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Sample records for group comparison studies

  1. Statistical Group Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  2. Data-driven intensity normalization of PET group comparison studies is superior to global mean normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Aanerud, Joel; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global mean (GM) normalization is one of the most commonly used methods of normalization in PET and SPECT group comparison studies of neurodegenerative disorders. It requires that no between-group GM difference is present, which may be strongly violated in neurodegenerative disorders....... Importantly, such GM differences often elude detection due to the large intrinsic variance in absolute values of cerebral blood flow or glucose consumption. Alternative methods of normalization are needed for this type of data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two types of simulation were performed using CBF images...... from 49 controls. Two homogeneous groups of 20 subjects were sampled repeatedly. In one group, cortical CBF was artificially decreased moderately (simulation I) or slightly (simulation II). The other group served as controls. Ratio normalization was performed using five reference regions: (1) Global...

  3. Normalization in PET group comparison studies - The importance of a valid reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Jonsdottir, Kristjana Yr; Cumming, Paul;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism, the large interindividual variation commonly is minimized by normalization to the global mean prior to statistical analysis. This approach requires that no between-group or between-state diffe......INTRODUCTION: In positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism, the large interindividual variation commonly is minimized by normalization to the global mean prior to statistical analysis. This approach requires that no between-group or between......-state differences exist in the normalization region. Given the variability typical of global CBF and the practical limit on sample size, small group differences in global mean easily elude detection, but still bias the comparison, with profound consequences for the physiological interpretation of the results....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Quantitative [15O]H2O PET recordings of CBF were obtained in 45 healthy subjects (21-81 years) and 14 patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). With volume-of-interest (VOI) and voxel-based statistics, we conducted regression analyses of CBF as function of age in the healthy group...

  4. Facilitating Group Analysis of Two Case Studies Utilising Peer Tutoring: Comparison of Tasks and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Lin Siew

    2016-01-01

    Peer-tutoring sessions of two groups of advanced diploma in financial accounting students with mixed proficiency were analysed thoroughly in this study. Numerous studies in peer tutoring have produced favourable results to both tutors and tutees due to the scaffolding process which promotes effective learning. However, there is a lack of studies…

  5. Hypertension management initiative prospective cohort study: comparison between immediate and delayed intervention groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, S W; Moy Lum-Kwong, M; Von Sychowski, S; Kandukur, K; Kiss, A; Flintoft, V

    2014-01-01

    The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario's Hypertension Management Initiative (HMI) was a pragmatic implementation of clinical practice guidelines for hypertension management in primary care clinics. The HMI was a prospective delayed phase cohort study of 11 sites enrolling patients in two blocks starting 9 months apart in 2007. The intervention was an evidence-informed chronic disease management program consisting of an interprofessional educational intervention with practice tools to implement the Canadian Hypertension Education Program's clinical practice guidelines. This study compares the change in blood pressure (BP) from baseline to 9 months after the intervention between groups. In the immediate intervention group, the mean BP at baseline was 134.6/79.1 mm Hg (18.2/11.5) and in the delayed intervention group 134.2/77.1 mm Hg (18.9/11.8). The fall in BP in the immediate intervention group from baseline to 9 months after the intervention was 7.3/3.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9-8.7/2.6-4.5) and in the delayed group 8.1/3.3 mm Hg (95% CI: 7.0-9.3/2.5-4.1) (all Phypertension can rapidly lead to lower BP levels.

  6. Comparison of 12-step groups to mutual help alternatives for AUD in a large, national study: Differences in membership characteristics and group participation, cohesion, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Mericle, Amy; Hemberg, Jordana

    2017-02-01

    Many studies suggest that participation in 12-step groups contributes to better recovery outcomes, but people often object to such groups and most do not sustain regular involvement. Yet, research on alternatives to 12-step groups is very sparse. The present study aimed to extend the knowledge base on mutual help group alternatives for those with an alcohol use disorder (AUD), sampling from large, active, abstinence-focused groups including Women for Sobriety (WFS), LifeRing, and SMART Recovery (SMART). This paper presents a cross-sectional analysis of this longitudinal study, using baseline data to describe the profile and participation characteristics of attendees of these groups in comparison to 12-step members. Data from participants 18 and over with a lifetime AUD (N=651) were collected using Web-based surveys. Members of alternative 12-step groups were recruited in collaboration with group directors, who helped publicize the study by emailing meeting conveners and attendees and posting announcements on social media. A comparison group of current (past-30-day) 12-step attendees was recruited from an online meeting hub for recovering persons. Interested parties were directed to a Webpage where they were screened, and eligible participants completed an online survey assessing demographic and clinical variables; in-person and online mutual help involvement; and group satisfaction and cohesion. Analyses involved comparing those identifying WFS, SMART, and LifeRing as their primary group to 12-step members on the above characteristics. Compared to 12-step members, members of the mutual help alternatives were less religious and generally higher on education and income. WFS and LifeRing members were also older, more likely to be married, and lower on lifetime drug and psychiatric severity; meanwhile, LifeRing and SMART members were less likely to endorse the most stringent abstinence goal. Finally, despite lower levels of in-person meeting attendance, members of all

  7. Testing the Nursing Worklife Model in Canada and Australia: a multi-group comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Duffield, Christine

    2015-02-01

    To test a model derived from the Nursing Worklife Model linking elements of supportive practice environments to nurses' turnover intentions and behaviours in Canada and Australia. With the worldwide shortage of nurses, retaining nurses within fiscally challenged health care systems is critical to sustaining the future of the nursing workforce and ultimately safe patient care. The Nursing Worklife Model describes a pattern of relationships amongst environmental factors that support nursing practice and link to nurse turnover. This model has been tested in north American settings but not in other countries. A secondary analysis of data collected in two cross-sectional studies in Canadian and Australian hospitals (N=4816) was conducted to test our theoretical model. Multigroup structural equation modelling techniques were used to determine the validity of our model in both countries and to identify differences between countries. The hypothesized model relationships were supported in both countries with few differences between groups. Components of supportive professional practice work environments, particularly resources, were significantly linked to nurses' turnover intentions and active search for new jobs. Leadership played a critical role in shaping the pattern of relationships to other components of supportive practice environments and ultimately turnover behaviours. The Nursing Worklife Model was shown to be valid in both countries, suggesting that management efforts to ensure that features of supportive practice environments are in place to promote the retention of valuable nursing resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy: a preliminary psychometric study and group comparisons in Korean physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dae Hun; Hong, Jong Soo; Lee, Dong Hun; Gonnella, Joseph S; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Empathy is an important element of professionalism in medicine. Thus, evaluation and enhancement empathy in physicians is important, regardless of geographical boundaries. This study was designed to evaluate the psychometrics of a Korean version of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) among Korean physicians. The Korean version of JSPE was completed by 229 physicians in Korea. Item-total score correlations were all positive and statistically significant. Cronbach's coefficient alpha was 0.84. The mean score was 98.2 (SD = 12.0), which was lower than that reported for American and Italian physicians. The emerged factor structure of the translated version was somewhat similar to that reported for American physicians, although the order was different. Significant differences in the mean empathy scores were observed between men and women and among physicians in different specialties. Our findings provide evidence in support of reliability and construct validity of the Korean version of JSPE for assessing empathy among Korean physicians. The disparity between Korean physicians and physicians from other countries may be explained by differences in the culture of medical education and medical practice. It suggests an exploration of cross-cultural differences in physician empathy.

  9. Safety impacts of platform tram stops on pedestrians in mixed traffic operation: A comparison group before-after crash study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David; Sarvi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Tram stops in mixed traffic environments present a variety of safety, accessibility and transport efficiency challenges. In Melbourne, Australia the hundred year-old electric tram system is progressively being modernized to improve passenger accessibility. Platform stops, incorporating raised platforms for level entry into low floor trams, are being retro-fitted system-wide to replace older design stops. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety impacts of platform stops over older design stops (i.e. Melbourne safety zone tram stops) on pedestrians in the context of mixed traffic tram operation in Melbourne, using an advanced before-after crash analysis approach, the comparison group (CG) method. The CG method evaluates safety impacts by taking into account the general trends in safety and the unobserved factors at treatment and comparison sites that can alter the outcomes of a simple before-after analysis. The results showed that pedestrian-involved all injury crashes reduced by 43% after platform stop installation. This paper also explores a concern that the conventional CG method might underestimate safety impacts as a result of large differences in passenger stop use between treatment and comparison sites, suggesting differences in crash risk exposure. To adjust for this, a modified analysis explored crash rates (crash counts per 10,000 stop passengers) for each site. The adjusted results suggested greater reductions in pedestrian-involved crashes after platform stop installation: an 81% reduction in pedestrian-involved all injury crashes and 86% reduction in pedestrian-involved FSI crashes, both are significant at the 95% level. Overall, the results suggest that platform stops have considerable safety benefits for pedestrians. Implications for policy and areas for future research are explored.

  10. Finding a Comparison Group: Is Online Crowdsourcing a Viable Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Tarek; Jacobson, Miriam R.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the viability of online crowdsourcing for creating matched-comparison groups. This exploratory study compares survey results from a randomized control group to survey results from a matched-comparison group created from Amazon.com's MTurk crowdsourcing service to determine their comparability. Study findings indicate…

  11. A double-masked comparison of Naprelan and nabumetone in osteoarthritis of the knee. Naprelan Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, R M; Flint, K; Constantine, G; Kolecki, B

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of Naprelan (naproxen sodium) 1000 mg once daily (QD) and nabumetone 1500 mg QD were compared in a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, double-masked, 4-week study of adult outpatients with active osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Nabumetone 1500 mg was chosen for comparison because it is commonly prescribed in a QD dosing regimen for OA. After a washout period free of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 279 patients were enrolled and assigned randomly to treatment with either Naprelan 1000 mg QD (n = 92), nabumetone 1500 mg QD (n = 93), or placebo (n = 94). All treatments were evaluated for efficacy and safety at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4 of the treatment period or at discontinuation. Demographic characteristics were comparable among all treatment groups. As might be expected in a study of OA of the knee, a majority of patients enrolled were women (68.8%), and many were obese (mean weight, 195.6 lb; mean height, 66 in). Significantly fewer patients (13) treated with Naprelan prematurely discontinued the study than did patients treated with placebo (27); there was a lower rate of discontinuation for insufficient therapeutic effect in the Naprelan group compared with the nabumetone and placebo groups. Using an intent-to-treat model, the overall distribution of scores in all three primary efficacy assessments (investigator's global assessment of OA, patient's global assessment of OA, and walking pain) at week 2 and at the last visit was significantly better for the Naprelan group compared with both the nabumetone and placebo groups. The mean improvement from baseline was also significant for Naprelan compared with the nabumetone and placebo groups for all three assessments at week 2 and for investigator's global assessment of OA and walking pain at the last visit. The nabumetone-treated group showed significant improvement over the placebo-treated group in only one primary assessment: mean change from baseline in

  12. The Differences between Novice and Expert Group-Piano Teaching Strategies: A Case Study and Comparison of Beginning Group Piano Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2014-01-01

    This case study compares the teaching strategies employed by a novice and an expert instructor of two beginning children's group-piano classes. In the United States, there is a century-long tradition of teaching piano to children in groups, and group teaching is championed in pedagogy texts and at professional educator conferences throughout…

  13. The Differences between Novice and Expert Group-Piano Teaching Strategies: A Case Study and Comparison of Beginning Group Piano Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2014-01-01

    This case study compares the teaching strategies employed by a novice and an expert instructor of two beginning children's group-piano classes. In the United States, there is a century-long tradition of teaching piano to children in groups, and group teaching is championed in pedagogy texts and at professional educator conferences throughout…

  14. Comparison of gait of persons with partial foot amputation wearing prosthesis to matched control group: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Barker, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the gait mechanics of persons with partial foot amputation and the influence of prosthetic intervention has been limited by the reporting of isolated gait parameters in specific amputation levels and limited interpretation and discussion of results. This observational study aimed to more completely describe the gait patterns of persons with partial foot amputation wearing their existing prosthesis and footwear in comparison with a nonamputee control group. Major adaptations occurred once the metatarsal heads were compromised. Persons with transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation who were wearing insoles and slipper sockets maintained the center of pressure behind the end of the residuum until after contralateral heel contact. This gait pattern may be a useful adaptation to protect the residuum, moderate the requirement of the calf musculature, or compensate for the compliance of the forefoot. Power generation across the affected ankle was virtually negligible, necessitating increased power generation across the hip joints. The clamshell devices fitted to the persons with Chopart amputation restored their effective foot length and normalized many aspects of gait. These persons' ability to adopt this gait pattern may be the result of the broad anterior shell of the socket, a relatively stiff forefoot, and immobilization of the ankle. The hip joints still contributed significantly to the power generation required to walk.

  15. Teaching Groups as Midlevel Sociocultural Contexts for Developing Teaching and Learning: A Case Study and Comparison to Microcultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Using a case-study approach, the structures, interactions and cultures in four teaching groups at a New Zealand university are explored. The aim of the research is to better understand the potential of teaching groups for assisting academic development. To contextualize this work, the case-study outcomes are compared to research on microcultures.…

  16. Sleep and Daytime Functioning: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study of Three Preschool-Age Comparison Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Thomas; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Schwichtenberg, A. J.; Tang, Karen; Goodlin-Jones, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This study examined sleep, sleepiness, and daytime performance in 68 children with autism, 57 children with intellectual disability (ID), and 69 typically developing preschool children. Children in the autism and ID groups had poorer daytime performance and behaviors than the typically developing children. Children in the ID group also were…

  17. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, Johanna M; Boot, Cécile R L; van der Gulden, Joost W J; Bosmans, Judith E; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the control group. Data on hand eczema and costs were collected at baseline and every 3 months. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed using linear multilevel analyses. The probability of the implementation strategy being cost-effective gradually increased with an increasing willingness-to-pay, to 0.84 at a ceiling ratio of €590,000 per person with hand eczema prevented (societal perspective). The implementation strategy appeared to be not cost-effective in comparison with the control group (societal perspective), nor was it cost-beneficial to the employer. However, this study had some methodological problems which should be taken into account when interpreting the results.

  18. Comparison of roxatidine acetate and ranitidine in the treatment of reflux esophagitis. The Roxatidine Esophagitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The 408 patients with symptomatic and endoscopic evidence of reflux esophagitis were enrolled in a double-blind, multi-center study. For 6 weeks, 201 patients (median age, 51 years; 59 women) were randomly assigned to receive 75 mg of roxatidine acetate twice daily and 207 (median age, 51 years; 62 women) received 150 mg of ranitidine twice daily. Baseline and final endoscopic findings were available for 158 of the roxatidine group and 156 of the ranitidine group who completed the study. After treatment, completely healed or residual erythema of the mucosa (conventional healing rate) was found in 68% of the roxatidine group and in 69% of the ranitidine group, complete healing of the mucosa, in 32% and 38%, and improvement in 83% and 84%. According to a reflux symptom index, at 6 weeks, 28% of 161 evaluable roxatidine-treated patients and 36% of 158 evaluable ranitidine-treated patients were asymptomatic during both the day and night. The conventional healing rates in this study were similar to those in nine previous studies of ranitidine; 3 roxatidine-treated patients and 4 ranitidine-treated patients dropped out of the study because of side effects. It is concluded that 75 mg of roxatidine acetate twice daily is as safe and effective as 150 mg of ranitidine twice daily in the treatment of reflux esophagitis.

  19. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  20. Self-Concept and Native Language Background: A Study of Measurement Invariance and Cross-Group Comparisons in Third Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Adelson, Jill L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the measurement and interpretation of self-concept among the growing population of children who are English Language Learners (ELLs). More specifically, a 3-group analysis was conducted comparing native English-speaking children, Spanish-speaking ELLs, and ELLs from Asian language backgrounds. Data were drawn from the Early…

  1. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  2. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  3. Comparison study of two aldehyde group finishing agents in surface modification of up-conversion luminescence materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Lili; FAN Huili; XIAO Junping; XU Xiaowei

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification of up-conversion luminescence materials (Na[Y0.57Yb0.39Er0.04]F4 modified by amino groups) by grafting and modifying with aldehyde groups was studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FFIR),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),and emission spectrum (EM).The surface modification effect was compared using two different finishing agents,p-phthalaldehyde and glutaraldehyde.It was found that the surface of up-conversion luminescence materials could be modified by aldehyde groups of the two finishing agents,the systematic dispersibility and the thermostability of the up-conversion luminescence material modified by p-phthalaldehyde were better than those of the material modified by glutaraldehyde,and the luminous intensity of the material modified by p-phthalaldehyde was increased.The AI (the ratio of the suspended segmental quality in the specimen to the total mass of the specimen) of the material modified by p-phthalaldehyde was higher than that of the material modified by glutaraldehyde.It is obviously seen that the embellishment effect of p-phthalaldehyde as a finishing agent was better than that of glutaraldehyde.In addition,the reasons why p-phthalaldehyde is a good finishing agent are also explained.

  4. Clinical comparison of monophasic oral contraceptive preparations of gestodene/ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol. Latin American Oral Contraceptive Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The efficacy, cycle control, subjective complaints, and safety of monophasic preparations of the oral contraceptives containing gestodene 75 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg versus desogestrel 150 mcg plus ethinyl estradiol 30 mcg were compared in a 6-cycle, open-label, parallel, randomized, multicenter phase IV clinical study in Latin America. Of a total of 176 women in each group, 163 in the gestodene group and 160 in the desogestrel group completed 6 cycles, providing data for 1,015 and 1,006 cycles, respectively. Subject compliance was excellent; pills were missed during only 6.9% of the cycles in each group. No woman became pregnant during the study. Gestodene group exhibited significantly better cycle control as evidenced by the lower incidence of breakthrough bleeding and spotting. Spotting in some cycles was reported by 11.9% of women taking the gestodene-combination compared with 21% of women taking the desogestrel-combination. Based on number of women, 86.4% of the gestodene group reported all cycles were normal (no BTB) compared with 76.7% of the desogestrel group. Also, the women in the gestodene group reported a significantly lower incidence of nuisance side effects during treatment cycles. No amenorrhea was observed for either group. There were no clinically significant differences between groups with respect to body weight, blood pressure, or laboratory evaluations. Seven women withdrew from the gestodene group and 8 women withdrew from the desogestrel group because of adverse reactions. The results of this study indicate that, although both OCs provided effective contraception, in comparison to the desogestrel-combination, the gestodene-containing OC is associated with better cycle control, less bleeding, and fewer subjective complaints.

  5. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  6. Comparison of two control groups for estimation of oral cholera vaccine effectiveness using a case-control study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Molly F; Jerome, J Gregory; Matias, Wilfredo R; Ternier, Ralph; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Harris, Jason B; Ivers, Louise C

    2017-10-13

    Case-control studies to quantify oral cholera vaccine effectiveness (VE) often rely on neighbors without diarrhea as community controls. Test-negative controls can be easily recruited and may minimize bias due to differential health-seeking behavior and recall. We compared VE estimates derived from community and test-negative controls and conducted bias-indicator analyses to assess potential bias with community controls. From October 2012 through November 2016, patients with acute watery diarrhea were recruited from cholera treatment centers in rural Haiti. Cholera cases had a positive stool culture. Non-cholera diarrhea cases (test-negative controls and non-cholera diarrhea cases for bias-indicator analyses) had a negative culture and rapid test. Up to four community controls were matched to diarrhea cases by age group, time, and neighborhood. Primary analyses included 181 cholera cases, 157 non-cholera diarrhea cases, 716 VE community controls and 625 bias-indicator community controls. VE for self-reported vaccination with two doses was consistent across the two control groups, with statistically significant VE estimates ranging from 72 to 74%. Sensitivity analyses revealed similar, though somewhat attenuated estimates for self-reported two dose VE. Bias-indicator estimates were consistently less than one, with VE estimates ranging from 19 to 43%, some of which were statistically significant. OCV estimates from case-control analyses using community and test-negative controls were similar. While bias-indicator analyses suggested possible over-estimation of VE estimates using community controls, test-negative analyses suggested this bias, if present, was minimal. Test-negative controls can be a valid low-cost and time-efficient alternative to community controls for OCV effectiveness estimation and may be especially relevant in emergency situations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A Comparison of Web-based and Small-Group Palliative and End-of-Life Care Curricula: A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Study at One Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Frank C.; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Griffin, Erin; Hoffman, Jerome R.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have compared the effect of web-based eLearning versus small-group learning on medical student outcomes. Palliative and end-of-life (PEOL) education is ideal for this comparison, given uneven access to PEOL experts and content nationally. Method In 2010, the authors enrolled all third-year medical students at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine into a quasi-randomized controlled trial of web-based interactive education (eDoctoring) compared to small-group education (Doctoring) on PEOL clinical content over two months. All students participated in three 3-hour PEOL sessions with similar content. Outcomes included a 24-item PEOL-specific self-efficacy scale with three domains (diagnosis/treatment [Cronbach’s alpha = 0.92, CI: 0.91–0.93], communication/prognosis [alpha = 0.95; CI: 0.93–0.96], and social impact/self-care [alpha = 0.91; CI: 0.88–0.92]); eight knowledge items; ten curricular advantage/disadvantages, and curricular satisfaction (both students and faculty). Results Students were randomly assigned to web-based eDoctoring (n = 48) or small-group Doctoring (n = 71) curricula. Self-efficacy and knowledge improved equivalently between groups: e.g., prognosis self-efficacy, 19%; knowledge, 10–42%. Student and faculty ratings of the web-based eDoctoring curriculum and the small group Doctoring curriculum were equivalent for most goals, and overall satisfaction was equivalent for each, with a trend towards decreased eDoctoring student satisfaction. Conclusions Findings showed equivalent gains in self-efficacy and knowledge between students participating in a web-based PEOL curriculum, in comparison to students learning similar content in a small-group format. Web-based curricula can standardize content presentation when local teaching expertise is limited, but may lead to decreased user satisfaction. PMID:25539518

  8. The inter-group comparison-intra-group cooperation hypothesis: comparisons between groups increase efficiency in public goods provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Robert; Rockenbach, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Identifying methods to increase cooperation and efficiency in public goods provision is of vital interest for human societies. The methods that have been proposed often incur costs that (more than) destroy the efficiency gains through increased cooperation. It has for example been shown that inter-group conflict increases intra-group cooperation, however at the cost of collective efficiency. We propose a new method that makes use of the positive effects associated with inter-group competition but avoids the detrimental (cost) effects of a structural conflict. We show that the mere comparison to another structurally independent group increases both the level of intra-group cooperation and overall efficiency. The advantage of this new method is that it directly transfers the benefits from increased cooperation into increased efficiency. In repeated public goods provision we experimentally manipulated the participants' level of contribution feedback (intra-group only vs. both intra- and inter-group) as well as the provision environment (smaller groups with higher individual benefits from cooperation vs. larger groups with lower individual benefits from cooperation). Irrespective of the provision environment groups with an inter-group comparison opportunity exhibited a significantly stronger cooperation than groups without this opportunity. Participants conditionally cooperated within their group and additionally acted to advance their group to not fall behind the other group. The individual efforts to advance the own group cushion the downward trend in the above average contributors and thus render contributions on a higher level. We discuss areas of practical application.

  9. Impact of tissue atrophy on high-pass filtered MRI signal phase-based assessment in large-scale group-comparison studies: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweser, Ferdinand; Dwyer, Michael G.; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Zivadinov, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The assessment of abnormal accumulation of tissue iron in the basal ganglia nuclei and in white matter plaques using the gradient echo magnetic resonance signal phase has become a research focus in many neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease. A common and natural approach is to calculate the mean high-pass-filtered phase of previously delineated brain structures. Unfortunately, the interpretation of such an analysis requires caution: in this paper we demonstrate that regional gray matter atrophy, which is concomitant with many neurodegenerative diseases, may itself directly result in a phase shift seemingly indicative of increased iron concentration even without any real change in the tissue iron concentration. Although this effect is relatively small results of large-scale group comparisons may be driven by anatomical changes rather than by changes of the iron concentration.

  10. A Comparison of Workplace Groups with Groups in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George M.; James, Joyce E.

    The use of groups in both the workplace and schools has been increasing. In the workplace, groups reflective of a growing trend toward worker participation in management have been variously referred to as self-managing work teams, self-directed work groups, quality circles, autonomous work groups, and cross-functional teams. Schools have used many…

  11. Comparison of amlodipine and benazepril monotherapy to amlodipine plus benazepril in patients with systemic hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. The Benazepril/Amlodipine Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frishman, W H; RAM, C V; McMahon, F G; Chrysant, S G; Graff, A; Kupiec, J W; Hsu, H

    1995-11-01

    A single-blind, run-in, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled comparison trial was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of low-dose amlodipine 2.5 mg daily, low-dose benazepril 10 mg daily, and the combination of the two drugs at the same doses used once daily in patients (n = 401) with mild to moderate (stages I and II) systemic hypertension. Both monotherapy regimens were shown to significantly reduce both systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with baseline placebo values, and the combination regimen was shown to be superior in lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared with either of the monotherapy regimens. The combination therapy also resulted in a greater percentage of patients having successful clinical response in mean sitting diastolic blood pressure. The amlodipine and benazepril regimen was also shown to be associated with a similar incidence of adverse experiences as the active monotherapy or placebo regimens, although the group given combination therapy appeared to have a lower incidence of edema than the group given amlodipine alone. Low-dose amlodipine (2.5 mg) plus benazepril (10 mg) provides greater blood-pressure-lowering efficacy than either monotherapy, and has an excellent safety profile.

  12. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  13. Divorce among physicians. Comparisons with other occupational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, W J; Burge, S K

    1989-04-28

    This study had two goals--to evaluate critically the literature regarding the quality and stability of physicians' marriages and to present national data regarding the divorce-proneness of physicians in comparison with other occupational groups. The conclusions from the literature review were that (a) there is no sound evidence that physicians have lower marital quality than other groups, and (b) methodological weaknesses in past research leave open the question of whether physicians are more prone or less prone to divorce than other groups. The conclusion from new analyses of 1970 and 1980 US census data was that both male and female physicians have a lower tendency to divorce than other occupational groups, including other groups of professionals.

  14. A comparison of donor and control group quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Abdul Talib Abdul Mutalib, Muzalwana; Mohd Satar, Nurulhuda; Abdullah, Nawi; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun

    2014-03-03

    Informed consent of prospective donors should include information about the quality of life (QoL) of existing donors, especially those within the relevant country. This study aimed to provide information on Malaysian organ donors' QoL relative to a control group. Using a shorter version of the SF-36, QoL of 80 donors from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Malaysia was surveyed and compared to QoL of 80 selected healthy individuals. ANOVA and General Linear Model (GLM) procedure were each applied for the QoL comparison, which was based on gender and age. Donors recorded a better QoL relative to the control group. Comparison across gender revealed that differences are more obvious for males than females. Donor/control comparison across age groups reveals that donors aged 56 and above reported significantly better QoL in most domains relative to other age groups. Information on donor QoL should be made available to the public to present a comprehensive picture of the consequences of organ donation. Nonetheless, we also argue that, despite the merits of organ donation, caution is required before concluding that donors have better QoL because the present research outcomes may reflect a self-selection bias in which respondents only included donors engaging in regular follow-ups.

  15. A Comparison of Verbal and Nonverbal Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Virginia; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The FIRO-B by Schutz and the Personal Orientation Inventory by Shostrum were used to assess personality changes in a verbal and a nonverbal T-group. Personality measures used failed to find significant posttreatment differences between groups. Several significant differences occurred within groups. (Author)

  16. A Comparison of Verbal and Nonverbal Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Virginia; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The FIRO-B by Schutz and the Personal Orientation Inventory by Shostrum were used to assess personality changes in a verbal and a nonverbal T-group. Personality measures used failed to find significant posttreatment differences between groups. Several significant differences occurred within groups. (Author)

  17. Women with Childhood ADHD: Comparisons by Diagnostic Group and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinski, Dara E; Pelham, William E; Molina, Brooke S G; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Yu, Jihnhee; Sibley, Margaret H; Biswas, Aparajita

    2011-12-01

    This study compared adult women with childhood ADHD to adult women without childhood ADHD and to adult men with childhood ADHD. The participants, all from a larger longitudinal study, included 30 women and 30 men (approximately age 23 to 24) with childhood ADHD, and 27 women without ADHD. Women with childhood ADHD were matched to comparison women on age, ethnicity, and parental education, and to men with childhood ADHD on age, ethnicity, and IQ. Self- and parent-reports of internalizing, interpersonal, academic, and job impairment, as well as substance use and delinquency indicated group differences on measures of self-esteem, interpersonal and vocational functioning, as well as substance use. Follow-up planned comparison tests revealed that almost all of these differences emerged by diagnostic status, and not by gender. This study adds to research on the negative adult outcomes of ADHD and demonstrates that the outcomes of men and women with childhood ADHD are relatively similar.

  18. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun Ju; Winkler, Thomas W; Manning, Alisa K; Aschard, Hugues; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert V; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brown, Michael R; Morrison, Alanna C; Fornage, Myriam; Lin, Li-An; Richard, Melissa; Bartz, Traci M; Psaty, Bruce M; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Feitosa, Mary F; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Deng, Xuan; Fisher, Virginia A; Zhou, Yanhua; Bielak, Lawrence F; Smith, Jennifer; Huffman, Jennifer E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Smith, Blair H; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva K; Arnett, Donna; Schwander, Karen; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Alfred, Tamuno; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Amin, Najaf; Franco, Oscar H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vojinovic, Dina; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Kardia, Sharon; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Rice, Kenneth; Borecki, Ingrid B; Rao, Dabeeru C; Gauderman, W James; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2016-07-01

    Studying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions uses a single regression model that includes both the genetic main and G × E interaction effects (the "joint" framework). The alternative "stratified" framework combines results from genetic main-effect analyses carried out separately within the exposed and unexposed groups. Although there have been several investigations using theory and simulation, an empirical comparison of the two frameworks is lacking. Here, we compare the two frameworks using results from genome-wide association studies of systolic blood pressure for 3.2 million low frequency and 6.5 million common variants across 20 cohorts of European ancestry, comprising 79,731 individuals. Our cohorts have sample sizes ranging from 456 to 22,983 and include both family-based and population-based samples. In cohort-specific analyses, the two frameworks provided similar inference for population-based cohorts. The agreement was reduced for family-based cohorts. In meta-analyses, agreement between the two frameworks was less than that observed in cohort-specific analyses, despite the increased sample size. In meta-analyses, agreement depended on (1) the minor allele frequency, (2) inclusion of family-based cohorts in meta-analysis, and (3) filtering scheme. The stratified framework appears to approximate the joint framework well only for common variants in population-based cohorts. We conclude that the joint framework is the preferred approach and should be used to control false positives when dealing with low-frequency variants and/or family-based cohorts.

  19. Unsolicited Reporting to Prescribers of Opioid Analgesics by a State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program: An Observational Study with Matched Comparison Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leonard D; Kreiner, Peter W; Panas, Lee

    2017-04-04

     State prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) can help detect individuals with multiple provider episodes (MPEs; also referred to as doctor/pharmacy shopping), an indicator of prescription drug abuse and/or diversion. Although unsolicited reporting by PDMPs to prescribers of opioid analgesics is thought to be an important practice in reducing MPEs and the potential harm associated with them, evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. This exploratory research evaluates the impact of unsolicited reports sent by Massachusetts' PDMP to the prescribers of persons with MPEs.  Individuals with MPEs were identified from PDMP records between January 2010 and July 2011 as individuals having Schedule II prescriptions (at least one prescription being an opioid) from four or more distinct prescribers and four or more distinct pharmacies within six months. Based on available MA-PDMP resources, an unsolicited report containing the patient's 12-month prescription history was sent to prescribers of a subset of patients who met the MPE threshold; a comparison group closely matched on demographics and baseline prescription history, whose prescribers were not sent a report, was generated using propensity score matching. The prescription history of each group was examined for 12 months before and after the intervention.  There were eighty-four patients (intervention group) whose prescribers received an unsolicited report and 504 matched patients (comparison group) whose prescribers were not sent a report. Regression analyses indicated significantly greater decreases in the number of Schedule II opioid prescriptions ( P  opioid analgesics from multiple providers.

  20. Grouped pair-wise comparison for subjective sound quality evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Dongxing; GAO Yali; YU Wuzhou; WANG Zuomin

    2006-01-01

    In subjective sound quality pair-wise comparison evaluation, test time grows with square of the number of sound stimulus. For this reason, subjective evaluation of large quantity of stimulus is difficult to carry out with pair-wise comparison method. A grouped pair-wise comparison (GPC) method is proposed to greatly decrease time and difficult of subjective comparison test, in which stimuli in the whole evaluation corpus are divided into N test groups,with reference-link stimuli configured in each group. Derived from subjective results of each group, final results of all stimuli are reconstructed, and their perceptual attributes of sound quality can be analyzed. With car interior noise as example, realization of subjective sound quality evaluation with GPC method is introduced. The results of GPC evaluation are in good agreement with those obtained from paired comparison and semantic differential methods.

  1. Description and Comparison of Group Behavior Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    they prefer to behave. The claisification theory started with the work of Carl Gustav Jung (7:18). Jung believed an individual’s behavior was...preference for introversion . These preferences are displayed in the scale percentages and in the group mean scores (see Appendix C). The Navy shows

  2. Comparison of group vs self-directed music interventions to reduce chemotherapy-related distress and cognitive appraisal: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Chou, Cheng-Chen; Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Lin, Mei-Feng

    2017-08-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine effects of group music intervention and self-directed music intervention on anxiety, depression, and cognitive appraisal among women with breast cancer. A quasi-experimental design randomly assigned 60 women undergoing chemotherapy to 3 groups: group music intervention, self-directed music intervention, or a control group. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale were administered before, after the 8-week interventions, and at 3-month follow-up. Of the 52 women completing the study, results indicated that group music intervention had a significant (p cognitive avoidance compared to the other two groups at 3-month follow-up. Group music intervention can be considered an effective supportive care in alleviating the chemotherapy-related distress and enhancing cognition modification of women with breast cancer. Further research is needed to determine the role of cognitive appraisal in the illness trajectory.

  3. Comparison groups on bills: Automated, personalized energy information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Maithili; Kempton, Willett; Payne, Christopher

    2006-07-01

    A program called ``Innovative Billing?? has been developed to provide individualized energy information for a mass audience?the entireresidential customer base of an electric or gas utility. Customers receive a graph on the bill that compares that customer?s consumption with othersimilar customers for the same month. The program aims to stimulate customers to make ef?ciency improvements. To group as many as severalmillion customers into small ``comparison groups??, an automated method must be developed drawing solely from the data available to the utility.This paper develops and applies methods to compare the quality of resulting comparison groups.A data base of 114,000 customers from a utility billing system was used to evaluate Innovative Billing comparison groups, comparing fouralternative criteria: house characteristics (?oor area, housing type, and heating fuel); street; meter read route; billing cycle. Also, customers wereinterviewed to see what forms of comparison graphs made most sense and led to fewest errors of interpretation. We ?nd that good qualitycomparison groups result from using street name, meter book, or multiple house characteristics. Other criteria we tested, such as entire cycle, entiremeter book, or single house characteristics such as ?oor area, resulted in poor quality comparison groups. This analysis provides a basis forchoosing comparison groups based on extensive user testing and statistical analysis. The result is a practical set of guidelines that can be used toimplement realistic, inexpensive innovative billing for the entire customer base of an electric or gas utility.

  4. Veterans Administration Cooperative Dental Implant Study--comparisons between fixed partial dentures supported by blade-vent implants and removable partial dentures. Part I: Methodology and comparisons between treatment groups at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, K K

    1987-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether fixed partial dentures supported by dental implants provide an acceptable alternative to conventional removable partial dentures in patients with Kennedy class I or class II edentulous conditions. The acceptability of the new treatment will be based on success rates, impact on the health of the remaining dentition, masticatory performance, patient satisfaction, and maintenance care and cost. The study was planned also to provide comparisons between two designs commonly used by dentists for fabricating removable partial dentures. The designs differed only in terms of the type of the retainer (clasp type) and tooth support (rest location). A total of 272 patients with Kennedy class I and class II edentulous conditions were assigned on a random basis to one of the treatment groups, 134 to receive a removable partial denture and 138 a fixed partial denture supported by a blade-vent implant. All of the patients were medically screened and met prespecified criteria for oral hygiene, bone support for abutment teeth, and size of the residual ridge. Thirty-four patients were eliminated from the study before completion of their treatment. An additional six patients with early implant failures were reentered in the study and followed up as a separate group. The remaining 232 patients received comprehensive dental care, including removable partial dentures for 118 and fixed partial dentures for 114 patients. A series of examinations, radiographs, masticatory performance tests, patient satisfaction, food selection questionnaires, and dietary history were completed before initiation of the treatment, 16 weeks after the insertion of an RPD or an implant, and thereafter at 6-, 18-, 36-, and 60-month intervals. In addition, patients were seen at 6-month intervals for a recall dental examination, oral prophylaxis, plaque instructions, radiographic survey of the implant, and any needed dental treatment. The randomization stratification

  5. Teenage pregnancy: a small comparison group of known mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, T L; Muram, D; Tolley, E A; Mcalpine, J

    1993-01-01

    To obtain confirmation of the findings of the authors' earlier comparison of ever-pregnant and nonpregnant Black high school students from Tennessee, 16 students confirmed to be pregnant were substituted for the 33 subjects in the original study whose pregnancy status was based solely on self-report. The nonpregnant control group of 251 teens was utilized in both analyses. Although the confirmed pregnant group was too small to repeat the regression analysis, striking concordance of findings between the 2 studies emerged for all dependent variables except the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire anxiety scale. The lower anxiety scores recorded among subjects in the original study may be either a statistical artifact or a reflection of the fact that these pregnant teens remained in school while subjects in the second study were enrolled in programs centered around their pregnant status. Sexual activity scores were strong or moderate significantly more often in both groups of pregnant teens compared to their nonpregnant counterparts. Interesting was the finding that 81% of pregnant teens regarded romance novels and soap operas to be accurate portrayals of real-life dating relationships compared to only 49% of nonpregnant teens. On the other hand, only 56% of the pregnant subjects regarded their own relationships to have this romantic quality. In a future study, the role of such uncritical romantic ideals in adolescent pregnancy risk will be investigated in a larger sample.

  6. Measuring the effectiveness of small-group and web-based training methods in teaching clinical communication: a case comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Vallevand, Andrea; Violato, Claudio; Hecker, Kent G

    2013-01-01

    Current teaching approaches in human and veterinary medicine across North America, Europe, and Australia include lectures, group discussions, feedback, role-play, and web-based training. Increasing class sizes, changing learning preferences, and economic and logistical challenges are influencing the design and delivery of communication skills in veterinary undergraduate education. The study's objectives were to (1) assess the effectiveness of small-group and web-based methods for teaching communication skills and (2) identify which training method is more effective in helping students to develop communication skills. At the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM), 96 students were randomly assigned to one of three groups (control, web, or small-group training) in a pre-intervention and post-intervention group design. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) was used to measure communication competence within and across the intervention and control groups. Reliability of the OSCEs was determined by generalizability theory to be 0.65 (pre-intervention OSCE) and 0.70 (post-intervention OSCE). Study results showed that (1) small-group training was the most effective teaching approach in enhancing communication skills and resulted in students scoring significantly higher on the post-intervention OSCE compared to the web-based and control groups, (2) web-based training resulted in significant though considerably smaller improvement in skills than small-group training, and (3) the control group demonstrated the lowest mean difference between the pre-intervention/post-intervention OSCE scores, reinforcing the need to teach communication skills. Furthermore, small-group training had a significant effect in improving skills derived from the initial phase of the consultation and skills related to giving information and planning.

  7. Why and how people engage in social comparison while learning social skills in groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Cohen-Schotanus, J; Nek, R.H.

    This study was conducted among 269 medical students who participated in educational training groups. Self-evaluation was the most important motive to engage in social comparison with other group members, followed by, respectively, self-enhancement and self-improvement. Upward comparisons (i.e., with

  8. [Movement and its significance: natural healing physiotherapy and modern pharmacological therapy of osteoporosis in the semantic differential. A quantitative study of a self-help group and two comparison groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitzer, M; Fischer, G C; Doering, T J

    2003-06-01

    Physiotherapy is a frequently applied concomitant therapy for patients with osteoporosis. Compared to modern pharmacological therapy physiotherapy appears to receive sustained high regard, which should be further examined in view of the attribution pattern of the patients. Elements of physiotherapy and Kneipp therapy were quantitatively examined in terms of their semantic content in a three-dimensional space of meaning. This was done in comparison with elements of modern pharmacological therapy. The questions regarding possible patterns of the attributions and a possible hierarchy of the therapy forms were analyzed by a survey of a self-help group for osteoporosis patients and two control groups. According to the methods of semantic differentials, a self-help group for osteoporosis patients and two control groups (high-school female pupils, breast carcinoma patients) were queried about the individual elements of physiotherapy and modern pharmacological therapy in a polar profile of a questionnaire. The results were arranged onto a numerical matrix and by means of factor analysis, a location in a three-dimensional space of meaning was calculated for each element questioned. For purpose of illustration, the results were transferred to a succession of diagrams so that the assessments for the three axes of meaning became more distinct. The results are discussed on the background of a current neurolinguistic theory of meaning: Sensomotoric experience generates meaning in form of 'primary metaphors'; if reactivated e.g. by physiotherapy, these metaphors can give fundaments for an emergent and salutogenic system of meaning, which helps to reconstruct the patient's 'subjective anatomy' and helps to create new values of living one's life. If sensomotoric experience has a central function in generating meaning, the axis of 'motion' and therapies stressing on sensomotoric experience (e.g. exercise group) will show a corresponding profile of evaluation throughout the three

  9. Comparison of mental distress in patients with low back pain and a population-based control group measured by Symptoms Check List--A case-referent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jan; Fisker, Annette; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Olsen, Lis Raabæk; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Langberg, Henning

    2015-08-01

    Mental distress is common in persons experiencing low back pain and who are sick-listed or at risk of being sick-listed. It is, however, not known how mental distress measured by the Symptoms Check List-90 differs between patients with low back pain and the general population. The objective of this study was to compare mental symptoms and distress as measured by the Symptoms Check List-90 in sick-listed or at risk of being sick-listed patients with low back pain with a population-based control group. Mental distress was compared in a group of patients with low back pain (n=770) and a randomly selected population-based reference group (n=909). Established Danish cut-off values for mental distress were used to evaluate the mental distress status in the low back pain and control group and logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the Global Severity Index and the symptom scales of the Symptoms Check List-90 while controlling for baseline demographic differences between the groups. Group mean scores showed that all symptom scales and the Global Severity Index for both sexes were statistically elevated in the low back pain group, except for interpersonal sensitivity in women. When the scores were dichotomized to cases and non-cases of mental distress, a significantly higher prevalence of cases was observed in the low back pain group compared to the reference group on all symptom check list scales, except for paranoid ideation for both sexes and interpersonal sensitivity for women. The biggest between-group difference was observed for the somatization symptom scale. Low back pain patients who are sick-listed or at risk of being sick-listed, are more mentally distressed compared to a randomly selected sample of the general Danish population. Self-reported symptoms of somatization, anxiety, phobic anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, depression and hostility are all more common among patients with low back pain compared to the general population. © 2015 the

  10. Five years' experience of transverse groin incision for femoral artery access in arterial reconstructive surgery: parallel observational longitudinal group comparison study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beirne, Christopher

    2008-07-01

    Vertical groin incisions (VGIs) have been used to access femoral vessels, but reports allude to wound complications. Our aim was to compare VGI with transverse groin incision (TGI) for femoral artery exposure. Over a 5-year interval, 196 patients with 284 femoral artery exposures for supra- and infrainguinal procedures were studied. Primary endpoints were surgical skin site wound infection, seroma, haematoma formation, and major lower limb amputation. Secondary endpoints were graft patency, wound paresthesias, and length of hospital stay. There were 160 TGIs and 124 VGIs. The demographics and risk factor profile were not statistically different between groups. Seroma developed in 4.4% of TGIs and 13.7% of VGIs (p= .005). The complicated skin and soft tissue infection rate was five times greater with VGI (p= .001). The VGI group had a significantly higher rate of major amputation (p= .0005). Significantly higher graft failure rates were observed in the VGI group (p= .011). No paresthesia was reported in any TGI wound. The mean hospital stay was also significantly shorter in the TGI group (p= .006). The study data support and expound on the theory that an alternative incision to VGI offers lower short- and long-term morbidity. Our findings sustain the selection of the TGI in femoral artery surgery for both supra- and infrainguinal procedures without compromise of vessel exposure.

  11. A comparison of cycle control and effect on well-being of monophasic gestodene-, triphasic gestodene- and monophasic desogestrel-containing oral contraceptives. Gestodene Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, V; Croxatto, H; De La Cruz, J; Dhont, M; Durlot, F; Fernandes, M T; Andrade, R P; Weisberg, E; Rhoa, M

    2000-04-01

    This was an open-label multicenter study to compare the cycle control and effect on well-being of two oral contraceptives containing gestodene and one containing desogestrel. A total of 2419 healthy women gestodene (Minulet; n = 806, mean age 24.5 years), triphasic gestodene (Tri-Minulet; n = 808, mean age 24.6 years) or monophasic desogestrel (Mercilon; n = 805, mean age 24.6 years). Subjects were to participate in the study for up to 13 treatment cycles. A modified Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was used to evaluate menstrual symptoms and to assess overall well-being. A total of 698 women were withdrawn from the study, 154 due to adverse events. Cycle control with gestodene was superior to that with desogestrel at almost all time points, particularly for breakthrough bleeding and/or spotting, which occurred significantly less frequently with gestodene than with desogestrel at cycles 1-7 and 9-11 (p gestodene. The duration of bleeding was not consistently different between the gestodene and desogestrel groups; however, the intensity of bleeding was greater with gestodene at all time points (p gestodene at cycles 1-5 and 8-10 (p gestodene and at cycle 13 with desogestrel; however, no statistically significant differences among treatment groups in overall well-being scores or individual factors of well-being could be identified. All three treatments were well tolerated. The most common drug-related adverse events were headache (14.2%), breast pain (6.2%), nausea (4.1%), metrorrhagia (3.9%) and abdominal pain (3.5%). The incidence of adverse events in all treatment groups was similar, with the exception of metrorrhagia, which occurred in more patients in the desogestrel group than in the gestodene treatment groups (p < 0.05).

  12. On the comparison of group performance with categorical data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Herrero

    Full Text Available There are many different evaluation problems that involve several groups (societies, firms or institutions whose members can be classified into ordered categories, pursuant to their characteristics or their achievements. This paper addresses these types of problems and provides an evaluation criterion based on the distribution of the agents across categories. The starting point is that of dominance relations in pair-wise comparisons. We say that group i dominates group j when the expected category of a member of i is higher than the expected category of a member of j. We introduce the notion of relative advantage of a group to extend this principle to multi-group comparisons and show that there is a unique evaluation function that ranks all groups consistently in terms of this criterion. This function associates to each evaluation problem the (unique dominant eigenvector of a matrix whose entries describe the dominance relations between groups in pair-wise comparisons. The working of the model is illustrated by means of three different applications.

  13. An open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group, multicenter, prospective, interventional, clinical study to evaluate efficacy and safety of “AHPL/AYTOP/0113” in comparison with “Framycetin sulphate cream” in acute wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay U Nipanikar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to assess efficacy and safety of AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream, a polyherbal formulation in comparison with Framycetin sulphate cream in acute wounds. Methodology: It was an open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group and multi-center clinical study. Total 47 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-A (AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream and 42 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-B (Framycetin sulphate cream. All the subjects were advised to apply study drug, thrice daily for 21 days or up to complete wound healing (whichever was earlier. All the subjects were called for follow up on days 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 or up to the day of complete wound healing. Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. Results: Group-A subjects took significantly less (P < 0.05 i.e., (mean 7.77 days than (mean 9.87 days of Group-B subjects for wound healing. At the end of the study, statistically significant better (P < 0.05 results were observed in Group-A than Group-B in mean wound surface area, wound healing parameters and pain associated with wound. Excellent overall efficacy and tolerability was observed in subjects of both the groups. No adverse event or adverse drug reaction was noted in any subject of both the groups. Conclusion: AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream proved to be superior to Framycetin sulphate cream in healing of acute wounds.

  14. Group membership as a 'frame of reference' for interpersonal comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Vliek, M.L.W.

    2008-01-01

    Although individuals may view themselves as part of a group (e.g., couple, a family, or a nationality) when comparing to others, most contemporary theory and research in psychology focuses on the interpersonal comparisons that individuals make to other individuals. The prevailing view is quite

  15. A randomised comparison of meropenem with cefotaxime or ceftriaxone for the treatment of bacterial meningitis in adults. Meropenem Meningitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzhard, E; Williams, K J; Vukmirovits, G; Chmelik, V; Pfausler, B; Featherstone, A

    1995-07-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins are presently the agents of choice for the empirical antimicrobial therapy of bacterial meningitis. However, a number of factors associated with these agents, namely the development of resistance by pneumococci, limited activity against some Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., and the possible adverse effects of their bacteriolytic mode of action, indicate that newer classes of antimicrobial agents be evaluated for the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Meropenem is a carbapenem antibiotic which is highly active against the major bacterial pathogens causing meningitis, and penetrates well into the cerebrospinal fluid. Two prospective randomised studies in 56 adult bacterial meningitis patients have compared meropenem 40 mg/kg 8-hourly, up to a maximum of 6 g/day (n = 28) with cephalosporin treatment, i.e. cefotaxime (n = 17) or ceftriaxone (n = 11). Patients were assessed by neurological examination, Glasgow Coma Score and Herson-Todd score. Clinical cure was observed in all 23 evaluable patients treated with meropenem (100%) and with 17 of the 22 evaluable cephalosporin-treated patients (77%). All pre-treatment isolates were eradicated except one isolate of Staphylococcus aureus in a cefotaxime-treated patient. Neurological sequelae were noted in three meropenem and four cephalosporin-treated patients. No patients in either treatment group experienced seizures after the start of therapy. This was despite the fact that a patient in each group had experienced seizures before therapy, several had underlying CNS disorders, and that doses of 6 g/day of meropenem were given. Hearing impairment was recorded in 11 meropenem and nine cephalosporin treated patients. Three patients in the meropenem group and one in the cephalosporin group died during treatment for reasons unrelated to study therapy. Overall, the results of this study indicate that meropenem is an effective and well-tolerated antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial

  16. A Group-Period Phase Comparison Method Based on Equivalent Phase Comparison Frequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Bao-Qiang; ZHOU Wei; DONG Shao-Feng; ZHOU Hai-Niu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the principle of equivalent phase comparison frequency, we propose a group-period phase comparison method. This method can be used to reveal the inherent relations between periodic signals and the change laws of the phase difference. If these laws are applied in the processing of the mutual relations between frequency signals, phase comparison can be accomplished without frequency normalization. Experimental results show that the method can enhance the measurement resolution to 10-13/s in the time domain.

  17. A Comparison of Creativity in Project Groups in Science and Engineering Education in Denmark and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Different pedagogical strategies influence the development of creativity in project groups in science and engineering education. This study is a comparison between two cases: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in Denmark and Project-Organized Learning (POL) in China.......Different pedagogical strategies influence the development of creativity in project groups in science and engineering education. This study is a comparison between two cases: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in Denmark and Project-Organized Learning (POL) in China....

  18. Geology orbiter comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  19. GRIN: “GRoup versus INdividual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: an assessor-masked randomised comparison trial”: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood. Spasticity is a significant contributor to the secondary impairments impacting functional performance and participation. The most common lower limb spasticity management is focal intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A accompanied by individually-delivered (one on one) physiotherapy rehabilitation. With increasing emphasis on improving goal-directed functional activity and participation within a family-centred framework, it is timely to explore whether physiotherapy provided in a group could achieve comparable outcomes, encouraging providers to offer flexible models of physiotherapy delivery. This study aims to compare individual to group-based physiotherapy following intramuscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections to the lower limbs for ambulant children with cerebral palsy aged four to fourteen years. Methods/Design An assessor-masked, block randomised comparison trial will be conducted with random allocation to either group-based or individual physiotherapy. A sample size of 30 (15 in each study arm) will be recruited. Both groups will receive six hours of direct therapy following Botulinum Toxin-A injections in either an individual or group format with additional home programme activities (three exercises to be performed three times a week). Study groups will be compared at baseline (T1), then at 10 weeks (T2, efficacy) and 26 weeks (T3, retention) post Botulinum Toxin-A injections. Primary outcomes will be caregiver/s perception of and satisfaction with their child’s occupational performance goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure) and quality of gait (Edinburgh Visual Gait Score) with a range of secondary outcomes across domains of the International Classification of Disability, Functioning and Health. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol including theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for this assessor-masked, randomised

  20. The influence of social comparison and peer group size on risky decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the influence of different social reference points and different comparison group sizes on risky decision-making. Participants were presented with a scenario describing an exam, and presented with the opportunity of making a risky decision in the context of different information provided about the performance of their peers. We found that behavior was influenced, not only by comparison with peers, but also by the size of the comparison group. Specifically, the larger the reference group, the more polarized the behavior it prompted. In situations describing social loss, participants were led to make riskier decisions after comparing themselves against larger groups, while in situations describing social gain, they become more risk averse. These results indicate that decision making is influenced both by social comparison and the number of people making up the social reference group.

  1. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind comparison of roxatidine with ranitidine in the treatment of patients with uncomplicated benign gastric ulcer disease. The Multicenter Roxatidine Cooperative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, G; Marks, I N; Lanza, F; Kogut, D; Cobert, B; Savitsky, J P; Bender, W; Labs, R; Wurzer, H

    1995-01-01

    Roxatidine (150 mg, 312 patients) was compared with ranitidine (300 mg, 308 patients) in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, 6-week therapeutic study for the treatment of patients with uncomplicated, benign gastric ulcer disease. The study end points (verified by using endoscopy results) were fully healed ulcers at 4 or 6 weeks. The results of roxatidine therapy were comparable to those of ranitidine therapy: healing rates of 52% and 54% at week 4 and 77% and 76% at week 6 were recorded for roxatidine and ranitidine, respectively. The drugs produced comparable reductions in ulcer diameters and decreases in abdominal pain. Adverse events associated with both roxatidine (27%) and ranitidine (28%) were headache, diarrhea, and dizziness; rash was associated in 6 of 8 cases and in only 1 case with roxatidine. In this trial, roxatidine 150 mg once daily was as efficacious and safe as ranitidine 300 mg once daily for treatment of patients with uncomplicated, benign gastric ulcer disease.

  2. HEAD - TO - HEAD COMPARISON OF TOLERABILITY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF SINGLE DOSE OF FOUR TOPICAL NSAIDS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CATARACT SURGERY : A RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL PARALLEL GROUP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Ophthalmic NSAIDs are used to control pain , discomfort and inflammation associated with ocular conditions and also , following ophthalmic cataract surgeries. These drugs can cause ocular discomfort following administration which lasts for a short duration. However , there exist differences in the intensity and duration of burning sensation among the c ommonly used ophthalmic NSAIDs. Hence , we evaluated the tolerability and acceptability of four topical NSAIDS i.e. , 0.3% nepafenac (N , 0.5% ketorolac (K , 0.4% ketorolac (K LS and 0.09% bromfenac (B after instilling a single drop. METHODS: This randomized , open label , parallel group study was conducted in the department of Ophthalmology in Narayana Medical College , Nellore. A total number of 80 patients participated in the study. Randomization list was computer generated in a ratio of 1:1:1:1 of N , K , K L Sand B. Each patient received one drop of the study drug either in right or left eye which was also decidedat random.Patients of either gender above21 years of age , having no ocular surface pathology and eligible for cataract surgery were include d in the study. Outcome variables included ocular burning intensity on VAS (0 - 100 mm at 0 min (immediately , 2 min and 6 min after administration of medications , time to complete pain relief and global medication performance rated by patient as 0 (bad , 1 (fair , 2(good or 3 (severe . RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 52.85±17.46 years. All groups were age matched , however there were more females than males (pN>K LS >K on global medication performance. CONCLUSION: Bromfenac had better tolerability and acceptability as compared to other tested topical NSAIDs , which was in the order of B>N> K LS >K.

  3. Comparison of the inhibitory capacity of two groups of pure natural extract on the crystallization of two types of material compound urinary stones in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghalia, Mohamed; Ghalem, Said; Allali, Hocine

    2015-10-01

    Urolithiasis is defined as the result of an abnormal precipitation within the urinary tract. This precipitation is most often from the normal constituents of the urine. This is a fairly common condition in the population. She is happy and recurrent etiology is often unknown if hypothetical. In Algeria, as in many countries, a large number of patients use herbal medicines in the treatment of their diseases including urolithiasis. Thus the aim of this study is the most widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, in the treatment of calcium urolithiasis oxalo-and magnesium-amoniaco in vitro. The study also examines the effect of these extracts on the states of crystallization (nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation), followed by photography on polarized light microscope.In this regard, we are devoted to studying the crystallization steps from oxalo-calcium and phospho-calcic prepared as artificial urine and supersaturated aqueous solutions, maintained at 37 °C to remain close to biological conditions. Extracts of the first group of herbs: Ammodaucus leucotrichus, Ajuga iva, Globularia alypum, Atriplex halimus are studied on the crystallization calcium oxalate, we cite the Ammodaucus leucotrichus which acts on the stages of nucleation, growth and the aggregation with a total inhibition. The second group of extracts plants tested on calcium phosphate crystallization : Acacia raddiana, Citrullus colocynthis, Rhus tripartita, Pistacia lentiscu, Warionia saharae, are able to significantly reduce phosphate crystallization in vitro. It is easily proved by FTIR and optical microscope. In conclusion the results of our work allows us to confirm the use of these plants as an aqueous decoction, in the field of urolithiasis. These activities may help to strengthen the body in depressed situations.

  4. Validation of cytogenetic risk groups according to International Prognostic Scoring Systems by peripheral blood CD34+FISH: results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braulke, Friederike; Platzbecker, Uwe; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Nolte, Florian; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L.; Bennett, John M.; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    International Prognostic Scoring Systems are used to determine the individual risk profile of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. For the assessment of International Prognostic Scoring Systems, an adequate chromosome banding analysis of the bone marrow is essential. Cytogenetic information is not available for a substantial number of patients (5%–20%) with dry marrow or an insufficient number of metaphase cells. For these patients, a valid risk classification is impossible. In the study presented here, the International Prognostic Scoring Systems were validated based on fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using extended probe panels applied to cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) peripheral blood cells of 328 MDS patients of our prospective multicenter German diagnostic study and compared to chromosome banding results of 2902 previously published patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. For cytogenetic risk classification by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of CD34+ peripheral blood cells, the groups differed significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival by uni- and multivariate analyses without discrepancies between treated and untreated patients. Including cytogenetic data of fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of peripheral CD34+ blood cells (instead of bone marrow banding analysis) into the complete International Prognostic Scoring System assessment, the prognostic risk groups separated significantly for overall and leukemia-free survival. Our data show that a reliable stratification to the risk groups of the International Prognostic Scoring Systems is possible from peripheral blood in patients with missing chromosome banding analysis by using a comprehensive probe panel (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01355913). PMID:25344522

  5. What's wrong with cross-cultural comparisons of subjective Likert scales?: The reference-group effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Steven J; Lehman, Darrin R; Peng, Kaiping; Greenholtz, Joe

    2002-06-01

    Social comparison theory maintains that people think about themselves compared with similar others. Those in one culture, then, compare themselves with different others and standards than do those in another culture, thus potentially confounding cross-cultural comparisons. A pilot study and Study 1 demonstrated the problematic nature of this reference-group effect: Whereas cultural experts agreed that East Asians are more collectivistic than North Americans, cross-cultural comparisons of trait and attitude measures failed to reveal such a pattern. Study 2 found that manipulating reference groups enhanced the expected cultural differences, and Study 3 revealed that people from different cultural backgrounds within the same country exhibited larger differences than did people from different countries. Cross-cultural comparisons using subjective Likert scales are compromised because of different reference groups. Possible solutions are discussed.

  6. Standard care quality determines treatment outcomes in control groups of HAART-adherence intervention studies: implications for the interpretation and comparison of intervention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marijn; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Hospers, Harm J; Schaalma, Herman P; Kok, Gerjo

    2009-11-01

    Clinical trials of behavioral interventions seek to enhance evidence-based health care. However, in case the quality of standard care provided to control conditions varies between studies and affects outcomes, intervention effects cannot be directly interpreted or compared. The objective of the present study was to examine whether standard care quality (SCQ) could be reliably assessed, varies between studies of highly active antiretroviral HIV-adherence interventions, and is related to the proportion of patients achieving an undetectable viral load ("success rate"). Databases were searched for relevant articles. Authors of selected studies retrospectively completed a checklist with standard care activities, which were coded to compute SCQ scores. The relationship between SCQ and the success rates was examined using meta-regression. Cronbach's alpha, variability in SCQ, and relation between SCQ and success rate. Reliability of the SCQ instrument was high (Cronbach's alpha = .91). SCQ scores ranged from 3.7 to 27.8 (total range = 0-30) and were highly predictive of success rate (p = .002). Variation in SCQ provided to control groups may substantially influence effect sizes of behavior change interventions. Future trials should therefore assess and report SCQ, and meta-analyses should control for variability in SCQ, thereby producing more accurate estimates of the effectiveness of behavior change interventions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Comparison Groups in Yoga Research: A Systematic Review and Critical Evaluation of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groessl, Erik; Maiya, Meghan; Sarkin, Andrew; Eisen, Susan V.; Riley, Kristen; Elwy, A. Rani

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Comparison groups are essential for accurate testing and interpretation of yoga intervention trials. However, selecting proper comparison groups is difficult because yoga comprises a very heterogeneous set of practices and its mechanisms of effect have not been conclusively established. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the control and comparison groups used in published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga. Results We located 128 RCTs that met our inclusion criteria; of these, 65 included only a passive control and 63 included at least one active comparison group. Primary comparison groups were physical exercise (43%), relaxation/meditation (20%), and education (16%). Studies rarely provided a strong rationale for choice of comparison. Considering year of publication, the use of active controls in yoga research appears to be slowly increasing over time. Conclusions Given that yoga has been established as a potentially powerful intervention, future research should use active control groups. Further, care is needed to select comparison conditions that help to isolate the specific mechanisms of yoga’s effects. PMID:25440384

  8. Comparison principle for parabolic equations in the Heisenberg group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bieske

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We define two notions of viscosity solutions to parabolic equations in the Heisenberg group, depending on whether the test functions concern only the past or both the past and the future. We then exploit the Heisenberg geometry to prove a comparison principle for a class of parabolic equations and show the sufficiency of considering the test functions that concern only the past.

  9. When are emotions related to group-based appraisals? A comparison between group-based emotions and general group emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Toon; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2014-12-01

    In the literature on emotions in intergroup relations, it is not always clear how exactly emotions are group-related. Here, we distinguish between emotions that involve appraisals of immediate group concerns (i.e., group-based emotions) and emotions that do not. Recently, general group emotions, measured by asking people how they feel "as a group member" but without specifying an object for these emotions, have been conceptualized as reflecting appraisals of group concerns. In contrast, we propose that general group emotions are best seen as emotions about belonging to a group. In two studies, general group emotions were closely related to emotions that are explicitly measured as belonging emotions. Two further studies showed that general group emotions were not related to appraisals of immediate group concerns, whereas group-based emotions were. We argue for more specificity regarding the group-level aspects of emotion that are tapped by emotion measures.

  10. Comparison of the world health organization and the International association of diabetes and pregnancy study groups criteria in diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus in South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivagnanam Nallaperumal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to compare the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG and the World Health Organization (WHO criteria to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the retrospective data of 1351 pregnant women who underwent screening for GDM at four selected diabetes centers at Chennai (three private and one government. All women underwent an oral glucose tolerance test using 75g glucose load and fasting, 1-h, and 2-h samples were collected. The IADPSG and WHO criteria were compared for diagnosis of GDM. Results: A total of 839 women had GDM by either the IADPSG or the WHO criteria, of whom the IADPSG criteria identified 699 and the WHO criteria also identified 699 women as having GDM. However, only 599/839 women (66.6% were identified by both criteria. Thus, 140/839 women (16.7% were missed by both the IADPSG and the WHO criteria. 687/699 (98.2% of the women with GDM were identified by the WHO criteria. In contrast, each value of IADPSG criteria i.e., fasting, 1 h, and 2 h identified only 12.5%, 14%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusions: A single WHO cut-point of 2 h > 140 mg/dl appears to be suitable for large-scale screening for GDM in India and other developing countries.

  11. [Aetiological classification of ischaemic strokes: comparison of the new A-S-C-O classification and the classification by the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino García, P; García Pastor, A; García Arratibel, A; Vicente Peracho, G; Rodriguez Cruz, P M; Pérez Sánchez, J R; Díaz Otero, F; Vázquez Alén, P; Villanueva Osorio, J A; Gil Núñez, A

    2013-09-01

    The A-S-C-O classification may be better than other methods for classifying ischaemic stroke by aetiology. Our aims are to describe A-S-C-O phenotype distribution (A: atherosclerosis, S: small vessel disease, C: cardiac source, O: other causes; 1: potential cause, 2: causality uncertain, 3: unlikely to be a direct cause although disease is present) and compare them to the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group (GEECV/SEN) classification. We will also find the degree of concordance between these classification methods and determine whether using the A-S-C-O classification delivers a smaller percentage of strokes of undetermined cause. We analysed those patients with ischaemic stroke admitted to our stroke unit in 2010 with strokes that were classified according to GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O criteria. The study included 496 patients. The percentages of strokes caused by atherosclerosis and small vessel disease according to GEECV/SEN criteria were higher than the percentages for potential atherosclerotic stroke (A1) (14.1 vs. 11.9%; P=.16) and potential small vessel stroke (S1) (14.3 vs. 3%; P0.8 (unusual causes and O1). Our results show that GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O classifications are neither fully comparable nor consistent. Using the A-S-C-O classification provided additional information on co-morbidities and delivered a smaller percentage of strokes classified as having an undetermined cause. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparisons of ZnO codoped by group ⅢA elements(Al,Ga,In)and N: a first-principle study*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ping; Deng Sheng-Hua; Zhang Li; Yu Jiang-Ying; Liu Guo-Hong

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structures and effective masses of the N mono-doped and Al-N,Ga-N,In-N codoped ZnO system have been calculated by a first-principle method,and comparisons among different doping cases are made.According to the results,the impurity states in the codoping cases are more delocalised compared to the N mono-doping case,which means a better conductive behaviour can be obtained by codoping.Besides,compared to the Al-N and Ga-N codoping cases,the hole effective mass of In-N codoped system is much smaller,indicating the p-type conductivity can be more enhanced by In-N codoping.

  13. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoCicero, J

    1993-09-01

    Both patients and the medical profession are quick to embrace new technology, particularly when it may replace an existing surgical procedure. Unfortunately, the rapidity of acceptance is rarely associated with careful evaluation. Laparoscopy is a recent example of such widely embraced technology. Studies of laparoscopy that yielded good comparative data to more traditional methods were slow to accrue. This led to the exposure of its shortcomings through governmental reports and the lay press. To prevent this from happening in thoracoscopy, two types of studies are required so that valid conclusions about the new technology can be drawn. The first is an accounting of the new technology as procedures evolve around it. The data collected in such a study should contain basic information, including the indications for the procedure, how it was performed, procedure length, associated complications, and patient outcome. Such information provides a broad profile of the technology, emphasizing from the outset its potential strengths and weaknesses. The second type of study involves a more detailed concurrent comparison of the specific procedures utilizing this technology to the established traditional methods. Such randomized studies help to firmly establish through scientific process the place of the new technology. The Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group was organized in early 1992 to address these concerns. From an initial four surgeons the group has grown to include more than 41 institutions. Currently the group is collecting data in a registry and has established three clinical trials to evaluate video-assisted thoracic surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Disability pension and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a prospective comparison of farmers and other occupational groups. The HUNT Study, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torske, Magnhild Oust; Hilt, Bjørn; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Glasscock, David; Krokstad, Steinar

    2015-11-02

    Agriculture has undergone major changes, and farmers have been found to have a high prevalence of depression symptoms. We investigated the risk of work disability in Norwegian farmers compared with other occupational groups, as well as the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and future disability pension. We linked working participants of the HUNT2 Survey (1995-97) aged 20-61.9 years, of whom 3495 were farmers and 25,521 had other occupations, to national registry data on disability pension, with follow-up until 31 December 2010. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of disability pension, and to investigate the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression caseness at baseline (score on the anxiety or depression subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) ≥8) and disability pension. Farmers had a twofold increased risk of disability pension (age-adjusted and sex-adjusted HR 2.07, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.38) compared with higher grade professionals. Farmers with symptoms of depression caseness had a 53% increased risk of disability pension (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.87) compared with farmers below the cut-off point of depression caseness symptoms, whereas farmers with symptoms of anxiety caseness had a 51% increased risk (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.86). Farmers have an increased risk of disability pension compared with higher grade professionals, but the risk is lower than in most other manual occupational groups. Farmers who report high levels of depression or anxiety symptoms are at substantially increased risk of future work disability, and the risk increase appears to be fairly similar across most occupational groups. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. A 1-year multicenter randomized double-blind comparison of repaglinide and glyburide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Dutch and German Repaglinide Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B H; Landgraf, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Repaglinide is a newly developed oral blood glucose-lowering agent that exerts its effect by stimulating insulin secretion. This multicenter study was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of this drug with glyburide in a 1-year randomized double-blind study of outpatients with type

  16. Juvenile Group Sex Offenders: A Comparison of Group Leaders and Followers

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette A.; Vermeiren, Robert R. J. M.; Jansen, Lucres M. C.; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate group sex offenses with regard to the role of leaders versus followers and to compare both groups on levels of psychopathology, intelligence, and psychosocial and offense-related characteristics. Eighty-nine adolescent group sex offenders (mean age = 14.9, SD = 1.4) referred by the police to the Dutch child…

  17. Screening families of patients with premature coronary heart disease to identify avoidable cardiovascular risk: a cross-sectional study of family members and a general population comparison group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Helen J; Pell, Alastair Ch; Anderson, Judith; Chow, Clara K; Pell, Jill P

    2010-05-11

    Primary prevention should be targeted at individuals with high global cardiovascular risk, but research is lacking on how best to identify such individuals in the general population. Family history is a good proxy measure of global risk and may provide an efficient mechanism for identifying high risk individuals. The aim was to test the feasibility of using patients with premature cardiovascular disease to recruit family members as a means of identifying and screening high-risk individuals. We recruited family members of 50 patients attending a cardiology clinic for premature coronary heart disease (CHD). We compared their cardiovascular risk with a general population control group, and determined their perception of their risk and current level of screening. 103 (36%) family members attended screening (27 siblings, 48 adult offspring and 28 partners). Five (5%) had prevalent CHD. A significantly higher percentage had an ASSIGN risk score >20% compared with the general population (13% versus 2%, p family members were aware they were at increased risk and only 50% had had their blood pressure and serum cholesterol level checked in the previous three years. Patients attending hospital for premature CHD provide a mechanism to contact family members and this can identify individuals with a high global risk who are not currently screened.

  18. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjaer, Ole G; Møller, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    immune response when the host is challenged by bacterial pathogens. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been suggested as a marker of severe bacterial infections and sepsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT in a well-characterised sepsis cohort. The study plan included...... analysis of the levels of the inflammatory markers in relation to the severity of infection, to the prognosis and to the ability to identify patients with bacteraemia. METHODS: Patients suspected of having severe infections and admitted to a department of internal medicine were included in a prospective...... manner. Demographic data, comorbidity, routine biochemistry, microbiological data, infection focus, severity score and mortality on day 28 were recorded. Plasma and serum were sampled within 24 hours after admission. Levels of all studied markers (HMGB1, LBP, PCT, IL-6, C-reactive protein, white blood...

  19. Standard Care Quality Determines Treatment Outcomes in Control Groups of HAART-Adherence Intervention Studies: Implications for the Interpretation and Comparison of Intervention Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de M.; Viechtbauer, W.; Hospers, H.J.; Schaalma, H.P.; Kok, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Clinical trials of behavioral interventions seek to enhance evidence-based health care. However, in case the quality of standard care provided to control conditions varies between studies and affects outcomes, intervention effects cannot be directly interpreted or compared. The objective

  20. Reducing Bias and Increasing Precision by Adding Either a Pretest Measure of the Study Outcome or a Nonequivalent Comparison Group to the Basic Regression Discontinuity Design: An Example from Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Cook, Thomas D.; Kisbu-Sakarya, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Regression discontinuity design (RD) has been widely used to produce reliable causal estimates. Researchers have validated the accuracy of RD design using within study comparisons (Cook, Shadish & Wong, 2008; Cook & Steiner, 2010; Shadish et al, 2011). Within study comparisons examines the validity of a quasi-experiment by comparing its…

  1. A FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE COMPARISON OF GROUP AND NON-GROUP FIRMS IN TEXTILE SECTOR OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishtiaq AHMAD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is a developing economy and business groups are key players of the Pakistan’s economy. Previous research evidence shows that in the emerging economies group affiliation creates value for the firms. This study is intended to empirically investigate to know that whether group affiliated (GA firms perform financially better than non-group affiliated firms or not? GA firms in emerging economies can have better financial performance by sharing tangible and intangible resources at group level. The financial ratio is used to compare performance of affiliated and non-group affiliated firms by using the data of 70 textile firms listed at Karachi Stock Exchange(now Pakistan Stock Exchange covering a period from 2008 to 2012. Based on mean values of return on assets (ROA, results of the study show that GA firms have higher financial performance than non-group affiliated firms in each year and over all five years.

  2. Comparison of long-term prognosis of patients with AIDS treated and not treated with zidovudine. AIDS in Europe Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Phillips, A N; Pedersen, C;

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the association between elapsed time since starting zidovudine and survival in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). DESIGN--Inception cohort and observational study of patients treated and not treated with zidovudine. SETTING--Fifty-one centers in 17...... European countries. PATIENTS--A total of 4484 patients diagnosed as having AIDS from 1979 to 1989 who survived their initial AIDS-defining event and who had not started zidovudine before AIDS diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Use of zidovudine and mortality. RESULTS--Among patients who did not receive...... zidovudine, the death rate was approximately constant for the first 5 years after AIDS diagnosis. For patients treated with zidovudine, the death rate within the first year since starting zidovudine was markedly lower than for untreated patients who had developed AIDS at the same time (relative rate, 0...

  3. Frequency of del(12p) is commonly underestimated in myelodysplastic syndromes: Results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braulke, Friederike; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L; Bennett, John M; Solé, Francesc; Slovak, Marilyn L; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Bacher, Ulrike; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-12-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), deletion of the short arm of chromosome 12 (del(12p)) is usually a small abnormality, rarely detected as a single aberration by chromosome banding analysis (CBA) of bone marrow metaphases. Del(12p) has been described in 0.6 to 5% of MDS patients at initial diagnosis and is associated with a good to intermediate prognosis as a sole anomaly according to current scoring systems. Here, we present the results of a systematic del(12p) testing in a German prospective diagnostic study (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01355913) on 367 MDS patients in whom CD34+ peripheral blood cells were analysed for the presence of del(12p) by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses. A cohort of 2,902 previously published MDS patients diagnosed by CBA served as control. We demonstrate that, using a sensitive FISH technique, 12p deletion occurs significantly more frequently in MDS than previously described (7.6% by CD34+ PB-FISH vs. 1.6% by CBA, P < 0.001) and is often associated with other aberrations (93% by CD34+ PB-FISH vs. 60% by CBA). Additionally, the detection rate can be increased by repeated analyses in a patient over time which is important for the patient´s prognosis to distinguish a sole anomaly from double or complex aberrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to screen for 12p deletions with a suitable probe for ETV6/TEL in 12p13. Our data suggest that the supplement of a probe for the detection of a 12p deletion to common FISH probe panels helps to avoid missing a del(12p), especially as part of more complex aberrations.

  4. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled comparison of nocturnal roxatidine in the treatment of active duodenal ulcer disease. Multicenter Roxatidine Cooperative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilinsky, N H; Bright-Asare, P; Cobert, B L; Fitch, D D; Lanza, F L; Kerr, R M; Savitsky, J P

    1992-07-01

    This multicenter randomized, double-blind, 4-wk study compared the new H2-receptor antagonistic roxatidine (R) to placebo (P) for treatment of endoscopically diagnosed active duodenal ulcer disease. Subjects were evaluated after 2 and 4 wk of treatment. Those whose ulcer was unhealed at 2 wk received 2 more weeks of treatment before final evaluation. Ulcer healing (endoscopically determined) with roxatidine was more effective than placebo at both wk 0-2 (R = 33.9%, P = 21.9%, p = 0.018) and wk 2-4 (R = 68.2%, P = 29.7%, p less than 0.001), with an overall 4-wk effectiveness of 78.9% compared to 44.8% (p less than 0.001). At the end of treatment, average maximum ulcer diameter diminished 83% in R and 50% in P (p less than 0.001). Roxatidine was also more effective than placebo in decreasing abdominal pain (p less than 0.001), decreasing the number of antacid tablets taken for pain relief (p less than 0.001), improving dyspeptic symptoms (p less than 0.001), and permitting return to a normal routine for subjects with previous illness-imposed restrictions on work and/or other daily activities. The profile of laboratory values and adverse experiences demonstrated roxatidine to be safe and well-tolerated. The efficacy of roxatidine as evaluated by the healing rate of duodenal ulcer and reduction in abdominal pain emphasize its value as an addition to the family of H2-receptor antagonists.

  5. Physical Demands Study - Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    and the rounds in the boxes weigh 35 lb, which is lighter than equipment handled in the other physically demanding job tasks already identified...and standards. Ergonomics . 53: 858-871. 40 Appendix A: Questionnaires Completed by Volunteers prior to each Focus Group Interview 1 2 3 4a 4b 5

  6. Predictive power of renormalisation group flows a comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F; Litim, Daniel F.; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2001-01-01

    We study a proper-time renormalisation group, which is based on an operator cut-off regularisation of the one-loop effective action. The predictive power of this approach is constrained because the flow is not an exact one. We compare it to the Exact Renormalisation Group, which is based on a momentum regulator in the Wilsonian sense. In contrast to the former, the latter provides an exact flow. To leading order in a derivative expansion, an explicit map from the exact to the proper-time renormalisation group is established. The opposite map does not exist in general. We discuss various implications of these findings, in particular in view of the predictive power of the proper-time renormalisation group. As an application, we compute critical exponents for O(N)-symmetric scalar theories at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in 3d from both formalisms.

  7. The Iraq Study Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Hilda Arellano —U.S. Agency for International Development Director in Iraq * Terrance Kelly—Director, Office of Strategic Plans and Assessments...President, Mercy Corps Michael O’Hanlon—Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution George Packer—The New Yorker Carlos Pascual—Vice

  8. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  9. Selecting a comparison group for 5-year oral and pharyngeal cancer survivors: Two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Henrietta L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess potential long-term consequences of cancer treatment, studies that include comparison groups are needed. These comparison groups should be selected in a way that allows the subtle long-range effects of cancer therapy to be detected and distinguishes them from the effects of aging and other risk factors. The purpose of this investigation was to test two methods of recruiting a comparison group for 5-year oral and pharyngeal cancer survivors (peer-nominated and listed sample with emphasis on feasibility and the quality of the match. Methods Participants were drawn from a pool of 5-year survivors treated at a large Southeastern hospital. A peer-nominated sample was solicited from the survivors. A listed sample matched on sex, age, and zip code was purchased. Telephone interviews were conducted by a professional call center. Results The following represent our key findings: The quality of matching between survivors and listed sample was better than that between survivors and peer-nominated group in age and sex. The quality of matching between the two methods on other key variables did not differ except for education, with the peer method providing a better match for the survivors than the listed sample. The yield for the listed sample method was greater than for the peer-nominated method. The cost per completed interview was greater for the peer-nominated method than the listed sample. Conclusion This study not only documents the methodological challenges in selecting a comparison group for studies examining the late effects of cancer treatment among older individuals but also documents challenges in matching groups that potentially have disproportionate levels of comorbidities and at-risk health behaviors.

  10. DECLARED AGGRESSION AND AGGRESSIVENESS IN HANDBALL PLAYERS IN COMPARISON WITH REFERENCE GROUPS

    OpenAIRE

    Jasiński, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this study was comparison of declared aggression and aggressiveness in boys training handball, where aggressive reactions not provided for in regulations are condemned and punished, with their level in schoolchildren participating only in the physical education lessons. The study involved altogether 146 male participants, aged between 12 to 33 years. The participants were divided into three groups. The first (G1) was formed out of sports club Orlen handball players (40 competitors). Re...

  11. Incorporating group correlations in genome-wide association studies using smoothed group Lasso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Ma, Shuangge; Wang, Kai

    2013-04-01

    In genome-wide association studies, penalization is an important approach for identifying genetic markers associated with disease. Motivated by the fact that there exists natural grouping structure in single nucleotide polymorphisms and, more importantly, such groups are correlated, we propose a new penalization method for group variable selection which can properly accommodate the correlation between adjacent groups. This method is based on a combination of the group Lasso penalty and a quadratic penalty on the difference of regression coefficients of adjacent groups. The new method is referred to as smoothed group Lasso (SGL). It encourages group sparsity and smoothes regression coefficients for adjacent groups. Canonical correlations are applied to the weights between groups in the quadratic difference penalty. We first derive a GCD algorithm for computing the solution path with linear regression model. The SGL method is further extended to logistic regression for binary response. With the assistance of the majorize-minimization algorithm, the SGL penalized logistic regression turns out to be an iteratively penalized least-square problem. We also suggest conducting principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality within groups. Simulation studies are used to evaluate the finite sample performance. Comparison with group Lasso shows that SGL is more effective in selecting true positives. Two datasets are analyzed using the SGL method.

  12. Body composition and somatotype of judo athletes and untrained male students as a reference group for comparison in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study was to determine the body composition and somatotype of untrained male students studying at Warsaw University of Technology in 2011, in order to create a current reference group for comparison, and to investigate the difference in body build of male judoists compared with the non-athlete group.

  13. Effects of social comparison on aggression and regression in groups of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrock, J W; Smith, P C; Bourbeau, P E

    1976-09-01

    The influence of negative, equal, and positive social comparison and of nonsocial comparison upon 4- and 5-year-old black children's subsequent aggressive and regressive behavior in 3-member groups was investigated. The group behavior of boys included more physical agression following negative social comparison than the other treatments, and their group behavior also consisted of more nonverbal teasing behavior following the negative comparison treatment than that of the equal and nonsocial comparison groups. When the behavior of the nontarget partners was controlled, children initiated more physical aggression, nonverbal teasing, and regression after experiencing negative social comparison with the partners than after following the other treatments. There was some evidence to support the reciprocal influence of children's aggressive behavior on each other, particularly for boys following imbalanced social comparison treatments.

  14. Career Choices: A Comparison of Two Occupational Therapy Practice Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Seanne; Rosenthal, Carolyn

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of 20 occupational therapists in gerontology with 20 in pediatrics found that societal and personal values, opportunity structures, attitudes and beliefs, experiences, and the context of work influenced choice of practice setting. Academic and clinical experiences were very influential for those in pediatrics. Those in gerontology felt…

  15. Controlled Cohort Study of Serum Gonadal and Adrenocortical Steroid Levels in Males Prior to Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis (pre-RA: A Comparison to pre-RA Females and Sex Differences among the Study Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonse T. Masi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum testosterone levels are generally reported to be lower in male rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, but it is not determined if a deficiency may occur before clinical onset of disease (pre-RA. Lower testosterone levels were recently reported in males many years before RA onset but were predictive only of rheumatoid factor (RF—negative disease. A preceding prospective study did not reveal androgenic-anabolic hormone association with risk of RA in men or women. This cohort study of males analyzed baseline serum levels of gonadal and adrenocortical steroids, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin in 18 pre-RA versus 72 matched non-RA control (CN subjects. Findings in males were compared to those in female pre-RA and CN subjects in the same cohort, and sex differences were analyzed. Steroidal and hormonal levels, including total testosterone, were similar between male study groups. In females, mean (±SE serum androstenedione (nmol/L was slightly (P=0.048 lower in 36 pre-RA (6.7 ± 0.36 than 144 CN (7.6 ± 0.22. With the exception of 3 partial correlations of hormonal variables observed to differ between pre-RA versus CN subjects, the patterns were similar overall. However, partial correlations of hormonal variables differed frequently by sex, both within and between study groups.

  16. Upward and downward comparison in the intermediate-status group: the role of social stratification stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca

    2012-06-01

    This work analyses intergroup comparison choices made by intermediate-status group members. Seventy-six psychology students were categorized in an intermediate position with respect to other faculties. Stability was manipulated at three levels: stable, upwardly unstable, and downwardly unstable. Data on strength of comparison, comparison for enhancing, comparison for evaluation, and ingroup identification were collected. Results revealed that in the stable condition, participants were equally engaged in both upward and downward comparison. In the upwardly unstable condition, participants were more likely to compare themselves with the high-status group, whereas in the downwardly unstable condition, they were more likely to choose a downward comparison. In this latter condition, both downward comparison for enhancement and in-group identification were lower than in other conditions.

  17. The $K$-groups and the index theory of certain comparison $C^*$-algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Monthubert, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    We compute the $K$-theory of comparison $C^*$-algebra associated to a manifold with corners. These comparison algebras are an example of the abstract pseudodifferential algebras introduced by Connes and Moscovici \\cite{M3}. Our calculation is obtained by showing that the comparison algebras are a homomorphic image of a groupoid $C^*$-algebra. We then prove an index theorem with values in the $K$-theory groups of the comparison algebra.

  18. Tract-oriented statistical group comparison of diffusion in sheet-like white matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Dyrby, T. B.; Sorensen, P. S.;

    2013-01-01

    Identifying specific structures of the brain where pathology differs between groups of subjects may aid to develop imaging-based markers for disease diagnosis. We propose a new technique for doing multivariate statistical analysis on white matter tracts with sheet like shapes. Previous works assume...... tube-like shapes, not always suitable for modelling the white matter tracts of the brain. The tract-oriented technique aimed at group studies, integrates the usage of multivariate features and outputs a single value of significance indicating tract-specific differences. This is in contrast to voxel...... based analysis techniques which outputs a significance per voxel basis, and requires multiple comparison correction. We demonstrate our technique by comparing a group of controls with a group of Multiple Sclerosis subjects obtaining significant differences on 11 different fascicle structures....

  19. When are emotions related to group-based appraisals? : A comparison between group-based emotions and general group emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Toon; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the literature on emotions in intergroup relations, it is not always clear how exactly emotions are group-related. Here, we distinguish between emotions that involve appraisals of immediate group concerns (i.e., group-based emotions) and emotions that do not. Recently, general group emotions, mea

  20. Comparison of STR polymorphism among a Kirgiz ethnic group from Sinkiang and other groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Shuhui; Li Shengbin

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the genetic relationship between Kirgiz individuals living in Sinkiang China and analyze the difference among Kirgiz and the other population with STR polymorphisms. Methods PCR amplification was performed using PE9700, the PCR products were typed by automated sequencer and genescan. Results A database of nine STR loci of Kirgiz was established. It shows there are at least 73 STR alleles and 191 genotypes in Kirgiz. Genotype frequencies distribution showed no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by χ2-test. Kirgiz was compared with the other Chinese ethnic groups, then the American Black and the White. Conclusion These results suggested that the nine STR loci and Amelogenin locus were very useful in human identification, biological archaeology and gene resource studies.

  1. IRT studies of many groups: The alignment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt eMuthen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Asparouhov and Muthen (forthcoming presented a new method for multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, referred to as the alignment method. The alignment method can be used to estimate group-specific factor means and variances without requiring exact measurement invariance. A strength of the method is the ability to conveniently estimate models for many groups, such as with comparisons of countries. This paper focuses on IRT applications of the alignment method. An empirical investigation is made of binary knowledge items administered in two separate surveys of a set of countries. A Monte Carlo study is presented that shows how the quality of the alignment can be assessed.

  2. Comparison of the Anaerobic Power of Brazilian Professional Football Players Grouped by Tactical Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Renato Cruz dos Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe anthropometric characteristics and body composition of elite handball and basketball players as well as to make comparisons between them. Fifty-nine males were enrolled in the study, divided into three groups: fifteen handball players, fourteen basketball players and thirty healthy sedentary subjects. The descriptive statistics were expressed as a mean (SD for each variable, while the ANOVA and LSD Post Hoc tests were carried out to detect the effects of each type of sport. The results showed there was no significant difference in body mass index among the groups, while a significant difference was found for body height and body weight as well as for all three of the body contents measured (muscle, bone and fat among the groups. These findings may give coaches from the region better working knowledge and suggest to them to follow recent selection process methods and to be more careful during the recruitment.

  3. Comparison of group motor control training versus individual training for people suffering from back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Heike; Mätzold, Franz; Hamilton, Christine; Wagner, Petra

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of "motor-control training" (MCT) using the model of deficits in the activation of transversus abdominis (TrA) in people with recurrent back pain. The purpose of this investigation was to establish whether MCT - implemented within a new group intervention (experimental group) - is able to produce results similar to those of a conventional intervention applied individually (control group) to people suffering from back pain. Using the form of an experimental pre-post-test design, the study consisted of an experimental group (N = 18, mean age M = 45.2; SD = 18.4; 9 ♂, 9 ♀) and a comparison group (N = 13; age = 56.6; SD = 18.5; 6 ♂, 7 ♀). The training covered a period of six weeks, with two training sessions per week. The amount of training was the same in both groups. Aside from the same extent of training, the participants in the experimental group completed training content in the group interventions identical to that completed by the comparison group in the individual treatments. To clarify: The difference between the two groups was that the participants in the individual-therapy control group received individual feedback on their exercise performance and correction notes from the instructor. This degree of individual attention was not given within the group therapy. The selective activation of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was the main focus of the intervention, with the intent of improving its stabilising corset function, especially within the lumbar region, via increased tension of the thoracolumbar fascia. To record the progress of both groups, the anterolateral abdominal muscle recruitment of the M. transversus abdominis (TrA) was measured as a main influencing factor for anterolateral stabilisation of the spine. For measurements of muscle recruitment, rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (M-Turbo™ SonoSite(®) Erlangen in B-Mode) according to Whittaker (2007) was used. Furthermore, the relationship between pain

  4. Utility of DSM-5 section III personality traits in differentiating borderline personality disorder from comparison groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Bo, S

    2016-01-01

    to determine how the alternative DSM-5 Section III personality trait dimensions differentiates such features in BPD patients versus comparison groups. To date, no study has attempted such validation. METHOD: The current study examined the utility of the DSM-5 trait dimensions in differentiating patients...... with the categorical DSM-IV/5 diagnosis of BPD (n=101) from systematically matched samples of other PD patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=101). This was investigated using one-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Results indicated that Emotional Lability, Risk Taking...

  5. Facebook Groups as LMS: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meishar-Tal, Hagit; Kurtz, Gila; Pieterse, Efrat

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study in using Facebook as an alternative to a learning management system (LMS). The paper reviews the current research on the use of Facebook in academia and analyzes the differences between a Facebook group and a regular LMS. The paper reports on a precedent-setting attempt to use a Facebook group as a course…

  6. Quality control of involved-field radiotherapy for patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma based on a central prospective review. Comparison of the results between two study generations of the German Hodgkin Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bangard, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Bongartz, R.; Baues, C.; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Based on experience in trials HD10 and HD11 (1998-2003), the radiotherapy reference center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) continued their central prospective radiation oncological review in trials HD13 and HD14. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the impact of this procedure on radiotherapeutic management and to compare findings with former trials. Methods: Between 2003 and 2009, 1,710 patients were enrolled in the HD13 trial (early favorable stages) and 2,039 patients in the HD14 trial (early unfavorable stages). All patients received a total of 30 Gy involved-field (IF) radiotherapy within a combined modality approach. Results: For patients in HD13, there was a correction of disease involvement in 847/1,518 patients (56%), and for patients in HD14 in 1,370/1,905 patients (72%). Most discrepancies were observed in the lower mediastinum (19.2%), infraclavicular (31.7%), upper cervical (12.7%), and supraclavicular (10.8%) lymph nodes. This resulted in a change of disease stage in 241 (7%) patients and a shift into another study protocol in 66 (2%) patients. Due to the incorrect lymph node documentation of the participating study centers, the IF radiotherapy volume had to be enlarged in 1,063/3,423 patients (31%) and reduced in 244/3,423 patients (7.1%). These findings are comparable to the results of the quality control in the trials HD10 and HD11 (2,611 patients reviewed). Conclusion: Central review of the diagnostic imaging and clinical findings of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients shows a considerable number of discrepancies compared with the local evaluation. Thus, meticulous evaluation of all imaging information in close collaboration between the radiation oncologist and diagnostic radiologist is mandatory. (orig.)

  7. Configured-groups hypothesis: fast comparison of exact large quantities without counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravete, Sébastien; Tricot, André; Kalyuga, Slava; Amadieu, Franck

    2017-07-17

    Our innate number sense cannot distinguish between two large exact numbers of objects (e.g., 45 dots vs 46). Configured groups (e.g., 10 blocks, 20 frames) are traditionally used in schools to represent large numbers. Previous studies suggest that these external representations make it easier to use symbolic strategies such as counting ten by ten, enabling humans to differentiate exactly two large numbers. The main hypothesis of this work is that configured groups also allow for a differentiation of large exact numbers, even when symbolic strategies become ineffective. In experiment 1, the children from grade 3 were asked to compare two large collections of objects for 5 s. When the objects were organized in configured groups, the success rate was over .90. Without this configured grouping, the children were unable to make a successful comparison. Experiments 2 and 3 controlled for a strategy based on non-numerical parameters (areas delimited by dots or the sum areas of dots, etc.) or use symbolic strategies. These results suggest that configured grouping enables humans to distinguish between two large exact numbers of objects, even when innate number sense and symbolic strategies are ineffective. These results are consistent with what we call "the configured group hypothesis": configured groups play a fundamental role in the acquisition of exact numerical abilities.

  8. Facilitating peer learning in study groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2009-01-01

    the preliminary results from the facilitated study groups. After one term (February-May), student satisfaction with both the social and the disciplinary environment had increased. The project shows how academic and social integration can be achieved with minimum faculty member involvement. This is done by relying...... 'Facilitating study environment' at one of DPU's educations in spring 2009. The pilot project consisted of three elements: Facilitated study groups, a student bar with facilitated activities, and academic identity events. Subsequently, we have studied students' experiences with the project. This paper outlines...... on the students' own resources, using peer-learning and facilitating these activities....

  9. Group Decision Support Systems and Group Communication: A Comparison of Decision Making in Computer-Supported and Nonsupported Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marshall Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Explores the effects of Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) on small group communication and decision-making processes. Finds that comparing GDSS, manual, and baseline conditions enables separation of effects resulting from procedural structures from those resulting from computerization. Results support some aspects of the research model and…

  10. Comparison between different reactions of group IV hydride with H

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Shaolong; ZHANG; Xuqiang; ZHANG; Qinggang; ZHANG; Yici

    2006-01-01

    The four-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics calculations for reactions of group IV hydride with H are carried out by employing the semirigid vibrating rotor target model and the time-dependent wave packet method. The reaction possibility, cross section and rate constants for reactions (H+SiH4 and H+GeH4) in different initial vibrational and rotational states are obtained. The common feature for such kind of reaction process is summarized. The theoretical result is consistent with available measurement, which indicates the credibility of this theory and the potential energy surface.

  11. Virtual Versus In-Person Focus Groups: Comparison of Costs, Recruitment, and Participant Logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Douglas J; Poehlman, Jon A; Hayes, Jennifer J; Ray, Sarah E; Moultrie, Rebecca R

    2017-03-22

    Virtual focus groups-such as online chat and video groups-are increasingly promoted as qualitative research tools. Theoretically, virtual groups offer several advantages, including lower cost, faster recruitment, greater geographic diversity, enrollment of hard-to-reach populations, and reduced participant burden. However, no study has compared virtual and in-person focus groups on these metrics. To rigorously compare virtual and in-person focus groups on cost, recruitment, and participant logistics. We examined 3 focus group modes and instituted experimental controls to ensure a fair comparison. We conducted 6 1-hour focus groups in August 2014 using in-person (n=2), live chat (n=2), and video (n=2) modes with individuals who had type 2 diabetes (n=48 enrolled, n=39 completed). In planning groups, we solicited bids from 6 virtual platform vendors and 4 recruitment firms. We then selected 1 platform or facility per mode and a single recruitment firm across all modes. To minimize bias, the recruitment firm employed different recruiters by mode who were blinded to recruitment efforts for other modes. We tracked enrollment during a 2-week period. A single moderator conducted all groups using the same guide, which addressed the use of technology to communicate with health care providers. We conducted the groups at the same times of day on Monday to Wednesday during a single week. At the end of each group, participants completed a short survey. Virtual focus groups offered minimal cost savings compared with in-person groups (US $2000 per chat group vs US $2576 per in-person group vs US $2,750 per video group). Although virtual groups did not incur travel costs, they often had higher management fees and miscellaneous expenses (eg, participant webcams). Recruitment timing did not differ by mode, but show rates were higher for in-person groups (94% [15/16] in-person vs 81% [13/16] video vs 69% [11/16] chat). Virtual group participants were more geographically diverse (but

  12. Tip and Torque Angle of Permanent Teeth: A Comparison Between Treated Patients and Normal Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Miresmaeili

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The angle of long axis of tooth crown is called tip in mesiodostal and torque in faciolingual direction. Both have special importance for producing an ideal occlusion. The aim of the present study was determination of the average tip and torque of each permanent tooth in well treated patients with edgewise system compare to control group with normal occlusion. In this study, 19 well treated cases through standard edgewise technique with non extraction strategy and 20 students of pre-university schools with normal occlusion according to IOTN were selected. Reference points and lines were marked on facial surface of each tooth on casts. Special device was designed for measuring the faciolingual and mesiodistal inclination of crowns. After 3 times measuring the tip and torque of teeth, student t-test and Kruskal – Wallis analysis were used for statistical analysis.The mean age of control group was 18.8 ± 0.5 year and in treated group was 20.3 ± 0.8. There was significant difference between mean of torque in control group and treated group for upper lateral incisor (4.75±5.21 , 8.76±5.82 respectively , p<0.03 . Also a significant difference was seen in average torque of lower second premolar between control group and treated one ( -23.48±5.99 , -26.66±4.64 respectively , p<0.05. There were no significant differences in tip of teeth between two groups. In comparison with Andrews study, in normal occlusion group, upper canine & first molar and lower lateral & first premolar had more buccal root torque. Except the torque of upper lateral incisor and lower 2nd premolar, torque and tip of other teeth had no significant difference.

  13. Space Station concept development group studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA study activities in preparation for a Space Station began in the early 1970's. The early studies included many in-house NASA and contracted studies. A group of representatives from all the NASA Centers, titled the Space Station Concept Development Group (CDG) was involved in the studies which led to the initiation of the Space Station Program. The CDG studies were performed over a period of approximately one year and consisted of four phases. The initial phase had the objective to determine the functions required of the station as opposed to a configuration. The activities of the second phase were primarily concerned with a sizing of the facilities required for payloads and the resources necessary to support these mission payloads. The third phase of studies was designed to develop a philosophical approach to a number of areas related to autonomy, maintainability, operations and logistics, and verification. The fourth phase of the study was to be concerned with configuration assessment activities.

  14. Virtual Versus In-Person Focus Groups: Comparison of Costs, Recruitment, and Participant Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlman, Jon A; Hayes, Jennifer J; Ray, Sarah E; Moultrie, Rebecca R

    2017-01-01

    Background Virtual focus groups—such as online chat and video groups—are increasingly promoted as qualitative research tools. Theoretically, virtual groups offer several advantages, including lower cost, faster recruitment, greater geographic diversity, enrollment of hard-to-reach populations, and reduced participant burden. However, no study has compared virtual and in-person focus groups on these metrics. Objective To rigorously compare virtual and in-person focus groups on cost, recruitment, and participant logistics. We examined 3 focus group modes and instituted experimental controls to ensure a fair comparison. Methods We conducted 6 1-hour focus groups in August 2014 using in-person (n=2), live chat (n=2), and video (n=2) modes with individuals who had type 2 diabetes (n=48 enrolled, n=39 completed). In planning groups, we solicited bids from 6 virtual platform vendors and 4 recruitment firms. We then selected 1 platform or facility per mode and a single recruitment firm across all modes. To minimize bias, the recruitment firm employed different recruiters by mode who were blinded to recruitment efforts for other modes. We tracked enrollment during a 2-week period. A single moderator conducted all groups using the same guide, which addressed the use of technology to communicate with health care providers. We conducted the groups at the same times of day on Monday to Wednesday during a single week. At the end of each group, participants completed a short survey. Results Virtual focus groups offered minimal cost savings compared with in-person groups (US $2000 per chat group vs US $2576 per in-person group vs US $2,750 per video group). Although virtual groups did not incur travel costs, they often had higher management fees and miscellaneous expenses (eg, participant webcams). Recruitment timing did not differ by mode, but show rates were higher for in-person groups (94% [15/16] in-person vs 81% [13/16] video vs 69% [11/16] chat). Virtual group

  15. STUDIES ON HUMAN FALLOPIAN TUBAL EPITHELIUM IN DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS The “fallopian tubes” (oviducts or uterine tubes are long paired flexuous reproductive organ which transports ova, spermatozoa, zygotes, the pre-implantation morulae and blastocyst. It has major role during reproductive period, but it remains as if vestigial organ before puberty and after menopause. Due to increasing rate of tubal block and infertility, oviducts and their structures gaining importance and have become a subject of research in present days particularly epithelium. The aim of the study is to ascertain any histological difference of tubal epithelium in different age groups and the research work could be utilized for investigation and management of infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven samples of each group i.e., prereproductive, reproductive & postmenopausal were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadavers received in the department of Anatomy, FAA Medical College, Barpeta, Assam. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Under low and high power objectives the type of cells were observed and epithelial height was measured in the different segments. Stress was given for any significant difference of epithelial height between the different age groups. RESULTS Study revealed that among the groups within the same segment, epithelial height was recorded highest (33.57µm in reproductive group as against the lowest (22.91µm in post-menopausal group. Epithelial structures of the prereproductive and reproductive groups were significantly differed (p<0.01 from the postmenopausal group. CONCLUSIONS From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that: 1. In all the groups fallopian tubal epithelium is of simple columnar type and contains three types of cells. Cells are ciliated, secretory & peg (intercalary cells. 2. In all the groups same type of increasing trend of epithelial height from intramural segment to ampullary segment was recorded. 3. In intergroup comparison of

  16. Comparison of two doses of intravitreal bevacizumab as primary treatment for macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion: results of the pan American collaborative retina study group at 24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lihteh; Arevalo, J Fernando; Berrocal, Maria H; Maia, Mauricio; Roca, José A; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio; Alezzandrini, Arturo A; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the injection burden, central macular thickness (CMT), and change in best-corrected visual acuity after injecting 1.25 mg or 2.5 mg bevacizumab as needed in patients with primary macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion. This is an interventional, retrospective, comparative multicenter study of 86 eyes with macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion that were treated primarily with intravitreal bevacizumab (44 eyes, 1.25 mg; 42 eyes, 2.5 mg). The main outcome measures were the CMT and the change of best-corrected visual acuity at 24 months. All patients completed at least 24 months of follow-up. The mean number of injections per eye were 7.2 for the 1.25-mg dose group and 8.1 for the 2.5-mg dose group (P = 0.4492). At 24 months, in the 1.25-mg dose group, the logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity improved from baseline 0.35 +/- 0.57 units (P or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity and 6 (13.6%) lost >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity. In the 2.5-mg dose group, 24 (57.1 %) eyes improved >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity and 7 (16.7%) lost >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity. The CMT in the 1.25-mg dose group improved from 635 +/- 324 microm to 264 +/- 160 microm (P central retinal vein occlusion. There were no statistically significant differences between the two dose groups with regard to the number of injections, CMT, and change in visual acuity.

  17. Metacognition and Group Differences: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, metacognition refers to performing visual analysis and discrimination of real life events and situations in naïve psychology, naïve physics, and naïve biology domains. It is used, along with measuring reaction time, to examine differences in the ability of four groups of students to select appropriate pictures that correspond with…

  18. Report of the Public Cryptography Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    Concerns of the National Security Agency (NSA) that information contained in some articles about cryptography in learned and professional journals and in monographs might be inimical to the national security are addressed. The Public Cryptography Study Group, with one dissenting opinion, recommends that a voluntary system of prior review of…

  19. Preference weights for cost-outcome analyses of schizophrenia treatments: comparison of four stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Martha

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified preferences for schizophrenia outcomes in four stakeholder groups, tested the hypotheses that outcomes differ in importance and stakeholder groups have different preferences, and produced preference weights for seven outcomes for cost-outcome analysis. Fifty patients with schizophrenia, 50 clinicians, 41 family members of patients, and 50 members of the general public rated 16 schizophrenia-related health states, yielding preference weights for seven outcomes: positive symptoms, negative symptoms, extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, social function, independent living, and vocational function. Outcomes differed in importance (F = 23.4, p stakeholders rated positive symptoms and social functioning as more important than negative and extrapyramidal symptoms. Stakeholder groups had different preferences (F = 1.9, p = 0.01). Patients rated extrapyramidal symptoms as more important than did other groups (p important than did patients or family members (p important than did patients and the general public (p important and that stakeholder groups value outcomes differently, demonstrating the importance of incorporating stakeholder preferences in cost-outcome analyses and other treatment comparisons.

  20. Social comparison framing in health news and its effect on perceptions of group risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigman, Cabral A

    2014-01-01

    News about health disparities often compares health risks faced by different demographic groups. Does this social comparison produce a contrast effect? It was hypothesized that when two racial groups are compared, people would perceive the relatively more at-risk group to be more, and the less at-risk group to be less, at-risk than if the same risk information was presented without the comparative reference group. Three experiments with Black and White respondents tested effects of intergroup social comparison framing (SCF) on perceptions of risk for sexually transmitted infections and skin cancer. SCF (including one White and two Black disparity frames) did not raise respondents' perceived risk regarding the more at-risk racial group, but consistently lowered respondents' risk ratings for the less at-risk racial group. The finding that the same statistic was perceived differently in comparative and noncomparative contexts underscores the importance of considering effects of communication about disparities.

  1. Life of Pizza Pie: The Implications of Sub-Group Comparisons in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tara N.

    2013-01-01

    Current educational statistics have pitted subgroups against one another without consideration of the actual population sizes of each group. This paper is intended to provided a clearer understanding of the current usage of sub-group comparisons in American education. (Contains 4 figures.)

  2. Voxel-wise comparisons of the morphology of diffusion tensors across groups of experimental subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H; Plessen, Kerstin J;

    2007-01-01

    and eigenvectors that create the 3D morphologies of DTs. We present a mathematical framework that permits the direct comparison across groups of mean eigenvalues and eigenvectors of individual DTs. We show that group-mean eigenvalues and eigenvectors are multivariate Gaussian distributed, and we use the Delta...... method to compute their approximate covariance matrices. Our results show that the theoretically computed mean tensor (MT) eigenvectors and eigenvalues match well with their respective true values. Furthermore, a comparison of synthetically generated groups of DTs highlights the limitations of using FA...... neuropsychiatric illnesses. Comparisons of tensor morphology across groups have typically been performed on scalar measures of diffusivity, such as Fractional Anisotropy (FA) rather than directly on the complex 3D morphologies of DTs. Scalar measures, however, are related in nonlinear ways to the eigenvalues...

  3. Report of the special study group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.H.

    1956-07-18

    The special study group was activated by a charter letter from Sub-Section Managers of Pile Technology on June 20, 1956. The principal objectives were: to collect the information which is presently available for new reactor design and to determine what information should be developed; to make a guess at pile variables; and to point out development programs which must be pursued to achieve a detailed design start in two years. The study was restricted to graphite moderated reactors with H{sub 2}0, D{sub 2}0, and organic coolants. The program was to determine technical feasibility only and detailed economic considerations were not to be included. This report presents the conclusions of the group and some of the reasoning behind these conclusions.

  4. Repeat spinal anesthesia in cesarean section: A comparison between 10 mg and 12 mg doses of intrathecal hyperbaric (0.05%) bupivacaine repeated after failed spinal anesthesia: A prospective, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhar, Debasish; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Das, Anjan; Chhaule, Subinay; Mondal, Sudipta Kumar; Bisai, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Spinal anesthesia for cesarean section is not a 100% successful technique. At times, despite straightforward insertion and drug administration, intrathecal anesthesia for cesarean section fails to obtain any sensory or motor block. Very few studies and literature are available regarding repeat administration of spinal anesthesia and its drug dosage, especially after first spinal failure in cesarean section lower segment cesarean section (LSCS) due to fear of the excessive spread of drug. The aim of our study is to compare the outcome between two different doses of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine repeated intrathecally after failed spinal. After taking informed consent and Ethical Committee approval this prospective, randomized single-blinded study was conducted in 100 parturients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II who were posted for elective LSCS and had Bromage score 0 and no sensory block even at L4 dermatome after 10 min of first spinal anesthesia; were included in the study. Group A (n = 50) patients received 2.4 ml and Group B (n = 50) patients received 2 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine respectively for administering repeat spinal anesthesia. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and electrocardiogram were monitored both intra- and post-operatively and complications were recorded. Incidence of high spinal, bradycardia, hypotension, respiratory complications, and nausea vomiting are significantly higher in Group A compared to Group B (P cesarean section with 10 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine provided after first spinal anesthesia, the level of sensory block is below L4 and motor power in Bromage scale is 0.

  5. Comparison of STR polymorphism among a Kirgiz ethnic group from Sinkiang and other groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    STR(Short tandem repeats)loci consist ofsi mple repeated sequences with2-6bp in length.The range of STR polymorphis m fragments is ap-proxi mately from100bp to350bp.STR appears tobe abundant in human genome and occurs every20kb on average[1-2].In present study,the frequencydistributions for nine STRloci were analyzed usingAmpFLSTR(ProfilerTMPCR Amplification Kit(Perkin-El mer).These STRs are D3S1358,VWA,CSF1PO,FGA,THO1,TPOX,D5S818,D13S317and D7S820.All these loci were analyzedby genescan.Establishment of a ...

  6. Early Maladaptive Schemas among Young Adult Male Substance Abusers: A Comparison with a Non-Clinical Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Anderson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Early maladaptive schemas are rigidly held cognitive and behavioral patterns that guide how individuals encode and respond to stimuli in their environments (Young, 1994). Research has examined the early maladaptive schemas of substance abusers, as schemas are believed to underlie, perpetuate, and maintain problematic substance use. To date, research has not examined whether young adult male substance abuse treatment seekers (ages 18 to 25) report greater early maladaptive schema endorsement than a non-clinical comparison group. The current study extended the research on substance use and schemas by comparing the early maladaptive schemas of young adult male residential substance abuse patients (n = 101) and a group of non-clinical male college students (n = 175). Results demonstrated that the substance abuse group scored higher than the non-clinical comparison group on 9 of the 18 early maladaptive schemas. Implications of these findings for future research and substance use treatment programs are discussed. PMID:23312769

  7. Comparison of lidocaine, metoclopramide, and flurbiprofen axetil for reducing pain on injection of propofol in Japanese adult surgical patients: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yoshitaka; Itakura, Michiyo

    2008-02-01

    Pain on injection is a recognized adverse event (AE) of propofol administration for the induction of general anesthesia. Pretreatment with lidocaine, metoclopramide, or flurbiprofen axetil has been reported to be effective in reducing propofol-induced pain. However, no studies comparing the efficacy of these 3 drugs for preventing pain on injection of propofol have been identified. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of lidocaine, metoclopramide, and flurbiprofen axetil for reducing pain on injection of propofol in Japanese adult surgical patients. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study was conducted at the Department of Anesthesiology, Ushiku Aiwa General Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan. Japanese patients scheduled to undergo elective surgery were eligible for inclusion in the study. Patients were randomized into 4 groups to receive IV lidocaine 40 mg, metoclopramide 10 mg, flurbiprofen axetil 50 mg, or placebo (saline), preceded by venous occlusion with a rubber tourniquet for 2 minutes, and followed by the administration of propofol 0.5 mg/kg into the largest vein of the hand through a 20-gauge IV cannula. Immediately after the administration of propofol, an investigator blinded to treatment interviewed each patient on injection-site pain. Responses were scored on a 4-point verbal rating scale (0 = none, 1 = mild pain, 2 = moderate pain, and 3 = severe pain). Incidence and intensity of pain (as assessed by mean pain scores) were determined in each of the 4 study groups. AEs at the injection site (eg, pain, edema, wheal, inflammation), extrapyramidal disturbance, and symptoms or signs associated with gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration were assessed by the study investigator for 24 hours following surgery using spontaneous reporting and patient interview. A total of 100 patients (54 women, 46 men) aged 22 to 65 years were enrolled in the study. The patients' mean (SD) age was 42 (12) years. Their mean (SD) height

  8. Morphological and glucose metabolism abnormalities in alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome: group comparisons and individual analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Pitel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gray matter volume studies have been limited to few brain regions of interest, and white matter and glucose metabolism have received limited research attention in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS. Because of the lack of brain biomarkers, KS was found to be underdiagnosed in postmortem studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine consecutively selected patients with KS and 22 matched controls underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography examinations. Using a whole-brain analysis, the between-group comparisons of gray matter and white matter density and relative glucose uptake between patients with KS and controls showed the involvement of both the frontocerebellar and the Papez circuits, including morphological abnormalities in their nodes and connection tracts and probably resulting hypometabolism. The direct comparison of the regional distribution and degree of gray matter hypodensity and hypometabolism within the KS group indicated very consistent gray matter distribution of both abnormalities, with a single area of significant difference in the middle cingulate cortex showing greater hypometabolism than hypodensity. Finally, the analysis of the variability in the individual patterns of brain abnormalities within our sample of KS patients revealed that the middle cingulate cortex was the only brain region showing significant GM hypodensity and hypometabolism in each of our 9 KS patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate widespread brain abnormalities in KS including both gray and white matter damage mainly involving two brain networks, namely, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the Papez circuit. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the middle cingulate cortex may play a key role in the pathophysiology of KS and could be considered as a potential in vivo brain biomarker.

  9. Comparison of Plasma Copper Concentrations in Patients with Brucellosis and Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Mobaien

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective : There are some reports about influence of the rare nutrients such as copper and zinc on immune system. Serum concentrations of copper alter in patients with brucellosis. Brucellosis is a common and endemic disease and a health problem in Iran. We compared serum concentrations of copper in patients with brucellosis and healthy individuals.Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional study, serum concentrations of copper was measured in patients with brucellosis and control group. Eighty six subjects were enrolled in the study, including 43 patients with brucellosis (34 men and 9 women and 43 healthy individuals. Serum concentrations of copper was measured by automatic absorptive spectrophotometer in patients with brucellosis and compared with control group. We employed a non parametrical test, kolmogrov – smirnov, to determine if data distribution was normal or not. Results: Mean age of patients with brucellosis was 40.1415.10 years with the range of 14-60 years. The most frequent symptoms were arthralgia (86%. Serum concentrations of copper in patients with brucellosis were significantly higher than healthy subjects (160.8454.61, 101.7427.37 g/dl respectively, p<0.001.Conclusion: Serum concentrations of copper in patients with brucellosis showed significant alterations in comparison with healthy subjects. So, we recommend using serum copper concentrations in patients with brucellosis as a marker in brucellosis diagnosis. Also we recommend another study for detection of serum copper concentrations before and during treatment.

  10. Environmental studies group. Annual report for 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, D. C.; Hurley, J. D. [eds.

    1980-08-21

    Group projects included radioecological studies of aquatic and terrestrial systems, land management activities, foodstuff monitoring, dust transport studies including fugitive dust measurements and modeling, and several support programs involving evaluation of the plant's ambient air samplers and airborne tritium monitoring techniques. Some salient results from the several project reports include determination of an appropriate model for mechanically generated fugitive dust dispersion, a radionuclide inventory of Smart Ditch Pond (Pond D-1), a coefficient of community determination for two terrestrial sample plots on the plant site buffer zone, a natality and mortality rate determination for fawns in the plant deer herd (including one positive coyote-kill determination), inlet loss and filter paper collection efficiencies for the plant ambient air samplers, and differential tritium sampling measurements of the vapor in Building 771 stack effluent.

  11. Report of JLC site study group

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, T; Yamashita, S

    2003-01-01

    This study group selected some good sites for construction of JLC (Electron-Positron Linear Collider) on the basis of investigation of data and field survey. The aims, activity, use of underground of private land, conditions of site, selection of site at present and future, summary and proposal are reported. 9 sites (Hidaka, Kitakami, Murayama, Abukuma, Kitaibaraki, Aichi and Gifu, Takamatsu, Hiroshima and Seburi range) are selected for the construction on the basis of firm ground and 4 sites (Okinawa, Harima, Tsukuba and Mutsuogawara) for development and researches. 9 sites area consists of plutonic rock or old strata of Paleozoic era. Many problems in each site are reported. There are three following proposals; 1) the self-governing communities of the sites have to understand JLC and start to construct it by information, 2) a site evaluation committee consists of specialist of civil engineering, building, social and natural environment and disaster prevention and 3) the vibration test should be carried out ...

  12. DPHEP: From Study Group to Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The international study group on data preservation in High Energy Physics, DPHEP, achieved a major milestone in 2012 with the publication of its eagerly anticipated large-scale report [1]. This document contains a description of data preservation activities from all major high energy physics collider-based experiments and laboratories. A central message of the report is that data preservation in HEP is not possible without long term investment in not only hardware but also human resources, and with this in mind DPHEP will evolve to a new collaboration structure in 2013. This paper describes the progress made since the publication of that report – shortly before CHEP 2012 – as well as the future working directions of the new collaboration.

  13. A comparison principle for singular parabolic equations in the Heisenberg group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Ochoa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we prove a comparison principle for singular parabolic equations with boundary conditions in the context of the Heisenberg group. In particular, this result applies to interesting equations, such as the parabolic infinite Laplacian, the mean curvature flow equation and more general homogeneous diffusions.

  14. Nonlinear Attitude Filtering: A Comparison Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani, M.; Trumpf, J.; Mahony, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a concise comparison of a number of nonlinear attitude filtering methods that have attracted attention in the robotics and aviation literature. With the help of previously published surveys and comparison studies, the vast literature on the subject is narrowed down to a small pool of competitive attitude filters. Amongst these filters is a second-order optimal minimum-energy filter recently proposed by the authors. Easily comparable discretized unit quaternion implementati...

  15. Quantitative electroencephalography in Alzheimer's disease: comparison with a control group, population norms and mental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, V; Mohr, E; Mahoney, C; Ilivitsky, V

    2001-03-01

    Given that quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) has repeatedly shown excessive slow wave activity in dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) that increases with disease progression, we assessed the clinical utility of this tool by comparing various approaches used to assess slowing. Cross-sectional study comparing quantitative EEG data from patients with DAT with normative data from an elderly control group and from EEG norms derived from a large population. 35 subjects diagnosed with probable DAT and 30 elderly controls. EEG recorded from 21 scalp sites of each patient and elderly control during vigilance-controlled, eyes-closed, resting conditions was spectrally analyzed to yield measures of absolute and relative power in delta, theta, alpha and beta bands and indices of mean alpha band and total band frequency. Group comparisons of raw or age-regressed z-score population normative values yielded different profiles with respect to direction of frequency band changes, regional topography and clinical rating correlations, but both procedures evidenced overall patterns of EEG slowing in DAT. However, both methodologies yielded only modest (75%) classification rates. Quantitative EEG remains a valuable research tool but, as yet, an unproven diagnostic tool, for DAT.

  16. Aggression in children with autism spectrum disorders and a clinic-referred comparison group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Cristan; Butter, Eric; Mazurek, Micah O; Cowan, Charles; Lainhart, Janet; Cook, Edwin H; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Aman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A gap exists in the literature regarding aggression in autism spectrum disorders and how this behavior compares to other groups. In this multisite study, the Children's Scale for Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive and the Aggression subscale of the Child Behavior Checklist were rated for 414 children with autism spectrum disorder (autistic disorder, 69%; pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 24%; Asperger's disorder, 7%) and 243 clinic-referred children without autism spectrum disorder, aged 1-21 years (mean age about 7 years). Participants were not selected for aggressive behavior. Relative to the comparison group, children with autism spectrum disorder were reported to have less aggression and were more likely to be rated as reactive rather than proactive. Among all subjects, sex was not associated with aggression; higher IQ/adaptive behavior and older age were associated with more sophisticated types of aggression, while lower scores on IQ, adaptive behavior, and communication measures were associated with more physical aggression. The interaction between demographic variables and diagnosis was significant only for age: younger but not older children with autism spectrum disorder showed less aggression than clinic-referred controls.

  17. Self-concept and self-esteem after acquired brain injury: a control group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie; Kelly, Amber; Couchman, Grace

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the multidimensional self-concept, global self-esteem and psychological adjustment of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared with healthy controls. Group comparison on self-report questionnaires. Forty-one individuals who had sustained a TBI were compared with an age- and gender-matched sample of 41 trauma-free control participants on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (second edition) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS). Participants with TBI rated significantly lower mean levels of global self-esteem and self-concept on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and Tennessee Self Concept Scale than the control group. Survivors of TBI rated themselves more poorly on a range of self-dimensions, including social, family, academic/work and personal self-concept compared to controls. They also reported higher mean levels of depression and anxiety on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Overall self-concept was most strongly associated with depressive symptoms and anxiety. Self-concept may be lowered following TBI and is associated with negative emotional consequences. Clinicians may improve the emotional adjustment of survivors of TBI by considering particular dimensions of self-concept for intervention focus.

  18. Comparison of the Effect of Group Transdiagnostic Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy on Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cognitive behavioral interventions based on the transdiagnostic approach for emotional disorders have received useful empirical supports in recent years. Most of the researches on this area have been conducted without any control group. Moreover, little information about comparative effectiveness has reported. The current study was compared transdiagnostic group therapy with classical cognitive group therapy.Methods: Thirty three collages students with anxiety and depressive symptoms participated in eight two-hour sessions in Akhavan Hospital, Tehran, Iran during May and June 2011. The results were analyzed by The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, and Work and Social Adjustment Scale in pre and post intervention.Results: Both groups showed the significant difference in research variables pre and post test. However, there was no significant difference in the results analysis using ACOVAs except for anxiety symptoms.Conclusions: The effectiveness of transdiagnostic group therapy was confirmed in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms. Implications of the study are discussed.

  19. Comparison of performance of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society, the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group and the modified New York criteria in a cohort of Chinese patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho Yin; Lau, Chak Sing; Wu, Ka Pik; Wong, Woon Sing; MOK, Mo Yin

    2011-07-01

    Early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis (SpA) is essential as anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy can achieve significant symptomatic relief and control of disease activity. This study aims to compare the clinical characteristics, disease activity, and functional status of a Chinese cohort of SpA patients who were re-classified into ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients fulfilling the modified New York (MNY) criteria, those with undifferentiated SpA (USpA) fulfilling the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) classification criteria only (USpA/ESSG) and those who fulfill Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) only (USpA/ASAS). Disease activity was evaluated by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), severity of morning stiffness, patient global assessment, and C-reactive protein. Functional status was evaluated by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), modified Schober index, and dimension of chest expansion. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with disease duration of 16.3 ± 10.4 years were recruited. Patients in USpA/ESSG and USpA/ASAS were significantly younger (p = 0.01), had shorter disease duration (p 3. BASFI correlated inversely with dimension of chest expansion and negatively modified Schober index in AS patients (p expansion or modified Schober index. Compared with established AS patients recognized by MNY criteria, patients fulfilling USpA defined by ESSG or ASAS criteria had earlier disease, as active disease and less irreversible functional deficit.

  20. Comparison of Estimators for Exponentiated Inverted Weibull Distribution Based on Grouped Data Amal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hassan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many situations, instead of complete sample, data is available only in grouped form. This paper presents estimation of population parameters for the exponentiated inverted Weibull distribution based on grouped data with equi and unequi-spaced grouping. Several alternative estimation schemes, such as, the method of maximum likelihood, least lines, least squares, minimum chi-square, and modified minimum chi-square are considered. Since the different methods of estimation didn't provide closed form solution, thus numerical procedure is applied. The root mean squared error resulting estimators used as comparison criterion to measure both the accuracy and the precision for each parameter.

  1. Case-Control Study: Smoking History Affects the Production of Tumor Antigen-Specific Antibodies NY-ESO-1 in Patients with Lung Cancer in Comparison with Cancer Disease-Free Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myšíková, Dagmar; Adkins, Irena; Hradilová, Nad'a; Palata, Ondřej; Šimonek, Jan; Pozniak, Jiří; Kolařík, Jan; Skallová-Fialová, Anna; Špíšek, Radek; Lischke, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide; therefore, understanding the biological or clinical role of tumor-associated antigens and autoantibodies is of eminent interest for designing antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we prospectively analyzed the serum frequencies of New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 1 (NY-ESO-1), human epidermal growth factor 2/neu, and melanoma-associated antigen A4 (MAGE-A4) antibodies and expression of the corresponding antigens in tumors of 121 patients with NSCLC undergoing an operation without prior neoadjuvant chemotherapy and compared them with those in 57 control age-matched patients with no history of a malignant disease. We found that only antibodies specific for NY-ESO-1 (19.8% [n = 24 of 121]) were significantly increased in the group of patients with NSCLC compared with in the controls. NY-ESO-1 seropositivity was significantly positively associated with an active smoking history in patients with NSCLC but not in smokers from the control group. In tumors, the frequency of NY-ESO-1 mRNA expression was 6.3% (in four of 64 patients), the frequency of human epidermal growth factor 2/neu (HER 2/neu) expression was 11.9% (five of 42), and the frequency of MAGE-A4 expression was 35.1% (20 of 57). MAGE-A4 expression in tumors correlated with smoking status and male sex in patients with NSCLC. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma displayed higher expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-A4 in tumors than did patients with adenocarcinoma. On the other hand, 94.7% of nonsmoking patients in our study had adenocarcinoma (of whom 73.7% were women). These results confirm the reported high immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 and suggest that a smoking-induced chronic inflammatory state might potentiate the development of NY-ESO-1-specific immune responses. Moreover, smoking might contribute to the expression of other cancer/testis antigens such as MAGE-A4 at early stages of NSCLC development. Copyright © 2016

  2. A study at 10 medical centers of the safety and efficacy of 48 flexible sigmoidoscopies and 8 colonoscopies during pregnancy with follow-up of fetal outcome and with comparison to control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappell, M S; Colon, V J; Sidhom, O A

    1996-12-01

    To analyze the risks versus benefits of flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy to the pregnant female and fetus, we conducted a multiyear, retrospective study at 10 hospitals of 46 patients undergoing 48 sigmoidoscopies and 8 patients undergoing 8 colonoscopies during pregnancy. Sigmoidoscopy controls included two study control groups and the average American pregnancy outcomes. Sigmoidoscopy indications included hematochezia in 28, diarrhea in 10, abdominal pain in 4, and other in 3. Thirteen patients were in the first trimester of pregnancy, 18 were in the second trimester, and 15 were in the third trimester. Twenty-seven patients had a lesion diagnosed by sigmoidoscopy, including reactivated or newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease, bleeding internal hemorrhoids, and other colitidies. Twenty-two of 29 patients with rectal bleeding had a significant lesion identified by sigmoidoscopy. Sigmoidoscopy was significantly more frequently diagnostic for hematochezia than for other indications (p born infant Apgar scores were 8.2+/-1.5 (SD) at 1 min and 9.0+/-0.2 at 5 min (control mean Apgar scores: 8.1+/-1.7 at 1 min and 8.8+/-1.0 at 5 min; NS, Student's t test). Three high-risk pregnancies ended with fetal demise at 8, 9, or 12 weeks after sigmoidoscopy, from causes unrelated to sigmoidoscopy. No fetal cardiac abnormalities were detected by fetal cardiac monitoring during two sigmoidoscopies. Eight pregnant females underwent colonoscopy, without complications. Pregnancy outcomes included six healthy babies delivered at full term, one voluntary abortion, and one fetal demise in a high-risk pregnancy 4 months after colonoscopy from causes unrelated to colonoscopy. This study suggests that sigmoidoscopy does not induce labor or result in congenital malformations, that sigmoidoscopy is not contraindicated during pregnancy, and that sigmoidoscopy may be beneficial in pregnant patients with significant lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Colonoscopy during pregnancy should

  3. A comparison of clinical and nonclinical groups of children on the bender - gestalt and draw a person tests

    OpenAIRE

    Özer, Serap

    2010-01-01

    The present study compared a clinical and a control sample of Turkish children on the Bender Gestalt and Draw A Person tests. 44 of the children from a clinic sample were compared to 44 children from a matched nonclinical school sample The tests were scored according to the Koppitz criteria. ANOVA comparisons showed differences on the Bender Gestalt test, and the HFD. The two groups did not differ on the number of Emotional Indicators. Correct classification of the children in the clinical gr...

  4. New Groups Study Science's Effect on Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the chief aims of the Council for Science and Society in London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. Indicates that both groups are planning to function as a multinational interdisciplinary organization. (CC)

  5. Voxel-wise comparisons of the morphology of diffusion tensors across groups of experimental subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H; Plessen, Kerstin J; Xu, Dongrong; Royal, Jason; Peterson, Bradley S

    2007-12-15

    Water molecules in the brain diffuse preferentially along the fiber tracts within white matter that form the anatomical connections across spatially distant brain regions. A diffusion tensor (DT) is a probabilistic ellipsoid composed of three orthogonal vectors, each having a direction and an associated scalar magnitude, that represent the probability of water molecules diffusing in each of those directions. The 3D morphologies of DTs can be compared across groups of subjects to reveal disruptions in structural organization and neuroanatomical connectivity of the brains of persons with various neuropsychiatric illnesses. Comparisons of tensor morphology across groups have typically been performed on scalar measures of diffusivity, such as Fractional Anisotropy (FA) rather than directly on the complex 3D morphologies of DTs. Scalar measures, however, are related in nonlinear ways to the eigenvalues and eigenvectors that create the 3D morphologies of DTs. We present a mathematical framework that permits the direct comparison across groups of mean eigenvalues and eigenvectors of individual DTs. We show that group-mean eigenvalues and eigenvectors are multivariate Gaussian distributed, and we use the Delta method to compute their approximate covariance matrices. Our results show that the theoretically computed mean tensor (MT) eigenvectors and eigenvalues match well with their respective true values. Furthermore, a comparison of synthetically generated groups of DTs highlights the limitations of using FA to detect group differences. Finally, analyses of in vivo DT data using our method reveal significant between-group differences in diffusivity along fiber tracts within white matter, whereas analyses based on FA values failed to detect some of these differences.

  6. Utility of DSM-5 section III personality traits in differentiating borderline personality disorder from comparison groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, B; Sellbom, M; Bo, S; Simonsen, E

    2016-09-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a highly prevalent diagnosis in mental health care and includes a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms. As the field of personality disorder (PD) research moves to emphasize dimensional traits in its operationalization, it is important to determine how the alternative DSM-5 Section III personality trait dimensions differentiates such features in BPD patients versus comparison groups. To date, no study has attempted such validation. The current study examined the utility of the DSM-5 trait dimensions in differentiating patients with the categorical DSM-IV/5 diagnosis of BPD (n=101) from systematically matched samples of other PD patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=101). This was investigated using one-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results indicated that Emotional Lability, Risk Taking, and Suspiciousness uniquely differentiated BPD patients from other PD patients, whereas Emotional Lability, Depressivity, and Suspiciousness uniquely differentiated BPD patients from healthy controls. Emotional Lability is in particular a key BPD feature of the proposed Section III model, whereas Suspiciousness also augments essential BPD features. Provided that these findings are replicated cross-culturally in forthcoming research, a more parsimonious traits operationalization of BPD features is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Report of the Study Group on Assessment and Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Crouch, R; Netter, K; Crouch, Richard; Gaizuaskas, Robert; Netter, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    This is an interim report discussing possible guidelines for the assessment and evaluation of projects developing speech and language systems. It was prepared at the request of the European Commission DG XIII by an ad hoc study group, and is now being made available in the form in which it was submitted to the Commission. However, the report is not an official European Commission document, and does not reflect European Commission policy, official or otherwise. After a discussion of terminology, the report focusses on combining user-centred and technology-centred assessment, and on how meaningful comparisons can be made of a variety of systems performing different tasks for different domains. The report outlines the kind of infra-structure that might be required to support comparative assessment and evaluation of heterogenous projects, and also the results of a questionnaire concerning different approaches to evaluation.

  8. Preparing for Life after High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 2: Comparisons across Disability Groups. Full Report. NCEE 2017-4018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Stephen; Hamison, Joshua; Liu Albert Y.; Burghardt, John; Johnson, David R.; Thurlow, Martha

    2017-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the 12 percent of all youth in American public schools who have disabilities comprise a set of students with distinct capacities and needs. Federal legislation, including the most recent updates to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2004, identifies different disability groups and mandates that…

  9. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Závada, Jakub; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), a study group of investigators representing European biologic DMARD (bDMARD) registers was convened. The purpose of this initial assessment was to collect and compare a cross section of patient characteristics...

  10. Social comparison-based thoughts in groups : Their associations with interpersonal trust and learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, Eric; Nauta, Aukje; Buunk, Bram P.

    This study relates thoughts derived from 4 types of social comparison to trust and individual learning. Our study (N = 362 students) showed that upward identification (i.e., believing one is just as good as a better performing teammate) was positively related to trust and individual learning. Upward

  11. Eating attitudes and weight concern among Chinese middle-age women: A comparison between different age and BMI groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoli Tao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Few studies have been conducted to explore eating behavior and weight concern among middle-aged women. Methods: Participants were a sample of 236 Chinese women aged 30-52. Outcome measures were various symptoms related to eating disorders, the weight concern and psychological characteristics subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 questionnaire (EDI-2. Independent variables were age, education level and BMI. ANOVA-Test and Linear Regression were performed. Results: A group of women (N = 132, 78% with normal weight (19 < BMI < 24 showed dissatisfaction with their weight and wanted to reduce it. Overweight and obese women scored significantly higher on the subscale Body Dissatisfaction on the EDI-2 than women with lower BMI. In comparison to the older group (50-59, the younger group (30-39 and middle-aged group (40-49 expressed the desire to lose weight with a lower BMI. Conclusions: In comparison to age, the BMI had a stronger impact on the psychological and behavioral traits related to the eating disorders among a group of middle-aged Chinese women.

  12. Performance Comparison of Gender and Age Group Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Won Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on performance comparison of gender and age group recognition to perform robot’s application services for Human-Robot Interaction (HRI. HRI is a core technology that can naturally interact between human and robot. Among various HRI components, we concentrate audio-based techniques such as gender and age group recognition from multichannel microphones and sound board equipped withrobots. For comparative purposes, we perform the performancecomparison of Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC andLinear Prediction Coding Coefficients (LPCC in the feature extraction step, Support Vector Machine (SVM and C4.5 Decision Tree (DT in the classification step. Finally, we deal with the usefulness of gender and age group recognition for humanrobot interaction in home service robot environments.

  13. Comparison of results derived from follow-up examination of respiratory systems in chosen groups of metallurgists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarzyk, E; Gałuszka, Z; Pach, J; Szczeklik, J; Targosz, D

    1992-01-01

    In a 16.5-year follow-up study of the steel industry we investigated the relation of chronic occupational exposure to the changes of ventilatory efficiency and to the frequency of chronic bronchitis (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease--COPD) in a group of 65 men working in the harmful environment of a Coking Plant (CP). The reference group comprised 34 employees of Cold Rolling Mill (CRM) working in favorable hygienic conditions. The faster decline of VC and FEV1 were noted in the group of CP in comparison to the control group. Also the frequency of pathologic values of RT was significantly higher (p < or = 0.001) in the exposed group. The incidence of COPD increased more in the group of CP than in the group of rollers. No differences in the annual decline of FEV1 and VC between smokers and nonsmokers from CP were noted, while in the group of men working in favorable environmental conditions the differences between smoking categories were significant. It suggests that the impact of occupational exposure is so powerful that it can mask the unfavorable influence of cigarette smoking on the ventilatory function of men working in a Coking Plant.

  14. Group-as-a-whole as a context for studying individual behaviour: A group diagnostic intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk J. Geldenhuys

    2012-01-01

    Orientation: Traditionalists view group interventions from three perspectives: singletons, dyads and whole groups. The focus of this research was on interventions from the third perspective, that of the whole group, using a systems psychodynamic stance. Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to use group-as-a-whole to study individual behaviour in organisations.Motivation for the study: Team research and practice is not on a par with the complexities that teams actually experience....

  15. ORAM and shutdown PRA comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, W.G.; Hilsmeier, Todd; Carrier, Tom [PSE and G, Salem, NJ (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A comparison study between results obtained from an Outage Risk Assessment and Management (ORAM) model and a shutdown Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) model was conducted. The purpose of the study was to provide useful risk information for better outage planning by focusing resources and contingency plans on risk significant configurations. The comparison study used selected configurations from the 8th refueling outage of the Hope Creek Generation Station (HCGS), a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A total of Eleven configurations were compared. Three configurations were selected to evaluate the impact of the Service Water System during the early stage of a refueling outage. (There are existing studies suggesting that the designed redundancy of Service Water Systems is needed during the early stage of a shutdown.) Four configurations were selected because they were deemed risk significant by the ORAM analysis. (For configurations deemed risk significant by ORAM results, compensatory actions have been taken and contingency plans have been developed to mitigate potential deviations from the configuration. The shutdown PRA was used to evaluate the necessity and effectiveness of these contingency plans and compensatory actions.) To increase the comparison population, an additional four configurations were randomly selected. Thus, a total of 15 configurations were evaluated by the shutdown PRA, and a total of 11 configurations were studied by the ORAM. (author)

  16. The Attunement Principles: A Comparison of Nurture Group and Mainstream Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Daniela; MacKay, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Two key areas identified for research are differences in practice between nurture groups and mainstream classrooms, and nurturing approaches in rural and low-density populations. This study compared classroom practice in a nurture group serving a wide rural area with the four mainstream classes to which the five children in the group belonged. The…

  17. Decision Development in Small Groups I: A Comparison of Two Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marshall Scott

    1981-01-01

    Studies the sequence of phases in group decision making. Compares the unitary sequence model, which assumes that all groups follow the same sequence of phases, and the multiple sequence model, which assumes that different groups follow different sequences. Results support the latter model and suggest revisions in current decision development. (PD)

  18. Resource Allocation in Divisionalized Groups : A Study of Investment Manuals and Corporate Means of Control

    OpenAIRE

    Segelod, Esbjörn

    1995-01-01

    How do corporate management in divisionalized groups control the direction of investments? There are many case-studies and postal surveys of capital budgeting procedures. This study represents a different approach, being founded on analyses of investment manuals and interviews with corporate managers of Swedish-based groups. Comparisons are made with UK and US studies throughout the book. The book shows how investment requests are handled and the means of control which corporate managers deem...

  19. The Women in the Army Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences has been tasked to validate maximum female content levels recommended by Training and...an overview, several conclusions can be made. First, a considerable void remains with regard to establishing a sound data base to support the decision...This point is supported throughout the study. It is clear that the original intent of Congress and, by extension, the intent of the American people

  20. Comparison of Group-Buying Online Auction and Posted Pricing Mechanism in an Uncertain Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian; LIU Yunhui; SONG Xiping

    2004-01-01

    Demand uncertainty is a key factor for the seller's decision making, especially in the e-business environment, for the website to sell products through the online auction. In this paper, two kinds of demand uncertainties are considered: the consumer regime uncertainty and the inherent randomness of the market environment. Then, how to use a novel business model and group-buying auction (GBA) is analyzed in such a market environment. Based on the comparison of the GBA and the posted price mechanism, some conditions that favor the GBA are provided.

  1. Multiple comparisons in drug efficacy studies: scientific or marketing principles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    When researchers design an experiment to compare a given medication to another medication, a behavioral therapy, or a placebo, the experiment often involves numerous comparisons. For instance, there may be several different evaluation methods, raters, and time points. Although scientifically justified, such comparisons can be abused in the interests of drug marketing. This article provides two recent examples of such questionable practices. The first involves the case of the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex), where the study lasted 12 months but the authors only presented 6 months of data. The second case involves the NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study (MTA) study evaluating the efficacy of stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder where ratings made by several groups are reported in contradictory fashion. The MTA authors have not clarified the confusion, at least in print, suggesting that the actual findings of the study may have played little role in the authors' reported conclusions.

  2. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warpinski, N.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abou-Sayed, I.S. [Mobil Exploration and Production Services (United States); Moschovidis, Z. [Amoco Production Co. (US); Parker, C. [CONOCO (US)

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  3. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  4. Statistical power in parallel group point exposure studies with time-to-event outcomes: an empirical comparison of the performance of randomized controlled trials and the inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Peter C; Schuster, Tibor; Platt, Robert W

    2015-10-15

    Estimating statistical power is an important component of the design of both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies. Methods for estimating statistical power in RCTs have been well described and can be implemented simply. In observational studies, statistical methods must be used to remove the effects of confounding that can occur due to non-random treatment assignment. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using the propensity score is an attractive method for estimating the effects of treatment using observational data. However, sample size and power calculations have not been adequately described for these methods. We used an extensive series of Monte Carlo simulations to compare the statistical power of an IPTW analysis of an observational study with time-to-event outcomes with that of an analysis of a similarly-structured RCT. We examined the impact of four factors on the statistical power function: number of observed events, prevalence of treatment, the marginal hazard ratio, and the strength of the treatment-selection process. We found that, on average, an IPTW analysis had lower statistical power compared to an analysis of a similarly-structured RCT. The difference in statistical power increased as the magnitude of the treatment-selection model increased. The statistical power of an IPTW analysis tended to be lower than the statistical power of a similarly-structured RCT.

  5. CDI Scores in Pediatric Psychiatric Inpatients: A Brief Retrospective Static Group Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Friedberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Children's Depression Inventory is a widely researched and clinically useful measurement tool. However, research on the CDI is limited by an overreliance on outpatient samples. This is unfortunate because the CDI holds potential for use in inpatient settings. Method. This retrospective static group comparison examined the CDI total scores contained in 69 pediatric psychiatric inpatients treated at a large academic medical center. Patients were sorted into static groups (depressive spectrum, nondepressive spectrum based on their diagnoses at admission. Results. Independent t-tests revealed that the CDI total scores discriminated between patients presenting with depressive spectrum disorders and youngsters admitted with non-depressive disorders. Conclusion. The results suggested that the CDI is a rather dimensional measure, which reflects broad negative affectivity as well as particular depressive symptoms in pediatric psychiatric inpatients.

  6. The effective comparison between emotion-focused cognitive behavioral group therapy and cognitive behavioral group therapy in children with separation anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Afrooz; Neshat-Doost, Hamid Taher; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Ahmady, Mozhgan Kar; Amiri, Shole

    2014-03-01

    Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT) is a new form of CBT with emotion regulation components. This form of treatment is suggested to be employed to improve dysregulation of anxiety and other kind of emotions in anxious children. This study observed and compared the effectiveness of CBT and ECBT on anxiety symptoms; sadness and anger management; and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD). This study is a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 30 children from 9 to 13-years-old (15 girls and 15 boys) with diagnosis of SAD, being randomly assigned to CBT, ECBT, and control groups (five girls and five boys in each group). Subject children in CBT group participated in 10-h weekly sessions within Coping Cat manual; whereas, subject children in ECBT group contributed in 12-h weekly sessions within ECBT. The control group received no treatment. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED; child and parent forms), Children's Emotion Management Scale (CEMS; anger and sadness forms), and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) tests administered to all subjects in pretest, posttest, and the follow-up measurement (3 months later). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) repeated measure and Kruskal-Wallis were applied to analyze data by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software package (v. 20). CBT and ECBT; demonstrated no significant difference in reducing separation anxiety and total anxiety symptoms from parent and children's reports. ECBT effectively increased anger coping and decreased negative cognitive strategies and dysregulation of anger in children, both in posttest and follow-up. Also, ECBT reduced sadness dysregulation and increased sadness coping, though these significant advantages were lost in 3 months later follow-up. CBT reduced negative cognitive strategies in follow-up and increased sadness coping in posttest. None of treatments affected on anger and

  7. Group-analytic training groups for psychology students: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, Vibeke Torpe; Poulsen, Stig

    2004-01-01

    This article presents results from an interview study of psychology students' experiences from group-analytic groups conducted at the University of Copenhagen. The primary foci are the significance of differences in themotivation participants'  personal aims of individual participantsfor...... participation in the group, the impact of the composition of participants on the group process, and the professional learning through the group experience. In general the interviews show a marked satisfaction with the group participation. In particular, learning about the importance of group boundaries...... and about being in the dual position of both helper and client is seen as important. However the fact that all group members are fellow students is challenging to the participants....

  8. GroupFinder: A Hyper-Local Group Study Coordination System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Ryan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GroupFinder is a system designed to help users working in groups let each other know where they are, what they are working on, and when they started. Students can use the GroupFinder system to arrange meetings within the library. GroupFinder also works with the phpScheduleIt room reservation system used to reserve group study rooms at the D.H. Hill Library at NCSU. Information from GroupFinder is presented on the GroupFinder web site, the mobile web site and on electronic bulletin boards within the library. How GroupFinder was developed from the initial concept through the implementation is covered in the article.

  9. A comparison of the content of memory rehabilitation groups for patients with neurological disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Marie Claire; das Nair, Roshan; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the fidelity of manualised group memory rehabilitation programmes for participants with neurological disabilities. A sample of 11 neurological patients with memory problems, enrolled in a randomised controlled trial comparing compensation, restitution and self-help treatments, were observed during group sessions. Time-sampling was used to record the activity of the participants and the content of the discussion at one minute intervals. There was a significant difference between groups in the amount of time the group leader and participants spent talking (p memory rehabilitation discussion than participants in the self-help group (p memory aids in the compensation and restitution groups (p rehabilitation groups.

  10. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  11. Ethnic helping and group identity : A study among majority group children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, Jellie; Thijs, Jochem; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Two vignette studies were conducted on children's evaluations of ethnic helping. In the first study, 272 native Dutch children (mean age = 10.7) evaluated a child who refused to help in an intra-group context (Dutch-Dutch or Turkish-Turkish) or inter-group context (Dutch-Turkish or Turkish-Dutch). C

  12. Ethnic Helping and Group Identity: A Study among Majority Group Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, J.; Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Two vignette studies were conducted on children's evaluations of ethnic helping. In the first study, 272 native Dutch children (mean age = 10.7) evaluated a child who refused to help in an intra-group context (Dutch-Dutch or Turkish-Turkish) or inter-group context (Dutch-Turkish or Turkish-Dutch). C

  13. Ethnic Helping and Group Identity: A Study among Majority Group Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, J.; Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Two vignette studies were conducted on children's evaluations of ethnic helping. In the first study, 272 native Dutch children (mean age = 10.7) evaluated a child who refused to help in an intra-group context (Dutch-Dutch or Turkish-Turkish) or inter-group context (Dutch-Turkish or Turkish-Dutch). C

  14. Carnot群上凸函数的比较原理%Comparison Principles for Convex Functions on the Carnot Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李虎俊; 王彦林; 徐飞

    2011-01-01

    The monotonicity properties of convex functions on the Carnot group are important in studying the regularity of fully nonlinear subelliptic equations. Firstly, the (H)r-convex function class was introduced on the Carnot group. Then, the comparison principle of the (H). Convex functions was established by constructing auxiliary functions and using divergence theorem based on the group structure. Moreover,as an application of the result, the comparison principle of the convex functions on the higher - dimension Heisenberg group was obtained. These results are expected to provide some theoretical basis for the further study of the properties of convex functions and of the regularity of fully nonlinear equations on the Carnot group.%Carnot群上凸函数的单调性质对研究完全非线性次椭圆方程的正则性理论起关键作用.通过在Carnot群上引入(H)r-凸函数类,利用辅助函数方法并结合基于群结构的散度定理,建立了关于(H)2-凸函数的比较原理.此外,作为该结论的应用,得到了高维Heisenberg群上关于凸函数的比较原理.这些结果有望为进一步研究Carnot群上凸函数的性质和完全非线性方程的正则性提供理论基础.

  15. Sample-size calculations for multi-group comparison in population pharmacokinetic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for calculating sample size for population pharmacokinetic experiments that involve hypothesis testing based on multi-group comparison detecting the difference in parameters between groups under mixed-effects modelling. This approach extends what has been described for generalized linear models and nonlinear population pharmacokinetic models that involve only binary covariates to more complex nonlinear population pharmacokinetic models. The structural nonlinear model is linearized around the random effects to obtain the marginal model and the hypothesis testing involving model parameters is based on Wald's test. This approach provides an efficient and fast method for calculating sample size for hypothesis testing in population pharmacokinetic models. The approach can also handle different design problems such as unequal allocation of subjects to groups and unbalanced sampling times between and within groups. The results obtained following application to a one compartment intravenous bolus dose model that involved three different hypotheses under different scenarios showed good agreement between the power obtained from NONMEM simulations and nominal power.

  16. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  17. Individualisation of Migration from the East? Comparison of Different Socio-Demographic Groups and their Migration Intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarja Saar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on Eastern European migration argue that moving for self-development reasons is becoming increasingly common among this group. Furthermore, it is suggested that migration from the East is becoming individualised and less dependent on social surroundings. Nevertheless, most such results rely on interviews conducted among certain social groups, such as the young and highly skilled. Hence, the comparison between different social groups and their motivations is rarely provided and, therefore, the claims about increased individualisation might be premature. This article uses the Estonian Household Module Survey, including responses from 620 Estonians intending to migrate, to evaluate if migration flows are indeed becoming more individualised and less dependent on social surroundings. Using cluster analysis, three different groups — self-development, economic and life quality migrants — are formed, which are then tested using regression analysis to check for the influence of socio-demographic variables. The article concludes that socio-demographic variables such as gender, age, ethnicity, family status and socio-economic status are still relevant for migration intentions. Indeed, a new group of Eastern European migrants, mainly oriented towards self-development, is emerging; however, it is small and consists mostly of young, Estonian-speaking females. The results complicate the notions of free mobility and liquid migration from Eastern Europe and illustrate that there is a need to pay attention to the increasing group differences in these societies

  18. Study on dermatoses and their prevalence in groups of confirmed alcoholic individuals in comparison to a non-alcoholic group of individuals Estudo das dermatoses e sua prevalencia em individuos comprovadamente alcoolistas comparativamente a um grupo de individuos não alcoolistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Teixeira de Carvalho Bruno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The direct relationship between alcoholism and dermatoses has been evaluated in recent researches. However, there are few objective surveys that demonstrate and prove a direct relationship between alcohol and a specific dermatosis. OBJECTIVES: to verify the prevalence of dermatoses in alcoholics, analize the dermatological changes found in these patients and their evolution during alcoholic abstinence. Also, to compare the results obtained with a non-alcoholic control group and with the data found in medical literature. METHODS: the dermatologic conditions of 278 alcoholic patients (250 men, 28 women were studied over a period of 4 years, and compared to those of a control group of 271 non-alcoholic individuals (249 men, 22 women, members of the Military Police Force. The individuals in both groups were between 20 and 60 years old. RESULTS: Pellagra, nummular eczema, purpura pigmentosa chronica (also known as pigmented purpuric dermatosis and psoriasis were more frequent in the group of alcoholics and, apparently, occurred in parallel with alcoholism that seems to play a role in the evolution of these dermatoses. The dermatopathies were more frequent before the age of forty, regardless of factors such as profession, race or gender. CONCLUSION: the association of dermatoses and alcoholism was extremely significant according to the statistical data. Alcoholism can be considered a risk factor for pellagra, psoriasis, nummular eczema and purpura pigmentosa chronica dermatoses, which can, as well, be considered alcoholism indicators. FUNDAMENTOS: A relação direta entre o alcoolismo e as dermatoses vem sendo avaliada em recentes pesquisas. No entanto são poucos os estudos objetivos que demonstram e comprovam uma relação direta entre o álcool e uma determinada dermatose. OBJETIVOS: Verificar a prevalência de dermatoses em alcoolistas, avaliar as alterações dermatológicas encontradas nesses doentes e sua evolução frente abstin

  19. The impact of attitude functions on luxury brand consumption: An age-based group comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, Michael; Hegner, Sabrina; Horstmann, Florian; Brinkmann, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to understand the consumption of luxury brands in different age groups. Attitude functions (social-adjustive, value-expressive, hedonic, utilitarian) explain luxury brand consumption among three age groups. A total of 297 respondents between the age of 16 and 59 par

  20. Latino College Students at Highly Selective Institutions: A Comparison of Their College Experiences and Outcomes to Other Racial/Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.; Rennick, Liz A.; Franco, Marla A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines unique patterns of college engagement and outcomes among Latino undergraduate students attending highly selective institutions in comparison with those from other racial/ethnic groups. The study also identifies predictors of select college outcomes--that is, cognitive, affective, and civic outcomes--for this population.…

  1. Comparison of familial and psychological factors in groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çengel-Kültür, S Ebru; Akdemir, Devrim; Saltık-Temizel, İnci N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the differences between groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation. The Symptom Checklist- 90-Revised, the COPE Questionnaire, the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the McMaster Family Assessment Device and the Parenting Style Scale were used to evaluate, respectively, maternal psychiatric symptoms, coping abilities, attachment style, family functioning and children's perceptions of parenting behaviors. Psychiatric diagnoses were evaluated using the K-SADS. A higher level of maternal psychiatric symptoms, impaired role and affective involvement functioning of the family and less psychological autonomy were observed in the group of encopresis patients with constipation than in the group of encopresis patients without constipation. No significant differences were found between the groups in psychiatric comorbidities, maternal coping abilities and attachment style. The two groups had a similar pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders and maternal psychological factors, although some familial factors-related mainly to parental authority-were differentiated in the encopresis with constipation group.

  2. Group-as-a-whole as a context for studying individual behaviour: A group diagnostic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Geldenhuys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Traditionalists view group interventions from three perspectives: singletons, dyads and whole groups. The focus of this research was on interventions from the third perspective, that of the whole group, using a systems psychodynamic stance. Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to use group-as-a-whole to study individual behaviour in organisations.Motivation for the study: Team research and practice is not on a par with the complexities that teams actually experience. Traditional group interventions use humanistic and functionalistic paradigms that do not consider the unconscious functioning of groups. Interventions that use the system psychodynamic paradigm could address these dynamics because they study behaviour of individual group members in the context of the group-as-a-whole. Research design, approach and method: The researcher conducted action research in a publishing company. He used purposive sampling and analysed the data using qualitative content analysis.Main findings: The researcher found that the group-as-a-whole partly explains the behaviour of team members and that intervening from this perspective could improve negative relationships.Practical/managerial implications: Managers can use interventions that use the groupas- a-whole concept as a diagnostic intervention to study and possibly change the complex behavioural issues that team members experience.Contribution/value-add: The findings give one an understanding of the behaviour of individual group members when one views it from a systems psychodynamic stance. Furthermore, the researcher proposes a group diagnostic intervention that will allow some of the root causes of poor interpersonal behaviour to surface and group members to diagnose and take ownership of their own behaviour.

  3. Study Abroad: The Reality of Building Dynamic Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransbury, Molly K.; Harris, Sandra A.

    1994-01-01

    The collaborative effort of a professor of human development with expertise in group process and a general education professor with expertise in Greek mythology and culture uses a case study format to apply theoretical models of group dynamics to the travel and learning experience of study abroad. Implications for course design and group process…

  4. Professional Development within Collaborative Teacher Study Groups: Pitfalls and Promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Teacher study groups are often thought to be effective professional development structures. Such teacher communities may foster teacher learning through a collaborative culture and the codification of group members' collective knowledge. However, not all study groups are effective professional development. This article is a discussion of factors…

  5. Prevalence of flatfoot and anthropometric comparison between flat and normal feet in the Hausa ethnic group of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Musa B T; Tafida, Rabiu U

    2013-01-01

    Flat arches in children usually become proper arches and high arches as the child progresses through adolescence and into adulthood. Only if the deformity persists or presents in adolescence or adulthood is it considered abnormal. We sought to determine the incidence of flatfoot in schoolchildren and to make an anthropometric comparison between flat and normal feet with respect to age and sex in the Hausa ethnic group of Nigeria. Two hundred 9- to 14-year-old students (100 boys and 100 girls) were studied. Navicular height, medial malleolar height, lateral malleolar height, foot length, and transverse arch length were measured with a ruler, marker, and measuring tape. Statistical analysis was conducted using analysis of variance and independent-samples t tests (P ethnic group, with the incidence decreasing with age. Girls had a higher incidence of flatfoot than boys, and it was also influenced by age.

  6. COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN UNION QUALITY LABELS UTILIZATION IN VISEGRAD GROUP COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rka Velcovsk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on European Union quality system known as Protected Designation of Origin, Protected Geographical Indication and Tradional Speciality Guaranteed used in agricultural and food products sector. The aim of the paper is to analyse and compare the utilization of these labels by Visegrad group countries. Firstly, the literature review dealing with the topical area is given. Further, the European Union quality scheme is specified and the comparison of Visegrad group countries according to selected criteria is provided. Empirical part of the paper involves marketing research results analysis and discussion. Data comes from the Database of Origin and Registration. The sample consists of all 93 product names registered as Protected Designation of Origin, Protected Geographical Indication and Traditional Speciality Guaranteed in the database by Visegrad group countries to the 30th April 2013. The frequency of using the labels is analysed according to type of label, country of origin and product class. Pearsons chi-square test of independence and Pearson's and Cramer's contingency coefficients were used in order to confirm if significant differences do exist between variables.

  7. Comparison between alkalimetal and group 11 transition metal halide and hydride tetramers: molecular structure and bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamdi, Majid; Solà, Miquel; Frenking, Gernot; Poater, Jordi

    2013-08-22

    A comparison between alkalimetal (M = Li, Na, K, and Rb) and group 11 transition metal (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) (MX)4 tetramers with X = H, F, Cl, Br, and I has been carried out by means of the Amsterdam Density Functional software using density functional theory at the BP86/QZ4P level of theory and including relativistic effects through the ZORA approximation. We have obtained that, in the case of alkalimetals, the cubic isomer of Td geometry is more stable than the ring structure with D4h symmetry, whereas in the case of group 11 transition metal tetramers, the isomer with D4h symmetry (or D2d symmetry) is more stable than the Td form. To better understand the results obtained we have made energy decomposition analyses of the tetramerization energies. The results show that in alkalimetal halide and hydride tetramers, the cubic geometry is the most stable because the larger Pauli repulsion energies are compensated by the attractive electrostatic and orbital interaction terms. In the case of group 11 transition metal tetramers, the D4h/D2d geometry is more stable than the Td one due to the reduction of electrostatic stabilization and the dominant effect of the Pauli repulsion.

  8. Comparison of Gen-Probe Group A streptococcus Direct Test with culture for diagnosing streptococcal pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, S J; Vetter, E A; Wollan, P C; Cockerill, F R

    1994-01-01

    The Group A Streptococcus Direct Test (GP-ST test; Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) was compared with culture for the detection of Streptococcus pyogenes from throat swabs of 767 patients with pharyngitis. Swabs were tested by the GP-ST test after inoculating a 5% sheep blood agar (SBA) plate. SBA plates were incubated at 35 degrees C in room air for 72 h. SBA plates with no evidence of beta-hemolytic colonies after 18 to 24 h of incubation were subcultured by taking a swipe across the primary inoculum from the SBA plate to an agar selective for Streptococcus spp. In a low-prevalence (11.9%) population and in comparison with the number of positive cultures detected by the 72-h single-culture method (SBA plate method), the GP-ST test had a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.8%, a positive predictive value of 83.9%, and a negative predictive value of 98.5%. In comparison with the growth of any colonies of S. pyogenes on the 72-h SBA plates plus a subculture onto selective blood agar, the sensitivities and specificities were as follows: 72-h SBA plate method, 96.7 and 100%, respectively; GP-ST test, 85.7 and 97.8%, respectively. The GP-ST test is an easy-to-perform, reliable test for batch screening of throat swabs for S. pyogenes. PMID:8077386

  9. Piezoelectricity in quasicrystals: A group-theoretical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Rama Rao; P Hemagiri Rao; B S K Chaitanya

    2007-03-01

    Group-theoretical methods have been accepted as exact and reliable tools in studying the physical properties of crystals and quasicrystalline materials. By group representation theory, the maximum number of non-vanishing and independent second- order piezoelectric coefficients required by the seven pentagonal and two icosahedral point groups - that describe the quasicrystal symmetry groups in two and three dimensions - is determined. The schemes of non-vanishing and independent second-order piezoelectric tensor components needed by the nine point groups with five-fold rotations are identified and tabulated employing a compact notation. The results of this group-theoretical study are briefly discussed.

  10. Reactions to group devaluation and social inequality: A comparison of social identity and system justification predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuma Kevin Owuamalam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available System justification theory (SJT proposes that support for social inequality should be stronger among members of devalued groups than among members of higher status groups; that embracing the system in this way soothes anger and leads to a withdrawal of support for social change; and that these effects should occur when group interest is weak. We compared these SJT predictions with identity management and hope for group advancement accounts that we deduced from social identity theory (SIT and that suggest that both system justification and support for social change will be significant when group interest is strong. Consistent with the SIT-based accounts, Study 1 (N = 116, Malaysia, Mage =19.09 years showed that strong identifiers were more concerned about their ingroup’s reputation than weak identifiers, and that this concern increased system justification but only before an outgroup audience to whom a need to present one’s group in good light is normally strong. Study 2 (N = 375, Australia, Mage = 23.59 years conceptually replicated Study 1’s results and further revealed that strong identifiers justified the system due to the hope that their ingroup status would improve in the future. Finally, Study 3 (N = 132, Germany, Mage = 20.34 years revealed that system justification soothed anger and reduced support for social protest but only when group interest was strong (not weak. We did not find evidence in support of SJT predictions.

  11. Comparison of Value System among a Group of Military Prisoners with Controls in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmood Mirzamani Ph.D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Religious values were investigated in a group of Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Tehran .Methods: The sample consisted of official duty troops and conscripts who were in prison due to a crime. One hundred thirty seven individuals cooperated with us in the project (37 Official personnel and 100 conscripts. The instruments used included a demographic questionnaire containing personal data and the Allport, Vernon and Lindzey's Study of Values Test. Most statistical methods used descriptive statistical methods such as frequency, mean, tables and t-test.Results: The results showed that religious value was lower in the criminal group than the control group (p<.001. Discussion: This study showed lower religious value scores in the criminals group, suggesting the possibility that lower religious value increases the probability of committing crimes .

  12. Improving Group Processes in Transdisciplinary Case Studies for Sustainability Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Ralf; Crott, Helmut W.; Mieg, Harald A.; Scholz, Roland W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Deficient group processes such as conformity pressure can lead to inadequate group decisions with negative social, economic, or environmental consequences. The study aims to investigate how a group technique (called INFO) improves students' handling of conformity pressure and their collective judgments in the context of a…

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Principles within Group Mentoring: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jent, Jason F.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group…

  14. Academic and Personal Development through Group Work: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study linked academic and personal development within a group counseling intervention. A pre-test post-test research design compared social skills, learning behaviors, and achievement with a convenience sample and control group of students from three elementary schools. For the treatment group, grade point average in Language Arts…

  15. Periodontal manifestation comparison in a group of chimu consumers and smokers in Villavicencio, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Forero, Diana; Espinosa, Edgar; Pinzón Castro, Luis Alexys

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: the active ingredient of chewing tobacco, known as chimú in Colombia, is nicotine, a liquid, oily and colorless alkaloid that goes through the oral mucosa, which is a triggering factor and further problem in periodontal diseases. The objective of this analysis was to determine the difference in patients consuming chewing tobacco (chimu), compared to a group of cigarette smokers and a group of non-smokers. Methods: a case and cross-sectional study, with a sample, for convenience ...

  16. Group Behavior and Development: A Comparison of Farmers' Organisations in South Korea and Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Burmeister, Larry; Ranis, Gustav; Wang, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of farmers' organisations in Korea and Taiwan during 1950-80 in order to help us understand the role of group behavior in affecting development outcomes. It highlights the linkages between group behavior, parastatal organisational structures and economic performance. The paper examines the historical and political economy contexts that led to the creation of both countries' farmers' organisations and highlights the institutional characteristics that ...

  17. Deriving statistical significance maps for SVM based image classification and group comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Population based pattern analysis and classification for quantifying structural and functional differences between diverse groups has been shown to be a powerful tool for the study of a number of diseases, and is quite commonly used especially in neuroimaging. The alternative to these pattern analysis methods, namely mass univariate methods such as voxel based analysis and all related methods, cannot detect multivariate patterns associated with group differences, and are not particularly suit...

  18. A comparison of the EQ-5D and SF-6D across seven patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, John; Roberts, Jennifer; Tsuchiya, Aki; Busschbach, Jan

    2004-09-01

    As the number of preference-based instruments grows, it becomes increasingly important to compare different preference-based measures of health in order to inform an important debate on the choice of instrument. This paper presents a comparison of two of them, the EQ-5D and the SF-6D (recently developed from the SF-36) across seven patient/population groups (chronic obstructive airways disease, osteoarthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, lower back pain, leg ulcers, post menopausal women and elderly). The mean SF-6D index value was found to exceed the EQ-5D by 0.045 and the intraclass correlation coefficient between them was 0.51. Whilst this convergence lends some support for the validity of these measures, the modest difference at the aggregate level masks more significant differences in agreement across the patient groups and over severity of illness, with the SF-6D having a smaller range and lower variance in values. There is evidence for floor effects in the SF-6D and ceiling effects in the EQ-5D. These discrepancies arise from differences in their health state classifications and the methods used to value them. Further research is required to fully understand the respective roles of the descriptive systems and the valuation methods and to examine the implications for estimates of the impact of health care interventions.

  19. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy: preliminary psychometrics and group comparisons in Italian physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lillo, Mariangela; Cicchetti, Americo; Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Taroni, Francesco; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2009-09-01

    To examine the psychometrics of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) among a sample of Italian physicians. The JSPE was translated into Italian using back-translation procedures to ensure the accuracy of the translation. The translated JSPE was administered to 778 physicians at three hospitals in Rome, Italy in 2002. Individual empathy scores were calculated, as well as descriptive statistics at the item and scale level. Group comparisons of empathy scores were also made among men and women, physicians practicing in medical or surgical specialties, physicians working in different hospitals, and at physicians at various levels of career rank. Results are reported for 289 participants who completed the JSPE. Item-total score correlations were all positive and statistically significant. The prominent component of "perspective taking," which is the most important underlying construct of the scale, emerged in the factor analysis of the JSPE and was similar in both Italian and American samples. However, more factors appeared among Italian physicians, indicating that the underlying construct of empathy may be more complex among Italians. Cronbach coefficient alpha was .85. None of the group differences observed among physicians classified by gender, hospital of practice, specialty, or level of career rank reached statistical significance. Findings generally provide support for the construct validity and reliability of the Italian version of the JSPE. Further research is needed to determine whether the lack of statistically significant differences in empathy by gender and specialty is related to cultural peculiarities, the translation of the scale, or sampling.

  20. Which Setting to Choose: Comparison of Whole-Class vs. Small-Group Computer Simulation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara K.; Bell, Randy L.

    2014-01-01

    Studies considering whole-class use of computer simulations are limited, despite the increasing interest in this mode of use. The current study explored how a collection of computer simulations was integrated into both whole-class and small-group instructional settings during a high school chemistry unit on atomic structure. Participants included…

  1. The effective comparison between emotion-focused cognitive behavioral group therapy and cognitive behavioral group therapy in children with separation anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Afshari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT is a new form of CBT with emotion regulation components. This form of treatment is suggested to be employed to improve dysregulation of anxiety and other kind of emotions in anxious children. This study observed and compared the effectiveness of CBT and ECBT on anxiety symptoms; sadness and anger management; and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 30 children from 9 to 13-years-old (15 girls and 15 boys with diagnosis of SAD, being randomly assigned to CBT, ECBT, and control groups (five girls and five boys in each group. Subject children in CBT group participated in 10-h weekly sessions within Coping Cat manual; whereas, subject children in ECBT group contributed in 12-h weekly sessions within ECBT. The control group received no treatment. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED; child and parent forms, Children′s Emotion Management Scale (CEMS; anger and sadness forms, and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ tests administered to all subjects in pretest, posttest, and the follow-up measurement (3 months later. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA repeated measure and Kruskal-Wallis were applied to analyze data by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software package (v. 20. Results: CBT and ECBT; demonstrated no significant difference in reducing separation anxiety and total anxiety symptoms from parent and children′s reports. ECBT effectively increased anger coping and decreased negative cognitive strategies and dysregulation of anger in children, both in posttest and follow-up. Also, ECBT reduced sadness dysregulation and increased sadness coping, though these significant advantages were lost in 3 months later follow-up. CBT reduced negative cognitive strategies in follow-up and increased sadness coping

  2. Speaking up in groups: a cross-level study of group voice climate and voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Elizabeth Wolfe; Wheeler-Smith, Sara L; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on employee voice—defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or opinions intended to improve organizational or unit functioning—the effects of shared or collective-level cognitions have received scant attention. There has also been relatively little research on voice within work groups. Our goal in this study was to address these important gaps by focusing on the effects of group-level beliefs about voice (i.e., group voice climate) on individual voice behavior within work groups. We conducted a cross-level investigation of voice behavior within 42 groups of engineers from a large chemical company. Consistent with our hypotheses, group voice climate was highly predictive of voice and explained variance beyond the effects of individual-level identification and satisfaction, and procedural justice climate. Also consistent with predictions, the effect of identification on voice was stronger in groups with favorable voice climates. These findings provide evidence that voice is shaped not just by individual attitudes and perceptions of the work context, as past research has shown, but also by group-level beliefs. The results also highlight the importance of broadening our conceptual models of voice to include shared cognitions and of conducting additional cross-level research on voice.

  3. Comparisons of short-term efficacy between individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy for primary insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadera, Wataru; Sato, Miki; Harada, Daisuke; Iwashita, Masayuki; Aoki, Ryo; Obuchi, Keita; Ozone, Motohiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in outpatients with primary insomnia diagnosed by DSM-IV-TR. The participants were 20 individually treated (I-CBT-I) and 25 treated in a group therapy format (three to five patients per group) (G-CBT-I), which showed no significant difference regarding demographic variables between groups. The same components of CBT-I stimulus control therapy, sleep restriction therapy, cognitive therapy, and sleep hygiene education were applied on both groups. The short-term outcome (4 weeks after treatment) was measured by sleep logs, actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS), and was compared between I-CBT-I and G-CBT-I. The results indicated that CBT-I was effective in improving subjective and objective sleep parameters and subjective sleep evaluations for both individual and group treatment. However, I-CBT-I resulted in significantly better improvements over G-CBT-I, in (i) objective and subjective sleep onset latency time, (ii) objective sleep efficacy and moving time during sleeping, (iii) overall sleep quality and duration of actual sleep time in PSQI, (iv) consequences of insomnia, control and predictability of sleep, sleep requirement expectation, and sleep-promoting practices in DBAS. The present study suggested the superiority of I-CBT-I over G-CBT-I in clinical settings, and further evaluations are necessary. PMID:24098091

  4. Comparisons of short-term efficacy between individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy for primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadera, Wataru; Sato, Miki; Harada, Daisuke; Iwashita, Masayuki; Aoki, Ryo; Obuchi, Keita; Ozone, Motohiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in outpatients with primary insomnia diagnosed by DSM-IV-TR. The participants were 20 individually treated (I-CBT-I) and 25 treated in a group therapy format (three to five patients per group) (G-CBT-I), which showed no significant difference regarding demographic variables between groups. The same components of CBT-I stimulus control therapy, sleep restriction therapy, cognitive therapy, and sleep hygiene education were applied on both groups. The short-term outcome (4 weeks after treatment) was measured by sleep logs, actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS), and was compared between I-CBT-I and G-CBT-I. The results indicated that CBT-I was effective in improving subjective and objective sleep parameters and subjective sleep evaluations for both individual and group treatment. However, I-CBT-I resulted in significantly better improvements over G-CBT-I, in (i) objective and subjective sleep onset latency time, (ii) objective sleep efficacy and moving time during sleeping, (iii) overall sleep quality and duration of actual sleep time in PSQI, (iv) consequences of insomnia, control and predictability of sleep, sleep requirement expectation, and sleep-promoting practices in DBAS. The present study suggested the superiority of I-CBT-I over G-CBT-I in clinical settings, and further evaluations are necessary.

  5. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  6. Comparison of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide Level between Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Control Group

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    Noormohammad Noori

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated cardiomyopathy is revealed with left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the children with dilated cardiomyopathy and control group regarding the level of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP and its relationship with echocardiography findings Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 37 children with dilated cardiomyopathy and free of any clinical symptoms and 37 healthy age- and sex-matched children referring to Ali-e-Asghar and Ali Ebne Abitaleb hospitals in Zahedan, Iran. After taking history, echocardiography was performed for both groups. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software and appropriate statistical tests. Results: The two groups were significantly different regarding most of the echocardiographic parameters (P < 0.05. Also, a significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the mean CGRP levels (P = 0.001. Among echocardiographic parameters, CGRP was directly related to Interventricular Septal dimension in Systole (IVSS (P = 0.022, R = 0.375. However, no significant relationship was observed between CGRP level and Ross classification. Conclusions: The findings of this study showed an increase in CGRP serum levels in the case group. Besides, a direct correlation was observed between CGRP level and IVSS.

  7. Follow Up Study of Group Counseling with Underachieving College Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.

    The purpose of this study was to report long-range effects of group counseling and the college growth experience of students who were identified as underachievers and were enrolled as freshmen during the fall of 1969. Five variables were selected for this study as having possible influence on self-concept: (1) group, (2) education, (3) status, (4)…

  8. Cooperative Study Groups: Give Your Students the Home Team Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In this article I discuss the factors that led me to implement study groups in the teaching of mathematics. An important influence in this decision began with an experimental study conducted with two College Algebra classes in which students were randomly assigned to treatment groups. While there was no statistical difference between the study…

  9. Population data of five genetic markers in the Turkish population: comparison with four American population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuluş-Ulküer, M; Ulküer, U; Kesici, T; Menevşe, S

    2002-09-01

    In this study, the phenotype and allele frequencies of five enzyme systems were determined in a total of 611 unrelated Turkish individuals and analyzed by using the exact and the chi 2 test. The following five red cell enzymes were identified by cellulose acetate electrophoresis: phosphoglucomutase (PGM), adenosine deaminase (ADA), phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), adenylate kinase (AK), and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGD). The ADA, PGM and AK enzymes were found to be polymorphic in the Turkish population. The results of the statistical analysis showed, that the phenotype frequencies of the five enzyme under study are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Statistical analysis was performed in order to examine whether there are significant differences in the phenotype frequencies between the Turkish population and four American population groups. This analysis showed, that there are some statistically significant differences between the Turkish and the other groups. Moreover, the observed phenotype and allele frequencies were compared with those obtained in other population groups of Turkey.

  10. Laser Welding and Syncristallization Techniques Comparison: In Vitro Study

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    C. Fornaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, =1064 nm for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples, chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples, and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12±2.59 for group A and 5.20±1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (=0.0023 at the level 95%. On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50±288.56 N for group A, 896.41±120.84 N for group B, and 283.58±84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (=0.01 at the level 95%. Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving a

  11. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, C; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Nammour, S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  12. 32nd European Study Group with Industry, Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ESGI (European Study Group with Industry) is Europe's leading workshop for interaction between mathematicians and industry. These workshops have taken place in Great Britain for a number of years, going back to 1968 when Prof. Alan Tayler initiated the so-called Oxford Study Group with Industry....... The coordiantion of the study groups is now done by the European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry (ECMI).This is the final report for the first study group in Denmark, (and the first ESGI outside Great Britain). Six Danish companies brought problems to the Study Group, requiring a wide range of mathematical...... a model describing the chlorination of swimming pools.LEGO wanted an algorithm for building an arbitrary model with LEGO bricks in stable manner.SCANtechnology wanted an algorithm to identify features in an image from a 3D laser scanning....

  13. [Comparison between two caller groups of a medical call centre in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann Rau, S; Zwahlen, M

    2008-05-01

    The incidence distribution of triage advice in the medical call centre Medi24 and the pattern of service utilisation were analysed with respect to two groups of callers with different insurance schemes. Individuals having contracted insurance of the Medi24 model could use the telephone consultation service of the medical call centre Medi24 (mainly part of the mandatory basic health insurance) voluntarily and free of charge whereas individuals holding an insurance policy of the Telmed model (special contract within the mandatory basic health insurance with a premium discount ranging from 8% to 12%) were obliged to have a telephone consultation before arranging an appointment with a medical doctor. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the medical call centre Medi24 based on all triage datasets of the Medi24 and Telmed groups collected during the one year period from July 1st 2005 to June 30th 2006. The distribution of the six different urgency levels within the two groups and their respective pattern of service utilisation was determined. In a multivariable logistic regression model the Odds Ratio for every enquiry originating from the Telmed group versus those originating from the Medi24 group was calculated. During a one-year period 48 388 triage requests reached the medical call centre Medi24, 56% derived from the Telmed group and 44% from the Medi24 group. Within the Medi24 group more than 25% of the individuals received self-care advice, within the Telmed group, on the other hand, only about 18% received such advice. In contrast, 27% of the Telmed triage requests but only 18% of the Medi24 triage requests resulted in the advice to make a routine appointment with a medical doctor. The probability that an individual of the Telmed group obtained the advice to go to the accident and emergency department was lower than for an individual of the Medi24 group (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60-0.99). Likewise, the probability of self-care advice was decreased in regard to the

  14. Comparison of Intercanine and Intermolar Width Between Cleft Lip Palate and Normal Class I Occlusion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaj, Aiyesha; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2015-11-01

    To determine the mean difference of arch dimensions (both intercanine and intermolar width) between cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group. Cross-sectional analytic study. Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, [Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS)], Karachi, from March 2012 to April 2013. Group 1 consisted of 32 subjects with complete repaired, non-syndromic unilateral and bilateral cleft lip palate. Group 2 consisted of 32 subjects with normal facial morphology and class I occlusion. Exclusion criteria were cleft lip palate subjects with systemic diseases, any arch expansion procedure, incomplete repaired palate, open fistulas, developmental or acquired craniofacial muscular deformities, autoimmune conditions, syndromes, endocrine abnormalities, neurological problems, or previous history of orthodontic treatment and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, history of trauma, impacted or missing teeth, periodontally involved teeth, subdivision molar classification, skeletal base II and III with molar class I. The transverse width (intercanine and intermolar width) of dental casts was measured with the help of digital caliper. The intercanine width was measured between cusp tips of the canine while the intermolar width distance was measured between mesiobuccal cusp tips of first molars, and buccal grooves of the mandibular first molars in both cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group, respectively. There were 64 subjects with mean 14.7 ±6.8 years in the cleft palate and 14.7 ±6.3 years in the normal group. There was statistically significant differences found between intercanine and intermolar width in maxillary arch (p < 0.001). In mandibular arch, only intercanine width has showed significant difference (p < 0.001) between cleft and normal occlusion class I group. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine width was found to be significantly reduced in cleft lip palate group (both unilateral and bilateral) as

  15. Aggression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and a Clinic-Referred Comparison Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Cristan; Butter, Eric; Mazurek, Micah O.; Cowan, Charles; Lainhart, Janet; Cook, Edwin H.; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Aman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A gap exists in the literature regarding aggression in autism spectrum disorders and how this behavior compares to other groups. In this multisite study, the "Children's Scale for Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive" and the Aggression subscale of the "Child Behavior Checklist" were rated for 414 children with autism…

  16. The Knowledge-Based Reasoning of Physical Education Teachers: A Comparison between Groups with Different Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuker, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    The study addresses professional vision, including the abilities of selective attention and knowledge-based reasoning. This article focuses on the latter ability. Groups with different sport-specific and pedagogical expertise (n = 60) were compared according to their observation and interpretation of sport activities in a four-field design. The…

  17. A Comparison of Support for Two Groups of Young Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenen, Sarah; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Scholte, Evert

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) have varying profiles of cognitive, adaptive and behavioural functioning. There is also variability in their educational and therapeutic needs. This study compares recommended and actual provision of support for two groups of young adults with MBID and looks at young adults'…

  18. Comparison of particulate verification techniques study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy of five particulate verification techniques on four types of materials was studied. Statistical Analysis Software/JMP 6.0 was used to create a statistically valid design of experiments. In doing so, 35 witness coupons consisting of the four types of materials being studied, were intentionally contaminated with particulate fallout. Image Analysis was used to characterize the extent of particulate fallout on the coupons and was used to establish a baseline, or basis of comparison, against the five techniques that were studied. The five particulate verification techniques were the Tapelift, the Particulate Solvent Rinse, the GelPak lift, an in-line vacuum filtration probe, and the Infinity Focusing Microscope (IFM). The four types of materials consisted of magnesium flouride (MgF II) coated mirrors, composite coated silver aluminum (CCAg), Z93 and NS43G coated aluminum, and silicon (si) wafers. The vacuum probe was determined to be most effective for Z93, the tapelift or vacuum probe for MgF2, and the GelPak Lift for CCAg and si substrates. A margin of error for each technique, based on experimental data from two experiments, for si wafer substrates, yielded the following: Tapelift - 67%, Solvent Rinse - 58%, GelPak- 26%, Vacuum Probe - 93%, IFM-to be determined.

  19. Comparison of seropositivity of HCV between oral lichen planus and healthy control group in Hamedan province (west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Mobaien

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lichen planus is an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the skin, nail, hair and mucous membranes. Oral lichen planus (LP is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects the oral mucous membranes with a variety of clinical presentations. Various etiologies include HCV suggested for LP, and the aim of this study was comparison of seropositivity of HCV in LP patients and control group. Methods: All oral LP patients that were referred to dermatology clinic of farshchian hospitalwere entered in the study. Five cc of clot blood was taken from each patient and tested for anti-HCVand when anti-HCV tested positive another 2cc clot bloodwas taken for HCV-Rt-PCR test. The results were analyzed with SPSS 16. Results: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 oral lichen planus patients [males 13(43.3% females 17(56.7%] with mean ages of 46±13.7years and 60 healthy individual [males 26(43.3% females 34(56.7%]. There was no oral lichen planus patients who had anti-HCV positive whiles 2 males(3.3% of healthy group had anti-HCV positive which was confirmed by HCV-Rt-PCR. Conclusions: This study showed that there is no correlation between seropositivity of HCV and oral lichen planus in our patients in the west of Iran.

  20. Men's recognition of violence against women and spousal abuse: comparison of three groups of men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Claire; Fortin, Andrée; Turgeon, Joane; Laporte, Lise

    2007-01-01

    Our goal was to assess whether men in the following three groups differ in their ability to recognize and judge the severity of diverse forms of aggressive behavior: (a) men who reported being physically aggressive toward their spouses and who were entering treatment for domestic violence; (b) men who, after participating in a treatment program, were no longer physically violent; and (c) men who reported never having been physically violent towards their spouses (NPV group-non-physically violent). All 81 men in the study reported being verbally aggressive toward their spouses. Men who had been in treatment for spousal abuse and who had not been physically violent toward their spouses since finishing the program were better able than the other two groups to recognize emotionally abusive behaviors.

  1. [Latent classes of personality disorders: group comparisons and course of psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Julia; Schöttke, Henning

    2013-09-01

    Using latent class analysis the Personality Disorder Screening (PDS) classifies patients into 4 groups: personality disordered (PD) patients (PDS+), healthy patients (PDS -) and 2 hybrid classes with exaggerated personality styles (histrionic/dependent and avoidant/obsessive-compulsive). The present study investigated if the PDS groups differ concerning sociodemographic and clinical variables, psychological distress and treatment outcome. We analyzed the PDS response patterns of 555 outpatients. PDS+ group membership is associated with typical PD characteristics, chronic depression and a high level of general psychological distress. Patients of both hybrid classes are found to show average psychological distress. The treatment was effective for all patients. Membership in the histrionic/dependent hybrid class is associated with early drop out from outpatient therapy.

  2. Studying the Stellar Populations of the Local Group with VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    The best chance we have to understand star formation and how it proceeds in the Universe is going to come from detailed studies of the numerous different environments found within the Local Group (LG). Present day star formation in our Galaxy occurs exclusively in metal rich environments (Z ˜ Z_⊙), so if we want to study how low metallicity stars form (and thus understand observations of galaxies at high-redshift) we have to look beyond our Galaxy, to the smallest star forming dwarf galaxies, which can have extremely low metallicities (Z ˜ 0.02-0.05Z_⊙). Of course in its entirety a stellar population always contains the complete details of the star formation history of a galaxy, however this information is often hard to disentangle retroactively. We also have much to learn from the Magellanic Clouds (Z ˜ 0.1- 0.3Z_⊙), although because they are undergoing interactions with our Galaxy and each other their evolutionary picture and its general applicability less obvious. In our LG there are also a number of "remnants", or galaxies which which currently do not form stars (e.g. the dSph, such as Carina, Leo I, Ursa Minor, etc..). It is not straight forward to draw parallels between galaxies which are forming stars and those which aren't. This is of course because star formation has such a dramatic impact upon a galaxy, and alternative methods have to be used to make the most basic of comparisons of properties (e.g. metallicity, mass, luminosity evolution). It is necessary to put all the dwarf galaxies into a global picture if we are to draw meaningful conclusions about their star formation properties (e.g. Ferrara & Tolstoy 1999). Many of the small LG galaxies contain direct evidence of complicated star formation histories (e.g. Smecker-Hane et al. 1994; Tolstoy et al. 1998; Gallart et al. 1999), which suggests that star formation patterns can change dramatically over long time scales. This kind of evolutionary behaviour can have a dramatic impact upon the

  3. Title: The Comparison of Anxiety Sensitivity and Happiness in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients with Normal Matched Group in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: The purpose of this study was the comparison of anxiety sensitivity and happiness between patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS and normal matched group. Materials & Methods: The Subjects were 35 (21 females and 14 male IBS patients diagnosed by gastroenterologist and 35 (25 female and 10 males normal matched group all in 14– 63 old age. Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI-R, Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (OHQ, and a checklist applied as measures of anxiety sensitivity, happiness and demographic information. Results: Data analysis indicates that IBS patients significantly are higher than matched group in fear of publicly observable symptoms (P= 0.032, fear of cardiovascular symptoms (P= 0.01, fear of gastrointestinal symptoms (P= 0.001, fear of dissociative and neurological symptoms (P= 0.018, & general anxiety sensitivity (P= 0.003, and lower in joy (P= 0.005, control (P= 0.008, self- esteem (P= 0.001 calm (P= 0.006 and general happiness (P= 0.001. Although no significant differences were found in life satisfaction (P= 0.083 & efficacy (P= 0.09, fear of respiratory symptoms (P= 0.067, and fear of cognitive control deficiency (p= 0.097. Conclusion: As a psychological variable anxiety sensitivity can predict treatment seeking of IBS patient, and happiness negatively influenced by both anxiety sensitivity and IBS.

  4. The quality of control groups in nonrandomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shepard P; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate control group selection in nonrandomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery American (JHS). We reviewed all papers published in JHS in 2013 to identify studies that used nonrandomized control groups. Data collected included type of study design and control group characteristics. We then appraised studies to determine whether authors discussed confounding and selection bias and how they controlled for confounding. Thirty-seven nonrandomized studies were published in JHS in 2013. The source of control was either the same institution as the study group, a different institution, a database, or not provided in the manuscript. Twenty-nine (78%) studies statistically compared key characteristics between control and study group. Confounding was controlled with matching, exclusion criteria, or regression analysis. Twenty-two (59%) papers explicitly discussed the threat of confounding and 18 (49%) identified sources of selection bias. In our review of nonrandomized studies published in JHS, papers had well-defined controls that were similar to the study group, allowing for reasonable comparisons. However, we identified substantial confounding and bias that were not addressed as explicit limitations, which might lead the reader to overestimate the scientific validity of the data. Incorporating a brief discussion of control group selection in scientific manuscripts should help readers interpret the study more appropriately. Authors, reviewers, and editors should strive to address this component of clinical importance. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Work and diet-related risk factors of cardiovascular diseases: comparison of two occupational groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grieshaber Romano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although work related risk factors associated with Cardiovascular Diseases (CD have been well researched, there is no detailed knowledge regarding disparate occupational groups each with a different risk exposition. Therefore, two occupational groups (chefs and office workers were compared with a focus on nutritional and psychosocial factors. Methods Two groups of subjects were tested for work and diet-related risks of CD (45 chefs and 48 office workers. The groups matched both for gender (male and age (30 to 45 years. The study included a medical check-up, bioelectrical impedance analysis as well as an evaluation of questionnaires on health, nutritional behaviour and coping capacity. In addition, volunteers were required to compile a 7-day-dietary-record and collect their urine 24 h prior to their check-up. Blood samples drawn were analysed for glucose and lipid metabolism, homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid; C-reactive protein, uric acid, red blood cell fatty acids, plant sterols, antioxidative capacity and oxidative stress. Results On average, the chefs showed one risk factor more compared to the office workers. The most frequent risk factors in both groups included overweight/obesity (chef group [CG]: 62.2%; office group [OG]: 58.3% and elevated TC (CG: 62.2%; OG: 43.8%]. Moreover, although the chefs often had higher CRP-concentrations (40.0%, more office workers suffered from hypertension (37.5%. Chefs showed significant higher concentrations of saturated fatty acids and oleic acid, whereas docosahexaenoic acid, Omega-6- and trans fatty acids were found more frequently in the red blood cell membranes of office workers. While there were no significant differences in analysed plant sterols between the two occupational groups, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine was significantly increased in office workers. Concerning the work-related psychosocial factors, the chefs were characterised by a stronger subjective importance

  6. Religious and national group identification in adolescence: a study among three religious groups in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng Tseung-Wong, Caroline; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2013-01-01

    Religious group identification is an important but understudied social identity. The present study investigates religious group identification among adolescents of different faiths (Hindu, Muslim, Christian) living in multicultural Mauritius. It further explores how religious and national group identities come together among religious majority and minority adolescents. For three age groups (11 to 19 years, N = 2152) we examined the strength of adolescents' religious and national group identification, the associations between these two identities, and the relationships to global self-esteem. Across age and religious group, participants reported stronger identification with their religious group than with the nation. Identification with both categories declined with age, with the exception of Muslims, whose strong religious identification was found across adolescence. The association between religious and national identification was positive, albeit stronger for the majority group of Hindus and for early adolescents. We examined the manner in which religious and national identities come together using a direct self-identification measure and by combining the separate continuous measures of identification. Four distinct clusters of identification (predominant religious identifiers, dual identifiers, neutrals, and separate individuals) that were differently associated with global self-esteem were found. Dual identifiers reported the highest level of global self-esteem. The clusters of identification did not fully correspond to the findings for the direct self-identification measure. The results are discussed in terms of the meaning of dual identity and the positive manner in which adolescents can manage their multiple identities while taking into account the ideological framework in which those identities are played out.

  7. Comparison of dyslipidemia among the normal-BMI and high-BMI group of people of rural Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharaman Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Overweight and obesity are considered major epidemic health problems in both developed and underdeveloped countries, as many studies showed a remarkable rise. One of the causes of dyslipidemia is obesity. Body mass index (BMI correlates reasonably well with laboratory-based measures of adiposity for population studies, and is extremely practical in most clinical settings. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the lipid profile of patients with normal BMI and high BMI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 400 subjects attended the medical outpatient department (OPD of a private medical college hospital at Salem from March 2010 to August 2011. The subjects were divided into two groups (200 in each group: (1 high BMI (BMI 25 and above and (2 normal BMI (BMI less than 25. The laboratory parameters; cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL and triglyceride (TG were determined directly by using an automated chemistry analyzer. Statistical Analysis: The Student′s t-test was used for comparison between categorical variables, i.e. lipid profile, high-BMI and normal-BMI subjects at P ≤0.05. Results: The total cholesterol, LDL and very LDL cholesterol and the TGs are found to be relatively high among the subjects with high BMI when compared with normal BMI persons, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P 0.05. Conclusion: By analyzing the results of the study conducted, it was concluded that there was an increased risk of dyslipidemia among the high-BMI group compared with the normal-BMI people. Hence, a community-based education in this regard is of utmost importance.

  8. Evaluation of periodontal condition of menopause women with osteoporosis and osteopenia and comparison with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorsand A.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Several risk factors directly affect the development of periodontal diseases. Also some systemic diseases act indirectly as predisposing and aggrevating factors. Osteoporosis is one of these factors and one of its main causes is lack of physical activity in postmenopause period. The incidence of osteoporosis is increasing in our country. The goal of this study was to evaluate the periodontal condition of women with osteoporosis and osteopenia referred to bone densitometric division of Loghman hospital in 2003 and compare to control group. Materials and Methods: In this case control study based on BMD (Bone Mineral Density measurement of back and thigh using DEXA method, 60 patients referred to bone densitometric division of Loghman hospital, were randomly selected. Cases were divided into three groups, 20 with osteoporosis, 20 with osteopenia and 20 normal cases. Periodontal indices consisting of plaque index (PI, tooth loss (TL, gingival recession (GR, probing pocket depth (PPD and papilla bleeding index (PBI were evaluated by clinical and radiographic examination. Data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis and Dunn tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: PBI, PI and TL were significantly higher in osteoporotic group than osteopenic and normal group. PPD was not different in the three groups. Due to the low prevalence of recession in our study, this parameter was not included in the statistical analysis. Conclusion: It seems that osteoporosis does not increase the incidence of periodontal diseases because it affects bone quality rather than quantity. In osteoporosis calcium deficiency and increasing age lead to decreased physical activity and ultimately affect the patient's oral hygiene performance. Thus, periodontal manifestations are presented as gingival bleeding and gingivitis.

  9. Grassroots Growth: The Evolution of a Teacher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Dana; Moore, Terry; Taylor, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Four years ago, a group of teachers lingered after a district meeting, sharing a conversation about encouraging social responsibility in the school district of Tenafly, New Jersey. That conversation led to the eventual formation of a teacher study group, a grassroots professional learning community that has impacted its members and the school…

  10. Study on Concept of Centralization and Decentralization Group Decision Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qin-sheng; XI You-min; WANG Ying-luo

    2002-01-01

    The paper extracts the concept of Centralization Group Decision Making (CGDM) and Decentralization Group Decision Making (DGDM) from management systems on bases of studies on Informational Centralization Process (ICP) and Informational Decentralization Process (IDP), then the similarities and differences between CGDM and DGDM are presented. Further, the taxonomy of CGDM and DGDM is researched.

  11. Learning How to Improve Vocabulary Instruction through Teacher Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimino, Joseph; Taylor, Mary Jo

    2009-01-01

    Professional development with proven positive effects on vocabulary instruction and student achievement: that's what reading teachers are looking for, and that's what the Teacher Study Group (TSG) model delivers. With the nine complete TSG sessions in this book, K-8 teachers will form dynamic in-school learning groups with their fellow educators…

  12. Educator Study Groups: A Professional Development Tool to Enhance Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner-Patnode, Leah

    2009-01-01

    Professional development can take many forms. The most effective development includes individual educators in the formation and planning process. Educator study groups are one form of professional development that allows major stakeholders in the education process the autonomy to develop individual and group goals. This often translates into an…

  13. Somatotype and body composition of volleyball players and untrained female students – reference group for comparison in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszak Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that somatotype and success in sport and physical performance are positively related. Existing somatotype data on athletes are useful as guidelines for sport selection and choice of training appropriate to the enhancement of desired somatotype characteristics. Updated somatotype data from non-athlete reference groups complement comparative analysis applied in assessing the effects of the training process and selection. The aim of this study was to determine the somatotype of untrained girls studying at Warsaw University of Technology in 2011, in order to create a current reference group for comparison, and to investigate the difference in body build of female volleyball players compared with the non-athlete group. Twelve Second Division female volleyball players (age 21.6±1.5 years, body height 177.3±6.2 cm, body mass 71.0±6.5 kg, training experience 8.4±3.4 years and 150 female untrained students of the University of Technology in Warsaw (age 20.0±6.4 years, body height 166.5±6.4 cm, body mass 59.7±8.4 kg participated in a study carried out in 2011. Somatotype was determined using the Heath-Carter method. The volleyball players were a little older and were significantly taller and heavier than female students (p<0.05. Significant differences between the groups were found in breadth of the elbow, breadth of the wrist, biacromial diameter, arm circumference and crus circumference (p<0.05. The mean somatotype of the volleyball players was 4.5-3.4-2.8. (4.5±1.0-3.4±1.2-2.8±1.3, whilst that of the untrained students was 5.1-3.6-2.8. (5.1±1.4-3.6±1.1-2.8±1.3; the groups did not differ significantly in somatotype. The groups were significantly different in body composition (F [kg] and LBM [kg], as estimated by BIA and anthropometric methods (p<0.05. No differences were observed between the groups in the skinfolds. Morphological characteristics of the female volleyball players depended on the competition level

  14. Adjusted indirect treatment comparisons of bioequivalence studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwaza, L

    2016-01-01

    Generic medicines are approved by regulatory authorities based on demonstration of bioequivalence with the innovator, however, current regulatory systems do not require direct comparison between all available generics of the same innovator to ensure interchangeability. As such, interchangeability be

  15. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidinia, Masoumeh; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Fallah, Fatemeh; Bakhshi, Bita; Sajadinia, Raheleh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A) and intI1 (encoding a class 1 integrase) in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI) during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intI1 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54%) and D (34%) whereas group A (44%) and D (26%) are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p UPEC (24%) in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%). Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  16. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Navidinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A and intll (encoding a class 1 integrase in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intll genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54% and D (34% whereas group A (44% and D (26% are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05. intll gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24% in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%. Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  17. A comparative study between met & unmet need groups of contraception in rural area of Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha M Solanki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare met & unmet need groups of contraception with socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors. Methods Community based cross-sectional, comparative study was conducted among 363 married women of reproductive age groups in rural area selected by stratified simple random technique. After collecting preliminary information, the study population then divided into two groups based on their contraceptive use i.e. MET Group & UNMET NEED Groups. Then the role of socio-economic, demographic, accessibility & family Planning (FP related factors were studies to determine contraceptive use between these groups. Results Mean age of study subjects was 24.12 ± 4.45 years & average number of children per women was 2.02. Males were more literate than females (69.1% Vs 47.2%. 51.8% women were belonging to lower socio-economic status. Early marriages were still prevalent in this study (53.7%. Prevalence of met group of contraception was 59.2% & that of unmet need for contraception was 44.1%. Met groups were mainly from 20-29 years age group (46.6%; most of them (46.8% were literate & were from high socio-economic group (30.9% compared to unmet need groups. On comparison to unmet groups, most of the met group (33.9% got married after 18 years of age, residing within 5km area (26.4%, had visited to FP centre (49.0% & ever visited by FP staff (43.3%. Conclusion Education, income, marriage age, accessibility, FP staff related factors definitely has role among met & unmet need groups in their contraceptive use.

  18. Ancient Human Bone Microstructure in Medieval England: Comparisons between Two Socio-Economic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Miszkiewicz, Justyna J.; Mahoney, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the links between bone microstructure and human lifestyle is critical for clinical and anthropological research into skeletal\\ud growth and adaptation. The present study is the first to report correspondence between socio-economic status and variation in bone microstructure\\ud in ancient humans. Products of femoral cortical remodeling were assessed using histological methods in a large human medieval\\ud sample (N:450) which represented two distinct socio-economic groups. Osteona...

  19. Bion's thinking about groups: a study of influence and originality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John A

    2015-04-01

    One of Bion's least-acknowledged contributions to psychoanalytic theory is his study of the relationship between the mind of the individual (the ability to think), the mentalities of groups of which the individual is a member, and the individual's bodily states. Bion's early work on group therapy evolved into a study of the interplay between mind and bodily instincts associated with being a member of a group, and became the impetus for his theory of thinking. On the foundation of Bion's ideas concerning this interaction among the thinking of the individual, group mentality, and the psyche-soma, the author presents his thoughts on the ways in which group mentality is recognizable in the analysis of individuals.

  20. Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Hoogveld, Bert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., Hoogveld, A. W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands; EU Forlic project.

  1. Open mic: Introduction to the CERN Study Group

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mozilla Study Groups are knowledge- and skill-sharing meet-ups for people to get help with their research or work on open-science projects. A CERN chapter was launched recently and you are invited to participate!

  2. Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Hoogveld, Bert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., Hoogveld, A. W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands; EU Forlic project.

  3. A Comparison of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Psychological Screening Inventory in a Delinquent Sample and a Comparison Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Barry J.; Bolton, Neil

    1981-01-01

    Compared the scores of reformatory inmates and technical college students on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Psychological Screening Inventory. Two factors accounted for most of the variance. Neuroticism was common to both groups. The second factor in the delinquent group was extraversion. (Author/JAC)

  4. Comparison of serum levels of copper and zinc among multiple sclerosis patients and control group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Sedighi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been several studies done on the role of metals in the occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS disease, but their roles have not been confirmed yet. Because of the lack of information on this issue, this study compared the serum level of copper and zinc in MS patients with their levels in a control group.This was an analytical, cross-sectional study conducted in Kerman (a medium size city, Iran. We assessed the serum level of copper and zinc in 58 MS patients and 39 healthy individuals, who were selected from the relatives of cases and matched for age and sex.The average serum level of Copper in cases and controls were 93.7 and 88.9 ml/dl, respectively. The corresponding numbers for Zinc were 36.7 and 40.9 ml/dl, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (copper: P = 0.459; zinc: P = 0.249.The groups were matched for age, sex, and family. However, we did not find a considerable difference between the level of these metals in MS patients and controls.

  5. Ancient Human Bone Microstructure in Medieval England: Comparisons between Two Socio-Economic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszkiewicz, Justyna J; Mahoney, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the links between bone microstructure and human lifestyle is critical for clinical and anthropological research into skeletal growth and adaptation. The present study is the first to report correspondence between socio-economic status and variation in bone microstructure in ancient humans. Products of femoral cortical remodeling were assessed using histological methods in a large human medieval sample (N = 450) which represented two distinct socio-economic groups. Osteonal parameters were recorded in posterior midshaft femoral sections from adult males (N = 233) and females (N = 217). Using univariate and multivariate statistics, intact, fragmentary, and osteon population densities, Haversian canal area and diameter, and osteon area were compared between the two groups, accounting for sex, age, and estimated femoral robusticity. The size of osteons and their Haversian canals, as well as osteon density, varied significantly between the socio-economic groups, although minor inconsistencies were observed in females. Variation in microstructure was consistent with historical textual evidence that describes differences in mechanical loading and nutrition between the two groups. Results demonstrate that aspects of ancient human lifestyle can be inferred from bone microstructure.

  6. Obesity in occupational groups of Western Siberia: comparison with representative national data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Maksimov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare obesity prevalences in the occupational groups of Western Siberia with the national data. Materials and methods: We performed a single-step cross-sectional study enrolling 4472 employees of 14 occupational groups from Western Siberian institutions and enterprises. Obesity was considered to be present if the body mass index was >30.0 kg/m2; sex, age and education data were obtained with questionnaires. Age-adjusted obesity prevalence in the occupational groups (separately for men and women was compared with the national data with calculation of odds ratio, attributable risk and 95% confidence interval. Results: Among women the prevalence of obesity was lower in teachers compared with the national data (OR=0.45; 95% CI: 0.31–0.66. Higher obesity prevalence was observed among operating personnel and technical workers (OR=1.69; 95% CI: 1.37–2.09 as well as metallurgy equipment operators (OR=1.65; 95% CI: 1.17–2.31. Among males higher obesity prevalence was registered in top-managers (OR=2.53; 95% CI: 1.80–3.55, operating personnel and technical workers (OR=2.03; 95% CI: 1.59–2.58, civil servants (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.27–2.40, and mechanics (OR=1.37; 95% CI: 1.08–1.73. Moreover, in women university education (higher percentage of employees having graduated from a higher professional institution led to less obesity prevalence. In males no such tendencies were observed. Conclusions: The study allowed to identify the occupational groups of Western Siberia with higher obesity prevalence and to demonstrate the impact of sex and education level on this parameter. The obtained data can make a theoretical and practical basis for primary and secondary prevention of obesity in the workplace.

  7. Novice Teachers Learning through Participation in a Teacher Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambson, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Using Lave and Wenger's framework of legitimate peripheral participation in communities of practice, this case study explores the experiences of three novice teachers engaged with more experienced teachers in a teacher study group during their first year of teaching. The study illustrates how, over time, the novices moved from more peripheral to…

  8. Comparison of an intermittent and continuous forearm muscles fatigue protocol with motorcycle riders and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, M; Torrado, P; Busquets, A; Ríos, J G; Angulo-Barroso, R

    2013-02-01

    Motorcycle races' long duration justify the study of forearm muscles fatigue, especially knowing the frequently associated forearm discomfort pathology. Moreover, while continuous fatigue protocols yield unequivocal results, EMG outcomes from an intermittent protocol are quite controversial. This study examined the forearm muscle fatigue patterns produced during these two protocols, comparing riders with a control group, and relating maximal voluntary contraction with EMG parameters (amplitude - NRMS and median frequency - NMF) of both protocols to the forearm discomfort among motorcycle riders. Twenty riders and 39 controls performed in separate days both protocols simulating the braking gesture and posture of a rider. EMG of flexor digitorum superficialis (FS) and carpi radialis (CR) were monitored. CR revealed more differences among protocols and groups compared to FS. The greater CR activation in riders could be interpreted as a neuromotor strategy to improve braking precision. When FS fatigue increased, the control group progressively shift toward a bigger CR activation, adopting an intermuscular activation pattern closer to riders. Despite the absence of NMF decrement throughout the intermittent protocol, which suggest that we should have shorten the recovery times from the actual 1 min, the superior number of rounds performed by the riders proved that this protocol discriminates better riders against controls and is more related to forearm discomfort.

  9. The Comparison of the Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Methadone Maintenance Therapy on Changing Beliefs Related to Substance and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taherh Ghorbani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was aimed to compare of the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy and methadone maintenance therapy on changing beliefs toward substance abuse among addicted people. Method: The research method was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest with witness group. 30 addicted people who were referred to the addiction treatment centers selected by available sampling, and they randomly assigned to three groups namely: cognitive-behavioral therapy, methadone maintenance therapy and witness groups. Substance abuse beliefs questionnaire was administered among all participants before and after intervention. Results: Results showed that in both experimental groups, beliefs toward drug was reduced significantly in comparison with witness group. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be changed on cognitive mediator variables, like beliefs toward substance therefore, it can reduce the risk of relapse. However, the programs of treatment of substance abuse should be targeted this type of intermediate variables.

  10. Comparison of Y-STR polymorphisms in three different Slovak population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrejcíková, Eva; Siváková, Daniela; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan; Rebała, Krzysztof; Boronová, Iveta; Bôziková, Alexandra; Sovicová, Adriana; Gabriková, Dana; Maceková, Sona; Svícková, Petra; Carnogurská, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Eleven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci included in the Powerplex Y multiplex kit were analyzed in different Slovak population samples: Habans (n = 39), Romanies (n = 100) and Slovak Caucasian (n = 148) individuals, respectively, from different regions of Slovakia. The analysis of molecular variance between populations indicated that 89.27% of the haplotypic variations were found within populations and only 10.72% between populations (Fst = 0.1027; p = 0.0000). The haplotype diversities were ranging from 0.9258 to 0.9978, and indicated a high potential for differentiating between male individuals. The study reports differences in allele frequencies between the Romanies, Habans and Slovak Caucasian men. Selected loci showed that both the Romany and Haban population belonged to endogamous and relatively small founder population groups, which developed in relatively reproductive isolated groups surrounded by the Slovak Caucasian population.

  11. A Comparison of Cost and Reward Procedures With Interdependent Group Contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn; Penrod, Becky; Price, Jenifer N

    2016-06-07

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of two variations of a token economy for reducing disruptive behavior within a general education classroom. One variation involved a group contingency in which tokens were removed contingent on disruptive behavior (response cost), and the other variation involved a group contingency in which tokens were gained according to a differential reinforcement of other behavior schedule. Two elementary school teachers and their students participated. Results indicated that both procedures were effective in reducing the overall number of students disrupting; however, both teachers and students indicated a greater preference for the response cost condition. Implications for the use of these behavior management strategies in the classroom are discussed in terms of effectiveness and ease of implementation.

  12. Effects of historically portrayed modeling and group treatment on self-observation: A comparison with agoraphobics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, Paul M.G.; Emmelkamp-Benner, Ank

    1975-01-01

    The effects of historically portrayed modeling and group treatment on self-observation were determined in a factorial design with agoraphobic patients. Group 1 saw a videofilm and was treated individually; group 2 saw the film and received group treatment; group 3 did not see the film and received i

  13. A Comparison of Two Group-Delivered Social Skills Programs for Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K. A.; Schultz, Janet R.; Newsom, Crighton

    2007-01-01

    A social skills group intervention was developed and evaluated for young children with autism. Twenty-five 4- to 6-year-old (diagnosed) children were assigned to one of two kinds of social skills groups: the direct teaching group or the play activities group. The direct teaching group used a video-modeling format to teach play and social skills…

  14. Comparison of cytological parameters of exfoliated buccal mucosal cells in different temperament groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zendehboodi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temperament (Mizaj forms the basic concept of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM, and greatly influences the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, as well as maintains the ideal healthy state of an individual. In particular, temperament is presumed to affect the morphological, physiological, and psychological features of a person; however, its influence on biological features remains unclear in practical ITM. This study aimed to evaluate the association between the temperament and the cytological features of buccal mucosa in healthy people. Methods: The study sample included 75 healthy individuals from Fars province, southern Iran. The temperament was determined using a self-reported temperament identification scale. Based on the questionnaire, volunteers were classified in nine temperaments including one equilibrium, four simple temperaments (warm, cold, moist, and dry, and four combined temperaments (warm–moist, warm–dry, cold–moist, cold–dry. Smears collected from the buccal mucosa of participants were analyzed for biomarkers of DNA damage, cytokinetic defects, proliferative potential, and cell death using micronucleus (MN assay. Student’s t-test or Mann–Whitney U test was applied to identify the differences between groups. Results: DNA damage (nuclear buds and cell death biomarkers (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexic, pyknotic, and karyolitic cells reported significant differences between certain temperament groups. Conclusions: The present study reported that the aforementioned cytological parameters could be affected by the temperament; however, more studies with greater sample sizes are warranted.

  15. A mentored cooperative group pilot study: atrophic vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne L; Jarvis, Chandler; Bartholomew, Deborah; Yee, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    To review nursing research initiatives from two cooperative groups and outline a pilot study performed by a junior nurse researcher mentored by cooperative group nurse researchers and institutional physicians. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, World Wide Web. Nursing research can be initiated and led by nurses in the cooperative group setting. The team approach model of research includes several disciplines to examine multiple facets of the same problem, or of multiple problems that a cancer patient may face. This new model will enable a greater number of nurse researchers to investigate symptom management, survivorship, and quality-of-life issues. Nurse researchers should be included in every cooperative group study to investigate nurse-sensitive outcomes and issues related to symptom management, survivorship, and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Deriving statistical significance maps for SVM based image classification and group comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Population based pattern analysis and classification for quantifying structural and functional differences between diverse groups has been shown to be a powerful tool for the study of a number of diseases, and is quite commonly used especially in neuroimaging. The alternative to these pattern analysis methods, namely mass univariate methods such as voxel based analysis and all related methods, cannot detect multivariate patterns associated with group differences, and are not particularly suitable for developing individual-based diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. A commonly used pattern analysis tool is the support vector machine (SVM). Unlike univariate statistical frameworks for morphometry, analytical tools for statistical inference are unavailable for the SVM. In this paper, we show that null distributions ordinarily obtained by permutation tests using SVMs can be analytically approximated from the data. The analytical computation takes a small fraction of the time it takes to do an actual permutation test, thereby rendering it possible to quickly create statistical significance maps derived from SVMs. Such maps are critical for understanding imaging patterns of group differences and interpreting which anatomical regions are important in determining the classifier's decision.

  17. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  18. Insulin resistance and occurrence and prognosis of ischemic stroke A non-randomized concurrent control and intra-group comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong Zhao; Shaojun Jiang; Yue Tan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical evidence has demonstrated that insulin resistance might be an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, which has not been recognized. At present, insulin resistance has been proven to be an independent risk factor for coronary arteriosclerotic heart disease. However, the relationship between the onset and prognosis of ischemic stroke remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to analyze the relationship between insulin resistance and ischemic stroke and the correlation between insulin resistance and stroke risk factor, and to investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and ischemic stroke prognosis as well as whether insulin resistance is an independent prognostic factor. DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent control experiment. SETTING: Department of Geriatric Disease, Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 106 inpatients with ischemic stroke of the cervical internal carotid artery, who had suffered from the disease within the previous 72 hours, were admitted to the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College from March to December in 2005 and, recruited for the present study. All 106 inpatients corresponded to the diagnostic criteria of ischemic stroke, formulated at the Fourth National Cerebrovascular Disease Conference in 1995, and were confirmed as having had an ischemic stroke by CT/MRI examinations. The patient group consisted of 54 males and 52 females. An additional 50 healthy individuals, who received health examinations simultaneously, were included as controls. Among the control subjects, there were 26 males and 24 females. Informed consent for laboratory measurements was obtained from all subjects; this study was approved by the Hospital Ethics Committee.METHODS: Following admission, all subjects were inquired of age, gender, previous history, blood pressure, body temperature, admission time, and smoking habits. Meanwhile, they were

  19. Self-estimates of intelligence: interaction effects of the comparison to a specific reference group and neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipp, T; Kleingeld, A

    2012-04-01

    An experiment that investigated the interaction effect of Neuroticism and the comparison to different reference groups on self-estimates of intelligence is reported. University students (100 men, 15 women) were randomly assigned to two experimental groups and asked to rate their own intelligence on a one-item measure, in IQ points, having been provided with reference values for either the general population or a student sample. Analysis of data confirmed that the accuracy of self-estimates of intelligence was influenced by the variation of the instruction. Participants provided more accurate estimations when confronted with comparison information about fellow students than about the general population. Persons scoring high on Neuroticism estimated their intelligence lower, but only when their estimation was based on a general reference group. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

  20. Motivating Study Groups across the Disciplines in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styslinger, Mary E.; Clary, Deidre M.; Oglan, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces Project RAISSE: Reading Assistance Initiative for Secondary School Educators and shares the findings of a study into those factors found to motivate study group participants at two rural high schools in the southern USA. The research team collected qualitative data over a two-year period, including interviews, artifacts,…

  1. Study: California Ethnic Groups Seeing Increased Cancer Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A statewide study on cancer and ethnicity hints that cancer rates among immigrant groups may be tied to their degree of assimilation into American culture. The study, released by the University of Southern California's Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, marks the first statewide look at cancer rates among Vietnamese and South Asians and provides…

  2. A Comparison of Written Chinese Achievement among Heritage Learners in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Helen H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines effects of grouping practice on written Chinese achievement among heritage learners in college Chinese classes. Subjects were two groups of heritage students, a homogeneous group and a heterogeneous group. Results suggest in college level Chinese language classes, tracking based on linguistic background can improve heritage students'…

  3. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  4. COMPARISON OF FUZZY TOPSIS METHODS USED GROUP DECISION MAKING AND AN APPLICATION

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    FATİH ECER

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy TOPSIS method used group decision making in fuzzy environment is one of the Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methods.  It is needed to decision makers (DM, alternatives and decision criteria in order to apply this method. Foundation of the method is the ideal solution is the shortest distance from Fuzzy Positive Ideal Solution (FPIS and the farthest distance from Fuzzy Negative Ideal Solution (FNIS. Using FPIS and FNIS, closeness coefficients of alternatives are evaluated. Closeness coefficients express scores of the alternatives. According to closeness coefficients, alternatives are ranked from the best to the worst. In this study, two fuzzy TOPSIS methods having different algorithms are compared. To this purpose, firstly assessments of decision makers are converted to triangular fuzzy numbers. It is seen at the end of the study that ranking orders of alternatives don’t change.

  5. A Case Study: Novel Group Interactions through Introductory Computational Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Obsniuk, Michael J; Caballero, Marcos D

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high-level programming languages capable of quickly rendering three-dimensional simulations, the inclusion of computers as a learning tool in the classroom has become more prevalent. Although work has begun to study the patterns seen in implementing and assessing computation in introductory physics, more insight is needed to understand the observed effects of blending computation with physics in a group setting. In a newly adopted format of introductory calculus-based mechanics, called Projects and Practices in Physics, groups of students work on short modeling projects -- which make use of a novel inquiry-based approach -- to develop their understanding of both physics content and practice. Preliminary analyses of observational data of groups engaging with computation, coupled with synchronized computer screencast, has revealed a unique group interaction afforded by the practices specific to computational physics -- problem debugging.

  6. Hypovitaminosis D according to psychiatric diagnosis groups: A study with control group

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    Derya Güliz Mert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One of the risk factor for different psychiatric disorders has been indicated as hypovit-aminosis D. The present study aimed to compare 25 (OH D level between 4 different types of psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety disorder and healthy controls, and to assess the risk factors of hypovitaminosis D in psychiatric inpatients. Method: This retrospective study included 974 individuals [depression (n=553, bipolar disorder (n=135, schizophrenia (n=186 and anxiety disorder (n=100] who received inpatient treatment in psychiatry clinic between 2012 and 2014, and 574 individuals in control group who were not diagnosed with a psychiatric condition. A 25 (OH D level less than 21 ng/mL was considered to indicate hypovitaminosis D. Results: 25 (OH D level average of the control group was found to be significantly higher than that of the four psychiatric diagnosis groups (p0.05. Lo-gistic regression analysis of the study parameters suggested that the female gender (odds ratio: 3.46; 95% confidence interval: 0.99-1.01, winter and spring seasons (odds ratio: 2.56; 95% con-fidence interval: 1.69-3.86 and odds ratio: 2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.33-3.11, respectively were significant predictors in level of vitamin D in psychiatric inpatients. Conclusions: Hypovitaminosis D is a condition that frequently exists in inpatients in psychiatry clinic suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder and depression. Being a female, winter and spring are the most remarkable risk factors in these patients.

  7. Evaluation and comparison of tooth size discrepancies among different malocclusion groups

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    Mujagić, A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The compliance of proportions between the mesiodistal dimensions of the upper and the lower teeth is necessary for good intercuspidation. Given that a significant discrepancy in tooth size can prevent ideal occlusion at the end of orthodontic treatment, the absence of tooth size discrepancy is a significant factor for the realization of the ideal occlusion. Aim: Aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the incidence of tooth size discrepancies among different skeletal malocclusion groups in the orthodontic patients. Material and methods: The sample comprised 300 pretreatment study casts (118 males and 182 females with fully erupted and complete permanent dentition except third molars, which were selected randomly from records of orthodontic patients. All subjects were divided in three groups, according to the Angle classification of malocclusion. The measurements were made on study models with digital calipers accurately to 0.01 mm. The Class was defined by using the Steiner analysis on lateral cephalograms. The subjects were divided into three groups depending on the value of the ANB angle. For every subject, the value of the angles SNA, SNB and ANB was measured. The reliability of measurements was examined by the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. To determine whether there were gender differences an independent sample t-test was performed. Results: There is no statistically significant differences in Bolton’s discrepancy by different gender, or at different classes. The average value of the anterior Bolton ratio was 78.16 and of the overall were 90.87. Values of the anterior and overall Bolton ratios are highest in patients with Class III. The highest average value of anterior discrepancy was in male subjects with III Class (-0.72, while the highest average value of overall discrepancy was in male subjects with II Class (0.65. Conclusion: The results of the study show that there are no

  8. A comparison study between two discharge planning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jui-Hui; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Shu-Ming; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to compare the effectiveness between a systematic assessment tool and a traditional assessment tool for discharge planning. This research adopted a two-group comparison study design, and convenience sampling was adopted to recruit patients requiring discharge-planning services at eight wards in a regional teaching hospital in Southern Taiwan. The postdischarge care requirements of two groups of patients were evaluated using a traditional assessment tool and a systematic assessment tool in different implementation periods, respectively. Sixty-eight patients were matched with similar age and with similar activity in daily living index scores to compare the effectiveness of the tools. The systematic assessment tool exhibited higher assessment integrity and placement appropriateness, as well as lower rates of rehospitalization or mortality within discharge 14 days. The two groups exhibited no significant difference in inappropriate hospital days, primary decision-makers' satisfaction, and proportion of referral professionals who meet patient care requirements. However, the differences in three items of satisfaction exhibited moderate-to-large effect sizes, which may be of clinical importance. To meet the needs of primary decision-makers in a family, enhance their satisfaction, and provide effective discharge-planning services, clinicians should adopt the systematic assessment tool to assess the postdischarge care requirements of a patient, and the hospital should provide relevant facilities to assist in implementing all plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of two group-delivered social skills programs for young children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K A; Schultz, Janet R; Newsom, Crighton

    2007-05-01

    A social skills group intervention was developed and evaluated for young children with autism. Twenty-five 4- to 6-year-old (diagnosed) children were assigned to one of two kinds of social skills groups: the direct teaching group or the play activities group. The direct teaching group used a video-modeling format to teach play and social skills over the course of the intervention, while the play activities group engaged in unstructured play during the sessions. Groups met for 5 weeks, three times per week, 1 h each time. Data were derived and coded from videotapes of pre- and post-treatment unstructured play sessions. Findings indicated that while members of both groups increased prosocial behaviors, the direct teaching group made more gains in social skills.

  10. Revitalising PBL groups: evaluating PBL with study teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moust, Jos; Roebertsen, Herma; Savelberg, Hans; De Rijk, Angelique

    2005-03-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), students are actively engaged with psychological learning principles as activation of prior knowledge, elaboration and organization of knowledge. In their tutorial groups, however, students do not always apply these principles when working with a procedure like the "Seven-Jump" method. To stimulate students to use these principles more often, they were offered another format within a PBL context: PBL with study teams. During the period of self-study, students work on a regular basis in so-called study teams, small groups of 3-4 persons. In these groups they explain to each other their learning outcomes, clarify for each other their problems while studying texts and organize their knowledge to present this to the members of other study teams in their tutorial group. Previous research showed that students spent more time on self-study in a PBL with study team condition than in a traditional PBL context. In this study the achievement as well as appreciation of students participating in a PBL with study teams' environment, is compared with students working in a traditional PBL environment. To determine whether PBL with study teams differs from the traditional PBL environment in students' appreciation and study time. We conducted an experiment in two blocks over two years. Questionnaires were administered to collect data on appreciation and time for self-study. Students' appreciation of the two formats did not differ much. The large standard deviations indicate considerable differences in appreciation between individual students. Appreciation was slightly higher in the second experiment when instructions about how to collaborate were less strict. Students devoted twice as many hours studying in the study group format compared with the traditional PBL format. The students indicated that they enjoyed the format but that the increased workload disturbed their customary study rhythm. Assessment scores and tutors'impressions suggest that

  11. The comparison between carboxyl, amido and hydroxy group in influencing electrorheological performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huo; Li, Jun-Ran; Liao, Fu-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Three kinds of electrorheological (ER) materials with carboxyl, amido and hydroxyl group, respectively, were synthesized by a simple adsorption method. The powder of silicon dioxide as a substrate of the materials, as well as terephthalic acid [ p-C6H4(COOH)2, abbr.: phen-COOH], p-phenylenediamine [ p-C6H4(NH2)2, abbr.: phen-NH2] and hydroquinone [ p-C6H4(OH)2, abbr.: phen-OH] were chosen as starting materials. The ER properties of suspensions of the materials in silicon oil were studied. The suspension of the material adsorbing phen-COOH reveals the highest ER activity, the relative shear stress of the suspension (25 wt%), τr(=τE/τ0, τE and τ0 are the shear stresses at electric field strengths of E=4.2 and 0 kV/mm, respectively), reaches 220 under a DC electric field at a shear rate of 14.5 s-1. The shear stress of the suspension of the material adsorbing phen-NH2 is the largest at an high electric field strength. The ER activity of the material adsorbing phen-OH is the lowest among the three materials. The molecule structure is an importance factor in influencing ER performance of the materials for similar compounds with different polar function groups. The relationship between the ER activity and dielectric property of the materials was discussed.

  12. A Comparative Study of Group Key Management in MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Bashary,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Ad-Hoc Network (MANET is a self organized network, with no fixed infrastructure, limited resources and limited physical security. Security in such an environment is an essential requirement. Key management is a salient element in MANET security. It is responsible for key generation, storage, distribution, updating, revocation, deleting, and archiving. Key management protocols are classified into symmetric, asymmetric, group, and hybrid. Group key management is a point of interest for researchers with the growing usage of mobile devices and the rising of multicast communication. This paper surveys different approaches in group key management schemes. A comparative study is demonstrated in terms of reliability, computational complexity, storage cost, communication overheads, pre-requirements, security levels, robustness, vulnerabilities, scalability, energy and mobility. Finally, the study concludes the pros and cons of each protocol.

  13. Experiences of older adults in a group physiotherapy program at a rehabilitation hospital: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Melissa J; Burge, Angela T; Soh, Sze-Ee; Jeffs, Kimberley J; Winter, Adele; Holland, Anne E

    2016-05-01

    Physiotherapy delivered in a group setting has been shown to be effective in a variety of populations. However, little is known about the attitudes of older adults toward participating in group physiotherapy. The objectives of this study were to explore older inpatients' perceptions and experiences of group physiotherapy using qualitative methods. Twelve hospitalized adults aged ≥65 years who were involved in a larger randomized controlled trial undertook individual semistructured interviews regarding their experiences in group physiotherapy. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and line by line, iterative thematic analysis was undertaken. Descriptive codes were developed, compared, and grouped together to create themes. Analysis revealed 6 major themes and 10 subthemes. All participants reported feeling happy to attend group sessions, a satisfactory alternative to individual physiotherapy. Participants described physical benefits that increased their motivation, and comparisons with their peers either motivated them or made them feel gratitude for their own health. Perceived attentiveness of group instructors contributed to participants reporting that treatment was individualized and similar to individual physiotherapy. Motivation and camaraderie with peers contributed to their enjoyment of group physiotherapy. Hospitalized older adults enjoyed exercising with their peers and valued the physical and social benefits of group physiotherapy. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:358-362. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Evaluating Blood Parameters, P53, and IL6 in Personnel of Copper Complex: A Comparison with Control Group

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    Hadis Ahmadiraad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Industrial pollution including trace elements is the ability to exert many biological effects such as cancer and inflammatory diseases on humans. Therefore, in this study, some of the inflammation and cancer awareness factors such as P53 and IL6 and some blood indices are examined along with trace elements to which people are normally exposed. Materials & Methods: The population includes 45 workers subjected to trace elements who are studied in comparison with the control group with some biochemical parameters such as WBC, RBC, and CRP. In addition, gene expressions of p53 and IL6 are measured by Real time PCR technique. Results: The results show that the gene expressions of IL6 and P53 increases significantly (P –Value p53=0.00, IL6=0.0037. Furthermore, the number of red and white blood cells demonstrate a substantial upsurge. The level of liver enzymes of ALT and AST grows. Additionally, ALP reduces and CRP is negative in all the subjects. (P = 0.001. Conclusion: The results confirm that industrial pollution is able to induce some changes in gene expressions of P53, IL6, and some blood parameters. It may create serious risks for people who will be exposed to pollution in the future.

  15. Comparison of Personality Characteristics and Coping Strategies in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Control Group

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    Mohammadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The present study aimed to investigate personality traits and coping strategies in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS who were admitted to Sina hospital compared with healthy individuals. Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare personality characteristics and coping strategies between patients with MS and healthy controls. Materials and Methods The study sample included 55 patients with MS and 57 matched healthy control individuals. The data were gathered via a demographic form, the ways of coping questionnaire, and the NEO five-factor inventory. The data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and logistic regression. Results No significant differences in personality characteristics were observed between patients and healthy controls (all P > 0.05. Only the coping strategy subscale of Distancing was significant between patients and healthy controls (P 0.05. Only the Neuroticism personality trait and the Distancing coping strategy were predictive of group membership (i.e., healthy or patient. Conclusions Our study suggests that the personality traits of patients with MS and healthy individuals are not significantly different. Patients with MS are likely to use the same coping strategies as healthy individuals, except in the subscale of Distancing.

  16. Ethics reflection groups in community health services: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemoen, Lillian; Pedersen, Reidar

    2015-04-17

    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health (including nursing homes and residency), - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project. A mixed-methods design with qualitative focus group interviews, observations and written reports were used to evaluate. The study was conducted at two nursing homes, two home care districts and a residence for people with learning disabilities. Participants were employees, facilitators and service managers. The study was guided by ethical standard principles and was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We found support for ethics reflection as a valuable measure to strengthen clinical practice. New and improved solutions, more cooperation between employees, and improved collaboration with patients and their families are some of the results. No negative experiences were found. Instead, the ethics reflection based on experiences and challenges in the workplace, was described as a win-win situation. The evaluation also revealed what is needed to succeed and useful tips for further development of ethics support in community health services. Ethics reflection groups focusing on ethical challenges from the participants' daily work were found to be significant for improved practice, collegial support and cooperation, personal and professional development among staff, facilitators and managers. Resources needed to succeed were managerial support, and anchoring ethics sessions in the routine of daily work.

  17. Violence in Street Culture: Cross-Cultural Comparison of Youth Groups and Criminal Gangs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdun, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Violence is a widespread phenomenon in juvenile street culture. But the questions of whether this relationship is a deterministic one, and if not, which are the contributing factors, are largely unanswered. This article focuses on the role of public space, starting with a comparison of the meaning of deviant behavior and crime in street culture in…

  18. The Influence of Learner Strategies on Oral Presentations: A Comparison between Group and Individual Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mu-hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning has frequently been used in language classrooms, from in-class task-based group work to group presentations. Research suggests that cooperative learning provides mutual support, as well as successful and effective learning outcomes of tasks. The present research addressed a number of problems discovered in group oral…

  19. Comparison of Group Cohesion, Class Participation, and Exam Performance in Live and Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyon, Charles E.; Heaton, Eleanore C. T.; Best, Tiffany L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Though class participation and group cohesion have shown some potential to promote student performance in conventional classrooms, their efficacy has not yet been demonstrated in an online-class setting. Group cohesion, defined as member attraction to and self-identification with a group, is thought to promote positive interdependence and the…

  20. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun Univ. College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant.

  1. Commonwealth Defence Science Organisation (CDSO Food Study Group (FSG

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    J. M. Watts

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The Food Study Group (FSG under Commonwealth Defence Science Organisation was established in 1962 to review major items of Defence research programmes and exchange scientific information in the commonwealth countries. This paper gives an insight into the set-up, terms of reference, membership and the way research programmes are conceived and dealt with.

  2. Effective Single-Parent Training Group Program: Three System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Harold E.; Miller, Keva M.; Orellana, E. Roberto; Briggs, Adam C.; Cox, Wendell H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study highlights Dr. Elsie Pinkston and colleagues' research on the effectiveness of behavior parent training and examines the application of single-parent training group (SPG) programs to three parent-child dyads exposed to distressed family circumstances. Methods: Single-system evaluation designs were conducted with two…

  3. TRICARE Fourth Generation Study Group - Exploring the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TRICARE Fourth Generation Study Group - Exploring the...1ncludes all AD, AOFMIGRIGRFM, and unclef 65 RETIRETFMIOTH, exclucbng 65+ Albers Equal Area Prqect10n, 2011 2011 MHS Conference Five Models  TRICARE

  4. Categorizing at the group-level in response to intragroup social comparisons : A self-categorization theory integration of self-evaluation and social identity motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, MT; Branscombe, NR; Silvia, PJ; Garcia, DM; Spears, R

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments examined how people respond to upward social comparisons in terms of the extent to which they categorize the self and the source of comparison within the same social group. Self-evaluation maintenance theory (SEM) suggests that upward ingroup comparisons can lead to the rejection of

  5. Visuo-spatial memory deficits following medial temporal lobe damage: A comparison of three patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani-Bayerl, Nazli; Finke, Carsten; Braun, Mischa; Düzel, Emrah; Heekeren, Hauke R; Holtkamp, Martin; Hasper, Dietrich; Storm, Christian; Ploner, Christoph J

    2016-01-29

    The contributions of the hippocampal formation and adjacent regions of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to memory are still a matter of debate. It is currently unclear, to what extent discrepancies between previous human lesion studies may have been caused by the choice of distinct patient models of MTL dysfunction, as disorders affecting this region differ in selectivity, laterality and mechanisms of post-lesional compensation. Here, we investigated the performance of three distinct patient groups with lesions to the MTL with a battery of visuo-spatial short-term memory tasks. Thirty-one subjects with either unilateral damage to the MTL (postsurgical lesions following resection of a benign brain tumor, 6 right-sided lesions, 5 left) or bilateral damage (10 post-encephalitic lesions, 10 post-anoxic lesions) performed a series of tasks requiring short-term memory of colors, locations or color-location associations. We have shown previously that performance in the association task critically depends on hippocampal integrity. Patients with postsurgical damage of the MTL showed deficient performance in the association task, but performed normally in color and location tasks. Patients with left-sided lesions were almost as impaired as patients with right-sided lesions. Patients with bilateral post-encephalitic lesions showed comparable damage to MTL sub-regions and performed similarly to patients with postsurgical lesions in the association task. However, post-encephalitic patients showed additional impairments in the non-associative color and location tasks. A strikingly similar pattern of deficits was observed in post-anoxic patients. These results suggest a distinct cerebral organization of associative and non-associative short-term memory that was differentially affected in the three patient groups. Thus, while all patient groups may provide appropriate models of medial temporal lobe dysfunction in associative visuo-spatial short-term memory, additional deficits in

  6. Comparison of Masking Level Difference in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Healthy Control Group

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    Soghrat Faghihzadeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a neurological disorder that involves central nervous system. Studies have showed that multiple sclerosis affects behavioral central auditory tests, such as masking release or masking level difference (MLD. The purpose of this study is to compare the masking level difference between multiple sclerosis patients and normal subjects.Methods: This cross sectional and non-interventional study was conducted on 32 multiple sclerosis patients aged between 20-50 years and 32 controls matched for age and gender in Faculty of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. masking level difference test was performed on each subject.Results: The mean masking level difference in the two groups was significantly different (p<0.01 however, gender did not prove to play a role in this difference.Conclusion: As part of the multiple sclerosis diagnosis panel, masking level difference test is an efficient modality for evaluation of hearing impairment and monitoring of rehabilitation progress.

  7. A plea for neutral comparison studies in computational sciences.

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    Anne-Laure Boulesteix

    Full Text Available In computational science literature including, e.g., bioinformatics, computational statistics or machine learning, most published articles are devoted to the development of "new methods", while comparison studies are generally appreciated by readers but surprisingly given poor consideration by many journals. This paper stresses the importance of neutral comparison studies for the objective evaluation of existing methods and the establishment of standards by drawing parallels with clinical research. The goal of the paper is twofold. Firstly, we present a survey of recent computational papers on supervised classification published in seven high-ranking computational science journals. The aim is to provide an up-to-date picture of current scientific practice with respect to the comparison of methods in both articles presenting new methods and articles focusing on the comparison study itself. Secondly, based on the results of our survey we critically discuss the necessity, impact and limitations of neutral comparison studies in computational sciences. We define three reasonable criteria a comparison study has to fulfill in order to be considered as neutral, and explicate general considerations on the individual components of a "tidy neutral comparison study". R codes for completely replicating our statistical analyses and figures are available from the companion website http://www.ibe.med.uni-muenchen.de/organisation/mitarbeiter/020_professuren/boulesteix/plea2013.

  8. Comparison of the clinical features and outcomes in two age-groups of elderly patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao XH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Xing-Hui Shao,1 Yan-Min Yang,1 Jun Zhu,1 Han Zhang,1 Yao Liu,1 Xin Gao,1 Li-Tian Yu,1 Li-Sheng Liu,1 Li Zhao,2 Peng-Fei Yu,3 Hua Zhang,4 Qing He,5 Xiao-Dan Gu6 1Emergency and Intensive Care Center, Fuwai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 2Department of Emergency, Fu Xing Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3Department of Cardiology, Pingdu People’s Hospital, Pingdu, 4Department of Emergency, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, 5Department of Emergency, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 6Department of Emergency, Sixth People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF disproportionately affects older adults. However, direct comparison of clinical features, medical therapy, and outcomes in AF patients aged 65–74 and ≥75 years is rare. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the differences in clinical characteristics and prognosis in these two age-groups of geriatric patients with AF.Materials and methods: A total of 1,336 individuals aged ≥65 years from a Chinese AF registry were assessed in the present study: 570 were in the 65- to 74-year group, and 766 were in the ≥75-year group. Multivariable Cox hazards regression was performed to analyze the major adverse cardiac events (MACEs between groups.Results: In our population, the older group were more likely to have coronary artery disease, hypertension, previous stroke, cognitive disorder, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the 65- to 74-year group were more likely to have valvular heart disease, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, or sleep apnea. The older patients had 1.2-fold higher mean CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes, stroke scores, but less ­probability of being prescribed drugs. Compared with those aged 65–74 years, the older group had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio 2

  9. A Joint GMRT/X-ray study of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, E; Vrtilek, J M; Raychaudhuri, S; Athreya, R; Venturi, T; David, L P

    2009-01-01

    We present results from combined low-frequency radio and X-ray studies of nearby galaxy groups. We consider two main areas: firstly, the evolutionary process from spiral-dominated, HI-rich groups to elliptical-dominated systems with hot, X-ray emitting gas halos; secondly, the mechanism of AGN feedback which appears to balance radiative cooling of the hot halos of evolved groups. The combination of radio and X-ray observations provides a powerful tool for these studies, allowing examination of gas in both hot and cool phases, and of the effects of shock heating and AGN outbursts. Low-frequency radio data are effective in detecting older and less energetic electron populations and are therefore vital for the determination of the energetics and history of such events. We present results from our ongoing study of Stephan's Quintet, a spiral-rich group in which tidal interactions and shock heating appear to be transforming HI in the galaxies into a diffuse X-ray emitting halo, and show examples of AGN feedback fr...

  10. Unilateral neglect and perceptual parsing: a large-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppi-Mòdona, Marco; Savazzi, Silvia; Ricci, Raffaella; Genero, Rosanna; Berruti, Giuseppina; Pepi, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Array-centred and subarray-centred neglect were disambiguated in a group of 116 patients with left neglect by means of a modified version of the Albert test in which the central column of segments was deleted so as to create two separate sets of targets grouped by proximity. The results indicated that neglect was more frequent in array- than subarray-centred coordinates and that, in a minority of cases, neglect co-occurred in both coordinate-systems. The two types of neglect were functionally but not anatomically dissociated. Presence of visual field defects was not prevalent in one type of neglect with respect to the other. These data contribute further evidence to previous single-case and small-group studies by showing that neglect can occur in single or multiple reference frames simultaneously, in agreement with current neuropsychological, neurophysiological and computational concepts of space representation.

  11. Treatment of radiation enteritis: a comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiudice, T.A.; Lang, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with severe radiation injury to the small bowel seen over a 4-year period were randomized to four treatment groups: 1) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po, 2) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, 3) total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, and 4) Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po. Patients received nothing by mouth except water in groups II and III, and only Vivonex-HN in groups I and IV. Patients were treated for 8-wk periods. Improvement was gauged by overall nutritional assessment measurements, nitrogen balance data and by radiological and clinical parameters. No significant difference between groups I, II, III, and IV could be found for age, sex, mean radiation dosage, time of onset after radiation therapy, or initial nutritional assessment data. Differences statistically could be found between groups II and III and I and IV regarding nutritional assessment data, nitrogen balance, radiographic and clinical parameters after therapy, with marked improvement noted in groups II and III. We conclude that a treatment regimen consisting of total parenteral nutrition and bowel rest is beneficial in the treatment of radiation enteritis. Methylprednisolone appears to enhance this effect and indeed, may be responsible for a longer lasting response.

  12. Evaluating the Labor Market Performance of Veterans Using a Matched Comparison Group Design

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen L. Mehay; Hirsch, Barry T.

    2003-01-01

    A key concern in estimating the effect of military service on civilian earnings is bias from unmeasured differences between military veterans and nonveterans. The effects of activeduty service are estimated using the 1986 and 1992 Reserve Components Surveys, which permit a matched comparison between reservists who are veterans and reservists without active-duty service. Because military entrance requirements are identical for the reserves and active duty, estimated treatment effects embody co...

  13. Comparison of Estimators for Exponentiated Inverted Weibull Distribution Based on Grouped Data Amal

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In many situations, instead of complete sample, data is available only in grouped form. This paper presents estimation of population parameters for the exponentiated inverted Weibull distribution based on grouped data with equi and unequi-spaced grouping. Several alternative estimation schemes, such as, the method of maximum likelihood, least lines, least squares, minimum chi-square, and modified minimum chi-square are considered. Since the different methods of estimation didn...

  14. Hypertrophic scarring in cleft lip repair: a comparison of incidence among ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani AM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ali M Soltani, Cameron S Francis, Arash Motamed, Ashley L Karatsonyi, Jeffrey A Hammoudeh, Pedro A Sanchez-Lara, John F Reinisch, Mark M UrataDivision of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CA, USA; The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Although hypertrophic scar (HTS formation following cleft lip repair is relatively common, published rates vary widely, from 1% to nearly 50%. The risk factors associated with HTS formation in cleft patients are not well characterized. The primary aim of this retrospective study of 180 cleft lip repairs is to evaluate the frequency of postoperative HTS among various ethnic groups following cleft lip repair.Methods: A retrospective chart view of patients undergoing primary cleft lip repair over a 16-year period (1990–2005 by the senior surgeon was performed. The primary outcome was the presence of HTS at 1 year postoperatively. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to evaluate potential risk factors for HTS, including ethnicity, type and laterality of cleft, and gender.Results: One hundred and eighty patients who underwent cleft lip repair were included in the study. The overall rate of postoperative HTS formation was 25%. Ethnicity alone was found to be an independent predictor of HTS formation. Caucasian patients had the lowest rate of HTS formation (11.8% and were used as the reference group. HTS rates were significantly higher in the other ethnicities, 32.2% in Hispanic patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.53–8.85, and 36.3% for Asian patients (OR 4.27; 95% CI: 1.36–13.70. Sex, cleft type, and cleft laterality were not associated with increased rates of HTS.Conclusions: Differences in ethnic makeup of respective patient populations may be a major factor influencing the wide variability of reported

  15. Platinum-group elements in the Eastern Deccan volcanic province and a comparison with platinum metals of the western Deccan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Crocket; Dalim Paul; Trisha Lala

    2013-08-01

    This study is the first detailed investigation of the platinum-group elements (PGE) at the eastern margin of the Deccan volcanic province of India. One of the PGE, osmium, is not included largely because of analytical problems. The study is focused on mafic volcanics and dykes from four areas including Amarkantak, Umaria, Shahdol and Chirimiri. The first two localities represent two lava piles of about 170 and 400 m thickness respectively. In Umaria, 16 flows have been demarcated based on petrography and field studies. The Shahdol samples are basal lava formations overlying Gondwana sediments (Carboniferous) and the Chirimiri samples are dykes. In this study, the western Deccan province is defined as the Western Ghats plus Kutch. On average, the PGE are ∼20% higher in Amarkantak than Umaria and the flows are ∼13% higher in PGE than the dykes. A Zr vs. Pd scattergram found a strong positive correlation for these two elements except for one Umaria sample which indicated severe Pd loss. A comparison of west and east parts of the Deccan volcanic province using primitive mantle normalization showed that higher values prevailed in the western province suite in the Ni-Ir-Ru-Pt region. In contrast, eastern province values dominated in the Pd-Au-Cu region at the ‘Cu’ end of the profiles. A strong dominance of Pd in the eastern Deccan was also of interest. A number of factors, for example, percentage partial melting of the source rock and the temperature and pressure of partial melting strongly influence the character of these profiles. The observed PGE profile characteristics probably result in part from a long distance of subsurface transport of Deccan magma from the western to eastern regions.

  16. A Price Survey Comparison of Alcoholic Beverages with the Five Basic Food Groups in Paraiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles I. Abramson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of alcohol abuse is relatively new in Brazil. Government estimates suggest that 11.2% of the Brazilian population is alcohol dependent. Problems associated with alcohol dependence include domestic violence, increased risk of traffic accidents, poor self-esteem and weak academic performance. A factor known to correlate with alcohol abuse in 12-17 year olds is to have the money necessary to purchase alcoholic beverages. No data is available, however, on the price of alcoholic beverages. The objective of the present study was to provide data on price and to compare the price of alcoholic beverages to basic food items in the Brazilian diet. We also had interest in studying a population in the northeast region of Brazil. This region is the poorest in Brazil, has the highest percentage of alcohol dependency and is seldom the focus of research on dependency. We report that the prices of many alcoholic beverages are less than the price of basic food items. Prices of alcoholic beverages including beer, wine and spirits were compared to the prices of select food items as represented in the Food Pyramid. Food items were selected from the categories of Grain, Dairy, Fruit, Meat and Vegetable. Data was gathered from 32 supermarkets in 8 cities in the northeast state of Paraiba. The price of alcohol is generally less expensive than most basic food group items, especially brands of cachaça (a spirit distilled from sugar cane and beer. Data on price should be considered in any alcohol dependency program in Brazil.

  17. A Comparison of Nature Waves and Model Waves with Special Reference to Wave Grouping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution.......This paper represents a comparative analyses of the occurrence of wave grouping in field storm waves and laboratory waves with similar power spectra and wave height distribution....

  18. Renormalization group study of damping in nonequilibrium field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zanella, J

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we shall study whether dissipation in a $\\lambda\\phi^{4}$ may be described, in the long wavelength, low frequency limit, with a simple Ohmic term $\\kappa\\dot{\\phi}$, as it is usually done, for example, in studies of defect formation in nonequilibrium phase transitions. We shall obtain an effective theory for the long wavelength modes through the coarse graining of shorter wavelengths. We shall implement this coarse graining by iterating a Wilsonian renormalization group transformation, where infinitesimal momentum shells are coarse-grained one at a time, on the influence action describing the dissipative dynamics of the long wavelength modes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of the nonequilibrium renormalization group to the calculation of a damping coefficient in quantum field theory.

  19. [Comparison between 2 groups of nursing professionals on the knowledge of pediatric pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobete Prieto, C; Rey Galán, C; Kiza, A H

    2015-01-01

    To compare infant pain knowledge between a group of nurses who work in a pediatric hospital and one that works in a general hospital. Descriptive study based on the use of a validated questionnaire for assessing the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about pediatric pain (Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain [PNKAS]). PNKAS questionnaire was distributed to the nursing staff of a pediatric hospital and a general hospital and the results were compared. The average score obtained in the pediatric vs. the general hospital was: mean, 51.7% vs. 47.2%, 95% confidence interval, 47.5 to 56% vs. 43.6 to 50.8% (P=.098). There were no differences between the scores in the PNKAS questionnaire between nurses working exclusively with children and nurses working with general population. Training on pediatric pain needs to be improved in nurses caring for sick children. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Debrecen and Mount Wilson/Kodaikanal sunspot group tilt angles and the Joy's law

    CERN Document Server

    Baranyi, T

    2014-01-01

    The study of active region tilt angles and their variations in different time scales plays an important role in revealing the subsurface dynamics of magnetic flux ropes and in understanding the dynamo mechanism. In order to reveal the exact characteristics of tilt angles, precise long-term tilt angle data bases are needed. However, there are only a few different data sets at present, which are difficult to be compared and cross-calibrate because of their substantial deviations. In this paper, we describe new tilt angle data bases derived from the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data ($DPD$) (1974--) and from the SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data ($SDD$) (1996-2010) sunspot catalogues. We compare them with the traditional sunspot group tilt angle data bases of Mount Wilson Observatory (1917-85) and Kodaikanal Solar Observatory (1906-87) and we analyse the deviations. Various methods and filters are investigated which may improve the sample of data and may help deriving better results based on combined data. As a demonstration...

  1. Comparison of Debrecen and Mount Wilson/Kodaikanal sunspot group tilt angles and the Joy's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, T.

    2015-02-01

    The study of active region tilt angles and their variations in different time-scales plays an important role in revealing the subsurface dynamics of magnetic flux ropes and in understanding the dynamo mechanism. In order to reveal the exact characteristics of tilt angles, precise long-term tilt angle data bases are needed. However, there are only a few different data sets at present, which are difficult to be compared and cross-calibrate because of their substantial deviations. In this paper, we describe new tilt angle data bases derived from the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD) (1974-) and from the SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data (SDD) (1996-2010) sunspot catalogues. We compare them with the traditional sunspot group tilt angle data bases of Mount Wilson Observatory (1917-85) and Kodaikanal Solar Observatory (1906-87) and we analyse the deviations. Various methods and filters are investigated which may improve the sample of data and may help in deriving better results based on combined data. As a demonstration of the enhanced quality of the improved data set a refined diagram of Joy's law is presented.

  2. Vast planes of satellites in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group: comparison to Andromeda

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Knebe, A; Libeskind, N; Yepes, G; Gottlober, S; Hoffman, Y

    2014-01-01

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of former similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modelling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al.. However the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we fin...

  3. Comparison of the serum sensitivity of uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli isolated from different diagnostic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vraneš,

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal activity of serum caused by complement system is an important defence mechanism protecting the host organism against infection. The capacity to resist bactericidal activity of normal human serum contributes to the virulence of many gram-negative pathogens. Serum resistance in bacteria has been attributed to their surface components, but exact mechanism of resistance which most likely involves multiple factors is not well understood. In this study, the capacity of Escherichia coli to resist the bactericidal action of serum was examined in 85 clinical isolates obtained from patients with acute pyelonephritis (n=23, acute cystitis (n=22, chronic pyelonephritis (n=22 and asymptomatic bacteriuria (n=18. Serum sensitivity was also examined in relation to the serogroup specificity and expression of the different adhesins of the strains.Bacterial susceptibility to serum killing was measured by assessing regrowth after incubation in serum according to Schiller and Hatch method. The adhesins of E. coli were determined by hemagglutination and inhibition of hemagglutiation, and serotyping was performed on glass slides and confirmed using a mechanized microtechnique.The significant correlation between serum resistance of uropathogenic strains of E. coli and expression of P-fimbriae and O6 serogroup was observed.Theincidence of serum-resistant E. coli strains was significantly higher in strains isolated from urine of patients with acute pyelonephritis, as compared to strains isolated in other diagnostic groups, which is in accordance with higher virulence and invasive potential of these strains.

  4. Ab-Initio Study of the Group 2 Hydride Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.; Manship, Daniel R.

    2013-06-01

    The beryllium hydride (BeH)- dimer has recently been shown to be surprisingly strongly bound, with an electronic structure which is highly dependent on internuclear separation. At the equilibrium distance, the negative charge is to be found on the beryllium atom, despite the higher electronegativity of the hydrogen. The current study expands this investigation to the other Group 2 hydrides, and attempts to explain these effects. M. Verdicchio, G. L. Bendazzoli, S. Evangelisti, T. Leininger J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, 192, (2013)

  5. Microscopic study of human spleen in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizamma Alex

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microscopic structure of spleen is variable depending on the developmental stage of the organ, and the age and immune status of the individual. The aim of the investigation was to study the microscopic structure of human spleen in different age groups, starting from a six month old foetus up to the eighth decade of life. Methods: Seventy formalin fixed human spleens obtained postmortem, were included in the study. They were classified into different age groups, in both sexes, for a detailed study of the microscopic details. Results: The white pulp of spleen showed peri-arteriolar lymphatic sheath (PALS and lymphatic follicles. The corona or mantle zone and the germinal centre were discernible in many of the Malpighian bodies. The marginal zone separating the red pulp from the white pulp also could be clearly demarcated. The marginal sinus and peri-follicular zone could be seen in some sections only. The capsule thickness, trabecular network, cellularity of white pulp and red pulp, the connective tissue framework seen in the red pulp etc., showed variations in the different age groups. Conclusion: The microscopic structure of spleen varies in different age groups, with the PALS and the white pulp showing scanty cellularity in the six month foetus, and almost uniform cellularity in all areas of spleen at full term. Thereafter the follicles showed increase in its cellularity up to the third decade, and then seemed becoming progressively atrophic. Further studies are required on age related changes in the cellular architecture of this organ correlating with its functions. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1701-1706

  6. Latitudinal comparison of spawning season and growth of 0-group sole, Solea solea (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, C.; Amara, R.; Maia, A.; Cabral, H. N.

    2008-07-01

    0-Group sole, Solea solea (Linnaeus, 1758) were sampled in four nursery grounds: two on the Northern French coast and two on the Portuguese coast. Juvenile sole were collected at the Vilaine estuary (Northern Bay of Biscay) in 1992, in the Authie estuary (Eastern English Channel) in 1997, and in the Douro and Tagus estuary (Northern and central Portugal, respectively) in 2005. Left lapilli otoliths were used to estimate age and investigate variability in growth rates and hatch dates. In the French study areas nursery colonisation ended in early June in the Vilaine estuary and in late June in the Authie estuary. In the Portuguese estuaries nursery colonisation ended in May in the Douro estuary and in late June in the Tagus estuary. Growth rates were higher in the Portuguese estuaries, 0.767 mm d -1 in the Tagus estuary and 0.903 mm d -1 in the Douro estuary. In the French nurseries, growth rates were estimated to be 0.473 mm d -1 in the Villaine estuary and 0.460 mm d -1 in the Authie estuary. Data on growth rates from other studies shows that growth rates are higher at lower latitudes, probably due to higher water temperature. Spawning took place between early January and early April in the Villaine estuary's coastal area in 1992. In 1997, in the Authie estuary spawning started in late January and ended in early April. On the Douro estuary's adjacent coast spawning started in mid-January and ended in late March, in 2005, while on the Tagus estuary's adjacent coast spawning started in mid-February and ended in mid-April, in the same year. Literature analysis of the spawning period of sole along a latitudinal gradient ranging from 38°N to 55°N in the Northeast Atlantic indicated that there is a latitudinal trend, in that spawning starts sooner at lower latitudes. Results support that local conditions, particularly hydrodynamics, may overrule general latitudinal trends.

  7. Reference group theory with implications for information studies: a theoretical essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Murell Dawson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role and implications of reference group theory in relation to the field of library and information science. Reference group theory is based upon the principle that people take the standards of significant others as a basis for making self-appraisals, comparisons, and choices regarding need and use of information. Research that applies concepts of reference group theory to various sectors of library and information studies can provide data useful in enhancing areas such as information-seeking research, special populations, and uses of information. Implications are promising that knowledge gained from like research can be beneficial in helping information professionals better understand the role theory plays in examining ways in which people manage their information and social worlds.

  8. Innovation in Accounting Tasks: Empirical Study in Two Professional Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Cristina da Silva Vicente

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge on innovation in accounting tasks, from the point of view of two professional groups. Its goals are: evaluating the importance given by the professionals to accounting tasks; identifying whether there is convergence between the two professional groups, regarding the importance of the tasks; examining whether there is an association between the professionals’ individual characteristics and the importance they attach to the tasks. Two professional groups were surveyed: 105 financial officers of the top 500 Portuguese companies; and 412 Chartered Accountants. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the respondents attach more importance to the traditional tasks, linked to the concept of a monetary-oriented accountant, and less importance to the more innovative tasks, related to business strategy; there is no convergence between the two professional groups in terms of the importance of the accountants’ participation in the strategic tasks. Regarding the association between individual characteristics and the level of importance assigned to the accounting tasks, we found an influence of the following characteristics: gender; academic degree of the professionals; and the institution where that degree was obtained.

  9. Hearing aids and tinnitus--an experimental group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, L; Scott, B; Lindberg, P; Lyttkens, L

    1987-05-01

    From a waiting list consisting of hearing-impaired patients waiting for hearing aids to be fitted, 39 subjects who at interview also stated that they had tinnitus took part in an experimental group study with the aim of investigating the effect of a hearing aid on tinnitus. No subject had any previous experience of hearing aids. The subjects were randomly allocated to a treatment and a waiting list control group. After an initial interview, the routine programme for the fitting of hearing aids started in the treatment group, while the waiting list control group had to wait for 6 weeks before starting the same hearing aid rehabilitation programme. The hearing aids were fitted exclusively for hearing purposes. As expected, the hearing aids improved the hearing capacity, but they did not reduce tinnitus as recorded on a visual analogue scale. According to information obtained at the final interview, there were significant differences in tinnitus between subjects who used their aid for more than 2 hours daily and those who used it for less than 2 hours. However, the results of scaling (pre- and post-fitting) did not support this finding. The discrepancy between the scaling and interview data is probably due to demand characteristics.

  10. Length of training, hostility and the martial arts: a comparison with other sporting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K; Thornton, E

    1992-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that training in the martial arts leads to a reduction in levels of hostility. However, such research has only compared hostility within martial arts groups. The present research compares two martial arts groups and two other sporting groups on levels of assaultive, verbal and indirect hostility. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between length of training in the respondent's stated sport and whether that sport was a martial art in predicting assaultive and verbal hostility. The form of the interaction suggests that participation in the martial arts is associated, over time, with decreased feelings of assaultive and verbal hostility. PMID:1422642

  11. Length of training, hostility and the martial arts: a comparison with other sporting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K; Thornton, E

    1992-09-01

    Previous research has indicated that training in the martial arts leads to a reduction in levels of hostility. However, such research has only compared hostility within martial arts groups. The present research compares two martial arts groups and two other sporting groups on levels of assaultive, verbal and indirect hostility. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between length of training in the respondent's stated sport and whether that sport was a martial art in predicting assaultive and verbal hostility. The form of the interaction suggests that participation in the martial arts is associated, over time, with decreased feelings of assaultive and verbal hostility.

  12. Adolescent girls' views on cosmetic surgery: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikali, Eleni-Marina; Dittmar, Helga; Ayers, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined adolescent girls' views of cosmetic surgery. Seven focus groups were run with girls aged 15-18 years (N = 27). Participants read case studies of women having cosmetic surgery, followed by discussion and exploration of their views. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) dissatisfaction with appearance, (2) acceptability of cosmetic surgery, (3) feelings about undergoing cosmetic surgery and (4) cosmetic surgery in the media. Results suggest the acceptability of cosmetic surgery varies according to the reasons for having it and that the media play an important role by normalising surgery and under-representing the risks associated with it.

  13. Global Analysis and Comparison of the Transcriptomes and Proteomes of Group A Streptococcus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Le Breton, Yoann; Tran, Bao Q.; Scott, Alison J.; Harro, Janette M.; Ernst, Robert K.; Goo, Young Ah; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Goodlett, David R.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To gain a better understanding of the genes and proteins involved in group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) biofilm growth, we analyzed the transcriptome, cellular proteome, and cell wall proteome from biofilms at different stages and compared them to those of plankton-stage GAS. Using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) shotgun proteomics, we found distinct expression profiles in the transcriptome and proteome. A total of 46 genes and 41 proteins showed expression across the majority of biofilm time points that was consistently higher or consistently lower than that seen across the majority of planktonic time points. However, there was little overlap between the genes and proteins on these two lists. In line with other studies comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, the overall correlation between the two data sets was modest. Furthermore, correlation was poorest for biofilm samples. This suggests a high degree of regulation of protein expression by nontranscriptional mechanisms. This report illustrates the benefits and weaknesses of two different approaches to global expression profiling, and it also demonstrates the advantage of using proteomics in conjunction with transcriptomics to gain a more complete picture of global expression within biofilms. In addition, this report provides the fullest characterization of expression patterns in GAS biofilms currently available. IMPORTANCE Prokaryotes are thought to regulate their proteomes largely at the level of transcription. However, the results from this first set of global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of paired microbial samples presented here show that this assumption is false for the majority of genes and their products in S. pyogenes. In addition, the tenuousness of the link between transcription and translation becomes even more pronounced when microbes exist in a biofilm or a stationary planktonic state

  14. Bayesian model reduction and empirical Bayes for group (DCM) studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl J; Litvak, Vladimir; Oswal, Ashwini; Razi, Adeel; Stephan, Klaas E; van Wijk, Bernadette C M; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zeidman, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This technical note describes some Bayesian procedures for the analysis of group studies that use nonlinear models at the first (within-subject) level - e.g., dynamic causal models - and linear models at subsequent (between-subject) levels. Its focus is on using Bayesian model reduction to finesse the inversion of multiple models of a single dataset or a single (hierarchical or empirical Bayes) model of multiple datasets. These applications of Bayesian model reduction allow one to consider parametric random effects and make inferences about group effects very efficiently (in a few seconds). We provide the relatively straightforward theoretical background to these procedures and illustrate their application using a worked example. This example uses a simulated mismatch negativity study of schizophrenia. We illustrate the robustness of Bayesian model reduction to violations of the (commonly used) Laplace assumption in dynamic causal modelling and show how its recursive application can facilitate both classical and Bayesian inference about group differences. Finally, we consider the application of these empirical Bayesian procedures to classification and prediction.

  15. Studying Problem Solving through Group Discussion in Chat Rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Kozlova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present article we use a chat conversations’ corpus to study the process of resolving language problems. Our corpus includes chat conversations which took place between LSP students engaged in correcting errors in their peers’ summaries. The participants worked in groups and used the Windows Messenger program for communication within the group. Their task also included making use of electronic dictionaries and other reference materials. The conversations’ corpus obtained as a result of this exercise was analyzed holistically for possible indicators of each particular stage of the problem solving process. Later these indicators were validated throughout the entire corpus. Each problem solving process was thus represented as a chain of indicators and acceptability was determined for each error correction. The resulting problem solving chains were used to prove our hypotheses concerning internal and external support in text reproduction.

  16. Risk adjustment models for interhospital comparison of CS rates using Robson's ten group classification system and other socio-demographic and clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colais, Paola; Fantini, Maria P; Fusco, Danilo; Carretta, Elisa; Stivanello, Elisa; Lenzi, Jacopo; Pieri, Giulia; Perucci, Carlo A

    2012-06-21

    Caesarean section (CS) rate is a quality of health care indicator frequently used at national and international level. The aim of this study was to assess whether adjustment for Robson's Ten Group Classification System (TGCS), and clinical and socio-demographic variables of the mother and the fetus is necessary for inter-hospital comparisons of CS rates. The study population includes 64,423 deliveries in Emilia-Romagna between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, classified according to theTGCS. Poisson regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted hospital relative risks of CS compared to a reference category. Analyses were carried out in the overall population and separately according to the Robson groups (groups I, II, III, IV and V-X combined). Adjusted relative risks (RR) of CS were estimated using two risk-adjustment models; the first (M1) including the TGCS group as the only adjustment factor; the second (M2) including in addition demographic and clinical confounders identified using a stepwise selection procedure. Percentage variations between crude and adjusted RRs by hospital were calculated to evaluate the confounding effect of covariates. The percentage variations from crude to adjusted RR proved to be similar in M1 and M2 model. However, stratified analyses by Robson's classification groups showed that residual confounding for clinical and demographic variables was present in groups I (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and III (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, spontaneous labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and to a minor extent in groups II (nulliparous, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour) and IV (multiparous, excluding previous CS, single, cephalic, ≥37 weeks, induced or CS before labour). The TGCS classification is useful for inter-hospital comparison of CS section rates, but

  17. Comparison of pain control medication in three age groups of elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honari, S; Patterson, D R; Gibbons, J; Martin-Herz, S P; Mann, R; Gibran, N S; Heimbach, D M

    1997-01-01

    There are no published reports of burn pain management in the elderly population. To assess the range of requirement and use of opioids among elderly patients with burns of different age categories, a retrospective review of 89 consecutive admissions of patients over 55 years of age (January 1995 through July 1996) was conducted. Complete data were available on 44 patients with a burn mean total body surface area of 17.2%. Patient ages ranged from 55 to 92 years. Individuals were divided into three age categories: Group I (55 to 65) n = 20; Group II (66 to 75) n = 14; and Group III (76 to 92) n = 10. Use of commonly prescribed opioids for procedural pain and breakthrough pain were evaluated. We compared the opioid equivalents of medications prescribed versus the actual amount administered. Paired t tests comparing minimum amount of medication ordered with that given revealed Group I patients received significantly more procedural medication than the minimum prescribed (t = 3.88, p = 0.001), and that Group III patients were given significantly less as needed medication than the minimum prescribed (t = 2.58, p < 0.05).

  18. Blood group comparisons between European mouflon sheep and north American desert bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T D; Nguyen, T C

    1982-01-01

    Blood group systems in true sheep (Ovis) provide an additional method by which phylogenetic relationships can be measured. Of the eight genetic systems of blood groups identified in domestic sheep, all appeared to have their homologue in European mouflons and at least six might have their equivalent in North American desert bighorns. The red cells of the European mouflon, which is believed to be ancestral to domestic sheep, cross-reacted with domestic sheep blood-group typing reagents much more strongly and extensively than did the red cells of desert bighorn sheep. It also was noted that all the Mexican desert bighorns tested were Da positive, but their blood factor was not observed in the Nelson desert bighorns sampled. This observation indicated that the two subspecies might differ from each other with respect to the D blood group system. Transferrin type D was observed in the mouflons, while Tfs D and E were in the desert bighorns. Hemoglobins B and AB were observed in the mouflons but only Hb B occurred in the desert bighorns. The systematic implications of blood group polymorphisms are discussed.

  19. Inviting Argument by Analogy: Analogical-Mapping-Based Comparison Activities as a Scaffold for Small-Group Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emig, Brandon R.; McDonald, Scott; Zembal-Saul, Carla; Strauss, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    This study invited small groups to make several arguments by analogy about simple machines. Groups were first provided training on analogical (structure) mapping and were then invited to use analogical mapping as a scaffold to make arguments. In making these arguments, groups were asked to consider three simple machines: two machines that they had…

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Short Anger Management Group for Special Education Teachers in Greece: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Tsiligiannis, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a psychoeducational group for Greek special education teachers, all but one of whom reported experiencing anger in class. An anger management program was designed, which included a short, four-session package to be given within two weeks. The results of a pretest-posttest comparison revealed reductions in…

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Short Anger Management Group for Special Education Teachers in Greece: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Tsiligiannis, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a psychoeducational group for Greek special education teachers, all but one of whom reported experiencing anger in class. An anger management program was designed, which included a short, four-session package to be given within two weeks. The results of a pretest-posttest comparison revealed reductions in…

  2. TRUST MATTERS: A CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF NORTHERN GHANA AND OAXACA GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eAcedo-Carmona

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A cross-cultural analysis of trust and cooperation networks in Northern Ghana (NGHA and Oaxaca (OAX was carried out by means of ego networks and interviews. These regions were chosen because both are inhabited by several ethnic groups, thus providing a good opportunity to test the cultural group selection hypothesis. Against the predictions of this approach, we found that in both regions cooperation is grounded in personal trust groups, and that social cohesion depends on these emotional bonds. Moreover, in agreement with Fiske's notion of evolved proclivities, we also found two distinct kinds of trust networks, one for each region, which vary in terms of the degree of ethnic interrelation. This pattern suggests that social cohesion increases when environmental resources are scarce.

  3. Trust matters: a cross-cultural comparison of Northern Ghana and Oaxaca groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    A cross-cultural analysis of trust and cooperation networks in Northern Ghana (NGHA) and Oaxaca (OAX) was carried out by means of ego networks and interviews. These regions were chosen because both are inhabited by several ethnic groups, thus providing a good opportunity to test the cultural group selection hypothesis. Against the predictions of this approach, we found that in both regions cooperation is grounded in personal trust groups, and that social cohesion depends on these emotional bonds. Moreover, in agreement with Fiske's notion of "evolved proclivities," we also found two distinct kinds of trust networks, one for each region, which vary in terms of the degree of ethnic interrelation. This pattern suggests that social cohesion increases when environmental resources are scarce.

  4. Trust matters: a cross-cultural comparison of Northern Ghana and Oaxaca groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    A cross-cultural analysis of trust and cooperation networks in Northern Ghana (NGHA) and Oaxaca (OAX) was carried out by means of ego networks and interviews. These regions were chosen because both are inhabited by several ethnic groups, thus providing a good opportunity to test the cultural group selection hypothesis. Against the predictions of this approach, we found that in both regions cooperation is grounded in personal trust groups, and that social cohesion depends on these emotional bonds. Moreover, in agreement with Fiske's notion of “evolved proclivities,” we also found two distinct kinds of trust networks, one for each region, which vary in terms of the degree of ethnic interrelation. This pattern suggests that social cohesion increases when environmental resources are scarce. PMID:26052296

  5. Statistical Network Analysis for Functional MRI: Mean Networks and Group Comparisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric E Ginestet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparing networks in neuroscience is hard, because the topological properties of a given network are necessarily dependent on the number of edges of that network. This problem arises in the analysis of both weighted and unweighted networks. The term density is often used in this context, in order to refer to the mean edge weight of a weighted network, or to the number of edges in an unweighted one. Comparing families of networks is therefore statistically difficult because differences in topology are necessarily associated with differences in density. In this review paper, we consider this problem from two different perspectives, which include (i the construction of summary networks, such as how to compute and visualize the mean network from a sample of network-valued data points; and (ii how to test for topological differences, when two families of networks also exhibit significant differences in density. In the first instance, we show that the issue of summarizing a family of networks can be conducted by either adopting a mass-univariate approach, which produces a statistical parametric network (SPN, or by directly computing the mean network, provided that a metric has been specified on the space of all networks with a given number of nodes. In the second part of this review, we then highlight the inherent problems associated with the comparison of topological functions of families of networks that differ in density. In particular, we show that a wide range of topological summaries, such as global efficiency and network modularity are highly sensitive to differences in density. Moreover, these problems are not restricted to unweighted metrics, as we demonstrate that the same issues remain present when considering the weighted versions of these metrics. We conclude by encouraging caution, when reporting such statistical comparisons, and by emphasizing the importance of constructing summary networks.

  6. Global comparison of warring groups in 2002-2007: fatalities from targeting civilians vs. fighting battles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelyn Hsiao-Rei Hicks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Warring groups that compete to dominate a civilian population confront contending behavioral options: target civilians or battle the enemy. We aimed to describe degrees to which combatant groups concentrated lethal behavior into intentionally targeting civilians as opposed to engaging in battle with opponents in contemporary armed conflict. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified all 226 formally organized state and non-state groups (i.e. actors that engaged in lethal armed conflict during 2002-2007: 43 state and 183 non-state. We summed civilians killed by an actor's intentional targeting with civilians and combatants killed in battles in which the actor was involved for total fatalities associated with each actor, indicating overall scale of armed conflict. We used a Civilian Targeting Index (CTI, defined as the proportion of total fatalities caused by intentional targeting of civilians, to measure the concentration of lethal behavior into civilian targeting. We report actor-specific findings and four significant trends: 1. 61% of all 226 actors (95% CI 55% to 67% refrained from targeting civilians. 2. Logistic regression showed actors were more likely to have targeted civilians if conflict duration was three or more years rather than one year. 3. In the 88 actors that targeted civilians, multiple regressions showed an inverse correlation between CTI values and the total number of fatalities. Conflict duration of three or more years was associated with lower CTI values than conflict duration of one year. 4. When conflict scale and duration were accounted for, state and non-state actors did not differ. We describe civilian targeting by actors in prolonged conflict. We discuss comparable patterns found in nature and interdisciplinary research. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most warring groups in 2002-2007 did not target civilians. Warring groups that targeted civilians in small-scale, brief conflict concentrated more lethal

  7. Theoretical studies on energetic materials bearing pentaflurosulphyl (SF5) groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Xiao-Hong; Cui Hong-Ling; Ju Wei-Wei; Li Tong-Wei; Zhang Rui-Zhou; Yong Yong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Heats of formation (HOF) for a series of energetic materials containing SF5 group were studied by density functional theory. Results show that HOFs increase with the augmention of field effects of substituted groups. Addition of furazan or furoxan ring increases HOF of the energetic materials. All the SF5-containing compounds have densities which are ∼0.19 g/cm3 higher than those containing -NH2 group. S-F bond is the trigger bond for the thermolysis process in the title compounds and bond dissociation energies of the weakest bonds range from 351.1 to 388.3 kJ/mol. Detonation velocities (D) and pressures (P) are evaluated by Kamlet-Jacobs equations with the calculated densities and HOFs. Results show that increasing the amount of furazan rings results in a larger D and P. Considering the detonation performance and thermal stability, eight compounds may be considered as potential candidates for high-energy density materials.

  8. Self-esteem: a comparative study of adolescents from mainstream and minority religious groups in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Ayub, Nadia

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the level of self-esteem among religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) by making a comparison with their dominant counterparts (Muslims) in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that adolescents of religious minorities would have lower level of self-esteem than their dominant counterparts. In the present study 320 adolescents participated, in which 160 adolescents belonged to minority religious groups (i.e. 76 Christians and 84 Hindus) and 160 adolescents belonged to dominant religious group i.e. Muslims. To assess self-esteem of the participants, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg in Society and the adolescent self image, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1965) was used. One Way Analysis of Variance reveals that religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) inclined to have lower self-esteem as compared to their dominant counterpart (Muslim adolescents).

  9. National logistics working groups: A landscape analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leab, Dorothy; Schreiber, Benjamin; Kasonde, Musonda; Bessat, Olivia; Bui, Son; Loisel, Carine

    2017-04-19

    Several countries have acknowledged the contributions made by national logistics working groups (NLWG) to ensure equitable access to the expanded program on immunization's (EPI) vaccines against preventable diseases. In order to provide key insights to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) supply chain hub - as well as other players, including national EPI - a landscape analysis study was conducted from September 2015 to February 2016. This is a cross-sectional survey taken by 43 countries that combines qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected through a desk review, consultation, interviews, and distance questioning. References and guidance were used to determine and specify the underlying mechanisms of NLWGs. The key findings are:This study has provided a general overview of the status of NLWGs for immunization in various countries. Based on the key insights of the study, technical assistance needs have been identified, and immunization partners will be required to help countries create and reinforce their NLWGs.

  10. Comparison of a citation-based indicator and peer review for absolute and specific measures of research-group excellence

    CERN Document Server

    Mryglod, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, B

    2013-01-01

    Many different measures are used to assess academic research excellence and these are subject to ongoing discussion and debate within the scientometric, university-management and policy-making communities internationally. One topic of continued importance is the extent to which citation-based indicators compare with peer-review-based evaluation. Here we analyse the correlations between values of a particular citation-based impact indicator and peer-review scores in several academic disciplines, from natural to social sciences and humanities. We perform the comparison for research groups rather than for individuals. We make comparisons on two levels. At an absolute level, we compare total impact and overall strength of the group as a whole. At a specific level, we compare academic impact and quality, normalised by the size of the group. We find very high correlations at the former level for some disciplines and poor correlations at the latter level for all disciplines. This means that, although the citation-ba...

  11. A Clinico - Aetiological Study Of Dermatoses In Paediatric Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sadhan K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred patients of the age group 0-12 years were studied for different types of dermatoses. Pyoderma (35.6%, scabies (22.4% and eczema (17.6% were the most common dermatological conditions, followed by molluscum contagiosum (4.6%, popular urticaria with insect bite (4%, vitiligo (3.4%, miliaria (2.8%, nevus (1.6%. Other dermatoses (8% were pityriasis rosea, wart, chicken pox, herpes zoster, acne vulgaris, leprosy, angular stomatitis, pruritus vulvae, psoriasis, candidiasis, condylomatalata, fixed drug relation, tinea capitis and corporis, phrynoderma, alopecia areata, phimosis, geographic tongue, trichotillomania, canitis, pediculosis, hypertrophic scar and pityriasis versicolor.

  12. Density matrix renormalization group numerical study of the kagome antiferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H C; Weng, Z Y; Sheng, D N

    2008-09-12

    We numerically study the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice using the density-matrix renormalization group method. We find that the ground state is a magnetically disordered spin liquid, characterized by an exponential decay of spin-spin correlation function in real space and a magnetic structure factor showing system-size independent peaks at commensurate magnetic wave vectors. We obtain a spin triplet excitation gap DeltaE(S=1)=0.055+/-0.005 by extrapolation based on the large size results, and confirm the presence of gapless singlet excitations. The physical nature of such an exotic spin liquid is also discussed.

  13. [Hospital Infection Epidemiology Nederland (ZIEN): from club to study group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M; Kluytmans, J A; Voss, A

    1997-08-09

    Medical care is increasingly a technical business, and hospitalised patients are more and more susceptible to infections, notably due to the application of aggressive therapies for all kinds of disorders. As a consequence the epidemiology of hospital infections requires serious attention. Following the initiative of some medical microbiologists in the Netherlands, a study group was established to tackle this epidemiology and to initiate relevant research (Working party on Hospital Infections and Epidemiology of the Netherlands; WHEN). Recent subjects include fungemia in hospitalised patients, risk factors for acquiring methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus during a stay abroad, and prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

  14. Comparison of TNM-based stage grouping versus UICC/AJCC stage grouping (7th edition) in malignant parotid gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreppel, Matthias; Scheer, Martin; Meyer, Moritz; Stenner, Markus; Wedemeyer, Inga; Drebber, Uta; Semrau, Robert; Odenthal, Margarete; Zöller, Joachim E; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Büttner, Reinhard; Beutner, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Although the UICC/AJCC's TNM staging of the 7th edition was improved in 2002, there are still shortcomings concerning the prognostic quality. Alternative TNM-based stage-groupings such as the T and N Integer Score (TANIS) where shown to have a better prognostic quality for various kinds of head and neck tumors in the past. The aim of the study was to compare the prognostic value of the 7th edition of the UICC/AJCC TNM-classification for carcinoma of the parotid gland with different TNM-based stage groupings. The retrospective analysis included 180 patients with carcinoma of the parotid gland diagnosed between 1986 and 2007. The stage grouping system of the 7th edition of the UICC/AJCC and TNM-based stage-groupings (TANIS-3, TANIS-8, Snyderman, Berg and Hart) were tested for their prognostic significance. Overall survival (OS) was plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Prognostic factors were identified through univariate and multivariate analysis. In univariate analysis all stage-groupings had a highly significant impact on overall survival (pTNM-based stage groupings the UICC/AJCC-classification did not provide significant prediction of OS, while alternative stage-groupings such as the TANIS-8 had a higher prognostic value. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Social Validation of Three Physical Restraint Procedures: A Comparison of Young People and Professional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Andrew A.; Sturmey, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Forty-one special education professionals and classroom aides, 47 residential care staff, and 74 high school students rated the treatment acceptability of three forms of physical restraint. A chair method of restraint was rated as more acceptable than other floor restraint methods by all three groups. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  16. Coping with Workplace Stress: A Multiple-Group Comparison of Female Managers and Clerical Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.

    1998-01-01

    A causal model of workplace stress was refined and cross-validated. Multivariate analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were used to investigate the effects of social roles on patterns of coping with workplace stress and job satisfaction. Differences found between managers (n=249) and clerical workers (n=214) suggest power and…

  17. Voxel-wise comparisons of the morphology of diffusion tensors across groups of experimental subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2007-01-01

    and an associated scalar magnitude, that represent the probability of water molecules diffusing in each of those directions. The 3D morphologies of DTs can be compared across groups of subjects to reveal disruptions in structural organization and neuroanatomical connectivity of the brains of persons with various...

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Comparison of Individual Therapy, Group Therapy, and Telephone Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Celyne H.; Morin, Charles M.; Ouellet, Marie-Christine; Blais, France C.; Bouchard, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    Forty-five adults with primary insomnia received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) implemented in a group therapy format, in individual face-to-face therapy or through brief individual telephone consultations. The results indicate that CBT was effective in improving sleep parameters with all 3 methods of treatment implementation, and there was no…

  19. The Comparison of Different Age Groups on the Attitudes toward and the Use of ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Different factors may be influencing the use of information and communication technology (ICT). One of the important factors is age. The society is divided into different groups according to age. A well-known age-based categorization, commonly used especially in the field of economics,, is based on whether people belong to the Millennial…

  20. Detection of Differential Item Functioning for More than Two Groups: A Monte Carlo Comparison of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W. Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is a crucial component in test construction, serving as the primary way in which instrument developers ensure that measures perform in the same way for multiple groups within the population. When such is not the case, scores may not accurately reflect the trait of interest for all individuals in the…

  1. A Comparison of Punishment and Positive Reinforcement Group Contingencies in the Modification of Inappropriate Classroom Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonewille, Jack; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Measures the relative effectiveness of a short-term punishment versus a snort-term positive reinforcement contingency system for reducing the frequency of specific inappropriate behaviors of a group of senior elementary students. Students were directly involved in identifying the different types of discipline so that they might help determine the…

  2. Comparison of Eysenck's PEN and Lanyon's Psychological Screening Inventory in a Group of American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehryar, A. H.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Eysenck's PEN Inventory and Lanyon's Psychological Screening Inventory were given to groups of male and female American undergraduates from a state university. A factorial analysis of the intercorrelations showed that three major factors could account for the bulk of correlations among the nine differently labeled characteristics covered by the…

  3. Comparison of the Perception of English Learning Between Ethnic Group Students and Han Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈映梅

    2013-01-01

    This paper has analyzed the discrepancies of the perception of English learning between ethnic students and Han studens in a trilingual language context. The research results will be expected to broaden our understanding of the ethnic group students in the minority regions, and to provide some empirical references and implications for teachers.

  4. Report of the APS Neutrino Study Reactor Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouzaid, E.; Anderson, K.; Barenboim, G.; Berger, B.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Formaggio, J.; Freedman, S.; Finely, D.; Fisher, P.; Fujikawa, B.; Gai, M.; Goodman, M.; de Goueva, A.; Hadley, N.; Hahn, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; Kadel, R.; Kayser, B.; Heeger, K.; Klein, J.; Learned, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Luk, K.-B.; McKeown, R.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohapatra, R.; Naples, D.; Peng, J.; Petcov, S.; Pilcher, J.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Stanton, N.; Stefanski, R.; Yamamoto, R.; Worcester, M.

    2004-10-28

    The worldwide program to understand neutrino oscillations and determine the neutrino mixing parameters, CP violating effects, and mass hierarchy will require a broad combination of measurements. The group believes that a key element of this future neutrino program is a multi-detector neutrino experiment (with baselines of {approx} 200 m and {approx} 1.5 km) with a sensitivity of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} = 0.01. In addition to oscillation physics, the reactor experiment may provide interesting measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} at Q{sup 2} = 0, neutrino couplings, magnetic moments, and mixing with sterile neutrino states. {theta}{sub 13} is one of the twenty-six parameters of the standard model, the best model of electroweak interactions for energies below 100 GeV and, as such, is worthy of a precision measurement independent of other considerations. A reactor experiment of the proposed sensitivity will allow a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} with no ambiguities and significantly better precision than any other proposed experiment, or will set limits indicating the scale of future experiments required to make progress. Figure 1 shows a comparison of the sensitivity of reactor experiments of different scales with accelerator experiments for setting limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the mixing angle is very small, or for making a measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the angle is observable. A reactor experiment with a 1% precision may also resolve the degeneracy in the {theta}{sub 23} parameter when combined with long-baseline accelerator experiments. In combination with long-baseline measurements, a reactor experiment may give early indications of CP violation and the mass hierarchy. The combination of the T2K and Nova long-baseline experiments will be able to make significant measurements of these effects if sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.05 and with enhanced beam rates can improve their reach to the sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.02 level

  5. Angiographic analysis of the circle of wills: comparison between normal and aneurysm groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Suh, Dae Chul; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il [Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate angiographic variations of the circle of Willis in a normal group, and to compare the pattern of these variations between normal and aneurysm groups. We reviewed 220 cases in which subjects had undergone digital subtraction cerebral angiography which showed the circle of Willis in its entirety. One hundred patients were diagnosed as normal, and 110 had an aneurysm. We reviewed the absence or presence and relative size of each segment, and the configuration of the distal basilar artery. Where the circle was complete, we evaluated whether or not the circle was balanced. And we compared the pattern of these variations between the two groups. In the normal group, the most common pattern was a small anterior communicating artery with symmetrically large A1 segments in the anterior circulation(27%) and symmetrically small posterior communication arteries with large P1 segments in the posterior circulation(39%). The anterior half of the circle was complete in 90% of cases, and the posterior half in 63%. In cases in which it was incomplete, there was agenesis of the anterior communicating artery in 9% of cases, of the A1 segment in 1%, of the posterior communicating artery in 36%, and of the P1 segment in 3%. Unilateral absence of the posterior communicating artery and P1 segment was noted in two cases. In the distal basilar artery, symmetric cranial fusion was most common, accounting for 77% of cases. In contrast, incomplete circles with agenesis of the A1 (1% vs 12%, p < .05) or P1 segment (3% vs 10%, p < .05) were more common in the aneurysm group than among normal subjects. Unbalanced types with a size discrepancy between A1 segments(8% vs 18%, p < .05), or posterior communicating arteries equal to or larger than the P1 segment (27% vs 46%, p < .05) were also more common. In the distal basilar artery, symmetric cranial fusion was most common, and accounted for 69% of cases. A complete and balanced circle was more common in the normal group. The most common

  6. Actions to promote energy efficient electric motors. Motors study group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, A.T. de [Coimbra Univ. (PT). Inst. of Systems and Robotics (ISR)

    1996-10-01

    Motor electricity consumption is influenced by many factors including: motor efficiency, motor speed controls, power supply quality, harmonics, systems oversizing, distribution network, mechanical transmission system, maintenance practices, load management and cycling, and the efficiency of the end-use device (e.g. fan, pump, etc.). Due to their importance, an overview of these factors is presented in this report. This study also describes the electricity use in the industrial and tertiary sectors and the electricity consumption associated with the different types of electric motors systems in the Member States of the European Union, as well as estimated future evolution until 2010. The studies for individual countries were carried out by the different partners of the motors study group at a previous stage. The study has found that there is a lack of accurate information about the motor electricity consumption, installed motor capacity and the motor market in almost all the European Union countries and only some general statistical sources are available. There is little field data, which is mainly available in Denmark, France, Italy and the Netherlands. Due to this lack of primary information, some common assumptions were made, based on the experience of the members of the study group. This lack of end-use characterisation data shows the need for improvement from the point of view of current knowledge. It is therefore recommended that further research is undertaken to arrive at more accurate figures. These could be the basis for a better understanding for motor use in practice and - as a consequence - for a more precise appraisal of potentials and barriers to energy efficiency. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of buspirone in two separate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, H L; Finnerty, R

    1982-12-01

    Two double-blind studies are described in which buspirone was compared with placebo and diazepam (Study A) or clorazepate (Study B) in outpatients with moderate to severe anxiety. Results, assessed on the Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, the SCL-56, the Profile of Mood States, and the Covi and Raskin scales, indicated that buspirone consistently relieved both anxiety and associated depression. In Study B, trends in favor of buspirone were seen on several SCL-56 items and the Hamilton somatic factor; significant differences in this direction were found for several POMS items. Sedation was seen less often with buspirone than either diazepam or clorazepate.

  8. Workers' perception of chemical risks: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambach, Ramona; Mairiaux, Philippe; François, Guido; Braeckman, Lutgart; Balsat, Alain; Van Hal, Guido; Vandoorne, Chantal; Van Royen, Paul; van Sprundel, Marc

    2011-02-01

    Workers' perceptions with respect to health and safety at work are rarely taken into account when considering the development of prevention programs. The aim of this study was to explore workers' perceptions of chemical risks at the workplace, in order to investigate the prerequisites for a workplace health program. A qualitative study was conducted involving seven focus groups of 5-10 participants (blue-collar workers) each. All groups were homogeneous in terms of sex, work status, language, and company membership. Results showed that several factors have an important influence on workers' perception of chemical risks. Workers assess risks by means of both sensory and empirical diagnosis and are concerned about the long-term health consequences. They perceive the threat of chemical risks as high. Despite this, they are resigned to accepting the risks. Existing formal sources of information are rarely consulted because they are judged to be difficult to understand and not user friendly. Instead, workers tend to obtain information from informal sources. Communication problems with and lack of trust in prevention advisers and hierarchy are frequently mentioned. Workers feel that their specific knowledge of their working conditions and their proposals for practical, cost-effective solutions to improve health and safety at the workplace are insufficiently taken into account. The use of focus groups yielded a useful insight into workers' perceptions of chemical risks. Our findings suggest that training programs for prevention advisers should include topics such as understanding of workers' perceptions, usefulness of a participatory approach, and communication and education skills. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  9. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders. Comparison with other age groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yura, Shinya; Mabuchi, Akiko; Izumiyama, Yuri; Deyama, Ayako; Totsuka, Yasunori; Inoue, Nobuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Dental Medicine

    2002-12-01

    To estimate the incidence of disc displacement, disc deformity, and bone changes of the temporomandibular joint in elderly patients with temporomandibular disorders, 55 elderly patients (110 joints) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging. The ages of the patients ranged from 65 to 89 years (average, 70 years). They consisted of 13 men and 42 women. Normal disc position was found in 40 joints (36.4%), anterior disc displacement with reduction in 17 joints (15.5%), and anterior disc displacement without reduction in 53 joints (48.2%) on magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-eight (71.6%) of the 53 joints with anterior disc displacement without reduction had disc deformity and 33 (62.3%) had bone changes. The frequency of bone changes in the elderly group was higher than that in the younger group. Women had a higher incidence of bone changes than men. (author)

  11. A comparison of liking of pureed food between two groups of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Laurel; Keller, Heather H; Duizer, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive difficulties make consumer testing with older adults who have dysphagia extremely difficult. Using a healthier older adult population to predict liking scores of this subgroup of older adults could provide a reliable method of determining liking in this population. Forty-five adults older than 65 years who had not been diagnosed with dysphagia participated in a taste test at a local seniors' center. Twelve puree consumers were recruited from five long-term care homes in Ontario. All participants rated three commercial carrot purees and turkey purees for their liking of the appearance and flavor using a 5-point modified Cued Facial Scale. Significant differences between the groups indicate that a healthy group of older adults cannot replicate liking of puree consumers.

  12. Group hypnotherapy versus group relaxation for smoking cessation: an RCT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson-Spillmann Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of smokers would like to stop smoking. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of pharmacological smoking cessation treatments, many smokers are unwilling to use them; however, they are inclined to try alternative methods. Hypnosis has a long-standing reputation in smoking cessation therapy, but its efficacy has not been scientifically proven. We designed this randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of group hypnosis as a method for smoking cessation, and we will compare the results of group hypnosis with group relaxation. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT to compare the efficacy of a single session of hypnosis with that of relaxation performed in groups of 8-15 smokers. We intend to include at least 220 participants in our trial. The inclusion criteria include smoking at least 5 cigarettes per day, not using other cessation methods and being willing to quit smoking. The intervention is performed by a trained hypnotist/relaxation therapist. Both groups first receive 40 min of mental preparation that is based on motivational interviewing. Then, a state of deep relaxation is induced in the hypnosis condition, and superficial relaxation is induced in the control condition. Suggestions are made in the hypnosis condition that aim to switch the mental self-image of the participants from that of smokers to that of non-smokers. Each intervention lasts for 40 min. The participants also complete questionnaires that assess their smoking status and symptoms of depression and anxiety at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months post-intervention. In addition, saliva samples are collected to assess cotinine levels at baseline and at 6 months post-intervention. We also assess nicotine withdrawal symptoms at 2 weeks post-intervention. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this RCT is the first to test the efficacy of group hypnosis versus group relaxation. Issues requiring discussion in the outcome

  13. Comparison of efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of chronic spontaneous urticaria: A randomized, double-blind, comparative, parallel group trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh N Dakhale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of rupatadine and olopatadine in patients of chronic spontaneous urticaria. Materials and Methods: A 6-week, single-centered, randomized, double blind, parallel group comparative clinical study was conducted on patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria. Following inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 patients were recruited and were randomized to two treatment groups and received the respective drugs for 6 weeks. At follow-up, parameters assessed were mean total symptom score (MTSS calculated by adding the mean number of wheals (MNW and the mean pruritus score (MPS, number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep (SIWS. Results: Both the drugs significantly reduced the MTSS, number of wheals, size of wheal, scale for interference of wheals with sleep, but olopatadine was found to be superior. In olopatadine group, there was significantly higher reduction in MTSS (p = 0.01, Number of wheals (P < 0.05, Size of wheals (p < 0.05, Scale for intensity of erythema (p < 0.05 and change in eosinopils count (p = 0.015 than that of rupatadine. Incidence of adverse effects was found to be less in olopatadine group when compared with rupatadine group. Cost effectiveness ratio was less in olopatadine group as compared to rupatadine group throughout the treatment. Conclusions: Olopatadine is a better choice in chronic spontaneous urticaria in comparison to rupatadine due to its better efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness profile.

  14. Cooperative Research Twin Trawl Sweep Comparison Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The "Twin-Trawl Sweep Efficiency Study" was intended to compare the sweep efficiency and selectivity of the NEFSC standardized bottom trawl to that of a standardized...

  15. A Comparison of Phase II Study Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sally Hunsberger; Yingdong Zhao; Richard Simon

    2009-01-01

    .... In this article, we compare different phase II study strategies to determine the most efficient drug development path in terms of number of patients and length of time to conclusion of drug efficacy on overall survival...

  16. The Life Design Group: A Case Study Vignette in Group Career Construction Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Susan R.; Stoltz, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Providing cost efficient, yet effective, student services, including career services, is a critical component in higher education. Career services must include the perspectives of the 21st-century work place. We advocate for the delivery of career development services in a group format using a narrative approach to career counseling with college…

  17. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  18. Life Cycle Leadership Theory vs. Theory on the Phases of Small Group Discussion: Comparisons, Contrasts, and Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Charles Thomas, Jr.

    The work of Paul Hersey and Kenneth Blanchard on life-cycle leadership was compared and contrasted to three studies on group phase theories. The studies on group phases were conducted by Robert Bales and Fred Strodtbeck in 1951, Thomas Scheidel and Laura Crowell in 1964, and B. Aubrey Fisher in 1970. The two theoretical approaches were found to…

  19. Noise-induced tinnitus: A comparison between four clinical groups without apparent hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Cathrine Lindblad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of people with normal hearing thresholds seeking medical help for tinnitus and other hearing problems is increasing. For diagnostic purposes, existence/nonexistence of lesions or combinations of lesions in the inner ear not reflected in the audiogram was evaluated with advanced hearing tests applied to tinnitus patients with certain backgrounds, including noise exposure. For forty-six patients with pronounced tinnitus, and other symptoms, tentative diagnoses were established, including judgments of the influence of four causative factors: (1 acoustic trauma, (2 music, (3 suspected hereditary, and (4 nonauditory, for example, stress or muscular tension. They were analyzed with a test battery sensitive to lesions involving the outer hair cells, damage from impulse noise, and dysfunction of the efferent system. There were significant differences in test results between groups with individuals with the same most likely causative factor. Most patients claiming acoustic trauma had a specific type of result, ′hyper-PMTF′ (psychoacoustical modulation transfer function, and abnormal test results of the efferent system. Everyone in the hereditary group had dysfunction of the efferent system. All patients working with music, except one, had some abnormality, but without specific pattern. The nonauditory group mostly had normal test results. The investigation shows that it is possible to diagnose minor cochlear lesions as well as dysfunction of the efferent system, which might be causing the tinnitus. Those abnormalities could not be detected with routine audiological tests. Malfunctioning caused by impulse noise is an obvious example of this. These findings facilitate choice of treatment, rehabilitation programs, and medicolegal decisions.

  20. Comparison of artificial inoculation methods for studying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divya

    2013-05-01

    May 1, 2013 ... Establishment of disease by artificial inoculation is essential for studies of various aspects of plant pathology. Keeping this in mind .... three to four days under cool white fluorescent light (2,000 lux) followed by 2 days ... and placed in growth chambers at 25°C and 70% relative humidity. The Petri plates were ...

  1. An ethnography of reading in a spiritist study group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Lewgoy

    Full Text Available As a religion, Kardecism confers fundamental importance to the study of its own body of literature, understood as the complement to religious revelation. Based upon ethnographic research in a traditional middle-class Kardecist centre in Porto Alegre, this article examines some ways through which the Kardecists, structured in small groups, interact with this written tradition. The group is fundamental in forming a spiritist identity for two reasons: firstly, it delimits internal alliances, whether or not these are translated into differences in doctrinal views. Secondly, it is one of the spaces in which the spiritist orator is formed by learning to make use of formulas extracted from a specific repertoire. Inspired by the discussions on orality and literacy and by the recent proposal for an ethnography of reading (Boyarin 1993, I aim to show that, if the spiritist speech is constructed as orality supported by texts, there are also very important informal dimensions to be considered which contextualize and actualize these group’s relation with sacred texts.

  2. Young Adults, Technology, and Weight Loss: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Stephens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity are a major concern in young adults. Technology has been integrated into many weight loss interventions; however little is known about the use of this technology in young adults. The purpose of this study was to explore through focus group sessions the opinions of young adults on the use of technology for weight loss. A total of 17 young adults, between 18 and 25 years of age, participated in three focus group sessions. Major results indicated that young adults have very little knowledge on the use of Smartphone technology for weight loss but would like to use this type of technology to help them lose weight. Results also indicated that young adults struggle to make healthy food choices and have priorities that outweigh exercise and they need support and guidance to make better decisions. In conclusion, young adults would be open to using Smartphone technology for weight loss but also need feedback and guidance to help make healthy decisions.

  3. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics - Quasi-experimental Pre-test and Post-test Comparison Using Two Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D. R.; Majerich, D. M.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-01

    A flipped classroom approach has been implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watch short on-line videos before class, participate in active in-class problem solving (in dyads), and complete individualized on-line quizzes weekly. In-class activities are designed to achieve a trifecta of: 1. developing problem solving skills, 2. learning subject content, and 3. developing inquiry skills. The instructor and assistants provide critical ``just-in-time tutoring'' during the in-class problem solving sessions. Comparisons are made with a simultaneous section offered in a traditional mode by a different instructor. Regression analysis was used to control for differences among students and to quantify the effect of the flipped fluid mechanics course. The dependent variable was the students' combined final examination and post-concept inventory scores and the independent variables were pre-concept inventory score, gender, major, course section, and (incoming) GPA. The R-square equaled 0.45 indicating that the included variables explain 45% of the variation in the dependent variable. The regression results indicated that if the student took the flipped fluid mechanics course, the dependent variable (i.e., combined final exam and post-concept inventory scores) was raised by 7.25 points. Interestingly, the comparison group reported significantly more often that their course emphasized memorization than did the flipped classroom group.

  4. Is There a Relation between ABO Blood Groups and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Pemphigoid? A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Bakhtiari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Relationship between blood groups and dermatologic diseases remains controversial and was not yet fully elucidated nor explained clearly. The aim of this study was to examine if any relation exists between different types of pemphigoid diseases and ABO blood group. Methods. In this case-control study, 159 pemphigoid patients and 152 healthy matched-controls were evaluated. All blood group (including Rh status data for the study was obtained from the hospital medical records. Statistical comparisons were completed with chi-square test and logistic regression. Results. Blood group “O” was found in 32.9% of patients and 38.2% of control group. Blood group “A” was found among 30.8% of patients and 34.2% of control group, while group “B” was reported in 27.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls and “AB” was identified among 8.9% of patients and 6.6% of control group. 84.9% of patients were Rh positive, while in the control group 86.2% of patients were Rh positive. No significant differences were found regarding ABO blood groups (P=0.46 or Rh (P=0.76 between pemphigoid patients and control group. Also, older females had the higher risk of developing bullous pemphigoid. Conclusion. We found no relationship between ABO blood groups and pemphigoid disease.

  5. A case study of a Postgraduate student's group expe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    higher education contexts especially in one year masters degree in a foreign country ... physical attractiveness; perceived ability and competence; attitude and ... developed amongst the group members and this cohesion helps the group to.

  6. Mathematics Comparison Study = Etude Comporative Portant Sur les Mathematiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    At the request of the Council of Ministries of Education, Canada (CMEC), Alberta Learning conducted this Mathematics Comparison Study. The focus of this study is from Kindergarten to Grade 12. All provinces and territories were invited to participate, and only the Quebec region declined. Participating regions were invited to send a representative…

  7. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Faraji, Mona

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students' attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students' practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Both methods were effective on the students' attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

  8. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. Methods A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students’ attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Results Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303 and practice (P=0.493 toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001. Moreover, the students’ practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001. Conclusion Both methods were effective on the students’ attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

  9. Virtual Gaming Simulation in Nursing Education: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyl, Margaret; Hughes, Michelle; Tsui, Joyce; Betts, Lorraine; St-Amant, Oona; Lapum, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    The use of serious gaming in a virtual world is a novel pedagogical approach in nursing education. A virtual gaming simulation was implemented in a health assessment class that focused on mental health and interpersonal violence. The study's purpose was to explore students' experiences of the virtual gaming simulation. Three focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 20 first-year nursing students after they completed the virtual gaming simulation. Analysis yielded five themes: (a) Experiential Learning, (b) The Learning Process, (c) Personal Versus Professional, (d) Self-Efficacy, and (e) Knowledge. Virtual gaming simulation can provide experiential learning opportunities that promote engagement and allow learners to acquire and apply new knowledge while practicing skills in a safe and realistic environment. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):274-280.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Teaching Astronomy in Extracurricular Study Groups of Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Mher; Grigoryan, Avetik

    2016-12-01

    The report presents the history of activity of Extracurricular Study Groups of Ar¬menia teaching astronomy and related subjects. It mainly refers to the Aerospace Club founded in 1988, which has long been acting as an officially unre¬gis¬tered, but efficiently performing non-governmental organization - Armenian Youth Ae¬ro¬space Society. The Club teaches, provides a truly scientific view of the world, advocates astronomy and other scientific and technical areas, provides interesting lectures and ar¬ticles to schools and mass media, arranges seminars and meetings with renowned experts, publishes scientific ar¬ticles, manuals, books, puts forward important scientific and techno-logical problems and offer students to work together on them, seek for solutions and develop possible appli¬ca¬tions. All this is aimed at maintaining and further development of leading positions of Armenia's scientific potential, particularly in astronomy.

  11. Accountable Metadata-Hiding Escrow: A Group Signature Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohlweiss Markulf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A common approach to demands for lawful access to encrypted data is to allow a trusted third party (TTP to gain access to private data. However, there is no way to verify that this trust is well placed as the TTP may open all messages indiscriminately. Moreover, existing approaches do not scale well when, in addition to the content of the conversation, one wishes to hide one’s identity. Given the importance of metadata this is a major problem. We propose a new approach in which users can retroactively verify cryptographically whether they were wiretapped. As a case study, we propose a new signature scheme that can act as an accountable replacement for group signatures, accountable forward and backward tracing signatures.

  12. The narrow range of perceived predation: a 19 group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mesly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper rests largely on the works of Mesly (1999 to 2012. It argues that the phenomenon of perceived predation as a functional behavioural phenomenon is subjected to certain limits, a finding based on studies performed on 19 different groups spread over a four-year span. It also finds a constant of k = 1.3 which reflects the invariant nature of perceived predation. These findings add to the theory of financial predation which stipulates that financial predators operate below the limits of detection pertaining to their customers (and market regulators. They are experts at minimizing the perception that clients could have that they are after their money, causing them financial harm, by surprise (perceived predation. Understanding the narrow range in which financial predators operate is setting the grounds to offer better protection to investors and to implementing better control and punitive measures.

  13. Introducing Semantic Cohesion Analysis: A Study of Group Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Cohesive talk was observed over time and across psychotherapy groups led by self-disclosing or nondisclosing therapists. Despite individual therapist differences, the nondisclosing groups showed more cohesive interactions throughout therapy. No differences were observed in clients' perceptions of therapists or their attraction to the group.…

  14. Gout in immigrant groups: a cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wändell, Per; Carlsson, Axel C; Li, Xinjun; Gasevic, Danijela; Ärnlöv, Johan; Holzmann, Martin J; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-01-13

    Our aim was to study the association between country of birth and incidence of gout in different immigrant groups in Sweden. The study population included the whole population of Sweden. Gout was defined as having at least one registered diagnosis in the National Patient Register. The association between incidence of gout and country of birth was assessed by Cox regression, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), using Swedish-born individuals as referents. All models were conducted in both men and women, and the full model was adjusted for age, place of residence in Sweden, educational level, marital status, neighbourhood socio-economic status and co-morbidities. The risk of gout varied by country of origin, with highest estimates, compared to Swedish born, in fully adjusted models among men from Iraq (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.54-2.16), and Russia (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.26-2.27), and also high among men from Austria, Poland, Africa and Asian countries outside the Middle East; and among women from Africa (HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.50-3.31), Hungary (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.45-2.71), Iraq (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.13-2.74) and Austria (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.07-2.70), and also high among women from Poland. The risk of gout was lower among men from Greece, Spain, Nordic countries (except Finland) and Latin America and among women from Southern Europe, compared to their Swedish counterparts. The increased risk of gout among several immigrant groups is likely explained by a high cardio-metabolic risk factor pattern needing attention.

  15. Gender-based education during clerkships: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Leerdam L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lotte van Leerdam, Lianne Rietveld, Doreth Teunissen, Antoine Lagro-JanssenDepartment of Primary and Community Care, Gender and Women's Health, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsObjectives: One of the goals of the medical master's degree is for a student to become a gender-sensitive doctor by applying knowledge of gender differences in practice. This study aims to investigate, from the students’ perspective, whether gender medicine has been taught in daily practice during clerkship.Methods: A focus group study was conducted among 29 medical students from Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who had just finished either their internal medicine or surgical clerkships. Data were analyzed in line with the principles of constant comparative analysis.Results: Four focus groups were conducted with 29 participating students. Clinical teachers barely discuss gender differences during students’ clerkships. The students mentioned three main explanatory themes: insufficient knowledge; unawareness; and minor impact. As a result, students feel that they have insufficient competencies to become gender-sensitive doctors.Conclusion: Medical students at our institution perceive that they have received limited exposure to gender-based education after completing two key clinical clerkships. All students feel that they have insufficient knowledge to become gender-sensitive doctors. They suppose that their clinical teachers have insufficient knowledge regarding gender sensitivity, are unaware of gender differences, and the students had the impression that gender is not regarded as an important issue. We suggest that the medical faculty should encourage clinical teachers to improve their knowledge and awareness of gender issues.Keywords: medical education, clerkship, gender, hidden curriculum, clinical teachers

  16. Music during after-death care: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Marianne S; Fålun, Nina; Gjengedal, Eva; Norekvål, Tone M

    2012-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is not only a place to recover from injuries incurred during accidents and from serious illness. For many patients, it is also a place where they might die. Nursing care does not stop when a patient dies; rather, it continues with the care of the deceased and with family support. The aims of this study were (1) to explore the experiences and attitudes of nurses towards the use of ambient music in the ICU during after-death care and (2) to describe the feedback nurses received from relatives when music was used during the viewing. A qualitative design employing focus group interviews was used. Three focus group interviews with 15 nurses were conducted. All the interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six main categories of attitudes emerged from the analysis: (1) different attitudes among nurses towards the use of music; (2) music affects the atmosphere; (3) music affects emotions; (4) use of music was situational; (5) special choice of music and (6) positive feedback from the bereaved. This study demonstrates that music might be helpful for nurses during after-death care as well as for the care of the relatives. Including ambient music in an after-death care programme can help nurses show respect for the deceased as the body is being prepared. Music played during the viewing may be a way of helping relatives in their time of grieving. It may ease the situation by making that event special and memorable. However, standardizing this intervention does not seem appropriate. Rather, the individual nurse and the family must decide whether music is to be used in a particular situation. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  17. Focus Group Study Exploring Factors Related to Frequent Sickness Absence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Notenbomer

    Full Text Available Research investigating frequent sickness absence (3 or more episodes per year is scarce and qualitative research from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves is lacking. The aim of the current study is to explore awareness, determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves.We performed a qualitative study of 3 focus group discussions involving a total of 15 frequent absentees. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Results were analyzed with the Graneheim method using the Job Demands Resources (JD-R model as theoretical framework.Many participants were not aware of their frequent sickness absence and the risk of future long-term sickness absence. As determinants, participants mentioned job demands, job resources, home demands, poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Managing these factors and improving communication (skills were regarded as solutions to reduce frequent sickness absence.The JD-R model provided a framework for determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence. Additional determinants were poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Frequent sickness absence should be regarded as a signal that something is wrong. Managers, supervisors, and occupational health care providers should advise and support frequent absentees to accommodate job demands, increase both job and personal resources, and improve health rather than express disapproval of frequent sickness absence and apply pressure regarding work attendance.

  18. Group intervention for siblings of children with disabilities: a pilot study in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granat, Tina; Nordgren, Ingrid; Rein, George; Sonnander, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of a group intervention in a clinical setting designed to increase knowledge of disability and improve sibling relationship among siblings of children with disabilities. A self-selected sample of 54 younger and older siblings with typical development (ages 8-12 years) of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (9), Asperger syndrome (7), autistic disorder (13), physical disability (8) and intellectual disability (17) participated in collateral sibling groups. The Sibling Knowledge Interview (SKI) and Sibling Relationship Questionnaire (SRQ) were administered pre- and post-intervention. SKI scores increased (p < 0.001) from pre- to post-intervention when merged diagnostic groups were compared. Comparisons of SRQ pre- and post-intervention scores across diagnostic sibling groups showed significantly different (p < 0.05) score patterns. The results were encouraging and contribute to further development of interventions meeting the needs of siblings of children with disabilities. In view of the limited empirical research on group interventions for siblings of children with disabilities future work is needed to investigate the effectiveness of such interventions. Particular attention should be given to siblings of children with autism and siblings of children with intellectual disability.

  19. Viscosity of heptane-toluene mixtures. Comparison of molecular dynamics and group contribution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Ana Milena; Hoyos, Bibian A

    2017-02-01

    Three methods of molecular dynamics simulation [Green-Kubo (G-K), non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and reversed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD)], and two group contribution methods [UNIFAC-VISCO and Grunberg-Nissan (G-N)] were used to calculate the viscosity of mixtures of n-heptane and toluene (known as heptol). The results obtained for the viscosity and density of heptol were compared with reported experimental data, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. Overall, the five methods showed good agreement between calculated and experimental viscosities. In all cases, the deviation was lower than 9%. It was found that, as the concentration of toluene increases, the deviation of the density of the mixture (as calculated with molecular dynamics methods) also increases, which directly affects the viscosity result obtained. Among the molecular simulation techniques evaluated here, G-K produced the best results, and represents the optimal balance between quality of result and time required for simulation. The NEMD method produced acceptable results for the viscosity of the system but required more simulation time as well as the determination of an appropriate shear rate. The RNEMD method was fast and eliminated the need to determine a set of values for shear rate, but introduced large fluctuations in measurements of shear rate and viscosity. The two group contribution methods were accurate and fast when used to calculate viscosity, but require knowledge of the viscosity of the pure compounds, which is a serious limitation for applications in complex multicomponent systems.

  20. Comparison of Synchronization Indices: Behavioral Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Dugué

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of a neuronal response to a given periodic stimulus is usually measured by Goldberg and Brown's vector strength metric. This index does not take omitted spikes into account. This particular limitation has motivated the development of two new indices: the corrected vector strength index and the corrected phase variance index, both including a penalty factor linked to the firing rate. In this paper, a theoretical study on the normalization of the corrected phase variance index is conducted. Both indices are compared to four existing ones using a simulated dataset which considers three desynchronizing disturbances: irregularity in firing, added spikes, and omitted spikes. In the case of unimodal responses, the two new indices are satisfying and appear the more promising in the case of real signals. In the multimodal case, the entropy-based index is better than the others even if this index is not drawback-free.

  1. Facilitating small-group learning: A comparison of student and staff tutors' behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.C. Moust (Jos); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThis study focused on students' observations of student and staff tutors' behavior during two academic courses, using a thirtynine-item rating scale. The study took place within an integrated problem-based law curriculum. Six major factors in tutors' behavior were identified. Differences

  2. The reliability and validity of the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire : a comparison between patient groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mersch, Peter Paul A; Vastenburg, Nanette C.; Meesters, Ybe; Bouhuys, Antoinette L; Beersma, Domien G. M; van den Hoofdakker, Rutger H; den Boer, Johannes A

    2004-01-01

    Background: The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) is a frequently used screening instrument in the research on Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Nevertheless, studies on its reliability and validity are relatively scarce. In the present study the reliability and the contrast validity

  3. Marital Discord and Coronary Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of coronary heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and high control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…

  4. Marital Discord and Coronary Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of coronary heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and high control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…

  5. Comparison of Serum Zinc Levels among Children with Simple Febrile Seizure and Control Group: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi NASEHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Nasehi MM, Sakhaei R, Moosazadeh M, Aliramzany M. Comparison of Serum Zinc Levels among Children with Simple Febrile Seizure and Control Group: A Systematic Review. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:17-24 .AbstractObjectiveSeveral factors are involved in the etiology of febrile seizure (FS, among themis zinc (Zn, which has been discussed in various studies. The present systematic review compares Zn levels in children with FS and a control group.Materials & MethodsWe searched keywords of febrile seizure, febrile convulsion, children, childhood,fever, trace elements, risk factor, predisposing, zinc, Zn, and epilepsy in thefollowing databases: SCOPUS, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The quality ofresearch papers was assessed using a checklist. Data was extracted from primarystudies based on demographic variables and amounts of Zn in case and controlgroups.ResultsTwenty primary studies were entered in the present study. Of which, eighteenstudies, reported that Zn serum levels were significantly lower in the case group(patients with FS than the control group.ConclusionThe present systematic review indicated that Zn is one factor for predicting FS.A low level of this element among children can be regarded as a contributingfactor for FS, a conclusion with a high consensus among different studies carriedout in different parts of the world. ReferencesHeydarian F, Ashrafzadeh F, Ghasemian A. Serum ZINC level in Patients with simple febrile seizure. Iran J Child Neurology 2010; 14(2:41-44.Mahyar A, Pahlavan AA, Varasteh-Nejad A. Serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure. Acta Medica Iranica 2008; 46(6: 477-80.Kunda GK, Rabin F, Nandi ER, Sheikh N, Akhter S. Etiology and Risk Factors of Febrile Seizure – An Update. Bangladesh J Child Health 2010; 34 (3:103-112.Abbaskhaniyan A, Shokrzadeh M, Rafati MR, Mashhadiakabr M, Arab A, Yazdani J. Survey and Relation of Serum Magnesium Level in Children with Seizure. J Mazand Univ

  6. Comparison of renormalization group schemes for sine-Gordon type models

    CERN Document Server

    Nandori, I; Sailer, K; Trombettoni, A

    2009-01-01

    We consider the scheme-dependence of the renormalization group (RG) flow obtained in the local potential approximation for two-dimensional periodic, sine-Gordon type field-theoric models with possible inclusion of explicit mass terms. For sine-Gordon type models showing up a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii type phase transition the Wegner-Houghton, the Polchinski, the functional Callan-Symanzik and the effective average action RG methods give qualitatively the same result and the critical frequency (temperature) can be obtained scheme-independently from the RG equations linearized around the Gaussian fixed point. For the massive sine-Gordon model which undergoes an Ising type phase transition, the Wegner-Houghton, the functional Callan-Symanzik and the effective average action RG methods provide the same scheme-independent phase structure and value for the critical ratio, in agreement with the results of lattice methods. It is also shown that RG equations linearized around the Gaussian fixed point produce sch...

  7. Occupational therapists' perceptions of gender - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedberg, Gunilla M; Björk, Mathilda; Hensing, Gunnel

    2010-10-01

    Women and men are shaped over the courses of their lives by culture, society and human interaction according to the gender system. Cultural influences on individuals' social roles and environment are described in occupational therapy literature, but not specifically from a gender perspective. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how a sample of occupational therapists perceives the 'gender' concept. Four focus group interviews with 17 occupational therapists were conducted. The opening question was: 'How do you reflect on the encounter with a client depending on whether it is a man or a woman?' The transcribed interviews were analysed and two main themes emerged: 'the concept of gender is tacit in occupational therapy' and 'client encounters'. The occupational therapists expressed limited theoretical knowledge of 'gender'. Furthermore, the occupational therapists seemed to be 'doing gender' in their encounters with the clients. For example, in their assessment of the client, they focussed their questions on different spheres: with female clients, on the household and family; with male clients, on their paid work. This study demonstrated that occupational therapists were unaware of the possibility that they were 'doing gender' in their encounters with clients. There is a need to increase occupational therapists' awareness of their own behaviour of 'doing gender'. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate whether gendered perceptions will shorten or lengthen a rehabilitation period and affect the chosen interventions, and in the end, the outcome for the clients. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2010 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  8. Alcohol Habits in Patients with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain: Comparison with a Matched Control Group from the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin Bronner, Kerstin Birgitta; Wennberg, Peter; Kallmen, Hakan; Schult, Marie-Louise Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to describe alcohol habits in patients with chronic pain compared with those in a matched control group from the general Swedish population. In total, 100 consecutive patients enrolled were matched against 100 individuals in a control group on the basis of age and sex. Alcohol habits were measured using the Alcohol Use…

  9. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, F.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting talented group improvisation. It addresses the question which interface is needed to generate collectives with collective talent. Inspired by Pask's Conversation Theory, the author has developed a t...

  10. Recent advances in the study of the Equivariant Brauer Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwknegt, Peter; Ratnam, Rishni

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we outline a recent construction of a Chern-Weil isomorphism for the equivariant Brauer group of $\\mathbb R^n$ actions on a principal torus bundle, where the target for this isomorphism is a "dimensionally reduced" \\vCech cohomology group. Using this latter group, we demonstrate how to extend the induced algebra construction to algebras with a non-trivial bundle as their spectrum.

  11. Assessing English Language Learners' Oral Performance: A Comparison of Monologue, Interview, and Group Oral Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effect of test format on oral performance in terms of test scores and discourse features (accuracy, fluency, and complexity). Moreover, we explored how the scores obtained on different test formats relate to such features. To this end, 23 Iranian EFL learners participated in three test formats of monologue,…

  12. Goal Setting during Early Childhood Parent-Teacher Conferences: A Comparison of Three Groups of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2013-01-01

    Parent-teacher communication and partnerships are important in children's early years. This study compared goal setting, conducted in English, during Head Start parent-teacher conferences with native Spanish speaking, Latino bilingual, and native English speaking parents and their children's teachers. To understand conference goal-setting…

  13. The importance of emotional display rules for employee well-being: A multi-group comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, J.F.; Dam, K. van

    2014-01-01

    'Serving with a smile' has generally been associated with negative effects for employee well-being. The present study investigated whether emotional display rules also relate to positive outcomes by distinguishing demands to suppress negative emotional response (negative display rules) from demands

  14. The importance of emotional display rules for employee well-being : A multi-group comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, Jan Fekke; van Dam, Karen

    2014-01-01

    'Serving with a smile' has generally been associated with negative effects for employee well-being. The present study investigated whether emotional display rules also relate to positive outcomes by distinguishing demands to suppress negative emotional response (negative display rules) from demands

  15. The importance of emotional display rules for employee well-being : A multi-group comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, Jan Fekke; van Dam, Karen

    2014-01-01

    'Serving with a smile' has generally been associated with negative effects for employee well-being. The present study investigated whether emotional display rules also relate to positive outcomes by distinguishing demands to suppress negative emotional response (negative display rules) from demands

  16. Goal Setting during Early Childhood Parent-Teacher Conferences: A Comparison of Three Groups of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2013-01-01

    Parent-teacher communication and partnerships are important in children's early years. This study compared goal setting, conducted in English, during Head Start parent-teacher conferences with native Spanish speaking, Latino bilingual, and native English speaking parents and their children's teachers. To understand conference goal-setting…

  17. Personality, Alcohol Use, and Drinking Motives: A Comparison of Independent and Combined Internal Drinking Motives Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Abby L.; Flett, Gordon L.

    2009-01-01

    It is well-established that coping and enhancement drinking motives predict college student drinking and that personality traits predict drinking motives. Little is known, however, about personality and drinking patterns among individuals who drink for both enhancement and coping reasons. University students in the current study completed…

  18. Group comparison of spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Montine, Thomas J; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    right insula, an area implicated in network shifting and associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, was more highly correlated with both these networks in Parkinson's disease than in controls. In Parkinson's disease, increased correlation of the insula with the default mode network was related to lower attentional accuracy. We demonstrated that in an omnibus sense, correlations among network kernels describe biological impact of pathophysiological processes (through correlation with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers) and clinical status (by classification of patient group). At a greater level of detail, we demonstrate aberrant involvement of the insula in the default mode network and the frontal frontoparietal task control network kernel. Network kernel analysis holds promise as a sensitive method for detecting biologically and clinical relevant changes to specific networks that support cognition and are impaired in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Geochemical Study of Lichens in Tatun Volcano Group, North Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Ssu-Yu

    2015-04-01

    Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located in the northwest of Taipei, the capital of Taiwan. Although the last activity was 200000 years ago, it is critical to monitor TVG because it is nearby metropolitan area. This study is part of the monitoring program and attempts to observe the geochemical relationship between lichen and volcanic gas. Lichens have been extensively used for monitoring atmospheric quality. Lichen can live in critical environments and can accumulate metals from atmosphere due to lack of excretion mechanism. Moreover, lichen can live long and growth in a low rate; therefore, lichen geochemistry can represent an average in a long term manner. In TVG, fruticose lichen can be seldom found due to the high concentration of SO2 in the atmosphere. However, foliose lichen and crustose lichen are not rare in the study area. In this study, lichens were collected from TVG and Nan-ao Trail which is in non-volcanic area. The cations were measured by ICP-MS. The geochemical results were analyzed by principal components analysis (PCA). It shows that there is no significant difference among non-volcanic lichens and the non-volcanic lichens are located at an end-member of two distinct trends. It is believed that the non-volcanic lichens indicate a geochemical baseline in north Taiwan and two trends may represent the mixing between two different types of volcanic gases in TVG and geochemical baseline. In this study, rare earth elements (REEs) were also measured. The results of non-volcanic and TVG lichens were normalized by North America Shale and TVG andesite, respectively. Both obtain a flat REE pattern, which confirm that TVG lichens receive metals from volcanic origin and non-volcanic lichens give information of background geochemistry in north Taiwan. In addition, a middle REE enrichment and distinct Ce negative anomaly can be observed. According to the previous studies, middle REE enrichment may be achieved by the selected adsorption of middle REEs by organic

  20. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting t

  1. Technology User Groups and Early Childhood Education: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parette, Howard P.; Hourcade, Jack J.; Blum, Craig; Watts, Emily H.; Stoner, Julia B.; Wojcik, Brian W.; Chrismore, Shannon B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a preliminary examination of the potential of Technology User Groups as a professional development venue for early childhood education professionals in developing operational and functional competence in using hardware and software components of a Technology toolkit. Technology user groups are composed of varying numbers of…

  2. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting

  3. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting t

  4. Yeast Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Comparison of Two Symbiont Groups in the Same Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The combination of ecological diversity with genetic and experimental tractability makes Drosophila a powerful model for the study of animal-associated microbial communities. Despite the known importance of yeasts in Drosophila physiology, behavior, and fitness, most recent work has focused on Drosophila-bacterial interactions. In order to get a more complete understanding of the Drosophila microbiome, we characterized the yeast communities associated with different Drosophila species collect...

  5. Dissipative two-electron transfer: A numerical renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Sabine; Bulla, Ralf; Anders, Frithjof B.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2008-07-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium two-electron transfer in a model redox system represented by a two-site extended Hubbard model and embedded in a dissipative environment. The influence of the electron-electron interactions and the coupling to a dissipative bosonic bath on the electron transfer is studied in different temperature regimes. At high temperatures, Marcus transfer rates are evaluated, and at low temperatures, we calculate equilibrium and nonequilibrium population probabilities of the donor and acceptor with the nonperturbative numerical renormalization group approach. We obtain the nonequilibrium dynamics of the system prepared in an initial state of two electrons at the donor site and identify conditions under which the electron transfer involves one concerted two-electron step or two sequential single-electron steps. The rates of the sequential transfer depend nonmonotonically on the difference between the intersite and on-site Coulomb interaction, which become renormalized in the presence of the bosonic bath. If this difference is much larger than the hopping matrix element, the temperature as well as the reorganization energy, simultaneous transfer of both electrons between donor and acceptor can be observed.

  6. Operating theatre nurses' perceptions of competence: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne; Chang, Hsiao-Yun Annie; Werder, Helen

    2009-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring nurses' perceptions of the components of competence in the operating theatre. Competency Standards for operating theatre practice are used in some countries to guide clinical and professional behaviours. The need for competence assessment has been enshrined, but the conceptualization and agreement about what signifies competence in Operating Theatre has been lacking. Three focus groups were conducted with 27 operating theatre nurses in three major metropolitan hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Interviews were audio taped and field notes were taken. Data were collected during 2008. Thematic analysis was performed. From the analysis of the textual data, three themes were identified: 'coalescence of theoretical, practical, situational and aesthetic knowledge within a technocratic environment'; 'the importance of highly developed communication skills among teams of divergent personalities and situations'; and 'managing and coordinating the flow of the list'. These findings have identified that competence in respect to components of knowledge, teamwork and communication, and the ability to coordinate and manage are important and should be incorporated in operating theatre Competency Standards. Additionally, findings may assist in the development of an instrument to measure operating nurses' perceived competence.

  7. Nutrient adequacy during weight loss interventions: a randomized study in women comparing the dietary intake in a meal replacement group with a traditional food group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovee Vicki

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and effective weight control strategies are needed to stem the current obesity epidemic. The objective of this one-year study was to document and compare the macronutrient and micronutrient levels in the foods chosen by women following two different weight reduction interventions. Methods Ninety-six generally healthy overweight or obese women (ages 25–50 years; BMI 25–35 kg/m2 were randomized into a Traditional Food group (TFG or a Meal Replacement Group (MRG incorporating 1–2 meal replacement drinks or bars per day. Both groups had an energy-restricted goal of 5400 kJ/day. Dietary intake data was obtained using 3-Day Food records kept by the subjects at baseline, 6 months and one-year. For more uniform comparisons between groups, each diet intervention consisted of 18 small group sessions led by the same Registered Dietitian. Results Weight loss for the 73% (n = 70 completing this one-year study was not significantly different between the groups, but was significantly different (p ≤ .05 within each group with a mean (± standard deviation weight loss of -6.1 ± 6.7 kg (TFG, n = 35 vs -5.0 ± 4.9 kg (MRG, n = 35. Both groups had macronutrient (Carbohydrate:Protein:Fat ratios that were within the ranges recommended (50:19:31, TFG vs 55:16:29, MRG. Their reported reduced energy intake was similar (5729 ± 1424 kJ, TFG vs 5993 ± 2016 kJ, MRG. There was an improved dietary intake pattern in both groups as indicated by decreased intake of saturated fat (≤ 10%, cholesterol ( Conclusion In this one-year university-based intervention, both dietitian-led groups successfully lost weight while improving overall dietary adequacy. The group incorporating fortified meal replacements tended to have a more adequate essential nutrient intake compared to the group following a more traditional food group diet. This study supports the need to incorporate fortified foods and/or dietary supplements while following an energy

  8. Nutrient adequacy during weight loss interventions: a randomized study in women comparing the dietary intake in a meal replacement group with a traditional food group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Judith M; Herzog, Holly; Clodfelter, Sharon; Bovee, Vicki; Schrage, Jon; Pritsos, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Background Safe and effective weight control strategies are needed to stem the current obesity epidemic. The objective of this one-year study was to document and compare the macronutrient and micronutrient levels in the foods chosen by women following two different weight reduction interventions. Methods Ninety-six generally healthy overweight or obese women (ages 25–50 years; BMI 25–35 kg/m2) were randomized into a Traditional Food group (TFG) or a Meal Replacement Group (MRG) incorporating 1–2 meal replacement drinks or bars per day. Both groups had an energy-restricted goal of 5400 kJ/day. Dietary intake data was obtained using 3-Day Food records kept by the subjects at baseline, 6 months and one-year. For more uniform comparisons between groups, each diet intervention consisted of 18 small group sessions led by the same Registered Dietitian. Results Weight loss for the 73% (n = 70) completing this one-year study was not significantly different between the groups, but was significantly different (p ≤ .05) within each group with a mean (± standard deviation) weight loss of -6.1 ± 6.7 kg (TFG, n = 35) vs -5.0 ± 4.9 kg (MRG, n = 35). Both groups had macronutrient (Carbohydrate:Protein:Fat) ratios that were within the ranges recommended (50:19:31, TFG vs 55:16:29, MRG). Their reported reduced energy intake was similar (5729 ± 1424 kJ, TFG vs 5993 ± 2016 kJ, MRG). There was an improved dietary intake pattern in both groups as indicated by decreased intake of saturated fat (≤ 10%), cholesterol (<200 mg/day), and sodium (< 2400 mg/day), with increased total servings/day of fruits and vegetables (4.0 ± 2.2, TFG vs 4.6 ± 3.2, MRG). However, the TFG had a significantly lower dietary intake of several vitamins and minerals compared to the MRG and was at greater risk for inadequate intake. Conclusion In this one-year university-based intervention, both dietitian-led groups successfully lost weight while improving overall dietary adequacy. The group

  9. Differential aspects of stroke and congestive heart failure in quality of life reduction: a case series with three comparison groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To assess QOL of patients with stroke in comparison to other groups (caregivers and CHF patients), to identify which items of QOL are more affected on each group and what is the functional profile of patients with stroke. Methods Consecutive stroke or congestive heart failure (CHF) patients were evaluated and compared to their caregivers (caregivers). The NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D) scale were applied. Results We evaluated 67 patients with stroke, 62 with CHF and 67 caregivers. For stroke patients, median NIHSS score was four. EQ-5D score was significantly worse in stroke, as compared to CHF and caregivers (0.52, 0.69 and 0.65, respectively). Mobility and usual activity domains were significantly affected in stroke and CHF patients as compared to caregivers; and self-care was more affected in stroke as compared with the other two groups. Conclusions Despite a mild neurological deficit, there was a significantly worse QOL perception in stroke as compared to CHF patients, mostly in their perception of self-care. PMID:21831270

  10. Differential aspects of stroke and congestive heart failure in quality of life reduction: a case series with three comparison groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cincura Carolina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess QOL of patients with stroke in comparison to other groups (caregivers and CHF patients, to identify which items of QOL are more affected on each group and what is the functional profile of patients with stroke. Methods Consecutive stroke or congestive heart failure (CHF patients were evaluated and compared to their caregivers (caregivers. The NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS and EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D scale were applied. Results We evaluated 67 patients with stroke, 62 with CHF and 67 caregivers. For stroke patients, median NIHSS score was four. EQ-5D score was significantly worse in stroke, as compared to CHF and caregivers (0.52, 0.69 and 0.65, respectively. Mobility and usual activity domains were significantly affected in stroke and CHF patients as compared to caregivers; and self-care was more affected in stroke as compared with the other two groups. Conclusions Despite a mild neurological deficit, there was a significantly worse QOL perception in stroke as compared to CHF patients, mostly in their perception of self-care.

  11. Profiles in Successful Group Piano for Children: A Collective Case Study of Children's Group-Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the best practices in beginning group-piano instruction. Four beginning and intermediate groups of piano students (N =20) were observed. Data were triangulated through in-class observation of students and teachers, teacher interviews and student questionnaires. The master teachers…

  12. Profiles in Successful Group Piano for Children: A Collective Case Study of Children's Group-Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the best practices in beginning group-piano instruction. Four beginning and intermediate groups of piano students (N =20) were observed. Data were triangulated through in-class observation of students and teachers, teacher interviews and student questionnaires. The master teachers…

  13. Profiles in Successful Group Piano for Children: A Collective Case Study of Children's Group-Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to explore the best practices in beginning group-piano instruction. Four beginning and intermediate groups of piano students (N =20) were observed. Data were triangulated through in-class observation of students and teachers, teacher interviews and student questionnaires. The master teachers…

  14. Fundamental Tactical Principles of Soccer: A Comparison of Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Paulo Henrique; Guilherme, José; Rechenchosky, Leandro; da Costa, Luciane Cristina Arantes; Rinadi, Wilson

    2017-09-01

    The fundamental tactical principles of the game of soccer represent a set of action rules that guide behaviours related to the management of game space. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of fundamental offensive and defensive tactical principles among youth soccer players from 12 to 17 years old. The sample consisted of 3689 tactical actions performed by 48 soccer players in three age categories: under 13 (U-13), under 15 (U-15), and under 17 (U-17). Tactical performance was measured using the System of Tactical Assessment in Soccer (FUT-SAT). The Kruskal Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Friedman, Wilcoxon, and Cohen's Kappa tests were used in the study analysis. The results showed that the principles of "offensive coverage" (p = 0.01) and "concentration" (p = 0.04) were performed more frequently by the U-17 players than the U-13 players. The tactical principles "width and length" (p < 0.05) and "defensive unit" (p < 0.05) were executed more frequently by younger soccer players. It can be concluded that the frequency with which fundamental tactical principles are performed varies between the gaming categories, which implies that there is valuation of defensive security and a progressive increase in "offensive coverage" caused by increased confidence and security in offensive actions.

  15. Evaluation and Comparison of Individual and Group Sports in the Social Adjustment of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Mousavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the role of sports in youth social adjustment and social skills in their interpersonal relationships and social skills associated with academic achievement and their role in reducing mental and psychological problems ,we conducted this study to examine the role of physical activity in different sport fields. In order to compare the social skills of male students participating in the team and individual sports in Islamic Azad University of Zanjan, we chose 30 randomly as the sample size. In order to gather information, two questionnaires-i-e-demographic questionnaire and social skills questionnaire (social adjustment section Albert J. Petitpas F (2004 with a reliability of 0.90 were used. For data analysis, descriptive statistics and T-test were used. Results showed significant differences between team and individual sports athletes with the soccer ranking higher than the rest of the field. Gymnastics athletes would have better social adjustment than the rest of athletes and the rowing athletes had less social adjustment, but this difference was not statistically significant and the results showed no significant relationship between age and marital status with the Social Adjustment. The results of this study confirm a considerable effect of team sports on levels of social adjustment compared with individual sports.

  16. Comparison of base composition analysis and Sanger sequencing of mitochondrial DNA for four U.S. population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesler, Kevin M; Coble, Michael D; Hall, Thomas A; Vallone, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    A set of 711 samples from four U.S. population groups was analyzed using a novel mass spectrometry based method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) base composition profiling. Comparison of the mass spectrometry results with Sanger sequencing derived data yielded a concordance rate of 99.97%. Length heteroplasmy was identified in 46% of samples and point heteroplasmy was observed in 6.6% of samples in the combined mass spectral and Sanger data set. Using discrimination capacity as a metric, Sanger sequencing of the full control region had the highest discriminatory power, followed by the mass spectrometry base composition method, which was more discriminating than Sanger sequencing of just the hypervariable regions. This trend is in agreement with the number of nucleotides covered by each of the three assays. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Sexual risk attitudes and intentions of youth aged 12-14 years: survey comparisons of parent-teen prevention and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared differences in sexual risk attitudes and intentions for three groups of youth (experimental program, n = 90; attention control, n = 80; and nonparticipant control, n = 634) aged 12-14 years. Two student groups participated with their parents in programs focused on strengthening family interaction and prevention of sexual risks, HIV, and adolescent pregnancy. Surveys assessed students' attitudes and intentions regarding early sexual and other health-risk behaviors, family interactions, and perceived parental disapproval of risk behaviors. The authors used general linear modeling to compare results. The experimental prevention program differentiated the total scores of the 3 groups (p < .05). A similar result was obtained for student intentions to avoid sex (p < .01). Pairwise comparisons showed the experimental program group scored higher than the nonparticipant group on total scores (p < .01) and on students' intention to avoid sex (p < .01). The results suggest this novel educational program involving both parents and students offers a promising approach to HIV and teen pregnancy prevention.

  18. Comparison of growth rates of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and other bacterioplankton groups in coastal Mediterranean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Isabel; Gasol, Josep M; Sebastián, Marta; Hojerová, Eva; Koblízek, Michal

    2011-11-01

    Growth is one of the basic attributes of any living organism. Surprisingly, the growth rates of marine bacterioplankton are only poorly known. Current data suggest that marine bacteria grow relatively slowly, having generation times of several days. However, some bacterial groups, such as the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, have been shown to grow much faster. Two manipulation experiments, in which grazing, viruses, and resource competition were reduced, were conducted in the coastal Mediterranean Sea (Blanes Bay Microbial Observatory). The growth rates of AAP bacteria and of several important phylogenetic groups (the Bacteroidetes, the alphaproteobacterial groups Roseobacter and SAR11, and the Gammaproteobacteria group and its subgroups the Alteromonadaceae and the NOR5/OM60 clade) were calculated from changes in cell numbers in the manipulation treatments. In addition, we examined the role that top-down (mortality due to grazers and viruses) and bottom-up (resource availability) factors play in determining the growth rates of these groups. Manipulations resulted in an increase of the growth rates of all groups studied, but its extent differed largely among the individual treatments and among the different groups. Interestingly, higher growth rates were found for the AAP bacteria (up to 3.71 day⁻¹) and for the Alteromonadaceae (up to 5.44 day⁻¹), in spite of the fact that these bacterial groups represented only a very low percentage of the total prokaryotic community. In contrast, the SAR11 clade, which was the most abundant group, was the slower grower in all treatments. Our results show that, in general, the least abundant groups exhibited the highest rates, whereas the most abundant groups were those growing more slowly, indicating that some minor groups, such the AAP bacteria, very likely contribute much more to the recycling of organic matter in the ocean than what their abundances alone would predict.

  19. Performance study on Gossip-based group key distribution protocal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yan; Ma Jiaqing; Zhong Yiping; Zhang Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Group key distribution is faced with two important problems, i.e. reliability and scalability, to support security multicast for large and dynamic groups. With group member increasing, traditional reliable multicast protocol can not deal with them fully. Gossip-based group key distribution idea for wide-area dissemination was provided. It is based on an gossip-based loss recovery control mechanism. It can provide a probabilistic reliable guarantee for a information dissemination to reach every group member, which can achieve scalability and reliability. To achieve full reliability, three layers protocol model in group key distribution was provided. One is best effect layer, which provides unreliable dissemination. Other is gossip-based loss recovery layer, which provides probabilistic reliable guarantee. Last is vsync-based layer, which provide deterministic loss recovery. We integrate probabilistic loss recovery method with deterministic one. The model possess scalability that probabilistic method has and full reliability prosthesis by vsync-based. To evaluate the effectiveness of gossip technique in scalable and reliable multicast protocols. We have compared gossip protocol with other reliable multicast protocols. Experimental result shows that gossip protocol has better scalability than other.

  20. Multiple comparisons in genetic association studies: a hierarchical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2014-02-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically "significant" effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/).

  1. What about N? A methodological study of sample-size reporting in focus group studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenton Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focus group studies are increasingly published in health related journals, but we know little about how researchers use this method, particularly how they determine the number of focus groups to conduct. The methodological literature commonly advises researchers to follow principles of data saturation, although practical advise on how to do this is lacking. Our objectives were firstly, to describe the current status of sample size in focus group studies reported in health journals. Secondly, to assess whether and how researchers explain the number of focus groups they carry out. Methods We searched PubMed for studies that had used focus groups and that had been published in open access journals during 2008, and extracted data on the number of focus groups and on any explanation authors gave for this number. We also did a qualitative assessment of the papers with regard to how number of groups was explained and discussed. Results We identified 220 papers published in 117 journals. In these papers insufficient reporting of sample sizes was common. The number of focus groups conducted varied greatly (mean 8.4, median 5, range 1 to 96. Thirty seven (17% studies attempted to explain the number of groups. Six studies referred to rules of thumb in the literature, three stated that they were unable to organize more groups for practical reasons, while 28 studies stated that they had reached a point of saturation. Among those stating that they had reached a point of saturation, several appeared not to have followed principles from grounded theory where data collection and analysis is an iterative process until saturation is reached. Studies with high numbers of focus groups did not offer explanations for number of groups. Too much data as a study weakness was not an issue discussed in any of the reviewed papers. Conclusions Based on these findings we suggest that journals adopt more stringent requirements for focus group method

  2. Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study Samuel A. Spear1 and James V. Crawford2 1 48th Medical Group, ENT...cited. Objective. To visually compare the Nitinol “smart” stapes prosthesis to conventional manual crimping stapes pistons in temporal bone cadaver...answer questions about each stapes piston. The answers to the survey were then recorded for analysis. Results. 8 of 9 Nitinol pistons were described as

  3. A Study on Signal Group Processing of AUTOSAR COM Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Hwang, Hyun Yong; Han, Tae Man; Ahn, Yong Hak

    2013-06-01

    In vehicle, there are many ECU(Electronic Control Unit)s, and ECUs are connected to networks such as CAN, LIN, FlexRay, and so on. AUTOSAR COM(Communication) which is a software platform of AUTOSAR(AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture) in the international industry standards of automotive electronic software processes signals and signal groups for data communications between ECUs. Real-time and reliability are very important for data communications in the vehicle. Therefore, in this paper, we analyze functions of signals and signal groups used in COM, and represent that functions of signal group are more efficient than signals in real-time data synchronization and network resource usage between the sender and receiver.

  4. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  5. Transpersonal experiences in childhood: an exploratory empirical study of selected adult groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, H T; Gervais, A; Shearing-Johns, S; Travis, F

    1992-12-01

    A questionnaire was developed to assess adult recall for a range of transpersonal experiences throughout childhood and adolescence (mystical experience, out-of-body experience, lucid dreams, archetypal dreams, ESP), as well as nightmares and night terrors as indicators of more conflicted, negative states. In two exploratory studies this questionnaire was administered to subjects with high estimated levels of early transpersonal experiences and practising meditators, with respective undergraduate controls. A cognitive skills/precocity model of early transpersonal experience was contrasted with a vulnerability of self model by comparisons of these groups on questionnaire categories, imaginative absorption, neuroticism, and visual-spatial skills, with some support found for both models depending on experience type, age of estimated recall, and adult meditative practice.

  6. Microtribological study of perfluoropolyether with different functional groups coated on hydrogen terminated Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minn, Myo; Satyanarayana, Nalam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Sinha, Sujeet K., E-mail: mpesks@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kondo, Hirofumi [Sony Chemical and Information Device Corporation, R and D Division, 1078 Kamiishikawa, Kanuma 322-8503 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Friction and wear properties of different perfluoropolyether (PFPE) films with and without hydrogen termination on Si (Si-H) were studied using a ball-on-disk tribometer. The physical and chemical properties of the films were evaluated using contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Coating of PFPEs onto bare Si has lowered the coefficient of friction (from 0.6 for Si to {approx}0.05 with PFPE) and enhanced the wear durability (20,000 times) in comparison with those for bare Si which failed immediately. The introduction of hydrogen termination onto Si prior to PFPE coating has further increased the wear durability of PFPE with different functional groups several times (>5 times) under a normal load of 30 mN and a sliding speed of 0.052 m/s.

  7. Histologic Evaluation of Gastric Biopsies According to Sydney Classification and Comparison of Chronic Gastritis Mucosal Histological Findings by Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Ugras

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the materials of gastric biopsies in cases diagnosed as chronic gastritis according to the Sydney system and to compare the parameters according to age groups. The Sydney system of gastritis has five main histological features of changes in gastric mucosa graded (chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori density In our study, we evaluated 63 patients under 31 years, 177 patients between the ages of 31-60 and 187 patients over 61 years, who were diagnosed as having chronic gastritis by endoscopic biopsy. In 31-60 age group, the localization of Helicobacter pylori was often the antrum. In contrast, in the under 31 years of age group, Helicobacter pylori infection were found to be in the form of the distribution pangastrit. Acute inflammation in the under31 years group was found to be significantly higher than other age groups. In over 61years group, high incidence of atrophy was found. In our study, we detected the rate in atrophy and intestinal metaplasia with Helicobacter pylori is independently increased with age. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(3.000: 173-178

  8. Enhancing Student Engagement: A Group Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Aakash

    2014-01-01

    Computing professionals work in groups and collaborate with individuals having diverse backgrounds and behaviors. The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) characterizes that a computing program must enable students to attain the ability to analyze a problem, design and evaluate a solution, and work effectively on teams to…

  9. Comparison of endoscopic findings in patients from different ethnic groups undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleed in eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Jaya; Acharya, Pramod; Barun, Bipin; Pokharel, Shashank; Uprety, Neeraj; Shrestha, Nabin Kumar

    2007-09-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleed is one of the commonest medical emergencies. Cultural customs and practices may influence the development of disease conditions that may lead to UGI bleed. The purpose of this study was to compare the causes of UGI bleed in different ethnic groups among patients presenting to a large tertiary care hospital with acute UGI bleed. A retrospective study was conducted examining data available in the endoscopy register at the B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS) in Nepal for patients presenting with UGI bleed over one calendar year. Study subjects were categorized into one of a few broad categories of ethnic groups: Khas, Newar, SeTaMaGuRaLi, Maithali and others. Demographic information and endoscopic diagnoses were abstracted. The relative frequencies of different causes of UGI bleed were compared across the ethnic groups using the chi2 test. One hundred and eighty-nine patients underwent endoscopy for UGI bleed in the time period studied. The mean age of the study cohort was 49.6 years and consisted of 71.0% males and 29.0% females. Overall the commonest cause of upper GI bleed was gastric ulcer. Esophageal varices was the commonest cause in the SeTaMaGuRaLi group, accounting for 33.3%. The relative frequency of esophageal varices as the cause of upper GI bleed was statistically significantly different among the various ethnic groups, with the SeTaMaGuRaLi group having the highest relative frequency (p-value 0.02). Physicians taking care of patients with upper GI bleed in Nepal should be aware of the high relative frequency of esophageal varices as a cause of upper GI bleed, and especially so among certain ethnic groups.

  10. Online Self-Tracking Groups to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Small-Scale Study on Mechanisms of Group Effect on Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Peng, Wei; Shin, Soo Yun; Chung, Minwoong

    2017-03-06

    between a focal participant and his/her group members during the experiment), such that participants who had a low performance discrepancy from other group members had greater fruit and vegetable consumption than participants who had a high performance discrepancy from other group members (P=.002). A mediation test showed that low performance discrepancy led to greater downward contrast (b=-0.78, 95% CI -2.44 to -0.15), which in turn led to greater fruit and vegetable consumption. Online self-tracking groups were more effective than self-tracking alone in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for early young adults. Low performance discrepancy from other group members lead to downward contrast, which in turn increased participants' fruit and vegetable consumption over time. The study highlighted social comparison processes in online groups that allow for sharing personal health information. Lastly, given the small scale of this study, nonsignificant results with small effect sizes might be subject to bias.

  11. Online Self-Tracking Groups to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Small-Scale Study on Mechanisms of Group Effect on Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Shin, Soo Yun; Chung, Minwoong

    2017-01-01

    , difference in fruit and vegetable consumption between a focal participant and his/her group members during the experiment), such that participants who had a low performance discrepancy from other group members had greater fruit and vegetable consumption than participants who had a high performance discrepancy from other group members (P=.002). A mediation test showed that low performance discrepancy led to greater downward contrast (b=–0.78, 95% CI –2.44 to –0.15), which in turn led to greater fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusions Online self-tracking groups were more effective than self-tracking alone in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for early young adults. Low performance discrepancy from other group members lead to downward contrast, which in turn increased participants’ fruit and vegetable consumption over time. The study highlighted social comparison processes in online groups that allow for sharing personal health information. Lastly, given the small scale of this study, nonsignificant results with small effect sizes might be subject to bias. PMID:28264793

  12. Comparison of models for analyzing two-group, cross-sectional data with a Gaussian outcome subject to a detection limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Ryan E; Rose, Charles E; Karon, John M

    2016-12-01

    A potential difficulty in the analysis of biomarker data occurs when data are subject to a detection limit. This detection limit is often defined as the point at which the true values cannot be measured reliably. Multiple, regression-type models designed to analyze such data exist. Studies have compared the bias among such models, but few have compared their statistical power. This simulation study provides a comparison of approaches for analyzing two-group, cross-sectional data with a Gaussian-distributed outcome by exploring statistical power and effect size confidence interval coverage of four models able to be implemented in standard software. We found using a Tobit model fit by maximum likelihood provides the best power and coverage. An example using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ribonucleic acid data is used to illustrate the inferential differences in these models.

  13. Executive functions and sustained attention:Comparison between age groups of 19-39 and 40-59 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rosa de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Few studies involving the cognition of middle-aged adults are available in the international literature, particularly investigating the process of cognitive aging, executive components and attention. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are differences in performance on neuropsychological tasks of executive functions and sustained attention between two age groups. Methods: The sample consisted of 87 adults aged from 19 to 59 years old, divided into two groups according to the age variable (younger adults and middle-aged adults. All participants were Brazilian and had no sensory, psychiatric or neurological disorders; subjects also had no history of alcohol abuse, and no self-reported use of illicit drugs or antipsychotics. The neuropsychological instruments administered were the Hayling Test, Trail Making Test, Bells Test and verbal fluency tasks. Results: Groups showed no significant differences in relation to sociodemographic variables, educational level or frequency of reading and writing habits. The younger adult group performed better than the middle-aged group on tasks that involved mainly processing speed, cognitive flexibility and lexical search. Conclusions: These findings serve as a valuable reference for cognitive processing in middle-aged adults, since a large number of comparative studies focus only on the younger and later phases of adulthood. Additional studies are needed to investigate possible interaction between different factors such as age and education.

  14. The effect of presenteeism-related health conditions on employee work engagement levels: A comparison between groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon T. de Beer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Awareness of presenteeism-related health conditions is important as the prevalence of these conditions unknowingly influences performance and productivity in organisations.Research purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the differences in work engagement levels based on groups of presenteeism-related conditions in employees.Motivation for the study: Awareness of the impact of presenteeism-related conditions on work engagement levels can aid in the crafting of interventions to assist employees who suffer from these conditions, which in turn can boost work engagement levels.Research design, approach and method: Cross-sectional data was collected from an availability sample of employees in the manufacturing sector (N = 3387.Main findings: The results of the multi-group structural equation modelling revealed significant mean differences in work engagement levels between the groups. Practical significance tests revealed significant differences between all the groups. The largest difference was between the group who suffered from no presenteeism-related conditions and the group who suffered from all three conditions included in this study concurrently.Practical/managerial implications: Organisational stakeholders are encouraged to take note of the effects that presenteeism-related health conditions have on work engagement and to consider relevant strategies and interventions to address and alleviate symptoms in order to tend to employee health and obviate the effect on productivity.Contribution: This study found that there were clear practical differences between employees who suffer from the presenteeism-related conditions and those who suffer from none of the conditions. Furthermore, there was also a clear difference when comparing the ‘no condition’ group to a general random sample in which employees might experience some symptoms but not comorbidity.

  15. Women With Addictions Report Reduced Anxiety After Group Music Therapy: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke S. Diestelkamp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Roughly six million females in the USA abuse or are addicted to alcohol. Women are more likely than men to report depression and anxiety as triggers for substance use and relapse, which emphasizes the importance of therapies designed to help women mitigate anxiety.Research supporting music therapy (MT with women with addictions is scarce. In this quasi-experimental investigation, we hoped to learn: (1 What percentage of women with addictive disorders in a 45-minute group MT session will report pre-session anxiety?; and (2 of these, what percentage will report a palpable reduction in their post-session anxiety? We used a single group design: Participants self-reported anxiety before and after each session.Study participants were 53 women in a gender-specific residential program. Voluntary group MT sessions were held twice weekly for 9 weeks. Four MT methods were used: Composition, Receptive (Listening, Improvisation, and Re-Creative (Performing. Of 53 first-session surveys, 39 (73.6% indicated pre-session anxiety. Of these, 33 (84.6% showed a reduction in post-session anxiety. A sign test confirmed an overall reduction in anxiety.Outcomes may have been related to interventions, group cohesion, or other factors. The absence of a comparison group prevents suppositions of causality. Nonetheless, the results present a compelling case for the use of MT with women with anxiety. Because of the link between trauma and addictive disorders, we encourage exploration of the role and benefits of MT within trauma-informed models of addiction treatment.

  16. Group schema therapy for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Susan G; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame, and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post-therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviors, whilst providing a de-stigmatizing and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  17. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Simpson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviours, whilst providing a de-stigmatising and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  18. The effects of group 1 versus group 2 carbapenems on imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Lidji, Shiri Klarfeld; Shabtai, Esther; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwaber, Mitchell J

    2011-07-01

    Use of the group 2 carbapenems, imipenem and meropenem, may lead to emergence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance. The group 1 carbapenem ertapenem has limited activity against P. aeruginosa and is not associated with imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IMP-R PA) in vitro. This retrospective, group-level, longitudinal study collected patient, antibiotic use, and resistance data from 2001 to 2005 using a hospital database containing information on 9 medical wards. A longitudinal data time series analysis was done to evaluate the association between carbapenem use (defined daily doses, or DDDs) and IMP-R PA. A total of 139 185 patient admissions were included, with 541 150 antibiotics DDDs prescribed: 4637 DDDs of group 2 carbapenems and 2130 DDDs of ertapenem. A total of 779 IMP-R PA were isolated (5.6 cases/1000 admissions). Univariate analysis found a higher incidence of IMP-R PA with group 2 carbapenems (P carbapenem use was highly associated with IMP-R PA, with a 20% increase in incidence (P = 0.0014) for each 100 DDDs. Group 2 carbapenem use tended to be associated with an increased proportion of IMP-R PA (P = 0.0625) in multivariate analysis. Ertapenem was not associated with IMP-R PA. These data would support preferentially prescribing ertapenem rather than group 2 carbapenems where clinically appropriate.

  19. Self-Actualizing Men and Women: A Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eleanor G.; Hansen, Jan B.

    1997-01-01

    The self-actualization of 167 women who lived in the Martha Cook (MC) dormitory of the University of Michigan (1950-1970) was compared to that of a group of Ivy League men researched in another study. In addition, two groups of MC women were compared to each other to identify differences which might explain why some self-actualized while other did…

  20. Views on clinically suspect arthralgia: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsum, Elize C; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2016-05-01

    The rheumatology field is moving towards identifying individuals with an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at a stage when arthritis is still absent but persons having clinically suspect arthralgia (CSA). Incorporating patients' views in rheumatologic care is pivotal; however, the views of persons with CSA on their condition are unknown. We aimed to help fill this gap by exploring illness perceptions of persons with CSA and their views on hypothetical prognoses for developing RA. Persons with CSA were invited to participate in a semi-structured focus group discussion. Illness perceptions according to the Common Sense Model (CSM) and four a priori formulated themes were explored in detail during the group discussion. The discussion was audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed in an interpretative phenomenological approach manner, on the basis of the dimensions of the CSM by three researchers independently. The views of four participants with CSA were explored during one focus group discussion. Four dimensions of the CSM were mainly observed: Identity, Consequences, Personal Control and Concern. None of the patients identified themselves as being a patient. They did experience pain and impairments in daily functioning and were concerned that their symptoms would progress. In the absence of physician-initiated treatment, some patients changed lifestyle in order to reduce pain and to promote health. Patients unanimously said that they could not interpret prognostic information on RA development expressed in hypothetical chances. Persons with CSA do not consider themselves patients. Prognostic information related to the development of RA based on risk percentages was considered as not useful by persons with CSA. Understanding of the illness perceptions of persons with CSA by health care professionals might improve medical management and facilitate shared decision-making.

  1. Cochlear and brainstem audiologic findings in normal hearing tinnitus subjects in comparison with non-tinnitus control group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While most tinnitus cases have some degree of hearing impairment, a small percent of the patients admitted to Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics or Hearing Evaluation Centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. Present study was performed in order to better understanding of the probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the cochlear and auditory brainstem function in normal hearing patients with chronic tinnitus. Altogether, 63 ears (31 ears with tinnitus and 32 ears without tinnitus were examined. The prevalence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and characteristics of the auditory brainstem response components including wave latencies and wave amplitudes was determined in the two groups and analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. There was no difference between the prevalence of transient evoked emissions in the two groups. The mean difference between absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that were not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly larger than the other group (p =0.04. The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the later ones, can be considered as an Audiologic finding in normal hearing tinnitus subjects and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in these patients must be investigated.

  2. Cochlear and brainstem audiologic findings in normal hearing tinnitus subjects in comparison with non-tinnitus control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Shadman; Faghih Habibi, Ali; Panahi, Rasool; Pastadast, Masoomeh

    2014-01-01

    While most tinnitus cases have some degree of hearing impairment, a small percent of the patients admitted to Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics or Hearing Evaluation Centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. Present study was performed in order to better understanding of the probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the cochlear and auditory brainstem function in normal hearing patients with chronic tinnitus. Altogether, 63 ears (31 ears with tinnitus and 32 ears without tinnitus) were examined. The prevalence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and characteristics of the auditory brainstem response components including wave latencies and wave amplitudes was determined in the two groups and analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. There was no difference between the prevalence of transient evoked emissions in the two groups. The mean difference between absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that were not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly larger than the other group (p =0.04). The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the later ones, can be considered as an Audiologic finding in normal hearing tinnitus subjects and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in these patients must be investigated.

  3. The false memory syndrome: experimental studies and comparison to confabulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M F; Fras, I A

    2011-04-01

    False memories, or recollections that are factually incorrect but strongly believed, remain a source of confusion for both psychiatrists and neurologists. We propose model for false memories based on recent experimental investigations, particularly when analyzed in comparison to confabulations, which are the equivalent of false memories from neurological disease. Studies using the Deese/Roedinger-McDermott experimental paradigm indicate that false memories are associated with the need for complete and integrated memories, self-relevancy, imagination and wish fulfillment, familiarity, emotional facilitation, suggestibility, and sexual content. In comparison, confabulations are associated with the same factors except for emotional facilitation, suggestibility, and sexual content. Both false memories and confabulations have an abnormal sense of certainty for their recollections, and neuroanatomical findings implicate decreased activity in the ventromedial frontal lobe in this certainty. In summary, recent studies of false memories in comparison to confabulations support a model of false memories as internally-generated but suggestible and emotionally-facilitated fantasies or impulses, rather than repressed memories of real events. Furthermore, like confabulations, in order for false memories to occur there must be an attenuation of the normal, nonconscious, right frontal "doubt tag" regarding their certainty.

  4. Comparison of the Effect of Noise Levels on Stress Response in Two Different Operation Groups in an Orthopedic Surgery Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibe Baytan Yildiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this randomized, single-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of noise on hemodynamic and neuroendocrine stress response by measuring the level of noise in the surgery rooms of patients undergoing knee operations under neuroaxial anesthesia. Gerec ve Yontem: We compared patient responses from two groups of patients: those undergoing knee operations in a surgery room where the noise level (measured in decibels is high, and those undergoing meniscus operations in a surgery room with lower noise levels. The STAI, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-1, and the anxiety test (STAI-2wereperformed at preoperative and postoperative periods. 20 ml of blood sample was taken for basal, intraoperative 30th minute, and postoperative 1st hour measurements. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures were found to be higher in the high noise level group. ACTH levels were increased during the early postoperative period and became normal during the late postoperative period in the high noise level group whereas ACTH levels were significantly decreased in the low-noise level group. Basal cortisol levels were significantly higher in the high noise level group. HCRP, an inflammatory response mediator was found to be decreased in both groups. Early and late blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the high noise group. There was a greater increase in early and late blood glucose levels in the high noise group. In the postoperative period, although the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-2 levels being higher in patients subject to noisier environment determines how people feel independent of the conditions and state they are in, this result made us consider that the noise the patients were subjected to in the intraoperative period may cause a stress response. Discussion: As a result we believe that standard noise levels should be achieved by reducing the factors causing high noise levels in the operating room. This will

  5. Comparison of condylar displacement between three biotypological facial groups by using mounted models and a mandibular position indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponces, Maria João; Tavares, José Pedro; Lopes, Jorge Dias; Ferreira, Afonso Pinhão

    2014-11-01

    Facial-type-associated variations in diagnostic features have several implications in orthodontics. For example, in hyperdivergent craniofacial types, growth imbalances are compensated by displacement of the condyle. When diagnosis and treatment planning involves centric relation (CR), detailed knowledge of the condylar position is desirable. The present study aimed to measure condylar displacement (CD) between CR and maximum intercuspation in three facial types of an asymptomatic orthodontic population. The study was conducted in 108 patients classified into three groups of 36 individuals each (27 women and 9 men; mean age, 20.5 years), based on the following facial patterns: hyperdivergent, hypodivergent, and intermediate. To quantify CD along the horizontal and vertical axes, the condylar position was analyzed using mounted casts on a semi-adjustable articulator and a mandibular position indicator. The Student t-test was used to compare CD between the groups. Vertical displacement was found to be significantly different between the hyperdivergent and hypodivergent groups (p displacement were not significant between the groups. In each group, vertical CD was more evident than horizontal displacement was. All facial types, especially the hyperdivergent type, carried a significantly high risk of CD. Therefore, the possibility of CD should be carefully evaluated and considered in the assessment of all orthodontic cases in order to accurately assess jaw relationships and avoid possible misdiagnosis.

  6. Further Understanding the Systemic Effects of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Comparison of Two Groups of Clinical Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Briana S.; Wampler, Karen S.

    2002-01-01

    Study compared female childhood sexual abuse (CSA) survivors and their male partners with a group of couples reporting no CSA. Both female CSA survivors and their partners reported higher symptoms of stress, suggesting support for the theory of secondary traumatic stress. Relationship impairment results did not support the hypothesis that CSA…

  7. Species identification of Streptococcus bovis group isolates causing bacteremia: a comparison of two MALDI-TOF MS systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agergaard, Charlotte N; Knudsen, Elisa; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Christensen, Jens J; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2017-02-20

    This study compared two MALDI-TOF MS systems (Biotyper and VITEK MS) on clinical Streptococcus bovis group isolates (n=66). The VITEK MS gave fewer misidentifications and a higher rate of correct identifications than the Biotyper. Only the identification of S. lutetiensis by the VITEK MS was reliable. Additional optimization of the available system databases is needed.

  8. To whom do national days matter? A comparison of national belonging across generations and ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coopmans, Manja; Lubbers, Marcel; Meuleman, Roza

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies to what extent participating in days for national commemoration and celebration is associated with feelings of national belonging, and to what extent this is comparable across generations and ethnic groups. Utilizing data from a national survey (N = 4,505), three major national da

  9. Use of illicit substances in a psychosis incidence cohort : a comparison among different ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, N; Selten, JP; Hoek, HW; Feller, W; van der Graaf, Y; Kahn, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Use of illicit substances has been suggested as an explanation for the increased incidence of psychosis among some immigrant groups. The aim of the present study is to compare the rates of illicit substance use among immigrants with a first psychosis with that among non-migrants. Method:

  10. Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga staging and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group proposal for the TNM staging systems based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Li, Yin; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Fang, Wentao

    2016-04-01

    To compare the predictive effect of the Masaoka-Koga staging system and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG) proposal for the new TNM staging on prognosis of thymic malignancies using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. From 1992 to 2012, 2,370 patients in ChART database were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 1,198 patients with complete information on TNM stage, Masaoka-Koga stage, and survival were used for analysis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was assessed in R0 patients. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated both in an R0 resected cohort, as well as in all patients (any R status). CIR and OS were first analyzed according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. Then, they were compared using the new TNM staging proposal. Based on Masaoka-Koga staging system, significant difference was detected in CIR among all stages. However, no survival difference was revealed between stage I and II, or between stage II and III. Stage IV carried the highest risk of recurrence and worst survival. According to the new TNM staging proposal, CIR in T1a was significantly lower comparing to all other T categories (PTNM staging proposal not only describes the extent of tumor invasion but also provides information on lymphatic involvement and tumor dissemination. Further study using prospectively recorded information on the proposed TNM categories would be helpful to better grouping thymic tumors for predicting prognosis and guiding clinical management.

  11. Synthesis and Electrochemical Studies on BEDT-TTF Derivatives with Hydroxyl Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    New electron donors with hydroxyl groups were synthesized and characterized spectroscopically.Their redox potentials were determined with cyclic voltammetry, and the comparison with BEDT-TTF [Bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene] in this aspect was made.These results indicated that the new electron donors had similar electron-donating capabilities as BEDT-TTF.

  12. Relationships between Depression, Lifestyle and Quality of Life in the Community Dwelling Elderly: A Comparison between Gender and Age Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Demura, Shinichi; Sato, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the comprehensive relationships between depression and the characteristics of lifestyle and quality of life (QOL) of healthy, community dwelling elderly, and compare them according to gender and age groups. 1302 subjects (657 males and 645 females) were used for analysis. The investigators in this study were researchers working at universities in each prefecture. Data collection was conducted in a general delivery survey and interview setting or...

  13. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    CERN Document Server

    Drews, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The questio...

  14. A renormalization in group study of supersymmetric field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, Marianne

    2015-05-13

    This thesis analyses scalar supersymmetric field theories within the framework of the functional renormalization group (FRG). Classical physics on microscopic scales is connected to the effective model on macroscopic scales via the scale-dependent effective average action by a reformulation of the path integral. Three supersymmetric theories are explored in detail: supersymmetric quantum mechanics, the three-dimensional Wess-Zumino model and supersymmetric spherical theories in three dimensions. The corresponding renormalization group flow is formulated in a manifestly supersymmetric way. By utilizing an expansion of the effective average action in derivative operators, an adequate and intrinsically non-perturbative truncation scheme is selected. In quantum mechanics, the supersymmetric derivative expansion is shown to converge by increasing the order of truncation. Besides, high-accuracy results for the ground and first excited state energies for quantum systems with conserved as well as spontaneously broken supersymmetry are achieved. Furthermore, the critical behaviour of the three-dimensional Wess-Zumino is investigated. Via spectral methods, a global Wilson-Fisher scaling solution and its corresponding universal exponents are determined. Besides, a superscaling relation of the leading exponents is verified for arbitrary dimensions greater than or equal to two. Lastly, three-dimensional spherical, supersymmetric theories are analysed. Their phase structure is determined in detail for infinite as well as finitely many superfields. The exact one-parameter scaling solution for infinitely many fields is shown to collapse to a single non-trivial Wilson-Fisher fixed-point for finitely many superfields. It is pointed out that the strongly-coupled domains of these theories are plagued by Landau poles and non-analyticities, indicating spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  15. A real case study on transportation scenario comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoukiás A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a real case study dealing with the comparison of transport scenarios. The study is conducted within a larger project concerning the establishment of the maritime traffic policy in Greece. The paper presents the problem situation and an appropriate problem formulation. Moreover a detailed version of the evaluation model is presented in the paper. The model consists of a complex hierarchy of evaluation models enabling us to take into account the multiple dimensions and points of view of the actors involved in the evaluations.

  16. Transcriptomic and Epigenetic Profiling of the Lung of Influenza-Infected Pigs: A Comparison of Different Birth Weight and Susceptibility Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses are a common cause of respiratory disease in swine. Infections range in severity from asymptomatic to causing significant morbidity. The main objective of this study was to compare lung transcriptomic and epigenetic responses to influenza infection in pigs from high or low birth weight litters. The latter is a potential indicator of intrauterine growth restriction, a significant risk factor for prenatal programming effects. Individual pigs from high (HBW or low birth weight (LBW litters (n = 17 were inoculated with influenza A virus and euthanized 48 hours later. Lesion severity and viral loads were assessed as previously described. The transcriptional response to infection in LBW and HBW groups (n = 16 was assessed by microarray. A separate analysis of pigs classified as 'Resilient' (RES or 'Susceptible' (SUS (n = 6 on the basis of severity of lung pathology was also conducted. Eight genes were confirmed as differentially expressed for the birth weight comparison, including three antiviral genes with lower expression in LBW: ISG15, OAS1, and OAS2 (P<0.05. The promoter region methylation status of these three genes was assessed for each birth weight group, and no differences were found. These expression data are consistent with our previous finding that LBW pigs had less severe lesion scores and a trend towards lower viral titres in lung than the HBW cohort. The SUS v RES comparison identified 91 differentially expressed genes (FDR<0.05 that were enriched with functional annotation terms and pathways associated with inflammation. The cytokine genes IL6, IL8, and CCL2 were all upregulated in SUS pigs, and may have driven disease severity in these animals. In conclusion, this study found no evidence that the transcriptional immune response to influenza was adversely affected by low litter birth weight, but did identify several candidate genes for driving disease pathology.

  17. In-Depth Cultural Studies in Multicultural Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina-Jasjukevica, Gunta; Briška, Ilze

    2016-01-01

    There is much research and educational practices at all levels of education on how to deal with promoting acceptance and understanding between different cultures. A cultural study forms an important part of shaping intercultural understanding. "The aim" of the research is to analyze an innovative way of incorporating cultural studies in…

  18. Report of the Study Group on Yale College, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale Univ., New Haven, CT.

    The Study Committee on Yale College was established to study all aspects of the college and to make recommendations for the next 20 years of operation. Recommendations include the areas of faculty role, student admissions, student role, the setting of undergraduate life, the appropriate range and limits of choice in learning, the process of…

  19. NASBE Study Group Surveys State Leadership Development Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bobbi; Hull, Robert

    2015-01-01

    State board members, working in partnership with the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted an in-depth study of states' school leadership development policies and practices. Data from this study are being analyzed to determine ways that states can create systems and structures for…

  20. Outcome of Home-Based Early Intervention for Autism in Sri Lanka: Follow-Up of a Cohort and Comparison with a Nonintervention Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemamali Perera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the outcome of a home-based autism intervention program (HBAIP in 18- to 40-month-old children newly diagnosed and treatment naïve. Intervention was exclusively implemented at home. Outcome was measured at 3 months and 6 months after intervention and compared with a group of newly diagnosed children with autism who were >40 months at intake but had not received any autism specific clinical management. Aim was also to estimate whether natural development would contribute to gain in skills and compare with the effect of intervention. Five selected parameters of behavior representing social interaction and social communication were used to assess outcome. Results showed a statistically significant improvement between preintervention and postintervention in all the measured parameters. The effect size was large when compared to preintervention and gains were indicated by changes in mean scores and p values within a narrow confidence interval. Highest gains were in first 3 months of postintervention which continued up to 6 months. Although the comparison group was more advanced in the measured skills at intake, they were significantly below the level reached by experimental group at 3 months and 6 months after intervention. This study was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry (SLCTR/2009/011.

  1. Comparison between scattering-states numerical renormalization group and the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh approach to quantum transport: Crossover from weak to strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2010-04-01

    The quantum transport through nanoscale junctions is governed by the charging energy U of the device. We employ the recently developed scattering-states numerical renormalization-group approach to open quantum systems to study nonequilibrium Green’s functions and current-voltage characteristics of such junctions for small and intermediate values of U . We establish the accuracy of the approach by a comparison with diagrammatic Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh results which become exact in the weak-coupling limit U→0 . We demonstrate the limits of the diagrammatic expansions at intermediate values of the charging energy. While the numerical renormalization-group approach correctly predicts only one single, universal low-energy scale at zero bias voltage, some diagrammatic expansions yield two different low-energy scales for the magnetic and the charge fluctuations. At large voltages, however, the self-consistent second Born as well as the GW approximation reproduce the scattering-states renormalization-group spectral functions for symmetric junctions while for asymmetric junctions the voltage-dependent redistribution of spectral weight differs significantly in the different approaches. The second-order perturbation theory does not capture the correct single-particle dynamics at large bias and violates current conservation for asymmetric junctions.

  2. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ekelijn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis. To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation.

  3. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ekelijn; Bouma, Annemarie; Klinkenberg, Don

    2011-02-23

    Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis). To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation.

  4. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  5. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  6. DFT study of glycosyl group reactivity in quercetin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevitha, D.; Sadasivam, K.; Praveena, R.; Jayaprakasam, R.

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to compute relevant electronic properties with the purpose of generating precise information which facilitates the best activity given by the positions of glycosyl group attached at all 3 different rings of quercetin such as Q3G (C- ring), Q7G (A-ring) and Q3‧G (B-ring). Computed values of the OH BDE, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), Density of states (DOS,PDOS,OPDOS) and electronic properties such as electron affinity (EA), ionization potential (IP), softness (S), hardness (η), electronegativity (χ) and electrophilic index (ω) indicate that the title compounds possess good radical scavenging activity. Charge delocalization and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are characterized using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NBO accurately differentiate the weak and strong intramolecular hydrogen bond of quercetin-O-glycoside compounds. Results available from the computational investigation have proved that A-ring glycoside of quercetin is capable of donating electrons and acts as a good anti-oxidant than B-ring glycoside and C-ring glycoside of quercetin.

  7. In-depth Cultural Studies in Multicultural Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliņa-Jasjukeviča Gunta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is much research and educational practices at all levels of education on how to deal with promoting acceptance and understanding between different cultures. A cultural study forms an important part of shaping intercultural understanding. The aim of the research is to analyze an innovative way of incorporating cultural studies in teacher education program from the perspective of encouraging multinational students to reveal common values within diverse manifestations of different cultures. The present article describes a qualitative study of multinational students’ experiences in international project related to the learning about Nordic and Baltic cultural traditions. In the conclusion of the article, the efficiency of the structure of content and the process of in-depth cultural studies are analyzed. The discussion contains problems for further research of this topic.

  8. A randomized comparison of home visits and hospital-based group follow-up visits after early postpartum discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, G J; Braveman, P A; Ackerson, L; Odouli, R; Coleman-Phox, K; Capra, A M; Wong, C; Lieu, T A

    2001-09-01

    Short postpartum stays are common. Current guidelines provide scant guidance on how routine follow-up of newly discharged mother-infant pairs should be performed. We aimed to compare 2 short-term (within 72 hours of discharge) follow-up strategies for low-risk mother-infant pairs with postpartum length of stay (LOS) of costs were studied using computerized databases and chart review. Breastfeeding continuation, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal satisfaction were assessed by means of telephone interviews at 2 weeks postpartum. During a 17-month period in 1998 to 1999, we enrolled and randomized 1014 mother-infant pairs (506 to the control group and 508 to the intervention group). There were no significant differences between the study groups with respect to maternal age, race, education, household income, parity, previous breastfeeding experience, early initiation of prenatal care, or postpartum LOS. There were no differences with respect to neonatal LOS or Apgar scores. In the control group, 264 mother-infant pairs had an individual visit only, 157 had a group visit only, 64 had both a group and an individual visit, 4 had a home health and a hospital-based follow-up, 13 had no follow-up within 72 hours, and 4 were lost to follow-up. With respect to outcomes within 2 weeks after discharge, there were no significant differences in newborn or maternal hospitalizations or urgent care visits, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or a combined clinical outcome measure indicating whether a mother-infant pair had any of the above outcomes. However, mothers in the home visit group were more likely than those in the control group to rate multiple aspects of their care as excellent or very good. These included the preventive advice delivered (76% vs 59%) and the skills and abilities of the provider (84% vs 73%). Mothers in the home visit group also gave higher ratings on overall satisfaction with the newborn's posthospital care (71% vs 59

  9. STUDY OF THERAPEUTIC COMPARISON OF TACROLIMUS 0.1% AND MINOXIDIL 2% IN ALOPECIA AREATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallappa C. Herkal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alopecia areata is a unique, idiopathic disease in which there is patchy hair loss. The variable and uncertain natural history of alopecia areata is accounting for the multiplicity of uncritical claims for a large variety of therapeutic procedures. Aim: to find the therapeutic comparison between tacrolimus 0.1% ointment and minoxidil 2% solution. Material and Methods: Patients attending skin out patient department in Navodaya medical college hospital and research centre, Raichur were screened and the consenting consecutive cases of Aopecia Areata (AA from December 2010 to November 2011 were chosen for study. There were 75 patients in the study. It is a randomized, single blind, intension to treat study. The eligible patients for the study were randomly allocated into two groups-Group A and Group B (38 in Group A and 37 in Group B. Patients in Group A were treated with 2% Minoxidi solution to be applied twice daily over the alopecia patch, where as Patients in Group B were treated with Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment applied twice daily. Patients were followed up at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks. Alopecia Grading Score (AGS was calculated at baseline and 12 weeks. Regrowth Score (RGS was calculated at 12 weeks. Results: Total 69 patients completed the study (35 in Group A and 34 in Group B. In our study RGS ≥ 3 was observed in 65.71% of patients treated with Tinoxidil 2% solution and 44.12% of patients treated with Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment. Conclusion: In our study Minoxidil 2% solution had better stimulatory effect on hair growth compared to Tacrolimus 0.1% ointment in the treatment of mild to moderate patchy alopecia areata. The combination treatment may yield a better clinical response than either of the agents used singly.

  10. Food groups and the risk of colorectal cancer: results from a Jordanian case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Mweis, Suhad S; Tayyem, Reema F; Shehadah, Ihab; Bawadi, Hiba A; Agraib, Lana M; Bani-Hani, Kamal E; Al-Jaberi, Tareq; Al-Nusairr, Majed

    2015-07-01

    The role of diet in colorectal cancer (CRC) in Jordan has not been studied previously. This study aimed at examining the association between food groups (including grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, and meat and legumes) and CRC risk in Jordan. We compared intakes of the different food groups among CRC patients (n=167) and matched controls (n=240) by age, sex, occupation, and marital status. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect dietary data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of quartiles of intakes of the different food groups with CRC risk. In addition, the association of selected food items with CRC risk was examined. Odds ratios (ORs) for the fourth versus the first quartile of intake were 2.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-6.08] for grains, 1.66 (95% CI: 0.81-3.40) for vegetables, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.26-1.16) for fruits, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.46-1.97) for milk, and 1.43 (95% CI: 0.68-2.98) for meat and legumes. In a comparison of the highest with the lowest weekly frequency of consumption, there was a direct association between the risk of CRC and the frequency of consumption of chicken (OR=2.52, 95% CI: 1.33-4.77). An increase in risk was observed with increased consumption of white bread (OR=3.13, 95% CI: 1.18-9.25), whereas consumption of whole bread was associated with a decreased risk for CRC (OR=0.32, 95% CI: 0.12-0.84). Our results support a role of diet in CRC. Direct associations were found for grains, white bread, and chicken, whereas an inverse relation was reported for whole bread.

  11. [Clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder --comparison with non-workplace-associated group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tsubasa; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder. We conducted a clinical survey involving 84 clinical cases (regular employees suffering from mood disorder) who were hospitalized in the Psychiatry Department of Jichi Medical University Hospital, for a period over 8 years and 4 months between April 1st, 2000 and July 31st, 2008. The size of the workplace-associated group as a percentage of those patients in whom the onset of the symptom was occasioned by an evident issue at their workplace was 65%. This rate accounted for 74% of the total patients if clinical cases in which an evident issue at the workplace served as a significant trigger for the symptom were added to these patients in the case of an initial episode in the "non-workplace associated group". In the workplace-associated group, cases in which the premorbid character was a "depression-related personality" comprised only 42%, and was noticeably characterized by a perfection-oriented habit, enthusiastic character, conformity with other people, etc. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who were diagnosed with a "depression-related personality" comprised only 59% of the "overworked group", in which a heavy workload was evident in the workplace-associated group. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of cases involving managerial workers was significantly high; their rate as initial cases was significantly high, as well the proportion of favorable outcomes. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of patients who showed unambiguous depression at the initial stage was significantly low. Likewise, a similar result was obtained in the overworked group. Workplace-associated mood disorder today tends to have a stress-related aspect, or aspect of adjustment disorder. There was a period in many cases during which the main symptoms were insomnia, headache, panic attack, etc., prior to the onset of unambiguous depression

  12. Comparison of the properties of two fossil groups of galaxies with the normal group NGC 6034 based on multiband imaging and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, C; Guennou, L; LeBrun, V; Durret, F; Clement, B; Clerc, N; Comeron, S; Ilbert, O; lin, Y; Russeil, D; Seemann, U

    2012-01-01

    We collected multiband imaging and spectroscopy for two fossil groups (RX J1119.7+2126 and 1RXS J235814.4+150524) and one normal group (NGC 6034). We computed photometric redshifts in the central zones of each group, combining previous data with the SDSS five-band data. For each group we investigated the red sequence (RS) of the color-magnitude relation and computed the luminosity functions, stellar population ages and distributions of the group members. Spectroscopy allowed us to investigate the large-scale surroundings of these groups and the substructure levels in 1RXS J235814.4+150524 and NGC 6034. The large-scale environment of 1RXS J235814.4+150524 is poor, though its galaxy density map shows a clear signature of the surrounding cosmic web. RX J1119.7+2126 appears to be very isolated, while the cosmic environment of NGC 6034 is very rich. At the group scale, 1RXS J235814.4+150524 shows no substructure. Galaxies with recent stellar populations seem preferentially located in the group outskirts. A RS is d...

  13. Consumers' preferences for fresh yam: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlagne, Carla; Cornet, Denis; Blazy, Jean-Marc; Diman, Jean-Louis; Ozier-Lafontaine, Harry

    2017-01-01

    In West and Central Africa and in the Caribbean, yam is one of the most important sources of carbohydrates and has a great potential to improve food security. The yam production sector is, however, now challenged by the satisfaction of evolving consumers' preferences. Since little is known about consumers' preferences regarding yams' characteristics, product quality, and the drivers of yam purchase, six focus group discussions were conducted (for a total of 31 participants). Among the purchasing criteria, price was considered more important than the others. It was followed by the external damage, the origin, and the size of the tuber. The most frequently cited consumption criteria were the taste, the texture, and color of flesh after cooking. Taste was considered more important than the other criteria. Three consumers' profiles were established reflecting heterogeneity in preferences, especially as concerns the willingness to pay for yam and consumption habits. They were designated as the Hedonistic, the Thrifty and the Flexible. Our results suggest that innovations can be implemented to sustain and stimulate the development of the yam sector in Guadeloupe. Two main development paths were identified. The first path is the valorization of the great existing diversity of yam varieties and the increase in the level of information for consumers about product attributes such as the cooking mode, the origin, and the mode of production. Building a marketing strategy based on the valorization of this diversity can help maintain and preserve yam's agro-biodiversity and the satisfaction of rapidly evolving consumption habits. The second path is the definition of yam ideotypes that suit consumers' needs. We expect that tailoring the production to consumers' needs will have a positive impact on global food security in the Caribbean region.

  14. Comparison of health related quality of life between two groups of veteran and non-veteran spinal cord injured patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; Rostami, Reza; Saadat, Soheil; Taheri, Taher; Tajabadi, Maryam; Ranjbari, Ghazale; Naji, Zohrehsadat; Jafarpour, Saba; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a lower health related quality of life (HRQOL) compared to both healthy controls and the normal population. The aim of this study was to compare HRQOL between two groups of veteran and non-veteran SCI patients. Methods: All male paraplegic non-veterans who had sustained complete SCI before 1988 and were residents of Tehran province (Iran), and a similar group of SCI veterans who consecutively participated in a health screening program were enrolled in this study. Patients fewer than 35 and older than 65 years of age were not included in this study. The participants were interviewed based on the Persian version of SF-36 questionnaire by two psychologists. Eight sub-scales and two physical and mental component summaries of the instrument were assessed. We used chi-square, odds ratio, Mann-Whitney U, independent t-test and linear regression for analysis. Results: Overall, 25 veterans and 22 non-veterans were enrolled in the study. The mean age, time since injury and the presence of comorbid illnesses were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). A greater number of veterans were married (p= 0.003) and employed (p= 0.047). On average, veterans had more years of formal education than non-veterans (p= 0.001). The mean (SD) bodily pain sub-scale was 72.73(31.253) for non-veterans and 49.7 (28.287) for veterans (p=0.011). Absence of comorbid illnesses was associated with a better physical component summary (p< 0.001). Employment was associated with a better mental component summary (p= 0.022). Conclusion: We did not find any differences in HRQOL between the two groups except for the bodily pain sub-scale. Further studies with larger sample sizes are recommended. PMID:26157716

  15. Plantar pitted keratolysis: a study from non-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Feride Kaptanoglu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitted keratolysis is an acquired, superficial bacterial infection of the skin which is characterized by typical malodor and pits in the hyperkeratotic areas of the soles. It is more common in barefooted people in tropical areas, or those who have to wear occlusive shoes, such as soldiers, sailors and athletes. In this study, we evaluated 41 patients who had been diagnosed with plantar pitted keratolysis. The patients were of high socioeconomic status, were office-workers, and most had a university degree. Malodor and plantar hyperhydrosis were the most frequently reported symptoms. The weight-bearing metatarsal parts of the feet were those most affected. Almost half the women in the study gave a history of regular pedicure and foot care in a spa salon. Mean treatment duration was 19 days. All patients were informed about the etiology of the disease, predisposing factors and preventive methods. Recurrences were observed in only 17% of patients during the one year follow-up period. This study emphasizes that even malodorous feet among non-risk city dwellers may be a sign of plantar pitted keratolysis. A study of the real incidence of the disease in a large population-based series is needed.

  16. Peer Group Status of Gender Dysphoric Children : A Sociometric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, Madeleine S. C.; Veenstra, Rene; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P. C.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.

    2010-01-01

    In this sociometric study, we aimed to investigate the social position of gender-referred children in a naturalistic environment. We used a peer nomination technique to examine their social position in the class and we specifically examined bullying and victimization of gender dysphoric children. A

  17. Researchers' Construction of Knowledge from Studying Professional Conversation Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Tillema, Harm

    2007-01-01

    Data from written correspondence and conversations gathered from the authors' study on knowledge construction was used to examine the process of interpretation, or how researchers construct 'knowledge about knowledge construction.' The notion of 'working in the interpretive zone' was used to conceptualize interpretation among researchers as a…

  18. Comparison of cognition abilities between groups of children with specific learning disability having average, bright normal and superior nonverbal intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karande Sunil

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Specific learning disabilities (SpLD viz. dyslexia, dysgraphia and dyscalculia are an important cause of academic underachievement. Aims: To assess whether cognition abilities vary in children with SpLD having different grades of nonverbal intelligence. SETTING: Government recognized clinic in a medical college. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ninety-five children with SpLD (aged 9-14 years were assessed. An academic achievement of two years below the actual grade placement on educational assessment with a Curriculum-Based test was considered diagnostic of SpLD. On basis of their nonverbal Intelligence Quotient (IQ scores obtained on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test, the study children were divided into three groups: (i average-nonverbal intelligence group (IQ 90-109, (ii bright normal-nonverbal intelligence group (IQ 110-119, and (iii superior-nonverbal intelligence group (IQ 120-129. A battery of 13 Cognition Function tests (CFTs devised by Jnana Prabodhini′s Institute of Psychology, Pune based on Guilford′s Structure of Intellect Model was administered individually on each child in the four areas of information viz. figural, symbolic, semantic and behavioral. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: The mean CFTs scores obtained in the four areas of information were calculated for each of the three groups and compared using one-way analysis of variance test. A P value < 0.05 was to be considered statistically significant. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between their mean CFTs scores in any of the four areas of information. CONCLUSIONS: Cognition abilities are similar in children with SpLD having average, bright-normal and superior nonverbal intelligence.

  19. Comparison the Effect of Student-Based Group Discussion and Lecture Methods Teaching on Midwifery Student\\'s Learning Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghapour SA.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: True learning needs the utilization of proper teaching methods leading to students’ interests in the learning activities to gain useful learning experiences. Therefore, it is needed to reform the traditional teaching methods and to use new student-focused methods by the educational systems.  The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the student-focused group discussion method and lecture method on the learning level in the Midwifery students. Materials & Methods: In the semi-experimental study, 72 third-semester Midwifery bachelor students of Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, were selected via census method to participate in the theoretical clinical pregnancy course presented as lecture and group discussion methods in 2014. The final test was done after the end of the training courses. And, material durability test was done 8 weeks after the end of the course sessions. Data was analyzed, using SPSS 16 software and Wilcoxon Non-parametric Test. Findings: There was a significant difference between the mean scores of all the sessions conducted through lecture method (45.00±8.00 and group discussion method (57.00±10.00; p=0.0001. There was a significant difference in the material durability after 8 weeks between the mean scores of lecture (24.50±13.90 and group discussion (35.10±13.10 methods (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Standard student-focused group discussion training affects the midwifery students’ learning more than the lecture method does and there is higher information durability.  

  20. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  1. Comparison of group B streptococci colonization in vaginal and rectal specimens by culture method and polymerase chain reaction technique

    OpenAIRE

    Bidgani, Shahrokh; Navidifar, Tahereh; Najafian, Mahin; Amin, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a colonizing microorganism in pregnant women and without causing symptoms. Colonization of GBS in the rectovaginal region in late of pregnancy is a risk factor for newborn diseases. GBS infection in newborn babies is acquired by the aspiration of infected amniotic fluid or vertical transmission during delivery through the birth canal. The aim of this study was determination of GBS prevalence among vaginal and anorectal specim...

  2. A comparison of time-motion and technical-tactical variables between age groups of female judo matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miarka, Bianca; Cury, Rubiana; Julianetti, Ricardo; Battazza, Rafael; Julio, Ursula Ferreira; Calmet, Michel; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify differences between age groups of female judo matches in time-motion and technical-tactical analysis. The sample was composed of pre-cadet (13-14 years, n = 148), cadet (15-16 years, n = 228), junior (17-19 years, n = 104) and senior (>20 years, n = 237) groups. The time-motion indicators consisted of total combat time, standing combat time, displacement without contact, gripping time, total time of techniques, groundwork combat time and pause time, per match and by each combat/pause cycle. Technical and tactical variables were also collected. The one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc test were conducted, P ≤ 0.05. Cadets, with a median of 7 (2, 12), had a number of combat/pause cycles different from junior, with 3 (1, 8.5). Regarding time-motion per match and per cycle, senior had longer total combat time, standing combat time and gripping time than other groups. Senior presented lower frequency of leg techniques than pre-cadet, cadet and junior. Time-motion and technical-tactical variables effects in female judo athletes emphasise the difference between seniors and other groups.

  3. Down's syndrome: a ten-year group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynon, M W; Schimek, R A

    1977-12-01

    Thirty individuals with the clinical diagnosis of Down's syndrome received ophthalmologic examination periodically over 10 years at a state school for exceptional children. External examination, retinoscopy, anterior segment evaluation, ophthalmoscopy, and tonometry were usually done. The ages at present range from 10 to 50 years. The sex ratio was 80% male and 20% female. Three subjects died during the course of the study. The most frequent ocular anomalies were oblique fissures, refractive error, blepharoconjunctivitis, epicanthus, and Brushfield's spots. All of these occurred in 50% or more of the subjects.

  4. A STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE LARYNGOSPASM IN PAEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Nagaprasad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postoperative laryngospasm is an anaesthetic emergency that is still responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in paediatric patients. It is relatively a frequent complication and requires prompt recognition and early correction by resorting to different manoeuvres and medications. METHODS A study had been done to know the incidence of postoperative laryngospasm in our institute in the year 2014. The reported cases of laryngospasm were managed by a protocol set in algorithm and the efficacy of each step in the management algorithm was evaluated. RESULTS The incidence of Postoperative Laryngospasm in our study was found to be 9.32/1000, which was similar to that published in the literature. We also found that majority of laryngospasms can be managed by simple manoeuvres like Chin lift, Jaw thrust, Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation {IPPV} or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure {CPAP} with 100% O2. An Intravenous bolus dose of Propofol was found to be effective in the treatment of postoperative laryngospasm. CONCLUSION Laryngospasm even though an alarming postoperative complication can be managed effectively by simple manoeuvres and some pharmacological intervention if it is tackled by a set protocol based algorithm.

  5. Study of sunspot group morphological variations leading to flaring events

    CERN Document Server

    Korsos, M B; Ludmany, A

    2014-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the most probable sites of flare occurrences are the locations of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in the active regions. Instead of magnetograms the present work checks this assumption by using sunspot data, the targeted phenomenon is the pre-flare behaviour of the strong horizontal gradients of the magnetic field at the location of the flare. The empirical basis of the work is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen sunspot Data) sunspot catalogue. Case studies of two active regions and five X-flares have been carried out to find possible candidates for pre-flare signatures. It has been found that the following properties of the temporal variations of horizontal magnetic field gradient are promising for flare forecast: the speed of its growth, its maximal value, its decrease after the maximum until the flare and the rate of its fluctuation.

  6. A Study of Effectiveness of Group Forgiveness Therapy in Reducing Aggression among 11-13 Year Old Male Adolescents in City of Dezful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sanai Zaker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to evaluate effectiveness of group forgiveness therapy in reducing aggression among 11 – 13 year old boys. Methods: This semi experimental study (pretest-posttest design with control group was conducted on 30 students who scored high on Aggression Questionnaire. The sample was selected through cluster sampling assignment and participants were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group received forgiveness counseling via twelve group sessions of 1 hour duration each. During this period no intervention was given to the control group. Data was analyzed using Kolmogrov-Smironov, Levene F test, and t-test for independent and dependent groups. Results: Statistical analysis, using independent t test for between-group comparison, showed that compared to the control group, aggression both physical and verbal, anger, and hostility in the experimental group significantly decreased. Also result of dependent t test for within-group comparison showed that aggression and its dimensions were significantly decreased after implementing independent variable. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that group forgiveness therapy can significantly reduce aggression.

  7. A Randomised Group Comparison Controlled Trial of "Preschoolers with Autism": A Parent Education and Skills Training Intervention for Young Children with Autistic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Bruce; Brereton, Avril; Kiomall, Melissa; Mackinnon, Andrew; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the effect of parent education on adaptive behaviour, autism symptoms and cognitive/language skills of young children with autistic disorder. Method: A randomised group comparison design involving a parent education and counselling intervention and a parent education and behaviour management intervention to control for parent…

  8. Analysis on productivity of clinical studies across -- Asian countries a case comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Sengoku, S; Kimura, H

    2007-08-01

    In an era of increasing global competition and an increased interest in global clinical studies Japan has been concerned with the risk of losing its attractiveness due to perceived longer execution times and higher cost structure. In contrast, other Asian countries particularly China and Singapore are widely recognized as potential key centers for fast conduction of global clinical studies. We conducted a case comparison based on two clinical studies performed by a multinational pharmaceutical company in order to measure the productivity of clinical studies by region and country. We focused on the site-related study cost which constituted the largest portion of the cost breakdown and also impacted both time and quality management. For investigation of the productivity we propose a breakdown model with two Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), enrollment efficiency and site-related cost efficiency, for the comparison of the number of enrolled subject per site and cost, respectively. Through the comparative analysis we found that the Asian countries (excluding Japan) on average achieved higher efficiency than Japan in both indicators. In the Asian group, China and Singapore stood out as the most efficient on both speed and site-related cost. However, when the site-related cost efficiency was adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) the cost advantage in China disappeared, implying the price level was critical for productivity management. Although quality aspects remain to be investigated we postulate that introducing a comparative approach based on a productivity framework would be useful for an accurate productivity comparison.

  9. Comparison of conventional and low dose steroid in the treatment of PFAPA syndrome: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgan, Hamza; Gültekin, Erhan; Yazıcılar, Osman; Sagun, Ömer Faruk; Uzun, Lokman

    2012-11-01

    Steroids have been widely used to relief symptoms in the patients with PFAPA syndrome. This study was constructed to show the effectiveness of low-dose steroid therapy in patients diagnosed with PFAPA syndrome. 41 patients (86 febrile attacks) who were diagnosed using the criteria suggested by Thomas et al. were involved in the study. The cases were classified into two groups and the selection of patients in groups was made randomly. Twenty patients received prednisolone at a dose of 2 mg/kg/day (first group: 40 attacks) and 21 patients received a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day (second group: 46 attacks). The effectiveness of the treatment was especially determined by the time needed to reduce the fever and the effect on the duration between the two attacks. The patients were re-examined 24 hours later, after a steroid treatment. The patients who were in the first group received 2mg/kg/day dose of prednisolone and their fever was dramatically decreased in 6-8 hours (7.6 ± 0.9 hours). The second group received 0.5mg/kg/day dose and 19 of these patients' fever was decreased in 8-12 hours. Two patients whose temperature did not decrease, received another dose of prednisolone 24 hours after the first dose and their fever was reduced 12 hours after the second dose (11.3 ± 6.4 hours). A comparison of the rate of fever reduction and the interval between the attacks (Group I: 5.11 ± 1.01 week and Group II: 5.2 ± 1.13 week) in the two groups did not show any statistical significance (p=0.104). Low-dose steroid treatment is as effective as normal dose in PFAPA syndrome but there is need to study with a larger group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Baseline characteristics and risk factors of retinal vein occlusion: a study by the Korean RVO Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Yoon, Young Hee; Kim, Ha Kyoung; Yoon, Hee Seong; Kang, Se Woong; Kim, June-Gone; Park, Kyu Hyung; Jo, Young Joon

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the demographic characteristics and risk factors of Korean patients with naÏve central or branch retinal vein occlusion (CRVO or BRVO). This study enrolled 41 clinical sites throughout Korea and included 557 consecutive patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) from May through November 2010. A total of 557 patients with new-onset RVO participated in this study. Two hundred and three (36.4%) patients were diagnosed with CRVO and 354 (63.6%) patients were diagnosed with BRVO. Comparisons between the two groups showed that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus was significantly higher in CRVO patients and hypertension was significantly higher in BRVO patients (P = 0.001 and 0.002, respectively). Poor baseline visual acuity was significantly associated with female and old age in BRVO patients (P = 0.002 and 0.013, respectively), whereas the wide intraretinal hemorrhage (CRVO, P = 0.029; BRVO, P Korean patients. Hypertension is strongly associated with BRVO and diabetes mellitus is more strongly associated with CRVO in Korean patients with RVO. As the first nationwide study performed by the Korean Retinal Society, the results of this study can be applied to future studies on RVO.

  11. [Study of heavy-flavored particles]. [Albany High Energy Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The program of physics analysis using CLEO II data is reported. A statistically significant measurement was made of the isospin mass splitting of the [Sigma][sub c][sup +] with respect to the [Sigma][sub c][sup o] and [Sigma][sub c][sup ++]. This result is based on first observation of the [Sigma][sub c][sup +] in the decay mode [Lambda][sub c][sup +][pi][sup 0]. Many new decay modes of the charmed baryon [Lambda][sub c][sup +] were studied. Several new decay modes of [xi][sub c]'s. Some preliminary results on 3 new modes of [Omega][sub c][sup 0] decay are reported. In the area of B-meson decay into baryons, were observed conclusively the decays B [yields] [Sigma][sub c][sup 0] and [Sigma][sub c][sup ++]. From about 1500 events corresponding to B [yields] [Lambda][sub c][sup +]X reconstruction of exclusive final states of the form [Lambda][sub c][sup +](n[pi]) was started. A comprehensive investigation of particle identification using both the time-of-flight and dE/dx systems was made. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton identification efficiencies have been made, corresponding to several different selection criteria. Measurements of corresponding pion probabilities to fake kaons nd protons have also been made.

  12. Cost-Benefit Study on Nature Reserves Group in Qinling Mountains: Cost-Benefit Comparison and Analysis%秦岭自然保护区群成本效益研究(I)——成本效益比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昌海; 温亚利; 李强; 司开创; 胡崇德

    2012-01-01

    本研究在秦岭自然保护区群成本效益计量研究成果的基础上,首先对秦岭自然保护区群的保护成本及效益进行了比较分析,同时修正了研究中的误差;采用利益相关者理论中的米切尔分类方法,找出了秦岭自然保护区群的成本承担者及效益分享者,并对其进行比较分析;最后文章对成本一效益进行进一步分析及发展趋势预测。研究结果表明:经过调整后的综合效益约为234亿元,其中生态效益约为188亿元;经济效益约为34亿元;社会效益约为12亿元;综合效益成本比为7.88。在成本效益比较分析表明保护区周边社区承担了过多的成本且产生了负效益,这也是引起社区与保护区矛盾最根本的原因。研究认为,随着国家社会经济的发展,保护区群的综合效益会呈上升趋势,国家有关部门应建立健全生态效益补偿机制。%The study firstly compared and analyzed the protection cost and efficiency of the Qinling Nature Reserve Group (QNRG)and at the same time corrected the errors. Based on the above achievements, we found out the cost undertaker and benefit sharer in the protection of QNRG by using the Mitchell classification method of Stakeholder Theory and then we compared and analyzed them. Finally, the cost-benefit was further analyzed and its development tendency was forecasted. The results show that the adjusted comprehensive benefit is about 23.4 billion RMB, in which the ecological benefit is about 18.8 billion RMB, the economic benefit is about 3.4 billion RMB and social benefit is about 1.2 billion RMB. The communities around the Nature Reserve bear so much cost that some negative benefits were produced, which is also the basic cause of conflicts between communities and QNRG. Previous studies suggested that the comprehensive benefit of the QNRG will rise with the development of social economy. However, ecological benefit will rise more

  13. Hyperactive night and day? Actigraphy studies in adult ADHD: a baseline comparison and the effect of methylphenidate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.M.; Kooij, J.J.; Oosterlaan, J.; Sergeant, J.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Someren, E.J. Van

    2007-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate parameters of sleep, activity, and circadian rhythm, as well as the effects of methylphenidate on these variables, in adults with ADHD. DESIGN: 1) Baseline group comparison; 2) Double blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over medication trial. SETTING: Data collection to

  14. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  15. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  16. Towards engagement: A comparison of fan groups in the context of a major South African football club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick W. Stander

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The commercial growth of sport clubs is often a direct consequence of the level of engagement of its fans. However, limited research has been done to understand how the engagement experience of these fans could be enhanced.Research purpose: The objective of this research was to evaluate whether differences exist amongst groups of sport fans in terms of their levels of engagement. This is conducted on the basis of customer engagement – relationship marketing – and market segmentation theories,and in an effort to inform practical strategies that could be used to leverage engagement. By establishing that differences do exist between segments of sport fans, practical strategies could be developed based on such differences.Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional, quantitative design was utilised in this study. A convenience sample of 430 adult fans of one of South Africa’s largest and best supported professional football clubs participated in the study. Two fan groupings were compared, namely fans who belonged to a formal supporters’ branch of the club versus fans who did not, and fans who frequented the social media platforms of such club versus fans who did not. Multi group confirmatory factor analysis and latent variable modelling were implemented to compare groups of fans in terms of sport fan engagement. Measurement invariance was reviewed to compare the equivalence of measurement between the groups.Main findings: Statistical analysis revealed greater levels of fan engagement amongst fans that form part of formal supporters’ branches as well as amongst fans who regularly visit the sport club’s social media platforms.Practical/managerial implications: By making use of supporters’ branches and social media,practical engagement strategies are available to professional sport clubs that seek to enhance the engagement experience of their fans. These strategies could assist clubs in developing customised

  17. Radiologic findings and curve progression 22 years after treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: comparison of brace and surgical treatment with matching control group of straight individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, A J; Nachemson, A L

    2001-03-01

    This study is a follow-up investigation for a consecutive series of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated between 1968 and 1977. In this series, 156 patients underwent surgery with distraction and fusion using Harrington rods, and 127 were treated with brace. To determine the long-term outcome in terms of radiologic findings and curve progression at least 20 years after completion of the treatment. Radiologic appearance is important in comparing the outcome of different treatment options and in evaluating clinical results. Earlier studies have shown a slight increase of the Cobb angle in brace-treated patients with time, but not in fused patients. Of 283 patients, 252 attended a clinical and radiologic follow-up assessment by an unbiased observer (91% of the surgically treated and 87% of the brace-treated patients). This evaluation included chart reviews, validated questionnaires, clinical examination, and full-length standing frontal and lateral roentgenographs. Curve size was measured by the Cobb method on anteroposterior roentgenograms as well as by sagittal contour and balance on lateral films. The occurrence of any degenerative changes or other complications was noted. An age- and gender-matched control group of 100 individuals was randomly selected and subjected to the same examinations. The mean follow-up times were 23 years for surgically treated group and 22 years for brace-treated group. The deterioration of the curves was 3.5 degrees for all the surgically treated curves and 7.9 degrees for all the brace-treated curves (P flat back syndrome developed in four patients. Eight of the patients treated with fusion (5.1%) had undergone some additional curve-related surgical procedure. The lumbar lordosis was less in the surgically treated than in the brace-treated patients or the control group (mean, 33 degrees vs 45 degrees and 44 degrees, respectively). Both surgically treated and brace-treated patients had more degenerative disc changes than

  18. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program towards a blended intervention; a focus-group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise programs, older adults participating in such interventions often do not meet the frequency, intensity or duration of exercises needed to gain health benefits. An exercise program that combines the advantages of group-based exercises led by an instructor with tailored home-based exercises can increase the effectiveness. Technology can assist in delivering a personalized program. The aim of the study was to determine the susceptibility of older adults currently participating in a nationwide group-based exercise program to such a blended exercise program. Eight focus-groups were held with adults of 55 years of age or older. Two researchers coded independently the remarks of the 30 participants that were included in the analysis according to the three key concepts of the Self Determination Theory: autonomy, competence and relatedness. The results show that maintaining self-reliance and keeping in touch with others were the main motives to participate in the weekly group-based exercises. Participants recognized benefits of doing additional home-based exercises, but had concerns regarding guidance, safety and motivation. Furthermore, some participants strongly rejected the idea to use technology to support them in doing exercises at home, but the majority was open to it. Insights are discussed how these findings can help design novel interventions that can increase the wellbeing of older adults and preserve an independent living.

  19. Comparison of Ant Community Diversity and Functional Group Composition Associated to Land Use Change in a Seasonally Dry Oak Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuautle, M; Vergara, C H; Badano, E I

    2016-04-01

    Ants have been used to assess land use conversion, because they reflect environmental change, and their response to these changes have been useful in the identification of bioindicators. We evaluated ant diversity and composition associated to different land use change in a temperate forest (above 2000 m asl) in Mexico. The study was carried out in "Flor del Bosque" Park a vegetation mosaic of native Oak Forests and introduced Eucalyptus and grasslands. Species richness, dominance and diversity rarefaction curves, based on ant morphospecies and functional groups, were constructed and compared among the three vegetation types, for the rainy and the dry seasons of 2008-2009. Jaccard and Sorensen incidence-based indices were calculated to obtain similarity values among all the habitats. The Oak Forest was a rich dominant community, both in species and functional groups; the Eucalyptus plantation was diverse with low dominance. The most seasonality habitat was the grassland, with low species and high functional group diversity during the dry seasons, but the reverse pattern during the wet season. The Oak Forest was more similar to the Eucalyptus plantation than to the grassland, particularly during the dry season. Oak Forests are dominated by Cold Climate Specialists, specifically Prenolepis imparis (Say). The Eucalyptus and the grassland are characterized by generalized Myrmicinae, as Pheidole spp. and Monomorium ebenium (Forel). The conservation of the native Oak Forest is primordial for the maintenance of Cold Climate Specialist ant communities. The microclimatic conditions in this forest, probably, prevented the invasion by opportunistic species.

  20. Welfare Lobby Groups responding to Globalisation: A Comparison of the Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS and the UK Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has witnessed a period of intense economic globalisation. The growing significance of international trade, investment, production and financial flows appears to be curtailing the autonomy of individual nation states. In particular, globalisation appears to be encouraging, if not demanding, a decline in social spending and standards. However, many authors believe that this thesis ignores the continued impact of national political and ideological pressures and lobby groups on policy outcomes. In particular, it has been argued that national welfare consumer and provider groups remain influential defenders of the welfare state. For example, US aged care groups are considered to be particularly effective defenders of social security pensions. According to this argument, governments engaged in welfare retrenchment may experience considerable electoral backlash (Pierson 1996; Mishra 1999. Yet, it is also noted that governments can take action to reduce the impact of such groups by reducing their funding, and their access to policy-making and consultation processes. These actions are then justified on the basis of removing potential obstacles to economic competitiveness (Pierson 1994; Melville 1999.