (7,383 was Rh-D negative. The frequency of Rh-D phenotypes in the various ABO blood groups was as - A Positive 23.70% (38,039, A Negative 1.10% (1,765, B Positive 30.80% (49,433, B Negative 1.20% (1,927, AB Positive 5.40% (8,665, AB Negative 0.20% (321, O Positive 35.50% (56,980 and O Negative 2.10% (3,370 respectively. DISCUSSION Silchar Medical College and Hospital Blood Bank receives blood samples for grouping of almost all population of Cachar district. Hence, the data revealed in the present study fairly reflects the prevalence of ABO and Rh-D groups distribution in the Cachar district in Barak valley of Assam. CONCLUSION The present study provide information on the status of ABO and Rh-D blood groups distribution of the region and

  7. Antibody titers in Group O platelet donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Amar Tendulkar

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Microplate can be used to perform titers in resource-constrained settings. Screening for critical titers in O group donors is essential as they are more implicated in hemolytic transfusion reactions. In the absence of a global consensus on this topic, institutes may need to formulate their own guidelines on handling ABO plasma-incompatible PLT transfusions.

  8. The renewal of humanism in psychotherapy: summary and conclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kirk J; Längle, Alfried

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes and discusses the main themes to emerge from this special section on the renewal of humanism in psychotherapy. It is concluded that (1) despite some controversies, humanism is both a viable and growing influence among the leading specialty areas of psychotherapy; (2) humanism is a foundational element of effectiveness among these specialty areas; and (3) humanistic training is essential to the development of trainees in the aforementioned specialty areas. The implications of these findings for each of the specialty areas, for the profession of psychotherapy, and for the public at large are elaborated, concluding with a call for a reassessment of priorities in the research, practice, and training of standardized mental health delivery. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Why Value Framework Assessments Arrive at Different Conclusions: A Multiple Myeloma Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Kimberly; Buelt, Lisabeth; Dubois, Robert W

    2017-06-01

    As the United States transitions from a volume-based health care system to one that rewards value, new frameworks are emerging to help patients, providers, and payers assess the value of medical services and biopharmaceutical products. These value assessment frameworks are intended to support various types of health care decision making. They have the potential to substantially affect patients, whether as tools for shared decision making with their doctors, as an input to care pathways used by providers, or through payer use of the frameworks to make coverage or reimbursement decisions. Prominent among current U.S. value assessment frameworks are those developed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. These frameworks generally reflect the interests and expertise of the organizations that developed them. The evidence, methodology, and intended use differ substantially across frameworks, which can lead to highly variable determinations of value for the same treatment therapy. To demonstrate this variability, we explored how these frameworks assess the value of treatment regimens for multiple myeloma. Cross-framework comparisons of multiple myeloma assessments were conducted, and consistency of findings was examined for 3 case studies. A discussion of the analysis explores why different frameworks arrive at different conclusions, whether those differences are cause for concern, and the resulting implications for framework readiness to support health care decision making. Funding for this project was provided by the National Pharmaceutical Council. The authors are employees of the National Pharmaceutical Council, an industry-funded health policy research group that is not involved in lobbying or advocacy. Study concept and design were contributed by Westrich and Dubois, along with Buelt. Westrich took the lead in data

  10. Hypothesis, Prediction, and Conclusion: Using Nature of Science Terminology Correctly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper defines the terms "hypothesis," "prediction," and "conclusion" and shows how to use the terms correctly in scientific investigations in both the school and science education research contexts. The scientific method, or hypothetico-deductive (HD) approach, is described and it is argued that an understanding of the scientific method,…

  11. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48 Section 901.48 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension...

  12. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  13. Clinical Implications of High-mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) in Cutaneous Malignancy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Detty, Shannon Q; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and the immune system play a role in the development and progression of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting effects of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have been investigated in these cutaneous malignancies. The clinical implication of these molecules is not fully described. The National Library of Medicine database was searched for articles addressing the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and RAGE in melanoma, BCC, and SCC. This systematic review includes nine articles, with six summarizing RAGE in cutaneous malignancies and three involving HMGB1. RAGE has been found to be up-regulated in SCC lesions, as well as melanoma. Levels of RAGE were highest in stage IV melanomas. Lower levels of soluble RAGE have been associated with poor overall survival in melanoma. Sporadic extracellular expression of HMGB1 was evident in BCC and SCC lesions, which could be released by necrotic tumor cells. HMGB1 was found to be a prognostic marker in melanoma, and HMGB1 levels were elevated in patients who were non-responders to ipilimumab treatment. HMGB1 and RAGE could serve as potential prognostic markers or therapeutic targets in treating melanoma, BCC, and SCC, but further research regarding the clinical utility of the HMGB1-RAGE axis in cutaneous malignancies is warranted. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Factors associated with results and conclusions of trials of thiazolidinediones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Rattinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When a sponsor funds a study of two competing drugs in a head-to-head comparison, the results and conclusions are likely to favor the sponsor's drug. Thiazolidinediones, oral medications used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, are one of the most costly choices of oral anti-diabetic medications, yet they do not demonstrate clinically relevant differences in achieving lower glycosylated hemoglobin levels compared to other oral antidiabetic drugs. Our aim is to examine associations between research funding source, study design characteristics aimed at reducing bias, and other factors with the results and conclusions of randomized controlled trials (RCTs of thiazolidinediones compared to other oral hypoglycemic agents. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This is a cross-sectional study of 61 published RCTs comparing a thiazolidinedione (glitazone to another anti-diabetic drug or placebo for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Data on study design characteristics, funding source, author's financial ties, results for primary outcomes, and author conclusions were extracted. Univariate logistic regression identified associations between independent variables and results and conclusions that favored the glitazone. Of the RCTs, 59% (36/61 were funded by industry, 39% (24/61 did not disclose any funding. Common study design weaknesses included inadequate blinding and lack of concealment of allocation. Trials that reported favorable glycemic control results for the glitazone were more likely to have adequate blinding (OR (95% CI = 5.42 (1.46, 21.19, p = 0.008 and have a corresponding author with financial ties to the glitazone manufacturer (OR (95% CI = 4.12 (1.05, 19.53; p = 0.04. Trials with conclusions favoring the glitazone were less likely to be funded by a comparator drug company than a glitazone company (OR (95% CI = 0.026 (0, 0.40, p = 0.003 and less likely to be published in journals with higher impact factors (OR (95% CI = 0.79 (0.62, 0.97, p = 0

  15. EMU – Fiscal Challenges: Conclusions For the New EU Members.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate fiscal challenges which are facing the Economic and Monetary Union countries after four years of monetary union functioning. Then, the author formulates conclusions for accession countries which are planning to become members of the Economic and Monetary Unions in the near future. The first part of the paper deals with the criteria of fiscal stabilization within EMU, their significance and links to economic growth. On the one hand, these criteria limit poss...

  16. Do Economists Reach a Conclusion on Household and Municipal Recycling?

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Gunter

    2007-01-01

    Do economists reach a conclusion on household and municipal recycling? I explore the policy judgments of published economists on recycling and find that there is no broad consensus. The mainstream recycling literature is dominated by a guided-market approach; taxes and subsidies are advocated to correct for market failures. There are two less popular but still significant approaches: a minimal government laissez faire approach and a command and control regulatory approach. Laissez faire econo...

  17. Review conclusions by Ernst and Canter regarding spinal manipulation refuted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Roni

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the April 2006 issue of the Journal of Royal Society of Medicine, Ernst and Canter authored a review of the most recent systematic reviews on the effectiveness of spinal manipulation for any condition. The authors concluded that, except for back pain, spinal manipulation is not an effective intervention for any condition and, because of potential side effects, cannot be recommended for use at all in clinical practice. Based on a critical appraisal of their review, the authors of this commentary seriously challenge the conclusions by Ernst and Canter, who did not adhere to standard systematic review methodology, thus threatening the validity of their conclusions. There was no systematic assessment of the literature pertaining to the hazards of manipulation, including comparison to other therapies. Hence, their claim that the risks of manipulation outweigh the benefits, and thus spinal manipulation cannot be recommended as treatment for any condition, was not supported by the data analyzed. Their conclusions are misleading and not based on evidence that allow discrediting of a large body of professionals using spinal manipulation.

  18. Interactions and potential implications of Plasmodium falciparum-hookworm coinfection in different age groups in south-central Cote d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie A Righetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the widespread distribution of Plasmodium and helminth infections, and similarities of ecological requirements for disease transmission, coinfection is a common phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere in the tropics. Interactions of Plasmodium falciparum and soil-transmitted helminths, including immunological responses and clinical outcomes of the host, need further scientific inquiry. Understanding the complex interactions between these parasitic infections is of public health relevance considering that control measures targeting malaria and helminthiases are going to scale. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in April 2010 in infants, young school-aged children, and young non-pregnant women in south-central Côte d'Ivoire. Stool, urine, and blood samples were collected and subjected to standardized, quality-controlled methods. Soil-transmitted helminth infections were identified and quantified in stool. Finger-prick blood samples were used to determine Plasmodium spp. infection, parasitemia, and hemoglobin concentrations. Iron, vitamin A, riboflavin, and inflammation status were measured in venous blood samples. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multivariate regression analysis revealed specific association between infection and demographic, socioeconomic, host inflammatory and nutritional factors. Non-pregnant women infected with P. falciparum had significantly lower odds of hookworm infection, whilst a significant positive association was found between both parasitic infections in 6- to 8-year-old children. Coinfected children had lower odds of anemia and iron deficiency than their counterparts infected with P. falciparum alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that interaction between P. falciparum and light-intensity hookworm infections vary with age and, in school-aged children, may benefit the host through preventing iron deficiency anemia. This observation warrants additional investigation to

  19. SYNTAXOMOMICAL SURVEY O F EUROPEAN BEECH FORESTS: SOME GENERAL CONCLUSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. DIERSCHKE

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A short overwiev is given about the historical development of syntaxonomy of European beech forests. Different solutions of classification have been proposed, following more or less two main approaches: Division of alliances and suballiances by ecologically or geographically orientated species groups. A new classification of European beech forests is proposed with 8 (or more geographically orientated alliances, which can be further divided into suballiances by ecological species groups. For each alliance character and differential species, nomenclatural type and the area is mentioned, based on a (non puplished synthetic table, including 10.006 relevés from all parts of Europe. From this table also some overlapping species groups (a-n are given.

  20. Different partial volume correction methods lead to different conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Salat, David H; Bowen, Spencer L

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional group study of the effects of aging on brain metabolism as measured with (18)F-FDG-PET was performed using several different partial volume correction (PVC) methods: no correction (NoPVC), Meltzer (MZ), Müller-Gärtner (MG), and the symmetric geometric transfer matrix (SGTM) usin...

  1. Conclusions from the Image Analysis of the VSOP Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E.; Wiik, K.

    2009-08-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) mission. A significant fraction of the mission time was to be dedicated to the VSOP Survey of bright compact Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 5 GHz, which was lead by ISAS. The VSOP Survey Sources are an unbiased dataset of 294 targets, of which 82% were successfully observed. These are now undergoing statistical analysis to tease out the characteristics of typical AGN sources. We present here the summary of the imaging and conclusions we have reached.

  2. Zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope study of the Neoproterozoic Haizhou Group in the Sulu orogen: Provenance and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Bo; Wilde, Simon A.; Liu, Fu-Lai; Han, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic Haizhou Group crops out sporadically in the Sulu orogen in east-central China. It is divided into the Jinping and Yuntai formations and consists of quartzite, quartz schist, marble and graphite- and apatite-bearing sequences. Major and trace element data for quartz schist from the two formations indicate that these rocks have a greywacke protolith and have been deposited during strong tectonic activity. LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating of detrital zircon yields ages of 635 to 1074 Ma for three samples from the Jinping Formation and 611 to 943 Ma for two samples from the Yuntai Formation. More than 78% of the detrital zircons from the two formations have U-Pb ages grouped between 700 and 890 Ma, with two clusters peaking at 758 Ma and 828 Ma, respectively. This indicates that their provenance is magmatic rocks of Neoproterozoic age that have a tectonic affinity to the South China Block (SCB). A few older zircon populations with peak U-Pb ages at 943 and 1074 Ma are also present. A younger population shows peaks at 661 and 611 Ma. This suggests that deposition of the Haizhou Group was later than ~ 611 Ma rather than during the Mesoproterozoic as previously thought. Zircon Lu-Hf isotope data collected from the same U-Pb sites show negative ɛHf(t) values of - 22.8 to - 7.4 and Hf model ages of 2341 to 3100 Ma. This indicates that the Neoproterozoic magmatic rocks were derived from reworking of ancient Paleoproterozoic to Archean crust. The results support the contention that the Haizhou Group is similar to the Wulian Group at the northwestern edge of the Sulu orogen, both having a SCB affinity, but that the Penglai Group does not belong to the SCB because of the absence of Neoproterozoic ages. This lends support to the conclusion that the Triassic suture between the North China and South China blocks is located along the Baichihe-Yantai Fault, which lies north of the Wulian Complex and south of the Jiaobei Terrane; thus the Wulian-Yantai Fault is not the suture

  3. Fracture characterization and discrimination criteria for karst and tectonic fractures in the Ellenburger Group, West Texas: Implications for reservoir and exploration models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoak, T.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)]|[Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Deyhim, P. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Lab. for Computational Geodynamics

    1998-12-31

    In the Ellenburger Group fractured dolomite reservoirs of West Texas, it is extremely difficult to distinguish between multiple phases of karst-related fracturing, modifications to the karst system during burial, and overprinting tectonic fractures. From the analyses of drill core, the authors developed criteria to distinguish between karst and tectonic fractures. In addition, they have applied these criteria within the context of a detailed diagenetic cement history that allows them to further refine the fracture genesis and chronology. In these analyses, the authors evaluated the relationships between fracture intensity, morphologic attributes, host lithology, fracture cement, and oil-staining. From this analysis, they have been able to characterize variations in Ellenburger tectonic fracture intensity by separating these fractures from karst-related features. In general, the majority of fracturing in the Ellenburger is caused by karst-related fracturing although a considerable percentage is caused by tectonism. These findings underscore the importance of considering the complete geologic evolution of a karst reservoir during exploration and field development programs. The authors have been able to more precisely define the spatial significance of the fracture data sets by use of oriented core from Andector Field. They have also demonstrated the importance of these results for exploration and reservoir development programs in West Texas, and the potential to extrapolate these results around the globe. Given the historic interest in the large hydrocarbon reserves in West Texas carbonate reservoirs, results of this study will have tremendous implications for exploration and production strategies targeting vuggy, fractured carbonate systems not only in West Texas, but throughout the globe.

  4. Trends and Group Differences in the Association between Educational Attainment and U.S. Adult Mortality: Implications for Understanding Education’s Causal Influence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Mark D.; Hummer, Robert A.; Sasson, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Has the shape of the association between educational attainment and U.S. adult mortality changed in recent decades? If so, is it changing consistently across demographic groups? What can changes in the shape of the association tell us about the possible mechanisms in play for improving health and lowering mortality risk over the adult life course? This paper develops the argument that societal technological change may have had profound effects on the importance of educational attainment – particularly advanced education – in the U.S. adult population for garnering health advantages and that these changes should be reflected in changes in the functional form of the association between educational attainment and mortality. We review the historical evidence on the changing functional form of the association, drawing on studies based in the United States, to assess whether these changes are consistent with our argument about the role of technological change. We also provide an updated analysis of these functional form patterns and trends, contrasting data from the early 21st Century with data from the late 20th Century. This updated evidence suggests that the shape of the association between educational attainment and U.S. adult mortality appears to be reflecting lower and lower adult mortality for very highly educated Americans compared to their low-educated counterparts in the 21st Century. We draw on this review and updated evidence to reflect on the question whether education’s association with adult mortality has become increasingly causal in recent decades, why, and the potential research, policy, and global implications of these changes. PMID:25440841

  5. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition edge sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Devin H; de Almeida, Marcelo; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date all experimental tests with single photon states have relied on post-selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavorable events in losses. Here we close this "detection loophole" by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented $\\sim$62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 standard deviations. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  6. The European Food Consumption Validation Project: conclusions and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Boer, E. J.; Slimani, N.; van 't Veer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To outline and discuss the main results and conclusions of the European Food Consumption Validation (EFCOVAL) Project. Subjects/Methods: The EFCOVAL Project was carried out within the EU Sixth Framework Program by researchers in 11 EU countries. The activities focused on (1...... showed that two non-consecutive EPIC-Soft 24-HDRs are suitable to estimate the usual intake distributions of protein and potassium of European adult populations. The 2-day non-consecutive 24-HDRs in combination with a food propensity questionnaire also appeared to be appropriate to rank individuals...... according to their fish and fruit and vegetable intake in a comparable way in five European centers. Dietary intake of (young) children can be assessed by the combination of EPIC-Soft 24-HDRs and food recording booklets. The EPIC-Soft-standardized method of describing foods is useful to estimate dietary...

  7. Metacognition-augmented cognitive remediation training reduces jumping to conclusions and overconfidence but not neurocognitive deficits in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Thoering, Teresa; Kühn, Simone; Willenborg, Bastian; Westermann, Stefan; Nagel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with schizophrenia display neurocognitive deficits (e.g., memory impairment) as well as inflated cognitive biases (e.g., jumping to conclusions). Both cognitive domains are implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder and are known to compromise functional outcome. At present, there is a dearth of effective treatment options. A total of 90 patients with schizophrenia were recruited online (a diagnosis of schizophrenia had been confirmed in a large subgroup during a previous hospital admission). Subsequent to a baseline assessment encompassing psychopathology, self-reported cognition as well as objective memory and reasoning tests, patients were randomized to one of three conditions: standard cognitive remediation (mybraintraining), metacognition-augmented cognition remediation (CR) condition (variant of mybraintraining which encouraged patients to reduce speed of decision-making and attenuate response confidence when participants made high-confidence judgements and hasty incorrect decisions) and a waitlist control group. Patients were retested after 6 weeks and again 3 months after the second assessment. Groups did not differ on psychopathology and neurocognitive parameters at any timepoint. However, at follow-up the metacognitive-augmented CR group displayed a significant reduction on jumping to conclusions and overconfidence. Treatment adherence correlated with a reduction of depression; gains in the training exercises from the standard mybraintraining condition were correlated with improved objective memory performance. The study suggests that metacognition-augmented CR may ameliorate cognitive biases but not neurocognition. The study ties in well with prior research showing that neurocognitive dysfunctions are rather resistant to change; the failure to detect significant improvement of CR or metacognition-augmented CR on psychopathology and neurocognition over time may partly be attributed to a number of methodological limitations of

  8. Metacognition-augmented cognitive remediation training reduces jumping to conclusions and overconfidence but not neurocognitive deficits in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen eMoritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with schizophrenia display neurocognitive deficits (e.g. memory deficits as well as inflated cognitive biases (e.g. jumping to conclusions. Both cognitive domains are implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder and are known to compromise functional outcome. At present, there is a dearth of effective treatment options.A total of 90 patients with schizophrenia were recruited online (a diagnosis of schizophrenia had been confirmed in a large subgroup during a previous hospital admission. Subsequent to a baseline assessment encompassing psychopathology, self-reported cognition as well as objective memory and reasoning tests, patients were randomized to one of three conditions: standard cognitive remediation (mybraintraining, metacognition-augmented cognition remediation (CR condition (variant of mybraintraining which encouraged patients to reduce speed of decision-making and attenuate response confidence when they made high-confidence judgements and hasty incorrect decisions and a waitlist control group. Patients were retested after six weeks and again three months after the second assessment. Groups did not differ on psychopathology and neurocognitive parameters at any timepoint. However, at follow-up the metacognitive-augmented CR group displayed a significant reduction on jumping to conclusions and overconfidence. Treatment adherence correlated with a reduction of depression; gains in the training exercises from the standard mybraintraining condition were correlated with improved objective memory performance. The study suggests that metacognition-augmented CR may ameliorate cognitive biases but not neurocognition. The study ties in well with prior research showing that neurocognitive dysfunctions are rather resistant to change; the failure to detect significant improvement of CR or metacognition-augmented CR on psychopathology and neurocognition over time may partly be attributed to a number of methodological

  9. Northern Canada in a Changing Climate: Major Findings and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prowse, Terry D.; Peters, Daniel L. (Water and Climate Impacts Research Centre, Environment Canada, Dept. of Geography, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada)). e-mail: terry.prowse@ec.gc.caa; Furgal, Chris (Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent Univ., Peterborough, ON (Canada))

    2009-07-15

    Key findings include: Climate-induced changes in the cryosphere have large implications for infrastructure maintenance and design. Much of the infra-structure in the North is dependent upon the cryosphere to, for example, provide stable surfaces for buildings and pipelines, contain wastes, stabilize shorelines, and provide access to remote communities in the winter. Permafrost warming and thaw may require remedial action or further engineering modifications to existing infrastructure. Waste retention ponds and lakes that rely on the impervious nature of permafrost to retain environmentally hazardous materials are a particular concern. In the longer term, marine and freshwater transportation will need to shift its reliance from ice routes to open-water or land-based transport systems. Coastal areas and communities will also become more vulnerable to erosion with loss of sea ice compounded with increased storminess and rising sea levels. Changes in the timing of river flows will require modifications to the infrastructure and flow strategies used in generating hydroelectricity. As the climate continues to change, there will be consequences for biodiversity shifts and in ranges and distribution of many species with impacts on availability, accessibility, and quality of resources upon which human populations rely. The northward migration of species, and disruption and competition from invading species, are already occurring and will continue to alter terrestrial and aquatic communities. Shifting environmental conditions will likely introduce new animal transmitted diseases and redistribute some existing diseases, affecting key economic resources and some human populations. Stress on populations of iconic wildlife species will likely continue as a result of changes to critical sea-ice habitat. Where these stresses affect economically or culturally important species, they will have significant impacts on people and regional economies. Increased navigability of Arctic

  10. Employee counseling services evaluation system: design, issues and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, D A; Teems, L A

    1983-01-01

    Employee Counseling Services (ECS) programs have emerged as an effective method for dealing with employees whose job performance has deteriorated due to personal problems such as alcoholism or drug abuse. It is estimated that 18% of any work force is effected by such problems at any given time and that these employees cost industry billions of dollars annually in lost productivity, abuse of sick leave, etc. One of the critical concerns of this emerging field is the need for comprehensive evaluation that can demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefits of ECS programs. This paper will describe the model Federal ECS developed at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as well as the components of the evaluation system designed to determine its effectiveness. The system is the first of its kind and will be a valuable contribution to the field. The paper then raises issues and develops conclusions about designing such an evaluation within the context of a large bureaucracy.

  11. Bionics in Engineering Education Considerations, Experiences and Conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Neurohr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years bionics, a new discipline which is in charge with the transfer of the principles of construction, regulation, interaction and organisation of biology into innovative technical solutions, has attracted significant interest from various industries. Based on this request for bionic expertise in engineering, the faculty for teaching engineering in foreign languages (FILS at ‘Politehnica’ University of Bucharest started a course in bionics in SS 2007, which was supported by the expertise of the German ‘Bionik-Kompetenz-Netz’, one of the leading organizations in bionics. This is the report on the considerations involved in the course concept, the first experiences with the students' acceptance, some conclusions and future perspectives for extending bionics activities at ‘Politehnica’. Finally, within the last section, the evaluation of a questionnaire, filled in by the students at the end of the course, will be presented. In order to avoid any confusion, considering overlapping or mixing up with other bio-disciplines related to technology, the paper starts with a short introduction, explaining the principles of bionics and providing a clear definition of the field.

  12. Collaborative Automation Reliably Remediating Erroneous Conclusion Threats (CARRECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansey, Jonathan C.; Picciano, Paul; Yohai, Ian; Grant, Fred; Gern, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of the CARRECT software is to make cutting edge statistical methods for reducing bias in epidemiological studies easy to use and useful for both novice and expert users. Introduction Analyses produced by epidemiologists and public health practitioners are susceptible to bias from a number of sources including missing data, confounding variables, and statistical model selection. It often requires a great deal of expertise to understand and apply the multitude of tests, corrections, and selection rules, and these tasks can be time-consuming and burdensome. To address this challenge, Aptima began development of CARRECT, the Collaborative Automation Reliably Remediating Erroneous Conclusion Threats system. When complete, CARRECT will provide an expert system that can be embedded in an analyst’s workflow. CARRECT will support statistical bias reduction and improved analyses and decision making by engaging the user in a collaborative process in which the technology is transparent to the analyst. Methods Older approaches to imputing missing data, including mean imputation and single imputation regression methods, have steadily given way to a class of methods known as “multiple imputation” (hereafter “MI”; Rubin 1987). Rather than making the restrictive assumption that the data are missing completely at random (MCAR), MI typically assumes the data are missing at random (MAR). There are two key innovations behind MI. First, the observed values can be useful in predicting the missing cells, and thus specifying a joint distribution of the data is the first step in implementing the models. Second, single imputation methods will likely fail not only because of the inherent uncertainty in the missing values but also because of the estimation uncertainty associated with generating the parameters in the imputation procedure itself. By contrast, drawing the missing values multiple times, thereby generating m complete datasets along with the

  13. The critical wetting saga: how to draw the correct conclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Bernardino, N. R.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    A long-standing problem in condensed matter physics concerns the nature of the critical wetting phase transition in the Ising model or, more generally, in 3D systems with short-ranged forces. This is of fundamental interest because 3D corresponds to the upper critical dimension of the transition and it is not clear a priori whether the behaviour of the system will be mean-field-like or fluctuation-dominated. Renormalization group studies of the standard coarse-grained effective interfacial Hamiltonian model famously predict strong non-universal critical exponents which depend on the value of the so-called wetting parameter ω. However, these predictions are at odds with extensive Monte Carlo simulations of wetting in the Ising model, due to Binder, Landau and coworkers, which appear to be more mean-field-like. Further amendments to the interfacial Hamiltonian, which included the presence of a position-dependent stiffness, worsened the problem by paradoxically predicting fluctuation-induced first-order wetting behaviour. Here we show from re-analysis of a microscopic Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model of 3D short-ranged wetting that correlation functions are characterized by two diverging parallel length scales, not one, as previously thought. This has a simple diagrammatic explanation using a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian and yields a thermodynamically consistent theory of wetting in keeping with exact sum rules. The non-local model crucially contains long-ranged two-body interfacial interactions, characterized by the new length scale, which were missing in earlier treatments. For critical wetting the second length cuts off the spectrum of interfacial fluctuations determining the repulsion from the wall. We show how this corrects previous renormalization group predictions for fluctuation effects, based on local interfacial Hamiltonians. In particular, lowering the cut-off leads to a substantial reduction in the effective value of the wetting parameter controlling the

  14. The critical wetting saga: how to draw the correct conclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, A O [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rascon, C [Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, E-28911 Leganes (Spain); Bernardino, N R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Romero-Enrique, J M [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Seville (Spain)

    2008-12-10

    A long-standing problem in condensed matter physics concerns the nature of the critical wetting phase transition in the Ising model or, more generally, in 3D systems with short-ranged forces. This is of fundamental interest because 3D corresponds to the upper critical dimension of the transition and it is not clear a priori whether the behaviour of the system will be mean-field-like or fluctuation-dominated. Renormalization group studies of the standard coarse-grained effective interfacial Hamiltonian model famously predict strong non-universal critical exponents which depend on the value of the so-called wetting parameter {omega}. However, these predictions are at odds with extensive Monte Carlo simulations of wetting in the Ising model, due to Binder, Landau and coworkers, which appear to be more mean-field-like. Further amendments to the interfacial Hamiltonian, which included the presence of a position-dependent stiffness, worsened the problem by paradoxically predicting fluctuation-induced first-order wetting behaviour. Here we show from re-analysis of a microscopic Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model of 3D short-ranged wetting that correlation functions are characterized by two diverging parallel length scales, not one, as previously thought. This has a simple diagrammatic explanation using a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian and yields a thermodynamically consistent theory of wetting in keeping with exact sum rules. The non-local model crucially contains long-ranged two-body interfacial interactions, characterized by the new length scale, which were missing in earlier treatments. For critical wetting the second length cuts off the spectrum of interfacial fluctuations determining the repulsion from the wall. We show how this corrects previous renormalization group predictions for fluctuation effects, based on local interfacial Hamiltonians. In particular, lowering the cut-off leads to a substantial reduction in the effective value of the wetting parameter

  15. The Bero Volganic Group: New Lithological, Stratigraphic, and Geochemical Data of this Extension of the Parana-Etendeka Igneous Province into SW Angola with Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J.; Swart, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Bero Volcanic Group, an extension of the Etendeka-Paraná Igneous Province into SW Angola, forms the eroded basement to the on-shore Namibe Basin, an Early Cretaceous-Cenozoic terrestrial and marine sedimentary sequence. The igneous suite outcrops between latitudes 14.68o and 15.25o S and comprises quartz latite rheoignimbrites/lavas, tholeiitic basaltic lavas, pyroclastic/volcaniclastic deposits, minor aeolian sandstones, and mafic tholeiitic dykes and gabbroic sheets. Quartz latite lithologies dominate. In the Rio Bero area in the S quartz latites are underlain by several thin flows of basalt interbedded with, and underlain by, thin discontinuous lenses of aeolian sandstone. This sequence is consistent with the general stratigraphic sequence in the northern Etendeka of Namibia. To the N basalts and aeolian sandstones are absent and the quartz latites lie directly on Precambrian basement rocks in places. To date, data for a quartz latite correlated with a Chapecó rhyolites of the Paraná are available from only one locality in Angola. This study's wider sampling and major and trace element and radiogenic isotope analysis reveals the following: (1) all mafic rocks are high-Ti, the lavas being equivalent to the Khumiba/Urubici type; (2) mafic dykes cutting the quartz latites having affinities to the Paranapanema-Ribeira mafic lavas; (3) five quartz latite geochemical types are present, three of which are known from Etendeka/Paraná (Sarusas/Guarapuava, Khoraseb/Ourinhos and Ventura) and their stratigraphic relationships in Angola are consistent with those in the Etendeka and Paraná; (4) their Angolan occurrence significantly extends the area covered by, and potential eruptive volumes of, these silicic types; (5) two other quartz latite types are unknown in the Etendeka and Paraná and are probably products of low-volume, local eruptions. The Chinguau type is geochemically similar to the low-Ti quartz lalites of the southern Etendeka but has lower Epsilon Nd

  16. Anterior Chamber Contamination at the Conclusion of Phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza Soleimani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate anterior chamber aspirates at the conclusion of phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation (PE+IOL for bacterial and fungal contamination. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 80 eyes of 80 patients undergoing routine PE+IOL by performing bacterial and fungal culture on aspirates obtained from the anterior chamber at the end of the surgery. RESULTS: Anterior chamber fluid aspirates were positive for bacteria in 5 eyes (6.33% with coagulase-negative staphylococcus being the most common organism (three eyes. No instance of positive fungus culture was observed. One of the culture-positive eyes developed postoperative uveitis which resolved during a week of treatment with topical corticosteroids and antibiotics.  None of the eyes developed endophthalmitis. CONCLUSION: In the current series, the rate of anterior chamber contamination by bacteria at the end of phacoemulsification was in the lower range reported by previous studies.  

  1. An Exploration of Specialist Palliative Care Nurses' Experiences of Providing Care to Hospice Inpatients from Minority Ethnic Groups-Implication for Religious and Spiritual Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrea Henry; Fiona Timmins

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this research study was to gain an understanding of nurses' experiences of providing care to patients from minority ethnic groups within the specialist palliative care inpatient unit of an Irish hospice...

  2. Qualitative exploration of the benefits of group-based memory rehabilitation for people with neurological disabilities: implications for rehabilitation delivery and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliara, Niki; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2016-09-19

    To identify patient-perceived benefits of memory rehabilitation and draw transferrable lessons for the delivery and evaluation of similar interventions for people with neurological disabilities. A qualitative study was conducted as part of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial comparing 2 memory rehabilitation approaches with a self-help control group. Postintervention interviews were conducted with 20 participants with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis or stroke. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Participants receiving memory rehabilitation reported that the sessions responded to previously unmet needs for information on brain injury and memory function and developed their insight along with a sense of self-efficacy and control over the management of their memory problems. Although they did not experience major improvements in their memory function per se, they reported that rehabilitation gave them the skills to effectively cope with the residual deficits. Respondents in the control groups did not report similar benefits. The opportunities for interaction offered by the group setting were greatly valued by all respondents. Mixed aetiology groups were received positively; however, marked differences in cognitive performance were frustrating for some participants. The study highlighted important patient-perceived outcomes that should be considered by researchers and rehabilitation professionals when evaluating the effects of memory rehabilitation. The use of domain-specific outcome measures which reflect these areas is recommended. Qualitative changes in the use of memory aids may be achieved which cannot be captured by frequency indices alone. The benefits of the group-based rehabilitation approach were stressed by participants, suggesting that a combination of group and individual sessions might be a good practice. ISRCTN92582254; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  3. Geochemistry of fine-grained clastic rocks in the Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group: implications for provenance and the tectonic model of the Eastern Tianshan, Xinjiang, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deng-Feng; Chen, Hua-Yong; Zhang, Li; Fralick, Philip; Hollings, Pete; Mi, Mei; Lu, Wan-Jian; Han, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Fang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group, which is unconformably overlain by the Lower Cambrian Huangshan Formation and conformably overlies the Mesoproterozoic Xingxingxia Group in the Eastern Tianshan area, NW China, is comprised mainly of siltstone, slate, sandstone and phyllite. New geochemical data for the clastic rocks from the Kawabulake Group were investigated to constrain the provenance and weathering history of the source rocks, in order to evaluate the tectonic evolution of the Eastern Tianshan area. Kawabulake Group rocks are compositionally similar to PAAS (average Post-Archean Australian Shale), indicating derivation from a felsic source that is characterized by depletion in some HFSEs such as Nb, Ta and Ti. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) for the sandstone, siltstone and slate samples (CIA = 60 on average) suggests intensely weathered sources. Light REE-enrichment patterns ((La/Yb)CN = 4-20) coupled with negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* between 0.44 and 0.89 with an average of 0.62) are similar to those of PAAS, consistent with cratonic sources. The major and trace element compositions imply a dominantly Precambrian felsic source region with a minor contribution from mafic materials. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and the ages of T DM2 ( 3.4, 2.5-1.8, 1.2 and 1.0 Ga) are consistent with the evolutionary history of Kuluketage in the northern Tarim, suggesting that the Tarim Craton was the main source area for the Kawabulake Group.

  4. Geochemistry of fine-grained clastic rocks in the Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group: implications for provenance and the tectonic model of the Eastern Tianshan, Xinjiang, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deng-Feng; Chen, Hua-Yong; Zhang, Li; Fralick, Philip; Hollings, Pete; Mi, Mei; Lu, Wan-Jian; Han, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Kawabulake Group, which is unconformably overlain by the Lower Cambrian Huangshan Formation and conformably overlies the Mesoproterozoic Xingxingxia Group in the Eastern Tianshan area, NW China, is comprised mainly of siltstone, slate, sandstone and phyllite. New geochemical data for the clastic rocks from the Kawabulake Group were investigated to constrain the provenance and weathering history of the source rocks, in order to evaluate the tectonic evolution of the Eastern Tianshan area. Kawabulake Group rocks are compositionally similar to PAAS (average Post-Archean Australian Shale), indicating derivation from a felsic source that is characterized by depletion in some HFSEs such as Nb, Ta and Ti. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) for the sandstone, siltstone and slate samples (CIA = 60 on average) suggests intensely weathered sources. Light REE-enrichment patterns ((La/Yb)CN = 4-20) coupled with negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* between 0.44 and 0.89 with an average of 0.62) are similar to those of PAAS, consistent with cratonic sources. The major and trace element compositions imply a dominantly Precambrian felsic source region with a minor contribution from mafic materials. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions and the ages of T DM2 (~3.4, 2.5-1.8, 1.2 and 1.0 Ga) are consistent with the evolutionary history of Kuluketage in the northern Tarim, suggesting that the Tarim Craton was the main source area for the Kawabulake Group.

  5. Zircon U-Pb Geochronology, Hf Isotopic Composition and Geological Implications of the Neoproterozoic Huashan Group in the Jingshan Area, Northern Yangtze Block, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the northern Yangtze Block, a clear angular unconformity between the Mesoproterozoic sequences (e.g. Dagushi Group) and the overlying Neoproterozoic strata (e.g. Huashan Group) marks the the Jinning orogeny. A combined study of Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb ages for detrital zircons from Huashan Group can provide information on the crustal evolution of sedimentary provenances and the timing of the Jinning orogeny. Detrital zircons from Huashan Group have two major U-Pb age populations of about 2.0Ga, 2.65Ga, and three subordinate age groups of about 0.82Ga, 2.5Ga, 2.9Ga with minor >3.0Ga ages. The youngest five analyses yield a weighted average age of 816±9Ma, which is consistent with that of interlayered basalt (824±9Ma, Deng et al., 2013) and roughly defines the minimum depositional age of Huashan Group. Detrital zircons of Huashan Group mostly have two stage Hf isotope model ages (TDM2) between 3.0 to 3.3Ga, indicating that the northern Yangtze Block experienced significant continental crustal growth during the Paleo- to Meso-archean. Similar U-Pb ages of detrital zircons have been obtained from Precambrian sedimentary rocks in the northern Yangtze Block from previous studies (Liu et al., 2008; Guo et al., 2014 and references therein). Recently, ca. 2.65Ga A-type granites had been reported from the Kongling and Huji area, which likely record the thermally stable lithosphere (Chen et al., 2013; Zhou et al., 2015). In combination with this study, it documents the widespread 2.6-2.7Ga magmatic rocks in the northern Yangtze Block. Zhao et al. (2013) demonstrated both the ca. 850Ma tonalite and trondhjemite of the Huangling igneous complex were formed in a continental arc setting. This suggests the Miaowan-Huashan oceanic basin proposed by Bader et al. (2013) has not been closed at ca. 850Ma. This evidence, together with the depositional age of the Huashan Group, indicates the Jinning orogeny took place at 850-820 Ma. [1] Bader et al., 2013 Tectonics [2] Deng et al

  6. Contextual factors of the ICF as a tool for analysis of the implications of physical disability for a group of patients under Occupational Therapy care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosé Colom Toldrá

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the implications of the acquisition of physical disability on everyday life situations of persons under occupational therapy care using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – ICF, with emphasis on contextual factors. The study included 11 adults and elderly with physical impairments resulting from neurological disorders who were under Occupational Therapy care at the Center for Teaching and Research at the University of Sao Paulo from 2009 to 2010. It’s an exploratory qualitative research conducted through documentary study and semi-structured interview for the administration of the ICF components. Changes in body functions are diverse, both mental and related to movement, and when coupled with contextual factors may result in different levels and types of disabilities, preventing participation in life situations. The analysis of contextual factors helps to identify and relate personal and environmental aspects and their dynamic interaction reflects processes that may cause disability, establishing the ICF as a valuable guide for research and development of rehabilitation practices that consider the different aspects of the reality of a person’s life.

  7. The Missing Data Assumptions of the Nonequivalent Groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) Design and Their Implications for Test Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-09-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design involves missing data that are missing by design. Three popular equating methods that can be used with a NEAT design are the poststratification equating method, the chain equipercentile equating method, and the item-response-theory observed-score-equating method. These three methods each…

  8. Exploring the Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Communication Preferences of the General Public regarding HPV: Findings from CDC Focus Group Research and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L.; Shepeard, Hilda

    2007-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States, causing genital warts, cervical cell abnormalities, and cervical cancer in women. To inform HPV education efforts, 35 focus groups were conducted with members of the general public, stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, and urban/rural…

  9. A new turtle from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group of Brazil, updated phylogeny and implications for age of the Santo Anastácio Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegazzo, Mirian Costa; Bertini, Reinaldo José; Manzini, Flávio Fernando

    2015-03-01

    A new Podocnemidinura specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group (Paraná Basin) of southeastern Brazil was described. The Bauru Group provided an important portrait of the Brazilian Mesozoic terrestrial biota, which boasts a vertebrate fauna formed from fishes, frogs, lacertilians, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs and mammals; records of palynomorphs; and invertebrate fauna consisted of gastropods, bivalves, ostracods and conchostracans. Nevertheless, the age of these continental deposits is not precisely estimated, which prevents global correlations, and its fauna is argued to be endemic. The new specimen described is the first turtle from the Santo Anastácio Formation, and its morphological comparison with other South American forms provided a significant advancement in the understanding of the age of this unit (Late Cretaceous). This study permitted a revision of the turtle taxa of the Bauru Group. As a result, some taxa were considered synonym, including the new Santo Anastácio form. The specimen is still unnamed due to the absence of skull characters that preclude its accurate positioning within the Bauru Group skull-based taxa. In addition, the phylogenetic affinities of this taxon were analyzed into Podocnemidinura clade.

  10. Supportive-Expressive Group Therapy for People Experiencing Collective Traumatic Crisis During the Genocide Commemoration Period in Rwanda: Impact and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Gishoma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In Rwanda, the annual commemorations of the genocide are associated with an increase in the level of collective traumatic crises whereby many people participating in commemoration activities present various symptoms, including emotional distress and re-experiencing traumatic events of the 1994 genocide. These sudden crises normally last between 30 and 120 minutes and can affect hundreds of people at big commemoration events. They are accompanied by a degree of urgency that disturbs the whole assembly. This article briefly presents an overview of these crises and highlights the results of a study on the effects of a supportive-expression group intervention in the post-crisis period for people who experienced these collective traumatic crises. The study compares the therapeutic progress made by a group of people who participated in a supportive-expression group therapy program as compared to those who did not receive the intervention. The study suggests that the supportive group intervention can improve the overall psychological wellbeing of people who experienced collective traumatic crisis even though it was ineffective for some symptoms.

  11. Zircon U-Pb Ages from an Ultra-High Temperature Metapelite, Rauer Group, East Antarctica: Implications for Overprints by Grenvillian and Pan-African Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; Tong, Laixi; Liu, Dunyi

    2007-01-01

    SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircon from an ultra-high temperature (UHT, ~1000 °C) granulite-facies metapelite from the Rauer Group, Mather Peninsula, east Antarctica, has yielded evidence for two episodes of metamorphic zircon growth, at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma, and two episodes of magmatism in the source region for the protolith sediment, at ~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga, were identified from the zircon cores. Successive zircon growth at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma records a sequence of distinct, widely spaced high-temperature metamorphic and/or anatectic events related to Grenvillian and Pan-African orogenesis. This study presents the first robust geochronological evidence for the timing of UHT metamorphism of the Rauer Group, supporting arguments that the peak UHT metamorphic event occurred at ~1.00 Ga and was overprinted by a separate high-grade event at ~530 Ma. The new age data indicate that the UHT granulites of the Rauer Group experienced a complex, multi-stage tectonothermal history, which cannot simply be explained via a single Pan-African (~500 Ma) high-grade tectonic event. This is critical in understanding the role of the eastern Prydz Bay region during the assembly of the east Gondwana supercontinent, and the newly recognized inherited Archaean ages (~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga) suggest a close tectonic relationship between the Rauer Group and the adjacent Archaean of the Vestfold Hills

  12. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense group 1 is distinguished by a unique amino acid substitution in the HpHb receptor implicated in human serum resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Symula

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (Tbr and T. b. gambiense (Tbg, causative agents of Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness in Africa, have evolved alternative mechanisms of resisting the activity of trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs, components of innate immunity in human serum that protect against infection by other African trypanosomes. In Tbr, lytic activity is suppressed by the Tbr-specific serum-resistance associated (SRA protein. The mechanism in Tbg is less well understood but has been hypothesized to involve altered activity and expression of haptoglobin haemoglobin receptor (HpHbR. HpHbR has been shown to facilitate internalization of TLF-1 in T.b. brucei (Tbb, a member of the T. brucei species complex that is susceptible to human serum. By evaluating the genetic variability of HpHbR in a comprehensive geographical and taxonomic context, we show that a single substitution that replaces leucine with serine at position 210 is conserved in the most widespread form of Tbg (Tbg group 1 and not found in related taxa, which are either human serum susceptible (Tbb or known to resist lysis via an alternative mechanism (Tbr and Tbg group 2. We hypothesize that this single substitution contributes to reduced uptake of TLF and thus may play a key role in conferring serum resistance to Tbg group 1. In contrast, similarity in HpHbR sequence among isolates of Tbg group 2 and Tbb/Tbr provides further evidence that human serum resistance in Tbg group 2 is likely independent of HpHbR function.

  13. A Comparison of the Teaching Strategies of Maurice Martenot and Edgar Willems: Conclusions and Implications for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frega, Ana Lucia

    1996-01-01

    Compares the music-teaching methods of Maurice Martenot and Edgar Willems, used widely in Spain and Portugal, by applying a revised comparative model to both methods. Concludes that both methods have solid values relating to the development of aural perception. Suggests areas for further research. (DSK)

  14. Reading and Study Behavior: A Review of the Behavioral Literature with Conclusions and Implications for Developmental Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Ronald V.; Brozo, William G.

    To ascertain the relevancy of behavioral psychology to those who are engaged in developmental work with college and adult students, this paper reviews articles found in several journals concerned with that discipline. The articles reviewed were chosen as representative of those pertaining to achieving academic success and are organized into five…

  15. Business Entity Selection: Why It Matters to Healthcare Practitioners. Part III--Nonprofits, Ethics, Practice Implications, and Conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithman, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The Bureau of Labor statistics indicates only a 50% four-year survivability rate among businesses classified as "education and health services." Gaining knowledge of IRS business entities can result in cost savings, operational efficiency, reduced liability, and enhanced sustainability. Each entity has unique disadvantages, depending on size, diversity of ownership, desire to expand, and profitability. Business structures should be compatible with organizational mission or vision statements, services and products, and professional codes of ethics. Healthcare reform will require greater business acumen. We have an ethical duty to disseminate and acquire the knowledge to properly establish and manage healthcare practices to ensure sustainable services that protect and serve the community.

  16. U-Pb dating of zircon from the bed parallel anatectic granitic intrusion in the Baoban group in Hainan Island and the tectonic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Shijiang; HU; Jianmin; SONG; Biao; CHEN; Mulun; XIE

    2005-01-01

    The petrological and geochemical features of the bed parallel granitic intrusion in the Pre-Cambrian Baoban group in Hainan Island attest to the anatexis origin of the granites. U-Pb dating analyses of zircons from the anatectic granite and the biotite two-feldspar gneiss in the Baoban group, using SHRIMP II in the Beijing Ion-probe Center, acquire 206Pb/238U ages of 368±3.5 Ma (of granite, 95% confidence level, MSDW=1.23) and 362.9±6.1 Ma (of gneiss, 95% confidence level, MSDW = 2.04) respectively. The two late Devonian ages indicate consistently a tectonic- thermal event experienced in Hainan Island, and are the first discovered record of the Devonian geological process in the district. This event possibly resulted from the deep thermal-dynamic process when the Gondwana continent began to break up in the Devonian period.

  17. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb Zircon Geochronology of Basic Dikes within Maxianshan Rock Group in the Central Qilian Orogenic Belt and Its Tectonic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shiping; Wang Hongliang; Chen Junlu; Xu Xueyi; Zhang Hongfei; Ren Guangming; Yu Jiyuan

    2007-01-01

    A large number of basic dikes, which indicate an important tectonic-magmatic event in the eastern part of the Central Qilian (祁连) orogenic belt, were found from Maxianshan (马衔山) rock group, Yongjing (永靖) county, Gansu (甘肃) Province, China. According to the research on the characteristics of geology and petrology, the basic dike swarms, widely intruded in Maxianshan rock group,are divided into two phases by the authors. U-Pb isotope of zircons from the basic dikes above two phases is separately determined by LA-ICP-MS in the Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics of Northwest University, China and the causes of formation of the zircons are studied using CL images.The formation age of the earlier phase of metagabbro dikes is (441.1±1.4) Ma (corresponding to the early stage of Early Silurian), and the age of the main metamorphic period is (414.3±1.2) Ma (corresponding to the early stage of Early Devonian). The formation age of the later phase of diabase dike swarms is (434±1.0) Ma (corresponding to the late stage of Early Silurian). The cap- tured-zircons from diabase dike swarms saved some information of material interfusion by Maxianshan rock group (207pb/206Pb apparent ages are (2325±3)-(2573±6) Ma), and some zircons from diabase dike swarms also saved impacted information by tectonic thermal event during the late period of Caledonian movement (206pb/238U apparent ages are (400±2)-(429±2) Ma). By combining the results of the related studies, the basic dikes within Maxianshan rock group were considered to be formed in the transfer period, from subductional orogeny towards collisional orogeny, which represents geological records of NW-SE extension during regional NE-SW towards intense compression in the Central Qilian block.

  18. Within-trait heterogeneity in age group differences in personality domains and facets: implications for the development and coherence of personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, René; Realo, Anu; Allik, Jüri; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Johnson, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated differences in the Five-Factor Model (FFM) domains and facets across adulthood. The main questions were whether personality scales reflected coherent units of trait development and thereby coherent personality traits more generally. These questions were addressed by testing if the components of the trait scales (items for facet scales and facets for domain scales) showed consistent age group differences. For this, measurement invariance (MI) framework was used. In a sample of 2,711 Estonians who had completed the NEO Personality Inventory 3 (NEO PI-3), more than half of the facet scales and one domain scale did not meet the criterion for weak MI (factor loading equality) across 12 age groups spanning ages from 18 to 91 years. Furthermore, none of the facet and domain scales met the criterion for strong MI (intercept equality), suggesting that items of the same facets and facets of the same domains varied in age group differences. When items were residualized for their respective facets, 46% of them had significant (p facets were residualized for their domain scores, a majority had significant (p facets as embodied in the NEO PI-3 do not reflect aetiologically coherent traits.

  19. Evidence for spreading in the lower Kam Group of the Yellowknife greenstone belt: Implications for Archaean basin evolution in the Slave Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstaedt, H.; Padgham, W. A.

    The Yellowknife greenstone belt is the western margin of an Archean turbidite-filled basin bordered on the east by the Cameron River and Beaulieu River volcanic belts (Henderson, 1981; Lambert, 1982). This model implies that rifting was entirely ensialic and did not proceed beyond the graben stage. Volcanism is assumed to have been restricted to the boundary faults, and the basin was floored by a downfaulted granitic basement. On the other hand, the enormous thickness of submarine volcanic rocks and the presence of a spreading complex at the base of the Kam Group suggest that volcanic rocks were much more widespread than indicated by their present distribution. Rather than resembling volcanic sequences in intracratonic graben structures, the Kam Group and its tectonic setting within the Yellowknife greenstone belt have greater affinities to the Rocas Verdes of southern Chile, Mesozoic ophiolites, that were formed in an arc-related marginal basin setting. The similarities of these ophiolites with some Archean volcanic sequences was previously recognized, and served as basis for their marginal-basin model of greenstone belts. The discovery of a multiple and sheeted dike complex in the Kam Group confirms that features typical of Phanerozoic ophiolites are indeed preserved in some greenstone belts and provides further field evidence in support of such a model.

  20. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  1. Training implications of maximal forces on a computer-controlled and motor-driven leg press by age group, sex, footplate direction, and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Brian W.; Hart-Hughes, Stephanie; Gordon, Mark T.; Bulat, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Strength training that overloads lengthening muscle fibers may result in greater strength gains with less effort and perceived exertion than conventional training modalities. This study evaluates a device capable of this overloading (a motor-driven and computer-controlled leg press) to develop recommendations for future training interventions. Unimpaired younger and older men and women (7/group, total n=28) performed three maximal-effort trials for both directions of footplate motion (IN and OUT) at three speed profiles (knee rotation speeds of 15, 25, and 35°/s) on a motor-driven and computer-controlled leg press. Normalized forces were tested for effects of age group, sex, direction of footplate motion, and knee rotation speed. Peak forces were 57% greater for younger and 20% greater for IN. Trends of greater IN relative to OUT forces (IN overloading) were present in women, but this was due to an inverse correlation between strength and IN overloading that was independent of age group and sex. Leg press strength training on a device that is capable of overloading lengthening muscle fibers is a promising new training method that appears to have the greatest potential benefits for the weakest participants. Training target profiles on the device tested and others similar to it should be set based on participant-specific maximums across the ROM in both IN and OUT directions at a speed in the middle of the range to be trained. PMID:22289381

  2. Mean annual temperatures of mid-latitude regions derived from δ(2)H values of wood lignin methoxyl groups and its implications for paleoclimate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhäuser, Tobias; Greule, Markus; Polag, Daniela; Bowen, Gabriel J; Keppler, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Tree-rings are widely used climate archives providing annual resolutions on centennial to millennial timescales. Stable isotope ratios of tree-rings have been applied to assist with the delineation of climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation. Here, we investigated stable hydrogen isotope ratios (expressed as δ(2)H values) of lignin methoxyl groups of wood from various tree species collected along a ~3500km north-south transect across Europe with mean annual temperatures (MAT) ranging from -4 to +17°C. We found a strong linear relationship between MATs and δ(2)H values of wood lignin methoxyl groups. We used this relationship to predict MATs from randomly collected wood samples and found general agreement between predicted and observed MATs for the mid-latitudes on a global scale. Our results are discussed in context of their paleoclimate relevance and suggest that δ(2)H values of lignin methoxyl groups might have the potential to reconstruct MATs when applied on mid-latitudinal tree-ring chronologies of the Late Holocene.

  3. The virucidal effect of platelet concentrates: preliminary study and first conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, A; Marchand-Arvier, M; Edert, D; Le Faou, A; Gondrexon, G; Vigneron, C

    2002-06-01

    Despite the increased safety of blood components, achieved through improved donor selection and testing, transfusion recipients remain at risk of transfusion-associated diseases. Transfusion of cellular blood components has been implicated in transmission of viral, bacterial and protozoan diseases. Investigators have studied a myriad of processes for pathogen depletion and/or inactivation. No successful treatments, apart the leukodepletion, have already been identified for red cells and platelets. And more, several evidences indicate that platelets play a key role in host defence against infection. High levels of pathogens were added to single-donor platelet concentrates (PC) containing 3 to 5 10(11) platelets in 300 ml. The infectivity of each pathogen was measured with established biologic assays. The following levels of pathogen inactivation were achieved : >10(2.63) plaque-forming units (PFU) per ml of adenovirus 5 (ADV5), >10(5.6) PFU per ml of Poliovirus 1 (P1) and >10(4.1) PFU per ml of vaccinia virus (VaV). In conclusion, the PC show a potential virucidal effect. This inactivation process has been found with bacteria and still remains unknown for viruses.

  4. Correspondences between theory of mind, jumping to conclusions, neuropsychological measures and the symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Todd S; Mizrahi, Romina; Menon, Mahesh; Christensen, Bruce K

    2009-12-30

    Tasks measuring reasoning biases and social cognition were originally applied to the study of schizophrenia in order to shed light on the cognitive underpinnings of positive symptoms. However, the empirical evidence for overlap between these tasks, and their association with positive symptoms, remains preliminary. In the current study we explore these associations using multivariate methodology, with primary interest in two commonly studied paradigms: jumping to conclusions (JTC) and theory of mind (ToM). We also included measures of memory, executive function and fluency performance, in order to relate the cognitive constructs to more traditional neuropsychological constructs. Forty-six schizophrenia inpatients were administered JTC, ToM, verbal fluency, executive functioning, and verbal memory tasks. A principal component analysis resulted in three components interpreted as Memory, Elaboration and Flexibility. ToM loaded with verbal fluency on the Elaboration component, whereas JTC loaded with executive functioning on the Flexibility component. The negative susbscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) correlated with the Elaboration component, but no other component-subscale correlations reached significance. Implications of these results are that impairments in elaboration may underlie the commonly observed correlation between ToM and negative symptoms, but argue against a common neurocognitive system for JTC, ToM and positive symptoms.

  5. The thrust contact between the Canastra and Vazante groups in the Southern Brasília Belt: structural evolution, white mica crystallinity and implications for the Brasiliano orogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela de Oliveira Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Two regional thrust-sheets of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks occur in the Southern Brasília Belt, northwest Minas Gerais. The lower one comprises the Vazante Group, that is formed in the studied area, from base to top, by the Serra do Garrote (metapelites interlayered with carbonaceous phyllite, Serra do Poço Verde (beige to pink stromatolitic metadolomite with interlayered greenish slates, Morro do Calcário (gray stromatolitic metadolomite interlayered with gray slates and Serra da Lapa (phyllite with dolarenitic lenses interlayered with slates formations. The upper thrust sheet consists of the Canastra Group (Paracatu formation: laminated sericite phyllites and carbonaceous phyllites interlayered with quartzite. The Braziliano orogeny resulted in four phases of contractional deformation, associated with low-grade metamorphism. The first two (D1 and D2 are ductile, while the third and fourth ones (D3 and D4 are brittle-ductile. D1 developed a slaty S1 cleavage subparallel to the primary layering, with shallow to steep dips to NW. D2 developed a crenulation cleavage (S2 that dips moderately to NW and is associated with tight to isoclinal folds. D3 and D4 phases developed crenulations and open folds and kink bands. S3 dips steeply to NW, while S4 has moderate to steep dips to NE and SW. White mica crystallinity (Kübler index measurements in metapelites indicate that both the Canastra and Vazante groups reached anchizone/epizone conditions, and metamorphic discontinuities along thrusts indicate that the peak of metamorphism is pre or syn-thrusting.

  6. 领导风格分类对于团体辅导的启示%Implications of Different Leadership Styles for Group Counseling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞悦; 古苑诗; 黄柔颖; 黄筑舲

    2014-01-01

    Leadership style is the explicit behavior, intention or feeling that the group members are aware of after a group leader presents himself. This article tries to arrange and describe different leadership styles and their potential relevance, relfecting the exist leadership style in a more speciifc and perfect way. In order to offer the reference about the practice of group counseling for the novice counselors, it also attempts to arrange and describe, in the axial of “warm/amiable-maintain boundaries/keep distance” and “actively/guide-respond/reaction”, the difference in the efifciency of different types of leadership style through two facets as relationship and work.%领导风格即在领导者呈现后能被成员所觉知到的外显行为、意图或感受。本文试图通过对不同类型的领导风格及其相关影响进行整理和描述,从而更具体与完整地反映出现有的领导风格类型,期待能以“关系”和“工作”两个面向作为分类的依据,在“温暖/亲和-保有界限/距离”以及“积极/引导-回应/反映”这两个轴面上整理描绘出不同类型领导风格的效能差异,作为未来新手咨询师在团体辅导实务上的参考。

  7. Provenance analysis of the Guaritas Group (RS conglomeratic sandstones: implications for the paleoclimate and paleogeography of the Eocambrian Central Camaquã sub-basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Romalino Santos Fragoso-Cesar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Camaquã Supergroup, located in the central-south region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, constitutes a rift-type post-orogenicsedimentary basin, whose deposition occurred in a continental environment between the Ediacaran and the Eocambrian.The upper succession of the Camaquã Supergroup is represented by the Guaritas Group, a unit formed by fluvial, eolian andalluvial fan deposits that keeps important records of the sedimentation right after the end of the neoproterozoic orogenesis thatgave rise to the Gondwana supercontinent. The objective of the present work was to apply sedimentary provenance analysis inconglomeratic arenites and conglomerates of the Guaritas Group, in order to explore the climatic and tectonic evolution historyof this unit. Based on the pebble compositional data, two main source areas were recognized for the deposits of this unit,a more distal one located to the north, related with a trunk river system parallel to the basin main axis, and a more proximalone located to the east, related to transversal fluvial systems and alluvial fans at the border of the basin. The comparison of theprovenance data with previous studies on facies and paleocurrents suggests that, during the entire evolution of the east borderof the basin, there was a same transversal fluvial system, whose catchment area suffered significative reductions due to thereactivation of the east border fault during the deposition of the Varzinha and Pedra Pintada Formations. The Serra do ApertadoFormation, the upper unit of Guaritas Group, shows a high correlation between the variation of quartzose and non quartzosepebbles composition, and it was attributed to a variation between more humid and more arid climatic conditions.

  8. High frequency peritidal cycles of the upper Araras Group: Implications for disappearance of the neoproterozoic carbonate platform in southern Amazon Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitzki, Isaac Daniel; Romero, Guilherme Raffaeli; Hidalgo, Renata; Nogueira, Afonso Cesar Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The Araras Group is an extensive carbonate platform developed at the southeastern margin of the Amazon Craton during the Neoproterozoic. The Nobres Formation corresponds to the upper unit of the Neoproterozoic Araras Group. It is exposed in road cuts and quarries in the Northern Paraguay Belt, and is characterized by meter-scale shallowing upward cycles. Forty-four fourth-to fifth-order parasequence cycles are enclosed into three third order sequences/megacycles, unconformably overlain by siliciclastic deposits of the Alto Paraguay Group. The cycles are generally of peritidal type, limited by exposure surfaces composed of asymmetrical tidal flat/sabkha lithofacies in the basal Nobres Formation. They consist of fine dolostone, intraclastic dolostones with megaripples, stromatolites biostrome, sandy dolostone with enterolithic structures and silicified evaporite molds. Upsection, the cycles progressively become symmetrical, comprising arid tidal flat deposits with abundant stromatolite biostrome, fine-grained sandstone and rare evaporitic molds. The stacking patterns for hundreds of meters indicate continuous and recurrent generation of accommodation space, probably triggered by subsidence concomitant with relative sea-level changes. Palynomorphs found in the upper part of Nobres Formation comprehend spheroidal forms, such as Leiospharidia, rare filamentous and acanthomorphous acritarchs, mostly Tanarium correlated to the Ediacaran Complex Acantomorph Palynoflora of ˜580-570 Ma. Previous data of carbon isotopes and paleogeographic reconstructions, and also the presence of evaporites and storm-influenced deposits in the Araras Group, suggest a wet to tropical setting for Amazonia during the Mid-Ediacaran, which is incompatible with previous claims for Gaskiers-related glacial sedimentation in the region. During the final stages of evolution of the Araras carbonate platform, a progressive input of terrigenous has occurred in the peritidal setting likely due tectonic

  9. Integrated seismic analysis of the Chalk Group in eastern Denmark—Implications for estimates of maximum palaeo-burial in southwest Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Hansen, Thomas Mejer;

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the topography of southwest Scandinavia is subject to discussion. Analysis of borehole seismic velocity has formed the basis for interpretation of several hundred metres of Neogene uplift in parts of Denmark.Here, refraction seismic data constrain a 7.5km long P-wave velocity model...... Group. The sonic velocities are consistent with the overall seismic layering, although they show additional fine-scale layering. Integration of gamma and sonic log with porosity data shows that seismic velocity is sensitive to clay content. In intervals near boundaries of the refraction model, moderate...

  10. Low-molecular-weight heparin biosimilars: potential implications for clinical practice. Australian Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin Biosimilar Working Group (ALBW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandurkar, H; Chong, B; Salem, H; Gallus, A; Ferro, V; McKinnon, R

    2014-05-01

    A working group of clinicians and scientists was formed to review the clinical considerations for use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) biosimilars. LMWH are biological molecules of significant complexity; the full complexity of chemical structure is still to be elucidated. LMWH biosimilars are products that are biologically similar to their reference product and rely on clinical data from a reference product to establish safety and efficacy. The complex nature of LMWH molecules means that it is uncertain whether a LMWH biosimilar is chemically identical to its reference product; this introduces the possibility of differences in activity and immunogenicity. The challenge for regulators and clinicians is to evaluate the level of evidence required to demonstrate that a LMWH is sufficiently similar to the reference product. The consensus opinion of the working group is that prior to clinical use a LMWH biosimilar should have proven efficacy and safety, similar to the reference product with prospective studies, which should be confirmed with a proactive post-marketing pharmacovigilance programme.

  11. Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the WHO: conclusions and recommendations of eighth biannual meeting (September 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    The Malaria Policy Advisory Committee (MPAC) to the World Health Organization held its eighth meeting in Geneva, Switzerland from 16 to 18 September 2015. This article provides a summary of the discussions, conclusions and meeting recommendations. Meeting sessions included: recommendations from the Evidence Review Group (ERG) on mass drug administration; recommendations from the ERG on malaria in pregnancy; recommendations on when to scale back vector control; feedback on the Plasmodium vivax technical brief and the recommendation for G6PD testing before treatment; updates on artemisinin and artemisinin-based combination therapy resistance and the Greater Mekong Subregion elimination strategy; an update from the working group on malaria terminology; and updates on malaria elimination in the World Health Organization European region, the ERG on malaria elimination, and World Health Organization reform to support innovation, efficiency and quality in vector control tools. Policy statements, position statements, and guidelines that arise from the MPAC meeting conclusions and recommendations will be issued formally and disseminated to World Health Organization Member States by the World Health Organization Global Malaria Programme.

  12. Platinum-group Elements Geochemistry of the Yangliuping Magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE Sulfide Deposit:Implications of Its Genetic Link with the Extrusive Basalts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jianbin; CAO Zhimin; SONG Xieyan; AN Wei; LIU Ji

    2004-01-01

    Primitive mantle-normalized Platinum-group elements (PGE) concentration patterns for the Zhengziyanwo intrusion and Dashibao Formation basalts are of positive slope, similar to most of the world-class magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits. Characters of this intrusion and its related ores and Dashibao Formation basalts are their negative Pt-anomaly and high concentration of Rh relative to Pt and Pd, facts being interpreted to be the results of crystallization and fractionation of Pt-alloys and spinel phase-free crystallization history for the magma, respectively. PGE parameters of the Dashibao Formation basalts are consistent with the general trend of those found for the Zhengziyanwo intrusion, and this might infer a genetic link between them.

  13. Implications for HIV/AIDS of laws affecting men who have sex with men in Romania. ACCEPT (The Bucharest Acceptance Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, M; Coman, A

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the predicament, in Romanian society, of one group that is especially vulnerable to HIV infection and AIDS: men who have sex with men. Such men are driven to secrecy, and discouraged from disclosing themselves even to obtain the help and information they need, because Romanian law prohibits homosexual overtures, denies legal recognition to gay and lesbian organisations, often imposes strong disincentives in the way of those seeking diagnostic tests for HIV or for venereal disease, and still penalizes same sex relations themselves in many circumstances. Social and administrative circumstances in Romania have also aggravated such men's vulnerability. Drawing especially on the United Nations' International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights, the authors offer several recommendations for reform.

  14. Geochemistry and oxygen isotope composition of main-group pallasites and olivine-rich clasts in mesosiderites: Implications for the "Great Dunite Shortage" and HED-mesosiderite connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Richard C.; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Scott, Edward R. D.; Haack, Henning; Buchanan, Paul C.; Franchi, Ian A.; Yamaguchi, Akira; Johnson, Diane; Bevan, Alex W. R.; Burbine, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from iron meteorites indicates that a large number of differentiated planetesimals formed early in Solar System history. These bodies should have had well-developed olivine-rich mantles and consequentially such materials ought to be abundant both as asteroids and meteorites, which they are not. To investigate this "Great Dunite Shortage" we have undertaken a geochemical and oxygen isotope study of main-group pallasites and dunitic rocks from mesosiderites. Oxygen isotope analysis of 24 main-group pallasites (103 replicates) yielded a mean Δ17O value of -0.187 ± 0.016‰ (2σ), which is fully resolved from the HED Δ17O value of -0.246 ± 0.014 (2σ) obtained in our earlier study and demonstrates that both groups represent distinct populations and were derived from separate parent bodies. Our results show no evidence for Δ17O bimodality within the main-group pallasites, as suggested by a number of previous studies. Olivine-rich materials from the Vaca Muerta, Mount Padbury and Lamont mesosiderites, and from two related dunites (NWA 2968 and NWA 3329), have Δ17O values within error of the mesosiderite average. This indicates that these olivine-rich materials are co-genetic with other mesosiderite clasts and are not fragments from an isotopically distinct pallasite-like impactor. Despite its extreme lithologic diversity the mesosiderite parent body was essentially homogeneous with respect to Δ17O, a feature best explained by an early phase of large-scale melting (magma ocean), followed by prolonged igneous differentiation. Based on the results of magma ocean modeling studies, we infer that Mg-rich olivines in mesosiderites formed as cumulates in high-level chambers and do not represent samples of the underlying mantle. By analogy, recently documented Mg-rich olivines in howardites may have a similar origin. Although the Dawn mission did not detect mesosiderite-like material on Vesta, evidence linking the mesosiderites and HEDs includes: (i) their nearly

  15. Chemical Abundances and Kinematics in Globular Clusters and Local Group Dwarf Galaxies and Their Implications for Formation Theories of the Galactic Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Doug; Smith, Verne V; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I

    2007-01-01

    We review Galactic halo formation theories and supporting evidence, in particular kinematics and detailed chemical abundances of stars in some relevant globular clusters as well as Local Group dwarf galaxies. Outer halo red HB clusters tend to have large eccentricities and inhabit the area populated by dwarf spheroidal stars, favoring an extraGalactic origin. Old globulars show the full range of eccentricities, while younger ones seem to have preferentially high eccentricities, again hinting at their extraGalactic origin. We compare detailed abundances of a variety of elements between the halo and all dwarf galaxies studied to date, including both dwarf spheroidals and irregulars. The salient feature is that halo abundances are essentially unique. In particular, the general alpha vs. [Fe/H] pattern of 12 of the 13 galaxies studied are similar to each other and very different from the Milky Way. Sagittarius appears to be the only possible exception. It appears very unlikely that a significant fraction of the m...

  16. Detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data from the Liuling Group in the South Qinling belt: Provenance and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiao-ying; Wang, Ya-wei; Liu, Liang; Wang, Chao; Santosh, M.

    2017-02-01

    The Liuling Group is exposed in the Northern part of the South Qinling orogenic belt. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb analysis of detrital zircons from the meta-sandstones in this Group yields ages ranging between 400 Ma and 3200 Ma, with three prominent age clusters at 500-400 Ma, 850-700 Ma and 1000-900 Ma. A few older zircon populations with U-Pb ages of 1750-1450 Ma, 2000 Ma and 2600-2400 Ma are also present. Age data integrated with cathodoluminescence, trace element data and εHf(t) values of zircon grains show that the Liuling sediments have a complex source. Source rocks mainly include Early Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic granitoids, together with minor ultra-high pressure/high pressure (HP-UHP) metamorphic rocks, and paragneiss in the North Qinling belt, and Middle-Late Neoproterozoic magmatic rocks in the South Qinling belt. The dominant population of detrital zircon grains with ages between 500 Ma and 400 Ma show the characteristics of both magmatic and metamorphic zircons. They show three age clusters at 497 Ma, 451 Ma, and ca. 420 Ma and show marked correlation with the three stages of Palaeozoic magmatism, as well as with the peak and retrograde HP-UHP metamorphic stages in the North Qinling belt. This correlation demonstrates that these Early Palaeozoic granitoids and HP-UHP metamorphic rocks in the North Qinling belt were already exhumed to the surface, underwent erosion prior to Middle Devonian time and were then deposited in an extensional basin. Based on the results from detrital zircon U-Pb dating, combined with geochemical data and the regional geology, the deposition of Liuling sediments is inferred to have occurred in a post-orogenic extensional basin, rather than a subduction-related fore-arc basin or a foreland basin formed during or after continental collision.

  17. Minimal variation in anti-A and -B titers among healthy volunteers over time: Implications for the use of out-of-group blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprogøe, Ulrik; Yazer, Mark H; Rasmussen, Mads Hvidkjær; Antonsen, Berit; Bistrup, Claus; Assing, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    Using potentially out-of-group blood components, like low titer A plasma and O whole blood, in the resuscitation of trauma patients is becoming increasingly popular. However, very little is known whether the donors' anti-A and/or anti-B titers change over time and whether repeated titer measurements on the same donor are required to ensure that each donation produces a low titer product. The anti-A and/or anti-B titers were measured on 56 healthy adult volunteers (47 blood donors; nine blood center personnel) every 3 months for 12 consecutive months using an automated solid phase analyzer. The results were expressed as log2 titer steps (e.g., titer 32 = 5 titer steps). Minor variations in the average anti-A and/or anti-B titers were seen over time; the maximum individual SD in each group was 1.50 (IgG anti-A) or 1.00 (IgM anti-A, IgM, and IgG anti-B). When the SDs for the four titer measurements from all 56 volunteers were combined as appropriate, the highest overall combined SD was 0.47 titer steps for IgG anti-A. This value corresponds to a 95% confidence interval for intraindividual variation in this antibody's titer over 12 months of 0.96 titer steps. Thus, based on one measurement, an IgG anti-A with a titer step of, for example, 6 would be expected to be in the range of titer step 5 to titer step 7 over the course of 1 year with 95% probability. The titers of anti-A and/or anti-B among healthy adults are stable over at least 1 year. This suggests that repeated titer measurements within a year on the same donor are not necessary if donations are made at 3 months or longer intervals. Diagnostic study, level V.

  18. Geochemistry of fine-grained sediments of the upper Cretaceous to Paleogene Gosau Group (Austria, Slovakia: Implications for paleoenvironmental and provenance studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Hofer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bulk rock geochemistry of 169 fine-grained sediment samples of the upper Cretaceous to Paleogene Gosau Group (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria and Slovakia from borehole and outcrop localities was performed to separate non-marine and marine deposits. Geochemical characteristics of different Gosau depositional systems, basins and sediment provenance using major-, trace-, and rare earth elements were also investigated. Geochemical proxies such as boron concentrations were tested for seeking the possibilities of paleosalinity indicators. Due to the fact that several pelagic sections are represented by extremely low boron contents, B/Al* ratios are recognized as more robust and differentiate reliably between marine (mean: 160 ± 34 and non-marine (mean: 133 ± 33 samples. Using statistical factor analysis, hemipelagic to pelagic samples from the Gießhübl Syncline and Slovakian equivalents can be differentiated from marginal-marine to non-marine samples from the Grünbach and Glinzendorf Syncline related to terrigenous (SiO2, Al2O3, K2O, Th, Rb, Zr and others and pelagic indicative elements (CaO, Sr, TOT/C and B/Al*. A clear indication for ophiolitic provenance is traced by high amounts of chromium and nickel. Only non-marine successions of the Glinzendorf Syncline show higher Cr and Ni concentrations (up to 250 and 400 ppm, respectively and enriched Cr/V and Y/Ni ratios trending to an ultramafic source.

  19. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants.

  20. The petrochemistry of the auriferous, volcanosedimentary Riacho dos Machados Group, Central-eastern Brazil: geotectonic implications for shear-hosted gold mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, E.; Lobato, L. M.; Baars, F. J.

    1997-12-01

    The Ouro Fino Gold Deposit at the Riacho dos Machados Mine is located in the Araçuaí Fold Belt at the eastern margin of the São Francisco Craton. The gold is shear zone-hosted and associated principally with a sulphide-bearing, quartzmuscovite schist, derived from the hydrothermal alteration of pelitic and quartzofeldspathic schists of the Riacho dos Machados Group (RMG). Along the shear zones, mineral associations typical of the amphibolite facies are progressively altered to assemblages typical of the greenschist facies. It has become evident from the studies that the process of segregation and concentration of chemical elements and minerals is the very process of mineralization, involving the concentration of Au. The RMG comprises ultramafic, mafic and acid metavolcanic rocks intercalated in a sequence of metapelites. The metapelites have textures and geochemistry compatible with greywackes. The dacitic and mafic/ultramafic rocks are of calc-alkaline and tholeiitic subalkaline association, respectively. The RMG probably formed within a continental volcanic arc. The thrust faults that establish the regional architecture, and which host the Riacho dos Machados gold mineralization, are related to a continental collision of unknown age between the precursor to the São Francisco Craton and the Guanambi-Correntina Block.

  1. Standard care quality determines treatment outcomes in control groups of HAART-adherence intervention studies: implications for the interpretation and comparison of intervention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marijn; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Hospers, Harm J; Schaalma, Herman P; Kok, Gerjo

    2009-11-01

    Clinical trials of behavioral interventions seek to enhance evidence-based health care. However, in case the quality of standard care provided to control conditions varies between studies and affects outcomes, intervention effects cannot be directly interpreted or compared. The objective of the present study was to examine whether standard care quality (SCQ) could be reliably assessed, varies between studies of highly active antiretroviral HIV-adherence interventions, and is related to the proportion of patients achieving an undetectable viral load ("success rate"). Databases were searched for relevant articles. Authors of selected studies retrospectively completed a checklist with standard care activities, which were coded to compute SCQ scores. The relationship between SCQ and the success rates was examined using meta-regression. Cronbach's alpha, variability in SCQ, and relation between SCQ and success rate. Reliability of the SCQ instrument was high (Cronbach's alpha = .91). SCQ scores ranged from 3.7 to 27.8 (total range = 0-30) and were highly predictive of success rate (p = .002). Variation in SCQ provided to control groups may substantially influence effect sizes of behavior change interventions. Future trials should therefore assess and report SCQ, and meta-analyses should control for variability in SCQ, thereby producing more accurate estimates of the effectiveness of behavior change interventions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Potomacapnos apeleutheron gen. et sp. nov., a new Early Cretaceous angiosperm from the Potomac Group and its implications for the evolution of eudicot leaf architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Nathan A; Hickey, Leo J

    2013-12-01

    Eudicots diverged early in the evolution of flowering plants and now comprise more than 70% of angiosperm species. In spite of the importance of eudicots, our understanding of the early evolution of this clade is limited by a poor fossil record and uncertainty about the order of early phylogenetic branching. The study of Lower Cretaceous fossils can reveal much about the evolution, morphology, and ecology of the eudicots. Fossils described here were collected from Aptian sediments of the Potomac Group exposed at the Dutch Gap locality in Virginia, USA. Specimens were prepared by degaging, then described and compared with leaves of relevant extant and fossil plants. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters using parsimony while constraining the tree search with the topology found through molecular phylogenetic analyses. The new species is closely related to ranunculalean eudicots and has leaf architecture remarkably similar to some living Fumarioideae (Papaveraceae). These are the oldest eudicot megafossils from North America, and they show complex leaf architecture reflecting developmental pathways unique to extant eudicots. The morphology and small size of the fossils suggest that they were herbaceous plants, as is seen in other putative early eudicots. The absence of co-occurring tricolpate pollen at Dutch Gap either (1) reflects low preservation probability for pollen of entomophilous herbs or (2) indicates that some leaf features of extant eudicots appeared before the origin of tricolpate pollen.

  3. The pH-dependent release of platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel fuel catalysts: Implication for weathering in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchá, Veronika; Mihaljevič, Martin; Ettler, Vojtěch; Strnad, Ladislav

    2016-04-15

    Powdered samples of new and old gasoline catalysts (Pt, Pd, Rh) and new and old diesel (Pt) catalysts were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH 2-9) coupled with thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC-3 to verify the release and mobility of PGEs (platinum group elements). PGEs were released under acidic conditions, mostly exhibiting L-shaped leaching patterns: diesel old: 5.47, 0.005, 0.02; diesel new: 68.5, 0.23, 0.11; gasoline old: 0.1, 11.8, 4.79; gasoline new 2.6, 25.2, 35.9 in mg kg(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. Only the new diesel catalyst had a strikingly different leaching pattern with elevated concentrations at pH 4, probably influenced by the dissolution of the catalyst carrier and washcoat. The pH-static experiment coupled with thermodynamic modeling was found to be an effective instrument for understanding the leaching behavior of PGEs under various environmental conditions, and indicated that charged Pt and Rh species may be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of kaolinite or Mn oxides in the soil system, whereas uncharged Pd and Rh species may remain mobile in soil solutions.

  4. Character, relative age and implications of fractures and other mesoscopic structures associated with detachment folds: an example from the Lisburne Group of the Northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, C.L. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.; Wallace, W.K.; Atkinson, P.K.; Brinton, J. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.; Bui, T.; Jensen, J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering; Lorenz, J. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration can benefit enormously from a proper knowledge of the history and unique character of a fold-and-thrust belt. The study of fractures and other mesoscopic structures can help explain folding mechanisms. The northeastern Brooks Range of Alaska represents a fairly simple fold-and-thrust belt in which the history of fracture development can be studied. Deformed Lisburne Group carbonates preserve the character and sequence of fractures and suggest a variety of mechanisms for fracture formation before, during, and after folding. The earliest fractures were probably formed in the foreland basin and later incorporated into the thrust belt, then thrusted and folded. Later, carbonates that were previously lying flat were incorporated into the fold-and-thrust belt where they were deformed mainly by a detachment fold, as a result of flexural slip and homogeneous flattening. Early fractures such as these were commonly overprinted or destroyed by ductile strain as later homogeneous flattening allowed additional shortening. These were in turn overprinted by late extension fractures that formed during flexural slip in the last phases of folding or after folding due to unroofing of the orogenic wedge. This study thus highlights how multiple generations of mesoscopic structures may be related to the kinematics of a specific fold-and-thrust belt. 45 refs., 1 tab., 16 figs.

  5. Paleogeographic and tectonic implications of the first paleomagnetic results from the Middle Late Cambrian Mesón Group: NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Cecilia M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Astini, Ricardo A.

    2008-02-01

    The first paleomagnetic data from autochthonous Cambrian rocks in NW Argentina is reported to constrain the apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Gondwana during the Early Paleozoic. The paleomagnetic pole (Lat 4.5°S; Long 359.0°E; dp = 5.5; dm = 8.8; n = 26) was obtained from the red to purple sandstones of the Campanario Formation. These rocks present a characteristic remanence carried by fine-grained hematite. The pole indicates that during the Late Cambrian, rocks now exposed in the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina were deposited at relatively low latitudes (≈26°S), consistent with intense chemical alteration during wet and warm climates, as indicated from petrography of apparent first-cycle quarzites of the Mesón Group. However, the pole position is anomalous with respect to the most accepted apparent polar wander paths for Gondwana, suggesting that the study area (22°50'S, 65°00'W) underwent clockwise rotation of 38° ± 8°, likely related to the Cenozoic central Andes rotation pattern characteristic of the region.

  6. Micro-structural and compositional variations of hydrothermal epidote-group minerals from a peralkaline granite, Corupá Pluton, Graciosa Province, South Brazil, and their petrological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio R.F. Vlach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidote-group minerals, together with albite, quartz, fluorite, Al-poor and Fe-rich phyllosilicates, zircon, and minor oxides and sulphides, are typical hydrothermal phases in peralkaline alkali-feldspar granites from the Corupá Pluton, Graciosa Province, South Brazil. The epidote-group minerals occur as single crystals and as aggregates filling in rock interstices and miarolitic cavities. They display complex recurrent zoning patterns with an internal zone of ferriallanite-(Ce, followed by allanite-(Ce, then epidote-ferriepidote, and an external zone with allanite-(Ce, with sharp limits, as shown in BSE and X-ray images. REE patterns show decreasing fractionation degrees of LREE over HREE from ferriallanite to epidote. The most external allanite is enriched in MREE. LA-ICP-MS data indicate that ferriallanite is enriched (>10-fold in Ti, Sr and Ga, and depleted in Mg, Rb, Th and Zr relative to the host granite. Allanite has lower Ga and Mn and higher Zr, Nb and U contents as compared to ferriallanite, while epidote is enriched in Sr, U and depleted in Pb, Zr, Hf, Ti and Ga. The formation of these minerals is related to the variable concentrations of HFSE, Ca, Al, Fe and F in fluids remaining from magmatic crystallization, in an oxidizing environment, close to the HM buffer. L-MREE were in part released by the alteration of chevkinite, their main primary repository in the host rocks.Minerais do grupo do epidoto, com albita, quartzo, fluorita, filossilicatos pobres em Al e ricos em Fe, zircão e quantidades menores de óxidos e sulfetos são fases hidrotermais típicas em álcali-feldpato granitos peralcalinos do Pluton Corupá, Província Graciosa, Sul do Brasil. Os minerais do grupo do epidoto ocorrem como cristais individuais ou agregados que preenchem interstícios e cavidades miarolíticas na rocha. Mostram zonamento complexo, recorrente, descrito por uma zona interna de ferriallanita-(Ce, seguida por allanita-(Ce, epidoto-ferriepidoto e uma

  7. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among 403 women with triple-negative breast cancer: implications for genetic screening selection criteria: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, Florentia; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Pertesi, Maroulio; Timotheadou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Glentis, Stavros; Bournakis, Evangelos; Bobos, Mattheos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Skarlos, Pantelis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Paris A; Koutras, Angelos; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fountzilas, George

    2012-07-01

    In spite the close association of the triple-negative breast cancer immunophenotype with hereditary breast cancers and the BRCA1 pathway, there is a lack of population studies that determine the frequency of BRCA1 mutations among triple-negative breast cancer patients. To address this, we have screened a large sample of 403 women diagnosed with triple-negative invasive breast cancer, independently of their age or family history, for germline BRCA1 mutations. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 20-83). The overall prevalence of triple-negative cases among the initial patient group with invasive breast cancer was 8%. BRCA1 was screened by direct DNA sequencing in all patients, including all exons where a mutation was previously found in the Greek population (exons 5, 11, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24-77% of the BRCA1 coding region), including diagnostic PCRs to detect the three Greek founder large genomic rearrangements. Sixty-five deleterious BRCA1 mutations were identified among the 403 triple-negative breast cancer patients (16%). Median age of onset for mutation carriers was 39 years. Among a total of 106 women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer (<40 years), 38 (36%) had a BRCA1 mutation, while 27% of women with triple-negative breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years (56/208) had a BRCA1 mutation. A mutation was found in 48% (50/105) of the triple-negative breast cancer patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It is noteworthy, however, that of the 65 carriers, 15 (23%) had no reported family history of related cancers. All but one of the carriers had grade III tumors (98%). These results indicate that women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer, and ideally all triple-negative breast cancer patients, are candidates for BRCA1 genetic testing even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

  8. Geochemistry of a paleosol horizon at the base of the Sausar Group, central India: Implications on atmospheric conditions at the Archean–Paleoproterozoic boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarada P. Mohanty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A paleosol horizon is described from the contact of the Sausar Group (∼2400 Ma and its basement (Tirodi Gneiss; >2500 Ma in Central India. Physical evidence of pedogenesis is marked by the development of stress corrosion cracks, soil peds, corestone weathering and nodular rocks. XRD and SEM-EDX data indicate the presence of siderite, ankerite, uraninite, chlorite, alumino-silicate minerals, ilmenite, rutile and magnetite, in addition to quartz, feldspar and mica. The chemical index of alteration, the plagioclase index of alteration, and the chemical index of weathering show an increasing trend from parent rock to the paleosol and indicate a moderate trend of weathering. The A-CN-K plot indicates loss of feldspars, enrichment in Al2O3 and formation of illite. Different major element ratios indicate baseloss through hydrolysis, clay formation, leaching of some elements, and more precipitation with good surface drainage. The paleosol is depleted in HREE in comparison to the parent rock indicating high fluid-rock interaction during weathering. The paleosol samples show flat Ce and Eu anomalies, low ΣREE, and high (La/YbN, indicative of a reducing environment of formation. Reducing condition can also be inferred from the concentration of elements such as V, Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the paleosol profile. Although enriched in Fe and Mg, the overall geochemical patterns of the paleosol indicate oxygen deficient conditions in the atmosphere and development by weathering and leaching processes associated with high precipitation and good surface drainage at the time of development of this paleosol during the Archean–Paleoproterozoic transition.

  9. Implication of TLR- but not of NOD2-signaling pathways in dendritic cell activation by group B Streptococcus serotypes III and V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Lemire

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is an important agent of life-threatening invasive infection. It has been previously shown that encapsulated type III GBS is easily internalized by dendritic cells (DCs, and that this internalization had an impact on cytokine production. The receptors underlying these processes are poorly characterized. Knowledge on the mechanisms used by type V GBS to activate DCs is minimal. In this work, we investigated the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR/MyD88 signaling pathway, the particular involvement of TLR2, and that of the intracellular sensing receptor NOD2 in the activation of DCs by types III and V GBS. The role of capsular polysaccharide (CPS, one of the most important GBS virulence factors in bacterial-DC interactions was evaluated using non-encapsulated mutants. Despite differences in the role of CPS between types III and V GBS in bacterial internalization and intracellular survival, no major differences were observed in their capacity to modulate release of cytokines by DC. For both serotypes, CPS had a minor role in this response. Production of cytokines by DCs was shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize GBS and become activated mostly through TLR signaling. Yet, GBS-infected TLR2-/- DCs only showed a partial reduction in the production of IL-6 and CXCL1 compared to control DCs. Surprisingly, CXCL10 release by type III or type V GBS-infected DCs was MyD88-independent. No differences in DC activation were observed between NOD2-/- and control DCs. These results demonstrate the involvement of various receptors and the complexity of the cytokine production pathways activated by GBS upon DC infection.

  10. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor); (LBNL)

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Geochemical constraints on komatiite volcanism from Sargur Group Nagamangala greenstone belt, western Dharwar craton, southern India: Implications for Mesoarchean mantle evolution and continental growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushipokla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present field, petrographic, major and trace element data for komatiites and komatiite basalts from Sargur Group Nagamangala greenstone belt, western Dharwar craton. Field evidences such as crude pillow structure indicate their eruption in a marine environment whilst spinifex texture reveals their komatiite nature. Petrographic data suggest that the primary mineralogy has been completely altered during post-magmatic processes associated with metamorphism corresponding to greenschist to lower amphibolite facies conditions. The studied komatiites contain serpentine, talc, tremolite, actinolite and chlorite whilst tremolite, actinolite with minor plagioclase in komatiitic basalts. Based on the published Sm-Nd whole rock isochron ages of adjoining Banasandra komatiites (northern extension of Nagamangala belt and further northwest in Nuggihalli belt and Kalyadi belt we speculate ca. 3.2–3.15 Ga for komatiite eruption in Nagamangala belt. Trace element characteristics particularly HFSE and REE patterns suggest that most of the primary geochemical characteristics are preserved with minor influence of post-magmatic alteration and/or contamination. About 1/3 of studied komatiites show Al-depletion whilst remaining komatiites and komatiite basalts are Al-undepleted. Several samples despite high MgO, (Gd/YbN ratios show low CaO/Al2O3 ratios. Such anomalous values could be related to removal of CaO from komatiites during fluid-driven hydrothermal alteration, thus lowering CaO/Al2O3 ratios. The elemental characteristics of Al-depleted komatiites such as higher (Gd/YbN (>1.0, CaO/Al2O3 (>1.0, Al2O3/TiO2 (18 together with higher HREE, Y, Zr suggest their derivation from shallower upper mantle without garnet involvement in residue. The observed chemical characteristics (CaO/Al2O3, Al2O3/TiO2, MgO, Ni, Cr, Nb, Zr, Y, Hf, and REE indicate derivation of the komatiite and komatiite basalt magmas from heterogeneous mantle (depleted to primitive mantle at

  12. Abundances of platinum group elements in native sulfur condensates from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc: Implications for PGE mineralization in porphyry deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Campbell, Ian H.; Kim, Jonguk

    2016-02-01

    Some porphyry Cu-Au deposits, which are enriched in Pd, are potentially an economic source of Pd. Magmatic volatile phases are thought to transport the platinum group elements (PGEs) from the porphyry source magma to the point of deposition. However, the compatibilities of the PGEs in magmatic volatile phases are poorly constrained. We report PGE and Re contents in native sulfur condensates and associated altered dacites from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc, in order to determine the compatibility of PGEs and Re in magmatic volatile phases, and their mobility during secondary hydrothermal alteration. The native sulfur we analyzed is the condensate of a magmatic volatile phase exsolved from the Niuatahi-Motutahi magma. The PGEs are moderately enriched in the sulfur condensates in comparison to the associated fresh dacite, with enrichment factors of 11-285, whereas Au, Cu and Re are strongly enriched with enrichment factors of ∼20,000, ∼5000 and ∼800 respectively. Although the PGEs are moderately compatible into magmatic volatile phases, their compatibility is significantly lower than that of Au, Cu and Re. Furthermore, the compatibility of PGEs decrease in the order: Ru > Pt > Ir > Pd. This trend is also observed in condensates and sublimates from other localities. PGE mineralization in porphyry Cu-Au deposits is characterized by substantially higher Pd/Pt (∼7-60) and Pd/Ir (∼100-10,500) than typical orthomagmatic sulfide deposits (e.g. Pd/Pt ∼0.6 and Pd/Ir ∼20 for the Bushveld). It has previously been suggested that the high mobility of Pd, relative to the other PGEs, may account for the preferential enrichment of Pd in porphyry Cu-Au deposits. However, the low compatibility of Pd in the volatile phase relative to the other PGEs, shown in this study, invalidates this explanation. We suggest that the PGE geochemistry of Pd-rich Cu-Au deposits is principally derived from the PGE characteristics of the magma from which the ore

  13. An investigation of the "jumping to conclusions" data-gathering bias and paranoid thoughts in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänsch, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a data-gathering bias, in the form of jumping to conclusions, and links to paranoid ideation was investigated in Asperger syndrome (AS). People with AS (N = 30) were compared to a neurotypical control group (N = 30) on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Beads tasks, with self-report measures of depression, general anxiety, social anxiety, self-consciousness and paranoid ideation. The AS group performed less well than the control group on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with regard to accuracy but responded more quickly and tended to make decisions on the basis of less evidence on the Beads Task with 50 % demonstrating a clear 'jumping to conclusions bias', whereas none of the control group showed such a bias. Depression and general anxiety were associated with paranoid ideation but not data-gathering style, which was contrary to expectation.

  14. Definition of sampling units begets conclusions in ecology: the case of habitats for plant communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Mörsdorf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In ecology, expert knowledge on habitat characteristics is often used to define sampling units such as study sites. Ecologists are especially prone to such approaches when prior sampling frames are not accessible. Here we ask to what extent can different approaches to the definition of sampling units influence the conclusions that are drawn from an ecological study? We do this by comparing a formal versus a subjective definition of sampling units within a study design which is based on well-articulated objectives and proper methodology. Both approaches are applied to tundra plant communities in mesic and snowbed habitats. For the formal approach, sampling units were first defined for each habitat in concave terrain of suitable slope using GIS. In the field, these units were only accepted as the targeted habitats if additional criteria for vegetation cover were fulfilled. For the subjective approach, sampling units were defined visually in the field, based on typical plant communities of mesic and snowbed habitats. For each approach, we collected information about plant community characteristics within a total of 11 mesic and seven snowbed units distributed between two herding districts of contrasting reindeer density. Results from the two approaches differed significantly in several plant community characteristics in both mesic and snowbed habitats. Furthermore, differences between the two approaches were not consistent because their magnitude and direction differed both between the two habitats and the two reindeer herding districts. Consequently, we could draw different conclusions on how plant diversity and relative abundance of functional groups are differentiated between the two habitats depending on the approach used. We therefore challenge ecologists to formalize the expert knowledge applied to define sampling units through a set of well-articulated rules, rather than applying it subjectively. We see this as instrumental for progress in

  15. Summary of major conclusions from the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT), Foz do Iguacu, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes major conclusions of working groups convened in the following areas: comet assay; micronucleus test in the liver and organs other than bone marrow; pig-A assay; quantitative approaches to genotoxicity risk assessment; and approaches for identifying germ cell m...

  16. A fine-grained analysis of the jumping-to-conclusions bias in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Moritz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Impaired decision behavior has been repeatedly observed in schizophrenia patients. We investigated several cognitive mechanisms that might contribute to the jumping-to-conclusions bias (JTC seen in schizophrenia patients: biases in information-gathering, information weighting and integration, and overconfidence, using the process tracing paradigm Mouselab. Mouselab allows for an in-depth exploration of various decision-making processes in a structured information environment. A total of 37 schizophrenia patients and 30 healthy controls participated in the experiment. Although showing less focused and systematic information search, schizophrenia patients practically considered all pieces of information and showed no JTC in the sense of collecting less pieces of evidence. Choices of patients and controls both approximated a rational solution quite well, but patients showed more extreme confidence ratings. Both groups mainly used weighted additive decision strategies for information integration and only a small proportion relied on simple heuristics. Under high stress induced by affective valence plus time pressure, however, schizophrenia patients switched to equal weighting strategies: less valid cues and more valid ones were weighted equally.

  17. Conclusions of the commission: property transfer of natural gas transport networks; Conclusions de la commission: transfert de propriete des reseaux de transport de gaz naturel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    This document deals with the evolution of the avoidance of the natural gas transport allowances and their transfers modalities. The first part recalls the juridical, technical and economical situation and the european context taking into account by the commission in this project. The commission choices of the evaluation methods are then presented. The evaluations and the conclusions of the commission are presented in the last part. (A.L.B.)

  18. STRESS AND DIFFERENTIAL ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE-SYSTEM FUNCTIONS - CONCLUSIONS FROM SOCIAL STRESS STUDIES IN ANIMALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOHUS, B; KOOLHAAS, JM; DERUITER, AJH; HEIJNEN, CJ

    1991-01-01

    Psychosocial factors are implicated in the development, in the course of, and in the recovery from disease. The immune system may be a mediator of the disease. Studies with animal models using social interactions in rodents suggest that short- and long-term social stress does not invariably suppress

  19. Employer Policies and Practices to Manage and Prevent Disability: Conclusion to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Chris J; Shaw, William S

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Research of employer policies and practices to manage and prevent disability spans many disciplines and perspectives, and there are many challenges related to stakeholder collaboration, data access, and interventions. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the findings from a conference and year-long collaboration among a group of invited researchers intended to spur new research innovations in this field. Methods A multidisciplinary team of 26 international researchers with published research in employer-based disability management or related fields were invited to attend a 3-day conference in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA. The conference goals were to review the status of current research of workplace disability management and prevention, examine its relevance for employer decision-making, compare conceptual frameworks or theoretical perspectives, and recommend future research directions. In this paper, we summarize key points from the 6 resulting papers, compare them with an earlier 2005 conference on improving return-to-work research, and conclude with recommendations for further overarching research directions. Results/Conclusion In comparison with the 2005 conference, a greater emphasis was placed on organizational and social factors, employer roles and responsibilities, methods of implementation, non-clinical approaches, and facilitating stay-at-work as well as return-to-work. A special panel of employer consultants and representatives who were featured at the 2015 conference reinforced the importance of organizational culture, leadership style, and financial decision-making strategies at the employer level. Based on the conference proceedings, we recommend that future research in this area should strive for: (a) broader inclusion of workers and workplaces; (b) attention to multilevel influences in the workplace;

  20. 20 CFR 220.112 - Conclusions by physicians concerning the claimant's disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... claimant's impairment must result from anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which are... are not within the expertise of medical sources. (b) Medical opinions that are conclusive. A...

  1. Indium-111-monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies after the first year of heart transplantation. Identification of risk groups for developing rejection during long-term follow-up and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, M.; Obrador, D.; Carrio, I.; Auge, J.M.; Moya, C.; Pons-Llado, G.; Caralps-Riera, J.M. (Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain))

    1990-12-01

    The long-term clinical course and results of biopsies in 21 patients studied with monoclonal antimyosin antibodies more than 12 months after heart transplantation according to the presence and degree of antimyosin-antibody uptake is described. Eighteen men and three women aged 20-52 years (39 +/- 9 years) were studied with antimyosin antibodies 12-40 months (mean, 22 +/- 9 months) after heart transplantation, and followed for a mean of 18 months (10-28 months). The number of biopsies performed during follow-up was 102. Results showed normal antimyosin-antibody studies in nine patients and abnormal studies in 12 patients. Myocyte damage was identified in 18 of the 102 biopsies (17.6%), one in the normal antimyosin-antibody group of patients and 17 in those patients with myocardial antimyosin-antibody uptake. Patients who developed rejection comprised 11% and 67% of each respective group; the mean number of rejection episodes per patient was 0.11 +/- 0.33 and 1.41 +/- 1.41, respectively (p less than 0.01). A trend was noted by which higher heart-to-lung ratios were associated with greater probability of rejection. Conclusively, (1) antimyosin-antibody studies performed after more than 1 year after heart transplantation indicate the presence and level of rejection activity, (2) groups of patients at risk for developing rejection at biopsy during long-term follow-up may be detected by antimyosin-antibody study, and (3) surveillance for rejection and the degree of immunosuppression should be tailored to meet individual patient needs.

  2. Diffusion versus linear ballistic accumulation: different models but the same conclusions about psychological processes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkin, C.; Brown, S.; Heathcote, A.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative models for response time and accuracy are increasingly used as tools to draw conclusions about psychological processes. Here we investigate the extent to which these substantive conclusions depend on whether researchers use the Ratcliff diffusion model or the Linear Ballistic

  3. An Investigation of the "Jumping to Conclusions" Data-Gathering Bias and Paranoid Thoughts in Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänsch, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a data-gathering bias, in the form of jumping to conclusions, and links to paranoid ideation was investigated in Asperger syndrome (AS). People with AS (N = 30) were compared to a neurotypical control group (N = 30) on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Beads tasks, with self-report measures of depression, general anxiety,…

  4. A comprehensive strategy for the subtyping of patients with Fanconi anaemia: conclusions from the Spanish Fanconi Anemia Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, José Antonio; Callén, Elsa; Jacome, Ariana; Río, Paula; Castella, Maria; Lobitz, Stephan; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Cantalejo, Ángeles; Cela, Elena; Cervera, José; Sánchez‐Calero, Jesús; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesús; Dasí, Ángeles; Olivé, Teresa; Ortega, Juan José; Rodriguez‐Villa, Antonia; Tapia, María; Molinés, Antonio; Madero, Luis; Segovia, José C; Neveling, Kornelia; Kalb, Reinhard; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Surrallés, Jordi; Bueren, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    Background Fanconi anaemia is a heterogeneous genetic disease, where 12 complementation groups have been already described. Identifying the complementation group in patients with Fanconi anaemia constitutes a direct procedure to confirm the diagnosis of the disease and is required for the recruitment of these patients in gene therapy trials. Objective To determine the subtype of Fanconi anaemia patients in Spain, a Mediterranean country with a relatively high population (23%) of Fanconi anaemia patients belonging to the gypsy race. Methods Most patients could be subtyped by retroviral complementation approaches in peripheral blood T cells, although some mosaic patients were subtyped in cultured skin fibroblasts. Other approaches, mainly based on western blot analysis and generation of nuclear RAD51 and FANCJ foci, were required for the subtyping of a minor number of patients. Results and conclusions From a total of 125 patients included in the Registry of Fanconi Anaemia, samples from 102 patients were available for subtyping analyses. In 89 cases the subtype could be determined and in 8 cases exclusions of common complementation groups were made. Compared with other international studies, a skewed distribution of complementation groups was observed in Spain, where 80% of the families belonged to the Fanconi anaemia group A (FA‐A) complementation group. The high proportion of gypsy patients, all of them FA‐A, and the absence of patients with FA‐C account for this characteristic distribution of complementation groups. PMID:17105750

  5. Conclusions of the presidency. European council of Barcelona, March 15 and 16 2002; Conclusions de la presidence. Conseil europeen de Barcelone 15 et 16 mars 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document summarizes the conclusions of the European Council held in Barcelona (Spain) on March 15 and 16, 2002. Among the priority actions listed by the council figure the integration of energy, transportation and communication networks at the European scale. In particular, the council commits the Parliament and itself to start the final phase of opening of gas and electricity markets: free choice of a supplier, obligation of public utility, security of supplies, separation between transmission and distribution and between production and supply, non-discriminatory access of consumers and suppliers to networks with transparent tariffs, establishment of a regulatory agency in each member state, agreement for a tariffing system for the international electricity trades etc.. Concerning the sustainable development strategy of the European union, the council is pressing the member states for the completion of the national procedures of ratification of the Kyoto protocol. However, new measures need to be taken to develop technologies respectful for the environment, in particular in the domain of energy and transports. (J.S.)

  6. A comparative analysis of interactional metadiscourse markers in the Introduction and Conclusion sections of mechanical and electrical engineering research papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Estaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic writing, particularly writing research articles, is an indispensable part of every major in higher education. Hyland (2004 argued that a valuable means of exploring academic writing, and comparing the rhetorical features and preferences of different discourse communities, is through the metadiscourse analysis of the text. The present study examines the differences in the use, type, and frequency of interactional metadiscourse markers in the introduction and conclusion sections of research papers across the two disciplines of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. To this end, 42 research articles (21 Mechanical and 21 Electrical Engineering written by English native speakers were randomly selected from two major international journals. The current study made use of Hyland’s (2005 model for analyzing the interactional metadiscourse markers used in the selected corpus, consisting of 41484 words. To analyze the data, the frequency, patterns of use, and type of interactional metadiscourse markers were elicited both through a manual corpus analysis and concordance package. Furthermore, to examine whether there is any significant difference in the use of metadiscourse markers in the introduction and conclusion sections of these papers, a Chi-square analysis was run. The results of the quantitative analysis revealed that although there were some minor differences in the frequency and type of these metadiscourse markers, there was no statistically significant difference across the disciplines, which can be attributed to the close nature of these fields. The findings of this study may render some pedagogical implications for ESP courses and especially writing research papers.

  7. Application of Artificial Neural Networks in the Heart Electrical Axis Position Conclusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakanovskaya, L. N.

    2016-08-01

    The article touches upon building of a heart electrical axis position conclusion model using an artificial neural network. The input signals of the neural network are the values of deflections Q, R and S; and the output signal is the value of the heart electrical axis position. Training of the network is carried out by the error propagation method. The test results allow concluding that the created neural network makes a conclusion with a high degree of accuracy.

  8. Perceiving persons and groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed.

  9. Development of new group members' in-group and out-group stereotypes: changes in perceived group variability and ethnocentrism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C S; Bogart, L M

    1997-10-01

    Changes in new members' in-group and out-group stereotypes were examined, distinguishing among three stereotype components: stereotypicality, dispersion, and ethnocentrism. Pledges in 4 sororities judged their in-group and out-groups 4 times during their 8-month induction. Overall, out-groups were judged more stereotypically than in-groups at every wave. Although out-groups were initially perceived as more dispersed than in-groups, decreased out-group dispersion resulted in a shift toward out-group homogeneity. Ethnocentrism was present at every wave but decreased because of decreased in-group positivity. The authors discuss implications of these results for existing explanations of stereotype development. It is suggested that other aspects of group socialization (R.L. Moreland & J.M. Levine, 1982) are needed to explain fully the development of intergroup perceptions for new group members.

  10. Electron Sources for Future Lightsources, Summary and Conclusions for the Activities during FLS 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Kamps, Thorsten; Boulware, Chase; Corlett, John; Harkay, Katherine; Hannon, Fay; Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Militsyn, Boris; Quast, Torsten; Sannibale, Fernando; Teichert, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the discussions, presentations, and activity of the (Future Light Sources Workshop 2012) FLS 2012 working group dedicated to Electron Sources. The focus of the working group was to discuss concepts and technologies that might enable much higher peak and average brightness from electron beam sources. Furthermore the working group was asked to consider methods to greatly improve the robustness of operation and lower the costs of providing electrons.

  11. 美国集团采购组织分析及对我国药品采购的启示%Analysis on the group purchasing organizations in the United States and its implications for Chinese drug procurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵蓉; 谢金平; 蒋蓉

    2014-01-01

    本文采用文献研究法,详细地分析了美国集团采购组织的基本特质及其对医疗卫生体制的影响。主要内容包括集团采购组织在美国的发展历程、组织类型、基本职能、采购药品的流程及其主要费用来源,集团采购组织的特点及对医院、供应商、监管机构产生的影响。研究认为,集团采购组织为美国医疗保健提供方节约了大量成本,在医疗供应链中发挥着重要作用。建议创新与完善我国药品采购制度应更大范围、更深程度地引入市场机制,妥善协调政府与市场在药品采购中的作用;并科学设置评标方法,兼顾药品质量与价格要素,注重采购的经济实用性。%In this paper, basic characteristics of group purchasing organizations ( GPOs) and its implications for US health care system are analyzed using a literature research method. The main contents include the development process, type, basic functions, drug procurement processes, fee sources, characteristics and influence for the hospi-tals, supplies, regulators of GPOs. We suggest that GPOs have helped US health care providers save a lot of money and played an important role in the healthcare supply chain. We also suggest that market mechanisms should be intro-duced widely concerning the model innovation and improvement of domestic drug procurement. At the same time, government and the market should be coordinated properly. Moreover, scientific evaluation methods should be set in consideration of drug quality, prices and its economic practicality.

  12. The Historical Image of Chinese Teaching of the "Baima Lake Writer Group" and Its Implications%"白马湖作家群"国文教学的历史影像和现实启迪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘涌; 郭雅莲

    2016-01-01

    "五四"以后,以朱自清、夏丏尊、丰子恺、叶圣陶等为代表的文人汇聚在浙江上虞白马湖畔的春晖中学从事教学和写作活动.他们以文会友、教学相长、切磋互补,创造出一种超越尘世、清新脱俗的纯粹的教育境界即"春晖境界". "白马湖作家群"以卓越的文学才华、高洁的人格风范以及诚挚朴素、超然物外的教学风格在民国教育史上留下了清晰的历史影像,并为今天全面深化基础教育改革时期探索语文教师专业化发展路径、深远培育新国民的母语文化软实力提供了有益的现实启迪.%Since the May 4th Movement, some scholars like Zhu Ziqing, Xia Mianzun, Feng Zikai and Ye Shengtao ,worked in Chunhui secondary school by the lakeside of Baima Lake in Shangyu city , Zhejiang prov-ince.They taught and wrote there , and befriended each other , sharing similar interests in literature; they learned from each other in teaching and they were free from things of the world , showing a pure teaching ide-al, which was since referred to as "Chunhui Ideal".The writer group left a clear image in the history of edu-cation over the Republic of China ,with their excellent literary talent , noble personality and sincere and simple teaching styles .They also provided a way for Chinese teachers professional development and may have further implications for the strenthening of native culture as soft power .

  13. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  14. A fallacious jar? The peculiar relation between descriptive premises and normative conclusions in neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nils-Frederic; Northoff, Georg

    2015-06-01

    Ethical questions have traditionally been approached through conceptual analysis. Inspired by the rapid advance of modern brain imaging techniques, however, some ethical questions appear in a new light. For example, hotly debated trolley dilemmas have recently been studied by psychologists and neuroscientists alike, arguing that their findings can support or debunk moral intuitions that underlie those dilemmas. Resulting from the wedding of philosophy and neuroscience, neuroethics has emerged as a novel interdisciplinary field that aims at drawing conclusive relationships between neuroscientific observations and normative ethics. A major goal of neuroethics is to derive normative ethical conclusions from the investigation of neural and psychological mechanisms underlying ethical theories, as well as moral judgments and intuitions. The focus of this article is to shed light on the structure and functioning of neuroethical arguments of this sort, and to reveal particular methodological challenges that lie concealed therein. We discuss the methodological problem of how one can--or, as the case may be, cannot--validly infer normative conclusions from neuroscientific observations. Moreover, we raise the issue of how preexisting normative ethical convictions threaten to invalidate the interpretation of neuroscientific data, and thus arrive at question-begging conclusions. Nonetheless, this is not to deny that current neuroethics rightly presumes that moral considerations about actual human lives demand empirically substantiated answers. Therefore, in conclusion, we offer some preliminary reflections on how the discussed methodological challenges can be met.

  15. Searching ClinicalTrials.gov did not change the conclusions of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lisa M; Sharma, Ritu; Dy, Sydney M; Waldfogel, Julie M; Robinson, Karen A

    2017-07-27

    We assessed the effect of searching ClinicalTrials.gov on the conclusions of a systematic review. We conducted this case study concurrently with a systematic review. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov on March 9, 2016, to identify trial records eligible for inclusion in the review. Two independent reviewers screened ClinicalTrials.gov records. We compared conclusions and strength of evidence grade with and without ClinicalTrials.gov records for 31 comparisons and 2 outcomes. We identified 106 trials (53 in the peer-reviewed literature only, 23 in ClinicalTrials.gov only, and 30 in both sources). For one comparison, the addition of results identified through ClinicalTrials.gov reduced the pooled effect size. We found evidence of selective outcome reporting for two comparisons and suspected publication bias for another two comparisons. For all other comparisons, searching ClinicalTrials.gov did not change conclusions or the strength of evidence grading for the two outcomes. Our search of ClinicalTrials.gov bolstered suspicions of reporting biases but did not change either the conclusions or the strength of evidence grading. Further research is needed to determine the effect of searching ClinicalTrials.gov on the conclusions of systematic reviews in different topic areas and as the new rules for registration of trial results take effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The grand leap of the whale up the Niagara Falls: converting philosophical conclusions into policy prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2015-04-01

    This article analyzes a neat conjuring trick employed in bioethics, that is, the immediate conversion of a philosophical conclusion into a policy prescription, and compares it to the "grand leap of the whale up the Niagara Falls" mentioned by Benjamin Franklin. It is shown that there is no simple and easy way to achieve the conversion, by considering arguments falling under four headings: (1) reasonable disagreement about values and theories, (2) general jurisprudential arguments, (3) the differences between policymaking and philosophy, and (4) the messy world of implementation. The particular issue used to illustrate the difficulties in moving from philosophical conclusion to policy description is infanticide of healthy infants, but the analysis is general, and the conclusion that the immediate move to policy is illegitimate is quite general.

  17. Comparison of the Effect of Group Transdiagnostic Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cognitive behavioral interventions based on the transdiagnostic approach for emotional disorders have received useful empirical supports in recent years. Most of the researches on this area have been conducted without any control group. Moreover, little information about comparative effectiveness has reported. The current study was compared transdiagnostic group therapy with classical cognitive group therapy.Methods: Thirty three collages students with anxiety and depressive symptoms participated in eight two-hour sessions in Akhavan Hospital, Tehran, Iran during May and June 2011. The results were analyzed by The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, and Work and Social Adjustment Scale in pre and post intervention.Results: Both groups showed the significant difference in research variables pre and post test. However, there was no significant difference in the results analysis using ACOVAs except for anxiety symptoms.Conclusions: The effectiveness of transdiagnostic group therapy was confirmed in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms. Implications of the study are discussed.

  18. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  19. Optimal conclusive teleportation of a d-dimensional two-particle unknown quantum state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Guang; Wen Qiao-Yan; Zhu Fu-Chen

    2006-01-01

    A conclusive teleportation protocol of a d-dimensional two-particle unknown quantum state using three ddimensional particles in an arbitrary pure state is proposed. A sender teleports the unknown state conclusively to a receiver by using the positive operator valued measure(POVM) and introducing an ancillary qudit to perform the generalized Bell basis measurement. We calculate the optimal teleportation fidelity. We also discuss and analyse the reason why the information on the teleported state is lost in the course of the protocol.

  20. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  1. Is Tit-for-Tat the Answer? On the Conclusions Drawn from Axelrod's Tournaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Rapoport

    Full Text Available Axelrod's celebrated Prisoner's Dilemma computer tournaments, published in the early 1980s, were designed to find effective ways of acting in everyday interactions with the strategic properties of the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game. The winner of both tournaments was tit-for-tat, a program that cooperates on the first round and then, on every subsequent round, copies the co-player's choice from the previous round. This has been interpreted as evidence that tit-for-tat is an effective general-purpose strategy. By re-analyzing data from the first tournament and some more recent data, we provide new results suggesting that the efficacy of tit-for-tat is contingent on the design of the tournament, the criterion used to determine success, and the particular values chosen for the Prisoner's Dilemma payoff matrix. We argue that this places in doubt the generality of the results and the policy implications drawn from them.

  2. Global climate feedbacks: Conclusions and recommendations of the June 1990 BNL workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-08-01

    The issue of global change initiated by increases in the concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases is a scientific issue with major policy implications. The best means to examine the response of the Earth's climate to prospective perturbations in radiative forcing caused by such changes, and to other industrial activities, is modeling, specifically by means of general circulation models (GCMs) of the Earth's atmosphere and of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The purpose of this workshop was to identify the feedbacks inherent in the Earth's climate that actually or potentially govern the system's response to perturbations, to identify gaps in knowledge that preclude the accurate representation of these feedbacks in models, and to identify research required to represent these feedbacks accurately in models.

  3. Trait and social anxiety in adults with chronic stuttering: conclusions following meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Ashley; Tran, Yvonne

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between chronic stuttering and anxiety has been a matter of some debate over the past two decades, with a major emphasis of research focused on examining whether people who stutter have abnormally elevated levels of trait or social anxiety. The major goal of this paper was to perform a systematic literature review and perform meta-analyses on research that has assessed (i) trait anxiety and (ii) social anxiety, in adults who stutter. Only studies that met strict inclusion criteria were selected for the meta-analyses. Two meta-analyses were conducted, the first for trait anxiety, and the second for social anxiety. Meta-analysis combines statistically the results of selected studies that meet strict design criteria, thereby clarifying the size of differences in trait and social anxiety between adults who stutter and adults who do not stutter. Meta-analytic results confirmed that adults with chronic stuttering do have substantially elevated trait and social anxiety. The overall effect size for trait and social anxiety was calculated to be .57 and .82, respectively. Trait and social anxiety are definite problems for many adults who stutter. Clinical implications of these findings for the diagnosis and treatment of adult who stutter are discussed. The reader will be able to: (a) describe the process of conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis; (b) describe the possible impact of publication bias on meta-analysis results; (c) explain the impact of a chronic disorder like stuttering on levels of trait anxiety; (d) explain the impact of stuttering on levels of social anxiety; (e) interpret the results of meta-analysis when applied to differences in anxiety between adult people who stutter and those who do not stutter; and (f) describe implications for fluency enhancing treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oklo: The fossil nuclear reactors. Physics study - Translation of chapters 6, 13 and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudet, R. [CEA, Paris (France)

    1996-09-01

    Three parts of the 1991 book `Oklo: reacteurs nucleaires fossiles. Etude physique` have been translated in this report. The chapters bear the titles `Study of criticality`(45 p.), `Some problems with the overall functioning of the reactor zones`(45 p.) and `Conclusions` (15 p.), respectively.

  5. Tritium in precipitation of Vostok (Antarctica): conclusions on the tritium latitude effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Detlef

    2011-09-01

    During the Antarctic summer of 1985 near the Soviet Antarctic station Vostok, firn samples for tritium measurements were obtained down to a depth of 2.40 m. The results of the tritium measurements are presented and discussed. Based on this and other data, conclusions regarding the tritium latitude effect are derived.

  6. Jumping to the wrong conclusions? An investigation of the mechanisms of reasoning errors in delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Suzanne; Thompson, Claire; Hurley, James; Medin, Evelina; Butler, Lucy; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa

    2014-10-30

    Understanding how people with delusions arrive at false conclusions is central to the refinement of cognitive behavioural interventions. Making hasty decisions based on limited data ('jumping to conclusions', JTC) is one potential causal mechanism, but reasoning errors may also result from other processes. In this study, we investigated the correlates of reasoning errors under differing task conditions in 204 participants with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis who completed three probabilistic reasoning tasks. Psychotic symptoms, affect, and IQ were also evaluated. We found that hasty decision makers were more likely to draw false conclusions, but only 37% of their reasoning errors were consistent with the limited data they had gathered. The remainder directly contradicted all the presented evidence. Reasoning errors showed task-dependent associations with IQ, affect, and psychotic symptoms. We conclude that limited data-gathering contributes to false conclusions but is not the only mechanism involved. Delusions may also be maintained by a tendency to disregard evidence. Low IQ and emotional biases may contribute to reasoning errors in more complex situations. Cognitive strategies to reduce reasoning errors should therefore extend beyond encouragement to gather more data, and incorporate interventions focused directly on these difficulties.

  7. THE CONCLUSION OF THE CONTRACT FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE NEW CIVIL CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanciu D. C RPENARU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The New Civil Code regulates in large the general rules regarding the conclusion of the contract. These rules regard the formation of the contract, between parties that are either present or at a distance. The rules in question have as foundation the classical principles regarding the formation of the contract and also reflect the realities of the modern society.

  8. 20 CFR 410.471 - Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disability or death. 410.471 Section 410.471 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.471 Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death....

  9. Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder Show a Circumspect Reasoning Bias Rather than "Jumping-to-Conclusions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Chapman, Emma; Ashwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias.…

  10. On conclusive eavesdropping and measures of mutual information in quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegin, Alexey E.

    2016-03-01

    We address the question of quantifying eavesdropper's information gain in an individual attack on systems of quantum key distribution. It is connected with the concept of conclusive eavesdropping introduced by Brandt. Using the BB84 protocol, we examine the problem of estimating a performance of conclusive entangling probe. The question of interest depends on the choice of a quantitative measure of eavesdropper's information about the error-free sifted bits. The Fuchs-Peres-Brandt probe realizes a very powerful individual attack on the BB84 scheme. In the usual formulation, Eve utilizes the Helstrom scheme in distinguishing between the two output probe states. In conclusive eavesdropping, the unambiguous discrimination is used. Comparing these two versions allows to demonstrate serious distinctions between widely used quantifiers of mutual information. In particular, the so-called Rényi mutual information does not seem to be a completely legitimate measure of an amount of mutual information. It is brightly emphasized with the example of conclusive eavesdropping.

  11. The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Jaarsma, Thomas; Dewhurst, Richard; Boshuizen, Els

    2013-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Jaarsma, T., Dewhurst, R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012, October). The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine. Paper presented at the New tools and practices for seeing and learning in medicine ’12, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

  12. Highlights and conclusions from the Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET) conference 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nsour, M; Kaiser, R; Abd Elkreem, E; Walke, H; Kandeel, A; Bloland, R

    2012-02-01

    As a follow up of a short communication that the Eastern Mediterranean Health journal published in December 2011, this article reports on highlights and conclusions from scientific abstracts, methodology workshops and plenary sessions that were presented as part of the Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET) conference held from 6 to 9 December 2011 in Sharm Al Sheikh, Egypt.

  13. The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Jaarsma, Thomas; Dewhurst, Richard; Boshuizen, Els

    2013-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Jaarsma, T., Dewhurst, R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012, October). The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine. Paper presented at the New tools and practices for seeing and learning in medicine ’12, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

  14. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  15. Neurocognitive deficits are relevant for the jumping-to-conclusions bias, but not for delusions: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Andreou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with delusions exhibit an increased tendency to arrive at decisions based on very limited evidence (jumping-to-conclusions; JTC, making this reasoning bias relevant for the treatment of delusions. Neurocognitive deficits contribute to JTC, but it is not known whether this has any bearing on the clinical syndrome of delusions. We addressed this question by reanalyzing data from an efficacy study of non-pharmacological interventions as adjunctive treatments in schizophrenia. We investigated the longitudinal associations of cognitive functioning, JTC and delusions in patients with psychotic disorders receiving either a metacognitive intervention addressing reasoning biases (n = 59, or cognitive remediation (n = 58. Both interventions improved JTC; in the cognitive remediation group, tentative evidence suggested that better neurocognitive performance contributed to this improvement. However, JTC gains were associated with delusion improvement only in the metacognitive intervention group, suggesting a content-specific mechanism of action.

  16. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance potassium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the Netherlands, for the pesticide active substance potassium iodide are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of potassium iodide as a fungicide on tomatoes, sweet peppers, cucumber, eggplant, strawberries and ornamental flowers in greenhouse and field applications on strawberries. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  17. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance spiromesifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State, the United Kingdom, for the pesticide active substance spiromesifen are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of spiromesifen as an insecticide and acaricide on cucumber, courgette, pepper, tomato, eggplant (aubergine, French bean, melon, strawberry and ornamentals in permanent greenhouses. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  18. Studying the Possibility of Conclusion of Time Proportional Contracts via Definite Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Sadegh Tabatabaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time proportional contracts are such contracts in which the ownership of the property or itsprofits is transferred to the contracting party, proportional to time. This means that the partywill have the right to use or operate the property in determined portion of the year and will beable to intervene in the property permanently or alternately according to the terms of thecontract. This kind of contracts could be formed as a contract of rent, partnership in either theproperty or its profits, common sale conditional to partnership in profits, and the contract ofcompromise. Concerning the essence of such contracts, conclusion in the form of loan,exchange, and the right to benefit is impossible. Hereby, we will try to examine thepossibility of conclusion of time proportional contracts in the form of determined contracts.

  19. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance sodium hypochlorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State The Netherlands, for the pesticide active substance sodium hypochlorite are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EC No 2229/2004 as amended by Commission Regulation (EC No 1095/2007 and Commission Regulation (EU No 114/2010. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative use of sodium hypochlorite as a bactericide on mushrooms. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  20. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance pyridalyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the Netherlands, for the pesticide active substance pyridalyl are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EUNo 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of pyridalyl as an insecticide on field and glasshouse tomato, aubergine, sweet and chilli pepper, and on field cucurbits, lettuce and cotton. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  1. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance valifenalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State, Hungary, for the pesticide active substance valifenalate are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative use of valifenalate as a fungicide on grapes. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  2. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance pyrethrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State Italy, for the pesticide active substance pyrethrins are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EC No 2229/2004, as amended by Commission Regulation (EC No 1095/2007. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of pyrethrins as an insecticide on tomato, pepper, cucumber, melons, strawberries, potatoes, lettuce and ornamentals. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  3. View of Mission Control Center celebrating conclusion of Apollo 11 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), at the conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The television monitor shows President Richard M. Nixon greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet in the Pacific recovery area (40301); NASA and MSC Officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Offic of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ (40302).

  4. EMU Fiscal Challenges: Conclusions for the New Members of the EU

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate the fiscal challenges which have appeared before EMU (Economic and Monetary Union) countries after four years of monetary union functioning. Then the author formulates conclusions for accession countries, which plan to be members of EMU in the near future. The first part of the paper deals with criteria of fiscal stabilization within EMU, their meaning and connections with economic growth. The fiscal stabilization criteria were taken from the Pact of Stabil...

  5. Time & Law - Is it the nature of law to last? A Conclusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoecke, Mark

    1998-01-01

    About conceptions of time (physical time, human time, legal time) and conceptions of time in law (founding time, timeless time of legal doctrine, instant time, longlasting time, consolidation time, voluntarist future time, aleatory time, anarchic time, alternating time). Conceptions of the future (the instant view - no future, the empty view - a completely open future, the half-full view : an open future, party determined by the past). Conclusion : towards a dialectical time conception.

  6. Creativity in a cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gerald W.; Penick, John E.

    This study was to determine whether cooperative small groups would stimulate creativity of fith and sixth grade students more than an individualized learning environment. Student aptitudes for creative and academic work were assessed on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Verbal Form A), analysis of student created electrical circuit diagrams, and a batteries and bulbs prediction test. A measure of student perceptions was also used to indicate any changes in attitudes toward the science activity and learning environment. A posttest control group design was used with 11 I fifth and sixth grade students. Half of the population worked by themselves, while the other half (experimental) worked in a student-structured environment on the same science activity which involved creating as many different types of electrical circuits from a given set of batteries and bulbs as possible. An overall conclusion is that fifth and sixth grade students working within small cooperative groups can be more creative as measured by a figural creativity test with electrical circuits than students working alone. The implication of this study is that small cooperative groups as well as individualized groups should be used in elementary science classes when creativity is one of the instructional objectives.

  7. Conclusions about niche expansion in introduced Impatiens walleriana populations depend on method of analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mandle

    Full Text Available Determining the degree to which climate niches are conserved across plant species' native and introduced ranges is valuable to developing successful strategies to limit the introduction and spread of invasive plants, and also has important ecological and evolutionary implications. Here, we test whether climate niches differ between native and introduced populations of Impatiens walleriana, globally one of the most popular horticultural species. We use approaches based on both raw climate data associated with occurrence points and ecological niche models (ENMs developed with Maxent. We include comparisons of climate niche breadth in both geographic and environmental spaces, taking into account differences in available habitats between the distributional areas. We find significant differences in climate envelopes between native and introduced populations when comparing raw climate variables, with introduced populations appearing to expand into wetter and cooler climates. However, analyses controlling for differences in available habitat in each region do not indicate expansion of climate niches. We therefore cannot reject the hypothesis that observed differences in climate envelopes reflect only the limited environments available within the species' native range in East Africa. Our results suggest that models built from only native range occurrence data will not provide an accurate prediction of the potential for invasiveness if applied to areas containing a greater range of environmental combinations, and that tests of niche expansion may overestimate shifts in climate niches if they do not control carefully for environmental differences between distributional areas.

  8. Enhancing the credibility of decisions based on scientific conclusions: transparency is imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreider, Jay; Barrow, Craig; Birchfield, Norman; Dearfield, Kerry; Devlin, Dennis; Henry, Sara; Kramer, Melissa; Schappelle, Seema; Solomon, Keith; Weed, Douglas L; Embry, Michelle R

    2010-07-01

    Transparency and documentation of the decision process are at the core of a credible risk assessment and, in addition, are essential in the presentation of a weight of evidence (WoE)-based approach. Lack of confidence in the risk assessment process (as the basis for a risk management decision), beginning with evaluation of raw data and continuing through the risk decision process, is largely because of issues surrounding transparency. There is a critical need to implement greater transparency throughout the risk assessment process, and although doing so will not guarantee the correctness of the risk assessment or that all risk assessors come up with the same conclusions, it will provide essential information on how a particular conclusion or decision was made, thereby increasing confidence in the conclusions. Recognizing this issue, the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute convened a multisector committee tasked with discussing this issue and examining existing guidance and recommendations related to transparency in risk assessment. The committee concluded that transparency is inextricably linked to credibility: credibility of the data, credibility of the risk assessment process, and credibility of the resulting decision making. To increase this credibility, existing guidance concerning criteria elements of transparency related to the risk assessment process must be more widely disseminated and applied, and raw data for studies used in human health and environmental risk assessment must be more widely available. Finally, the decision-making process in risk management must be better documented and a guidance framework established for both the process itself and its communication to the public.

  9. The Effect of State Anxiety on Paranoid Ideation and Jumping to Conclusions. An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Lange, Jennifer; Burau, Julia; Exner, Cornelia; Moritz, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical models of persecutory delusions have emphasized the impact of reasoning biases and negative emotion at the early stages of symptom formation. However, the causal mechanisms remain unclear. This study tests the hypothesis that state anxiety will increase paranoid ideation and that this increase will be moderated by the level of individual vulnerability and mediated by the tendency to jump to conclusions. Healthy participants (n = 90) with varying levels of vulnerability (psychosis symptoms assessed by the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences) were randomly assigned to either an anxiety or a nonanxiety condition. Anxiety was induced by pictures from the International Affective Picture System and by in sensu exposure to individual anxiety-provoking situations. During each condition, symptoms of paranoia were assessed by a state-adapted version of the Paranoia Checklist. Jumping to conclusions (JTC) was assessed using a modified version of the beads task. Overall, participants in the anxiety condition reported significantly more paranoid thoughts and showed more JTC than participants in the neutral condition. Participants with higher baseline vulnerability were more likely to show an increase in paranoia as reaction to the anxiety manipulation. Moreover, the association of anxiety and paranoia was mediated by the increased tendency to jump to conclusions in the beads task. The results are in line with a threat anticipation conceptualization of paranoia and provide evidence for an interaction of anxiety and reasoning biases in the development of paranoid beliefs. A combination of meta-cognitive training directed at reasoning biases and promoting emotion regulation skills might prove beneficial in preventing symptoms. PMID:19429844

  10. One metric does not tell the whole story of scientific production. III. Management and conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves GONZÁLEZ-FERNÁNDEZ-VILLAVICENCIO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are different strategies for scientific publication that can be addressed from the perspective of management, ahead of the assessment by national agencies. Rising of alternative metrics, services and suppliers. Method: Narrative review. Results: the characteristic features of the evaluation criteria of scientific publications by Spanish agencies evaluation are presented and described altmetrics services. Conclusions: The need for national evaluation systems of scientific production to avoid the current bias and ignorance of the publishing sector which suffer WoS and Scopus arises. And also the need for other altmetric systems, complementary to traditional, to expand the type of scientific products and evaluate the scientific social impact.

  11. STRATEGIES (MARKETING DECISIONS ADAPTATION AND CONCLUSIONS OF TRANSNATIONAL NEW BRANDS ON THE RUSSIAN MARKET SOFT DRINKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Olegovna YAMPOLSKAYA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For several years the Russian market of soft drinks is growing rapidly. According to experts, this trend will continue in the future, but because our country is attrac-tive for brands large multinational companies. This article describes various ways to enter the Russian market brands world's largest companies, studied the experi-ence of promotion beverage company Coca-Cola, The peculiarities of the Russian perception of brands, shows how they are reflected in the advertising campaigns of the leading players in the market, formulate conclusions regarding behaviors of TNCs in various conditions.

  12. Leadership behaviour and practical implications for sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leadership behaviour and practical implications for sustainable agricultural and rural ... Rural development projects in Nigeria in the sixties were compartmentalized. ... the interest of the group in contributing to the success of group projects.

  13. Mechanistic effects of IVIg in neuroinflammatory diseases: conclusions based on clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms of action of IVIg on immunoregulatory and neuroinflammatory network have been predominantly based on in vitro experiments and animal studies, rather than direct effects on human tissues. Based on clinicopathologic correlations and tissues obtained before and after IVIg therapy, the better documented and clinically-relevant in-vivo actions of IVIg include effects on: a) Antibodies. An extracted antigen-specific anti-immunoglobulin (idiotypic) fraction appears partially responsible for its effect in myasthenia gravis and GBS; b) Complement. Sera from Dermatomyositis (DM) patients responding to IVIg, inhibit complement consumption and intercept MAC formation leading to disappearance of MAC deposits in the repeated muscle biopsies and normalization of muscle tissue; c) Genes. In repeated muscle biopsies from DM patients who improved after IVIg, but not from Inclusion-Body-Myositis (IBM) who did not improve, there is a 2-fold alteration of 2206 tissue genes associated with inflammation, fibrosis, tissue remodeling and regeneration; and d) degenerative-proinflammatory molecules and β-amyloid, implicated in neurodegenerative CNS diseases and IBM. In repeated muscle biopsies of IBM patients who did not respond to IVIg, the mRNA or protein expression for chemokines, IFN-γ, TGF-ß, IL-10, Ubiquitin and aB-crystallin is reduced, but not for the key molecules ICOS, ICOSL, IL-6, IL1-β, perforin, APP, nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine, in spite of good IVIg penetration in muscles. Collectively, the selective effectiveness of IVIg in human diseases seems to correlate in vivo with inhibition of causative inflammatory mediators. Study of accessible tissues before and after therapy and clinicopathologic correlations, may help explain the differential effect of IVIg in autoimmune or neuroinflammatory diseases.

  14. A case study in explanatory power: John Snow's conclusions about the pathology and transmission of cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulodziecki, Dana

    2011-09-01

    In the mid-1800s, there was much debate about the origin or 'exciting cause' of cholera. Despite much confusion surrounding the disease, the so-called miasma theory emerged as the prevalent account about cholera's cause. Going against this mainstream view, the British physician John Snow inferred several things about cholera's origin and pathology that no one else inferred. Without observing the vibrio cholerae, however,-data unavailable to Snow and his colleagues-, there was no way of settling the question of what exactly was causing cholera and how, or if, it was passed on. The question then arises as to how Snow arrived at conclusions so systematically different from those of his opponents. In this paper, I want to look at Snow's reasoning in some detail, and show that there were certain principles, explanatory power in particular, that were epistemologically important to Snow in their own right. I will show that Snow himself takes explanatory power to be an epistemic property, and makes explicit links between explanatory power and confirmation. Systematically juxtaposing Snow's claims and his opponents', I will show that Snow was right to tout the explanatory power of his theory, and that his conclusions about the epistemic superiority of his theory over that of the miasmatists' were justified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Conclusions on motor control depend on the type of model used to represent the periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Ilona J; van Soest, Arthur J; Bobbert, Maarten F; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2012-10-01

    Within the field of motor control, there is no consensus on which kinematic and kinetic aspects of movements are planned or controlled. Perturbing goal-directed movements is a frequently used tool to answer this question. To be able to draw conclusions about motor control from kinematic responses to perturbations, a model of the periphery (i.e., the skeleton, muscle-tendon complexes, and spinal reflex circuitry) is required. The purpose of the present study was to determine to what extent such conclusions depend on the level of simplification with which the dynamical properties of the periphery are modeled. For this purpose, we simulated fast goal-directed single-joint movement with four existing types of models. We tested how three types of perturbations affected movement trajectory if motor commands remained unchanged. We found that the four types of models of the periphery showed different robustness to the perturbations, leading to different predictions on how accurate motor commands need to be, i.e., how accurate the knowledge of external conditions needs to be. This means that when interpreting kinematic responses obtained in perturbation experiments the level of error correction attributed to adaptation of motor commands depends on the type of model used to describe the periphery.

  16. Broken Robustness Analysis: How to make proper climate change conclusions in contradictory multimodal measurement contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, V.

    2015-12-01

    Philosophers of science discuss how multiple modes of measurement can generate evidence for the existence and character of a phenomenon (Horwich 1982; Hacking 1983; Franklin and Howson 1984; Collins 1985; Sober 1989; Trout 1993; Culp 1995; Keeley 2002; Staley 2004; Weber 2005; Keyser 2012). But how can this work systematically in climate change measurement? Additionally, what conclusions can scientists and policy-makers draw when different modes of measurement fail to be robust by producing contradictory results? First, I present a new technical account of robust measurement (RAMP) that focuses on the physical independence of measurement processes. I detail how physically independent measurement processes "check each other's results." (This account is in contrast to philosophical accounts of robustness analysis that focus on independent model assumptions or independent measurement products or results.) Second, I present a puzzle about contradictory and divergent climate change measures, which has consistently re-emerged in climate measurement. This discussion will focus on land, drilling, troposphere, and computer simulation measures. Third, to systematically solve this climate measurement puzzle, I use RAMP in the context of drought measurement in order to generate a classification of measurement processes. Here, I discuss how multimodal precipitation measures—e.g., measures of precipitation deficit like the Standard Precipitation Index vs. air humidity measures like the Standardized Relative Humidity Index--can help with the classification scheme of climate change measurement processes. Finally, I discuss how this classification of measures can help scientists and policy-makers draw effective conclusions in contradictory multimodal climate change measurement contexts.

  17. Primal implication as encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Krupski, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We propose a "cryptographic" interpretation for the propositional connectives of primal infon logic introduced by Y. Gurevich and I. Neeman and prove the corresponding soundness and completeness results. Primal implication $\\imp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ corresponds to the encryption of $\\psi$ with a secret key $\\varphi$, primal disjunction $\\vp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ is a group key and $\\bot$ reflects some backdoor constructions such as full superuser permissions or a universal decryption key. For the logic ...

  18. Parton Distributions Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  19. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...

  20. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  1. 南海瑞雷面波群速度层析成像及其地球动力学意义%Group velocity tomography of Rayleigh waves in South China Sea and its geodynamic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立; 薛梅; Le Khanh Phon; 杨挺

    2012-01-01

    complex geological structures. In this study, we give a 3D shear wave velocity structure of South China Sea deduced from surface wave tomography and analyze its geodynamic implications. Due to the newly deployed seismic stations in western and southern South China Sea, we have a better ray path coverage when using the single station method. This is especially true for the coastal region of southern China, where earthquakes occur less frequently and the newly added stations can increase the ray density in this region. We used earthquakes distributed on the periphery of South China Sea and collected earthquake data from 48 stations. We first calculated the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode for Rayleigh waves with periods from 14 s to 130 s using multiple filter technique. Then we conducted subspace inversion to get group velocity distributions for different periods in the region. Finally, on the basis of the relationship between shear wave velocity and group velocity under certain layer structure of the Earth, we obtained the 3D shear wave structures in the form of depth slices and vertical profiles by using a damped least square algorithm. The results show: ①High velocities exist in sea basins where velocity image delineates the shape of sea basins: the high velocities in shallow parts may indicate oceanic characteristics of the sea basin crust, while high velocities in deeper parts may come from high velocity materials which remained after the formation of oceanic crust at expanding ocean ridge. The velocity differences among sea basins are consistent with their heat flow values as well as their ages. The high velocities disappear at depths greater than 60 km, and are replaced by a low-velocity zone in a certain depth range. Beneath the low-velocity zone, a NE-SW high-velocity belt is observed at a depth of 200 km, and may be related to the ancient subduction in this region. ②Surrounding the South China Sea, there are obvious high velocities

  2. Six Considerations for Social Justice Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "courageous conversations" in social justice group work and a continuum of action for social justice interventions. It analyzes themes from 20 contributions to 2 consecutive special issues of "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" on social justice group work. Implications for future development in group leadership and…

  3. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  4. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  5. Results and conclusions: perception sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anne; LaCelle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Close, Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has presented work on sensor requirements, specifications, and testing, to evaluate the feasibility of increasing autonomous vehicle system speeds. Discussions included the theoretical background for determining sensor requirements, and the basic test setup and evaluation criteria for comparing existing and prototype sensor designs. This paper will present and discuss the continuation of this work. In particular, this paper will focus on analyzing the problem via a real-world comparison of various sensor technology testing results, as opposed to previous work that utilized more of a theoretical approach. LADAR/LIDAR, radar, visual, and infrared sensors are considered in this research. Results are evaluated against the theoretical, desired perception specifications. Conclusions for utilizing a suite of perception sensors, to achieve the goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds, is also discussed.

  6. Gasification of waste. Summary and conclusions of twenty-five years of development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rensfelt, Erik [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Oestman, Anders [Kemiinformation AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    An overview of nearly thirty years development of waste gasification and pyrolysis technology is given, and some major general conclusions are drawn. The aim has been to give new developers an overview of earlier major attempts to treat MSW/RDF with thermochemical processes, gasification or pyrolysis. Research work in general is not covered, only R and D efforts that have led to substantial testing in pilot scale or demonstration. For further details, especially related to ongoing R and D, readers are referred to other recent reviews. The authors' view is that gasification of RDF with appropriate gas cleaning can play an important role in the future, for environmentally acceptable and efficient energy production. A prerequisite is that some of the major mistakes can be avoided, such as: (1) too rapid scale-up without experimental base, (2) unsuitable pretreatment of MSW to RDF and poor integration with material recycling, and (3) too limited gas/flue gas cleaning.

  7. The six most essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis: a pluralogue. Part 4: general conclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the conclusion to this multi-part article I first review the discussions carried out around the six essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis – the position taken by Allen Frances on each question, the commentaries on the respective question along with Frances’ responses to the commentaries, and my own view of the multiple discussions. In this review I emphasize that the core question is the first – what is the nature of psychiatric illness – and that in some manner all further questions follow from the first. Following this review I attempt to move the discussion forward, addressing the first question from the perspectives of natural kind analysis and complexity analysis. This reflection leads toward a view of psychiatric disorders – and future nosologies – as far more complex and uncertain than we have imagined.

  8. Ham Sandwich with Mayo: A Stronger Conclusion to the Classical Ham Sandwich Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, John H

    2009-01-01

    The conclusion of the classical ham sandwich theorem of Banach and Steinhaus may be strengthened: there always exists a common bisecting hyperplane that touches each of the sets, that is, intersects the closure of each set. Hence, if the knife is smeared with mayonnaise, a cut can always be made so that it will not only simultaneously bisect each of the ingredients, but it will also spread mayonnaise on each. A discrete analog of this theorem says that n finite nonempty sets in n-dimensional Euclidean space can always be simultaneously bisected by a single hyperplane that contains at least one point in each set. More generally, for n compactly-supported positive finite Borel measures in Euclidean n-space, there is always a hyperplane that bisects each of the measures and intersects the support of each measure.

  9. Adverbial stance marking in the introduction and conclusion sections of legal research articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Adams

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although scientific research articles have traditionally been taken as examples of an objective style of writing that aims to minimise researchers’ voices in their texts (Gilbert and Mulkay, 1984:42, authors inevitably adopt stances towards the information presented and the target audience when writing their papers. This article explores authorial stance as expressed by adverbial markers in the introduction and conclusion sections of legal research papers. Following Biber et al. (1999, and Conrad and Biber (1999, our aim is to identify the most frequent adverbial markers of stance present in each section as indicators of (i epistemicity, (ii attitude, and (iii style. We will try to show whether or not there are functional differences in the use of adverbial stance markers, and whether or not these are derived from the different communicative purposes of these sections.

  10. Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters, a conclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper closes the Special Issue of Hydrology and Earth System Sciences entitled 'Sustainability of UK forestry: contemporary issues for the protection of freshwaters' by presenting conclusions from the contributions together with associated research findings. The volume deals largely with issues of upland water quality and biology in the context of environmental research and management. The studies are linked to an array of issues which affect the sustainability of UK forestry in the context of the protection of freshwaters, freshwater ecosystems and freshwater organisms. These issues include atmospheric and climate driven factors (acidification from atmospheric pollutants, critical loads, climate-change and climate variability, forestry practice and hydrobiogeochemical processing both within-catchments and within-rivers. The findings lie within the context of the science and relate to environmental management. Keywords: water quality, forestry, stream ecology, acidification, critical loads, nutrients

  11. Sex differences in moral reasoning: response to Walker's (1984) conclusion that there are none.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, D

    1986-04-01

    Data from the Family Socialization and Developmental Competence Project are used to probe Walker's conclusion that there are no sex differences in moral reasoning. Ordinal and nominal nonparametric statistics result in a complex but theoretically meaningful network of relationships among sex, educational level, and Kohlberg stage score level, with the presence and direction of sex differences in stage score level dependent on educational level. The effects on stage score level of educational level and working status are also shown to differ for men and women. Reasons are considered for not accepting Walker's dismissal of studies that use (a) a pre-1983 scoring manual, or (b) fail to control for education. The problems presented to Kohlberg's theory by the significant relationship between educational and stage score levels in the general population are discussed, particularly as these apply to the postconventional level of moral reasoning.

  12. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  13. Highlights and Conclusions of the Chalonge Meudon Workshop Dark Matter in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    de Vega, H J

    2010-01-01

    The CIAS Chalonge Workshop `Dark Matter in the Universe and Universal Properties of Galaxies: Theory and Observations', was held at the Meudon Ch^ateau of Observatoire de Paris on 8-11 June 2010. The Workshop approached DM in a fourfold way: astronomical observations of DM structures (galaxy properties, halos, rotation curves and density profiles), DM numerical simulations (with and without baryons), theoretical astrophysics and cosmology (kinetic theory, Boltzmann-Vlasov evolution), astroparticle physics. Peter Biermann, Alfonso Cavaliere, Hector J. de Vega, Gianfranco Gentile, Chandra Jog, Andrea Lapi, Paolo Salucci, Norma G. Sanchez, Pasquale Serpico, Rainer Stiele, Janine van Eymeren and Markus Weber present here their highlights of the Workshop. The summary and conclusions by H. J. de Vega and N. G. Sanchez stress among other points the growing evidence that DM particles have a mass in the keV scale and that those keV scale particles naturally produce the small scale structures observed in galaxies. Wimp...

  14. On the possible physical mechanism of Chernobyl catastrophe and the unsoundness of official conclusion

    CERN Document Server

    Rukhadze, A A; Filippov, D V

    2003-01-01

    The official conclusion about the origin and mechanism of the Chernobyl catastrophe is shown to essentially contradict experimental facts available from the accident. In the frame of existing physical models of nuclear fission reactor, it is shown analytically that under conditions of the accident the period of runaway of reactor at the fourth power generating unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) should be either 10 times slower or 100 times faster than that observed. A self-consistent hypothesis is suggested for the probable birth of magnetic charges, during the turbine generator test under it's own momentum test, at the fourth power generating unit of CNPP, and for the impact of these charges on the reactivity coefficient.

  15. No Conclusive Evidence for Transits of Proxima b in MOST Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.; Cameron, Chris; Hartman, Joel D.; Davenport, James R. A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Rowe, Jason; Siverd, Robert J.; Chen, Jingjing; Sandford, Emily; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Jordán, Andrés; Bayliss, Daniel; Henning, Thomas; Mancini, Luigi; Penev, Kaloyan; Csubry, Zoltan; Bhatti, Waqas; Da Silva Bento, Joao; Guenther, David B.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2017-03-01

    The analysis of Proxima Centauri’s radial velocities recently led Anglada-Escudé et al. to claim the presence of a low-mass planet orbiting the Sun’s nearest star once every 11.2 days. Although the a priori probability that Proxima b transits its parent star is just 1.5%, the potential impact of such a discovery would be considerable. Independent of recent radial velocity efforts, we observed Proxima Centauri for 12.5 days in 2014 and 31 days in 2015 with the Microwave and Oscillations of Stars space telescope. We report here that we cannot make a compelling case that Proxima b transits in our precise photometric time series. Imposing an informative prior on the period and phase, we do detect a candidate signal with the expected depth. However, perturbing the phase prior across 100 evenly spaced intervals reveals one strong false positive and one weaker instance. We estimate a false-positive rate of at least a few percent and a much higher false-negative rate of 20%–40%, likely caused by the very high flare rate of Proxima Centauri. Comparing our candidate signal to HATSouth ground-based photometry reveals that the signal is somewhat, but not conclusively, disfavored (1σ–2σ), leading us to argue that the signal is most likely spurious. We expect that infrared photometric follow-up could more conclusively test the existence of this candidate signal, owing to the suppression of flare activity and the impressive infrared brightness of the parent star.

  16. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance sulfoxaflor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State Ireland and the co-rapporteur Member States Czech Republic, France and Poland for the pesticide active substance sulfoxaflor and the assessment of applications for maximum residue levels (MRLs are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of sulfoxaflor as an insecticide on fruiting vegetables (field use and glasshouse application; tomato, cherry tomato, pepper (bell and non bell, aubergine, cucurbits (field use and glasshouse application; cucumber, water melon, courgette, spring and winter cereals (wheat, rye, barley, oats, triticale and cotton. MRLs were assessed in almonds, pecans, apples, pears, cherries, peaches including nectarines, apricots, plums, wheat and barley grain, broccoli, cauliflower, mustard greens, cabbage, leaf and head lettuce, spinach, celery, cotton seed, oilseed rape seed, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, melons, squash (winter and summer, cucumbers, potatoes, sugar beet, carrots, soya bean, beans (pulses, fresh beans with and without pods, strawberries, tomatoes, peppers, wine and table grapes, and in animal commodities such as milk, eggs, muscle, fat, liver and kidney. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment and the proposed MRLs, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. With the available assessments a high risk to bees was not excluded for field uses and a high long-term risk was indicated for the small herbivorous mammal scenario for field uses in vegetables and in

  17. Mitigation of global greenhouse gas emissions from waste: conclusions and strategies from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. Working Group III (Mitigation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Jean; Pipatti, Riitta; Hashimoto, Seiji; Diaz, Cristobal; Mareckova, Katarina; Diaz, Luis; Kjeldsen, Peter; Monni, Suvi; Faaij, Andre; Gao, Qingxian; Zhang, Tianzhu; Ahmed, Mohammed Abdelrafie; Sutamihardja, R T M; Gregory, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from post-consumer waste and wastewater are a small contributor (about 3%) to total global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Emissions for 2004-2005 totalled 1.4 Gt CO2-eq year(-1) relative to total emissions from all sectors of 49 Gt CO2-eq year(-1) [including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and F-gases normalized according to their 100-year global warming potentials (GWP)]. The CH4 from landfills and wastewater collectively accounted for about 90% of waste sector emissions, or about 18% of global anthropogenic methane emissions (which were about 14% of the global total in 2004). Wastewater N2O and CO2 from the incineration of waste containing fossil carbon (plastics; synthetic textiles) are minor sources. Due to the wide range of mature technologies that can mitigate GHG emissions from waste and provide public health, environmental protection, and sustainable development co-benefits, existing waste management practices can provide effective mitigation of GHG emissions from this sector. Current mitigation technologies include landfill gas recovery, improved landfill practices, and engineered wastewater management. In addition, significant GHG generation is avoided through controlled composting, state-of-the-art incineration, and expanded sanitation coverage. Reduced waste generation and the exploitation of energy from waste (landfill gas, incineration, anaerobic digester biogas) produce an indirect reduction of GHG emissions through the conservation of raw materials, improved energy and resource efficiency, and fossil fuel avoidance. Flexible strategies and financial incentives can expand waste management options to achieve GHG mitigation goals; local technology decisions are influenced by a variety of factors such as waste quantity and characteristics, cost and financing issues, infrastructure requirements including available land area, collection and transport considerations, and regulatory constraints. Existing studies on mitigation potentials and costs for the waste sector tend to focus on landfill CH4 as the baseline. The commercial recovery of landfill CH4 as a source of renewable energy has been practised at full scale since 1975 and currently exceeds 105 Mt CO2-eq year(-1). Although landfill CH4 emissions from developed countries have been largely stabilized, emissions from developing countries are increasing as more controlled (anaerobic) landfilling practices are implemented; these emissions could be reduced by accelerating the introduction of engineered gas recovery, increasing rates of waste minimization and recycling, and implementing alternative waste management strategies provided they are affordable, effective, and sustainable. Aided by Kyoto mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI), the total global economic mitigation potential for reducing waste sector emissions in 2030 is estimated to be > 1000 Mt CO2-eq (or 70% of estimated emissions) at costs below 100 US$ t(-1) CO2-eq year(-1). An estimated 20-30% of projected emissions for 2030 can be reduced at negative cost and 30-50% at costs gas recovery in the short- to medium-term--at the present time, there are > 130 Mt waste year(-1) incinerated at more than 600 plants. Current uncertainties with respect to emissions and mitigation potentials could be reduced by more consistent national definitions, coordinated international data collection, standardized data analysis, field validation of models, and consistent application of life-cycle assessment tools inclusive of fossil fuel offsets.

  18. Parton Distributions Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, Lucy; Brock, R.; Casey, D.; Demina, R.; Giele, W.T.; Hirosky, R.; Huston, J.; Kalk, J.; Keller, S.A.; Klasen, M.; Kosower, D.A.; Kramer, M.; Kretzer, S.; Kuhlmann, S.; Martin, R.; Olness, Fredrick I.; Plehn, T.; Pumplin, J.; Scalise, R.J.; Schellman, H.; Smith, J.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, George F.; Stump, D.; Tung, W.K.; Varelas, N.; Vogelsang, W.; Yang, Un-Ki

    2000-01-01

    The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, we introduce a "Manifesto" that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  19. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  20. Permutation entropy based time series analysis: Equalities in the input signal can lead to false conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunino, Luciano, E-mail: lucianoz@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CONICET La Plata – CIC), C.C. 3, 1897 Gonnet (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Olivares, Felipe, E-mail: olivaresfe@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV), 23-40025 Valparaíso (Chile); Scholkmann, Felix, E-mail: Felix.Scholkmann@gmail.com [Research Office for Complex Physical and Biological Systems (ROCoS), Mutschellenstr. 179, 8038 Zurich (Switzerland); Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Rosso, Osvaldo A., E-mail: oarosso@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), BR 104 Norte km 97, 57072-970, Maceió, Alagoas (Brazil); Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires (ITBA) and CONICET, C1106ACD, Av. Eduardo Madero 399, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Complex Systems Group, Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad de los Andes, Av. Mons. Álvaro del Portillo 12.455, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    A symbolic encoding scheme, based on the ordinal relation between the amplitude of neighboring values of a given data sequence, should be implemented before estimating the permutation entropy. Consequently, equalities in the analyzed signal, i.e. repeated equal values, deserve special attention and treatment. In this work, we carefully study the effect that the presence of equalities has on permutation entropy estimated values when these ties are symbolized, as it is commonly done, according to their order of appearance. On the one hand, the analysis of computer-generated time series is initially developed to understand the incidence of repeated values on permutation entropy estimations in controlled scenarios. The presence of temporal correlations is erroneously concluded when true pseudorandom time series with low amplitude resolutions are considered. On the other hand, the analysis of real-world data is included to illustrate how the presence of a significant number of equal values can give rise to false conclusions regarding the underlying temporal structures in practical contexts. - Highlights: • Impact of repeated values in a signal when estimating permutation entropy is studied. • Numerical and experimental tests are included for characterizing this limitation. • Non-negligible temporal correlations can be spuriously concluded by repeated values. • Data digitized with low amplitude resolutions could be especially affected. • Analysis with shuffled realizations can help to overcome this limitation.

  1. On an experimental curiosity that if undetected may lead to erroneous far-reaching conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noninski, V.C.; Ciottone, J.L.; White, P.J. [Fitchburg State College, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This letter gives a brief discussion of the possibilities of inducing nuclear effects by carrying out only chemical reactions. Undoubtedly, this interest is a result of the still unresolved problem of `cold fusion,` and some colleagues tend to see a clear connection, and even an extension of the studies, between cold fusion and the alleged chemical transmutation of elements. While we have already published thorough reports (negative so far) of our studies with regard to the claimed increase of gamma-ray emission and beta decay after burning of a mixture of chemicals, this letter informs the Fusion Technology readership of an experimental curiosity that is encountered during similar studies that initially led us to an erroneous conclusion. As in previous studies, we compared certain radiochemical properties of a mixture of chemicals before and after a chemical reaction (burning). Under discussion here is a peak that we observed in the range of 412 keV in the gamma spectrum in one of the burned samples after neutron activating it for 3 min at 1 kW. This peak was ostensibly not present in the same sample unburned. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Pressure Measurement Techniques for Abdominal Hypertension: Conclusions from an Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Santosh Chopra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP measurement is an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of abdominal hypertension. Different techniques have been described in the literature and applied in the clinical setting. Methods. A porcine model was created to simulate an abdominal compartment syndrome ranging from baseline IAP to 30 mmHg. Three different measurement techniques were applied, comprising telemetric piezoresistive probes at two different sites (epigastric and pelvic for direct pressure measurement and intragastric and intravesical probes for indirect measurement. Results. The mean difference between the invasive IAP measurements using telemetric pressure probes and the IVP measurements was −0.58 mmHg. The bias between the invasive IAP measurements and the IGP measurements was 3.8 mmHg. Compared to the realistic results of the intraperitoneal and intravesical measurements, the intragastric data showed a strong tendency towards decreased values. The hydrostatic character of the IAP was eliminated at high-pressure levels. Conclusion. We conclude that intragastric pressure measurement is potentially hazardous and might lead to inaccurately low intra-abdominal pressure values. This may result in missed diagnosis of elevated abdominal pressure or even ACS. The intravesical measurements showed the most accurate values during baseline pressure and both high-pressure plateaus.

  3. Moves and Wrap-Up Sentences in Chinese Students’ Essay Conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Whether L1 (first language rhetorical transfer affects L2 (second language writing remains a controversial issue. Based on Hyland’s move theory, this article focuses on the moves and the quality of wrap-up sentences in essay conclusions, exploring the impact of L1 rhetorical transfer. One hundred eighty-four expository essays written by Chinese college students were analyzed, as well as 20 English and 20 Chinese model essays. Besides, sentence-initial discourse markers in 100 Chinese model essays were collected and categorized to investigate why Chinese teachers and students favor certain English linking adverbials. The research results show that the Chinese students displayed their strategy use in Discourse Marker, Consolidation and Close, but the preference to certain sets of linking adverbials and Affirmation move can be attributed to the L1 rhetorical transfer at lexical level and text level. In this study, L1 rhetorical transfer has been found to go hand in hand with strategy use. For the students at tertiary level, strategy use might overweigh L1 rhetorical transfer.

  4. Development integration via real and technological convergence. Experience of Poland and conclusions for Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał G. Woźniak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes main achievements, losses and gains during the first decade of Poland's membership in the EU, while also aiming at development of suggestions for the Polish economic policy in the years to come, as well as draws conclusions for Ukraine, which has now elected the strategy of international economic cooperation. The first part of the paper presents an empirical analysis of Poland's both real and technological convergence with the developed EU countries. These data show that since 1994, as the process of Poland integration with the EU commenced, our country significantly reduced the income and technology gap as compared to the EU. During the financial crisis, Poland 'felt' better than most European countries. In the second part of the paper we attempt to answer the question as to the current conditions of Polish economy development. It is demonstrated that Poland's economic success was due to multiple factors such as endogenous and exogenous, historical and those derived from present events. However, it can be assumed that integration with the EU has been an important positive factor in development of Poland during recent 20 years. Great importance was also vested in the implementation of economic reforms in Poland as well as in policy of the government, although not faultless. The last section of the paper identifies problems now faced by the EU and individual member states, including Poland as regards future years till 2020

  5. Conclusion: The Politics of Numbers – Censuses in the Post-Yugoslav States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeren Keil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This conclusion poses a number of questions related to policy issues and the censuses in the post-Yugoslav states. It is argued that censuses are always more than just a technical counting exercise. Census discussions in Western Europe tend to focus on regional funding, infrastructure support and long-term policy planning, and can be as contested and heated as questions over identity, religion and mother tongue in the post-Yugoslav states. However, identity-related questions in an area in which identity is still in flux and in which fundamental demographic changes have taken place recently, prevent any focus on more policy-oriented discussions. In their EU integration process, all of the post-Yugoslav countries will have to concentrate on issues such as economic development, sustainable infrastructure planning, budgeting within the strict rules of the most recent EU agreements and hence policy discussions should be at the forefront of the debates about the results of the censuses. Instead, discussions over who is counted and how remain of key importance in all countries (even those that have joined the EU, and demonstrate unconsolidated nation-building projects.

  6. Highlights and Conclusions of the Chalonge 13th Paris Cosmology Colloquium

    CERN Document Server

    de Vega, H J

    2010-01-01

    The 13th Chalonge Paris Cosmology Colloquium was held at the historic Perrault building of Observatoire de Paris on 23-25 July 2009. The Colloquium was held in the spirit of the Chalonge School, putting together real cosmological and astrophysical data and hard theory predictive approach in the framework of the Standard Model of the Universe. Peter Biermann, James Bullock, Claudio Destri, Hector de Vega, Massimo Giovannini, Sasha Kashlinsky, Eiichiro Komatsu, Anthony Lasenby and Norma G. Sanchez present here their highlights of the Colloquium. The summary and conclusions by H. J. de Vega, M. C. Falvella and N. G. Sanchez stress among other points: (i) the primordial CMB fluctuations are almost gaussian, large primordial non-gaussianity and large running index are strongly disfavored. The primordial graviton ratio r is predicted in the effective theory of inflation to be between 0.021 and 0.053, at reach of the next CMB observations. (ii) Dark energy observations are consistent with the cosmological constant. ...

  7. Advisory Functions of Selected Polish Business Institutions in the Innovation Process in Enterprises – Research Conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KUROWSKA-PYSZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains an analysis of innovation processes in enterprises, from the perspective of demand for knowledge, which companies increasingly obtain from business environment. This requires a discernment of valuable partners in the environment, who will provide professional transfer of knowledge to the company. Therefore, knowledge has become a product, and Polish universities and specialized, commercial knowledge providers are competing for the customer on the knowledge market. While knowledge transfer to companies is a secondary activity for Polish universities, specialized, commercial knowledge suppliers are making an effort of acquiring as much orders as possible. Therefore a natural competition between these two types of entities arises. In this paper the Author examines possibilities of supporting innovation-oriented enterprises by Polish universities and commercial providers of knowledge and formulates terms and conditions which will make cooperation between these two groups of entities possible, so as to transform the competition into cooperation, beneficial for both sides, and support innovative processes in enterprises.

  8. EXPERIENCES OF OPERATING AND STUDYING IN SECOND LIFE: Conclusions for Training Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta LISKI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Educational Association Citizens´ Forum SKAF ry is an educational institution for non-formal education. The Citizens’ Forum has been an active Second Life participant since 2007, researching its potential and challenges in educational use and non-governmental organisation activities. The first training sessions were organised in 2008 on a block of land rented from EduFinland I island. Later, ownership was acquired of the Suomi ry (Finland ry island, which was customised to serve Finnish organisations and non-governmental organisations (further NGO. The citizens’ Forum’s training courses have covered training in Second Life and the organisation of cooperative meetings and various other events in Second Life. The overall length of training sessions has been one month. Each course has consisted of 3-5. 1.5 hour meetings in Second Life and interim tasks completed either individually or in small groups. In addition to Second Life, Moodle, an online learning environment, has been employed in which tasks, experiences and feedback have been gathered and which has also contained written summaries of what was learned during the Second Life meetings. The Second Life environment has also been regularly utilised in Citizens’ Forum staff and various other work group work related meetings.Funding and ventures 2008: Ministry of Education special funding, Initiation of Second Life courses and construction of environment 2009-2010: ESF programme Open Learning Environments-AVO venture, development and implementation of Second Life educational programmes.This article is based on practical experiences gained from Ø suitability of cooperative educational processes for Second LifeØ constructing a Second Life environment for educational useØ suitability of Second Life technology and tools for education and team workØ practical methods related to educational situations .

  9. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an Inter

  10. The Conclusion of the Roman-Gothic Peace Treaty in 382

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Cedilnik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Seeking to call attention to the possibilities raised by the available sources but so far left unexamined, the author indicates some possible interpretations, which, however, can be proved with no more certainty than the prevailing view. Assuming that they might be correct, the course of events which led to the peace treaty of 382 may be summarised as follows. After the crushing defeat suffered by the Roman army in the Battle of Adrianople on August 9th, 378, Emperor Gratian attempted to stem the hostile rampages of the Goths, Huns, and Alans by offering them a truce in the same year. Since he was unsuccessful, the appointment of Theodosius as the new Emperor in the eastern part of the Roman Empire implied that the latter, at the head of a reorganised eastern army, would bear the main burden and responsibility in the Gothic war. In keeping with this plan, Illyricum, previously annexed to the West in its entirety, was divided into the western and eastern parts. The eastern part with the dioceses of Dacia and Macedonia, perceived as more prone to invasions by the Goths and their associates, the Huns and Alans, was annexed to Theodosius’ East, while the western part remained subject to the western administrative structures. If the campaigns of Theodosius’ army proved successful, the West was presumably no longer expected to come under attack, so the troops stationed there were, in the unlikely event of an attack, meant to stop the enemy’s progress only if Theodosius’ army should fail to carry out its basic plan. Since the year 379 was marked by Roman successes, owing to the disorganised warfare of the enemy troops, the attack of Alatheus and Saphrax’ group on Pannonia in the spring of 380 came as a surprise, probably no longer seriously contemplated. The surprise may have been still enhanced if the members of the triethnic group did not invade Pannonia from the south, across the Sava River, as might have been expected from their sojourn

  11. Secondary Data Analyses of Conclusions Drawn by the Program Implementers of a Positive Youth Development Program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. H. Siu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes is designed for adolescents with significant psychosocial needs, and its various programs are designed and implemented by social workers (program implementers for specific student groups in different schools. Using subjective outcome evaluation data collected from the program participants (Form C at 207 schools, the program implementers were asked to aggregate data and write down five conclusions (n = 1,035 in their evaluation reports. The conclusions stated in the evaluation reports were further analyzed via secondary data analyses in this study. Results showed that the participants regarded the Tier 2 Program as a success, and was effective in enhancing self-understanding, interpersonal skills, and self-management. They liked the experiential learning approach and activities that are novel, interesting, diversified, adventure-based, and outdoor in nature. They also liked instructors who were friendly, supportive, well-prepared, and able to bring challenges and give positive recognition. Most of the difficulties encountered in running the programs were related to time constraints, clashes with other activities, and motivation of participants. Consistent with the previous evaluation findings, the present study suggests that the Tier 2 Program was well received by the participants and that it was beneficial to the development of the program participants.

  12. Twenty years of children’s health monitoring: organization, results, conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anatol’evna Shabunova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep understanding of human potential reproduction, presenting it as a continuous cycle and reflecting the continuity of generations, is significant for the formation of health and development of children. Today’s children will determine the future of Russian society. It is they who in 10–15 years will be a major part of the labor and creative population, a demographic base of the country. The research into children’s problems through the prism of socio-economic development helps identify targets of the state many-sided policy. The article presents results of the long-term medical sociological monitoring on the formation of child health carried out by the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of RAS with the support of the Vologda Oblast Healthcare Department since 1995. The special monitoring study of health dynamics in real time is unique not only for the Vologda Oblast, but for Russia as well. It reveals the transformation of a personality and the dependence of these changes on direct and indirect factors. The work’s feature is that it addresses an extremely important and wide range of issues: whether man was born healthy or not, if he/she is unhealthy, then why and why he/she was born unhealthy; whether his/her health after the birth is improving or deteriorating; if health is changing, what causes the changes. The 15 year observations disclose the dynamics of child health in the conditions of transformation processes taking place in the country. If the official statistics only records certain health trends, the monitoring results allow us to talk about them at a qualitatively new level. They reveal the underlying causes of demographic processes. The conclusion is, on the one hand, obvious and, on the other hand, it can not be neglected: economic stability and orderly development of the social sphere are critical for family well-being and child health. The reverse situation leads to the destruction of the family

  13. Food, plant food, and vegetarian diets in the US dietary guidelines: conclusions of an expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David R; Haddad, Ella H; Lanou, Amy Joy; Messina, Mark J

    2009-05-01

    We summarize conclusions drawn from a panel discussion at the "Fifth International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition" about the roles of and emphasis on food, plant food, and vegetarianism in current and future US dietary guidelines. The most general recommendation of the panel was that future dietary guidelines, following the lead of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, should emphasize food-based recommendations and thinking to the full extent that evidence allows. Although nutrient-based thinking and Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) may help ensure an adequate diet in the sense that deficiency states are avoided, the emphasis on DRIs may not capture many important nutritional issues and may inhibit a focus on foods. More generally, in the context of the conference on vegetarian nutrition, this report focuses on the history and structure of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, on various plant food-oriented recommendations that are supported by literature evidence, and on mechanisms for participating in the process of forming dietary guidelines. Among recommendations that likely would improve health and the environment, some are oriented toward increased plant food consumption and some toward vegetarianism. The literature on health effects of individual foods and whole lifestyle diets is insufficient and justifies a call for future food-oriented research, including expanding the evidence base for plant-based and vegetarian diets. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee's role should be carried forward to creation of a publicly accessible icon (eg, the current pyramid) and related materials to ensure that the science base is fully translated for the public.

  14. Cost optimizing of large-scale offshore wind farms. Summary and conclusion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The project comprises investigation of the technical and economical possibilities of large-scale offshore wind farms at 3 locations in the eastern Danish waters: Roedsand and Gedser Rev located south of the islands of Falster and Lolland and Omoe Staagrunde located south-west of the island of Zealand plus experiences obtained from British and German offshore wind energy projects. The project included wind and wave measurements at the above 3 locations, data collection, data processing, meteorological analysis, modelling of wind turbine structure, studies of grid connection, design and optimisation of foundations plus estimates of investments and operation and maintenance costs. All costs are in ECU on 1997 basis. The main conclusion of the project financed by the European Commission is: Areas are available for large scale offshore wind farms in the Danish waters; A large wind potential is found on the sites; Park layouts of projects consisting of around 100 wind turbines each has been developed; Design of the foundations has been optimised radically compared to previous designs; A large potential for optimising of the wind turbine design and operation has been found; Grid connection of the first proposed large wind farms is possible with only minor reinforcement of the transmission system; The visual impact is not prohibitive for the projects; A production cost of 4-5 ECUcent/kWh is competitive with current onshore projects. All in all, the results from this project have proven to be very useful for the further development of large-scale wind farms in the Danish waters, and thereby an inspiration for similar projects in other (European) countries. (LN)

  15. Rapid diagnostic tests duo as alternative to conventional serological assays for conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egüez, Karina E; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Terán, Carolina; Chipana, Zenobia; García, Wilson; Torrico, Faustino; Gascon, Joaquim; Lozano-Beltran, Daniel-Franz; Pinazo, María-Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It affects several million people, mainly in Latin America, and severe cardiac and/or digestive complications occur in ~30% of the chronically infected patients. Disease acute stage is mostly asymptomatic and infection goes undiagnosed. In the chronic phase direct parasite detection is hampered due to its concealed presence and diagnosis is achieved by serological methods, like ELISA or indirect hemagglutination assays. Agreement in at least two tests must be obtained due to parasite wide antigenic variability. These techniques require equipped labs and trained personnel and are not available in distant regions. As a result, many infected people often remain undiagnosed until it is too late, as the two available chemotherapies show diminished efficacy in the advanced chronic stage. Easy-to-use rapid diagnostic tests have been developed to be implemented in remote areas as an alternative to conventional tests. They do not need electricity, nor cold chain, they can return results within an hour and some even work with whole blood as sample, like Chagas Stat-Pak (ChemBio Inc.) and Chagas Detect Plus (InBIOS Inc.). Nonetheless, in order to qualify a rapidly diagnosed positive patient for treatment, conventional serological confirmation is obligatory, which might risk its start. In this study two rapid tests based on distinct antigen sets were used in parallel as a way to obtain a fast and conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis using whole blood samples. Chagas Stat-Pak and Chagas Detect Plus were validated by comparison with three conventional tests yielding 100% sensitivity and 99.3% specificity over 342 patients seeking Chagas disease diagnosis in a reference centre in Sucre (Bolivia). Combined used of RDTs in distant regions could substitute laborious conventional serology, allowing immediate treatment and favouring better adhesion to it.

  16. Symposium Conclusion: Women's cardiovascular health after bed rest or space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L.; Arbeille, Phillipe; Shoemaker, Kevin; Edgell, Heather

    The Canadian Space Agency has recently funded research on two long-duration missions to study cardiovascular deconditioning associated with bed rest or space flight. The first, Women's International Space simulation for Exploration (WISE-2005) examined the responses during a 60-day head down bed rest (HDBR) of 24 women with or without a countermeasure that consisted of supine treadmill running within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device followed by 10-minutes resting LBNP and on different days high intensity resistance exercise on a flywheel device. The second study, Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular Control on return from the International Space Station (CCISS) is currently underway with two male astronauts tested and the first woman anticipated later this year. Women have been previously identified as being more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance than men after both bed rest and space flight studies. Thus, in the WISE-2005 study we examined responses of the cardiovascular system after HDBR in women and compared these to previously published data from men. We found that after HDBR women have a greater increase in heart rate with infusion of the drug isoproterenol and this was consistent with observations in men. However, during drug infusion the women had a reduction in leg vascular resistance while men had an increase. The exercise countermeasure group had preserved heart rate and leg vascular resistance responses to drug infusion. The ability to vasoconstrict the legs and splanchnic region is critical to maintenance of upright posture after HDBR and space flight. In the WISE-2005 study, subjects who were able to constrict the legs and/or splanchnic region after HDBR were much less likely to have a marked drop in blood pressure before the end of 10-minutes upright tilt, and subjects who performed the countermeasure were more likely to be in this group of tilt test finishers. These data provide new insight into mechanisms that might be responsible for

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  18. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...... of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would...

  19. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...

  20. Defining reactivity: how several methodological decisions can affect conclusions about emotional reactivity in psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brady D; Shankman, Stewart A; Olino, Thomas M; Klein, Daniel N

    2011-12-01

    There are many important methodological decisions that need to be made when examining emotional reactivity in psychopathology. In the present study, we examined the effects of two such decisions in an investigation of emotional reactivity in depression: (1) which (if any) comparison condition to employ; and (2) how to define change. Depressed (N = 69) and control (N = 37) participants viewed emotion-inducing film clips while subjective and facial responses were measured. Emotional reactivity was defined using no comparison condition (i.e., raw scores), baseline comparison condition (i.e., no stimulus presented), and neutral comparison condition (i.e., neutral stimulus presented). Change in emotional reactivity was assessed using four analytic approaches: difference scores, percentage change, residualised change, and ANCOVA. Results differed among the three comparison conditions and among several of the analytic approaches. Overall, our investigation suggests that choosing a comparison condition and the definition of change can significantly influence the presence of group differences in emotional reactivity. Recommendations for studies of emotional reactivity in psychopathology are discussed.

  1. Stability of dietary polyphenols under the cell culture conditions: avoiding erroneous conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianbo; Högger, Petra

    2015-02-11

    Most data of bioactivity from dietary polyphenols have been derived from in vitro cell culture experiments. In this context, little attention is paid to potential artifacts due to chemical instability of these natural antioxidants. An early degradation time ((C)T10) and half-degradation time ((C)T50) were defined to characterize the stability of 53 natural antioxidants incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. The degree of hydroxylation of flavones and flavonols significantly influenced the stability in order resorcinol-type > catechol-type > pyrogallol-type, with the pyrogallol-type being least stable. In contrast, any glycosylation of polyphenols obviously enhanced their stability. However, the glycosylation was less important compared to the substitution pattern of the nucleus rings. Methoxylation of flavonoids with more than three hydroxyl groups typically improved their stability as did the hydrogenation of the C2═C3 double bond of flavonoids to corresponding flavanoids. There was no significant correlation between the antioxidant potential of polyphenols and their stability. Notably, the polyphenols were clearly more stable in human plasma than in DMEM, which may be caused by polyphenol-protein interactions. It is strongly suggested to carry out stability tests in parallel with cell culture experiments for dietary antioxidants with catechol or pyrogallol structures and pyrogallol-type glycosides in order to avoid artifacts.

  2. [Misuse of drugs: conclusions of the pharmacovigilance workshops at La Baule, France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermont, I

    2002-01-01

    Drug iatrogeny is a current Public Health issue; it is often related to misuse and is therefore preventable. The congress "Les Ateliers de Pharmacovigilance de La Baule" (May 2001) bringing together pharmacovigilance staff from both the industry and Health authorities, showed that misuse concerns every step of the drug process--prescription, dispensing and administration--and all health professionals as well as the patient. New concepts have been brought to light with regard to the definition of misuse: the medical point of view should be preferred, based on the risk taken by a given patient without the expected benefit. product characteristics alone are inadequate and should be enlarged by relevent scientific data. the main goal is to improve the quality of healthcare by preventing misuse. A working group including Pharmacovigilance staff from the industry, the CRPV and the Afssaps has: to reach a consensus on definition in France and then propose it to EMEA; to analyse and propose specific prevention actions; to write a vademecum of those involved in this prevention.

  3. Important Conclusions on the Messinian Salinity Crisis Depositional History of the Eastern Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Pinar; Aksu, Ali; Hall, Jeremy

    2017-04-01

    The interpretation of a comprehensive set of high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection profiles, multibeam bathymetry data and the litho- and bio-stratigraphic information from exploration wells across the Antalya Basin and Florence Rise revealed important conclusions on the Miocene to Recent tectonic evolution and the Messinian Salinity Crisis depositional history of the eastern Mediterranean Basin. This study clearly demonstrated the presence of a 4-division Messinian evaporite stratigraphy in the eastern Mediterranean, similar to that observed in the western Mediterranean, suggesting the existence of a similar set of depositional processes across the Mediterranean during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. However, the stratigraphic and depositional similarities of the evaporites between the eastern and western basins do not necessitate synchroneity in their depositional histories. The fact that the only saline water source for the eastern Mediterranean is the Atlantic Ocean and that the Sicily sill creates a physical barrier between the eastern and western Mediterranean impose several critical conditions. A simple 2-D model is developed which satisfies these conditions. The synchroneity of evaporite deposition across the eastern and western basins broke down as the Sicily Gateway became largely subaerial during a period when the Calabrian Arc area experienced uplift associated with slab break-off: the Sicily sill must have remained within a "goldilocks" zone to allow the right amount of saline water inflow into the eastern Mediterranean so that evaporites (massive halite) could be deposited. During this time, the sea level in western Mediterranean was at the breach-level of the Sicily sill, thus no evaporite deposition took place there. The model suggests that the eastern and western basin margins experienced a nearly synchronized gypsum deposition associated with the initial drawdown of the Mediterranean level, followed by the resedimentation in the deep

  4. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  5. Fourth Integrated Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (ICNS) Conference and Workshop 2004: Conclusions and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brent; Swanda, Ronald L.; Lewis, Michael S.; Kenagy, Randy; Donahue, George; Homans, Al; Kerczewski, Robert; Pozesky, Marty

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center organized and hosted the Fourth Integrated Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (ICNS) Technologies Conference and Workshop, which took place April 26-30, 2004 at the Hyatt Fair Lakes Hotel in Fairfax, Virginia. This fourth conference of the annual series followed the very successful first ICNS Conference (May 1-3, 2001 in Cleveland, Ohio), second ICNS conference (April 29-May 2, 2002 in Vienna, Virginia), and third ICNS conference (May 19-22, 2003 in Annapolis, Maryland). The purpose of the Fourth ICNS Conference was to assemble government, industry and academic communities performing research and development for advanced digital communications, surveillance and navigation systems and associated applications supporting the national and global air transportation systems to: 1) Understand current efforts and recent results in near- and far-term R&D and technology demonstration; 2) Identify integrated digital communications, navigation and surveillance R&D requirements necessary for a safe, secure and reliable, high-capacity, advanced air transportation system; 3) Provide a forum for fostering collaboration and coordination; and 4) Discuss critical issues and develop recommendations to achieve the future integrated CNS vision for national and global air transportation. The workshop attracted 316 attendees from government, industry and academia to address these purposes through technical presentations, breakout sessions, and individual and group discussions during the workshop and after-hours events, and included 16 international attendees. An Executive Committee consisting of representatives of several key segments of the aviation community concerned with CNS issues met on the day following the workshop to consider the primary outcomes and recommendations of the workshop. This report presents an overview of the conference, workshop breakout session results, and the findings of the Executive Committee.

  6. Zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic and whole-rock geochemical constraints on the Lanhe and Heichashan Groups: Implications for the Paleoproterozoic tectonic basin evolution of the Lüliang Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaohui; Zhao, Guochun; Liu, Fulai; Shi, Jianrong; Ji, Lei; Liu, Pinghua; Yang, Hong; Liu, Lishuang; Wang, Wei; Tian, Zhonghua

    2016-10-01

    The Lüliang Complex is located at the western margin of the middle segment of the Trans-North China Orogen, along which the Western and Eastern Blocks collided to form the North China Craton. The complex mainly consists of metamorphosed granitic plutons and supracrustal rocks, of which the latter are subdivided into the Jiehekou, Lüliang, Yejishan, Lanhe and Heichashan Groups. The Lanhe Group is composed of meta-conglomerates, quartzites, and phyllites with minor meta-basalts, whereas the Heichashan Group consists of molasse-like meta-conglomerates and coarse-grained quartzites. Geochemistry of the Yejishan meta-sedimentary rocks indicates weak source weathering and dominantly chemical immature features, whereas the Lanhe and Heichashan samples display opposite features. U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from the Lanhe Groups yield four age peaks at ~ 2180 Ma, ~ 2370 Ma, ~ 2520 Ma and ~ 2700 Ma. The former three peaks coincide with ages of the Chijianling-Guandishan TTG gneisses (2199-2151 Ma) and meta-volcanic rocks from the Lüliang and Yejishan Groups (2213-2156 Ma), age of the Gaijiazhuang porphyritic gneisses (2375-2364 Ma) and age of the Yunzhongshan TTG gneisses (2499 Ma) respectively, whereas detrital zircons forming the oldest age peak were most likely derived from the early Neoarchean crust of the Eastern Block. For the Heichashan Group, the dominant 2.2-2.0 Ga detrital zircons were probably recycled from the underlying Jiehekou Group and the minority is directly derived from the early Paleoproterozoic granitoids in the Lüliang Complex. The youngest detrital zircon age peaks of ~ 2.17 Ga and ~ 1.82 Ga place maximum depositional ages on the Lanhe and Heichashan Groups respectively, whereas the local 1.81-1.79 Ga massive granites place constraint on their minimum depositional ages. Taking into account the lithostratigraphic features, provenance and formation ages, we suggest that the Lanhe Group formed in a shrinked remnant back-arc basin and the Heichashan

  7. Mechanism and site of inhibition of AMPA receptors: substitution of one and two methyl groups at the 4-aminophenyl ring of 2,3-benzodiazepine and implications in the "E" site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Wu, Andrew; Shen, Yu-Chuan; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Niu, Li

    2015-08-19

    2,3-Benzodiazepines are a well-known group of compounds for their potential antagonism against AMPA receptors. It has been previously reported that the inhibitory effect of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety can be enhanced by simply adding a chlorine atom at position 3 of the 4-aminophenyl ring. Here we report that adding a methyl group at position 3 on the 4-aminophenyl ring, termed as BDZ-11-7, can similarly enhance the inhibitory activity, as compared with the unsubstituted one or BDZ-11-2. Our kinetic studies have shown that BDZ-11-7 is a noncompetitive antagonist of GluA2Q homomeric receptors and prefers to inhibit the closed-channel state. However, adding another methyl group at position 5 on the 4-aminophenyl ring, termed as BDZ-11-6, fails to yield extra inhibition on GluA2Q receptors. Instead, BDZ-11-6 exhibits a diminished inhibition of GluA2Q. Site interaction test indicates the two compounds, BDZ-11-6 and BDZ-11-7, bind to the same site on GluA2Q, which is also the binding site for their prototype, BDZ-11-2. Based on the results from this and our earlier studies, we propose that the binding site that accommodates the 4-aminophenyl ring must contain two interactive points, with one preferring polar groups like chlorine and the other preferring nonpolar groups such as a methyl group. Either adding a chlorine or a methyl group may enhance the inhibitory activity of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety. Adding any two of the same group on positions 3 and 5 of the 4-aminophenyl ring, however, significantly reduces the interaction between these 2,3-benzodiazepines and their binding site, because one group is always repelled by one interactive point. We predict therefore that adding a chlorine atom at position 3 and a methyl group at position 5 of the 4-aminophenyl ring of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivatives with a 7,8-ethylenedioxy moiety may produce a new compound that is more potent.

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  9. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  10. Testing strategies to establish the safety of nanomaterials: conclusions of an ECETOC workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, David B; Borm, Paul J A; Hennes, Christa; Lademann, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    The European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) convened a workshop in Barcelona, Spain, in November 2005 to develop testing strategies to establish the safety of nanomaterials. It brought together about 70 scientific and clinical experts from industry, academia, government agencies, research institutes, and nongovernmental organizations. The primary questions to be addressed were the following: What can we do today, and what do we need tomorrow? The three major themes of the workshop were: (1) the need for enhanced efforts in nanomaterial characterization; (2) methodologies for assessments of airborne and internal exposures to nanomaterials; and (3) evaluation of the hazard potential--primarily focusing on pulmonary or dermal routes of exposures. Some of the summary conclusions of the workshop included the following: For the development of nanoparticle characterization, the working definition of nanoparticles was defined as < 100 nm in one dimension or < 1000 nm to include aggregates and agglomerates. Moreover, it was concluded that although many physical factors can influence toxicity, including nanoparticle composition, it is dissolution, surface area and characteristics, size, size distribution, and shape that largely determine the functional, toxicological and environmental impact of nanomaterials. In addition, most of the information on potential systemic effects has thus far been derived from combustion-generated particles. With respect to the assessment of external exposures and metrics appropriate for nanoparticles, the general view of the meeting was that currently it is not possible or desirable to select one form of dose metric (i.e., mass, surface area, or particle number) as the most appropriate measure source. However, it was clear that the surface area metric was likely to be of interest and requires further development. In addition, there is a clear and immediate need to develop instruments which are smaller, more

  11. Estudo sobre o melhoramento da laranja "Baía" III: Conclusão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Brieger

    1941-09-01

    -test (guadro IV and the "test of sequence" (quadro V. It was possible to separate the sample into three groups : the type "Baianinha Piracicaba" with a medium mean fruit diameter per tree, the "Baía" with large fruits and the new type "Baianinha Araras" with small fruits. 6. The experimental plot was selected as beeing reasonably uniform. The statistical analysis however revealed significant, though not very important heterogeneities which can only be partially responsible for the variations between trees mentioned above (quadro VI. 7. There is a constant negative linear correlation between the number of fruits per tree and the mean fruit diameter, the coefficient r beeing the same in all years and equal to 0.5 (quadro X. On the average, a loss of 1 mm in mean diameter corresponds to a gain of 50 fruits per tree. 8. The error within trees both when comparing the errors per tree in the same year or of different years showed significant variations which are however without much praticai importance. The annual means of these errors (sD vary from 4,69 mm in 1937 to 7,56 mm in 1939 (quadro VIII. 9. The error within trees cannot be used as a reliable measure since the variations within trees are highly abnormal, restricted by two physiological limits which prevent the appearance of very small or very large fruits and show sometimes a tendency to asymetry and bimodality. 10. The possible causes for the abnormal variation "within" were studied in some detail. The only positive result was obtained when comparing the production on older branches with that on recent strong off-shoots. In some case it was possible to collect the fruits on these components of a tree separately, the older branches forming the lower and the other the top parts of the tree (fig. 7. The latter produce always larger fruits (quadro IX and fig. 2. 11. Heterogeneity of the root stocks seems to be the most probable cause of the heterogeneity between trees. It has been shown by other experiments, not yet

  12. Inconsistent year-to-year fluctuations limit the conclusiveness of global higher education rankings for university management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Sorz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Backround. University rankings are getting very high international media attention, this holds particularly true for the Times Higher Education Ranking (THE and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities Ranking (ARWU. We therefore aimed to investigate how reliable the rankings are, especially for universities with lower ranking positions, that often show inconclusive year-to-year fluctuations in their rank, and if these rankings are thus a suitable basis for management purposes.Methods. We used the public available data from the web pages of the THE and the ARWU ranking to analyze the dynamics of change in score and ranking position from year to year, and we investigated possible causes for inconsistent fluctuations in the rankings by the means of regression analyses.Results. Regression analyses of results from the THE and ARWU from 2010–2014 show inconsistent fluctuations in the rank and score for universities with lower rank positions (below position 50 which lead to inconsistent “up and downs” in the total results, especially in the THE and to a lesser extent also in the ARWU. In both rankings, the mean year-to-year fluctuation of universities in groups of 50 universities aggregated by descending rank increases from less than 10% in the group of the 50 highest ranked universities to up to 60% in the group of the lowest ranked universities. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond in THES- and ARWU-Rankings for universities below rank 50.Discussion. We conclude that the observed fluctuations in the THE do not correspond to actual university performance and ranking results are thus of limited conclusiveness for the university management of universities below a rank of 50. While the ARWU rankings seems more robust against inconsistent fluctuations, its year to year changes in the scores are very small, so essential changes from year to year could not be expected. Furthermore, year

  13. Inconsistent year-to-year fluctuations limit the conclusiveness of global higher education rankings for university management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorz, Johannes; Wallner, Bernard; Seidler, Horst; Fieder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Backround. University rankings are getting very high international media attention, this holds particularly true for the Times Higher Education Ranking (THE) and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University's Academic Ranking of World Universities Ranking (ARWU). We therefore aimed to investigate how reliable the rankings are, especially for universities with lower ranking positions, that often show inconclusive year-to-year fluctuations in their rank, and if these rankings are thus a suitable basis for management purposes. Methods. We used the public available data from the web pages of the THE and the ARWU ranking to analyze the dynamics of change in score and ranking position from year to year, and we investigated possible causes for inconsistent fluctuations in the rankings by the means of regression analyses. Results. Regression analyses of results from the THE and ARWU from 2010-2014 show inconsistent fluctuations in the rank and score for universities with lower rank positions (below position 50) which lead to inconsistent "up and downs" in the total results, especially in the THE and to a lesser extent also in the ARWU. In both rankings, the mean year-to-year fluctuation of universities in groups of 50 universities aggregated by descending rank increases from less than 10% in the group of the 50 highest ranked universities to up to 60% in the group of the lowest ranked universities. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond in THES- and ARWU-Rankings for universities below rank 50. Discussion. We conclude that the observed fluctuations in the THE do not correspond to actual university performance and ranking results are thus of limited conclusiveness for the university management of universities below a rank of 50. While the ARWU rankings seems more robust against inconsistent fluctuations, its year to year changes in the scores are very small, so essential changes from year to year could not be expected. Furthermore, year-to-year results do not correspond

  14. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  15. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  16. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  17. Critical Thinking: Implications for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesizes critical thinking research in four areas--reading, writing, group interactions, and speaking--and discusses the implications of those studies for library information science research. The potential for employing critical thinking strategies in bibliographic instruction and the need for library science educators to initiate their own…

  18. Geomagnetic field: Conclusions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gorodnitsky, A.M.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.

    stream_size 1 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mem_Geol_Soc_India_1998_39_38.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mem_Geol_Soc_India_1998_39_38.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  19. Conclusion (The Mobile Future)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Aaron; Sala, Riccardo; Roibás, Anxo Cereijo

    There are a couple of fundamental beliefs that I hold about the future of technology and media. First, I believe that, absolutely, most, if not all, media will be delivered, at least intermittently in its lifecycle, over an IP network. It is an efficient carrier, it is scalable, and it can be organically evolved. Whether this is IPV6 or some other technology is inconsequential, it will just work.

  20. Out of Conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Frederiksen, Martin Demant

    2013-01-01

    Based on long-term fieldwork in Northeast Brazil and the Republic of Georgia, this article explores how open-endedness can be incorporated into ethnographic analysis and writing, not as the empirical object, but as a basic condition for our knowledge production. In the empirical contexts that we...... describe, daily life is marked by poor prospects and lack of possibility, especially for young people. Rather than letting this guide our analyses and ways of writing, this article argues for the necessity of paying attention to the openness and potential of experienced moments of change. We propose...... that even relapses into former habits and predicaments may present a potential for change on a subjective level, as they call for re-starting one’s personal life. As a meta-story to this discussion, we reflect upon the process of putting our informants’ stories into words and analysis. Revisiting both field...

  1. Conclusions and Further Readings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A.

    1979-01-01

    The components of a complete and effective marketing plan for higher education institutions are summarized. It is suggested that a marketing plan embrace all elements of the total marketing concept, and include curriculum evaluation, a retention program, and a scheme for evaluating the strategy's effectiveness. A bibliography is included.…

  2. 9.0 Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. Murdoch; Jennifer C. Jenkins; Richard A. Birdsey

    2008-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin (DRB) CEMRI effort described in this document points to several opportunities for national and regional collaboration strategies that could greatly improve the interpretive power of our environmental monitoring programs.

  3. Instead of a Conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosenrode, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The findings of the book are summarised and commented upon. The concept of 'martyrdom' and the reluctance in the use of violence are discussed......The findings of the book are summarised and commented upon. The concept of 'martyrdom' and the reluctance in the use of violence are discussed...

  4. Conclusion et discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Romain; Wachtel, Nathan; Berger, Laurent; Levi, Giovanni; Boucheron, Patrick; Calvo, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    M. Romain BERTRANDNous voilà désormais rendus au terme probablement très provisoire concernant les débats et les discussions des travaux de Nathan WACHTEL lors de cette rencontre. Il nous reste une trentaine de minutes pour engager le débat avec les participants de la dernière séance et, le cas échéant, faire valoir des remarques générales sur telle ou telle session. Je souhaiterais inviter Nathan WACHTEL à initier cet échange s’il le souhaite. M. Nathan WACHTELComme je l’expliquais à Romain,...

  5. Conclusions and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, van H.; Kabat, P.; Connor, R.

    2003-01-01

    Work will continue. The Water-and-Climate ball is rolling and there is a strong commitment to keep it going. This wrapup chapter contains a ten-point action agenda for countries, river basin authorities, regional organisations and the international development community. Contents: 6.1 Undeniable evi

  6. Different Teams, Same Conclusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuller, Thomas E; Haider, Haula F; Kikidis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Background: Though clinical guidelines for assessment and treatment of chronic subjective tinnitus do exist, a comprehensive review of those guidelines has not been performed. The objective of this review was to identify current clinical guidelines, and compare their recommendations for the asses......Background: Though clinical guidelines for assessment and treatment of chronic subjective tinnitus do exist, a comprehensive review of those guidelines has not been performed. The objective of this review was to identify current clinical guidelines, and compare their recommendations...

  7. Summary and conclusions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Neprochnov, Y.P.; Subrahmanyam, C.

    stream_size 4 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mem_Geol_Soc_India_1998_39_233.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mem_Geol_Soc_India_1998_39_233.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  8. Conformational analysis of thioglycoside derivatives of histo-blood group ABH antigens using an ab initio-derived reparameterization of MM4: implications for design of non-hydrolysable mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strino, Francesco; Lii, Jenn-Huei; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2009-12-01

    Histo-blood group ABH antigens serve as recognition sites for infectious microorganisms and tissue lectins in intercellular communication, e.g. in tumor progression. Thus, they are of interest as a starting point for drug design. In this respect, potent non-hydrolysable derivatives such as thioglycosides are of special interest. As prerequisite to enable estimations of ligand properties relative to their natural counterparts, conformational properties of the thioglycosidic derivatives of ABH trisaccharides and their disaccharide units were calculated using systematic and filtered systematic searches with the MM4 force field. Parameters for the glycosidic torsions of thioglycosides were independently derived from ab initio calculations. The resulting energy deviations required a reparameterization of MM4 to a new parameter set called MM4R. The data sets obtained using MM4R reveal that the thioglycosides have somewhat increased levels of flexibility about the major low-energy conformations shared with the corresponding O-glycosides. In the trisaccharides, the thiosubstitution of the Gal[NAc]α1-3Gal linkage leads to a preference for a conformation which is the secondary minimum of the natural counterparts. This conformation also generates contacts between the N-acetyl group and the fucose moiety in the blood group A derivative. Calculations further indicate that thiosubstitution of only the Fucα1-2Gal linkage does not affect the conformational preferences compared to the natural trisaccharide. Thiosubstitution of both linkages in the trisaccharide results in increased flexibility but the favored conformation of the natural trisaccharides is preferred. The study suggests that thioglycoside derivatives of ABH antigens could have pharmaceutical interest as ligands of lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  9. Systems of Organization and Allocation of National Resources for Scientific Research: Some International Comparisons and Conclusions for New Market Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Charles, Jr.; Passman, Sidney

    1991-01-01

    Reviews science and technology policymaking in five countries with free-market economies: the United Kingdom, Germany, France, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. Implications for eastern European and other countries currently reorganizing toward domestic market economies and greater orientation toward world trade are discussed. (61…

  10. Super-heavy pyrite (δ34Spyr > δ34SCAS) in the terminal Proterozoic Nama Group, Southern Namibia: Implications for atmospheric oxygen and seawater sulfate at the dawn of animal life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, J. B.; Fike, D. A.; Pratt, L.; Lyons, T. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur isotope analysis (δ34S) of well-preserved carbonates spanning a ca. 10 Myr interval of the terminal Proterozoic Nama Group in Namibia, southwestern Africa, reveals that pyrite is consistently enriched in 34S relative to coeval seawater sulfate as preserved in carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). This observation is not consistent with the current paradigm for interpreting the geologic record of sulfur isotopes, which assumes that pyrite δ34S (δ34Spyr) will be equal to or less than co-occurring CAS δ34S (δ34SCAS) due to the kinetic isotope effect of bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) that favors the lighter isotope of sulfur (32S) during sulfur-oxygen bond-breakage. Although the precise mechanism of pyrite enrichment is debatable, our combined observations of extremely enriched pyrite, low concentrations of CAS and pyrite, and high frequency fluctuations in δ34SCAS and δ34Spyr throughout the Nama Group carbonates point to very low concentrations of sulfate in portions of the terminal Proterozoic ocean. The additional occurrence of 34S-enriched pyrite in contemporaneous terminal Proterozoic sections from Poland and Canada reveal that low seawater sulfate may have been widespread in the oceans at this time. However, the absence of such extremely 34S-enriched pyrites from well-preserved, coeval carbonate sections in Oman suggests that such conditions were not globally uniform. Low, geographically varied concentrations of marine sulfate in terminal Proterozoic time are consistent with elevated and geographically varied concentrations of reactive, non-pyritized iron in marine shales recently reported for this interval, suggesting that high dissolved Fe(II)/low O2 conditions persisted in a range of marine facies as late as 543 Ma - tens of millions of years after the origin of animals yet prior to their major diversification in Early Cambrian time.

  11. Strategic Innovation of International Large Media Groups and the Implications to China%国外大型传媒集团战略革新对中国的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉继军

    2013-01-01

    Media technological innovations serve as a catalyst for the evolution of media ecology and the new media technologies featured by digitization have greatly transformed the operating model and communication philosophies of large media groups. Through new media technology, they realized a deep integration of content and platforms; they took advantage of the business realignment to realize the convergence of different media, which further consolidated their predominance in international communication order. When cloud computing is the norm in the digital technology, media groups should design media products that meet the tailored needs of information consumers so as to gain competitive advantage in the industry.%媒介技术的进步是传播生态变革的催化剂,以数字技术为核心的新媒体技术深刻地改变了大众传播形态,并促使传统传媒集团不断进行战略革新.以英国广播公司等为代表的大型传媒集团利用新媒体技术对内容和渠道进行深度集成,充分挖掘受众的个性化需求,并以业务整合为契机实现跨媒体融合,进一步巩固了其在国际传播领域内的强势地位.面对新媒体变革所带来的机遇与挑战,中国媒体应该了解与西方传媒的差距,学习其先进的经验和方法,力争改变国际传播领域内“西强东弱”的局面.

  12. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role...... of mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  13. Stable isotope and noble gas constraints on the source and residence time of spring water from the Table Mountain Group Aquifer, Paarl, South Africa and implications for large scale abstraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. A.; Dunford, A. J.; Swana, K. A.; Palcsu, L.; Butler, M.; Clarke, C. E.

    2017-08-01

    Large scale groundwater abstraction is increasingly being used to support large urban centres especially in areas of low rainfall but presents particular challenges in the management and sustainability of the groundwater system. The Table Mountain Group (TMG) Aquifer is one of the largest and most important aquifer systems in South Africa and is currently being considered as an alternative source of potable water for the City of Cape Town, a metropolis of over four million people. The TMG aquifer is a fractured rock aquifer hosted primarily in super mature sandstones, quartzites and quartz arenites. The groundwater naturally emanates from numerous springs throughout the cape region. One set of springs were examined to assess the source and residence time of the spring water. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes indicate that the spring water has not been subject to evaporation and in combination with Na/Cl ratios implies that recharge to the spring systems is via coastal precipitation. Although rainfall in the Cape is usually modelled on orographic rainfall, δ18O and δ2H values of some rainfall samples are strongly positive indicating a stratiform component as well. Comparing the spring water δ18O and δ2H values with that of local rainfall, indicates that the springs are likely derived from continuous bulk recharge over the immediate hinterland to the springs and not through large and/or heavy downpours. Noble gas concentrations, combined with tritium and radiocarbon activities indicate that the residence time of the TMG groundwater in this area is decadal in age with a probable maximum upper limit of ∼40 years. This residence time is probably a reflection of the slow flow rate through the fractured rock aquifer and hence indicates that the interconnectedness of the fractures is the most important factor controlling groundwater flow. The short residence time of the groundwater suggest that recharge to the springs and the Table Mountain Group Aquifer as a whole is

  14. Microglial Amyloid-β1-40 Phagocytosis Dysfunction Is Caused by High-Mobility Group Box Protein-1: Implications for the Pathological Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Takata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer disease (AD patient brains, the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides is associated with activated microglia. Aβ is derived from the amyloid precursor protein; two major forms of Aβ, that is, Aβ1-40 (Aβ40 and Aβ1-42 (Aβ42, exist. We previously reported that rat microglia phagocytose Aβ42, and high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, a chromosomal protein, inhibits phagocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous HMGB1 on rat microglial Aβ40 phagocytosis. In the presence of exogenous HMGB1, Aβ40 markedly increased in microglial cytoplasm, and the reduction of extracellular Aβ40 was inhibited. During this period, HMGB1 was colocalized with Aβ40 in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, exogenous HMGB1 inhibited the degradation of Aβ40 induced by the rat microglial cytosolic fraction. Thus, extracellular HMGB1 may internalize with Aβ40 in the microglial cytoplasm and inhibit Aβ40 degradation by microglia. This may subsequently delay Aβ40 clearance. We further confirmed that in AD brains, the parts of senile plaques surrounded by activated microglia are composed of Aβ40, and extracellular HMGB1 is deposited on these plaques. Taken together, microglial Aβ phagocytosis dysfunction may be caused by HMGB1 that accumulates extracellularly on Aβ plaques, and it may be critically involved in the pathological progression of AD.

  15. Complete Deletion of the Fucose Operon in Haemophilus influenzae Is Associated with a Cluster in Multilocus Sequence Analysis-Based Phylogenetic Group II Related to Haemophilus haemolyticus: Implications for Identification and Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gier, Camilla; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus are difficult to differentiate from Haemophilus influenzae despite a wide difference in pathogenic potential. A previous investigation characterized a challenging set of 60 clinical strains using multiple PCRs for marker genes and described strains that could not be unequivocally identified as either species. We have analyzed the same set of strains by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. MLSA unambiguously allocated all study strains to either of the two species, while identification by 16S rRNA sequence was inconclusive for three strains. Notably, the two methods yielded conflicting identifications for two strains. Most of the "fuzzy species" strains were identified as H. influenzae that had undergone complete deletion of the fucose operon. Such strains, which are untypeable by the H. influenzae multilocus sequence type (MLST) scheme, have sporadically been reported and predominantly belong to a single branch of H. influenzae MLSA phylogenetic group II. We also found evidence of interspecies recombination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus within the 16S rRNA genes. Establishing an accurate method for rapid and inexpensive identification of H. influenzae is important for disease surveillance and treatment.

  16. Teaching Group Work with "The Great Debaters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffry; Autry, Linda; Olson, Joann S.; Johnson, Kaprea F.

    2014-01-01

    An experiential learning activity, based on the film "The Great Debaters" (Washington, D., 2007), was used during a group work class. Description and preliminary evaluation of the activity is provided, including analysis of participant scores on the group leader self-efficacy instrument at multiple points. Implications and future…

  17. Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke patients: implications and interpretation of IMS III, MR RESCUE, and SYNTHESIS EXPANSION trials: A report from the Working Group of International Congress of Interventional Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Aleu, Aitziber; Connors, John J.; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Hassan, Ameer E.; Hussein, Haitham M.; Janjua, Nazli A.; Khatri, Rakesh; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Mazighi, Mikael; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Miley, Jefferson T.; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Shah, Qaisar A.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Suarez, Jose I.; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Tolun, Reha

    2014-01-01

    and those without large vessel occlusion on computed tomographic/magnetic resonance angiography. Conclusions: The results do not support a large magnitude benefit of endovascular treatment in subjects randomized in all the three trials. The possibility that benefits of a smaller magnitude exist in certain patient populations cannot be excluded. Large magnitude benefits can be expected with implementation of “parameter optimized endovascular treatment” in patients with ischemic stroke who are candidates for IV thrombolytics. PMID:24920991

  18. Confinement: G(2) group case

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, A; Lucini, B; Pica, C

    2007-01-01

    The gauge group being centreless, $G_2$ gauge theory is a good laboratory for studying the role of the centre of the group for colour confinement in Yang-Mills gauge theories. In this paper, we investigate $G_2$ pure gauge theory at finite temperature on the lattice. By studying the finite size scaling of the plaquette, the Polyakov loop and their susceptibilities, we show that a deconfinement phase transition takes place. The analysis of the pseudocritical exponents give strong evidence of the deconfinement transition being first order. Implications of our findings for scenarios of colour confinement are discussed.

  19. Microstructural observation and chemical dating on monazite from the Shilu Group, Hainan Province of South China: Implications for origin and evolution of the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Deru; Kusiak, Monika A.; Wang, Zhilin; Chen, Huayong; Bakun-Czubarow, Nonna; Wu, Chuanjun; Konečný, Patrik; Hollings, Peter

    2015-02-01

    New monazite chemical U-Th-total-Pb (CHIME) ages, combined with microstructural observations, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemistry, indicate that the large-scale, banded iron formation (BIF)-type Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district in Hainan Province, South China is a multistage product of sedimentation, metamorphism, and hydrothermal-metasomatic alteration associated with multiple orogenies. Two types of monazite, i.e. "polygenetic" and "metamorphic", were identified. The "polygenetic monazite" comprises a magmatic and/or metamorphic core surrounded by a metamorphic rim, and shows complex zoning. Breakdown corona structure, with a core of monazite surrounded by a mantle of fluorapatite, allanite, and/or epidote as concentric growth rings, is commonly observed. This type of monazite yielded three main CHIME-age peaks at ca. 980 Ma, ca. 880 Ma and ca. 450 Ma. The ages which range up to ca. 880 Ma for detrital cores, record a pre-deformational magmatic and/or metamorphic event(s), and is considered to be the depositional time-interval of the Shilu Group and interbedded BIFs in a marine, back-arc foreland basin likely due to the Grenvillian or South China Sibao orogeny. After deposition, the Shilu district was subjected to an orogenic event, which is recorded by the syndeformational metamorphic monazite with ca. 560-450 Ma population. Probably this event not only caused amphibolite facies metamorphism and associated regional foliation S1 but also enriched the original BIFs, and most likely corresponds to the "Pan-African" and/or the South China Caledonian orogeny. The post-deformational "metamorphic" monazite occurs mostly as inclusions in garnet and shows ca. 260 Ma age. It likely represents the Late Permian post-magmatic hydrothermal and related retrograde event(s) initiated by the Indosinian orogeny due to the closure of the Paleo-Tethys. The breakdown of monazite to secondary coronal mineral phases as well as the Fe-remobilization and associated skarnization

  20. Definition, diagnosis and treatment strategies for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction - Recommendations of the Nordic Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Munkholm, Pia; Simrén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    and incomplete evacuation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of its many symptoms and probably the most prevalent. The current review describes the pathophysiology, clinical implications and treatment of OIBD. Methods The Nordic Working Group was formed to provide input for Scandinavian specialists...... by exogenous opioids, there are changes in motility, secretion and absorption of fluids, and sphincter function that are reflected in clinical symptoms. The group supported a recent consensus statement for OIC, which takes into account the change in bowel habits for at least one week rather than focusing......, and they show advantages over laxatives. It should not be overlooked that many reasons for constipation other than OIBD exist, which should be taken into consideration in the individual patient. Conclusion and implications It is the belief of this Nordic Working Group that increased awareness of adverse effects...

  1. Influenza immunization rates in children and teenagers in Polish cities: conclusions from the 2009/2010 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, Ernest; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Zycinska, Katarzyna; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Szenborn, Leszek; Wardyn, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine influenza vaccine coverage among children aged 0-18 years in inner city practices in Poland in the 2009/2010 season and factors that might have influenced low vaccination coverage. A retrospective review of 11,735 vaccination charts of children aged 0-18 from seven randomly selected general practices in the capital city of Warsaw and one large practice in the city of Wroclaw was performed. We calculated the numbers of children who were vaccinated in the 2009/2010 season and analyzed the age distribution of vaccinated children. We also reviewed the vaccination history in patients who were vaccinated against influenza including: previous influenza vaccinations, modification (widening) of standard immunization scheme, and a proportion of children who completed the recommended two-dose schedule of vaccination. In the calculations, 95% confidence intervals were used. Out of the total of 11,735 children surveyed, 362 (3.1%, CI: 2.8-3.4%) were vaccinated against influenza in the 2009/2010 season. For 115 of these 362 (31.8%, CI: 27.0-36.6%) children it was their first vaccination against influenza. The mean age of a vaccinated child was 6.0 ± 4.3 years. Children aged 2-5 were most commonly vaccinated (153/362, 42.3%, CI: 37.2-47.4%), while infants (aged 6-12 months) were vaccinated rarely (15/362, 4.4%, CI: 2.2-6.2%). In the group of children younger than 8 years (86/362 children) who were vaccinated for the first time in their life only 29/86 (33.7%, CI: 23.7-43.7%) completed the recommended two-dose schedule. In conclusion, the importance of vaccinating children against influenza is hugely understated in Poland. General physicians should actively recommend annual influenza immunization of children. Recommendations of National Immunization Program concerning influenza vaccine should be clearer, simpler, and easier to implement.

  2. Aging and Others’ Pain Processing: Implications for Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Di Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While self-pain perception has been widely investigated in aging, the perception as well as memory of pain in others has received little attention. Methods. The study was designed as a cross-sectional behavioral study in which a group of 41 younger and a group of 41 older adults evaluated a series of valenced and pain-related pictures and were later required to recall them. Results. We found that older adults judge the stimuli as being less intense compared to their younger counterparts. However, older adults remembered a larger number of pictures with individuals expressing pain compared to pictures with individuals who have neutral or positive facial expressions. Conclusions. Older adults may underestimate emotional intensity in others, but they seem to remember painful information in others as well as younger adults. These data are discussed in terms of theories of pain perception and implications for hospitalization.

  3. Optimal Conclusive Teleportation of an Arbitrary d-Dimensional N-Particle Unknown State via a Partially Entangled Quantum Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO San-Ru; HOU Bo-Yu; XI Xiao-Qiang; YUE Rui-Hong

    2003-01-01

    In the paper we generalize the standard teleportation to the conclusive teleportation case which can teleportan arbitrary d-dimensional N-particle unknown state via the partially entangled quantum channel. We show that onlyif the quantum channel satisfies a constraint condition can the most general d-dimensional N-particle unknown state beperfect conclusively teleported. We also present a method for optimal conclusively teleportation of the N-particle statesand for constructing the joint POVM which can discern the quantum states on the sender's (Alice's) side. Two typicalexamples are given so that one can see how our method works.

  4. General survey and conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijtema, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Publikatie die bestaat uit twee delen: 1. General survey of the relation between water quantity and water quality; 2. Conclusions with regard to the connection of water quantity and water quality studies of surface waters

  5. Economic and social agents and renewable energies. Conclusions of the 3. juridical-technical meeting on renewable energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Camacho, C. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Belloso Perez, M.E [Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Gracia Navarro, S. [Compania Sevillana de Electricidad, Sevilla (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    The Meeting`s conclusions have been broken down into previous considerations, general actions and measures, and concrete actions and measures. The general and previous considerations are summarized in the article. (orig./AKF)

  6. Life Cycles of Ad Hoc Task Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    solving development raises some final questions. If groups are normally preoccupied with different issues at different times, if their capabilities change...context, and group across the group’s life cycle? If such modifications normally occur, there could be substantial implications, both for our theoretical...This, and Diane’s impatient question "What are we accomplishing then?" suggest the Iroup’s need to stop trying to coax the attractive first solucion

  7. Misrepresentation of neuroscience data might give rise to misleading conclusions in the media: the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Gonon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is often a huge gap between neurobiological facts and firm conclusions stated by the media. Data misrepresentation in the conclusions and summaries of neuroscience articles might contribute to this gap. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, we identified three types of misrepresentation. The first relies on prominent inconsistencies between results and claimed conclusions and was observed in two scientific reports dealing with ADHD. Only one out of the 61 media articles echoing both scientific reports adequately described the results and, thus questioned the claimed conclusion. The second type of misrepresentation consists in putting a firm conclusion in the summary while raw data that strongly limit the claim are only given in the results section. To quantify this misrepresentation we analyzed the summaries of all articles asserting that polymorphisms of the gene coding for the D4 dopaminergic receptor are associated with ADHD. Only 25 summaries out of 159 also mentioned that this association confers a small risk. This misrepresentation is also observed in most media articles reporting on ADHD and the D4 gene. The third misrepresentation consists in extrapolating basic and pre-clinical findings to new therapeutic prospects in inappropriate ways. Indeed, analysis of all ADHD-related studies in mice showed that 23% of the conclusions were overstated. The frequency of this overstatement was positively related with the impact factor of the journal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Data misrepresentations are frequent in the scientific literature dealing with ADHD and may contribute to the appearance of misleading conclusions in the media. In synergy with citation distortions and publication biases they influence social representations and bias the scientific evidence in favor of the view that ADHD is primarily caused by biological factors. We discuss the social consequences and

  8. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-06-10

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Misrepresentation of neuroscience data might give rise to misleading conclusions in the media: the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonon, Francois; Bezard, Erwan; Boraud, Thomas

    2011-01-31

    There is often a huge gap between neurobiological facts and firm conclusions stated by the media. Data misrepresentation in the conclusions and summaries of neuroscience articles might contribute to this gap. Using the case of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we identified three types of misrepresentation. The first relies on prominent inconsistencies between results and claimed conclusions and was observed in two scientific reports dealing with ADHD. Only one out of the 61 media articles echoing both scientific reports adequately described the results and, thus questioned the claimed conclusion. The second type of misrepresentation consists in putting a firm conclusion in the summary while raw data that strongly limit the claim are only given in the results section. To quantify this misrepresentation we analyzed the summaries of all articles asserting that polymorphisms of the gene coding for the D4 dopaminergic receptor are associated with ADHD. Only 25 summaries out of 159 also mentioned that this association confers a small risk. This misrepresentation is also observed in most media articles reporting on ADHD and the D4 gene. The third misrepresentation consists in extrapolating basic and pre-clinical findings to new therapeutic prospects in inappropriate ways. Indeed, analysis of all ADHD-related studies in mice showed that 23% of the conclusions were overstated. The frequency of this overstatement was positively related with the impact factor of the journal. Data misrepresentations are frequent in the scientific literature dealing with ADHD and may contribute to the appearance of misleading conclusions in the media. In synergy with citation distortions and publication biases they influence social representations and bias the scientific evidence in favor of the view that ADHD is primarily caused by biological factors. We discuss the social consequences and the causes of data misrepresentations and suggest a few corrective actions.

  10. Conducting Nursing Intervention Research in a Cooperative Group Setting – A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Heidi S.; Nolte, Susan; Edwards, Robert P.; Wenzel, Lari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide a history on nursing science within the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG); to discuss challenges and facilitators of nursing science in the cooperative group (CG) using a current nurse-led protocol (GOG-0259) as an exemplar; and to propose recommendations aimed at advancing nursing science in the CG setting. Data Source GOG reports and protocol databases, online databases of indexed citations, and experiences from the development and implementation of GOG-0259. Conclusions Benefits of CG research include opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration and ability to rapidly accrue large national samples. Challenges include limited financial resources to support non-treatment trials, a cumbersome protocol approval process, and lack of experience with nursing/quality of life intervention studies. Formal structures within GOG need to be created to encourage nurse scientists to become active members; promote collaboration between experienced GOG advanced practice nurses and new nurse scientists to identify nursing research priorities; and consider innovative funding structures to support pilot intervention studies. Implications for Nursing Practice Understanding the CG research process is critical for nurse scientists. A multi-disciplinary team of CG leaders can help investigators navigate a complex research environment and can increase awareness of the value of nursing research. PMID:24559780

  11. Conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999: translating results into nutrition policy Conclusiones de la Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999: traduciendo resultados a política nutricional

    OpenAIRE

    Juan A Rivera; Jaime Sepúlveda Amor

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article presents and overview of the main results and conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999) and the principal nutrition policy implications of the findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The NNS-1999 was conducted on a national probabilistic sample of almost 18 000 households, representative of the national, regional, as well as urban and rural levels in Mexico. Subjects included were children

  12. Financial competing interests were associated with favorable conclusions and greater author productivity in nonsystematic reviews of neuraminidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adam G; Zhou, Xujuan; Hudgins, Joel; Arachi, Diana; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico; Bourgeois, Florence T

    2016-12-01

    To characterize the conclusions and production of nonsystematic reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors relative to financial competing interests held by the authors. We searched for articles about neuraminidase inhibitors and influenza (January 2005 to April 2015), identifying nonsystematic reviews and grading them according to the favorable/nonfavorable presentation of evidence on safety and efficacy. We recorded financial competing interests disclosed in the reviews and from other articles written by their authors. We measured associations between competing interests, author productivity, and conclusions. Among 213 nonsystematic reviews, 138 (65%) presented favorable conclusions. Financial competing interests were identified for 26% (137/532) of authors; 51% (108/213) of reviews were associated with a financial competing interest. Reviews produced exclusively by authors with financial competing interests (33%; 71/213) were more likely to present favorable conclusions than reviews with no competing interests (risk ratio 1.27; 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.55). Authors with financial competing interests published more articles about neuraminidase inhibitors than their counterparts. Half of nonsystematic reviews about neuraminidase inhibitors included an author with a financial competing interest. Reviews produced exclusively by these authors were more likely to present favorable conclusions, and authors with financial competing interests published a greater number of reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the FERA study on bumble bees and consideration of its potential impact on the EFSA conclusions on neonicotinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority was requested to clarify whether the new publication on the effects of neonicotinoid seed treatments on bumble bee colonies under field conditions (March, 2013; Thompson et al. has an impact on the EFSA Conclusions on the three neonicotinoids clothianidin, thiamethoxam and imidacloprid (EFSA Journal 2013;11(1:3066; EFSA Journal 2013;11(1:3067; EFSA Journal 2013;11(1:3068. The Conclusions on neonicotinoids, published on 16 January 2013, did not permit to perform a risk assessment for bumble bees and identified the need for further information to address the risk to pollinators other than honey bees. The conclusions of this scientific statement were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the study report by Thompson et al. (2013,and additional raw data made available by the study authors to EFSA. The study investigated the exposure of bumble bee colonies placed in the vicinity of crops treated with neonicotinoids and its major effects on bumble bee colonies. The current assessment concluded that, due to the weaknesses of the study design and methodology, the study did not allow to draw any conclusion on the effects of neonicotinoids on exposed bumble bee colonies, and confirmed that the outcome of the conclusions drawn for the three neonicotinoid insecticides remains unchanged.

  14. Ethics of managed care. Implications for group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, D J

    1997-01-01

    The advent of managed care and the impact of an increasingly pluralistic, postmodern society need not mean abandoning standards of medical ethics embraced since Hippocrates. The time-honored relationship between patients and physicians remains of paramount importance. Ethical issues surrounding "universal" access and financial models that directly incentivize practices to withhold care are both addressed from a historical perspective.

  15. The marriage moments program for couples transitioning to parenthood: divergent conclusions from formative and outcome evaluation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alan J; Fawcett, Elizabeth B; Carroll, Jason S; Gilliland, Tamara T

    2006-12-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study of the Marriage Moments program, designed to prevent relationship deterioration during the 1st year of parenthood. The self-guided, low-intensity program emphasizes strengthening marital virtues and partnership during this time of significant personal and family transition. One hundred fifty-five married couples participated in a randomized clinical trial with 2 psychoeducational treatment groups (a self-guided group and an instructor-encouraged group) and a comparable control group. Despite positive formative evaluation results from program participants, hierarchical linear modeling analyses failed to find significant Group x Time differences on spouses' reports of marital virtues and a set of relational outcome measures. This failure reinforces the need for psychoeducators to invest in outcome evaluation research before claiming program success.

  16. Evolutionary models of in-group favoritism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Fu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In-group favoritism is the tendency for individuals to cooperate with in-group members more strongly than with out-group members. Similar concepts have been described across different domains, including in-group bias, tag-based cooperation, parochial altruism, and ethnocentrism. Both humans and other animals show this behavior. Here, we review evolutionary mechanisms for explaining this phenomenon by covering recently developed mathematical models. In fact, in-group favoritism is not easily realized on its own in theory, although it can evolve under some conditions. We also discuss the implications of these modeling results in future empirical and theoretical research.

  17. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  18. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  19. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  20. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of confirmatory data submitted for the active substance dimethoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessment carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the United Kingdom, for the pesticide active substance dimethoate are reported. The context of the peer review was that requested by the European Commission following the submission and evaluation of confirmatory mammalian toxicology, residues and ecotoxicology data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of dimethoate as an insecticide on sugar beet and protected lettuce. Concerns are identified.

  1. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long...... considered important prerequisites for disclosing and discussing professional problems. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that participation in a supervision group can be beneficial for maintaining and developing GPs' skills in dealing with patients with mental health problems. Group supervision......-established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...

  2. International Workshop on Educational Infrastructure: Conclusions (Summary of Proceedings, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, February 24-27, 2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Programme on Educational Building.

    This document summarizes themes developed and conclusions from the International Workshop on Educational Infrastructure. The opening topic was "Delivering Education and Training in the Knowledge Society." It was clear to participants that educational infrastructure must go hand-in-hand with reengineering processes to adjust to the needs…

  3. A cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural study of directives in discussions and conclusions of research articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jalilifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study provided cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary analyses of the distribution of directives in discussion and conclusion sections of English and Persian research articles (RAs in disciplines of physics, chemistry, counseling, and sociology, representing hard and soft sciences, respectively. To that aim, 80 RAs from both English and Persian journals between 2000 and 2012 were selected. The RAs were textually analyzed to determine the distribution of directives. Findings revealed a significant difference between Persian hard and soft science RAs in the employment of directives, with soft science writers employing directives more frequently in discussion and conclusion sections in comparison with hard science writers. However, no significant difference was found in the distribution of directives across discussion and conclusion sections of English soft and hard RAs. Moreover, findings did not show a significant difference across Persian and English RAs. Overall, results suggest that Persian and English academic writers tend to follow a similar generic and discursive trend in the employment of directives in their discussion and conclusion sections pointing to the universal nature of directives as persuasive strategies employed by academic writers in canonical branches of science. The findings of the present study might raise learners' awareness of the conventions and lexico-grammatical features of academic writing in Persian and/or English RAs.

  4. A Cross-Disciplinary and Cross-Cultural Study of Directives in Discussions and Conclusions of Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilifar, Alireza; Mehrabi, Khodayar

    2014-01-01

    The current study provided cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary analyses of the distribution of directives in discussion and conclusion sections of English and Persian research articles (RAs) in disciplines of physics, chemistry, counseling, and sociology, representing hard and soft sciences, respectively. To that aim, 80 RAs from both English…

  5. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  6. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  7. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance L-ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the Netherlands, for the pesticide active substance L-ascorbic acid are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of L-ascorbic acid as a fungicide on potato, glasshouse tomato and field and glasshouse flower bulbs. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  8. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance kieselgur (diatomaceous earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State Greece, for the pesticide active substance kieselgur are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EC No 2229/2004 as amended by Commission Regulation (EC No 1095/2007 and Commission Regulation (EU No 114/2010. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of kieselgur as an insecticide, acaricide on stored grain, empty rooms, mills, stores and soil treatment in home gardening. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  9. Data quality affects meta-analytic conclusions: a response to Miner and Raju (2004) concerning entrepreneurial risk propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Wayne H; Roth, Philip L

    2004-02-01

    J. B. Miner and N. S. Raju (2004) contended that there are additional studies that compare the risk propensity of entrepreneurs and managers, which, when added to the data from W. H. Stewart and P. L. Roth (2001) and meta-analyzed, produce relationships between risk propensity and entrepreneurial status that are substantially weaker than previously believed. This conclusion was evaluated by identifying and examining methodological problems associated with their inclusion of effect sizes (i.e., ds) from studies with variables not relevant to research questions, dependent samples, extraneous variance in outcome variables, and confusion of constructs. When these methodological issues were addressed, a new meta-analysis indicated an overall conclusion consistent with that of Stewart and Roth, but the results varied according to instrumentation, particularly objective instrumentation (observed d = 0.31) versus the Miner Sentence Completion Scale-Form T (observed d = -0.35). ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  10. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance Paecilomyces fumosoroseus strain FE 9901

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State Belgium for the pesticide active substance Paecilomyces fumosoroseus strain FE 9901 are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus as an insecticide in glasshouses on tomatoes. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified.

  11. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of confirmatory data submitted for the active substance imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessment carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State Germany, for the pesticide active substance imidacloprid are reported. The context of the peer review was that requested by the European Commission following the submission and evaluation of confirmatory mammalian toxicology and ecotoxicology data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of imidacloprid as an insecticide on apples, tomatoes and sugar beet. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. No concerns are identified.

  12. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of confirmatory data submitted for the active substance oryzalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessment carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State France, for the pesticide active substance oryzalin are reported. The context of the peer review was that requested by the European Commission following the submission and evaluation of confirmatory mammalian toxicology and ecotoxicology data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative use of oryzalin as a herbicide on grape vines. A concern has been identified as regards the assessment of the toxicological relevance of some impurities, which could not be finalised based on the data available.

  13. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of confirmatory data submitted for the active substance ethoprophos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessment carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the United Kingdom, for the pesticide active substance ethoprophos are reported. The context of the peer review was that requested by the European Commission following the submission and evaluation of confirmatory ecotoxicology data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of ethoprophos as an insecticide and nematicide on potatoes. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Concerns are identified.

  14. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance beta-cypermethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the United Kingdom, for the pesticide active substance beta-cypermethrin are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation (EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of beta-cypermethrin as an insecticide on oilseed rape, wheat and maize. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified as regards the risk to aquatic organisms, bees and non-target arthropods.

  15. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  16. Proof for part of the Sttla flow experimental conclusion and the improvement of Flügel formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春发; 崔映红; 杨文滨; 张德成; 宋之平

    2002-01-01

    Based on steam turbine's basic working principle,we draw the conclusion that at the critical state,critical pressure is proportional to its critical flow and square root of initial temperature.Part of the Sttla flow experimental curve is verified theoretically and an improved Flügel formula with a higher accuracy is proposed.As a result,not only the calculation is simplified,but also the theory of steam turbine's varying operation conditions is enriched.

  17. The BMB/ICES sea-going workshop "Fish diseases and parasites in the Baltic sea" - introduction and conclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, T.; Mellergaard, Stig

    1999-01-01

    General information on the rationale and objectives of the BMB/ICES Sea-going Workshop "Fish Diseases and Parasites in the Baltic Sea" (25 November to 8 December 1994), as well as cruise and methodological information, is presented as an introduction to a set of right contributions that describe...... the different studies carried out. Some main conclusions in relation to the objectives and results are highlighted. (C) 1999 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea....

  18. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize 1507

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize 1507, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2005 onwards. The EFSA GMO Panel performed a search of the scientific literature published between 2005 and September 2012, and identified 61 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize 1507, of which two were relevant for the food and feed safety assessment, and 34 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize 1507 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize 1507, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  19. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize MON 810

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize MON 810, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2009 onwards. Following a search of the scientific literature published between 2009 and October 2012, the EFSA GMO Panel identified 165 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize MON 810, of which 68 publications were discussed and/or cited in previous EFSA GMO Panel scientific outputs. From the remaining 97 publications, eight were relevant for the molecular characterisation, 27 for food and feed safety assessment, 55 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management, two for the molecular characterisation and the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management and five for the food and feed safety assessment and the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management of maize MON 810. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize MON 810 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize MON 810, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  20. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment for bees for the active substance fipronil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA was asked by the European Commission to perform a risk assessment for the active substance fipronil and provide conclusions as regards the risk to bees. In this context the conclusions of EFSA following the peer review of the risk assessment for bees for the active substance fipronil are reported. The context of the evaluation was that required by the European Commission in accordance with Article 21 of Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 to review the approval of active substances in light of new scientific and technical knowledge and monitoring data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the currently authorised uses of fipronil applied on a variety of crops in Europe. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the submitted studies and scientific publications including data available at EU and national level, are presented. Missing information identified as being required to allow for a complete risk assessment is listed. Concerns are identified.

  1. Scientific Opinion updating the risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize Bt11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA GMO Panel compiled its previous risk assessment conclusions and risk management recommendations on the genetically modified insect resistant maize Bt11, and considered their validity in the light of new relevant scientific publications published from 2005 onwards. Following a search of the scientific literature published between 2005 and October 2012, the EFSA GMO Panel identified 287 peer-reviewed publications containing evidence specific to the risk assessment and/or management of maize Bt11, of which 270 publications were previously discussed and cited in relevant GM maize-related applications and/or the numerous EFSA GMO Panel scientific outputs. From the remaining 17 publications, three were relevant for the food and feed safety assessment, and 14 for the environmental risk assessment and/or risk management of maize Bt11. None of these publications reported new information that would invalidate the previous conclusions on the safety of maize Bt11 made by the EFSA GMO Panel. Therefore, the EFSA GMO Panel considers that its previous risk assessment conclusions on maize Bt11, as well as its previous recommendations on risk mitigation measures and monitoring, remain valid and applicable.

  2. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  3. Philosophical Implications of Inflationary Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Knobe, J; Vilenkin, A; Knobe, Joshua; Olum, Ken D.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in cosmology indicate that every history having a nonzero probability is realized in infinitely many distinct regions of spacetime. Thus, it appears that the universe contains infinitely many civilizations exactly like our own, as well as infinitely many civilizations that differ from our own in any way permitted by physical laws. We explore the implications of this conclusion for ethical theory and for the doomsday argument. In the infinite universe, we find that the doomsday argument applies only to effects which change the average lifetime of all civilizations, and not those which affect our civilization alone.

  4. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  5. Technology-enhanced focus groups as a component of instrument development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strout, Tania D; DiFazio, Rachel L; Vessey, Judith A

    2017-06-22

    Background Bullying is a critical public health problem and a screening tool for use in healthcare is needed. Focus groups are a common tool for generating qualitative data when developing an instrument and evidence suggests that technology-enhanced focus groups can be effective in simultaneously engaging participants from diverse settings. Aim To examine the use of technology-enhanced focus groups in generating an item pool to develop a youth-bullying screening tool. Discussion The authors explore methodological and ethical issues related to conducting technology-enhanced focus groups, drawing on their experience in developing a youth-bullying measure. They conducted qualitative focus groups with professionals from the front lines of bullying response and intervention. They describe the experience of conducting technology-enhanced focus group sessions, focusing on the methodological and ethical issues that researchers engaging in similar work may encounter. Challenges associated with this methodology include establishing rapport among participants, privacy concerns and limited non-verbal communication. Conclusion The use of technology-enhanced focus groups can be valuable in obtaining rich data from a wide variety of disciplines and contexts. Organising these focus groups was inexpensive and preferred by the study's participants. Implications for practice Researchers should consider using technology-enhanced focus groups to generate data to develop health-related measurement tools.

  6. Magnetic translation groups as group extension

    OpenAIRE

    Florek, Wojciech

    1998-01-01

    Extensions of a direct product T of two cyclic groups Z_n1 and Z_n2 by an Abelian (gauge) group G with the trivial action of T on G are considered. All possible (nonequivalent) factor systems are determined using the Mac Lane method. Some of resulting groups describe magnetic translation groups. As examples extensions with G=U(1) and G=Z_n are considered and discussed.

  7. Have we drawn the wrong conclusions about the value of care pathways? Is a Cochrane review appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaecht, Kris; Ovretveit, John; Elliott, Martin J; Sermeus, Walter; Ellershaw, John; Panella, Massimiliano

    2012-03-01

    Care pathways are used increasingly worldwide to organize patient care. However, different views exist about their effectiveness. One of the reasons for this is that pathways are complex interventions. A recent Cochrane review was published which reported positive results, but although the Cochrane team performed excellent work with an enormous commitment, the conclusions may be inappropriate. To fully understand the potential and problems of care pathways, it is important to define (a) exactly what we are talking about (b) whether the study methods are appropriate, and (c) whether we can properly define the outcomes.

  8. Comparison between the pinch- and exergy method. The conclusions; Vergelijking van de pinch- en exergiemethode. De conclusies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartholt, M. [Hogeschool Dordrecht, Dordrecht (Netherlands); Zeiler, W. [Kropman, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1999-06-01

    Two calculation methods to assess energy saving measures are based on pinch technology and exergy. Within the framework of a final student`s project both methods were applied to a combined cold and power generating installation for an offset printing office. The results of the pinch method were discussed in the first article in the March 1999 issue of this magazine. In the second article (April 1999 issue) the results of the exergy method are dealt with. In this final article the conclusions will be given. 20 refs.

  9. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  10. Contrastive Study of Metadiscourse in the Conclusion of Academic Pa-pers between Soft Science and Hard Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟伟

    2014-01-01

    Academic paper as a genre is communicative. Interactional metadiscourse is one of the linguistic features that can sig-nificantly show the communicative feature of texts. With different research methodologies and characteristics, academic papers of hard and soft science present different degree of communicative features. The corpus of this study consists of 16 academic papers among which 8 are from hard science and 8 from soft science. This article aims to explore the different ways of scholars from soft and hard science to use metadiscourse in the conclusion part of their academic papers to exert lights to the pedagogical develop-ment of academic papers.

  11. Conclusions about properties of high-energy cosmic-rays drawn with limited recourse to hadronic models

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, A A

    2016-01-01

    Determining the energy and mass of the highest energy cosmic rays requires knowledge of features of particle interactions at energies beyond those reached at the LHC. Inadequacies of the model predictions set against a variety of data are summarised and it is clear that firm statements about primary mass are premature. Nonetheless, conclusions of significance about the origin of the highest-energy cosmic rays can be deduced from the data. This paper is dedicated to my great friend and colleague, Jim Cronin, who died suddenly on 25 August 2016, without whom the Auger Collaboration would not have happened.

  12. Debates to personal conclusion in peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction: A 30-year experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chwei-Chin Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been achieved in the science and management of peripheral nerve injuries over the past 40 years. Yet there are many questions and few answers. The author, with 30 years of experience in treating them at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, addresses debates on various issues with personal conclusions. These include: (1 Degree of peripheral nerve injury, (2 Timing of nerve repair, (3Technique of nerve repair, (4 Level of brachial plexus injury,(5 Level of radial nerve injury,(6 Traction avulsion amputation of major limb, (7 Proximal Vs distal nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries and (8 Post paralysis facial synkinesis.

  13. Evaluation of the 'Jumping to conclusions' bias in different subgroups of the at-risk mental state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rausch, F; Eisenacher, S; Elkin, H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psychosis display the so-called 'Jumping to Conclusions' bias (JTC) - a tendency for hasty decision-making in probabilistic reasoning tasks. So far, only a few studies have evaluated the JTC bias in 'at-risk mental state' (ARMS) patients, specifically in ARMS samples...... symptoms (BS). Similar data were available for 30 healthy control participants matched for age, gender, education and premorbid verbal intelligence. ARMS patients were identified by the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS) and the Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument - Adult Version (SPI...

  14. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  15. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  16. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  17. The Nearest Group of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Bergh, S

    1999-01-01

    The small Antlia-Sextans clustering of galaxies is located at a distance of only 1.36 Mpc from the Sun, and 1.72 Mpc from the adopted barycenter of the Local Group. The latter value is significantly greater than the radius of the zero- velocity surface of the Local Group which, for an assumed age of 14 Gyr, has Ro = 1.18 " 0.15 Mpc. This, together with the observation that the members of the Ant-Sex group have a mean redshift of +114 " 12 km s-1 relative to the centroid of the Local Group, suggests that the Antlia-Sextans group is not bound to our Local Group, and that it is expanding with the Hubble flow. If this conclusion is correct, then Antlia-Sextans may be the nearest external clustering of galaxies. The total galaxian population of the Ant-Sex group is ~ 1/5 that of the Local Group. However, the integrated luminosity of Ant-Sex is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Local Group. Subject headings: Galaxies - clusters: individual (Antlia-Sextans)

  18. Jumping to Conclusions About the Beads Task? A Meta-analysis of Delusional Ideation and Data-Gathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert Malcolm; McKay, Ryan; Coltheart, Max; Langdon, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that delusional and delusion-prone individuals have a tendency to gather less data before forming beliefs. Most of the evidence for this “jumping to conclusions” (JTC) bias comes from studies using the “beads task” data-gathering paradigm. However, the evidence for the JTC bias is mixed. We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from 38 clinical and nonclinical samples (n = 2,237) to investigate the relationship between data gathering in the beads task (using the “draws to decision” measure) and delusional ideation (as indexed by the “Peters et al Delusions Inventory”; PDI). We found that delusional ideation is negatively associated with data gathering (r s = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.17, −0.03]) and that there is heterogeneity in the estimated effect sizes (Q-stat P = .03, I 2 = 33). Subgroup analysis revealed that the negative association is present when considering the 23 samples (n = 1,754) from the large general population subgroup alone (r s = −0.10, 95% CI [−0.18, −0.02]) but not when considering the 8 samples (n = 262) from the small current delusions subgroup alone (r s = −0.12, 95% CI [−0.31, 0.07]). These results provide some provisional support for continuum theories of psychosis and cognitive models that implicate the JTC bias in the formation and maintenance of delusions. PMID:25616503

  19. Conclusions drawn from actions implemented within the first stage of the Cracow program of energy conservation and clean fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieda, J.; Bardel, J.; Pierce, B.

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), acting on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, executed the first stage of the Cracow Program of Energy Conservation and Clean Fossil Fuels, called also American-Polish Program of Actions for Elimination of Low Emission Sources in Cracow. The main contractor for BNL and PNL was the Cracow Development Office (BRK). The interest in improving the condition of Cracow air results from the fact that the standard for permissible air pollution was exceeded several times in Cracow and especially within the central part of the town. Therefore, air pollution appeared one of the most important problems that faced the municipal authorities. It followed from monitoring investigations that the high level of air pollutant concentration is caused by in-home coal-fired tile stoves operated in winter seasons and by coal- and coke-fired boiler houses simulated mainly in the central part of the town. The results obtained in first stage are presented. This paper is an attempt to formulate conclusions drawn from these works and recommendations with regard to the future policy of the town authorities; selected results are presented to clarify or illustrate the conclusions.

  20. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment of the active substance S-abscisic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA following the peer review of the initial risk assessments carried out by the competent authority of the rapporteur Member State the Netherlands, for the pesticide active substance S-abscisic acid are reported. The context of the peer review was that required by Commission Regulation EU No 188/2011. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the representative uses of S-abscisic acid as a plant growth regulator on tomato seedlings and grapes. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the available studies and literature in the dossier peer reviewed, are presented. Missing information identified as being required by the regulatory framework is listed. Concerns are identified in the areas of residues and ecotoxicology, as the consumer risk assessment and the risk assessment for higher aquatic plants for some metabolites could not be finalised based on the data available.

  1. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment for bees for the active substance imidacloprid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA was asked by the European Commission to perform a risk assessment of neonicotinoids, including imidacloprid, as regards the risk to bees. In this context the conclusions of EFSA concerning the risk assessment for bees for the active substance imidacloprid are reported. The context of the evaluation was that required by the European Commission in accordance with Article 21 of Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 to review the approval of active substances in light of new scientific and technical knowledge and monitoring data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the uses of imidacloprid applied as a seed treatment or granules on a variety of crops currently authorised in Europe. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the submitted studies and literature data as well as the available EU evaluations and monitoring data, are presented. Missing information identified as being required to allow for a complete risk assessment is listed. Concerns are identified.

  2. [Conclusions of an international symposium held at Aachen on 4 and 5 May about mucolytic agents, especially oral acetylcysteine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minette, A

    1979-01-01

    The usefulness of mucolytics for clinical purposes remains controversial. Although many authors agree with the opinion that some of these drugs, above all aerosols of acetylcysteine at convenient dosages, provided they are associated with beta 2-sympathomimetics, may be useful in the treatment of bronchial obstruction due to inspissated mucus in excess in the lumens, many specialists remain reluctant concerning the activity of mucolytics given by mouth. It seemed therefore interesting to organize an international meeting on this topic. First of all, I would like to pay honour to the initiative of the Zambon Laboratories who organized this symposium. I would also like to express my gratitude for having been involved in the preparation of the programme of these days and having been asked to present the general conclusions of the meeting. The following pages are devoted to these conclusions. We shall repeatedly make reference to the works which were presented in extenso during the meeting. The general report of the symposium will shortly appear in a special supplement of the European Journal of Respiratory Diseases. It seems however useful to give at the end of our text the complete list of the presented lectures.

  3. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment for bees for the active substance thiamethoxam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA was asked by the European Commission to perform a risk assessment of neonicotinoids, including thiamethoxam, as regards the risk to bees. In this context the conclusions of EFSA concerning the risk assessment for bees for the active substance thiamethoxam are reported. The context of the evaluation was that required by the European Commission in accordance with Article 21 of Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 to review the approval of active substances in light of new scientific and technical knowledge and monitoring data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the uses of thiamethoxam applied as a seed treatment on a variety of crops currently authorised in Europe. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the submitted studies and literature data as well as the available EU evaluations and monitoring data, are presented. Missing information identified as being required to allow for a complete risk assessment is listed. Concerns are identified.

  4. Conclusion on the peer review of the pesticide risk assessment for bees for the active substance clothianidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA was asked by the European Commission to perform a risk assessment of neonicotinoids, including clothianidin, as regards the risk to bees. In this context the conclusions of EFSA concerning the risk assessment for bees for the active substance clothianidin are reported. The context of the evaluation was that required by the European Commission in accordance with Article 21 of Regulation (EC No 1107/2009 to review the approval of active substances in light of new scientific and technical knowledge and monitoring data. The conclusions were reached on the basis of the evaluation of the uses of clothianidin applied as a seed treatment or granules on a variety of crops currently authorised in Europe. The reliable endpoints concluded as being appropriate for use in regulatory risk assessment, derived from the submitted studies and literature data as well as the available EU evaluations and monitoring data, are presented. Missing information identified as being required to allow for a complete risk assessment is listed. Concerns are identified.

  5. A Software Engine to Justify the Conclusions of an Expert System for Detecting Renal Obstruction on 99mTc-MAG3 Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest V.; Taylor, Andrew; Manatunga, Daya; Folks, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe and evaluate a software engine to justify the conclusions reached by a renal expert system (RENEX) for assessing patients with suspected renal obstruction and to obtain from this evaluation new knowledge that can be incorporated into RENEX to attempt to improve diagnostic performance. Methods RENEX consists of 60 heuristic rules extracted from the rules used by a domain expert to generate the knowledge base and a forward-chaining inference engine to determine obstruction. The justification engine keeps track of the sequence of the rules that are instantiated to reach a conclusion. The interpreter can then request justification by clicking on the specific conclusion. The justification process then reports the English translation of all concatenated rules instantiated to reach that conclusion. The justification engine was evaluated with a prospective group of 60 patients (117 kidneys). After reviewing the standard renal mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) scans obtained before and after the administration of furosemide, a masked expert determined whether each kidney was obstructed, whether the results were equivocal, or whether the kidney was not obstructed and identified and ranked the main variables associated with each interpretation. Two parameters were then tabulated: the frequency with which the main variables associated with obstruction by the expert were also justified by RENEX and the frequency with which the justification rules provided by RENEX were deemed to be correct by the expert. Only when RENEX and the domain expert agreed on the diagnosis (87 kidneys) were the results used to test the justification. Results RENEX agreed with 91% (184/203) of the rules supplied by the expert for justifying the diagnosis. RENEX provided 103 additional rules justifying the diagnosis; the expert agreed that 102 (99%) were correct, although the rules were considered to be of secondary importance. Conclusion We have described and

  6. About group digital signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-01-01

    ...).A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature...

  7. Determinants of physician empathy during medical education: hypothetical conclusions from an exploratory qualitative survey of practicing physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is an outcome-relevant physician characteristic and thus a crucial component of high-quality communication in health care. However, the factors that promote and inhibit the development of empathy during medical education have not been extensively researched. Also, currently there is no explicit research on the perspective of practicing physicians on the subject. Therefore the aim of our study was to explore physicians’ views of the positive and negative influences on the development of empathy during their medical education, as well as in their everyday work as physicians. Method We administered a written Qualitative Short Survey to 63 physicians in seven specialties. They were able to respond anonymously. Our open-ended question was: “What educational content in the course of your studies and/or your specialist training had a positive or negative effect on your empathy?” We analyzed the data using thematic content analysis following Mayring’s approach. Results Forty-two physicians took part in our survey. All together, they mentioned 68 specific factors (37 positive, 29 negative, 2 neutral) from which six themes emerged: 1. In general, medical education does not promote the development of empathy. 2. Recognizing the psycho-social dimensions of care fosters empathy. 3. Interactions with patients in medical practice promote empathy. 4. Physicians’ active self-development through reflective practice helps the development of empathy. 5. Interactions with colleagues can both promote and inhibit empathy through their role modeling of empathic and non-empathic behavior. 6. Stress, time pressure, and adverse working conditions are detrimental to empathy development. Conclusions Our results provide an overview of what might influence the development of clinical empathy, as well as hypothetical conclusions about how to promote it. Reflective practice seems to be lacking in current medical curricula and could be incorporated. Raising physicians

  8. Group adaptation, formal darwinism and contextual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, S; Paternotte, C

    2012-06-01

    We consider the question: under what circumstances can the concept of adaptation be applied to groups, rather than individuals? Gardner and Grafen (2009, J. Evol. Biol.22: 659-671) develop a novel approach to this question, building on Grafen's 'formal Darwinism' project, which defines adaptation in terms of links between evolutionary dynamics and optimization. They conclude that only clonal groups, and to a lesser extent groups in which reproductive competition is repressed, can be considered as adaptive units. We re-examine the conditions under which the selection-optimization links hold at the group level. We focus on an important distinction between two ways of understanding the links, which have different implications regarding group adaptationism. We show how the formal Darwinism approach can be reconciled with G.C. Williams' famous analysis of group adaptation, and we consider the relationships between group adaptation, the Price equation approach to multi-level selection, and the alternative approach based on contextual analysis.

  9. Health Insurance Competition : The Effect of Group Contracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Douven, R.C.M.H.; Droge, C.; Mosca, I.

    2010-01-01

    In countries like the US and the Netherlands health insurance is provided by private firms. These private firms can offer both individual and group contracts. The strategic and welfare implications of such group contracts are not well understood. Using a Dutch data set of about 700 group health insu

  10. Study Abroad: The Reality of Building Dynamic Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransbury, Molly K.; Harris, Sandra A.

    1994-01-01

    The collaborative effort of a professor of human development with expertise in group process and a general education professor with expertise in Greek mythology and culture uses a case study format to apply theoretical models of group dynamics to the travel and learning experience of study abroad. Implications for course design and group process…

  11. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Choi, Hoon-Seok

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  12. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.; Choi, H.-S.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  13. Jumping to conclusions style along the continuum of delusions: delusion-prone individuals are not hastier in decision making than healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Ho-wai So

    Full Text Available Literature comparing 'jumping to conclusions' (JTC between patients and healthy controls has demonstrated the importance of the reasoning bias in the development of delusions. When groups that vary along the entire delusional continuum are included, the relationship between JTC and delusionality is less clear. This study compared JTC and delusional dimensions between 28 patients with delusions, 35 delusion-prone individuals and 32 non-delusion-prone individuals. Delusion proneness was defined by an established threshold based on the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory. Two versions of the beads task (85:15 and 60:40 were used to measure JTC. As hypothesized, patients manifested hastier data gathering than the two non-clinical groups on both beads tasks. However, delusion-prone individuals did not manifest a hastier decision making style than non-delusion prone individuals. Instead, non-delusion-prone participants showed more JTC bias than delusion-prone individuals on the easier beads task. There was no evidence for a dose-response relationship between JTC and delusional dimensions, with correlations between JTC and PDI scores found in the non-delusion-prone group only. The present finding confirms the link between an extreme JTC bias and the presence of clinical delusions, and argues against a linear relationship between JTC and delusionality along the symptomatic continuum.

  14. Financial and tax steps and actions for renewable energies. Conclusions of the 2. juridical-technical meeting on renewable energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Camacho, C. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Belloso Perez, M.E. [Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Gracia Navarro, S. [Compania Sevillana de Electricidad, Sevilla (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of the juridical technical meetings on renewable energies, organized on a yearly period basis, is the discussion at expert level of every fiscal and technological question on renewable energy together with the dissemination of the expert`s conclusions. The intention with such a debate is anticipating to the problems that a development of such energies might present in accordance with their implicit resources and technology which, if not resolved, might lead to situations of undefined aspects and to contradictions of a very negative consequence to their progress. During the days of 18 and 19 November 1993, the `1. Juridical technical meeting on renewable energies` was held organized by the Seville University with the collaboration of Compania Sevillana de Electricidad and the Association for the Energy Development in Andalusia (SODEAN). Among their most relevant contents to be remarked those related to the jurdical and finance aspects of renewable energies, which are discussed in detail. (orig./AKF)

  15. Prospects of Conclusion of the First Comprehensive Agreement between the EU and the PRC - the Partnership and Cooperation Agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Mardashev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the issue of renewal of the treaty basis in relations between the EU and China, where the Agreement on Trade and Economic Cooperation signed in 1985 still remains the corner-stone document; determines major problems, which create obstacles to successful ending of the negotiating process, and evaluates prospects of solving these problems in the nearest future. The author makes conclusion, that after rather strained relations during 2008, there are all pre-conditions for parties to reach at last principle understandings in the new year, which will help them to finish formal negotiations, conclude the first comprehensive agreement and thus to upgrade the treaty basis to realities of bilateral relations at the beginning of the 21st century.

  16. Hospital ventilation standards and energy conservation: a summary of the literature with conclusions and recommendations. Final report, FY 78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollowell, C.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1978-09-01

    This research examines the basis of current hospital HVAC standards and determines if they can be relaxed on criteria that do not compromise the health, safety, and comfort of patients and staff and has acceptance of the health care community. Chapter 2 summarizes existing standards in use throughout the United States governing hospital ventilation systems and the thermal environment. Chapter 3 explores the role of air in hospital-acquired infections. Chapter 4 explores the realm of indoor air quality within the hospital. Chapter 5 contains a discussion concerning the influence of thermal factors on patient comfort. Chapter 6 discusses the hospital odor problem with regards to ventilation rates. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations developed from the literature review and from a small working conference sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

  17. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  18. Mestrado Profissional em História: o desafio do trabalho de conclusão final do curso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Radünz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available O Mestrado Profissional, como modalidade de curso Stricto Sensu, está em processo de consolidação. Nesse sentido, temas como a avaliação de programas, considerando as especificidades da modalidade, e a questão do Trabalho de Conclusão estão na ordem do dia. O objetivo deste artigo é problematizar possíveis formas de trabalhos finais para além da dissertação, considerando-se sobretudo, o disposto na Portaria Normativa 17, de 28 de dezembro de 2009, da Capes. A base empírica leva em consideração as primeiras propostas do Trabalho de Conclusão Final do Mestrado Profissional em História da Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS. O Programa iniciou suas atividades em agosto de 2013 e, neste momento, passa pelo seu primeiro processo de qualificação. Dentre as propostas apresentadas nessa etapa estão a produção do material didático; o uso de quadrinhos em sala de aula, jogos e sua relação com documentos históricos; uso da pesquisa socioantropológica no ensino de história; análises de livros didáticos; propostas metodológicas do uso de fontes no ensino de história, entre outras. O que se pretende nesta análise é problematizar, com as experiências dos mestrandos do Programa de Pós-Graduação em História da UCS, as possibilidades do conhecimento acadêmico ter uma maior função social.

  19. The Research on Admissibility of Polygraph Conclusion%测谎结论的可采性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建华

    2012-01-01

    As one kind of scientific evidences, polygraph conclusion is based on experimental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, electronic engineering etc. However, there are so many scientific disputes around it during the past century. But in criminal investigation practice, lie detection technology is used so far and wide, what make the problems that whether polygraph conclusion is admissible and what is its criterion in the presence of judicial officials. So this article makes a comprehensive analysis on scientific base of lie detection technology, consults other nations' legislation, and offer some proposals to our judicial practice.%作为科学证据的一种,测谎结论以实验心理学、认知神经科学以及电子工程学等现代科学为基础而产生.但百余年来,围绕测谎结论的科学争议始终没有停止过.而在犯罪案件侦查等实践领域,心理测谎技术却遍地开花,这使得测谎结论是否具有可采性或者其采纳标准如何等问题,摆在了司法者的面前.文章在综合分析了心理测谎技术的科学基础,借鉴国内外测谎结论的应用现状后,对完善测谎结论在我国司法中的应用提出了一些建议.

  20. The importance of isomorphism for conclusions about homology: A Bayesian multilevel structural equation modeling approach with ordinal indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel eGuenole

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a Monte Carlo study examining the impact of assuming item isomorphism (i.e., equivalent construct meaning across levels of analysis on conclusions about homology (i.e., equivalent structural relations across levels of analysis under varying degrees of non-isomorphism in the context of ordinal indicator multilevel structural equation models (MSEMs. We focus on the condition where one or more loadings are higher on the between level than on the within level to show that while much past research on homology has ignored the issue of psychometric isomorphism, psychometric isomorphism is in fact critical to valid conclusions about homology. More specifically, when a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an exogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the within level exogenous latent variance is under-estimated leading to over-estimation of the within level structural coefficient, while the between level exogenous latent variance is overestimated leading to underestimation of the between structural coefficient. When a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an endogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the endogenous within level latent variance is under-estimated leading to under-estimation of the within level structural coefficient while the endogenous between level latent variance is over-estimated leading to over-estimation of the between level structural coefficient. The innovative aspect of this article is demonstrating that even minor violations of psychometric isomorphism render claims of homology untenable. We also show that posterior predictive p-values for ordinal indicator Bayesian MSEMs are insensitive to violations of isomorphism even when they lead to severely biased within and between level structural parameters. We highlight conditions where poor estimation of even

  1. The Importance of Isomorphism for Conclusions about Homology: A Bayesian Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Approach with Ordinal Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenole, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo study examining the impact of assuming item isomorphism (i.e., equivalent construct meaning across levels of analysis) on conclusions about homology (i.e., equivalent structural relations across levels of analysis) under varying degrees of non-isomorphism in the context of ordinal indicator multilevel structural equation models (MSEMs). We focus on the condition where one or more loadings are higher on the between level than on the within level to show that while much past research on homology has ignored the issue of psychometric isomorphism, psychometric isomorphism is in fact critical to valid conclusions about homology. More specifically, when a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an exogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the within level exogenous latent variance is under-estimated leading to over-estimation of the within level structural coefficient, while the between level exogenous latent variance is overestimated leading to underestimation of the between structural coefficient. When a measurement model with non-isomorphic items occupies an endogenous position in a multilevel structural model and the non-isomorphism of these items is not modeled, the endogenous within level latent variance is under-estimated leading to under-estimation of the within level structural coefficient while the endogenous between level latent variance is over-estimated leading to over-estimation of the between level structural coefficient. The innovative aspect of this article is demonstrating that even minor violations of psychometric isomorphism render claims of homology untenable. We also show that posterior predictive p-values for ordinal indicator Bayesian MSEMs are insensitive to violations of isomorphism even when they lead to severely biased within and between level structural parameters. We highlight conditions where poor estimation of even correctly specified

  2. Epidemiological analysis of demographic characteristics and type of injuries in patients with multiple trauma with respect to conclusive treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagorac Slaviša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiple trauma is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the population of people under 45 years of age. The consequences of multiple trauma have huge epidemiological, social and economic significance. Objective The aim of the paper was to analyze the conclusive treatment outcome of multiply traumatized patients with respect to their sex, age, injury mechanism and type. METHOD This retrospective study included 100 patients with multiple injuries (ISS>16 treated in the Emergency Room of the Clinical Centre of Serbia in the course of 2004. Clinical, X-ray, laboratory and numerical presentation methods - scores (ISS and GCS were used to show the injury severity. Results Most of the injured were males (80%, and the average age was 40±20 (5-83. Out of the total number of patients who died, 23 (82% were males, and 5 (18% were females. The average age of the patients with fatal outcomes was 48±21 (8-86. Traffic accidents were the leading cause of injury (59%. The median GCS was 10±3 (3-15. The average ISS was 30 (20-66 in the surviving patients, and 53 (27-77 in those who died. Conclusion With respect to sex, in most cases multiple trauma affects males (p<0.01, with the average age of about 40. With respect to injury mechanism, the main cause of the occurrence of multiple trauma is traffic accidents (p<0.01. There is a statistically significant difference in the values of GCS and ISS relative to the definitive outcome (p<0.01. Statistical data processing indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between mortality and type of injury in a given organic system (p<0.01, but that there was no statistically significant correlation between mortality and age. .

  3. Ecological diversification in the Bacillus cereus Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Thompson, Fabiano L; Sorokin, Alexei; Normand, Philippe; Dawyndt, Peter; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Svensson, Birgitta; Sanchis, Vincent; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Vos, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus Group comprises organisms that are widely distributed in the environment and are of health and economic interest. We demonstrate an 'ecotypic' structure of populations in the B. cereus Group using (i) molecular data from Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism patterns, ribosomal gene sequences, partial panC gene sequences, 'psychrotolerant' DNA sequence signatures and (ii) phenotypic and descriptive data from range of growth temperature, psychrotolerance and thermal niches. Seven major phylogenetic groups (I to VII) were thus identified, with ecological differences that provide evidence for a multiemergence of psychrotolerance in the B. cereus Group. A moderate thermotolerant group (VII) was basal to the mesophilic group I, from which in turn distinct thermal lineages have emerged, comprising two mesophilic groups (III, IV), an intermediate group (V) and two psychrotolerant groups (VI, II). This stepwise evolutionary transition toward psychrotolerance was particularly well illustrated by the relative abundance of the 'psychrotolerant' rrs signature (as defined by Pruss et al.) copies accumulated in strains that varied according to the phylogenetic group. The 'psychrotolerant' cspA signature (as defined by Francis et al.) was specific to group VI and provided a useful way to differentiate it from the psychrotolerant group II. This study illustrates how adaptation to novel environments by the modification of temperature tolerance limits has shaped historical patterns of global ecological diversification in the B. cereus Group. The implications for the taxonomy of this Group and for the human health risk are discussed.

  4. Rodízio de firmas de auditoria: a experiência brasileira e as conclusões do mercado Rotation of audit firms: the brazilian experience and the market's conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Queiroz de Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O rodízio de firmas de auditoria foi introduzido no Brasil por ocasião dos escândalos corporativos de instituições financeiras na emissão das demonstrações contábeis e adotado pela CVM - Comissão de Valores Mobiliários às empresas registradas na Bolsa de Valores do Brasil. Tendo como objetivo a preservação da independência do auditor e a diminuição dos erros contábeis e fraudes relacionados ao processo de auditoria das demonstrações contábeis, o rodízio de firmas é um assunto polêmico, pois afeta a relação comercial e profissional dos auditores com seus clientes bem como toda a estrutura de mercado das firmas de auditoria. O artigo foi desenvolvido com base na evolução histórica do conceito de rodízio de firmas de auditoria, na avaliação das pesquisas realizadas sobre o assunto em outros países e nas estruturas filosóficas que determinam os princípios éticos que são atrelados à Contabilidade e à Auditoria. Além disso, foi realizada uma pesquisa de campo sobre os aspectos inerentes do rodízio de firmas de auditoria. Essa pesquisa coletou a opinião de 127 profissionais do mercado financeiro, sendo 84 executivos de empresas que trabalham ou influenciam na elaboração das demonstrações contábeis e 43 auditores independentes que atuam diretamente no processo de auditagem das contas contábeis. A principal conclusão obtida foi a confirmação de que o rodízio de firmas de auditoria não tem capacidade de assegurar a independência do auditor no seu trabalho e não diminui os riscos de erros contábeis e de fraudes na elaboração das demonstrações contábeis.The rotation of audit firms was introduced in Brazil as a result of the corporate scandals involving financial institutions in the issue of their financial statements, and adopted by the CVM - Brazilian Securities Commission for publicly traded companies in Brazil. Aiming to preserve the independence of the auditor and to reduce frauds and

  5. 1070 myeloablative megatherapy procedures followed by stem cell rescue for neuroblastoma: 17 years of European experience and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, F. [Centre Leon Berard, Unit of Biostatistics, 28, rue Laennec, 69373 Lyon (France); Rosti, G. [Ospedale Civile, Oncologia Medica, Via Le Randi 5, 48100 Ravenna (Italy); Bernard, J.L. [Hopital d' Enfants de la Timone, Department of Paediatrics, Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille (France); Kremens, B. [Universitats Klinikum Essen, Department of Paediatrics, Hufelandstrasse, 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Garaventa, A. [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Haematology/Oncology, Via Maggio 5, 16148 Genova Quarto (Italy); Klingebiel, T. [University Hospital, Abteilung Hamatologie Oncologie, Ruemelinstrasse 18-23, 7400 Tuebingen (Germany); Pearson, A.D.J. [Royal Victoria Infirmary, Sir J. Spence Institute of Child Health, Children' s Cancer Unit, Queen Victoria Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Pinkerton, R. [The Royal Marsden Hospital, Children' s Department, Downs Road, Sutton (United Kingdom); Zucker, J.M. [Institut Curie, Department of Paediatrics, 3 rue Thuillier, 75231 Paris (France); Hartmann, O. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Paediatrics, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Lasset, C. [Centre Leon Berard, Unit of Biostatistics, 28, rue Laennec, 69373 Lyon (France); Ladenstein, R. [St. Anna Kinderhospital, Department of Haematology, Wiener Rotes Kreuz, Kinderspitalgasse 6, 1086 Vienna (Austria); Philip, T. [Centre Leon Berard, Department of Paediatrics, 28, rue Laennec, 69373 Lyon (France)

    1997-10-01

    1070 myeloablative procedures followed by stem cell rescue for neuroblastoma are reviewed. These 1070 procedures are part of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMTG) registry from the last 17 years (in 4536 patients). In 1070 neuroblastoma patients, survival at 2 years was 49%, at 5 years, 33% and relapses were observed as late as 7 years post-BMT (bone marrow transplant). However, 5-year survivors after megatherapy with BMT for stage 4 disease do have an 80% chance of becoming a long-term survivor. When BMT had been used in first complete response (CR1) no salvage was possible, whereas 15% survivors may be seen if BMT is used for the first time at relapse. Infants with stage 4 neuroblastoma had a 17% toxic death rate and indication in this group is exceptional and not recommended. In a matched cohort (17 allogeneic and 34 autologous), autologous stem cell rescue (SCR) was shown to be at least equal to allogeneic SCR. Multivariate analysis of clinical prognostic factors in children with stage 4 disease over 1 year showed that event-free survival was mainly influenced by two adverse factors before the megatherapy procedure: persisting skeleton lesions ({sup 99}Tc and/or mIBG scan positive) as well as persisting bone marrow (BM) involvement. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Genomic analysis of the TRIM family reveals two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanella Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TRIM family is composed of multi-domain proteins that display the Tripartite Motif (RING, B-box and Coiled-coil that can be associated with a C-terminal domain. TRIM genes are involved in ubiquitylation and are implicated in a variety of human pathologies, from Mendelian inherited disorders to cancer, and are also involved in cellular response to viral infection. Results Here we defined the entire human TRIM family and also identified the TRIM sets of other vertebrate (mouse, rat, dog, cow, chicken, tetraodon, and zebrafish and invertebrate species (fruitfly, worm, and ciona. By means of comparative analyses we found that, after assembly of the tripartite motif in an early metazoan ancestor, few types of C-terminal domains have been associated with this module during evolution and that an important increase in TRIM number occurred in vertebrate species concomitantly with the addition of the SPRY domain. We showed that the human TRIM family is split into two groups that differ in domain structure, genomic organization and evolutionary properties. Group 1 members present a variety of C-terminal domains, are highly conserved among vertebrate species, and are represented in invertebrates. Conversely, group 2 is absent in invertebrates, is characterized by the presence of a C-terminal SPRY domain and presents unique sets of genes in each mammal examined. The generation of independent sets of group 2 genes is also evident in the other vertebrate species. Comparing the murine and human TRIM sets, we found that group 1 and 2 genes evolve at different speeds and are subject to different selective pressures. Conclusion We found that the TRIM family is composed of two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties. Group 2 is younger, highly dynamic, and might act as a reservoir to develop novel TRIM functions. Since some group 2 genes are implicated in innate immune response, their evolutionary features may account for

  7. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive...... of adherence to the guidelines in the different departments. CONCLUSION: Utilizing data from the DBCG database, a long array of high-quality DBCG studies of various designs and scope, nationwide or in international collaboration, have contributed to the current updating of the guidelines, and have been...

  8. Spreading of cooperative behaviour across interdependent groups

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Luo-Luo

    2013-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that links between groups reinforce individuals within groups to adopt cooperative behaviour. Moreover, links between networks may induce cascading failures, competitive percolation, or contribute to efficient transportation. Here we show that there in fact exists an intermediate fraction of links between groups that is optimal for the evolution of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma game. We consider individual groups with regular, random, and scale-free topology, and study their different combinations to reveal that an intermediate interdependence optimally facilitates the spreading of cooperative behaviour between groups. Excessive between-group links simply unify the two groups and make them act as one, while too rare between-group links preclude a useful information flow between the two groups. Interestingly, we find that between-group links are more likely to connect two cooperators than in-group links, thus supporting the conclusion that they are of paramount impor...

  9. Group decision-making: Factors that affect group effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Osmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are operating in a dynamic and turbulent environment. In these conditions, they have to make decisions for new problems or situations. Most of decisions are therefore non-programmed and unstructured, accompanied by risk and uncertainty. Moreover, the problems and situations are complex. All organizations are oriented towards group decisionmaking processes, as useful tools to cope with uncertainty and complexity. Apart from the necessity, companies are turning towards participatory processes also to benefit from the important advantages that these processes offer. Organizations have realized the importance of group decision-making processes to contribute to the creation of sustainable competitive advantages. Main objective of this paper is to show that group decision-making processes do not offer guarantee for good decisions, because the effectiveness of group is affected by many factors. So, the first thing done in this paper is discussing about the benefits and limitations that accompany the use of groups with decision-making purpose. Afterwards, we stop on the different factors that influence the group’s ability to make good decisions. The aim is to emphasize that regardless of the many advantages of groups, some factors as group size, type of communication within the group, leadership style, the norms, the differentiation of roles and statuses, cohesion and compliance degree should be the main elements to keep into consideration because they affect the effectiveness of group. In this regard, is discussed how such factors influence the quality of decision and then we try to draw some conclusions that can improve and make better and easier group decision-making processes.

  10. Gauging the Commitment of Clandestine Group Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    terrorism_strategy.pdf. Internet Accessed: 4 October 2005. Olson , Mancur . The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. Cambridge, MA...situations together. In 1965, while studying production effectiveness in terms of group size, Olson concluded that a small group size was more...desirable developing a bond and fulfilling group interests [ Olson , 1965:36]. These conclusions were challenged in 1974 by Chamberlin who concluded size was

  11. De la pregunta general a la recollida concreta i, d'aquí, a les conclusions transferibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Martin-Rubió

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available From the general question to the collection of data, and then on to transferable conclusions. This article reflects upon the way researchers approach the observable facts that are part of the data of a research project that focuses on the relationship between identity and linguistic ideology. More specifically, the aim of the project is to answer the following research question: how do youngsters living in the institutionally bilingual communities of Catalonia and the Basque Country build up their multilingual identities in relation to the discourses of globalisation and nationalism? We will try to show the tensions that surface in any research project when it comes to deciding upon the most suitable methodology, which in the case studied resulted in the adoption of a qualitative approach that combines ethnography, conversational analysis and critical discourse analysis. In the first section we open the methodological reflection by comparing quantitative and qualitative data from the same sociolinguistic context, i.e. the one where the first data set for the project was collected. In section 2 we present the methodology finally chosen for the project from four specific parameters. In the last section we list in detail the data collected for the project and explain how we mean to approach their analysis. (Catalan text.

  12. A pesquisa na graduação em enfermagem: requisito para conclusão do curso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silvana Totti Heyden

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto apresenta as diretrizes de implantação do Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso (TCC na graduação em Enfermagem do Centro Universitário Federal de Alfenas-MG, apontando as facilidades, dificuldades e os resultados destes quatro primeiros anos, utilizando-se dos registros de atas do Departamento e do Colegiado de Enfermagem e a vivência dos autores como coordenadores do processo. Relatam-se como pontos facilitadores: incentivo ao trabalho multidisciplinar; aumento das parcerias com os profissionais de campo; maior utilização da informática, da biblioteca e do banco de dados; aumento da participação em eventos de pesquisas. E, como dificultadores: estabelecimento de normas para apresentação de trabalhos científicos, uma vez que na época a Escola não tinha uma norma. Concluímos que apesar das dificuldades, a pesquisa é possível de acontecer, sendo um processo dinâmico em que o aprender a aprender está presente, tanto para os discentes como para os docentes.

  13. The postmodern turn in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, J V

    2001-10-01

    The postmodern critique, often referred to as social constructionism, has influenced nearly all disciplines, including recently the domain of psychology--and most particularly psychoanalysis. This article presents an exposition of the "postmodern turn," including some historical perspective, a description of its theoretical elements as related to psychological practice, as well as standard objections to its theories. This author believes that many of the concepts inherent to a social constructionist approach are compelling for theory and practice in group therapy. Clinical case studies are cited in describing how postmodern theories present a natural fit for group therapy. Furthermore, specific implications of this model are delineated for the arduous task of leading groups.

  14. Iron management in chronic kidney disease: conclusions from a "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bircher, Andreas J; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Obrador, Gregorio T; Pollock, Carol A; Stenvinkel, Peter; Swinkels, Dorine W; Wanner, Christoph; Weiss, Günter; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    Before the introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in 1989, repeated transfusions given to patients with end-stage renal disease caused iron overload, and the need for supplemental iron was rare. However, with the widespread introduction of ESAs, it was recognized that supplemental iron was necessary to optimize hemoglobin response and allow reduction of the ESA dose for economic reasons and recent concerns about ESA safety. Iron supplementation was also found to be more efficacious via intravenous compared to oral administration, and the use of intravenous iron has escalated in recent years. The safety of various iron compounds has been of theoretical concern due to their potential to induce iron overload, oxidative stress, hypersensitivity reactions, and a permissive environment for infectious processes. Therefore, an expert group was convened to assess the benefits and risks of parenteral iron, and to provide strategies for its optimal use while mitigating the risk for acute reactions and other adverse effects.

  15. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  16. Introduction to Working Group 7

    CERN Document Server

    Gueudet, Ghislaine; Giampaolo, Chiappini; Stephen, Hegedus; Hans-Georg, Weigand

    2010-01-01

    Technologies in mathematical education has been a theme present at CERME from the first edition. The available technologies have evolved a lot during these years. At CERME 5 conference, the conclusions of the technology Working Group (Kynigos et al. 2007), as well as Artigue's and Ruthven's interventions (Artigue 2007, Ruthven 2007), signal perspective evolutions towards more comprehensive studies, in several respects. Drawing on these previous works, CERME 6 WG7 intended to go further in the directions they have indicated.

  17. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  18. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  19. Implication of snail in metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression.

  20. Alliance and group cohesion in relationship education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Antle, Becky; Barbee, Anita

    2013-09-01

    Relationship education programs have been shown as an effective way to increase relationship functioning. There is less known about how process factors, such as alliance with the leader or group dynamics, affect outcomes in these interventions. We examined group cohesion and alliance with the leader in a relationship education program tailored for individuals. Specifically, we examined whether participants' ratings (n = 126) of the group cohesion and alliance with the leader were associated with changes in relationship adjustment, relationship confidence, and communication quality from pre- to postintervention. The results demonstrated that participants' perceptions of the cohesion among the members in their relationship education group, but not the leader-participant alliance, made a significant contribution to the changes in participants' relationship functioning. These results suggest that the group dynamics among the members in the group are important ingredients in relationship education. Implications for relationship programs are provided. © FPI, Inc.