WorldWideScience

Sample records for group communication processes

  1. Communication as group process mediator of aircrew performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. Clayton

    1989-01-01

    Considering recent operating experience as a group-level input factor, aspects of the communication process between crewmembers (captain and first officer) were explored as a possible mediator to performance. Communication patterns were defined by a speech-act typology adapted for the flight-deck setting and distinguished crews that had previously flown together (FT) from those that had not flown together (NFT). A more open communication channel and greater first officer participation in task-related topics was shown by FT crews, while NFT crews engaged in more nontask discourse.

  2. Communication as group process mediator of aircrew performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. Clayton

    1989-01-01

    Considering recent operating experience as a group-level input factor, aspects of the communication process between crewmembers (captain and first officer) were explored as a possible mediator to performance. Communication patterns were defined by a speech-act typology adapted for the flight-deck setting and distinguished crews that had previously flown together (FT) from those that had not flown together (NFT). A more open communication channel and greater first officer participation in task-related topics was shown by FT crews, while NFT crews engaged in more nontask discourse.

  3. Communication as group process media of aircrew performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, B. G.; Foushee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    This study of group process was motivated by a high-fidelity flight simulator project in which aircrew performance was found to be better when the crew had recently flown together. Considering recent operating experience as a group-level input factor, aspects of the communication process between crewmembers (Captain and First Officer), were explored as a possible mediator to performance. Communication patterns were defined by a speech act typology adapted for the flightdeck setting and distinguished crews that had previously flown together (FT) from those that had not flown together (NFT). A more open communication channel with respect to information exchange and validation and greater First Officer participation in task-related topics was shown by FT crews while NFT crews engaged in more non-task discourse, a speech mode less structured by roles and probably serving a more interpersonal function. Relationships between the speech categories themselves, representing linguistic, and role-related interdependencies provide guidelines for interpreting the primary findings.

  4. Communication as group process media of aircrew performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, B. G.; Foushee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    This study of group process was motivated by a high-fidelity flight simulator project in which aircrew performance was found to be better when the crew had recently flown together. Considering recent operating experience as a group-level input factor, aspects of the communication process between crewmembers (Captain and First Officer), were explored as a possible mediator to performance. Communication patterns were defined by a speech act typology adapted for the flightdeck setting and distinguished crews that had previously flown together (FT) from those that had not flown together (NFT). A more open communication channel with respect to information exchange and validation and greater First Officer participation in task-related topics was shown by FT crews while NFT crews engaged in more non-task discourse, a speech mode less structured by roles and probably serving a more interpersonal function. Relationships between the speech categories themselves, representing linguistic, and role-related interdependencies provide guidelines for interpreting the primary findings.

  5. Communication and Social Exchange Processes in Community Theater Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the communication experiences of two volunteer groups involved in the production of community theater musicals. Based on social exchange theory, it examined what group members perceived to be the positive benefits (primarily meeting people and having an opportunity to perform) and the negative costs (primarily disorganization,…

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  7. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  9. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  10. The Influence of Communication Processes on Group Outcomes: Antithesis and Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dean E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of communication processes on group outcomes is discussed from two perspectives, one in which influence does not exist and one in which influence is central. Formal models for both perspectives are presented as a means of bracketing discussion of the role of communication processes in group outcomes. The implications of these models…

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  13. Gender and Computer-Mediated Communication: Group Processes in Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrianson, L.

    2001-01-01

    Reports results from a study of university students in Sweden that investigated aspects of communicative processes using face-to-face and computer-mediated communication. Examined influences of gender on communication equality, social relations, and communicative processes and studied differences in self-awareness. Results showed few significant…

  14. Communication in Organizational Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Monica RADU

    2007-01-01

    Organizational group can be defined as some persons between who exist interactive connections (functional, communication, affective, normative type). Classification of these groups can reflect the dimension, type of relationship or type of rules included. Organizational groups and their influence over the individual efficiency and the efficiency of the entire group are interconnected. Spontaneous roles in these groups sustain the structure of the relationship, and the personality of each indi...

  15. A Study of the Communication Behaviors and Members' Roles in the Interaction Process of a Project-based Learning Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jane Lin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The infusion of information and communication technology into instruction has gained the foothold within many classrooms in higher education by its advantages to enable the variety and accessibility of school teaching and learning. However, to engage students with the technology enhanced learning experiences calls for attentions on more the processes than the mere outcome of technology use. This study examines the common phenomenon in college campus where network technology, group activities and project works are available with the intention to explore how student performance of teamwork and learning is affected by the micro factors of group compositions, members’ roles and their communication behaviors. Results show that the group performed most procedure-, task-, and social-communication behaviors during the execution stage than that of preparation and completion stages. Additionally, members’ roles performed and interfered within these stages positively affected the project performance to different extent. [Article content in Chinese; Extended abstract in English

  16. A teachable moment communication process for smoking cessation talk: description of a group randomized clinician-focused intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flocke Susan A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective clinician-patient communication about health behavior change is one of the most important and most overlooked strategies to promote health and prevent disease. Existing guidelines for specific health behavior counseling have been created and promulgated, but not successfully adopted in primary care practice. Building on work focused on creating effective clinician strategies for prompting health behavior change in the primary care setting, we developed an intervention intended to enhance clinician communication skills to create and act on teachable moments for smoking cessation. In this manuscript, we describe the development and implementation of the Teachable Moment Communication Process (TMCP intervention and the baseline characteristics of a group randomized trial designed to evaluate its effectiveness. Methods/Design This group randomized trial includes thirty-one community-based primary care clinicians practicing in Northeast Ohio and 840 of their adult patients. Clinicians were randomly assigned to receive either the Teachable Moments Communication Process (TMCP intervention for smoking cessation, or the delayed intervention. The TMCP intervention consisted of two, 3-hour educational training sessions including didactic presentation, skill demonstration through video examples, skills practices with standardized patients, and feedback from peers and the trainers. For each clinician enrolled, 12 patients were recruited for two time points. Pre- and post-intervention data from the clinicians, patients and audio-recorded clinician‒patient interactions were collected. At baseline, the two groups of clinicians and their patients were similar with regard to all demographic and practice characteristics examined. Both physician and patient recruitment goals were met, and retention was 96% and 94% respectively. Discussion Findings support the feasibility of training clinicians to use the Teachable Moments

  17. Internal communication in corporate groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grzesik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is dedicated to internal communication in corporate groups. It discusses internal communication systems operating in the explored corporate groups and their significance for effective human resources management in those organisations. The chapter presents both the theoretical analysis based on the results of literature studies, and empirical research carried out in the explored groups. Narodowe Centrum Nauki Katarzyna Grzesik

  18. Communicating to heterogeneous target groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karsten

    very often have to communicate to rather heterogeneous target groups that have little more in common than a certain geographical habitat. That goes against most schoolbook teaching in the field of communication, but is none the less the terms with which that kind of communication has to live...

  19. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  20. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  1. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  2. Organizational communication process

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan Spaho

    2012-01-01

    Managers spend majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to –face dis- cussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very im- portant part of their work because a lot of their work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups. This is the reason why communication has become more important in companies. The experience shows that there are significant differences in manners of ...

  3. Organizational communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Spaho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Managers spend majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to –face dis- cussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very im- portant part of their work because a lot of their work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups. This is the reason why communication has become more important in companies. The experience shows that there are significant differences in manners of communication and that it appears to be a very important factor which makes some organizations more successful than others. Communication is the most important for managers because research shows that the spent long period in work time in communication.

  4. GROUP ORAL PRESENTATION IN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION B

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Nguyen, NGUYEN

    2015-01-01

    Oral presentations are becoming more and more important in language learning process, especially in the university environment. In Business Communication B course at Kanazawa Institute of Technology (KIT), students also have a chance learn how to do group oral presentation on some business-related topics and this is one of the most important parts in the assessment process of Business Communication B course. In this paper, a review of the literature will illustrate how this oral activity coul...

  5. Small Group Communication: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouran, Dennis S.; Guadagnino, Christopher S.

    This annotated bibliography includes sources of information that are primarily concerned with problem solving, decision making, and processes of social influence in small groups, and secondarily deal with other aspects of communication and interaction in groups, such as conflict management and negotiation. The 57 entries, all dating from 1980…

  6. An Action Research Process on University Tutorial Sessions with Small Groups: Presentational Tutorial Sessions and Online Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Salarirche, Noelia; Gallardo-Gil, Monsalud; Herrera-Pastor, David; Servan-Nunez, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyse the action research process carried out by us as teachers in a general didactics course in the University of Malaga (Spain). The course methodology combined lectures to the whole class and small-group work. We were in charge of guiding small-group work. In the small groups, students researched on an educational innovation…

  7. Small Group Communication in the 1980's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neer, Michael R., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    This special edition of "Communication" brings together the work of nine leading scholars of small group communication. The following topics are discussed: (1) small group communication research in the 1980s; (2) unanswered questions in research on communication in the small group; (3) emerging trends in small group research; (4) structure in…

  8. COMMUNICATION PROCESSES AND STRATEGIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionThe main goal of studying a foreign language is to be able to communicate.The essence ofcommunication is sending and receiving messages and negotiating meaning.During the communicationprocess,learners may meet problems which hinder their understanding.In order to overcome theselimitations,it is very.important to know and use certain strategies involved in the communicationprocesses.There are three basic activities in the communication process-expressing intensions,interpretation andnegotiation.Expressing intentions is giving information.During communication,every speaker has tofirst send his or her messages and the listener must decode what he or she has heard.This activity may becalled interpretation.During conversation,both listener and speaker must do some negotiation in orderto make sure that they understand each other.Negotiation could be called communication exchange.

  9. Communicating Process Achitectures 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, Jan F.; Roebbers, Herman W.; Sunters, Johan P.E.; Welch, Peter H.; Wood, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The awareness of the ideas characterized by Communicating Processes Architecture and their adoption by industry beyond their traditional base in safety-critical systems and security is growing. The complexity of modern computing systems has become so great that no one person – maybe not even a small

  10. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  11. Group communication in Amoeba and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaashoek, M. F.; Tanenbaum, A. S.; Verstoep, K.

    1993-09-01

    Unlike many other operating systems, Amoeba is a distributed operating system that provides group communication (i.e. one-to-many communication). The authors discuss design issues for group communication, Amoeba's group system calls, and the protocols to implement group communication. To demonstrate that group communication is a useful abstraction, they describe a design and implementation of a fault-tolerant directory service. They discuss two versions of the directory service: one with non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) and one without NVRAM. They give performance figures for both implementations.

  12. Communication processes and modern society

    OpenAIRE

    Kornienko Olga Yu.; Naumenko Tamara V.; Suvorova Olga S.

    2016-01-01

    The article targets specific features of modern economic and communication processes, the ones being most obviously revealed in such integral spheres of modern environment as social relations and service sector, as well as their connection with communicative space of today’s social media. It focuses on ways to assess the role and place of mass-communication processes in optimization and development of social processes. It is conducted to ascertain the influence of major actors on modern socie...

  13. Explaining Individual Communication Processes in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Groups through Individualism-Collectivism and Self-Construal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetzel, John G.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effective decision-making theory's (EDMT) prediction that cultural individualism-collectivism, self-construal, and group composition influence turn-taking behavior and conflict behavior in small groups. Finds, for example, that independent self-construal is a predictor of the number of turns and competitive conflict tactics in…

  14. Secure Inter-Process Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Radulescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reveals the necessity in modern distributed systems for authentication of a process running in a distributed system and to provide a secure channel for inter-process communication in which both the client authenticates to the server and the server authenticates to the client. The distributed system is a client-server system based on ENEA LINX inter-process communication framework. Enea LINX is a Linux open source project which allows processes to exchange information between several media channels: shared memory (local process communication, Ethernet (local network inter process communication, TCP/IP (inter process communication through Internet in which nodes are communicating regardless of the underlying media. Because ENEA LINX offers no security mechanism it appears the need for securing the communicating over LINX protocol. Process authentication disables the need for personal authentication of the user and also prevents an attacker from starting a process which will harm the entire system. Besides authentication, using public key combined with symmetric key technologies the secure inter-process communication system must provide integrity and confidentiality.

  15. Processes of Mass Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channey, David

    This sociological treatment of mass communications analysis first discusses the theories of audience behavior, then turns to the organization of media production, and closes with a study of performance. The book covers audience needs and gratifications, the history of British press and broadcasting results of systems of media distribution, the…

  16. Scalable and Anonymous Group Communication with MTor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Dong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents MTor, a low-latency anonymous group communication system. We construct MTor as an extension to Tor, allowing the construction of multi-source multicast trees on top of the existing Tor infrastructure. MTor does not depend on an external service to broker the group communication, and avoids central points of failure and trust. MTor’s substantial bandwidth savings and graceful scalability enable new classes of anonymous applications that are currently too bandwidth-intensive to be viable through traditional unicast Tor communication-e.g., group file transfer, collaborative editing, streaming video, and real-time audio conferencing.

  17. Scalable and Anonymous Group Communication with MTor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong Lin; Micah Sherr; Boon Thau Loo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents MTor, a low-latency anonymous group communication system. We construct MTor as an extension to Tor, allowing the construction of multi-source multicast trees on top of the existing Tor infrastructure...

  18. Reversible Communicating Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Brown

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible distributed programs have the ability to abort unproductive computation paths and backtrack, while unwinding communication that occurred in the aborted paths. While it is natural to assume that reversibility implies full state recovery (as with traditional roll-back recovery protocols, an interesting alternative is to separate backtracking from local state recovery. For example, such a model could be used to create complex transactions out of nested compensable transactions where a programmer-supplied compensation defines the work required to "unwind" a transaction. Reversible distributed computing has received considerable theoretical attention, but little reduction to practice; the few published implementations of languages supporting reversibility depend upon a high degree of central control. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a practical reversible distributed language can be efficiently implemented in a fully distributed manner. We discuss such a language, supporting CSP-style synchronous communication, embedded in Scala. While this language provided the motivation for the work described in this paper, our focus is upon the distributed implementation. In particular, we demonstrate that a "high-level" semantic model can be implemented using a simple point-to-point protocol.

  19. Small-Group Discourse: Establishing a Communication-Rich Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quebec Fuentes, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a communication-rich classroom can be difficult. This article describes the process and findings of a practitioner action research study addressing the question of how teachers can interact with their students while they are working in groups to encourage and enhance student-to-student communication. Recommended research-based teacher…

  20. Voices of the Heart in Small Group Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Leanne O.

    Values can and should be a part of small group communication instruction. Discourse is value laden and to understand the communication process, the role of values must be understood. Many students come to the classroom not understanding values, and not being aware of the role of values in decision-making. Their lack of understanding requires that…

  1. The new Education and Communication group

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Since the start of the year, CERN's communication teams have been brought together under one umbrella for the sake of greater coherence and better coordination. The new Education and Communication group in Education and Technology Transfer division is led by James Gillies, former Editor of the CERN Courier. EC group comprises four sections: Events and Sponsoring, External Communication, Publications, and Visits and Educational Programmes. Its goal is to inform not only the general public but also the community of CERN staff, physicists and teachers about the research, events, innovations and major decisions of the Organization. Photo 01: The new Education and Communication group with ETT division leader Juan-Antonio Rubio (back row, centre).

  2. Process algebra for synchronous communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Klop, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Within the context of an algebraic theory of processes, an equational specification of process cooperation is provided. Four cases are considered: free merge or interleaving, merging with communication, merging with mutual exclusion of tight regions, and synchronous process cooperation. The rewrite

  3. Framework for Flexible Security in Group Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patrick; Prakash, Atul

    2006-01-01

    The Antigone software system defines a framework for the flexible definition and implementation of security policies in group communication systems. Antigone does not dictate the available security policies, but provides high-level mechanisms for implementing them. A central element of the Antigone architecture is a suite of such mechanisms comprising micro-protocols that provide the basic services needed by secure groups.

  4. Supporting Group Communication Among UX Consultants

    OpenAIRE

    Feldt, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Professional User Experience (UX) practitioners have an inherent need for effective group communication practices. If they work as external consultants, the need is arguably even greater. Enterprise Social Media (ESM) technologies have affordances that make them seem promising for this domain. The aim of this thesis is thus to identify the domain-specific communicative needs of UX consultants, and discuss how these might be supported using ESM. A case study was conducted, examining how the ES...

  5. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  6. Learning to communicate risk information in groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuchi Ting

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite vigorous research on risk communication, little is known about the social forces that drive these choices. Erev, Wallsten, and Neal (1991 showed that forecasters learn to select verbal or numerical probability estimates as a function of which mode yields on average the larger group payoffs. We extend the result by investigating the effect of group size on the speed with which forecasters converge on the better communication mode. On the basis of social facilitation theory we hypothesized that small groups induce less arousal and anxiety among their members than do large groups when performing new tasks, and therefore that forecasters in small groups will learn the better communication mode more quickly. This result obtained in Experiment 1, which compared groups of size 3 to groups of size 5 or 6. To test whether social loafing rather than social facilitation was mediating the effects, Experiment 2 compared social to personal feedback holding group size constant at 3 members. Learning was faster in the personal feedback condition, suggesting that social facilitation rather than loafing underlay the results.

  7. Structural processing for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jianhua; Ge, Ning

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents an alternative viewpoint on processing technology for wireless communications based on recent research advances. As a lever in emerging processing technology, the structure perspective addresses the complexity and uncertainty issues found in current wireless applications. Likewise, this brief aims at providing a new prospective to the development of communication technology and information science, while stimulating new theories and technologies for wireless systems with ever-increasing complexity. Readers of this brief may range from graduate students to researchers in related fields.

  8. Optimized Communication of Group Mobility in WPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Lata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ZigBee is a low cost, low-power consumption and long battery life network that is based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard; which is most usually used to transfer low data rates information in the Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN. In the Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN network, capability of sensor network and mobile network are combined that have energy limit and sensing range limits. Here a network is composed of a number of Sub-Network or groups with the selection of group leader. Group formation is defined under sensing range limit, density limit and type of nodes. The selection of group leader is defined under velocity analysis, energy and average distance after that inter group and intra group communication is performed and then Handoff mechanism is performed when nodes switch the group or group switch the base station.

  9. Group cell architecture for cooperative communications

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for capacity and Quality of Service in wireless cellular networks and motivated by the distributed antenna system, the authors proposed a cooperative communication architecture-Group Cell architecture, which was initially brought forward in 2001. Years later, Coordinated Multiple-Point Transmission and Reception (CoMP) for LTE-Advanced was put forward in April 2008, as a tool to improve the coverage of cells having high data rates, the cell-edge throughput and/or to increase system throughput. This book mainly focuses on the Group Cell architecture with multi-cell generalized coordination, Contrast Analysis between Group Cell architecture and CoMP, Capacity Analysis, Slide Handover Strategy, Power Allocation schemes of Group Cell architecture to mitigate the inter-cell interference and maximize system capacity and the trial network implementation and performance evaluations of Group Cell architecture.

  10. Neural Network Communications Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Technical Information Report for the Neural Network Communications Signal Processing Program, CDRL A003, 31 March 1993. Software Development Plan for...track changing jamming conditions to provide the decoder with the best log- likelihood ratio metrics at a given time. As part of our development plan we...Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN-91) Volume 2, June 24-28, 1991, pp. 1677-1680. Kohonen, Teuvo, Raivio, Kimmo, Simula, Oli, Venta , 011i, Henriksson

  11. Using multicast in the global communications infrastructure for group communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-07-30

    International Monitoring System (IMS) stations and the International Data Centre (IDC) of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization generate data and products that must be transmitted to one or more receivers. The application protocols used to transmit the IMS data and IDC products will be CD-x and IMS-x and the World Wide Web (WWW). These protocols use existing Internet applications and Internet protocols to send their data. The primary Internet applications in use are electronic mail (e-mail) and the file transfer protocol (ftp). The primary Internet communication protocol in use is the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), which provides reliable delivery to the receiver. These Internet applications and protocol provide unicast (point-to-point) communication. A message sent using unicast has a single recipient; any message intended for more than one recipient must be sent to each recipient individually. In the current design, the IDC and the National Data Centres (NDC's) provide data forwarding to the appropriate receivers. The overhead associated with using unicast to transmit messages to multiple receivers either directly or through a forwarder increases linearly with the number of receivers. In addition, using a forwarding site introduces possible delays and possible points of failure in the path to the receivers. Reliable multicast provides communication services similar to TCP but for a group of receivers. The reliable multicast protocol provides group membership services and message delivery ordering. If an IMS station were to send its data using reliable multicast instead of unicast, only sites that are members of the multicast group would receive the data at approximately the same time. This might provide an efficient means of disseminating station data or IDC data products to all receivers and eliminate or greatly reduce the need for data forwarding. Several commercial and research reliable multicast

  12. Dynamic Task Performance, Cohesion, and Communications in Human Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Luis Felipe; Passino, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    In the study of the behavior of human groups, it has been observed that there is a strong interaction between the cohesiveness of the group, its performance when the group has to solve a task, and the patterns of communication between the members of the group. Developing mathematical and computational tools for the analysis and design of task-solving groups that are not only cohesive but also perform well is of importance in social sciences, organizational management, and engineering. In this paper, we model a human group as a dynamical system whose behavior is driven by a task optimization process and the interaction between subsystems that represent the members of the group interconnected according to a given communication network. These interactions are described as attractions and repulsions among members. We show that the dynamics characterized by the proposed mathematical model are qualitatively consistent with those observed in real-human groups, where the key aspect is that the attraction patterns in the group and the commitment to solve the task are not static but change over time. Through a theoretical analysis of the system we provide conditions on the parameters that allow the group to have cohesive behaviors, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to study group dynamics for different sets of parameters, communication topologies, and tasks to solve.

  13. Group Decision Support Systems and Group Communication: A Comparison of Decision Making in Computer-Supported and Nonsupported Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marshall Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Explores the effects of Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) on small group communication and decision-making processes. Finds that comparing GDSS, manual, and baseline conditions enables separation of effects resulting from procedural structures from those resulting from computerization. Results support some aspects of the research model and…

  14. The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lea, M

    2000-01-01

    The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication (CMC) was examined among students who used e-mail as part of a course. A network analysis of group structures revealed that (a) content and form of communication is normative, group norms defining communication patterns within groups, (

  15. The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lea, M

    2000-01-01

    The formation of group norms in computer-mediated communication (CMC) was examined among students who used e-mail as part of a course. A network analysis of group structures revealed that (a) content and form of communication is normative, group norms defining communication patterns within groups, (

  16. Quantum communication and information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Travis Roland

    Quantum computers enable dramatically more efficient algorithms for solving certain classes of computational problems, but, in doing so, they create new problems. In particular, Shor's Algorithm allows for efficient cryptanalysis of many public-key cryptosystems. As public key cryptography is a critical component of present-day electronic commerce, it is crucial that a working, secure replacement be found. Quantum key distribution (QKD), first developed by C.H. Bennett and G. Brassard, offers a partial solution, but many challenges remain, both in terms of hardware limitations and in designing cryptographic protocols for a viable large-scale quantum communication infrastructure. In Part I, I investigate optical lattice-based approaches to quantum information processing. I look at details of a proposal for an optical lattice-based quantum computer, which could potentially be used for both quantum communications and for more sophisticated quantum information processing. In Part III, I propose a method for converting and storing photonic quantum bits in the internal state of periodically-spaced neutral atoms by generating and manipulating a photonic band gap and associated defect states. In Part II, I present a cryptographic protocol which allows for the extension of present-day QKD networks over much longer distances without the development of new hardware. I also present a second, related protocol which effectively solves the authentication problem faced by a large QKD network, thus making QKD a viable, information-theoretic secure replacement for public key cryptosystems.

  17. Visualizing human communication in business process simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groehn, Matti; Jalkanen, Janne; Haho, Paeivi; Nieminen, Marko; Smeds, Riitta

    1999-03-01

    In this paper a description of business process simulation is given. Crucial part in the simulation of business processes is the analysis of social contacts between the participants. We will introduce a tool to collect log data and how this log data can be effectively analyzed using two different kind of methods: discussion flow charts and self-organizing maps. Discussion flow charts revealed the communication patterns and self-organizing maps are a very effective way of clustering the participants into development groups.

  18. The Impact of a Group Communication Course on Veterinary Medical Students' Perceptions of Communication Competence and Communication Apprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a group communication course on veterinary medical students' perceptions of communication competence and communication anxiety. Students enrolled in the Group Communication in Veterinary Medicine course completed the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension and the Communicative Competence Scale at the beginning (Time 1) and end (Time 2) of the semester. Results show that first-year veterinary students' self-perceptions of communication competence increased and their self-reported levels of communication apprehension decreased across multiple contexts from Time 1 to Time 2. This research provides support for experiential communication training fostering skill development and confidence.

  19. Theoretical Modelling of Intercultural Communication Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Soter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The definition of the concepts of “communication”, “intercultural communication”, “model of communication” are analyzed in the article. The basic components of the communication process are singled out. The model of intercultural communication is developed. Communicative, behavioral and complex skills for optimal organization of intercultural communication, establishment of productive contact with a foreign partner to achieve mutual understanding, searching for acceptable ways of organizing interaction and cooperation for both communicants are highlighted in the article. It is noted that intercultural communication through interaction between people affects the development of different cultures’ aspects.

  20. THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION IN EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina MODREA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims realization process called relational communication in the educational processin termsof reconsidering the role of the student in the romanian education correlated with that european. School communication requirements are constant lyincreasing, which is why it multiplies forms of communication and expand their communication requirements toact. This development oblige the teachert o becomea good professional communication staff, both in the domination of the artcommunication, as well as that of receiver that of influencing the formation of his personality in many respects, communicative competencegainingin this way, anintegrative value of their teaching ability.

  1. The communication process in virtual teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the paradigms of virtual teams in the communication process in the context of the existing literature in this field. We argue the above issues and we explore the communication process within virtual teams like an interactive, complex and limiting process in connxion with the advantages and disadvantages offered by information technology.

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION IN EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arina MODREA; Alexandra SILVAȘ

    2016-01-01

    This article aims realization process called relational communication in the educational processin termsof reconsidering the role of the student in the romanian education correlated with that european...

  3. Causal Relationships between Communication Confidence, Beliefs about Group Work, and Willingness to Communicate in Foreign Language Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushino, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the causal relationships between three factors in second language (L2) group work settings: communication confidence (i.e., confidence in one's ability to communicate), beliefs about group work, and willingness to communicate (WTC). A questionnaire was administered to 729 first-year university students in Japan. A model…

  4. Causal Relationships between Communication Confidence, Beliefs about Group Work, and Willingness to Communicate in Foreign Language Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushino, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the causal relationships between three factors in second language (L2) group work settings: communication confidence (i.e., confidence in one's ability to communicate), beliefs about group work, and willingness to communicate (WTC). A questionnaire was administered to 729 first-year university students in Japan. A model…

  5. Communication in Decision-Making Groups: In Search of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes typical phases through which decision-making groups pass. Explores communication dimensions of small-group deliberation, and presents suggestions to improve the quality of group problem solving. (Author/BH)

  6. A virtual team group process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Marnie; Robertson, Della; Weeks, Marlene; Yu, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Virtual teams are a phenomenon of the Information Era and their existence in health care is anticipated to increase with technology enhancements such as telehealth and groupware. The mobilization and support of high performing virtual teams are important for leading knowledge-based health professionals in the 21st century. Using an adapted McGrath group development model, the four staged maturation process of a virtual team consisting of four masters students is explored in this paper. The team's development is analyzed addressing the interaction of technology with social and task dynamics. Throughout the project, leadership competencies of value to the group that emerged were demonstrated and incorporated into the development of a leadership competency assessment instrument. The demonstration of these competencies illustrated how they were valued and internalized by the group. In learning about the work of this virtual team, the reader will gain understanding of how leadership impacts virtual team performance.

  7. The intergroup protocols: Scalable group communication for the internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berket, Karlo [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2000-12-04

    Reliable group ordered delivery of multicast messages in a distributed system is a useful service that simplifies the programming of distributed applications. Such a service helps to maintain the consistency of replicated information and to coordinate the activities of the various processes. With the increasing popularity of the Internet, there is an increasing interest in scaling the protocols that provide this service to the environment of the Internet. The InterGroup protocol suite, described in this dissertation, provides such a service, and is intended for the environment of the Internet with scalability to large numbers of nodes and high latency links. The InterGroup protocols approach the scalability problem from various directions. They redefine the meaning of group membership, allow voluntary membership changes, add a receiver-oriented selection of delivery guarantees that permits heterogeneity of the receiver set, and provide a scalable reliability service. The InterGroup system comprises several components, executing at various sites within the system. Each component provides part of the services necessary to implement a group communication system for the wide-area. The components can be categorized as: (1) control hierarchy, (2) reliable multicast, (3) message distribution and delivery, and (4) process group membership. We have implemented a prototype of the InterGroup protocols in Java, and have tested the system performance in both local-area and wide-area networks.

  8. Secure Group Communications for Large Dynamic Multicast Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jing; Zhou Mingtian

    2003-01-01

    As the major problem in multicast security, the group key management has been the focus of research But few results are satisfactory. In this paper, the problems of group key management and access control for large dynamic multicast group have been researched and a solution based on SubGroup Secure Controllers (SGSCs) is presented, which solves many problems in IOLUS system and WGL scheme.

  9. The Big Information and Communication Groups in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rebelo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article addresses the form major world information and communication groups operate, based on strategies of verticalisation of activities that encompass the distinct media segments – newspapers and magazines, television and radio – and stretch to the new technologies, namely telecommunications and Internet access services. Operating through a vertical system, these groups work as a network system by establishing association or merger agreements, protocols to strengthen their commercial relations, and through interpersonal connections. Their corresponding capitals tend to disperse and their ownership is constantly changing, particularly thanks to the involvement of pension funds, which do not disregard the opportunity of alienating property whenever the profit obtained justifies it.Both directly, thanks to the strength of their own products – “global products” that inundate the world market, and indirectly, through the influence they have on others around them, the leading information and communication groups are a decisive factor in the speeding up of the processes of naturalization, the fixing of stereotypes, and in putting on the agenda the topics that will cross through public space.It is undeniable that the advent and massive spread of the new technologies pose a serious threat to the homogenization and the media standardization carried out by the major groups. However, there are still issues that call for moderation when analyzing this issue. Firstly, the power public authorities still detain, especially in non-democratic countries, to interrupt the circulation of contents. Secondly, the attack launched by the large information and communication groups in order to occupy online space themselves. Thirdly, the excess of information flow and the difficulty associated with the need to select and verify.

  10. Teaching Small Group Communication: The Do Good Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the parameters of a semester-long project called the "Do Good" project, geared towards developing small group communication skills in undergraduate students. This project highlights participation in a social engagement project that allows students to bridge concepts learned in small group communication lectures…

  11. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-01

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment with computers coupled for data communications through communications adapters and an active messaging interface (`AMI`), injecting for data communications instructions into slots in an injection FIFO buffer a transfer descriptor, at least some of the instructions specifying callback functions; injecting a completion descriptor for each instruction that specifies a callback function into an injection FIFO buffer slot having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list callback functions specified by data communications instructions; processing each descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer, setting a bit in a completion bit mask corresponding to the slot in the FIFO where the completion descriptor was injected; and calling by the AMI any callback functions in the pending callback list as indicated by set bits in the completion bit mask.

  12. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Kumar, Sameer; Jeffrey, Parker J.

    2014-06-10

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment with computers coupled for data communications through communications adapters and an active messaging interface (`AMI`), injecting for data communications instructions into slots in an injection FIFO buffer a transfer descriptor, at least some of the instructions specifying callback functions; injecting a completion descriptor for each instruction that specifies a callback function into an injection FIFO buffer slot having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list callback functions specified by data communications instructions; processing each descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer, setting a bit in a completion bit mask corresponding to the slot in the FIFO where the completion descriptor was injected; and calling by the AMI any callback functions in the pending callback list as indicated by set bits in the completion bit mask.

  13. Organization as Process of Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Vasquez, Consuelo; Cornelissen, Joep

    Within process views on organization, one central question is how organizations (as entities) are constituted by processes (i.e. non-entities). The answer to this question depends on the ways in which organizational scholars imagine organization, e.g., through rhetorical figures like metaphors or...

  14. mCell: Facilitating Mobile Communication of Small Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyri Virtanen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile communication technology offers a potential platform for new types of communication applications. Here, we describe the development and experiences with a mobile group communication application, mCell, that runs on a mobile phone. We present the underlying design implications, the application implementation, and a user study, where three groups used the application for one month. The findings of the user study reveal general user experiences with the application and show different patterns of usage depending on the social setting of the group and how the preferred features vary accordingly.

  15. Teaching Small Group Communication: A Do Good Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Minei, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the parameters of a semester-long project called the “Do Good” project, geared towards developing small group communication skills in undergraduate students. This project highlights participation in a social engagement project that allows students to bridge concepts learned in small group communication lectures (e.g., team dynamics, project management, conflict resolution, decision making, leadership with community outreach. Included are an overview of the project, and examples for how each component both challenges students’ ability to communicate in groups and provides motivation that foster students’ ability to link in-class knowledge with practical, real world application.

  16. Reinforcing Visual Grouping Cues to Communicate Complex Informational Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Juhee; Watson, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    In his book Multimedia Learning [7], Richard Mayer asserts that viewers learn best from imagery that provides them with cues to help them organize new information into the correct knowledge structures. Designers have long been exploiting the Gestalt laws of visual grouping to deliver viewers those cues using visual hierarchy, often communicating structures much more complex than the simple organizations studied in psychological research. Unfortunately, designers are largely practical in their work, and have not paused to build a complex theory of structural communication. If we are to build a tool to help novices create effective and well structured visuals, we need a better understanding of how to create them. Our work takes a first step toward addressing this lack, studying how five of the many grouping cues (proximity, color similarity, common region, connectivity, and alignment) can be effectively combined to communicate structured text and imagery from real world examples. To measure the effectiveness of this structural communication, we applied a digital version of card sorting, a method widely used in anthropology and cognitive science to extract cognitive structures. We then used tree edit distance to measure the difference between perceived and communicated structures. Our most significant findings are: 1) with careful design, complex structure can be communicated clearly; 2) communicating complex structure is best done with multiple reinforcing grouping cues; 3) common region (use of containers such as boxes) is particularly effective at communicating structure; and 4) alignment is a weak structural communicator.

  17. Image processing and communications challenges 5

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This textbook collects a series of research papers in the area of Image Processing and Communications which not only introduce a summary of current technology but also give an outlook of potential feature problems in this area. The key objective of the book is to provide a collection of comprehensive references on some recent theoretical development as well as novel applications in image processing and communications. The book is divided into two parts. Part I deals with image processing. A comprehensive survey of different methods  of image processing, computer vision  is also presented. Part II deals with the telecommunications networks and computer networks. Applications in these areas are considered. In conclusion, the edited book comprises papers on diverse aspects of image processing  and communications systems. There are theoretical aspects as well as application papers.

  18. Effects of Gender and Communication Content on Leadership Emergence in Small Task-Oriented Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Katherine W.

    A study examined the role played by gender and communication content in the leadership emergence process in small, task-oriented groups. Six hours of transcribed group interaction from a sample of the group deliberations of 6 mixed-sex groups of college students (n=27) engaged in a 4-month-long decision-making project served as the database for…

  19. Signal processing for mobile communications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ibnkahla, Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONSignal Processing for Future Mobile Communications Systems: Challenges and Perspectives; Quazi Mehbubar Rahman and Mohamed IbnkahlaCHANNEL MODELING AND ESTIMATIONMultipath Propagation Models for Broadband Wireless Systems; Andreas F. Molisch and Fredrik TufvessonModeling and Estimation of Mobile Channels; Jitendra K. TugnaitMobile Satellite Channels: Statistical Models and Performance Analysis; Giovanni E. Corazza, Alessandro Vanelli-Coralli, Raffaella Pedone, and Massimo NeriMobile Velocity Estimation for Wireless Communications; Bouchra Senadji, Ghazem Azemi, and Boualem Boashash

  20. Group Activities in Task-based Communicative Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓一琳; 王宇澄

    2005-01-01

    In a task-based communicative classroom, group activities are effective ways to devdop students' 4 basic language skills. However, not all group activities can reach the expected results. English teachers should pay attention to some aspects in organizing a classroom group activity.

  1. Recognizing and Enhancing the Communication Skills of Your Group Home Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Beverly A.

    The manual examines ways in which nonprofessional group home health care workers can enhance the communication and interaction skills of developmentally disabled clients. The communication process is explored in terms of information exchange, both verbal and nonverbal. Examples of vocal, nonvocal, and echolalic speech are offered and suggestions…

  2. Overlay Share Mesh for Interactive Group Communication with High Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-hua; CAI Yun-ze; XU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    An overlay share mesh infrastructure is presented for high dynamic group communication systems, such as distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and distributed virtual environments (DVE). Overlay share mesh infrastructure can own better adapting ability for high dynamic group than tradition multi-tree multicast infrastructure by sharing links among different groups. The mechanism of overlay share mesh based on area of interest (AOI) was discussed in detail in this paper. A large number of simulation experiments were done and the permance of mesh infrastructure was studied. Experiments results proved that overlay mesh infrastructure owns better adaptability than traditional multi-tree infrastructure for high dynamic group communication systems.

  3. EDUCATIVE STRATEGY FOCUS ON THE PROCESS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE GROUP OF INTEREST AND THE CRITICAL CASES / ESTRATEGIA EDUCATIVA DIRIGIDA AL PROCESO DE COMUNICACIÓN ENTRE EL GRUPO DE INTERÉS Y LOS CASOS CRÍTICOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Morejón Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to work on an educative strategy as a contribution for the improvement of communication between the group of interest and the critical cases that are the youngsters, the grown-ups and the olders in the municipality of Cabaiguán. In this research it was used a mixed methode with a first stage: descriptive, no experimental, of a transverse kind where the process on communication is described. The main methodes used were analysis-synthesis, historical-logical, observation, enquiry, interview, mathematical, systemic and the methode of criterion of experts. The strategy constitutes a scientific novel because a group of actions were designed with the purpose to allow an efficient communication that is based on a contextual diagnosis in the municipality and based on the demands and functions that guarantee the preparation of the group of interest for its labor. RESUMEN Este trabajo tuvo como objetivo elaborar una estrategia educativa como contribución al perfeccionamiento de la comunicación entre el grupo de interés y los casos críticos que incluye los jóvenes, adultez temprana y adultos mayores en el municipio de Cabaiguán. Se siguió una metodología investigativa mixta con una primera etapa, descriptiva, no experimental, de tipo transversal donde se realiza una descripción del estado del proceso de comunicación. Se utilizaron como métodos esenciales: análisis síntesis, histórico lógico, observación, encuesta, entrevista, matemático, sistémico y método de criterio de expertos. La estrategia constituye una novedad científica porque se diseñó un conjunto de acciones que permitan una comunicación eficiente sustentada en un diagnóstico contextual en el municipio, basada en exigencias y funciones que garanticen la preparación del grupo de interés para su labor.

  4. The Finite Heisenberg-Weyl Groups in Radar and Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderbank AR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the theory of the finite Heisenberg-Weyl group in relation to the development of adaptive radar and to the construction of spreading sequences and error-correcting codes in communications. We contend that this group can form the basis for the representation of the radar environment in terms of operators on the space of waveforms. We also demonstrate, following recent developments in the theory of error-correcting codes, that the finite Heisenberg-Weyl groups provide a unified basis for the construction of useful waveforms/sequences for radar, communications, and the theory of error-correcting codes.

  5. Optimal Grouping and Matching for Network-Coded Cooperative Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S; Shi, Y; Hou, Y T; Kompella, S; Midkiff, S F

    2011-11-01

    Network-coded cooperative communications (NC-CC) is a new advance in wireless networking that exploits network coding (NC) to improve the performance of cooperative communications (CC). However, there remains very limited understanding of this new hybrid technology, particularly at the link layer and above. This paper fills in this gap by studying a network optimization problem that requires joint optimization of session grouping, relay node grouping, and matching of session/relay groups. After showing that this problem is NP-hard, we present a polynomial time heuristic algorithm to this problem. Using simulation results, we show that our algorithm is highly competitive and can produce near-optimal results.

  6. Disjunctive Information Flow for Communicating Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2016-01-01

    The security validation of practical computer systems calls for the ability to specify and verify information flow policies that are dependent on data content. Such policies play an important role in concurrent, communicating systems: consider a scenario where messages are sent to different...... processes according to their tagging. We devise a security type system that enforces content-dependent information flow policies in the presence of communication and concurrency. The type system soundly guarantees a compositional noninterference property. All theoretical results have been formally proved...

  7. Team Communication as a Collaborative Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Gervits

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication channels can reveal a great deal of information about the effectiveness of a team. This is particularly relevant for teams operating in performance settings such as medical groups, military squads, and mixed human-robot teams. Currently, it is not known how various factors including coordination strategy, speaker role, and time pressure affect communication in collaborative tasks. The purpose of this paper is to systematically explore how these factors interact with team discourse in order to better understand effective communication patterns. In our analysis of a corpus of remote task-oriented dialogue (CReST corpus, we found that a variety of linguistic- and dialogue-level features were influenced by time pressure, speaker role, and team effectiveness. We also found that effective teams had a higher speech rate, and used specific grounding strategies to improve efficiency and coordination under time pressure. These results inform our understanding of the various factors that influence team communication, and highlight ways in which effective teams overcome constraints on their communication channels.

  8. Data Aggregation Gateway Framework for CoAP Group Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minki Cha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a data aggregation gateway framework (DA-GW for constrained application protocol (CoAP group communications is proposed. The DA-GW framework is designed to improve the throughput performance and energy efficiency of group communication to monitor and control multiple sensor devices collectively with a single user terminal. The DA-GW consists of four function blocks—the message analyzer, group manager, message scheduler and data handler—and three informative databases—the client database, resource database and information database. The DA-GW performs group management and group communication through each functional block and stores resources in the informative databases. The DA-GW employs international standard-based data structures and provides the interoperability of heterogeneous devices used in various applications. The DA-GW is implemented using a Java-based open source framework called jCoAP to evaluate the functions and performance of the DA-GW. The experiment results showed that the DA-GW framework revealed better performance than existing group communication methods in terms of throughput and energy consumption.

  9. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2014-06-03

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment, including receiving, in an active messaging interface (`AMI`) data communications instructions, at least one instruction specifying a callback function; injecting into an injection FIFO buffer of a data communication adapter, an injection descriptor, each slot in the injection FIFO buffer having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list any callback function specified by an instruction, incrementing a pending callback counter for each listed callback function; transferring payload data as per each injection descriptor, incrementing a transfer counter upon completion of each transfer; determining from counter values whether the pending callback list presently includes callback functions whose data transfers have been completed; calling by the AMI any such callback functions from the pending callback list, decrementing the pending callback counter for each callback function called.

  10. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J

    2014-05-20

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment, including receiving, in an active messaging interface (`AMI`) data communications instructions, at least one instruction specifying a callback function; injecting into an injection FIFO buffer of a data communication adapter, an injection descriptor, each slot in the injection FIFO buffer having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list any callback function specified by an instruction, incrementing a pending callback counter for each listed callback function; transferring payload data as per each injection descriptor, incrementing a transfer counter upon completion of each transfer; determining from counter values whether the pending callback list presently includes callback functions whose data transfers have been completed; calling by the AMI any such callback functions from the pending callback list, decrementing the pending callback counter for each callback function called.

  11. A Secure Session Key Distribution Scheme for Group Communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ren-hung; JAN Jinn-ke

    2006-01-01

    In a secure group communication system, messages must be encrypted before being transmitted to group members to prevent unauthorized access. In many secure group communication schemes, whenever a member leaves or joins the group, group center (GC) immediately changes the common encryption key and sends the new key to all valid members for forward and backward secrecy. If valid members are not on-line, they will miss the rekeying messages and will not be able to decrypt any ciphertext. Therefore, group members must be able to store the state of the system. In some applications, like global positioning systems (GPS) or pay-per-view systems, it is not reasonable to ask group members to stay on-line all the time and save the changes to the system. A hierarchical binary tree-based key management scheme are proposed for a secure group communication. This scheme reduces the key storage requirement of GC to a constant size and the group members are not required to be on-line constantly (stateless).

  12. Grouping in Primary Schools and Reference Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijnen, G. W.; Guldemond, H.

    2002-01-01

    Studied reference processes in within-class grouping for elementary school students in the Netherlands in homogeneous (n=16) and heterogeneous (n=14) classes. Findings indicate that homogeneous grouping sets strong reference processes in motion, and processes of comparison have considerably greater effects in homogeneous groups, with negative…

  13. Sensing, Signal Processing, and Communication for WBANs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyyed Hamed Fouladi; Ral ChvezSantiago; Pl Ander Floor; Ilangko Balasingham; Tor ARamstad

    2014-01-01

    A wireless body area network (WBAN) enables real-time monitoring of physiological signals and helps with the early detection of life-threatening diseases. WBAN nodes can be located on, inside, or in close proximity to the body in order to detect vital signals. Measurements from sensors are processed and transmitted over wireless channels. Issues in sensing, signal processing, and com-munication have to be addressed before WBAN can be implemented. In this paper, we survey recent advances in research on sig-nal processing for the sensor measurements, and we describe aspects of communication based on IEEE 802.15.6. We also discuss state-of-the-art WBAN channel modeling in all the frequencies specified by IEEE 802.15.6 as well as the need for new channel models for new different frequencies.

  14. CDMA Technique with Inter-process Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ravichandran

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel implementation of Inter process communication in CDMA NOC is proposed. In this study, the orthogonality properties of a Walsh code are used to route data packets between the IP-Cores.The asynchronous circuit design with combinational logic (Gate level design is used for transmission and receiving circuits, along with ip-cores and reduces the processing time and resource utilization. The use of asynchronous pipelined core design process increases the operating frequency as well. The data transfers over IP-Core based interconnect is implemented on gate level. The latency and throughput values are obtained for variable payload size. The performance of asynchronous and synchronous communication are measured and analyzed.

  15. Group Dynamics and Willingness to Communicate in EFL Classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAI Xiao-ping

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how group dynamics (such as group cohesiveness and group norms) influence learners ’willingness to communicate (WTC) in an EFL classroom. The results from the 236 questionnaires showed that there was a significant correla-tion between group dynamics and WTC in an EFL classroom. A dozen students who participated in this study were interviewed for more in-depth information and the data revealed that most interviewees acknowledged the importance of the class group. The qualitative data also showed the importance of their own determination to learn in establishing their WTC.

  16. Process of adoption communication openness in adoptive families: adopters’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Acciaiuoli Barbosa-Ducharne

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Communication about adoption is a family interaction process which is more than the simple exchange of information. Adoption communication can be characterized in terms of the level of openness of family conversations regarding the child’s past and the degree of the family’s adoption social disclosure. The objective of this study is to explore the process of adoption communication openness in Portuguese adoptive families by identifying the impact of variables related to the adoption process, the adoptive parenting and the adoptee. One hundred twenty five parents of children aged 3 to 15, who were adopted on average 4 years ago, participated in this study. Data was collected during home visits using the Parents Adoption Process Interview. A cluster analysis identified three different groups of families according to the level of adoption communication openness within the family and outside. The findings also showed that the process of the adoption communication openness started when parents decided to adopt, developed in parent-child interaction and was susceptible to change under professional intervention. The relevance of training given to prospective adopters and of professional practice based on scientific evidence is highlighted.

  17. 3rd International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Qilian; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Baoju; Pi, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    The Proceedings of The Third International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems provides the state-of-art developments of communications, signal processing, and systems. This book is a collection of contributions from the conference and covers such topics as wireless communications, networks, systems, and signal processing for communications. The conference was held July 2014 in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, China.

  18. Second International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Jiasong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Qilian; Pi, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    The Proceedings of The Second International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems provides the state-of-art developments of Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems. The conference covered such topics as wireless communications, networks, systems, signal processing for communications. This book is a collection of contributions coming out of The Second International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems (CSPS) held September 2013 in Tianjin, China.

  19. Communication processes, public administration and performance evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Arta Musaraj

    2011-01-01

    Albanian efforts to fulfill European standards and norm in its Public Administration and service delivery, are becoming a research argument for academics and practitioners as well. Even if significant efforts have been made in this direction there is still a gap in analyzing the link between the communication process which creates and delivers the public service, effect of the used tools in service provision and delivery, the performance evaluation of this sector and the future of the sector ...

  20. Advanced Signal Processing for Wireless Multimedia Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There is at present a worldwide effort to develop next-generation wireless communication systems. It is envisioned that many of the future wireless systems will incorporate considerable signal-processing intelligence in order to provide advanced services such as multimedia transmission. In general, wireless channels can be very hostile media through which to communicate, due to substantial physical impediments, primarily radio-frequency interference and time-arying nature of the channel. The need of providing universal wireless access at high data-rate (which is the aim of many merging wireless applications presents a major technical challenge, and meeting this challenge necessitates the development of advanced signal processing techniques for multiple-access communications in non-stationary interference-rich environments. In this paper, we present some key advanced signal processing methodologies that have been developed in recent years for interference suppression in wireless networks. We will focus primarily on the problem of jointly suppressing multiple-access interference (MAI and intersymbol interference (ISI, which are the limiting sources of interference for the high data-rate wireless systems being proposed for many emerging application areas, such as wireless multimedia. We first present a signal subspace approach to blind joint suppression of MAI and ISI. We then discuss a powerful iterative technique for joint interference suppression and decoding, so-called Turbo multiuser detection, that is especially useful for wireless multimedia packet communications. We also discuss space-time processing methods that employ multiple antennas for interference rejection and signal enhancement. Finally, we touch briefly on the problems of suppressing narrowband interference and impulsive ambient noise, two other sources of radio-frequency interference present in wireless multimedia networks.

  1. THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS OF THE FINANCIAL REPORTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolaescu Cristina; Moț Ioana

    2013-01-01

    An information has value through the financial reporting. Such are taken into account factors such as: the nature of the event referred to financial reporting, the adequacy of the presentation, the credibility and integrity of information, readability necessary to allow some conclusions on a reasonable impact on the financial statements, the investors risk profile and processing skills recovery opportunities. Communication is not an end in itself. Its existence can not be conceived outside su...

  2. Applications of Time-Reversal Processing for Planetary Surface Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the power constraints imposed on wireless sensor and communication networks deployed on a planetary surface during exploration, energy efficient transfer of data becomes a critical issue. In situations where groups of nodes within a network are located in relatively close proximity, cooperative communication techniques can be utilized to improve the range, data rate, power efficiency, and lifetime of the network. In particular, if the point-to-point communication channels on the network are well modeled as frequency non-selective, distributed or cooperative beamforming can employed. For frequency-selective channels, beamforming itself is not generally appropriate, but a natural generalization of it, time-reversal communication (TRC), can still be effective. Time-reversal processing has been proposed and studied previously for other applications, including acoustical imaging, electromagnetic imaging, underwater acoustic communication, and wireless communication channels. In this paper, we study both the theoretical advantages and the experimental performance of cooperative TRC for wireless communication on planetary surfaces. We give a brief introduction to TRC and present several scenarios where TRC could be profitably employed during planetary exploration. We also present simulation results illustrating the performance of cooperative TRC employed in a complex multipath environment and discuss the optimality of cooperative TRC for data aggregation in wireless sensor networks

  3. Distributed interactive communication in simulated space-dwelling groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Joseph V; Hienz, Robert D; Hursh, Steven R; Ragusa, Leonard C; Rouse, Charles O; Gasior, Eric D

    2004-03-01

    This report describes the development and preliminary application of an experimental test bed for modeling human behavior in the context of a computer generated environment to analyze the effects of variations in communication modalities, incentives and stressful conditions. In addition to detailing the methodological development of a simulated task environment that provides for electronic monitoring and recording of individual and group behavior, the initial substantive findings from an experimental analysis of distributed interactive communication in simulated space dwelling groups are described. Crews of three members each (male and female) participated in simulated "planetary missions" based upon a synthetic scenario task that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic specimens with a range of grade values. The results of these preliminary studies showed clearly that cooperative and productive interactions were maintained between individually isolated and distributed individuals communicating and problem-solving effectively in a computer-generated "planetary" environment over extended time intervals without benefit of one another's physical presence. Studies on communication channel constraints confirmed the functional interchangeability between available modalities with the highest degree of interchangeability occurring between Audio and Text modes of communication. The effects of task-related incentives were determined by the conditions under which they were available with Positive Incentives effectively attenuating decrements in performance under stressful time pressure.

  4. Problem Based Learning as a Shared Musical Journey--Group Dynamics, Communication and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Beck, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL) more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws on group dynamic theory, and points out the…

  5. A Study on Signal Group Processing of AUTOSAR COM Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Hwang, Hyun Yong; Han, Tae Man; Ahn, Yong Hak

    2013-06-01

    In vehicle, there are many ECU(Electronic Control Unit)s, and ECUs are connected to networks such as CAN, LIN, FlexRay, and so on. AUTOSAR COM(Communication) which is a software platform of AUTOSAR(AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture) in the international industry standards of automotive electronic software processes signals and signal groups for data communications between ECUs. Real-time and reliability are very important for data communications in the vehicle. Therefore, in this paper, we analyze functions of signals and signal groups used in COM, and represent that functions of signal group are more efficient than signals in real-time data synchronization and network resource usage between the sender and receiver.

  6. An Analysis of Students’ Communication during Group Work in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelopi D. Vasileiadou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing observation grid and interview study methologies, this research examines the ways in which students communicate with each other while working in a team during problem solving in mathematics. The study focuses primarily on the language used for communication. Results suggest that participants make assumptions to solve mathematical problems and justify their individual opinions, and cooperate and help each other, rarely asking for their teacher’s help, while using both the ordinary, and the mathematical spoken and written language. The interview indicates that students, although not experienced in undertaking group work, are able to readily identify its benefits and positive aspects.

  7. Communications between professional groups in an NHS trust hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J; Preston, D

    1996-01-01

    Discusses an audit of communications between doctors and other professional groups in a National Health Services trust hospital. The project was undertaken as a result of senior management's perception that there were problems regarding the interface between professionals and junior doctors particularly, and that these have a potentially detrimental impact on patient care. The aim of the study was to improve the work environment of medical practitioners and professional staff by researching the factors affecting communication and the sources of conflict which exist between the groups. Describes the methodology and provides an overview of the main findings grouped into themes. A large number of recommendations for change have been made to the hospital concerning systems, procedures, structures, training and inter-professional boundaries. Implementation of some of these recommendations has taken place already. Full evaluation of their impact is yet to be determined.

  8. Enable Secure Group Communication in the Mobile Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the key management issue of secure group communication in a highly mobile networking environment. In such environment, there are frequent joining and leaving of members due to roaming or suspending for a period. In order to preserve forward and backward confidentiality, it is necessary to rekey every time a member joins or leaves. This paper introduces a new state-based group key management framework suitable for highly mobile environment. In this scheme, a member enters "Park" state when it is going to roam or suspend for a period, when it becomes active again, it send a request to the key server to get the current group key and changes its state to "Active" again. No rekeying is needed for a roaming, and reliable delivery of rekeying messages is not required for "Park" members. The scheme can notably reduce the communication overhead and provide an efficient method for error recovery.

  9. Moving on in life after intensive care--partners' experience of group communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Mona; Bäckman, Carl; Jones, Christina; Walther, Sten; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2015-09-01

    Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners' intensive care period. They may appear to be coping well outwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensive care patients. The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive care unit (ICU) patients was evaluated. A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n = 15), 5 men and 10 women, aged 37-89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote, in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six of the partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews. Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2) Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participate in group communication. Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategies to ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is one way for partners to be able to move forward in life. Group communication with other patients' partners eases the process of going through the burden of being a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus and evidence for the best practice. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  10. Gender, Group Composition, and Task Type in Small Task Groups Using Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savicki, Victor; And Others

    1996-01-01

    To investigate gender effects on computer-mediated communication, undergraduate psychology students were put in small groups (males, females, or mixed) and were assigned feminine content (decision making) and masculine content (intellective) task types. Groups of females, regardless of task, sent more words per e-mail message, were more satisfied…

  11. Performance analysis of low-complexity adaptive frequency-domain equalization and MIMO signal processing for compensation of differential mode group delay in mode-division multiplexing communication systems using few-mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission systems utilizing few-mode fibers (FMF) have been intensively explored to sustain continuous traffic growth. The key challenges of MDM systems are inter-modal crosstalk due to random mode coupling (RMC), and largely-accumulated differential mode group delay (DMGD), whilst hinders mode-demultiplexer implementation. The adaptive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can dynamically compensate DMGD using digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. The frequency-domain least-mean squares (FD-LMS) algorithm has been universally adopted for high-speed MDM communications, mainly for its relatively low computational complexity. However, longer training sequence is appended for FD-LMS to achieve faster convergence, which incurs prohibitively higher system overhead and reduces overall throughput. In this paper, we propose a fast-convergent single-stage adaptive frequency-domain recursive least-squares (FD-RLS) algorithm with reduced complexity for DMGD compensation at MDM coherent receivers. The performance and complexity comparison of FD-RLS, with signal-PSD-dependent FD-LMS method and conventional FD-LMS approach, are performed in a 3000 km six-mode transmission system with 65 ps/km DMGD. We explore the convergence speed of three adaptive algorithms, including the normalized mean-square-error (NMSE) per fast Fourier transform (FFT) block at 14-30 dB OSNR. The fast convergence of FD-RLS is exploited at the expense of slightly-increased necessary tap numbers for MIMO equalizers, and it can partially save the overhead of training sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate adaptive FD-RLS can also be used for chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation without increasing the filter tap length, thus prominently reducing the DSP implementation complexity for MDM systems.

  12. Problem Based Learning as a Shared Musical Journey – Group Dynamics, Communication and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lindvang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws on group dynamic theory, and points out the importance of building a reflexive milieu in the group. Musical concepts are used to illustrate the communicative and creative aspects of PBL and the paper uses the analogy between improvising together and do a project work together. We also discuss the role of the supervisor in a PBL group process. Further we argue that creativity is rooted deep in our consciousness and connected to our ability to work with a flexible mind. In order to enhance the cohesion as well as the creativity of the group a model of music listening as a concrete intervention tool in PBL processes is proposed.

  13. Attuning: A Communication Process between People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability and Their Interaction Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Colin; Smith, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with severe and profound intellectual disability typically demonstrate a limited ability to communicate effectively. Most of their communications are non-verbal, often idiosyncratic and ambiguous. This article aims to identify the process that regulates communications of this group of people with others and to describe the…

  14. Attuning: A Communication Process between People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability and Their Interaction Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Colin; Smith, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with severe and profound intellectual disability typically demonstrate a limited ability to communicate effectively. Most of their communications are non-verbal, often idiosyncratic and ambiguous. This article aims to identify the process that regulates communications of this group of people with others and to describe the…

  15. Effects of Training on Computer-Mediated Communication in Single or Mixed Gender Small Task Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savicki, Victor; Kelley, Merle; Ammon, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Investigates group gender composition and communication styles in small task groups involved in computer-mediated communication. Describes a study that tried to train small task groups in the use of one communication style and suggests further research in the area of communication training for online task groups. (Author/LRW)

  16. Envy in the group-therapy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, M A

    1998-10-01

    The origins and vicissitudes of envy are discussed from the viewpoints of Boris and the Kleinians. Their ideas, coupled with a relational perspective of the therapeutic process, enrich our understanding and inform our work concerning the emergence, processing, and working through of envy in the therapy group. A variable in the negative therapeutic reaction, envy can be destructive to the therapy process. It is proposed that envy, accompanied by shame and guilt, is likely to enter the group via enactments. They are fueled by projective identification, which, if ignored, impede the continuation of the group process. Four clinical vignettes illustrate how envy enters the group and how the group functions as a container and transformational object as it processes the projective identifications and works through the enactments.

  17. 75 FR 49527 - Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as... Adjustment Assistance on June 24, 2010, applicable to workers of Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot..., Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot Group, formerly known as Caps Group Acquisition,...

  18. Communicating Processes with Data for Supervisory Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasen Markovski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We employ supervisory controllers to safely coordinate high-level discrete(-event behavior of distributed components of complex systems. Supervisory controllers observe discrete-event system behavior, make a decision on allowed activities, and communicate the control signals to the involved parties. Models of the supervisory controllers can be automatically synthesized based on formal models of the system components and a formalization of the safe coordination (control requirements. Based on the obtained models, code generation can be used to implement the supervisory controllers in software, on a PLC, or an embedded (microprocessor. In this article, we develop a process theory with data that supports a model-based systems engineering framework for supervisory coordination. We employ communication to distinguish between the different flows of information, i.e., observation and supervision, whereas we employ data to specify the coordination requirements more compactly, and to increase the expressivity of the framework. To illustrate the framework, we remodel an industrial case study involving coordination of maintenance procedures of a printing process of a high-tech Oce printer.

  19. Problembased learning as a shared musical journey - group dynamics, communication and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Beck, Bolette Daniels

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL) more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws...... on group dynamic theory, and points out the importance of building a reflexive milieu in the group. Musical concepts are used to illustrate the communicative and creative aspects of PBL and the paper uses the analogy between improvising together and do a project work together. We also discuss the role...... of the supervisor in a PBL group process. Further we argue that creativity is rooted deep in our consciousness and connected to our ability to work with a flexible mind. In order to enhance the cohesion as well as the creativity of the group a model of music listening as a concrete intervention tool in PBL...

  20. Gender and Group Composition in Small Task Groups Using Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savicki, Victor; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Gender and group composition variables in a computer-mediated communication context are examined. Subjects were 36 undergraduate male and female psychology students. Findings are analyzed in terms of choice of language; participation; satisfaction; and interpersonal conflict. Ten tables present study results. (Author/AEF)

  1. Understanding a Spiritual Youth Camp as a Consciousness Raising Group: The Effects of a Subculture's Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jim

    This paper defines a spiritual youth camp as a consciousness raising group. The camp, founded in 1956 as a community church camp, has been independent of any religious denomination since disassociating from the founding community church in 1986. Communication processes are described as they relate to primary aspects of the camp experience. Primary…

  2. Commentary: how can technology help us understand the communication process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyton, Joann

    2012-08-01

    In this commentary, the author reflects on the articles chosen for the special section on communications analysis. These articles problematize communication and raise an interesting set of questions for both human factors and communication scholars to ponder. In the end, both sets of scholars seek the same goal: How do we better examine communication to improve it? Problematizing communication requires scholars to challenge their fundamental assumptions about the phenomenon as well as to tease out the distinctions of methodological approaches typically used by both human factors and communication scholars. Human factors scholars tend to favor forms of communication in which technology or task roles control who can communicate and how. Communication scholars tend to favor contexts in which information flows more freely with fewer explicit restrictions. Creating opportunities to collaborate in research on the communication process may create the best understanding of technology that can better serve our understanding of communication.

  3. Culture: A Filtration Process during Communication in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Rudi

    This paper focuses on the filtration process of culture during communication in education with reference to visual elements. An introduction provides a review of some communication models--graphic representations of theories that attempt to predict and explain the process of communication. These simple models are discussed: Aristotle's model of…

  4. Communication Effects on Small Group Decision-Making: Homogeneity and Task as Moderators of the Communication-Performance Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Abran J.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates circumstances under which communication variables contribute significantly to the constitution of group decisions. Postulates two variables, homogeneity of task-relevant information possessed by group members and task demonstrability, to moderate the impact of communication and group member ability on quality of group outcomes.…

  5. Risk communication strategy development using the aerospace systems engineering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, S.; Sklar, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains the goals and challenges of NASA's risk communication efforts and how the Aerospace Systems Engineering Process (ASEP) was used to map the risk communication strategy used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to achieve these goals.

  6. A proof system for asynchronously communicating deterministic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, F.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072666641; van Hulst, M.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce in this paper new communication and synchronization constructs which allow deterministic processes, communicating asynchronously via unbounded FIFO buffers, to cope with an indeterminate environment. We develop for the resulting parallel programming language, which subsumes deterministi

  7. A proof system for asynchronously communicating deterministic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, F.S.; van Hulst, M.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce in this paper new communication and synchronization constructs which allow deterministic processes, communicating asynchronously via unbounded FIFO buffers, to cope with an indeterminate environment. We develop for the resulting parallel programming language, which subsumes deterministi

  8. Diffusion processes through social groups' dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Apolloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Axelrod's model describes the dissemination of a set of cultural traits in a society constituted by individual agents. In a social context, nevertheless, individual choices toward a specific attitude are also at the basis of the formation of communities, groups and parties. The membership in a group changes completely the behavior of single agents who start acting according to a social identity. Groups act and interact among them as single entities, but still conserve an internal dynamics. We show that, under certain conditions of social dynamics, the introduction of group dynamics in a cultural dissemination process avoids the flattening of the culture into a single entity and preserves the multiplicity of cultural attitudes. We also considered diffusion processes on this dynamical background, showing the conditions under which information as well as innovation can spread through the population in a scenario where the groups' choices determine the social structure.

  9. An efficient scalable key management scheme for secure group communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; GU Da-wu; MA Fan-yuan; BAI Ying-cai

    2006-01-01

    Several multicast key management schemes such as those proposed by Wallner et al and Wong et al are based on a multilevel, logical hierarchy (or tree) of key-encrypting keys. When used in conjunction with a reliable multicast infrastructure, this approach results in a highly efficient key update mechanism in which the number of multicast messages transmitted upon a membership update is proportional to the depth of the tree,which is logarithmic to the size of the secure multicast group. But this is based on the hypothesis that the tree is maintained in a balanced manner. This paper proposes a scalable rekeying scheme-link-tree structure for implementing secure group communication. Theoretical calculation and experimentation show that this scheme has better performance than the tree structure and the star structure, and at the same time still keep the link-tree structure balanced.

  10. Problembased learning as a shared musical journey - group dynamics, communication and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Beck, Bolette Daniels

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL) more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws...... of the supervisor in a PBL group process. Further we argue that creativity is rooted deep in our consciousness and connected to our ability to work with a flexible mind. In order to enhance the cohesion as well as the creativity of the group a model of music listening as a concrete intervention tool in PBL...

  11. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual.

  12. Problembased learning as a shared musical journey - group dynamics, communication and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Beck, Bolette Daniels

    2015-01-01

    of the supervisor in a PBL group process. Further we argue that creativity is rooted deep in our consciousness and connected to our ability to work with a flexible mind. In order to enhance the cohesion as well as the creativity of the group a model of music listening as a concrete intervention tool in PBL...... on group dynamic theory, and points out the importance of building a reflexive milieu in the group. Musical concepts are used to illustrate the communicative and creative aspects of PBL and the paper uses the analogy between improvising together and do a project work together. We also discuss the role...

  13. Communicating about overdiagnosis: Learning from community focus groups on osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rebecca; Hersch, Jolyn; Thomas, Rae; Glasziou, Paul; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Background Overdiagnosis is considered a risk associated with the diagnosis of osteoporosis–as many people diagnosed won’t experience harm from the condition. As yet there’s little evidence on community understanding of overdiagnosis outside cancer- where it is an established risk of some screening programs–or effective ways to communicate about it. We examined community understanding around overdiagnosis of osteoporosis, to optimise communication strategies about this problem. Methods and findings Using a qualitative design we recruited a community sample of women, 50–80 years, from the Gold Coast community around Bond University, Australia, using random digit dialing, and conducted 5 focus groups with 41 women. A discussion guide and 4-part presentation were developed and piloted, with independent review from a consumer and clinical experts. Initial discussion had 4 segments: osteoporosis; bone density vs. other risk factors; medication; and overdiagnosis. The second half included the 4 short presentations and discussions on each. Analysis used Framework Analysis method. Initially participants described osteoporosis as bone degeneration causing some fear, demonstrated imprecise understanding of overdiagnosis, had a view osteoporosis couldn’t be overdiagnosed as bone scans provided “clear cut” results, expressed belief in early diagnosis, and interest in prevention strategies enabling control. Following presentations, participants expressed some understanding of overdiagnosis, preference for describing osteoporosis as a “risk factor” not “disease”, concern about a poor risk-benefit ratio for medications, and surprise and unease the definition of osteoporosis decided bone density of young women was “normal”, without age adjustment. Limitations include English-speaking backgrounds of the sample and complex materials. Conclusions Our findings suggest a gap between community expectations and how experts sometimes arbitrarily set low

  14. Communication Barriers in Quality Process: Sakarya University Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Mehmet Ali

    2012-01-01

    Communication has an important role in life and especially in education. Nowadays, lots of people generally use technology for communication. When technology uses in education and other activities, there may be some communication barriers. And also, quality process has an important role in higher education institutes. If a higher education…

  15. Group Communication Media Choice and the Use of Information and Communication Technology to Support Learning: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Karim, Nor Shariza; Heckman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports a study conducted longitudinally to investigate group communication media choice and the use of a web-based learning tool, as well as other types of communication media, such as e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face, for communication and collaboration to complete given tasks. Design/methodology/approach: This study was…

  16. How Are Distributed Groups Affected by an Imposed Structuring of their Decision-Making Process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Anders Lorentz; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Groups often suffer from ineffective communication and decision making. This experimental study compares distributed groups solving a preference task with support from either a communication system or a system providing both communication and a structuring of the decision-making process. Results...... as its outcome. Notably, the task solutions arrived at by the groups using the system that imposes a structuring of the decision-making process show limited correlation with the task solutions suggested by the system on the basis of the groups’ explicitly stated criteria. We find no differences in group...

  17. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  18. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  19. Research on cognitive, social and cultural processes of written communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo González, Rosario; Salvador Mata, Francisco

    2009-08-01

    This article compiles the investigations carried out by a Research Group of the University of Granada, Spain. Its different projects on writing's cognitive social and cultural processes have been supported by the Spanish Government. This line of research joined together linguistic, psychological, social and cultural contributions to the development of writing from the 1970s. Currently, this line of research develops in collaboration with other European Universities: (a) Interuniversity Centre for Research On Cognitive Processing in Natural and Artificial Systems (ECONA), "La Sapienza" University of Rome (Italy); (b) Anadolu University, (Eskisehir, Turkey); (c) Coimbra University (Portugal); (d) University of Zaragoza (Spain); (e) the Institute of Education of the University of London (United Kingdom). The aforementioned collaboration is materializing into projects like the International Master on Multilingual Writing: Cognitive, Intercultural and Technological Processes of Written Communication ( http://www.multilingualwriting.com ) and the International Congress: Writing in the twenty-first Century: Cognition, Multilinguisim and Technologies, held in Granada ( http://www.asprogrades.org ). This research line is focussed on the development of strategies in writing development, basic to train twenty-first century societies' citizens. In these societies, participation in production media, social exchange and the development of multilingual written communication skills through new computer technologies spread multicultural values. In order to fulfil the social exigencies, it is needed to have the collaboration of research groups for designing and applying international research projects.

  20. Perceptions of organizational communication processes in quality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Arnold

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Language is a natural psychological phenomenon, indispensable to all humans in society. This article presents the theoretical foundations on communication in process quality management, bringing studies dealing with communication and ISO 9001:2000 management, aiming at investigating how these variables have been perceived in organizations. The importance of the steps that should permeate the communication process is highlighted through published research, concluding on the need for studies that demonstrate the importance of subjectivity in the communication process, a present phenomenon in any interpersonal relationship.

  1. Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Communication Process in the Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecki, Catherine Nuss

    2002-01-01

    Interviews (n=22) and observations (n=14) in clinical settings were coded and analyzed to identify student nurses' problems in communicating with patients and the process of learning solutions. The process involved affirming the self, engaging the patient, experiencing communication breakdown, and refining the repertoire of communication…

  2. Processo de comunicação em grupos de aprendizagem: uma experiência multiprofissional Proceso de comunicación en grupos de aprendizaje: una experiencia multiprofesional Process of communication in learning groups: a multiprofessional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar M. M. Rigobello

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo relata uma experiência multiprofissional vivenciada durante a realização de um curso de capacitação pedagógica, destinado a profissionais da área da saúde, principalmente dentistas, para atuarem na formação em serviço de pessoal de nível médio. O curso foi desenvolvido em grupo, tendo por tarefa a aprendizagem da pedagogia da problematização. O trabalho foi analisado segundo o referencial teórico de Pichon-Rivière. A análise dos dados permitiu constatar a estreita relação existente entre operatividade e a explicitação dos fantasmas das relações humanas, dificuldades de aprendizagem e distúrbios na comunicação, evidenciando a interdependência entre comunicação e aprendizagem.Este estudio describe una experiencia multiprofesional vivenciada durante la realización de un curso de capacitación pedagógica, dirigido a profesionales del área de la salud, principalmente odontólogos, para actuar en la formación de servicio de personal de nivel medio. El curso fue desarrollado en grupo, teniendo por tarea el aprendizaje de la pedagogía de la problematización. El trabajo fue analizado según el referencial teórico de Pichon-Rivière. El análisis de los datos permitió constatar la estrecha relación existente entre operatividad y la explicitación de los fantasmas de las relaciones humanas, las dificultades de aprendizaje y los disturbios en la comunicación y el aprendizaje.A multiprofessional experience carried out during a pedagogic course for health professionals, most of them dentists, to act on the in-service formation of middle level personnel is reported. The course was developed in group, and its task was to learn the problem posing pedagogy. The study was analyzed according to the Pichon-Rivière's theoretical framework. Data analysis has evidenced the close relationship among operativeness and the explicitness of the human relations ghosts, learning difficulties and communication disorders

  3. Information Overload in Group Communication: From Conversation to Cacophony in the Twitch Chat

    CERN Document Server

    Nematzadeh, Azadeh; Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Flammini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Online communication channels, especially social web platforms, are rapidly replacing traditional ones. Online platforms allow users to overcome physical barriers, enabling worldwide participation. However, the power of online communication bears an important negative consequence --- we are exposed to too much information to process. Too many participants, for example, can turn online public spaces into noisy, overcrowded fora where no meaningful conversation can be held. Here we analyze a large dataset of public chat logs from Twitch, a popular video streaming platform, in order to examine how information overload affects online group communication. We measure structural and textual features of conversations such as user output, interaction, and information content per message across a wide range of information loads. Our analysis reveals the existence of a transition from a conversational state to a cacophony --- a state of overload with lower user participation, more copy-pasted messages, and less informat...

  4. Direct marketing and market communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovović Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct marketing is marketing which demands immediate reply. That reply can be an order, a request for an additional information, a registration, a telephone call or a visit. This work presents direct marketing as the most contemporary method of company communications with environs. A concept of direct marketing is made and aimed for complete identification of existing customers and for finding out potential customers. Mail, printed documents e-mail and new medias are used as modern communications channels. It is especially emphasizes the Internet as an important media.

  5. Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

    2011-02-01

    Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

  6. Organizational Socialization: Processes for New Communication Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawyer, Carol Stringer; Friedrich, Gustav W.

    1998-01-01

    Surveys a national sample of new faculty members in communication departments to identify features of organizational socialization. Examines perceptions of socialization for the job interview and the orientation activities. Finds that amount of time spent in orientation activities is the best predictor of satisfaction upon arrival. (SR)

  7. The Organizational Communication Process in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbayi, Ilhan

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of teachers on the effectiveness of organizational communication in their schools and whether the perceptions differed between teachers in primary and junior high schools as a function of gender, age, marital status, seniority, and rank. Data were collected from a sample of 334 teachers in 63 schools, working in…

  8. Modeling interdependencies between business and communication processes in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigl, Birgit; Wendt, Thomas; Winter, Alfred

    2003-01-01

    The optimization and redesign of business processes in hospitals is an important challenge for the hospital information management who has to design and implement a suitable HIS architecture. Nevertheless, there are no tools available specializing in modeling information-driven business processes and the consequences on the communication between information processing, tools. Therefore, we will present an approach which facilitates the representation and analysis of business processes and resulting communication processes between application components and their interdependencies. This approach aims not only to visualize those processes, but to also to evaluate if there are weaknesses concerning the information processing infrastructure which hinder the smooth implementation of the business processes.

  9. The communication of "pure" group-based anger reduces tendencies toward intergroup conflict because it increases out-group empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H; Postmes, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining a positive long-term intergroup relationship, thereby increasing understanding for the situation (in contrast to the communication of the closely related emotion of contempt). Three experiments demonstrate that the communication of group-based anger indeed reduces destructive conflict intentions compared with (a) a control condition (Experiments 1-2), (b) the communication of group-based contempt (Experiment 2), and (c) the communication of a combination of group-based anger and contempt (Experiments 2-3). Moreover, results from all three experiments reveal that empathy mediated the positive effect of communicating "pure" group-based anger. We discuss the implications of these findings for the theory and practice of communicating emotions in intergroup conflicts.

  10. Group processes and process evaluations in a new treatment setting: inpatient group psychotherapy followed by internet-chat aftercare groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Sedway, Jan; Kordy, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about processes characterizing therapeutic Internet-chat groups, which offer a novel way of providing group therapy over distances. In this study group processes and group evaluations were examined in a treatment setting where face-to-face inpatient groups are followed by chat aftercare groups. For a sample of 121 patients who participated in both treatment modalities, group processes and group evaluations were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling. The group evaluations followed a consistent upward course from the beginning of therapy until the end of chat aftercare. For the process measures Activity and Emotional Reactivity, the initial scores at the beginning of the chat groups were lower than at the end of the inpatient treatment, but higher than at admission. During chat aftercare, Activity and Emotional Reactivity scores increased less than during the inpatient phase, but on average Activity and Emotional Reactivity were higher during Internet-chat aftercare. The predictive value of the acquaintance of the therapist from inpatient treatment and the course of group evaluations during inpatient treatment on the course of group evaluations during chat aftercare were examined.

  11. Smart Video Communication for Social Groups - The Vconect Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursu, M.; Stollenmayer, P.; Williams, D.; Torres, P.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Farber, N.; Geelhoed, E.

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the Vconect project. Vconect (Video Communications for Networked Communities) is a collaborative European research and development project dealing with high-quality enriched video as a medium for mass communication within social communities. The technical capabilities where V

  12. Ambiguity and Communication Effects on Small Group Decision-Making Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Abran J.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that the literature of group studies is controversial and confusing on the effect of communicative variables on small-group decision making. Postulates that two classes of variables (homogeneity and task) moderate the relationship between group communication and group performance. Advances the ambiguity model to reconcile the contradictory…

  13. Linguistic and perceptual processing of communicative cues in Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Saalasti, Satu

    2012-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) belongs to autism spectrum disorders where both verbal and non-verbal communication difficulties are at the core of the impairment. Social communication requires a complex use of affective, linguistic-cognitive and perceptual processes. In the four studies included in the current thesis, some of the linguistic and perceptual factors that are important for face-to-face communication were studied using behavioural methods. In all four studies the results obtained from ind...

  14. Social Identification and Interpersonal Communication in Computer-Mediated Communication: What You Do versus Who You Are in Virtual Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of interpersonal communication and intergroup identification on members' evaluations of computer-mediated groups. Participants (N= 256) in 64 four-person groups interacted through synchronous computer chat. Subgroup assignments to minimal groups instilled significantly greater in-group versus out-group…

  15. GGOS working group on ground networks and communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, M.; Altamimi, Z.; Beck, N.; Forsberg, R.; Gurtner, W.; Kenyon, S.; Behrend, D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Ma, C.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2005-01-01

    Activities of this Working Group include the investigation of the status quo and the development of a plan for full network integration to support improvements in terrestrial reference frame establishment and maintenance, Earth orientation and gravity field monitoring, precision orbit determination, and other geodetic and gravimetric applications required for the long-term observation of global change. This integration process includes the development of a network of fundamental stations with as many co-located techniques as possible, with precisely determined intersystem vectors. This network would exploit the strengths of each technique and minimize the weaknesses where possible. This paper discusses the organization of the working group, the work done to date, and future tasks.

  16. Using Reporting in the Internal Communication Process of the Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Marian Iosif

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Internal communication can be regarded either as a subsistent process of the organization, or as a process helping to decode and more easily understand them. Organizations are based on the internal communication process, because without it, information, ideas could not be sent, the organization’s goals and values could not be built, and its organizational culture would simply not exist. The internal communication process is centered on sending ideas, information in the organization. This is directly proportional with the efficiency of the organization. Internal communication allows for the best decision to be taken, for information to be sent towards the interior of the company, towards the employees, but also has the purpose of strengthening the relations between persons. Internal communication has at its basis the verbal and non-verbal communication, but they have great disadvantages, because: verbal communication has losses of information, depends on the moment of transmission, but also on the receiver.Keywords: report, internal communication, neuro linguistic programming, company

  17. Using Telestrations™ to Illustrate Small Group Communication Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2014-01-01

    This single class activity described here: (1) illustrates the importance of interdependence in groups; (2) can be used to measure group productivity and performance; (3) can encourage groups to engage in group learning; and (4) can facilitate group cohesion for newly formed groups. Students will be working in groups for the majority of their…

  18. Using Telestrations™ to Illustrate Small Group Communication Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2014-01-01

    This single class activity described here: (1) illustrates the importance of interdependence in groups; (2) can be used to measure group productivity and performance; (3) can encourage groups to engage in group learning; and (4) can facilitate group cohesion for newly formed groups. Students will be working in groups for the majority of their…

  19. Bringing in the "CIA": A New Process to Improve Staff Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Rebecca; Mitchell, Jinjer; Loomis, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Nurses consistently express dissatisfaction with the overwhelming amount and rate of change in health care today. Nurse educators identified this as a problem at a 475-bed hospital and developed a process to present changes in information in a new and exciting method. This article reports on the identification and implementation of the new communication model and the lessons learned during the process. A new method for communication dissemination was designed utilizing a "Coordinator Information Advisory Group" concept.

  20. Nanorack Compatible Standardized Data Processing, Communication, and Control Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I study will design and develop a NanoRacks Control Module (NCM) that provides communications, control functions and data processing in a NanoRacks...

  1. 28 CFR 51.30 - Action on communications from individuals or groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Individuals and Groups § 51.30 Action on communications from individuals or groups. (a) If there has already... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action on communications from individuals or groups. 51.30 Section 51.30 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES...

  2. 4th International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Jiasong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Baoju

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together papers presented at the 4th International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems, which provides a venue to disseminate the latest developments and to discuss the interactions and links between these multidisciplinary fields. Spanning topics ranging from Communications, Signal Processing and Systems, this book is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics, researchers and engineers from academia and industry as well as government employees (such as NSF, DOD, DOE, etc).

  3. Artefact specification, design, and production as a process of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per

    1999-01-01

    for the success of communication carry over to the artefact production process. The purpose of the analysis is to provide a conceptual background for the study of various aspects of artefact production, such as design, or the development of computer-based tools for collaborative design, product modelling......The co-operative process of specifying, designing, and producing an artefact is analysed in terms of communication among the agents involved. By way of introduction, I offer a brief analysis of communication in general, outlining conditions for its success, while avoiding simplistic assumptions...

  4. Distributed communication and psychosocial performance in simulated space dwelling groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, R. D.; Brady, J. V.; Hursh, S. R.; Ragusa, L. C.; Rouse, C. O.; Gasior, E. D.

    2005-05-01

    The present report describes the development and application of a distributed interactive multi-person simulation in a computer-generated planetary environment as an experimental test bed for modeling the human performance effects of variations in the types of communication modes available, and in the types of stress and incentive conditions underlying the completion of mission goals. The results demonstrated a high degree of interchangeability between communication modes (audio, text) when one mode was not available. Additionally, the addition of time pressure stress to complete tasks resulted in a reduction in performance effectiveness, and these performance reductions were ameliorated via the introduction of positive incentives contingent upon improved performances. The results obtained confirmed that cooperative and productive psychosocial interactions can be maintained between individually isolated and dispersed members of simulated spaceflight crews communicating and problem-solving effectively over extended time intervals without the benefit of one another's physical presence.

  5. Group processes in medical education: learning from social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Bryan

    2012-02-01

    The clinical workplace in which doctors learn involves many social groups, including representatives of different professions, clinical specialties and workplace teams. This paper suggests that medical education research does not currently take full account of the effects of group membership, and describes a theoretical approach from social psychology, the social identity approach, which allows those effects to be explored. The social identity approach has a long history in social psychology and provides an integrated account of group processes, from the adoption of group identity through a process of self-categorisation, to the biases and conflicts between groups. This paper outlines key elements of this theoretical approach and illustrates their relevance to medical education. The relevance of the social identity approach is illustrated with reference to a number of areas of medical education. The paper shows how research questions in medical education may be usefully reframed in terms of social identity in ways that allow a deeper exploration of the psychological processes involved. Professional identity and professionalism may be viewed in terms of self-categorisation rather than simply attainment; the salience of different identities may be considered as influences on teamwork and interprofessional learning, and issues in communication and assessment may be considered in terms of intergroup biases. Social identity theory provides a powerful framework with which to consider many areas of medical education. It allows disparate influences on, and consequences of, group membership to be considered as part of an integrated system, and allows assumptions, such as about the nature of professional identity and interprofessional tensions, to be made explicit in the design of research studies. This power to question assumptions and develop deeper and more meaningful research questions may be increasingly relevant as the nature and role of the medical profession change

  6. Business Communication: Its Process and Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Joel P.; Branchaw, Bernadine P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the essential difference between the writing process and its product; namely, that the former is a private and unique activity, whereas the latter is an observable artifact that can be publicly evaluated. Argues that even proponents of the process approach to writing cannot escape basing their discussions on products. (JD)

  7. An integrated solution for secure group communication in wide-area networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chevassut, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsudik, Gene [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Many distributed applications require a secure reliable group communication system to provide coordination among the application components. This paper describes a secure group layer (SGL) which bundles a reliable group communication system, a group authorization and access control mechanism, and a group key agreement protocol to provide a comprehensive and practical secure group communication platform. SGL also encapsulates the standard message security services (i.e, confidentiality, authenticity and integrity). A number of challenging issues encountered in the design of SGL are brought to light and experimental results obtained with a prototype implementation are discussed.

  8. Theories in Developing Oral Communication for Specific Learner Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Marham Jupri

    2016-01-01

    The current article presents some key theories most relevant to the development of oral communication skills in an Indonesian senior high school. Critical analysis on the learners' background is employed to figure out their strengths and weaknesses. The brief overview of the learning context and learners' characteristic are used to identify which…

  9. Technology, Talk, and Time: Patterns of Group Communication and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Laura Brown

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of technology is increasingly important in many fields where online and digital communication, collaboration, and production have become more prevalent. Although it is clear that many higher education students come into the classroom with skills involved with consuming technology, they often are much less capable of producing…

  10. Using a Wiki as a Group Communications Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The research explains wiki development and use in industry and potential benefits in higher education as a collaborative communication tool. The findings of a study conducted in a business administration class involving the use of wikis is discussed. The paper concludes with useful guidelines for college instructors incorporating wikis as a…

  11. Digital signal processing in communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Frerking, Marvin E

    1994-01-01

    An engineer's introduction to concepts, algorithms, and advancements in Digital Signal Processing. This lucidly written resource makes extensive use of real-world examples as it covers all the important design and engineering references.

  12. Gaussian Process Techniques for Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Mr Chong; Peters, Dr Gareth; Yuan, Prof Jinhong

    2010-01-01

    Bayesian filtering is a general framework for recursively estimating the state of a dynamical system. Classical solutions such that Kalman filter and Particle filter are introduced in this report. Gaussian processes have been introduced as a non-parametric technique for system estimation from supervision learning. For the thesis project, we intend to propose a new, general methodology for inference and learning in non-linear state-space models probabilistically incorporating with the Gaussian process model estimation.

  13. Context-aware adaptation for group communication support applications with dynamic architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Ismael Bouassida; Chassot, Christophe; Jmaiel, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a refinement-based adaptation approach for the architecture of distributed group communication support applications. Unlike most of previous works, our approach reaches implementable, context-aware and dynamically adaptable architectures. To model the context, we manage simultaneously four parameters that influence Qos provided by the application. These parameters are: the available bandwidth, the exchanged data communication priority, the energy level and the available memory for processing. These parameters make it possible to refine the choice between the various architectural configurations when passing from a given abstraction level to the lower level which implements it. Our approach allows the importance degree associated with each parameter to be adapted dynamically. To implement adaptation, we switch between the various configurations of the same level, and we modify the state of the entities of a given configuration when necessary. We adopt the direct and mediated Producer-...

  14. Computer-Mediated Collaborative Projects: Processes for Enhancing Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin-Bryant, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    Groups are a fundamental part of the business world. Yet, as companies continue to expand internationally, a major challenge lies in promoting effective communication among employees who work in varying time zones. Global expansion often requires group collaboration through computer systems. Computer-mediated groups lead to different communicative…

  15. All-optical signal processing data communication and storage applications

    CERN Document Server

    Eggleton, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the art of optical signal processing technologies and devices. It presents breakthrough solutions for enabling a pervasive use of optics in data communication and signal storage applications. It presents presents optical signal processing as solution to overcome the capacity crunch in communication networks. The book content ranges from the development of innovative materials and devices, such as graphene and slow light structures, to the use of nonlinear optics for secure quantum information processing and overcoming the classical Shannon limit on channel capacity and microwave signal processing. Although it holds the promise for a substantial speed improvement, today’s communication infrastructure optics remains largely confined to the signal transport layer, as it lags behind electronics as far as signal processing is concerned. This situation will change in the near future as the tremendous growth of data traffic requires energy efficient and ful...

  16. 6th International Image Processing and Communications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book collects a series of research papers in the area of Image Processing and Communications which not only introduce a summary of current technology but also give an outlook of potential feature problems in this area. The key objective of the book is to provide a collection of comprehensive references on some recent theoretical development as well as novel applications in image processing and communications. The book is divided into two parts and presents the proceedings of the 6th International Image Processing and Communications Conference (IP&C 2014) held in Bydgoszcz, 10-12 September 2014. Part I deals with image processing. A comprehensive survey of different methods  of image processing, computer vision  is also presented. Part II deals with the telecommunications networks and computer networks. Applications in these areas are considered.

  17. 8th International Image Processing and Communications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book collects a series of research papers in the area of Image Processing and Communications which not only introduce a summary of current technology but also give an outlook of potential feature problems in this area. The key objective of the book is to provide a collection of comprehensive references on some recent theoretical development as well as novel applications in image processing and communications. The book is divided into two parts and presents the proceedings of the 8th International Image Processing and Communications Conference (IP&C 2016) held in Bydgoszcz, Poland September 7-9 2016. Part I deals with image processing. A comprehensive survey of different methods of image processing, computer vision is also presented. Part II deals with the telecommunications networks and computer networks. Applications in these areas are considered.

  18. Crisis Communication Competence in Co-Producing Safety with Citizen Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Laajalahti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore interpersonal communication competence needed by crisis communication and management experts when co-operating with citizen groups in response to emergencies. Moreover, the purpose is to understand how response organizations can further develop this crisis communication competence and so contribute to the functioning of response networks. The research task is approached qualitatively by eliciting crisis communication and management experts’ (n = 33 perceptions of the interpersonal communication competence response organizations needs when co-operating with citizen groups. The data were gathered via an international online questionnaire using a method referred to as “thematic writing” and consist of written responses to open-ended questions on what constitutes the core of crisis communication competence and what aspects of it need more attention. The research findings indicate that co-producing safety with citizen groups demands crisis communication competence related to message production, message reception, and interaction between experts and citizen groups. In addition, the findings clarify what areas of crisis communication competence need to be further developed to facilitate co-operation between experts and citizen groups. However, the authors suggest that crisis communication competence should not be seen solely as a characteristic of individual crisis communicators but approached as a networked and co-created area of competence.

  19. COMMUNICATION IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NEGOTIATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria STOICA (MIHALI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to highlight the way in which communication reflects in the negotiation process. Negotiation is known as the oldest means of communication that leads to the development of human relationships, continuously adjusting them to the values that are imposed when an agreement is desired regarding their observance/enforcement. It is unanimously accepted that negotiation is carried out essentially through communication. During the negotiation process information and knowledge is transmitted and received by the participants. The messages that are thus generated are subsequently used in arguments and counterarguments and serve to the purpose of imposing the transmitter’s interests in the content of the agreements that might be reached with the receiver. The way in which communication is carried out in the process of negotiation helps to reveal feelings and concerns, attitudes, convictions, beliefs, temperament and character traits, taking up an offensive or defensive position, as well as other aspects of the interlocutors’ behavior. The above-mentioned aspects allow stating that during the negotiation process one deals with oral or written communication, non-verbal communication, as well as with the so-called „marketing communication”.

  20. Multidimensional Signal Processing for Sensing & Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    Kemkemian, J. Klare, E. Mokole, S. Seguin, P. Serafin, A. Shackelford , R.F. Tigrek, and T. Webster, Dynamic Waveform Diversity and Design, Final Report of...Seguin, N. Sentenac, A. Shackelford , R.F. Tigrek, Radar Spectrum Engineering and Management, Final Report of Task Group NATO SET-182, in release...Aerospace & Electronic Systems, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 332-346, Jan. 2011. [53] T. Higgins, S.D. Blunt, and A.K. Shackelford , “Space-range adaptive

  1. 77 FR 58576 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers... after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing...

  2. Evaluation of a women group led health communication program in Haryana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Jaswal, Nidhi; Saddi, Anil Kumar

    2017-06-04

    Sakshar Mahila Smooh (SMS) program was launched in rural areas of Haryana in India during 2008. A total of 6788 SMSs, each having 5-10 literate women, were equipped to enhance health communication. We carried out process evaluation of this program as an external agency. After a review of program documents, a random sample survey of Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs), SMS members, and village women was conducted. Out of four divisions of the state, one was randomly chosen, which had five districts. From 330 randomly chosen villages, 283 ANMs, 1164 SMS members, and 1123 village women were interviewed using a semi- structured interview schedule. Program inputs, processes, and outputs were compared in the five districts. Chi square was used for significance test. In the sampled division, out of 2009 villages, 1732 (86%) had functional SMS. In three years, SMS conducted 15036 group meetings, 2795 rallies, 2048 wall writings, and 803 competitions, and 44.5% of allocated budget was utilized. Most ANMs opined that SMSs are better health communicators. SMS members were aware about their roles and responsibilities. Majority of village women reported that SMS carry out useful health education activities. The characteristics of SMS members were similar but program performance was better in districts where health managers were proactive in program planning and monitoring. SMS Program has communicated health messages to majority of rural population, however, better planning & monitoring can improve program performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of Communication and Cohesion in Reducing Social Loafing in Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study examines previously untested variables that influence social loafing in professional and technical communication group projects by determining the influence of communication quality and task cohesion on social loafing. A set-up factors model, which included group size, peer review, project scope, and method of team formation, was also…

  4. Analyzing Effective Communication in Mathematics Group Work: The Role of Visual Mediators and Technical Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Nilsson, Per; Pettersson, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing and designing productive group work and effective communication constitute ongoing research interests in mathematics education. In this article we contribute to this research by using and developing a newly introduced analytical approach for examining effective communication within group work in mathematics education. By using data from…

  5. 76 FR 56244 - Dialpoint Communications Corp., Pacel Corp., Quantum Group, Inc. (The), and Tradequest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... COMMISSION Dialpoint Communications Corp., Pacel Corp., Quantum Group, Inc. (The), and Tradequest... Communications Corp. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended September 30, 2008. It... accurate information concerning the securities of Quantum Group, Inc. (The) because it has not filed any...

  6. Analyzing Effective Communication in Mathematics Group Work: The Role of Visual Mediators and Technical Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Nilsson, Per; Pettersson, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing and designing productive group work and effective communication constitute ongoing research interests in mathematics education. In this article we contribute to this research by using and developing a newly introduced analytical approach for examining effective communication within group work in mathematics education. By using data from…

  7. The Role of Communication in Group Decision-Making Efficacy: A Task-Contingency Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Randy Y.

    1990-01-01

    Argues importance of communication for group decision-making performance and its impact on such performance are function of three task characteristics: structure, information requirement, and evaluation demand. Identifies task circumstances in which group communication can be expected to play role in determining decision-making performance, as…

  8. The Role of Communication and Cohesion in Reducing Social Loafing in Group Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study examines previously untested variables that influence social loafing in professional and technical communication group projects by determining the influence of communication quality and task cohesion on social loafing. A set-up factors model, which included group size, peer review, project scope, and method of team formation, was also…

  9. Using Reframing in the External Communication Process of the Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Marian Iosif

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Any organization, in order to avoid an information attack from the external environment, creates connections with key persons: leaders of opinion, administrators of rival companies, local officials. There are three types of external communication: operational, strategic and promotional. In the communication process there are at least three categories of barriers: language barriers, perception and environment barriers. Using reframing in the external communication allows its adjustment and optimization in order to send a certain message as correctly as possible. Using reframing allows for a certain situation to be approaches from different angles, it allows a better adaptation of the employees‘ behaviours to the environment, of the organization or customers‘ needs.

  10. How to Teach Small Group Decision-Making in a Basic Business Communication Class. 1981 American Business Communication Association National Committee Report. Unit III. Research and Methodology. Teaching Methodology and Concepts Committee--Subcommittee--3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Business Communication Association, Urbana, IL.

    College business communication courses should assist students to learn both how small groups make decisions and how to facilitate small group discussions. Through a unit on small group decision making, the student should be able to understand the role of small groups in organizations, the process of decision making in groups, and the importance of…

  11. Processing of Communication Signal Using Operational Transconductance Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, A.; Ghosh, K.; Mondal, S; Ray, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a signal processing methodology of communication system and realized that circuits using operational transconductance amplifier (OTA). Two important classes of communication circuit, delta modulator and compander have been designed using that procedure. In the first implementation coded pulse modulation system is demonstrated which employ sampling, quantizing and coding to convert analog waveforms to digital signals while the second gives data compression and expansion in ...

  12. Space-Time Processing Applications for Wireless Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Hult, Tommy

    2008-01-01

    Wireless mobile communication networks are rapidly growing at an incredible rate around the world and a number of improved and emerging technologies are seen to be critical to the improved economics and performance of these networks. The technical revolution and continuing growth of mobile radio communication systems has been made possible by extraordinary advances in the related fields of digital computing, high-speed circuit technology, the Internet and, of course, digital signal processing...

  13. An Investigation of Sex Roles, Dimensions of Interpersonal Attraction and Communication Behavior In a Small Group Communication Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Earl E.; McDowell, Carlene E.

    Biological sex, social area, task area, and psychological sex were used as independent variables when 72 high school students in speech communication classes rated themselves and other members of small discussion groups. The results for males, females, and composite groups revealed that psychological sex was a more significant discriminating…

  14. The communication of heritage: Assessment of the communicative process in museums of Asturias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel SUÁREZ SUÁREZ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Communicating of heritage, especially in museums, is a complex process due to certain particularities. Each museum is unique because of the diversity of objects, the discourses generated and the interactions between different audiences. It makes it difficult to build theories which help to understand and improve the communicative process with in the museum context. In this way, from prior studies and through both a direct observation and monitoring of the guided visits, this work shows the analysis of 7 museums from Asturias, focusing on the spatial distribution, the museography and the interventions of the teachers and students. The results show that museums are making an ef-fort to set up multidirectional communication models, doing a coherent design between exhibition spaces, the ob-jects’ museography and the teachers’ explanation. Nevertheless, there are some problems which impede a full con-nection between the school and the museum, which limit the effective communication of the message about herit-age.

  15. Strategic Planning for a Communication Department: Process and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsky, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    Discusses advantages of creating a strategic plan, steps for the strategic-planning process, and application of the strategic-planning process. Suggests that communication departments should develop a strategic plan and use it as a guide in collectively pursuing initiatives related to teaching, research, and service as well as in advocating for…

  16. Communication processes, public administration and performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Musaraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of legal systems in European is one of the most important issues. This process has started by the fact that there are significant differences between the civil law and common law system and between the legal families in it. A law (at domestic or international level should not be viewed against the backdrop of the historical, political, cultural, social and economic context in which they function. In order to shed further light for our readers, we analyze by emphasizing the significant differences between the civil law and common law system on one side and the legal families that are part of the same legal system, either “Civil” or “Common,” on the other side. The Europeanization of law refers to the communization of the law by EU institutions and to a process that aims at creating a common Europe legal system. In the end, either in medium or long term, the Europeanization is contributing to the so-called non-mandatory or soft harmonization of private law. It is in the best interest of the EU to seek adequate judicial instruments to accommodate the massive numbers of laws deriving from different Civil Law and the Common law systems.

  17. Reggio Emilia Inspired Learning Groups: Relationships, Communication, Cognition, and Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Bock; Shaffer, LaShorage; Han, Jisu

    2017-01-01

    A key aspect of the Reggio Emilia inspired curriculum is a learning group approach that fosters social and cognitive development. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a Reggio Emilia inspired learning group approach works for children with and without disabilities. This study gives insight into how to form an appropriate learning group…

  18. Performance of human groups in social foraging: the role of communication in consensus decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew J; Narraway, Claire; Hodgson, Lindsay; Weatherill, Aidan; Sommer, Volker; Sumner, Seirian

    2011-04-23

    Early hominids searched for dispersed food sources in a patchy, uncertain environment, and modern humans encounter equivalent spatial-temporal coordination problems on a daily basis. A fundamental, but untested assumption is that our evolved capacity for communication is integral to our success in such tasks, allowing information exchange and consensus decisions based on mutual consideration of pooled information. Here we examine whether communication enhances group performance in humans, and test the prediction that consensus decision-making underlies group success. We used bespoke radio-tagging methodology to monitor the incremental performance of communicating and non-communicating human groups (small group sizes of two to seven individuals), during a social foraging experiment. We found that communicating groups (n = 22) foraged more effectively than non-communicating groups (n = 21) and were able to reach consensus decisions (an 'agreement' on the most profitable foraging resource) significantly more often than non-communicating groups. Our data additionally suggest that gesticulations among group members played a vital role in the achievement of consensus decisions, and therefore highlight the importance of non-verbal signalling of intentions and desires for successful human cooperative behaviour.

  19. Communication theory and signal processing for transform coding

    CERN Document Server

    El-Shennawy, Khamies Mohammed Ali

    2014-01-01

    This book is tailored to fulfil the requirements in the area of the signal processing in communication systems. The book contains numerous examples, solved problems and exercises to explain the methodology of Fourier Series, Fourier Analysis, Fourier Transform and properties, Fast Fourier Transform FFT, Discrete Fourier Transform DFT and properties, Discrete Cosine Transform DCT, Discrete Wavelet Transform DWT and Contourlet Transform CT. The book is characterized by three directions, the communication theory and signal processing point of view, the mathematical point of view and utility compu

  20. Process Analysis of the CV Group's Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmsson, M

    2000-01-01

    This report will give an explanation of the internal reorganization that has been done because of the necessity to optimize operation in the cooling and ventilation group. The basic structure for the group was defined at the end of 1998. We understood then that change was needed to accommodate the increased workload due to the LHC project. In addition, we face a relatively large turnover of personnel (retirements and some recruitment) with related integration issues to consider. We would also like to implement new approaches in the management of both operations and maintenance. After some running-in problems during the first half of 1999, we realized that much more could be gained with the analysis and the definition and documenting of each single function and generic activity within the group. The authors will explain how this analysis was carried out and give some feedback of the outcome, so far.

  1. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; d'Anterroches, Loïc

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a process-group-contribution Method to model. simulate and synthesize a flowsheet. The process-group based representation of a flowsheet together with a process "property" model are presented. The process-group based synthesis method is developed on the basis of the computer...

  2. 77 FR 52759 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers... to a data communications system.'' The Commission has determined to affirm the ID's finding...

  3. 77 FR 51571 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers, and components thereof. The.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Wireless Communication Devices, Portable...

  4. 78 FR 12785 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of... evidence demonstrates that the existence of portable communication devices using ``touch sensitive...

  5. Digital communication between clinician and patient and the impact on marginalised groups: a realist review in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Caroline J; Atherton, Helen; Watkins, Jocelyn Anstey; Griffiths, Frances

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, the NHS is embracing the use of digital communication technology for communication between clinicians and patients. Policymakers deem digital clinical communication as presenting a solution to the capacity issues currently faced by general practice. There is some concern that these technologies may exacerbate existing inequalities in accessing health care. It is not known what impact they may have on groups who are already marginalised in their ability to access general practice. To assess the potential impact of the availability of digital clinician-patient communication on marginalised groups' access to general practice in the UK. Realist review in general practice. A four-step realist review process was used: to define the scope of the review; to search for and scrutinise evidence; to extract and synthesise evidence; and to develop a narrative, including hypotheses. Digital communication has the potential to overcome the following barriers for marginalised groups: practical access issues, previous negative experiences with healthcare service/staff, and stigmatising reactions from staff and other patients. It may reduce patient-related barriers by offering anonymity and offers advantages to patients who require an interpreter. It does not impact on inability to communicate with healthcare professionals or on a lack of candidacy. It is likely to work best in the context of a pre-existing clinician-patient relationship. Digital communication technology offers increased opportunities for marginalised groups to access health care. However, it cannot remove all barriers to care for these groups. It is likely that they will remain disadvantaged relative to other population groups after their introduction. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  6. Toward a new information infrastructure in health technology assessment: communication, design, process, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikter, Susanna Allgurin; Rehnqvist, Nina; Rosén, Måns; Dahlgren, Helena

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to facilitate effective internal and external communication of an international network and to explore how to support communication and work processes in health technology assessment (HTA). STRUCTURE AND METHODS: European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) connected sixty-four HTA Partner organizations from thirty-three countries. User needs in the different steps of the HTA process were the starting point for developing an information system. A step-wise, interdisciplinary, creative approach was used in developing practical tools. An Information Platform facilitated the exchange of scientific information between Partners and with external target groups. More than 200 virtual meetings were set up during the project using an e-meeting tool. A Clearinghouse prototype was developed with the intent to offering a single point of access to HTA relevant information. This evolved into a next step not planned from the outset: Developing a running HTA Information System including several Web-based tools to support communication and daily HTA processes. A communication strategy guided the communication effort, focusing on practical tools, creating added value, involving stakeholders, and avoiding duplication of effort. Modern technology enables a new information infrastructure for HTA. The potential of information and communication technology was used as a strategic tool. Several target groups were represented among the Partners, which supported collaboration and made it easier to identify user needs. A distinctive visual identity made it easier to gain and maintain visibility on a limited budget.

  7. Employees' communication attitudes and dislike for working in a group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlock, Paul E; Kennedy-Lightsey, Carrie D; Myers, Scott A

    2007-12-01

    This study examined 128 working adults' attitudes of tolerance for disagreement, tolerance for ambiguity, and argumentativeness in relation to their dislike for working in a group. They completed the Revised Tolerance for Disagreement Scale, the Multiple Stimulus Types Ambiguity Tolerance Scale, the Argumentativeness Scale, and the Grouphate Scale. Dislike for working in a group correlated negatively with Tolerance for Disagreement (r = -.28, p Tolerance for Ambiguity (r = -.21, p < .05, r2 = .04), and Argumentativeness (r = -.21, p < .05, r2 = .04). Although these correlations are in the expected directions, magnitudes are very weak; unaccounted for variance should be examined.

  8. Patients’ perspectives on antenatal group consultations: Identifying communicative strengths and weaknesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Matilde Nisbeth; Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary

    consultations, followed by an observation study of group consultations at the same clinic. Results: Analysis identified the value of placing patients together, as it helped to normalize pregnancy which otherwise can be medicalized in the healthcare setting. The sharing of personal experiences had a reassuring......-patient communication, which is increasingly taking place in online patient communities. One novel offline setting which can support patient-patient communication is the group consultation where an individual healthcare professional and a group of patients engage. The purpose of this study is to investigate how patient......-patient communication unfolds in a group consultation with a midwife in order to identify its communicative strengths and weaknesses. Methods: Using a sequential multi-methods design, we performed eight individual interviews with pregnant women from a Danish antenatal clinic about their experiences of two group...

  9. Configuring Web-based Media for Communication in Dispersed Project Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheepers, Rens; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2006-01-01

    meetings, telephone) are not always viable options. Instead, computer-based communication media such as email, project intranets and extranets become surrogate conduits for day-to-day project communication and exchange of project-related content. We examined the effect of different media configurations......We studied how project groups in a pharmaceutical organization communicate project content. The project groups are geographically dispersed, and operate in different time zones. In such project environments, synchronous or geographically bounded modes of communication channels (e.g., face to face...... on the nature of content created by the project groups. We found that configuration decisions, notably the responsibility for content provision and who had access to content, influenced medium choice and the nature of communication taking place via the medium. More substantive content resulted when content...

  10. INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS: A CASE STUDY OF NIRMA GROUP OF COMPANIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ajay Kumar Garg

    2012-01-01

    .... All this is possible with the help of better integrated marketing communications. It is a holistic approach of disseminating information about the company as well as products and services to the myriad people in home and abroad. Nirma Group of companies has chosen an integrated marketing communications so as to reach each and every segment of society and individuals consumer. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT

  11. Learning Intercultural Communication through Group Work Oriented to the World beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Competence in intercultural communication has become a necessity for functioning effectively in our increasingly globalised and multicultural society. This study reports the use of a group project to enhance students' learning of intercultural communication. Participants were from a large undergraduate class in an Australian university. The aim of…

  12. Learning Intercultural Communication through Group Work Oriented to the World beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Competence in intercultural communication has become a necessity for functioning effectively in our increasingly globalised and multicultural society. This study reports the use of a group project to enhance students' learning of intercultural communication. Participants were from a large undergraduate class in an Australian university. The aim of…

  13. Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd Jane

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview Background Communication programmes are well established in nurse education. The focus of programmes is most often on communicating with patients with less attention paid to inter-professional communication or skills essential for working in specialised settings. Although there are many anecdotal reports of communication within the operating theatre, there are few empirical studies. This paper explores communication behaviours for effective practice in the operating theatre as perceived by nurses and serves as a basis for developing training. Methods A focus group interview was conducted with seven experienced theatre nurses from a large London teaching hospital. The interview explored their perceptions of the key as well as unique features of effective communication skills in the operating theatre. Data was transcribed and thematically analysed until agreement was achieved by the two authors. Results There was largely consensus on the skills deemed necessary for effective practice including listening, clarity of speech and being polite. Significant influences on the nature of communication included conflict in role perception and organisational issues. Nurses were often expected to work outside of their role which either directly or indirectly created barriers for effective communication. Perceptions of a lack of collaborative team effort also influenced communication. Conclusion Although fundamental communication skills were identified for effective practice in the operating theatre, there were significant barriers to their use because of confusion over clarity of roles (especially nurses' roles and the implications for teamwork. Nurses were dissatisfied with several aspects of communication. Future studies should explore the breadth and depth of this dissatisfaction in other operating theatres, its impact on morale and importantly

  14. Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Kidd, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview Background Communication programmes are well established in nurse education. The focus of programmes is most often on communicating with patients with less attention paid to inter-professional communication or skills essential for working in specialised settings. Although there are many anecdotal reports of communication within the operating theatre, there are few empirical studies. This paper explores communication behaviours for effective practice in the operating theatre as perceived by nurses and serves as a basis for developing training. Methods A focus group interview was conducted with seven experienced theatre nurses from a large London teaching hospital. The interview explored their perceptions of the key as well as unique features of effective communication skills in the operating theatre. Data was transcribed and thematically analysed until agreement was achieved by the two authors. Results There was largely consensus on the skills deemed necessary for effective practice including listening, clarity of speech and being polite. Significant influences on the nature of communication included conflict in role perception and organisational issues. Nurses were often expected to work outside of their role which either directly or indirectly created barriers for effective communication. Perceptions of a lack of collaborative team effort also influenced communication. Conclusion Although fundamental communication skills were identified for effective practice in the operating theatre, there were significant barriers to their use because of confusion over clarity of roles (especially nurses' roles) and the implications for teamwork. Nurses were dissatisfied with several aspects of communication. Future studies should explore the breadth and depth of this dissatisfaction in other operating theatres, its impact on morale and importantly on patient safety

  15. Interpersonal Communication in the Process of Value Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozek Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Issues of communication, isolation, and education are part of our everyday lives, whether private or professional. The behaviour of the young generation at school and at home has different forms. It demonstrates their actions, way of thinking and feeling. Furthermore, their behaviour expresses their future tendencies. These forms of behaviour are strongly influenced by a lack of communication. As a result, the educational process is made harder, sometimes even impossible. Many experts in ethics, pedagogy and psychology have been paying attention to this issue and have started to evaluate its impact on the young.

  16. The Role of Visual Communication in the Process of Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate; Jancsary, Dennis; Boxenbaum, Eva

    How does visual communication contribute to the emergence and consolidation of new institutions? Previous research on institutionalization has primarily focused on verbal text and neglected its interaction with visual forms of communication. We propose that a more thorough and systematic engagement...... with the ways in which the visual interacts with the verbal may help address existing ‘fault lines’ and ‘blind spots’ in our knowledge about processes of institutionalization. In order to theorize such contribution of a visual perspective, we utilize insights from social semiotics and flesh out a number...

  17. [Communication in the coordination practices of socioeducational groups in family health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Líliam Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the forms of communication used by coordinators in socioeducational groups in family health programmes. This qualitative, descriptive and exploratory study was conducted with 25 coordinators of groups in eight basic health units from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Data collection comprised non-participant observation and semistructured interviews with the coordinators. The theoretical basis for research was Bakhtin's formulations and references on communication and health. The gathered information showed that the body, health and disease triad was communicated in groups through different channels and at different levels of discourse. Our conclusion is that coordinators must adopt an approach that values the expression of participants, not just regarding the physical dimensions of health, but also the life of each participant, and should use various forms of communication to foster dialogical educational actions and means for interaction in groups.

  18. Group Contribution Based Process Flowsheet Synthesis, Design and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Anterroches, Loïc; Gani, Rafiqul

    2005-01-01

    In a group contribution method for pure component property prediction, a molecule is described as a set of groups linked together to form a molecular structure. In the same way, for flowsheet "property" prediction, a flowsheet can be described as a set of process-groups linked together to represent...... provides a contribution to the "property" of the flowsheet, which can be performance in terms of energy consumption, thereby allowing a flowsheet "property" to be calculated, once it is described by the groups. Another feature of this approach is that the process-group attachments provide automatically...... the flowsheet structure. Just as a functional group is a collection of atoms, a process-group is a collection of operations forming an "unit" operation or a set of "unit" operations. The link between the process-groups are the streams similar to the bonds that are attachments to atoms/groups. Each process-group...

  19. Using Electronic Communication Tools in Online Group Activities to Develop Collaborative Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Ebner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using synchronous and asynchronous communication tools in online group activities to develop collaborative learning skills. An experimental study was implemented on a sample of faculty of education students in Mansoura University. The sample was divided into two groups, a group studied…

  20. [Communicative process in the mobile emergency service (SAMU/192)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Maria Claudia; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the communication process among nursing assistants who work in vehicles of the basic life support of the mobile emergency service, in the coordination of this service, and in the unified medical regulation service in a city of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. This descriptive and qualitative research used the thematic content analysis for data analysis. Semi-structured interviews were used for the data collection, which was held in January, 2010. Results show diffculties in communication with both the medical regulation service and the coordination. Among the most highlighted aspects are failures during the radio transmission, lack of qualified radio operators, difficult access to the coordination and lack of supervision by nurses. However, it was possible to detect solutions that aim to improve the communication ana consequently, the service offered by the mobile emergency service.

  1. Ionospheric effects on terrestrial communications :Working Group 3 overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bourdillon

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunications via ionospheric reflection of radio signals of ground-based transmitters are a traditional area. However, this technique is still in use in telecommunications, broadcasting, etc. Various problems have not yet been solved and some of them were studied in Working Group 3 (WG3. Structure of WG 3 and the terms of reference of its four working packages are described in the introductory paper by Zolesi and Cander (2004. Here we describe the main results achieved in COST 271 in the following areas: i large-scale fluctuations of planetary and gravity waves; ii development of a new type of HF channel simulator; iii geomagnetic storm effects on the F1-region ionosphere; iv the sporadic E-layer and spread-F phenomena; v the HF radio wave propagation over northerly paths; vi how to increase the bit rate in ionospheric radio links. In general, substantial progress was achieved but some problems remain open for future investigations.

  2. Digital signal processing for wireless communication using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Gopi, E S

    2016-01-01

    This book examines signal processing techniques used in wireless communication illustrated by using the Matlab program. The author discusses these techniques as they relate to Doppler spread; delay spread; Rayleigh and Rician channel modeling; rake receiver; diversity techniques; MIMO and OFDM -based transmission techniques; and array signal processing. Related topics such as detection theory, link budget, multiple access techniques, and spread spectrum are also covered.   ·         Illustrates signal processing techniques involved in wireless communication using Matlab ·         Discusses multiple access techniques such as Frequency division multiple access, Time division multiple access, and Code division multiple access ·         Covers band pass modulation techniques such as Binary phase shift keying, Differential phase shift keying, Quadrature phase shift keying, Binary frequency shift keying, Minimum shift keying, and Gaussian minimum shift keying.

  3. Space-Time Coding and Signal Processing for MIMO Communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inaki Berenguer; Xiaodong Wang

    2003-01-01

    Rapid growth in mobile computing and other wireless multimedia services is inspiring many research and development activities on high-speed wireless communication systems.Main challenges in this area include the development of efficient coding and modulation signal processing techniques for improving the quality and spectral efficiency of wireless systems. The recently emerged space-time coding and signal processing techniques for wireless communication systems employing multiple transmit and receive antennas offer a powerful paradigm for meeting these challenges. This paper provides an overview on the recent development in space-time coding and signal processing techniques for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication systems. We first review the information theoretic results on the capacities of wireless systems employing multiple transmit and receive antennas. We then describe two representative categories of space-time systems, namely, the BLAST system and the space-time block coding system, both of which have been proposed for next-generation high-speed wireless system. Signal processing techniques for channel estimation and decoding in space-time systems are also discussed. Finally, some other coding and signal processing techniques for wireless systems employing multiple transmit and receive antennas that are currently under intensive research are also briefly touched upon.

  4. GRAS: A Group Reliant Authentication Scheme for V2V Communication in VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auxeeliya Jesudoss

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike fixed or wired networks, mobile ad-hoc networks pose a number of challenges for peer-to-peer communication due to their dynamic nature. This paper presents a novel framework for vehicleto- vehicle communication controlled and facilitated by a group leader within a group of vehicles. A communication model for a pure ad-hoc network is developed with much concern about the privacy and security of the system, for the ease of effective communication between vehicles with a reduced communication and computational overhead when no fixed infrastructure is present in the roadsides. In the proposed protocol, vehicles within a radio frequency form a group. They elect their leader based on some criteria who is then responsible for generating a group public and private key pair. Each vehicle is equipped with a tamper resistant OBU which is capable of generating public/private keys pairs and also self-certifies the generated keys based on one way hash chaining technique. Any vehicle joins the group communicates the group leader, authenticates itself to obtain the group key. Later, the vehicle uses the group key to send traffic related messages to the group leader who is responsible for batch verifying the authenticity of the message from different sources and one hop broadcast them to reduce the computation overhead on message verification in each vehicle. In addition, our scheme adopts the k-anonymity approach to protect user identity privacy, where an attacker cannot associate a message with the sending vehicle. Extensive analysis and simulations show that the proposed architecture provides an efficient and fully self organized system management for car-to-car communication without the need of any external infrastructure.

  5. Perceptions of Teachers about School Administrators’ Effectiveness in Communication Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem A. KÖSTERELİOĞLU

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the perceptions of teachers about the effectiveness of school administrators in communication process. The study was designed in the form of a survey study and during the study descriptive method was used. The subjects of this study were 250 teachers who participated in centralized inservice training program organized by Ministry of National Education (MoNE in 2007-2008 academic year. During the study the data were collected by means of the scale developed by Özmen ve Yörük (2007 and the scale has four factors as the administrators’ interest, communication method, integration with environment and focusing on teaching. To analyze the data collected, frequency, percentage, mean values were calculated and t- test and “Kruskal Wallis H tests were used. The findings of the study indicated that teachers’ perceptions about the effectiveness of school administrators in communication process have the highest mean score in the administrators’ interest dimension and communication method, integration with environment and focusing on teaching dimensions follow this dimension. The findings also indicated that teachers perceptions show significant difference in favour of female teachers when genders of teachers are concerned.

  6. A Multistage Control Mechanism for Group-Based Machine-Type Communications in an LTE System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When machine-type communication (MTC devices perform the long-term evolution (LTE attach procedure without bit rate limitations, they may produce congestion in the core network. To prevent this congestion, the LTE standard suggests using group-based policing to regulate the maximum bit rate of all traffic generated by a group of MTC devices. However, previous studies on the access point name-aggregate maximum bit rate based on group-based policing are relatively limited. This study proposes a multistage control (MSC mechanism to process the operations of maximum bit rate allocation based on resource-use information. For performance evaluation, this study uses a Markov chain with to analyze MTC application in a 3GPP network. Traffic flow simulations in an LTE system indicate that the MSC mechanism is an effective bandwidth allocation method in an LTE system with MTC devices. Experimental results show that the MSC mechanism achieves a throughput 22.5% higher than that of the LTE standard model using the group-based policing, and it achieves a lower delay time and greater long-term fairness as well.

  7. Using Group Decision Support Systems in Teaching the Small Group Communication Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Craig R.

    The nature of group decision support systems (GDSS), its key advantages, and the experience of using it with several classes help illustrate that this type of computer technology can serve an important function in supplementing instruction of the small group course. The primary purpose of a GDSS is to improve group decision-making and…

  8. Seasonal communication about dengue fever in educational groups in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Líliam Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; Fernandes, Maria Teresinha de Oliveira; Aquino, Ana Luiza de

    2011-12-01

    To analyze how seasonal communication for dengue control and prevention is conveyed in educational peer groups of Family Health teams. An exploratory and descriptive qualitative study was performed with 25 coordinators of peer education groups, distributed among eight basic health units of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil. Data collection occurred from March to June 2009, by non-participant observation and semi-structured interviews with coordinators. Content analysis and the principal theories in health communication were utilized in data interpretation. Three thematic units were identified: seasonal communication; subjects discussed and information sources about dengue; and information versus communication for action. Dengue prevention and control actions were principally discussed in groups during outbreaks, based on actions previously programmed by the Ministry of Health. The topics addressed focused on epidemiology, life cycle, modes of transmission, symptoms, prevention, domiciliary visits by zoonosis control units and vaccination for dengue. The predominant communication action is information conveyance by the coordinator, centered on a behavioralist and prescriptive discourse. Communication practices focused on dialogue is recommended, allowing the coordinator and group members freedom in regards to emergent issues in the group, so they learn to recognize and reflexively discuss them in context.

  9. Using Web-Based, Group Communication Systems to Support Case Study Learning at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Rourke

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the capacity of Web-based, group communication systems to support case-based teaching and learning. Eleven graduate students studying at a distance were divided into three groups to collaborate on a case study using either a synchronous voice, an asynchronous voice, or a synchronous text communication system. Participants kept a detailed log of the time they spent on various activities, wrote a 1,500-word reflection on their experience, and participated in a group interview. Analysis of these data reveals that each group supplemented the system that had been assigned to them with additional communication systems in order to complete the project. Each of these systems were used strategically: email was used to share files and arrange meetings, and synchronous voice systems were used to brainstorm and make decisions. Learning achievement was high across groups and students enjoyed collaborating with others on a concrete task.

  10. iBiology: communicating the process of science

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    The Internet hosts an abundance of science video resources aimed at communicating scientific knowledge, including webinars, massive open online courses, and TED talks. Although these videos are efficient at disseminating information for diverse types of users, they often do not demonstrate the process of doing science, the excitement of scientific discovery, or how new scientific knowledge is developed. iBiology (www.ibiology.org), a project that creates open-access science videos about biolo...

  11. A study of the effect of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel have been investigated. Software and hardware simulations have been used to determine the effects of channel group delay variations with frequency on the bit error rate for a 220 Mbps SMSK channel. These simulations indicate that group delay distortions can significantly degrade the bit error rate performance. The severity of the degradation is dependent on the amount, type, and spectral location of the group delay distortion.

  12. Dynamic systems and inferential information processing in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Renninger, LeeAnn

    2002-12-01

    Research in human communication on an ethological basis is almost obsolete. The reasons for this are manifold and lie partially in methodological problems connected to the observation and description of behavior, as well as the nature of human behavior itself. In this chapter, we present a new, non-intrusive, technical approach to the analysis of human non-verbal behavior, which could help to solve the problem of categorization that plagues the traditional approaches. We utilize evolutionary theory to propose a new theory-driven methodological approach to the 'multi-unit multi-channel modulation' problem of human nonverbal communication. Within this concept, communication is seen as context-dependent (the meaning of a signal is adapted to the situation), as a multi-channel and a multi-unit process (a string of many events interrelated in 'communicative' space and time), and as related to the function it serves. Such an approach can be utilized to successfully bridge the gap between evolutionary psychological research, which focuses on social cognition adaptations, and human ethology, which describes every day behavior in an objective, systematic way.

  13. THE ROLE OF THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS WITHIN THE MANAGEMENT ACTIONS IN THE POLITICAL AND BUSINESS WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Veljanovska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The model of communication aims to improve the internal perception of the employees about their working institutions, and improve the external perception of the institution in the eyes of co-workers and the general population. The analysis of the model of communication in the political world and the business world has its common aspects and some differences. Namely, it is a process that is the basis of creating good relationships and accomplishment in the institution of the working process at a high level. Any gap in communication directly reflects the quality of decision making and creating inappropriate image of the institution. Political institutions are exposed to further analysis by government institutions and the media, based on that, the flow of information it is required to be at a high level and made the basis of preset parameters of successful communication. Business world, on the other hand, is also necessary to take care of selecting the appropriate model of communication because it is subject to regular monitoring by the target groups according to their interest. The success of communication indicates the successful realization of the mission and vision of the institutions (political and business.

  14. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PRIMARY STUDENTS' SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS AND LEVELS OF USING INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESRA AÇIKGÜL FIRAT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s technology provides accessing almost all kinds of information. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT can be located in all the steps of the process of scientific research. Therefore, it is considered that technology has major contribution to the development of scientific process skills. Our study aims at determining the relationship between primary students' science process skills and levels of using ICT. The study group consisted of 487 primary students attending to 5 randomly selected schools at urban of the province of Adiyaman in 2009–2010 academic year. "Science Process Skills Test" and "Use of Information Communication Technologies Scale" were used in order to collect the data. The research, is a quantitative study carried out by using a correlational survey method. It was found that a significant relationship between students' science process skills and levels of using ICT according to the Pearson correlation coefficient.

  15. First International Conference Multimedia Processing, Communication and Computing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guru, Devanur

    2013-01-01

    ICMCCA 2012 is the first International Conference on Multimedia Processing, Communication and Computing Applications and the theme of the Conference is chosen as ‘Multimedia Processing and its Applications’. Multimedia processing has been an active research area contributing in many frontiers of today’s science and technology. This book presents peer-reviewed quality papers on multimedia processing, which covers a very broad area of science and technology. The prime objective of the book is to familiarize readers with the latest scientific developments that are taking place in various fields of multimedia processing and is widely used in many disciplines such as Medical Diagnosis, Digital Forensic, Object Recognition, Image and Video Analysis, Robotics, Military, Automotive Industries, Surveillance and Security, Quality Inspection, etc. The book will assist the research community to get the insight of the overlapping works which are being carried out across the globe at many medical hospitals and instit...

  16. Computer-Mediated Communication and Virtual Groups: Applications to Interethnic Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Joseph B.

    2009-01-01

    This essay concerns applications of computer-mediated communication (CMC) research in groups toward the enhancement of relations between members of potentially hostile ethnopolitical groups. The characteristics of CMC offer several possible means of facilitating the reduction of animosity through online contact among intergroup constituents. The…

  17. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  18. Teachers and Facebook: Using Online Groups to Improve Students' Communication and Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende da Cunha, Fernando, Jr.; van Kruistum, Claudia; van Oers, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on how teachers, from different cities in Brazil, used groups on Facebook and how communication between teachers and students was affected by using such groups. This study is framed under the Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) perspective, and is conceived from a methodological background that invites participants to…

  19. Social influence in computer-mediated communication : The effects of anonymity on group behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Sakhel, K; de Groot, D

    2001-01-01

    Two studies examined hypotheses derived from a Social Identity model of Deindividuation Effects (SIDE) as applied to social influence in computer-mediated communication (CMC) in groups. This model predicts that anonymity can increase social influence if a common group identity is salient. In a first

  20. Teachers and Facebook: Using Online Groups to Improve Students' Communication and Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende da Cunha, Fernando, Jr.; van Kruistum, Claudia; van Oers, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on how teachers, from different cities in Brazil, used groups on Facebook and how communication between teachers and students was affected by using such groups. This study is framed under the Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) perspective, and is conceived from a methodological background that invites participants to…

  1. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  2. TLC II. Talking, Listening, Communicating II. A Curriculum Guide for Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Carol Lou; Bormaster, Jeff

    This workbook provides affective education activities in building human relations skills in elementary and secondary school students in small discussion groups. Goals of the talking-listening-communicating (TLC) groups are: to develop positive regard for individual differences; to build a sense of belonging; to foster horizontal, nonauthoritative…

  3. An Efficient Causal Group Communication Protocol for Free Scale Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory Evropeytsev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In peer-to-peer (P2P overlay networks, a group of n (≥2 peer processes have to cooperate with each other. Each peer sends messages to every peer and receives messages from every peer in a group. In group communications, each message sent by a peer is required to be causally delivered to every peer. Most of the protocols designed to ensure causal message order are designed for networks with a plain architecture. These protocols can be adapted to use in free scale and hierarchical topologies; however, the amount of control information is O(n, where n is the number of peers in the system. Some protocols are designed for a free scale or hierarchical networks, but in general they force the whole system to accomplish the same order viewed by a super peer. In this paper, we present a protocol that is specifically designed to work with a free scale peer-to-peer network. By using the information about the network’s architecture and by representing message dependencies on a bit level, the proposed protocol ensures causal message ordering without enforcing super peers order. The designed protocol is simulated and compared with the Immediate Dependency Relation and the Dependency Sequences protocols to show its lower overhead.

  4. The Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience: building communication skills in the clinical reasoning context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopasek, Lyuba; Kelly, Kevin V; Bylund, Carma L; Wenderoth, Suzanne; Storey-Johnson, Carol

    2014-07-01

    Students are rarely taught communication skills in the context of clinical reasoning training. The purpose of this project was to combine the teaching of communication skills using SPs with clinical reasoning exercises in a Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience (GOSCE) to study feasibility of the approach, the effect on learners' self-efficacy and attitude toward learning communication skills, and the effect of providing multiple sources of immediate, collaborative feedback. GOSCE sessions were piloted in Pediatrics and Medicine clerkships with students assessing their own performance and receiving formative feedback on communication skills from peers, standardized patients (SPs), and faculty. The sessions were evaluated using a retrospective pre/post-training questionnaire rating changes in self-efficacy and attitudes, and the value of the feedback. Results indicate a positive impact on attitudes toward learning communication skills and self-efficacy regarding communication in the clinical setting. Also, learners considered feedback by peers, SPs, and faculty valuable in each GOSCE. The GOSCE is an efficient and learner-centered method to attend to multiple goals of teaching communication skills, clinical reasoning, self-assessment, and giving feedback in a formative setting. The GOSCE is a low-resource, feasible strategy for experiential learning in communication skills and clinical reasoning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crossing the Communication Barrier: Facilitating Communication in Mixed Groups of Deaf and Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Carol; Foster, Susan; Long, Gary; Stinson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of introductory technical courses such as statistics face numerous challenges in the classroom, including student motivation and mathematical background, and difficulties in interpreting numerical results in context. Cooperative learning through small groups addresses many such challenges, but students for whom spoken English is not their…

  6. COMMUNICATION COMPONENT FORMATION OF TEACHERS’ COMPETENCE IN THE MENTORING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera T. Sopegina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the integration process and special pedagogical competence in solving production and pedagogical challenges in the educational organizations and production enterprises engaged in the training of mentors.Methods. The methods involve the analysis of psycho-pedagogical and methodological literature on the issue; analysis of the Federal State Educational Standards and professional standards; modeling of processes.Results and scientific novelty. The problems of formation of communicative competence in the preparation of teachers are considered. The characteristic of the formation levels of mentoring such as «mentor-formal»; «mentor-theoretician», a «mentor-coach»; «mentor-adviser»; «mentor-professional» are given. The pedagogical potential of the phenomenon of «mentoring» is disclosed; an innovative way of mentoring within the competence approach is shown. The integrative activity of the teacher in solving production and pedagogical problems is analysed.Practical significance. The results can be used by trainers and mentors in the formation of communicative competence of students. The implementation of integration model of pedagogical and production tasks will provide the formation of communicative competence as part of vocational training. Using the obtained results can improve the effectiveness of vocational teacher education.

  7. The ethics of communicative process: Discourse, otherness, and public space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Cristina Salgueiro Marques

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reflect on ethical-moral questions that are present in different dimensions of the contemporary communicative processes. At a first moment, I explain how Habermas defines the concept of discourse ethics witch is capable to allow the articulation and negotiation among the plurality of points of view and citizens in the current societies. In addition, I confer prominence to the role media play in the interconnection of different audiences and dispersed speeches in order to guarantee possibilities of renewal of collective debates in the public sphere. I therefore propose that an ethics of communication instead of be restrained to media devices and its operative dynamics, should consider their connections with citizens’ concrete practices and experiences.

  8. Digital Signal Processing for Optical Coherent Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xu

    In this thesis, digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are studied to compensate for physical layer impairments in optical fiber coherent communication systems. The physical layer impairments investigated in this thesis include optical fiber chromatic dispersion, polarization demultiplexing......, light sources frequency and phase offset and phase noise. The studied DSP algorithms are considered as key building blocks in digital coherent receivers for the next generation of optical communication systems such as 112-Gb/s dual polarization (DP) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) optical...... spectrum narrowing tolerance 112-Gb/s DP-QPSK optical coherent systems using digital adaptive equalizer. The demonstrated results show that off-line DSP algorithms are able to reduce the bit error rate (BER) penalty induced by signal spectrum narrowing. Third, we also investigate bi...

  9. Probability and Random Processes With Applications to Signal Processing and Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Miller and Childers have focused on creating a clear presentation of foundational concepts with specific applications to signal processing and communications, clearly the two areas of most interest to students and instructors in this course. It is aimed at graduate students as well as practicing engineers, and includes unique chapters on narrowband random processes and simulation techniques. The appendices provide a refresher in such areas as linear algebra, set theory, random variables, and more. Probability and Random Processes also includes applications in digital communications, informati

  10. Time Reversal Signal Processing in Communications - A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A W; Candy, J V; Poggio, A J

    2002-01-30

    A typical communications channel is subjected to a variety of signal distortions, including multipath, that corrupt the information being transmitted and reduce the effective channel capacity. The mitigation of the multipath interference component is an ongoing concern for communication systems operating in complex environments such as might be experienced inside buildings, urban environments, and hilly or heavily wooded areas. Communications between mobile units and distributed sensors, so important to national security, are dependent upon flawless conveyance of information in complex environments. The reduction of this multipath corruption necessitates better channel equalization, i.e., the removal of channel distortion to extract the transmitted information. But, the current state of the art in channel equalization either requires a priori knowledge of the channel or the use of a known training sequence and adaptive filtering. If the ''assumed'' model within the equalization processor does not at least capture the dominant characteristics of the channel, then the received information may still be highly distorted and possibly useless. Also, the processing required for classical equalization is demanding in computational resources. To remedy this situation, many techniques have been investigated to replace classical equalization. Such a technique, the subject of this feasibility study, is Time Reversal Signal Processing (TRSP). Multipath is particularly insidious and a major factor in the deterioration of communication channels. Unlike most other characteristics that corrupt a communications channel, the detrimental effects of multipath cannot be overcome by merely increasing the transmitted power. Although the power in a signal diminishes as a function of the distance between the transmitter and receiver, multipath further degrades a signal by creating destructive interference that results in a loss of received power in a very localized area

  11. Effectiveness of communication strategies for deaf or hard of hearing workers in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In group settings, background noise and an obstructed view of the speaker are just a few of the issues that can make workplace communication difficult for an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing. Accommodation strategies such as amplification of the speaker's voice or the use of text-based alternatives exist to address these issues. However, recent studies have shown that there are still unmet needs related to workplace communication in group settings for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Identify the most common strategies used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve communication in group settings and gauge the perceived effectiveness of those strategies. An online survey was conducted with individuals who self-identified as deaf or hard of hearing. The survey presented specific communication strategies based on three functional approaches (aural/oral, text, visual). The strategies applied to both receptive and expressive communication in five different meeting types ranging in size and purpose. 161 adults (age 22-90 yrs.) with limited hearing ability completed the survey. Text-based strategies were typically the least frequently used strategies in group settings, yet they ranked high in perceived effectiveness for receptive and expressive communication. Those who used an interpreter demonstrated a strong preference for having a qualified interpreter present in the meeting rather than an interpreter acting remotely. For expressive communication, participants in general preferred to use their own voice or signing abilities and ranked those strategies as highly effective. A more accessible workplace for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing would incorporate more ubiquitous text-based strategy options. Also, qualified interpreters, when used, should be present in the meeting for maximum effectiveness.

  12. On Couple-Group Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Communication and Input Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-hao Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the couple-group consensus problems of the multiagent networks with the influence of communication and input time delays. Based on the frequency-domain theory, some algebraic criteria are addressed analytically. From the results, it is found that the input time delays and the coupling strengths between agents of the systems play a crucial role in reaching group consensus. The convergence of the system is independent of the communication delays, but it will affect the convergence rate of the system. Finally, several simulated examples are provided to verify the validity and correctness of our theoretical results.

  13. The Importance of Group Process in Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Margaret Patton; Themis, Sharon

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the Gestalt therapy group process and its roots in theory and therapeutic orientation. Indicates that the process itself, particularly the role of the therapist, is a key factor in the intensity and power of the group experience for the participants. (Author)

  14. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  15. Le Groupe de Recherche espagnol MDCS (Médiation Dialectique de la Communication Sociale)

    OpenAIRE

    Piñuel Raigada, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Depuis sa fondation il y a dix ans, le Groupe MDCS (Médiation Dialectique de la Communication Sociale) s’est engagé dans un Programme de recherche axé d’une part sur l’Épistémologie de la Communication, et d’autre part sur l’étude de l’enseignement et la recherche en Théorie de la Communication/Information dans les universités d’Europe et d’Amérique latine. Le Programme axé sur l’Épistémologie de la Communication s’appuie sur les travaux initiés les années 80 avec l’ouvrage collectif « Episte...

  16. Improving Group Processes in Transdisciplinary Case Studies for Sustainability Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Ralf; Crott, Helmut W.; Mieg, Harald A.; Scholz, Roland W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Deficient group processes such as conformity pressure can lead to inadequate group decisions with negative social, economic, or environmental consequences. The study aims to investigate how a group technique (called INFO) improves students' handling of conformity pressure and their collective judgments in the context of a…

  17. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Choi, Hoon-Seok

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  18. Motivated information processing, social tuning, and group creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.; Choi, H.-S.

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which groups are creative has wide implications for their overall performance, including the quality of their problem solutions, judgments, and decisions. To further understanding of group creativity, we integrate the motivated information processing in groups model (De Dreu, Nijstad,

  19. 78 FR 24775 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... United States after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of ] infringement of certain claims of...

  20. All-optical signal processing technique for secure optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng-chen; Su, Bing; Ye, Ya-lin; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Shao-feng; Duan, Tao; Duan, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Secure optical communication technologies are important means to solve the physical layer security for optical network. We present a scheme of secure optical communication system by all-optical signal processing technique. The scheme consists of three parts, as all-optical signal processing unit, optical key sequence generator, and synchronous control unit. In the paper, all-optical signal processing method is key technology using all-optical exclusive disjunction (XOR) gate based on optical cross-gain modulation effect, has advantages of wide dynamic range of input optical signal, simple structure and so on. All-optical XOR gate composed of two semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) is a symmetrical structure. By controlling injection current, input signal power, delay and filter bandwidth, the extinction ratio of XOR can be greater than 8dB. Finally, some performance parameters are calculated and the results are analyzed. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can be achieved over 10Gbps optical signal encryption and decryption, which is simple, easy to implement, and error-free diffusion.

  1. A New Scalable and Reliable Cost Effective Key Agreement Protocol for Secure Group Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Begum

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In a heterogeneous environment, for a secure multicast communication, the group members have to share a secret key which is used to encrypt/decrypt the secret messages among the members. The Secure Group Communication of large scale multicast group in a dynamic environment is more complex than securing one-to-one communication due to the inherent scalability issue of group key management. Since the group members are dynamic in nature such as joining or leaving the group, the key updating is performed among the valid members without interrupting the multicast session so that non group members can’t have access to the future renewed keys. Approach: The main aim is to develop a scheme which can reduce the cost of computational overhead, number of messages needed during the time of key refreshing and the number of keys stored in servers and members. The cost of establishing the key and renewal is proportionate to the size of the group and subsequently fetches a bottleneck performance in achieving scalability. By using a Cluster Based Hierarchical Key Distribution Protocol, the load of key management can be shared among dummy nodes of a cluster without revealing the group messages to them. Results: Especially, the existing model incurs a very less computational and communication overhead during renewal of keys. The proposed scheme yields better scalability because of the fact that the Key computational cost, the keys stored in key server and numbers of rekey-messages needed are very less. Conclusion: Our proposed protocol is based on Elliptic curve cryptography algorithm to form secure group key, even with smaller key size, it is capable of providing more security. This protocol can be used both in wired or wireless environments.

  2. A survey of ring-building network protocols suitable for command and control group communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeih, Ahmed; Yurcik, William

    2005-05-01

    Multicasting is the enabling technology for group communication. However, network-layer multicasting (e.g., IP multicast) has not been widely adopted more than 10 years of its invention due to the concerns related to deployment, scalability and network management. Application-layer multicast (ALM) has been proposed as an alternative for IP multicast. In ALM, group communications take place on an overlay network in which each edge corresponds to a direct unicast path between two group members. ALM protocols differ in, among other aspects, the topology of the underlying overlay network (e.g., tree, mesh or ring). Ring-based ALM protocols have the advantages of providing a constant node degree, and enabling the implementation of reliable and totally-ordered message delivery through the use of a ring with a token that contains ordering and flow control information. In addition, a ring overlay network topology is inherently reliable to single node failures. In this paper, we provide a survey and a taxonomy of several ring-building group communication protocols. Investigating the major characteristics of ring-building network protocols is an important step towards understanding which of them are suitable for command and control group communications.

  3. [Effects of a psychological group intervention on neuropsychiatric symptoms and communication in Alzheimer's dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Terworth, C; Probst, P

    2012-07-01

    Outcomes of a multicomponent psychological intervention designed for the treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms, communicative and emotional deficits in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's dementia were evaluated in a controlled trial. Core components of the program were milieu therapy interventions and music therapy. A total of 49 patients were involved into a pre-post design. The treatment group (n=26) received the program for 6 months, while controls (n=23) participated in standard occupational therapy. Statistical analyses included t-tests, calculation of effect sizes, and two-way analyses of variance. After 6 months, the treatment group showed clear, partly significant improvement of anxiety, agitation, aggression, and apathy as well as social communication, emotional competence and activity levels relative to controls. The program has the potential to increase psychological well-being and to improve communication in patients with Alzheimer's dementia.

  4. Configuring Web-based Media for Communication in Dispersed Project Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheepers, Rens; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2006-01-01

    meetings, telephone) are not always viable options. Instead, computer-based communication media such as email, project intranets and extranets become surrogate conduits for day-to-day project communication and exchange of project-related content. We examined the effect of different media configurations...... on the nature of content created by the project groups. We found that configuration decisions, notably the responsibility for content provision and who had access to content, influenced medium choice and the nature of communication taking place via the medium. More substantive content resulted when content...... provision was decentralized and access to content restricted to specific sub-groups. Content providers resorted to superficial use of "openly configured" Web-based media or used email if unsure who could access content, or if they suspected that recipients might lack the background to understand...

  5. MEGCOM: Min-Energy Group COMmunication in Multi-hop Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Kai; Luo, Jun; Liu, Yang; Huang, Liusheng

    2012-01-01

    Given the increasing demand from wireless applications, designing energy-efficient group communication protocols is of great importance to multi-hop wireless networks. A group communication session involves a set of member nodes, each of them needs to send a certain number of data packets to all other members. In this paper, we consider the problem of building a shared multicast tree spanning the member nodes such that the total energy consumption of a group communication session using the shared multicast tree is minimized. Since this problem was proven as NP-complete, we propose, under our Min-Energy Group COMmunication (MEGCOM) framework, three distributed approximation algorithms with provable approximation ratios. When the transmission power of each wireless node is fixed, our first two algorithms have the approximation ratios of O(ln(\\Delta+ 1)) and O(1), respectively, where \\Delta is the maximum node degree in the network. When the transmission power of each wireless node is adjustable, our third algor...

  6. Using Professional Teaching Assistants to Support Large Group Business Communication Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieber, Lloyd J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author reports on the use of classroom instructors and full-time professional teaching assistants called "course tutors" for teaching business communication to large groups at an undergraduate university. The author explains how to recruit course tutors, what course tutors do in the classroom, and the advantages and…

  7. A quality of experience testbed for video-mediated group communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.R.; Gunkel, S.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Video-Mediated group communication is quickly moving from the office to the home, where network conditions might fluctuate. If we are to provide a software component that can, in real-time, monitor the Quality of Experience (QoE), we would have to carry out extensive experiments under different vary

  8. A Systematic Review of Small-Group Communication in Post-Secondary Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Namsook

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review establishes a comprehensive understanding of research trends and the findings of current studies that focus on small-group communication in post-secondary online courses. The review includes 18 journal articles which are categorised and summarised on the basis of their common themes. This review finds that a majority of the…

  9. Group Communication and Critical Thinking Competence Development Using a Reality-Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The presented merger and acquisition classroom exercise is based on a real yet incomplete transaction transpiring during the period of the class. The approach enables adult students to apply their previously acquired business experience to a strategic analysis project facilitating the development of group communication, critical thinking, and…

  10. Investigating the Impact of Mediated Learning Experiences on Cooperative Peer Communication during Group Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert; Dinos, Sokratis

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how structured Mediated Learning Experiences may improve peer-cooperative communication within problem-solving task exercises. Two groups (n = 22) of Year 8 students (mean age 13 +/- 5 months) were randomly selected to participate in this study. The study began with two one-hour sessions of activity-based problem-solving…

  11. Gladwell and Group Communication: Using "The Tipping Point" as a Supplemental Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Blair W.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity using Malcolm Gladwell's "The Tipping Point" as a supplemental text in an undergraduate group communication course. This book will help stimulate conversation and promote easy avenues for classroom discussion. In addition to weekly quizzes over each chapter to help facilitate rich classroom discussions, the…

  12. Making Foundational Assumptions Transparent: Framing the Discussion about Group Communication and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Renee A.; Seibold, David R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to augment Dean Hewes's (1986, 1996) intriguing bracketing and admirable larger effort to "return to basic theorizing in the study of group communication" by making transparent the foundational, and debatable, assumptions that underlie those models. Although these assumptions are addressed indirectly by Hewes, the…

  13. An Examination into How Group Performance is influenced by Various Communication Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    effect on communication quality and team performance (Adelman, Christian, Gualtieri , & Bresnick, 1998). An additional limitation is that groups only...option for each issue. 2) Indicate rationale for choosing each option. 33 Bibliography Adelman, L., Christian, M., Gualtieri , J., & Bresnick, T

  14. The Impact of Belonging Groups in an Institutional Merger Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    for the discussions and worker's disaffection and anxieties about job security were brought to light in the research process. The analysis of the research process is informed by psychodynamic system theory and focuses on individual and group processes, and on the leaders' roles in the merger process. This leads......This paper discusses challenges in a reorganisation process where the action research process uncovered the attempts of a small group taking care of the organisational containment related to the whole system. A Danish municipal government decided to merge a branch of its public library and a public...... service centre to optimise community services and extend the use of online services. All affected employees were involved in work groups to discuss the reorganisation and their future tasks. Growing tensions between staff and leaders caused by the failure to establish a trusted framework...

  15. Diversity attitudes and group knowledge processing in multicultural organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    , based on a sample consisting of 489 members of multicultural academic departments, we set out to investigate the relationship between openness to diversity (linguistic, social category, value, and informational) and group knowledge processing (knowledge location, knowledge needed, bring knowledge...

  16. Evolving homogeneous neurocontrollers for a group of heterogeneous robots: coordinated motion, cooperation, and acoustic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuci, Elio; Ampatzis, Christos; Vicentini, Federico; Dorigo, Marco

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a simulation model in which artificial evolution is used to design homogeneous control structures and adaptive communication protocols for a group of three autonomous simulated robots. The agents are required to cooperate in order to approach a light source while avoiding collisions. The robots are morphologically different: Two of them are equipped with infrared sensors, one with light sensors. Thus, the two morphologically identical robots should take care of obstacle avoidance; the other one should take care of phototaxis. Since all of the agents can emit and perceive sound, the group's coordination of actions is based on acoustic communication. The results of this study are a proof of concept: They show that dynamic artificial neural networks can be successfully synthesized by artificial evolution to design the neural mechanisms required to underpin the behavioral strategies and adaptive communication capabilities demanded by this task. Postevaluation analyses unveil operational aspects of the best evolved behavior. Our results suggest that the building blocks and the evolutionary machinery detailed in the article should be considered in future research work dealing with the design of homogeneous controllers for groups of heterogeneous cooperating and communicating robots.

  17. Social Networking and Pedagogical Variations: An Integrated Approach for Effective Interpersonal and Group Communications Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim

    2012-01-01

    Electronic communication and social networking are effective and useful tools in the process of teaching and learning and have increasingly improved the quality of students' learning outcomes in higher education in recent years. The system encourages and supports students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities and…

  18. Acoustic environment challenges for the unique communication conditions in group learning classes in elementary school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Louis; Lubman, David; Pearsons, Karl

    2005-04-01

    Unlike the traditional ``sage-on-the-stage'' configuration of many K-12 classrooms, the group learning or ``guide-on-the-side'' configuration does not involve communication between a teacher in front of a seated class of 20 to 30 students. Instead, it can involve, most of the time, communication between the teacher and each of several small groups of students interacting, aurally, with each other. To maintain the desired 15 dB signal-to-noise ratio intended as the rationale for the ANSI standard, S12.60-2002 on classroom acoustics, the ``noise'' heard by participants in one of the groups is likely to include the speech levels generated by the participants in the other groups as well as the background noise in the unoccupied classroom. Thus, specification of the speech level within (i.e. the ``signal''), and between (i.e. part of the ``noise'') the learning groups, must be considered. Data available to evaluate these speech levels are reviewed and possible models considered to account for the Lombard effect for voice levels of both the teacher and the students. Some of the gaps in these data are suggested as a challenge to stimulate further studies on speech levels of teachers and students in a wide range of communication conditions.

  19. The Expert Group Work Supervision Process: Apperception, Actions, and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Deborah; Atieno Okech, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    The researchers conducted a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. This article's purpose is to report results that inform intentional practice and illustrate supervision interventions for group work supervisors. Results indicated that participants experienced an interactive…

  20. Narratives of empowerment and compliance: studies of communication in online patient support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzer, Helle S; Bygholm, Ann

    2013-12-01

    New technologies enable new forms of patient participation in health care. The article discusses whether communication in online patient support groups is a source of individual as well as collective empowerment or to be understood within the tradition of compliance. The discussion is based on a qualitative analysis of patient communication in two online groups on the Danish portal sundhed.dk, one for lung patients and one for women with fertility problems. The object of study is the total sum of postings during a specific period of time - a total of 4301 posts are included. The textmaterial was analyzed according to the textual paradigm of Paul Ricoeur, and the three steps of critical interpretation. Thus, the analysis moves from describing communicative characteristics of the site to a thorough semantic analysis of its narrative structure of construing meaning, interaction and collective identity, and finally as a source of collective action. The meta-narratives of the two groups confirm online patient support groups for individual empowerment, for collective group identity, but not for collective empowerment. The collective identities of patienthood on the two sites are created by the users (patients) through specific styles of communication and interaction, referred to as 'multi-logical narratives'. In spite of the potential of online communities of opening up health care to the critical voice of the public, the analysis points to a synthesis of the otherwise opposite positions of empowerment and compliance in patient care. On a collective level, the site is empowering the individual users to comply with 'doctor's recommendations' as a group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Configuring Web-based Media for Communication in Dispersed Project Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheepers, Rens; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2006-01-01

    the communicated. We explain these findings by proposing a “triad” of three interrelated concepts arising from both media richness theory and genre theory: content, medium and genre. We argue that substantive use (and acceptance of the medium and content) occurs when there is a “fit” between genre, medium...... meetings, telephone) are not always viable options. Instead, computer-based communication media such as email, project intranets and extranets become surrogate conduits for day-to-day project communication and exchange of project-related content. We examined the effect of different media configurations...... provision was decentralized and access to content restricted to specific sub-groups. Content providers resorted to superficial use of “openly configured” Web-based media or used email if unsure who could access content, or if they suspected that recipients might lack the background to understand...

  2. A Group Communication Approach for Mobile Computing Mobile Channel: An ISIS Tool for Mobile Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    of mobile hosts. However, these approaches require complicated protocols for handshaking and buffering , and fault-tolerance is not often addressed. On...view layer I sis 4- channel layer -- I~•• Network Newr IVF (U°P1 VF (uUPl channel to other servers to another client Figure 1.1 MobileChannel...necessary for any communication. When multiple processes need to synchronize, a handshake of two processes introduces a handshake time, and thus, buffering

  3. Associations among self-concept, verbal behaviors, and group climate early in the group counseling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Der Pan, Peter; Fan, Ai Chun; Bhat, Christine Suniti; Chang, Shona Shih Hua

    2012-12-01

    In this study, relations among group members' self-concept, verbal behaviors, and group climate early in the group counseling process were assessed for college students who were randomly assigned to four counseling groups. Based on measures from the hill interaction matrix, it was observed that family, social, and action self-concepts, as well as engagement, avoidance, and conflict group climate, were correlated with several verbal behaviors. Silence and quadrant 4 (Q4), which consists of speculative and confrontative verbal behaviors at personal and relationship levels, significantly predicted and explained 43% of the variance in engagement group climate. Silence and Q3, comprised of conventional and assertive verbal behaviors at personal and relationship levels, and Q1, conventional and assertive verbal behaviors at topic and group levels, explained 66% of variance in avoidance climate. Q4 and Silence explained 33% of conflict climate variance early in the group sessions. Implications for research and counseling practice are suggested.

  4. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  5. Metrics and the effective computational scientist: process, quality and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Eric T

    2012-09-01

    Recent treatments of computational knowledge worker productivity have focused upon the value the discipline brings to drug discovery using positive anecdotes. While this big picture approach provides important validation of the contributions of these knowledge workers, the impact accounts do not provide the granular detail that can help individuals and teams perform better. I suggest balancing the impact-focus with quantitative measures that can inform the development of scientists. Measuring the quality of work, analyzing and improving processes, and the critical evaluation of communication can provide immediate performance feedback. The introduction of quantitative measures can complement the longer term reporting of impacts on drug discovery. These metric data can document effectiveness trends and can provide a stronger foundation for the impact dialogue.

  6. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  7. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  8. Applying Social Justice to Oppression and Marginalization in Group Process: Interventions and Strategies for Group Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnes, Theodore R.; Ross, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    A call from the group counseling literature (Brown, 2009) recognizes the need for theoretical and empirical writings that explore the intersection of social justice and counseling practice, as many counselors are unprepared to address the impact of oppression and privilege on group process. The authors explore these issues by making…

  9. Processing of communication calls in Guinea pig auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine M S Grimsley

    Full Text Available Vocal communication is an important aspect of guinea pig behaviour and a large contributor to their acoustic environment. We postulated that some cortical areas have distinctive roles in processing conspecific calls. In order to test this hypothesis we presented exemplars from all ten of their main adult vocalizations to urethane anesthetised animals while recording from each of the eight areas of the auditory cortex. We demonstrate that the primary area (AI and three adjacent auditory belt areas contain many units that give isomorphic responses to vocalizations. These are the ventrorostral belt (VRB, the transitional belt area (T that is ventral to AI and the small area (area S that is rostral to AI. Area VRB has a denser representation of cells that are better at discriminating among calls by using either a rate code or a temporal code than any other area. Furthermore, 10% of VRB cells responded to communication calls but did not respond to stimuli such as clicks, broadband noise or pure tones. Area S has a sparse distribution of call responsive cells that showed excellent temporal locking, 31% of which selectively responded to a single call. AI responded well to all vocalizations and was much more responsive to vocalizations than the adjacent dorsocaudal core area. Areas VRB, AI and S contained units with the highest levels of mutual information about call stimuli. Area T also responded well to some calls but seems to be specialized for low sound levels. The two dorsal belt areas are comparatively unresponsive to vocalizations and contain little information about the calls. AI projects to areas S, VRB and T, so there may be both rostral and ventral pathways for processing vocalizations in the guinea pig.

  10. Process synthesis, design and analysis using a process-group contribution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar Tula, Anjan; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a process-group contribution method to model, simulate and synthesize chemical processes. Process flowsheets are generated in the same way as atoms or groups of atoms are combined to form molecules in computer aided molecular design (CAMD......) techniques. The fundamental pillars of this framework are the definition and use of functional process-groups (building blocks) representing a wide range of process operations, flowsheet connectivity rules to join the process-groups to generate all the feasible flowsheet alternatives and flowsheet property...

  11. The group discussion effect: integrative processes and suggestions for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Rose; Hopthrow, Tim; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    One of the most consistent findings in experimental social dilemmas research is the positive effect group discussion has on cooperative behavior. At a time when cooperation and consensus is critical to tackle global problems, ranging from debt to deforestation, understanding the dynamics of group discussion is a pressing need. Unfortunately, research investigating the underlying processes and implementation of the effect has been inconclusive. The authors present a critical review of existing explanations and integrate these perspectives into a single process model of group discussion, providing a more complete theoretical picture of how interrelated factors combine to facilitate discussion-induced cooperation. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, they consider complimentary approaches to the indirect and feasible implementation of group discussion. They argue that such strategies may overcome the barriers to direct discussion observed across a range of groups and organizations.

  12. How young people communicate risks of snowmobiling in northern Norway: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehus, Grete; Germeten, Sidsel; Henriksen, Nils

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to understand how the risks of snowmobiling are communicated among northern Norwegian youths. Study design. A qualitative design with focus group interviews was chosen. Interviews centred on safety precautions and estimation of risks related to snowmobiling and driving patterns. Eighty-one students (31 girls and 50 boys) aged between 16 and 23 years from 8 high schools were interviewed in 17 focus groups that were segregated by gender. Interview data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Boys and girls communicated differently about risks. Peer-group conformity appeared stronger among boys than girls. Boys did not spontaneously relate risks to their snowmobile activities, while girls did. Boys focused upon training, coping and balance between control and lack of control while driving. Girls talked about risks, were aware of risks and sought to avoid risky situations, in contrast to boys. Boys' risk communication in groups was about how to manage challenging situations. Their focus overall was on trying to maintain control while simultaneously testing their limits. Three risk categories emerged: those who drive as they ought to (mostly girls), those who occasionally take some risks (boys and girls) and those who are extreme risk-takers (a smaller number of boys). Perceptions of and communication about risk are related to gender, peer group and familiarity with risk-taking when snowmobiling. Northern Norwegian boys' driving behaviour highlights a specific need for risk reduction, but this must also draw upon factors such as acceptance of social and cultural codes and common sense related to snowmobiling.

  13. Flexible unicast-based group communication for CoAP-enabled devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Isam; Hoebeke, Jeroen; Van den Abeele, Floris; Rossey, Jen; Moerman, Ingrid; Demeester, Piet

    2014-06-04

    Smart embedded objects will become an important part of what is called the Internet of Things. Applications often require concurrent interactions with several of these objects and their resources. Existing solutions have several limitations in terms of reliability, flexibility and manageability of such groups of objects. To overcome these limitations we propose an intermediately level of intelligence to easily manipulate a group of resources across multiple smart objects, building upon the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP). We describe the design of our solution to create and manipulate a group of CoAP resources using a single client request. Furthermore we introduce the concept of profiles for the created groups. The use of profiles allows the client to specify in more detail how the group should behave. We have implemented our solution and demonstrate that it covers the complete group life-cycle, i.e., creation, validation, flexible usage and deletion. Finally, we quantitatively analyze the performance of our solution and compare it against multicast-based CoAP group communication. The results show that our solution improves reliability and flexibility with a trade-off in increased communication overhead.

  14. Flexible Unicast-Based Group Communication for CoAP-Enabled Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Ishaq

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart embedded objects will become an important part of what is called the Internet of Things. Applications often require concurrent interactions with several of these objects and their resources. Existing solutions have several limitations in terms of reliability, flexibility and manageability of such groups of objects. To overcome these limitations we propose an intermediately level of intelligence to easily manipulate a group of resources across multiple smart objects, building upon the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP. We describe the design of our solution to create and manipulate a group of CoAP resources using a single client request. Furthermore we introduce the concept of profiles for the created groups. The use of profiles allows the client to specify in more detail how the group should behave. We have implemented our solution and demonstrate that it covers the complete group life-cycle, i.e., creation, validation, flexible usage and deletion. Finally, we quantitatively analyze the performance of our solution and compare it against multicast-based CoAP group communication. The results show that our solution improves reliability and flexibility with a trade-off in increased communication overhead.

  15. Flexible Unicast-Based Group Communication for CoAP-Enabled Devices †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Isam; Hoebeke, Jeroen; Van den Abeele, Floris; Rossey, Jen; Moerman, Ingrid; Demeester, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Smart embedded objects will become an important part of what is called the Internet of Things. Applications often require concurrent interactions with several of these objects and their resources. Existing solutions have several limitations in terms of reliability, flexibility and manageability of such groups of objects. To overcome these limitations we propose an intermediately level of intelligence to easily manipulate a group of resources across multiple smart objects, building upon the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP). We describe the design of our solution to create and manipulate a group of CoAP resources using a single client request. Furthermore we introduce the concept of profiles for the created groups. The use of profiles allows the client to specify in more detail how the group should behave. We have implemented our solution and demonstrate that it covers the complete group life-cycle, i.e., creation, validation, flexible usage and deletion. Finally, we quantitatively analyze the performance of our solution and compare it against multicast-based CoAP group communication. The results show that our solution improves reliability and flexibility with a trade-off in increased communication overhead. PMID:24901978

  16. Rethinking Communication in Innovation Processes: Creating Space for Change in Complex Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Aarts, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a collec

  17. Rethinking communication in innovation processes: creating space for change in complex systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Aarts, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a

  18. Rethinking Communication in Innovation Processes: Creating Space for Change in Complex Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Aarts, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a

  19. Functional communication within a perceptual network processing letters and pseudoletters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Anthony T

    2011-10-01

    Many studies have identified regions within human ventral visual stream to be important for object identification and categorization; however, knowledge of how perceptual information is communicated within the visual network is still limited. Current theories posit that if a high correspondence between incoming sensory information and internal representations exists, then the object is rapidly identified, and if there is not, then the object requires extra detailed processing. Event-related responses from the present magnetoencephalography study showed two main effects. The N1m peak latencies were approximately 15 milliseconds earlier to familiar letters than to unfamiliar pseudoletters, and the N2m was more negative to pseudoletters than to letters. Event-related beamforming analyses identified these effects to be within bilateral visual cortices with a right lateralization for the N2m effect. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses revealed that gamma-band (50-80 Hz) oscillatory phase synchronizations among occipital regions were greater to letters than to pseudoletters (around 85 milliseconds). However, during a later time interval between 245 and 375 milliseconds, pseudoletters elicited greater gamma-band phase synchronizations among a more distributed occipital network than did letters. These findings indicate that familiar object processing begins by at least 85 milliseconds, which could represent an initial match to an internal template. In addition, unfamiliar object processing persisted longer than that for familiar objects, which could reflect greater attention to inexperienced objects to determine their identity and/or to consolidate a new template to aid in future identification.

  20. Enhancement of LED indoor communications using OPPM-PWM modulation and grouped bit-flipping decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aiying; Li, Xiangming; Jiang, Tao

    2012-04-23

    Combination of overlapping pulse position modulation and pulse width modulation at the transmitter and grouped bit-flipping algorithm for low-density parity-check decoding at the receiver are proposed for visible Light Emitting Diode (LED) indoor communication system in this paper. The results demonstrate that, with the same Photodetector, the bit rate can be increased and the performance of the communication system can be improved by the scheme we proposed. Compared with the standard bit-flipping algorithm, the grouped bit-flipping algorithm can achieve more than 2.0 dB coding gain at bit error rate of 10-5. By optimizing the encoding of overlapping pulse position modulation and pulse width modulation symbol, the performance can be further improved. It is reasonably expected that the bit rate can be upgraded to 400 Mbit/s with a single available LED, thus transmission rate beyond 1 Gbit/s is foreseen by RGB LEDs.

  1. The Socialization Process of Street Children in the Youth Gangs and Groups of Organized Crime in Local Community. Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article includes the research report on the socialization process of children in the street, youth gangs, and organized criminal groups in local communities. The author has analysed the signs and communication codes located on walls in local communities. This is very important to the socialization process of the youth street gangs.

  2. 2012 Proceedings of the International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Mu, Jiasong; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Baoju; Pi, Yiming; Zhao, Chenglin

    2012-01-01

    Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems is a collection of contributions coming out of the International Conference on Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems (CSPS) held October 2012. This book provides the state-of-art developments of Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems, and their interactions in multidisciplinary fields, such as Smart Grid. The book also examines Radar Systems, Sensor Networks, Radar Signal Processing, Design and Implementation of Signal Processing Systems and Applications. Written by experts and students in the fields of Communications, Signal Processing, and Systems.

  3. Effects of communication strategy training on EFL students’ performance in small-group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Benson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of studies have been conducted with regard to communication strategy training and performance on communicative tasks (Lam, 2009; Nakatani, 2010; Naughton, 2006. This study aims to add to the literature by examining how two strategies, clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation, and two methods of teaching the strategies, affected the interactional sequences and overall group discussion performance of EFL students at a university in Japan. Pre and posttreatment small-group discussions were recorded for assessment, and a stimulated recall interview was administered to determine the participants’ perceptions of their learning and language use. Posttest results reveal that the experimental groups that were taught predetermined phrases aimed at clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation employed such phrases more frequently than the control group. However, this employment of phrases did not lead to higher gains in group discussion skills as the control group enjoyed the largest gains from pre to posttest. The researchers consider the findings in light of previous research, and conclude with recommendations for future research on the topic with special regard to research design.

  4. Engaging communication experts in a Delphi process to identify patient behaviors that could enhance communication in medical encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Terry

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The communication literature currently focuses primarily on improving physicians' verbal and non-verbal behaviors during the medical interview. The Four Habits Model is a teaching and research framework for physician communication that is based on evidence linking specific communication behaviors with processes and outcomes of care. The Model conceptualizes basic communication tasks as "Habits" and describes the sequence of physician communication behaviors during the clinical encounter associated with improved outcomes. Using the Four Habits Model as a starting point, we asked communication experts to identify the verbal communication behaviors of patients that are important in outpatient encounters. Methods We conducted a 4-round Delphi process with 17 international experts in communication research, medical education, and health care delivery. All rounds were conducted via the internet. In round 1, experts reviewed a list of proposed patient verbal communication behaviors within the Four Habits Model framework. The proposed patient verbal communication behaviors were identified based on a review of the communication literature. The experts could: approve the proposed list; add new behaviors; or modify behaviors. In rounds 2, 3, and 4, they rated each behavior for its fit (agree or disagree with a particular habit. After each round, we calculated the percent agreement for each behavior and provided these data in the next round. Behaviors receiving more than 70% of experts' votes (either agree or disagree were considered as achieving consensus. Results Of the 14 originally-proposed patient verbal communication behaviors, the experts modified all but 2, and they added 20 behaviors to the Model in round 1. In round 2, they were presented with 59 behaviors and 14 options to remove specific behaviors for rating. After 3 rounds of rating, the experts retained 22 behaviors. This set included behaviors such as asking questions

  5. The significance of ABSA's Group chief executive's internal corporate communication programme for the commitment levels of selected Absa employees.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Grunig (1992:114) states that internal communication is so entwined with the process of organising and with organisational structure, environment, power and culture that many theorists of organisational communication argue that organisations would not exist without communication. Grunig (1992) goes further by saying that internal communication is the catalyst if not the key to organisational excellence and effectiveness. In this study an attempt was made to illustrate the link between the int...

  6. Hierarchical Group Based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Machine Type Communication in LTE and Future 5G Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probidita Roychoudhury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the exponential growth in the volume of wireless data communication among heterogeneous devices ranging from smart phones to tiny sensors across a wide range of applications, 3GPP LTE-A has standardized Machine Type Communication (MTC which allows communication between entities without any human intervention. The future 5G cellular networks also envisage massive deployment of MTC Devices (MTCDs which will increase the total number of connected devices hundredfold. This poses a huge challenge to the traditional cellular system processes, especially the traditional Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (AKA mechanism currently used in LTE systems, as the signaling load caused by the increasingly large number of devices may have an adverse effect on the regular Human to Human (H2H traffic. A solution in the literature has been the use of group based architecture which, while addressing the authentication traffic, has their share of issues. This paper introduces Hierarchical Group based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (HGMAKA protocol to address those issues and also enables the small cell heterogeneous architecture in line with 5G networks to support MTC services. The aggregate Message Authentication Code based approach has been shown to be lightweight and significantly efficient in terms of resource usage compared to the existing protocols, while being robust to authentication message failures, and scalable to heterogeneous network architectures.

  7. Group-buying inventory policy with demand under Poisson process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammarat Kleebmek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The group-buying is the modern business of selling in the uncertain market. With an objective to minimize costs for sellers arising from ordering and reordering, we present in this paper the group buying inventory model, with the demand governed by a Poisson process and the product sale distributed as Binomial distribution. The inventory level is under continuous review, while the lead time is fixed. A numerical example is illustrated.

  8. Methods for Dealing with Communication Apprehension in Higher Education Speech Instruction via Use of Small Group Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Charla A.; Dudley, Jack A.

    Noting that many university speech students suffer from communication apprehension (CA) and must face the fear and anxiety of performance in front of the class, a study examined the effectiveness of group discussion, interpersonal communication, public speaking, and small group activities and interactions in reducing CA. Subjects, 57 students,…

  9. "Blogs" and "wikis" are valuable software tools for communication within research groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Igor M; Bialek, Dominik; Efimova, Ekaterina; Schwartlander, Ruth; Pless, Gesine; Neuhaus, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate software tools may improve communication and ease access to knowledge for research groups. A weblog is a website which contains periodic, chronologically ordered posts on a common webpage, whereas a wiki is hypertext-based collaborative software that enables documents to be authored collectively using a web browser. Although not primarily intended for use as an intranet-based collaborative knowledge warehouse, both blogs and wikis have the potential to offer all the features of complex and expensive IT solutions. These tools enable the team members to share knowledge simply and quickly-the collective knowledge base of the group can be efficiently managed and navigated.

  10. Group Cooperative Learning-Making Learning a Deeper Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jin; LI Hong-mei; WANG Ya-lei; ZHANG Min

    2014-01-01

    The paper is to explore whether or not group cooperative learning in author’s university can make students learning deeply. In 2004, the Chinese Ministry of Education constituted“College English Teaching Syllabus”( College English Teaching Syllabus,2004, showed in appendix), in which it makes it clear that the properties and objectives of College English teaching are:College English teaching is a teaching system which has the content of English language knowledge, English applied skills, learn-ing strategies, intercultural communication. According to the syllabus, lots of Chinese universities will aim to explore new and ef-fective teaching modes, which will stimulate college English teachers to reflect their traditional teaching methods and make the corresponding improvement inevitably.

  11. The purpose of the communication process of group activities in the Family Health Strategy Finalidad del proceso de comunicación de las actividades en grupo en la Estrategia Salud de la Familia Finalidade do processo comunicacional das atividades em grupo na Estratégia Saúde da Família

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Silveira Cardoso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study identified the purposes of the communication process in the group activities of the Family Health strategy from the perspective of nurses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and recorded with 60 nurses and non-participant observation with 19 group activities, analyzed according to qualitative content analysis. Five categories emerged: Health education, Clinical follow-up, Co-responsibilization of patients, Team-Community Interaction, and Work Organization. These categories revealed that the establishment of reciprocal interactions among professionals, patients and families favor health promotion because it encourages the exchange of knowledge among the participants concerning their health experiences.Se objetivó identificar los sentidos de finalidad del proceso de comunicación en las actividades en grupo de la Estrategia Salud de la Familia, en la perspectiva de los enfermeros. Se usó las técnicas de entrevista semiestructurada grabada con 60 enfermeros y de observación no participante en 19 actividades en grupo, analizadas según el abordaje cualitativo de contenido. Se evidenció cinco categorías: Educación en Salud, Acompañamiento Clínico, Corresponsabilidad de los Clientes, Interacción Equipo Comunidad y Organización del Trabajo. Ellos permitieron inferir que el establecimiento de interacciones de reciprocidad entre profesionales, clientes y familia favorece la intervención promotora de la salud por estimular el intercambio de conocimientos entre los participantes al respecto de sus experiencias de salud.Objetivou-se, por este estudo, identificar os sentidos de finalidade do processo comunicacional nas atividades em grupo da Estratégia Saúde da Família, na perspectiva dos enfermeiros. Usaram-se as técnicas de entrevista semiestruturada gravada, com 60 enfermeiros, e de observação não participante, em 19 atividades em grupo, analisadas segundo abordagem qualitativa de conteúdo. Evidenciaram-se cinco

  12. Near-field environment/processes working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, W.M. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the near-field environment to geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The near-field environment may be affected by thermal perturbations from the waste, and by disturbances caused by the introduction of exotic materials during construction of the repository. This group also discussed the application of modelling of performance-related processes.

  13. Communication needs of patients with altered hearing ability: Informing pharmacists' patient care services through focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, McKenzie; Liu, Min

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify communication barriers and needs for Deaf and hard-of-hearing (HOH) patients when they seek pharmaceutical care, and to better understand the impact of poor communication upon medication adherence and medication errors among this underserved population. Focus group discussion. Midwestern United States in September 2013 through April 2014. Deaf/HOH patients aged 18 years or older who used American Sign Language as their primary method of communication and were taking at least two long-term prescription medications. Qualitative themes. Many of the Deaf/HOH still perceived community pharmacists in a dispensing role and lacked an understanding of other services being offered in this setting. In addition, pharmacists who demonstrated a lack of sensitivity and patience towards the Deaf/HOH risk weakening the relationship between patient and provider. As a result, safe use of medications is compromised. Deaf and HOH patients have unique needs that pharmacists must understand and address. Effective communication and literacy assessment is essential to ensure safe medication use and optimal health outcomes. Pharmacist education and staff training are needed to increase awareness of this patient population's needs and to strengthen the patient-pharmacist relationship.

  14. Health-related Support Groups on the Internet: Linking Empirical Findings to Social Support and Computer-mediated Communication Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B; Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B

    2003-01-01

    This literature review of research on health-related computer-mediated support groups links features of these groups to existing theory from the areas of social support and computer-mediated communication research. The article exams computer-mediated support groups as weak tie networks, focuses on how these support groups facilitate participant similarity and empathic support and identifies changes in supportive communication due to characteristics of the medium.

  15. The Impact of Perceived Loafing and Collective Efficacy on Group Goal Processes and Group Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey; Klein

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents two studies investigating the influence of social perceptions (perceived loafing, collective efficacy, and cohesion) on group goal processes (difficulty and commitment) and group performance. The role of group goal processes as mediators of the relationships between social perception variables and group performance was also tested. The first study involved a sample of 247 college students in 59 groups working on a team interdependent, divisible academic task. Results supported all but one hypothesis. The mediation hypothesis was not supported as both group goal and social perception variables related similarly to group performance. The second study employed a different design to address some limitations of the first study and to extend those findings. Results from the second study, using 383 college students in 101 groups, were consistent with Study 1 with two exceptions. First, the mediation hypothesis was supported in Study 2, replicating the findings of Klein and Mulvey (1995). Second, anticipated lower effort and the sucker effect, additional intervening variables examined in Study 2, partially mediated the relationship between perceived loafing and collective goal difficulty as hypothesized. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Communication and Collective Consensus Making in Animal Groups via Mechanical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várkonyi, Péter L.

    2011-06-01

    Mechanical constraints have a strong influence on the dynamics and structure of granular aggregations. The contact forces within dense suspensions of active particles may give rise to intriguing phenomena, including anomalous density fluctuations, long-range orientational ordering, and spontaneous pattern formation. Various authors have proposed that these physical phenomena contribute to the ability of animal groups to move coherently. Our systematic numerical simulations confirm that spontaneous interactions of elongated individuals can trigger oriented motion in small groups. They are, however, insufficient in larger ones, despite their significant imprint on the group's internal structure. It is also demonstrated that preferred directions of motion of a minority of group members can be communicated to others solely by mechanical interactions. These findings strengthen the link between pattern formation in active nematics and the collective decision making of social animals.

  17. Joint digital signal processing for superchannel coherent optical communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Pan, Jie; Detwiler, Thomas; Stark, Andrew; Hsueh, Yu-Ting; Chang, Gee-Kung; Ralph, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-high-speed optical communication systems which can support ≥ 1Tb/s per channel transmission will soon be required to meet the increasing capacity demand. However, 1Tb/s over a single carrier requires either or both a high-level modulation format (i.e. 1024QAM) and a high baud rate. Alternatively, grouping a number of tightly spaced "sub-carriers" to form a terabit superchannel increases channel capacity while minimizing the need for high-level modulation formats and high baud rate, which may allow existing formats, baud rate and components to be exploited. In ideal Nyquist-WDM superchannel systems, optical subcarriers with rectangular spectra are tightly packed at a channel spacing equal to the baud rate, thus achieving the Nyquist bandwidth limit. However, in practical Nyquist-WDM systems, precise electrical or optical control of channel spectra is required to avoid strong inter-channel interference (ICI). Here, we propose and demonstrate a new "super receiver" architecture for practical Nyquist-WDM systems, which jointly detects and demodulates multiple channels simultaneously and mitigates the penalties associated with the limitations of generating ideal Nyquist-WDM spectra. Our receiver-side solution relaxes the filter requirements imposed on the transmitter. Two joint DSP algorithms are developed for linear ICI cancellation and joint carrier-phase recovery. Improved system performance is observed with both experimental and simulation data. Performance analysis under different system configurations is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed joint DSP algorithms.

  18. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  19. Fault Tolerance and Recovery for Group Communication Services in Distributed Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Hua Wang; Zhong Zhou; Ling Liu; Wei Wu

    2012-01-01

    Group communication services (GCSs) are becoming increasingly important as a wide field of promising applications has emerged to serve millions of users distributed across the world.However,it is challenging to make the service fault tolerance and scalable to fulfill the voluminous demand of users in a distributed network (DN).While many reliable group communication protocols have been dedicated to addressing such a challenge so as to accommodate the changes in the network,they are often costly or require complicated strategies to handle the service interruptions caused by node departures or link failures,which hinders the service practicability. In this paper,we present two schemes to address the challenges.The first one is a location-aware replication scheme called NS,which makes replicas in a dispersed fashion that enables the services on nodes to gain immunity of failures with different patterns (e.g.,network partition and single point failure) while keeping replication overhead low.The second one is a novel failure recovery scheme that exploits the independence between service recovery and structure recovery in time domain to achieve quick failure recovery.Our simulation results indicate that the two proposed schemes outperform the existing schemes and simple alternative schemes in service success rate,recovery latency,and communication cost.

  20. Found in translation: exporting patient-centered communication and small group teaching skills to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Benjamin; Kallenberg, Gene; Lang, Forrest; Mahoney, Patrick; Patterson, JoEllen; Dugan, Beverly; Sun, Shaobang

    2009-06-26

    The Chinese Medical Doctor's Association asked us to develop a train-the-trainers program in doctor-patient communication and in teaching skills for a select group of Chinese health care professionals, who would then serve as trainers for practicing physicians throughout China. The request came in the context of increasing doctor-patient friction related, in part, to the dissolution of the socialist health care safety net in China. In this article we recount the implementation of our 5-day training program in Beijing. We explore cross-cultural issues that arose in presenting the program's two principal training domains: small group teaching and patient-centered doctor-patient communication. We also explore the linguistic challenges we encountered as non-Chinese speaking teachers. Finally, we reflect on the lessons learned from this project that may be of value to others called upon to export Western doctor-patient communications training to other cultures. In this age of increasing globalization, cross-cultural sharing of medical education represents a growing trend.

  1. Found in Translation: Exporting Patient-Centered Communication and Small Group Teaching Skills to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Benjamin; Kallenberg, Gene; Lang, Forrest; Mahoney, Patrick; Patterson, JoEllen; Dugan, Beverly; Sun, Shaobang

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Medical Doctor's Association asked us to develop a train-the-trainers program in doctor-patient communication and in teaching skills for a select group of Chinese health care professionals, who would then serve as trainers for practicing physicians throughout China. The request came in the context of increasing doctor-patient friction related, in part, to the dissolution of the socialist health care safety net in China. In this article we recount the implementation of our 5-day training program in Beijing. We explore cross-cultural issues that arose in presenting the program's two principal training domains: small group teaching and patient-centered doctor-patient communication. We also explore the linguistic challenges we encountered as non-Chinese speaking teachers. Finally, we reflect on the lessons learned from this project that may be of value to others called upon to export Western doctor-patient communications training to other cultures. In this age of increasing globalization, cross-cultural sharing of medical education represents a growing trend. PMID:20165520

  2. Sunspot Groups as Tracers of Sub-Surface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Η. Gokhale

    2000-09-01

    Data on sunspot groups have been quite useful for obtaining clues to several processes on global and local scales within the sun which lead to emergence of toroidal magnetic flux above the sun's surface. I present here a report on such studies carried out at Indian Institute of Astrophysics during the last decade or so.

  3. Poisson processes on groups and Feynamn path integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combe, P.; Rodriguez, R.; Sirugue, M.; Sirugue-Collin, M.; Hoegh-Krohn, R.

    1980-10-01

    We give an expression for the perturbed evolution of a free evolution by gentle, possibly velocity dependent, potential, in terms of the expectation with respect to a Poisson process on a group. Various applications are given in particular to usual quantum mechanics but also to Fermi and spin systems.

  4. Poisson processes on groups and Feynman path integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Ph.; Høegh-Krohn, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Sirugue, M.; Sirugue-Collin, M.

    1980-10-01

    We give an expression for the perturbed evolution of a free evolution by gentle, possibly velocity dependent, potential, in terms of the expectation with respect to a Poisson process on a group. Various applications are given in particular to usual quantum mechanics but also to Fermi and spin systems.

  5. Defining Business Communication Using the Movie "The Insider" as Mediator of Students' Thought Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Talavera, Leticia

    Business communication is different from other domains in that its contextual meaning requires previous metacognitive mediation of signs. The communicative process in business is aimed at accomplishing a specific outcome. Various forms of meaning come into play in business communication such as denotative, connotative, stylistic, affective,…

  6. Social Group Dynamics and Patterns of Latin American Integration Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Dubé

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes to incorporate social psychology elements with mainstream political science and international relations theories to help understand the contradictions related to the integration processes in Latin America. Through a theoretical analysis, it contributes to the challenge proposed by Dabène (2009 to explain the “resilience” of the Latin American regional integration process in spite of its “instability and crises.” Our main proposition calls for considering Latin America as a community and its regional organizations as “social groups.” In conclusion, three phenomena from the field of social psychology and particularly social group dynamics shed light on these contradictory patterns: the value of the group and the emotional bond, groupthink, and cognitive dissonance.

  7. Media Exposure, Interpersonal Communication and the Electoral Decision Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimsey, William D.; Hantz, Alan

    The relationships among mass media, interpersonal communication, and voting behavior were explored in a two-stage panel study of 141 respondents during a 1974 Illinois congressional election. Analyses of perceived exposures to mass media and to interpersonal communication were interpreted as supporting Rogers and Shoemakers' (1971)…

  8. Problems in Cutaneous Communication from Psychophysics to Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, B. VonHaller; Clark, Leslie L., Ed.

    After reviewing the history of communication through the skin, this paper considers recent research into the problem of cutaneous stimulation induced both mechanically and electrically. The general demands of a cutaneous communication system are discussed, and four primary dimensions of cutaneous stimulation are summarized (locus, intensity,…

  9. Processing data communications events by awakening threads in parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2016-03-15

    Processing data communications events in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer that includes compute nodes that execute a parallel application, with the PAMI including data communications endpoints, and the endpoints are coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through other data communications resources, including determining by an advance function that there are no actionable data communications events pending for its context, placing by the advance function its thread of execution into a wait state, waiting for a subsequent data communications event for the context; responsive to occurrence of a subsequent data communications event for the context, awakening by the thread from the wait state; and processing by the advance function the subsequent data communications event now pending for the context.

  10. Integrating IPsec within OpenFlow Architecture for Secure Group Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Heydari Fami Tafreshi; Ebrahim Ghazisaeedi; Haitham Cruickshank; Zhili Sun

    2014-01-01

    Network security protocols such as IPsec have been used for many years to ensure robust end-to-end communication and are impor-tant in the context of SDN. Despite the widespread installation of IPsec to date, per-packet protection offered by the protocol is not very compatible with OpenFlow and flow-like behavior. OpenFlow architecture cannot aggregate IPsec-ESP flows in transport mode or tunnel mode because layer-3 information is encrypted and therefore unreadable. In this paper, we propose using the Secu-rity Parameter Index (SPI) of IPsec within the OpenFlow architecture to identify and direct IPsec flows. This enables IPsec to con-form to the packet-based behavior of OpenFlow architecture. In addition, by distinguishing between IPsec flows, the architecture is particularly suited to secure group communication.

  11. 76 FR 13438 - In the Matter of AdAl Group, Inc., Com/Tech Communications Technologies, Inc., Dialog Group, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of AdAl Group, Inc., Com/Tech Communications Technologies, Inc., Dialog Group, Inc... Management Technologies Corporation, Interiors, Inc., and SFG Financial Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading... accurate information concerning the securities of AdAl Group, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  12. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Document Server

    A. Petrilli

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the Open Days at the end of September was the single biggest effort of the CMS Communications Group this year. We would like to thank all volunteers for their hard work to show our Point 5 facilities and explain science and technology to the general public. During two days more than 5,000 people visited the CMS detector underground and profited from the surface activities, which included an exhibition on CMS, a workshop on superconductivity, and an activity for our younger visitors involving wooden Kapla blocks. The Communications Group took advantage of the preparations to produce new CMS posters that can be reused at other venues. Event display images have been produced not just for this occasion but also for other exhibits, education purposes, publications etc. During the Open Days, Gilles Jobin, 2012 winner of CERN Collide@CERN prize, performed his Quantum show in Point 5, with the light installation of German artist Julius von Bismarck. Image 3: CERN Open Days at CMS wel...

  13. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor and D. Barney

    2010-01-01

    CMS Centres, Outreach and the 7 TeV Media Event The new CMS Communications group is now established and is addressing three areas that are critical to CMS as it enters the physics operations phase: - Communications Infrastructure, including almost 50 CMS Centres Worldwide, videoconferencing systems, and CERN meeting rooms - Information systems, including the internal and external Web sites as well as the document preparation and management systems - Outreach and Education activities, including working with print, radio and TV media, visits to CMS, and exhibitions. The group has been active in many areas, with the highest priority being accorded to needs of CMS operations and preparations for the major media event planned for 7 TeV collisions. Unfortunately the CMS Centre@CERN suffered a major setback when, on 21st December, a cooling water pipe froze and burst on the floor above the CMS Centre main room. Water poured through the ceiling, flooding the floor and soaking some of the consoles, before e...

  14. Treating the Information and Communication Technologies in the Offshore Outsourcing Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Christoffersen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    A qualitative research, based on 12 in-depth interviews within 12 companies has been conducted in order to explore information and communication technologies’ (ICT) utilisation in outsourcing. Three groups of companies regarding the consideration of ICT in the pre-transition phase, and ICT......’s contribution to achieving competitive advantages during the post-transition phase of the outsourcing process have been identified: techno-nerds, anachronists, and indifferents. We have profiled those companies regarding the barriers, enablers, expectation and surprises they have encountered while utilising ICT...

  15. Intention processing in communication: a common brain network for language and gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrici, Ivan; Adenzato, Mauro; Cappa, Stefano; Bara, Bruno G; Tettamanti, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Human communicative competence is based on the ability to process a specific class of mental states, namely, communicative intention. The present fMRI study aims to analyze whether intention processing in communication is affected by the expressive means through which a communicative intention is conveyed, that is, the linguistic or extralinguistic gestural means. Combined factorial and conjunction analyses were used to test two sets of predictions: first, that a common brain network is recruited for the comprehension of communicative intentions independently of the modality through which they are conveyed; second, that additional brain areas are specifically recruited depending on the communicative modality used, reflecting distinct sensorimotor gateways. Our results clearly showed that a common neural network is engaged in communicative intention processing independently of the modality used. This network includes the precuneus, the left and right posterior STS and TPJ, and the medial pFC. Additional brain areas outside those involved in intention processing are specifically engaged by the particular communicative modality, that is, a peri-sylvian language network for the linguistic modality and a sensorimotor network for the extralinguistic modality. Thus, common representation of communicative intention may be accessed by modality-specific gateways, which are distinct for linguistic versus extralinguistic expressive means. Taken together, our results indicate that the information acquired by different communicative modalities is equivalent from a mental processing standpoint, in particular, at the point at which the actor's communicative intention has to be reconstructed.

  16. The effects of work-related values on communication between R and D groups, part 1. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douds, C. F.

    1970-01-01

    The research concerned with the liaison, interface, coupling, and technology transfer processes that occur in research and development is reported. Overviews of the functions of communication and coupling in the R and D processes, and the theoretical considerations of coupling, communication, and values are presented along with descriptions of the field research program and the instrumentation.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of Unicast and Multicast CoAP Group Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Isam; Hoebeke, Jeroen; Moerman, Ingrid; Demeester, Piet

    2016-07-21

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expanding rapidly to new domains in which embedded devices play a key role and gradually outnumber traditionally-connected devices. These devices are often constrained in their resources and are thus unable to run standard Internet protocols. The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a new alternative standard protocol that implements the same principals as the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), but is tailored towards constrained devices. In many IoT application domains, devices need to be addressed in groups in addition to being addressable individually. Two main approaches are currently being proposed in the IoT community for CoAP-based group communication. The main difference between the two approaches lies in the underlying communication type: multicast versus unicast. In this article, we experimentally evaluate those two approaches using two wireless sensor testbeds and under different test conditions. We highlight the pros and cons of each of them and propose combining these approaches in a hybrid solution to better suit certain use case requirements. Additionally, we provide a solution for multicast-based group membership management using CoAP.

  18. Experimental Evaluation of Unicast and Multicast CoAP Group Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Isam; Hoebeke, Jeroen; Moerman, Ingrid; Demeester, Piet

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expanding rapidly to new domains in which embedded devices play a key role and gradually outnumber traditionally-connected devices. These devices are often constrained in their resources and are thus unable to run standard Internet protocols. The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a new alternative standard protocol that implements the same principals as the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), but is tailored towards constrained devices. In many IoT application domains, devices need to be addressed in groups in addition to being addressable individually. Two main approaches are currently being proposed in the IoT community for CoAP-based group communication. The main difference between the two approaches lies in the underlying communication type: multicast versus unicast. In this article, we experimentally evaluate those two approaches using two wireless sensor testbeds and under different test conditions. We highlight the pros and cons of each of them and propose combining these approaches in a hybrid solution to better suit certain use case requirements. Additionally, we provide a solution for multicast-based group membership management using CoAP. PMID:27455262

  19. Experimental Evaluation of Unicast and Multicast CoAP Group Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Ishaq

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT is expanding rapidly to new domains in which embedded devices play a key role and gradually outnumber traditionally-connected devices. These devices are often constrained in their resources and are thus unable to run standard Internet protocols. The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP is a new alternative standard protocol that implements the same principals as the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP, but is tailored towards constrained devices. In many IoT application domains, devices need to be addressed in groups in addition to being addressable individually. Two main approaches are currently being proposed in the IoT community for CoAP-based group communication. The main difference between the two approaches lies in the underlying communication type: multicast versus unicast. In this article, we experimentally evaluate those two approaches using two wireless sensor testbeds and under different test conditions. We highlight the pros and cons of each of them and propose combining these approaches in a hybrid solution to better suit certain use case requirements. Additionally, we provide a solution for multicast-based group membership management using CoAP.

  20. Processing of communication sounds: contributions of learning, memory, and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremba, Amy; Bigelow, James; Rossi, Breein

    2013-11-01

    Abundant evidence from both field and lab studies has established that conspecific vocalizations (CVs) are of critical ecological significance for a wide variety of species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents, and other mammals and birds. Correspondingly, a number of experiments have demonstrated behavioral processing advantages for CVs, such as in discrimination and memory tasks. Further, a wide range of experiments have described brain regions in many species that appear to be specialized for processing CVs. For example, several neural regions have been described in both mammals and birds wherein greater neural responses are elicited by CVs than by comparison stimuli such as heterospecific vocalizations, nonvocal complex sounds, and artificial stimuli. These observations raise the question of whether these regions reflect domain-specific neural mechanisms dedicated to processing CVs, or alternatively, if these regions reflect domain-general neural mechanisms for representing complex sounds of learned significance. Inasmuch as CVs can be viewed as complex combinations of basic spectrotemporal features, the plausibility of the latter position is supported by a large body of literature describing modulated cortical and subcortical representation of a variety of acoustic features that have been experimentally associated with stimuli of natural behavioral significance (such as food rewards). Herein, we review a relatively small body of existing literature describing the roles of experience, learning, and memory in the emergence of species-typical neural representations of CVs and auditory system plasticity. In both songbirds and mammals, manipulations of auditory experience as well as specific learning paradigms are shown to modulate neural responses evoked by CVs, either in terms of overall firing rate or temporal firing patterns. In some cases, CV-sensitive neural regions gradually acquire representation of non-CV stimuli with which subjects have training

  1. A focus group study of veterinarians' and pet owners' perceptions of veterinarian-client communication in companion animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jason B; Adams, Cindy L; Bonnett, Brenda N

    2008-10-01

    To compare veterinarians' and pet owners' perceptions of client expectations with respect to veterinarian-client communication and to identify related barriers and challenges to communication. Qualitative study based on focus group interviews. 6 pet owner focus groups (32 owners) and 4 veterinarian focus groups (24 companion animal veterinarians). Independent focus group sessions were conducted with standardized open-ended questions and follow-up probes. Content analysis was performed on transcripts of the focus group discussions. Five themes related to veterinarian-client communication were identified: educating clients (ie, explaining important information, providing information up front, and providing information in various forms), providing choices (ie, providing pet owners with a range of options, being respectful of owners' decisions, and working in partnership with owners), using 2-way communication (ie, using language clients understand, listening to what clients have to say, and asking the right questions), breakdowns in communication that affected the client's experience (ie, owners feeling misinformed, that they had not been given all options, and that their concerns had not been heard), and challenges veterinarians encountered when communicating with clients (ie, monetary concerns, client misinformation, involvement of > 1 client, and time limitations). Results suggested that several factors are involved in providing effective veterinarian-client communication and that breakdowns in communication can have an adverse effect on the veterinarian-client relationship.

  2. Communication roles that support collaboration during the design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1996-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that design (and development) teams increasingly include participants from different domains who must explore and integrate their specialized knowledge in order to create innovative and competitive artefacts and reduce design and development costs. Thus communication, in...

  3. Advanced information processing system: Authentication protocols for network communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Richard E.; Adams, Stuart J.; Babikyan, Carol A.; Butler, Bryan P.; Clark, Anne L.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1994-01-01

    In safety critical I/O and intercomputer communication networks, reliable message transmission is an important concern. Difficulties of communication and fault identification in networks arise primarily because the sender of a transmission cannot be identified with certainty, an intermediate node can corrupt a message without certainty of detection, and a babbling node cannot be identified and silenced without lengthy diagnosis and reconfiguration . Authentication protocols use digital signature techniques to verify the authenticity of messages with high probability. Such protocols appear to provide an efficient solution to many of these problems. The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate intercomputer communication architectures which employ authentication. As a context for the evaluation, the authentication protocol-based communication concept was demonstrated under this program by hosting a real-time flight critical guidance, navigation and control algorithm on a distributed, heterogeneous, mixed redundancy system of workstations and embedded fault-tolerant computers.

  4. Communication roles that support collaboration during the design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1996-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that design (and development) teams increasingly include participants from different domains who must explore and integrate their specialized knowledge in order to create innovative and competitive artefacts and reduce design and development costs. Thus communication, in...

  5. The process group approach to reliable distributed computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1992-01-01

    The difficulty of developing reliable distribution software is an impediment to applying distributed computing technology in many settings. Experience with the ISIS system suggests that a structured approach based on virtually synchronous process groups yields systems that are substantially easier to develop, exploit sophisticated forms of cooperative computation, and achieve high reliability. Six years of research on ISIS, describing the model, its implementation challenges, and the types of applications to which ISIS has been applied are reviewed.

  6. Renormalization group analysis for an asymmetric simple exclusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sutapa

    2017-03-01

    A perturbative renormalization group method is used to obtain steady-state density profiles of a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with particle adsorption and evaporation. This method allows us to obtain a globally valid solution for the density profile without the asymptotic matching of bulk and boundary layer solutions. In addition, we show a nontrivial scaling of the boundary layer width with the system size close to specific phase boundaries.

  7. Simultaneous use of different communication mechanisms leads to spatial sorting and unexpected collective behaviours in animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftimie, Raluca

    2013-11-21

    Communication among individuals forms the basis of social interactions in every animal population. In general, communication is influenced by the physiological and psychological constraints of each individual, and in large aggregations this means differences in the reception and emission of communication signals. However, studies on the formation and movement of animal aggregations usually assume that all individuals communicate with neighbours in the same manner. Here, we take a new approach on animal aggregations and use a nonlocal mathematical model to investigate theoretically the simultaneous use of two communication mechanisms by different members of a population. We show that the use of multiple communication mechanisms can lead to behaviours that are not necessarily predicted by the behaviour of subpopulations that use only one communication mechanism. In particular, we show that while the use of one communication mechanism by the entire population leads to deterministic movement, the use of multiple communication mechanisms can lead in some cases to chaotic movement. Finally, we show that the use of multiple communication mechanisms leads to the sorting of individuals inside aggregations: individuals that are aware of the location and the movement direction of all their neighbours usually position themselves at the centre of the groups, while individuals that are aware of the location and the movement direction of only some neighbours position themselves at the edges of the groups. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Study of Upward Bypassing in the Process of Vertical Control of an Organizational Communication System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-07

    Functions of the Executive. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1966. Berlo , David K. The Process of Communication, An Introduction to Theory and...communication which makes possible the existence and evolution of society itself. Berlo (1960), in The Process of Communication, estimates that the "average...other, and that the purpose of all this communi- cation is to manipulate some factor uc factors in our environment. Berlo says, "in short, we

  9. Investigating Modern Communication Technologies: The effect of Internet-based Communication Technologies on the Investigation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Phillip Simon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication technologies are commonplace in modern society. For many years there were only a handful of communication technologies provided by large companies, namely the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN and mobile telephony; these can be referred to as traditional communication technologies. Over the lifetime of traditional communication technologies has been little technological evolution and as such, law enforcement developed sound methods for investigating targets using them. With the advent of communication technologies that use the Internet – Internet-based or contemporary communication technologies – law enforcement are faced with many challenges. This paper discusses these challenges and their potential impact. It first looks at what defines the two technologies then explores the laws and methods used for their investigation. It then looks at the issues of applying the current methodologies to the newer and fundamentally different technology. The paper concludes that law enforcement will be required to update their methods in order to remain effective against the current technology trends.

  10. Effects of group size, gender, and ability grouping on learning science process skills using microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    What are the effects of group size (individuals, pairs, and quads of students), gender, and ability grouping of 245 seventh- and eighth-grade students on achievement within an environment that uses microcomputers as tools in learning science process skills? A split-plot, multivariate factorial design was used to analyze the above factors and interactions among the factors. Analyses indicated that the only statistically significant result was a main effect on ability for the two response variables measured in the study. Major conclusions included: (1) teams of two and four members working together solved problems as effectively as individuals, (2) the lessons and procedures implemented in the manner described generated a gender-neutral achievement outcome in science, and (3) microcomputer, using a file-management program and structured activities, can be used as a tool to promote student learning of science process skills.

  11. Process Writing and Communicative-Task-Based Instruction: Many Common Features, but More Common Limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Process writing and communicative-task-based instruction both assume productive tasks that prompt self-expression to motivate students and as the principal engine for developing L2 proficiency in the language classroom. Besides this, process writing and communicative-task-based instruction have much else in common, despite some obvious…

  12. Rethinking Communication in Innovation Processes: Creating Space for Change in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeuwis, Cees; Aarts, Noelle

    2011-01-01

    This paper systematically rethinks the role of communication in innovation processes, starting from largely separate theoretical developments in communication science and innovation studies. Literature review forms the basis of the arguments presented. The paper concludes that innovation is a collective process that involves the contextual…

  13. 77 FR 38826 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of infringement...

  14. The Influence of BMW Group Energy Strategy Communication on Corporate Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Jurum Kipke

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of BMW Group energystrategy communication in order to build excellent BMWcorporate image worldwide with the purpose of analyzing thecurrent situation regarding this topic on the Croatian car marketas well as analyzing the possible influence of BMW environmentprotection care and energy strategy on BMW corporateimage in the Republic of Croatia.To ensure sufficient supply of energy in order to meet the futureneeds, the BMW's chosen priorities worldwide are to promoteefficient use of today's available energy sources and to developinnovative solutions for the future. The company usesthese elements in building the desirable BMW corporate image.On the basis of the conducted surve, it was more than obviousthat these activities still do not play a large role in building agood BMW corporate image among BMW customers in Croatia.Obviously, there is great possibility for the BMW Group toimprove its corporate image in Croatia and on the similar marketsboth with the application of intensive environmental careand the energy strategy communication.

  15. Multilevel Approximations of Markovian Jump Processes with Applications in Communication Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Vilanova, Pedro

    2015-05-04

    This thesis focuses on the development and analysis of efficient simulation and inference techniques for Markovian pure jump processes with a view towards applications in dense communication networks. These techniques are especially relevant for modeling networks of smart devices —tiny, abundant microprocessors with integrated sensors and wireless communication abilities— that form highly complex and diverse communication networks. During 2010, the number of devices connected to the Internet exceeded the number of people on Earth: over 12.5 billion devices. By 2015, Cisco’s Internet Business Solutions Group predicts that this number will exceed 25 billion. The first part of this work proposes novel numerical methods to estimate, in an efficient and accurate way, observables from realizations of Markovian jump processes. In particular, hybrid Monte Carlo type methods are developed that combine the exact and approximate simulation algorithms to exploit their respective advantages. These methods are tailored to keep a global computational error below a prescribed global error tolerance and within a given statistical confidence level. Indeed, the computational work of these methods is similar to the one of an exact method, but with a smaller constant. Finally, the methods are extended to systems with a disparity of time scales. The second part develops novel inference methods to estimate the parameters of Markovian pure jump process. First, an indirect inference approach is presented, which is based on upscaled representations and does not require sampling. This method is simpler than dealing directly with the likelihood of the process, which, in general, cannot be expressed in closed form and whose maximization requires computationally intensive sampling techniques. Second, a forward-reverse Monte Carlo Expectation-Maximization algorithm is provided to approximate a local maximum or saddle point of the likelihood function of the parameters given a set of

  16. Verbal communication as a case of study in a psychotherapeutic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staniszewska Żanna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the psychological aspects of verbal communication, its role in the process of communication and realization of personality in society. Human speech is taken up as means of expression of individuality and his/her inner world. The features of speech are used in psychotherapeutic activity as an instrument for research of individual traits and communicative behaviour of a person. The development of active and empathic listening is an important part of psychotherapy aimed at the improvement of communicative skills in the intercourse. The important components in the process of research and correction of verbal behaviour are metacommunication and focusing on the process. The psychological prosecution of these aspects of verbal communication affects the improvement of communication efficiency and as a result influences adaptation and development of a personality in the society.

  17. The Advent of the Group-Communication Era%论群体传播时代的莅临

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋岩; 曹飞

    2012-01-01

    We have witnessed the advent of the group-communication era in which everyone can speak out and communication is prevalent. Excess production capacity is the basic economic feature of the group- communication era, and it is also the social soil for its rise. The Internet offers a "physical space" for group- communication, which is constantly existent. Group communication has to some extent reduced the meaning conveyance and media monopoly of mass communication, and also offers opportunities and platforms for individuals, groups, enterprises and institutions to participate in the communication competition. There' re both competition and cooperation among mass communication, organizational communication and group communication, and the only way for win-win is to benefit from each other' s strength. Making full use of group communication can get more effects with less effort in Internet promotion and cultural marketing. What' s worthy of noticing, the intertwining of group communication such as micro-blogs, with interpersonal communication may cause rumors to become influential.%一个“人人都能发声,传播无处不在”的群体传播时代已经到来。产能过剩是群体传播时代的基本经济特征,也是其兴起的社会土壤。互联网为群体传播提供了无时不在的“物理空间”。群体传播在一定程度上消解了大众传播的意义传递和媒介垄断,又为个体、群体、企业和机构参与传播竞争,提供了机会和平台。大众传播、组织传播与群体传播,既存博弈又有合作,只有相互借力才能共赢。在网络推广、文化营销中,充分利用群体传播能够实现“四两拨千斤”的效果。值得注意的是,微博等群体传播与人际传播的交织,却是谣言产生影响力的根源。

  18. Qualitative assessment of student-teacher communication using focus group discussion in a Dental College in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasweta Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The communication between faculty and students is a vital component of optimal facilitation of knowledge and learning. Various factors influence this dynamic. Aim: To assess communication levels between students and teachers in a dental college scenario via focus group discussion. Materials and Methods: The focus group discussion consisted of 10 groups; 5 groups representing the teachers, and 5 groups representing the students. Each group consisted of 6 participants. Hence there were a total of 30 teacher and 30 student participants. Focus group discussion was conducted for each of the groups for 30–45 min duration in the presence of a moderator and a note-taker. Open-ended questions were put across by the moderator to initiate and continue the discussions. The hand-written data taken by the note-taker were transcribed onto a computer on the same day of the discussion. Based on the transcription, domains were created for the student and teacher groups. Results: The issues raised by both the teacher and student groups in this focus group discussion were broadly classified into the following themes: (1 Past versus current scenario, (2 attitudes toward communication and learning, (3 hindrances to effective communication, and (4 potential solutions. Conclusions: Focus group discussion exposed many differences in the perceptions of teachers and students to communication. Each group, however, felt that bridging the teacher-student communication barrier was crucial to improve the teaching-learning experience. Many constructive solutions were provided by both the groups which can help to improve the quality of teaching-learning experience resulting in better quality of education.

  19. Investigating the effect of nurse-team communication on nurse turnover: relationships among communication processes, identification, and intent to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apker, Julie; Propp, Kathleen M; Ford, Wendy S Zabava

    2009-03-01

    Enhanced team communication may strengthen nurses' attachment to their organizations and teams and improve nurse retention. This study examines the relationships among nurse-team communication, identification (organizational and team), and intent to leave. Hospital nurses (N = 201) completed surveys measuring 3 nurse-team communication processes: promoting team synergy, ensuring quality decisions, and individualizing communication. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that promoting team synergy was a significant predictor of intent to leave, whereas ensuring quality decisions and individualizing communication did not account for significant additional variance in intent to leave. Separate analyses showed that the relationship between promoting team synergy and intent to leave was partially mediated by team identification or by organizational identification. Further analyses were conducted on the 7 communication practices for promoting team synergy. Mentoring emerged as the only significant predictor of intent to leave; however, its relationship to intent to leave was fully mediated by organizational identification or partially mediated by team identification. Pragmatic suggestions are offered to improve nurse identification and reduce turnover.

  20. Effects of Group Work on English Communicative Competence of Chinese International Graduates in United States Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mo

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated 14 Chinese international graduate students' lived experiences with group work and the effects of group work on their English communicative competence. The interview results showed that these participants' attitudes towards group work went through changes from initial inadaptation or dislike to later adaptation…

  1. Understanding process in group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Leclerc, Claude; Wykes, Til; Nicole, Luc; Abdel Baki, Amal

    2015-06-01

    Group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (GCBTp) has shown to be effective in diminishing symptoms, as well as in improving other psychosocial dimensions such as self-esteem. But little is known regarding the processes that generate these therapeutic improvements and might be harnessed to further improve its effectiveness. The current study aimed at investigating these processes, particularly those linked to interpersonal relationships. The participants were all assessed at baseline, were given 24 sessions of GCBTp over the course of 3 months and were assessed again at post-treatment as well as 6 months later (9 months from baseline). Sixty-six individuals with early psychosis took part in a study of GCBTp where therapist alliance and group cohesion were assessed at three time points during the therapy, and punctual (each session) self-perceptions on symptoms and optimism were collected. Improvements in symptoms (BPRS), self-esteem (SERS-SF) and in self-perceived therapeutic improvements (CHOICE) were linked to specific aspects of the alliance, group cohesion, as well as optimism. The variables retained were not always overall scores, suggesting the importance of the variables at key moments during the therapy. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the alliance and group cohesion, together significantly explaining improvements measured at post-therapy or follow-up. This study has attempted to focus mostly on relational aspects, as well as on self-perceptions, in the context of a GCBTp for individuals with early psychosis. This study also showed that these therapeutic relationships are especially useful when they are more stable and at specific moments during the therapy, namely when more difficult psychological work is done. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  2. The Cognitive Complexity in Modelling the Group Decision Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates for some basic contextual factors (such
    us the problem complexity, the users' creativity and the problem space complexity the cognitive complexity associated with modelling the group decision processes (GDP in e-meetings. The analysis is done by conducting a socio-simulation experiment for an envisioned collaborative software tool that acts as a stigmergic environment for modelling the GDP. The simulation results revels some interesting design guidelines for engineering some contextual functionalities that minimize the cognitive complexity associated with modelling the GDP.

  3. Starting the automation process by using group technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Andrés García Barbosa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes starting-up an automation process based on applying group technology (GT. Mecanizados CNC, a company making matallurgical sector products, bases the layout (organisation and disposition of its machinery on the concept of manufacturing cells; production is programmed once the best location for the equipment has been determined. The order of making products and suitable setting up of tools for the machinery in the cells is established, aimed at minimising set up leading to achieving 15% improvement in productivity.

  4. Value passing for Communicating Piecewise Deterministic Markov Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, Stefan; Schaft, Arjan van der; Julius, Agung

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we extend the CPDP model, which is used for compositional specification of PDP-type stochastic hybrid systems, to the value passing CPDP model. With value passing we can express communication of values of continuous variables between CPDP components. We show that the class of value pas

  5. Project Communication in Functions, Process and Project-Oriented Industiral Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samáková, Jana; Koltnerová, Kristína; Rybanský, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The article is focused on the project communication management. Industrial enterprises, which use project management must constantly search the new ways for improving. One of the possibilities is the change of management from a functional oriented to the projectoriented or process-oriented. Process-oriented and project-oriented companies have better project communication management during the all project life cycle. Communication in the project is a very important factor. According to the arguments of several authors, one of the biggest problem is that threaten the success of the project is just the communication. In each project is an important pillar - and that is communication. Only on the base of communication can the project move forward and achieve the target.

  6. Does CPOE support nurse-physician communication in the medication order process? A nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddik, Basema; Al-Mansour, Shaha

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of CPOE are many and have been recognised in the literature as important components for improving patient safety and clinician performance. However, there remain concerns about adverse effects CPOE systems may have on the medication order process and workflow processes. This study explores the perception of nurses regarding the CPOE support on nurse physician communication in the medication order process. A survey was developed measuring perceptions of CPOE features on workflow and nurse physician communication on a Likert scale. The majority of nurses felt that CPOE features supported the medication order process and perceived proper nurse physician communication. CPOE characteristics supported medication order processes and nurse physician communication although nurses reported additional work was required for follow up of physicians. Additional studies utilising in depth methods are recommended to fully understand medication order processes with further CPOE implementation.

  7. Using exercises to cope with the transference in the process of group counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Boyacı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available People who have different characteristics maintain their life by communicating each other. Today people may have many problems related to their relationships with others. So they may need professional support when they could not find a solution for some personal or social problems which they have faced throughout their life. In this sense, Counseling and Group Counseling is a professional field having the aim of helping people to overcome those problems. Group counseling has some advantages compared to individual counseling. The feeling of not being alone within the group and transfer of the experiences learned in the sessions to social life are some advantages of group counseling. Besides its advantages, transference and countertransference may arise in group counseling process. In this article; the exercises which may help to the group leader to cope with transference and countertransference during the group counseling have been examined in a theoretical framework. Some exercises like role playing, empty chair and unfinished business were discussed in the light of literature.  At the end of the study some recommendations and suggestions are offered to the counselors and the field professionals.

  8. Dynamical Processes in Ageing, Gene Regulation and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss

    project we constructed a mathematical model and showed that if DNA damage is primarily caused by geno-toxic agents, it would be advantageous for cells to have a fragile DNA repair mechanism. The second part of my Ph.D. thesis covers gene regulation. In the first project we show how RNA polymerase can...... be used as a transcription factor. This requires that promoter regions overlap, which 15% of promoters in E.coli do. In the second project I analyse a negative auto regulated transcription motif coupled to a positive auto regulation transcription motif. I find that a general feature of this motif...... players develop favourite communication partners. We observed how this dynamic caused a communication network to form. By quantifying the information flow in this network, we were able to shown how that the network functions as an anti-exploration mechanism against "information leeches"....

  9. Study on the Process of Gender Identification : Process by Children in Kindergarten Peer Groups

    OpenAIRE

    大滝, 世津子; Setsuko, OHTAKI; 東京大学大学院; Graduate School, The University of Tokyo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the formation of groups in kindergarten and the process of gender identification by children through their kindergarten life. In the field of sociology of education in Japan, there have been some studies on the process of gender identification. However, they have focused on the intensification process of gender categories, but tended to ignore the trigger that leads children to recognize their own "correct" gender, and how they ...

  10. Advantages of Parallel Processing and the Effects of Communications Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Allman, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Many computing tasks involve heavy mathematical calculations, or analyzing large amounts of data. These operations can take a long time to complete using only one computer. Networks such as the Internet provide many computers with the ability to communicate with each other. Parallel or distributed computing takes advantage of these networked computers by arranging them to work together on a problem, thereby reducing the time needed to obtain the solution. The drawback to using a network of computers to solve a problem is the time wasted in communicating between the various hosts. The application of distributed computing techniques to a space environment or to use over a satellite network would therefore be limited by the amount of time needed to send data across the network, which would typically take much longer than on a terrestrial network. This experiment shows how much faster a large job can be performed by adding more computers to the task, what role communications time plays in the total execution time, and the impact a long-delay network has on a distributed computing system.

  11. The effects of training group exercise class instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, N; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Quested, E; Hancox, J

    2016-06-10

    Drawing from self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), we developed and tested an intervention to train fitness instructors to adopt a motivationally adaptive communication style when interacting with exercisers. This was a parallel group, two-arm quasi-experimental design. Participants in the intervention arm were 29 indoor cycling instructors (n = 10 for the control arm) and 246 class members (n = 75 for the control arm). The intervention consisted of face-to-face workshops, education/information video clips, group discussions and activities, brainstorming, individual planning, and practical tasks in the cycling studio. Instructors and exercisers responded to validated questionnaires about instructors' use of motivational strategies and other motivation-related variables before the first workshop and at the end of the third and final workshop (4 months later). Time × arm interactions revealed no significant effects, possibly due to the large attrition of instructors and exercisers in the control arm. Within-group analyses in the intervention arm showed that exercisers' perceptions of instructor motivationally adaptive strategies, psychological need satisfaction, and intentions to remain in the class increased over time. Similarly, instructors in the intervention arm reported being less controlling and experiencing more need satisfaction over time. These results offer initial promising evidence for the positive impact of the training.

  12. The Role of Radiology in the Diagnostic Process: Information, Communication, and Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2017-07-25

    The diagnostic radiology process represents a partnership between clinical and radiology teams. As such, breakdowns in interpersonal interactions and communication can result in patient harm. We explore the role of radiology in the diagnostic process, focusing on key concepts of information and communication, as well as key interpersonal interactions of teamwork, collaboration, and collegiality, all based on trust. We propose 10 principles to facilitate effective information flow in the diagnostic process.

  13. Communication processes with patients in view of their perception of radiological risk: Experience in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, Leopoldo [Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Radiophysics and Radiation Protection Service, E-28034 Madrid, Spain(Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Concerning the use of ionising radiation in medicine, either for diagnosis or for therapy, the patient perceives a benefit for his health, but a radiological risk as well. The latest is sometimes not justified, because it comes from deficient information of the social surround or negatively influenced information by the mass media, which occurs when talking about radiobiological consequences of either nuclear or radioactive activities. These can lead to rejection, fears about the development of secondary effects (especially in children, pregnant women or cancer patients) and mistrust problems when the information received is not satisfactory. The correct communication with patients must assure that they can freely take an appropriate decision. Their implication in such strategy must be implicit in the informed consent at the end of the process. In the decision making with regard to the procedures with ionising radiations the following stake holders must be involved: Patients, Professionals and Involved organizations. Other stake holders' groups (institutions and public administration bodies, mass media, scientific and professional Societies, etc.) are involved and committed to this initiative of change in the communication process of such important information for the citizens about diagnostic and treatment of illness. (author)

  14. Participatory Communication in Development Process of Matenggeng Dams Cilacap District Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waluyo Handoko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction process of Matenggeng Dams is still have problem such as no dialogue or renegotiation to create a mutual agreement between the government and Dayeuhluhur society. This research aims to identify, analyze and design the model of participatory development communication in the construction process of Matenggeng Dams at Dayeuhluhur subdistrict Cilacap District, Central Java Province. This research used qualitative method with case study. Data Collection through interviews, observation, analysis of documentation and focus group discussions (FGD. The results showed: (1 People have known for a long time about the discourse of Matenggeng Dams construction through interpersonal communication from the parents. (2 There is still no agreement about compensation between the community and the government. (3 The community agree and have learned the benefits of dams and willing to dialogue again to achieve an agreement of compensation for the land and productive trees. The implication, the public will continue to feel anxious for certainty the future of people's lives, if there is no certainty continuation the development of the Matenggeng dams.

  15. Bio-objects and the media: the role of communication in bio-objectification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeseele, Pieter; Allgaier, Joachim; Martinelli, Lucia

    2013-06-01

    The representation of biological innovations in and through communication and media practices is vital for understanding the nature of "bio-objects" and the process we call "bio-objectification." This paper discusses two ideal-typical analytical approaches based on different underlying communication models, ie, the traditional (science- and media-centered) and media sociological (a multi-layered process involving various social actors in defining the meanings of scientific and technological developments) approach. In this analysis, the latter is not only found to be the most promising approach for understanding the circulation, (re)production, and (re)configuration of meanings of bio-objects, but also to interpret the relationship between media and science. On the basis of a few selected examples, this paper highlights how media function as a primary arena for the (re)production and (re)configuration of scientific and biomedical information with regards to bio-objects in the public sphere in general, and toward decision-makers, interest groups, and the public in specific.

  16. 1st International Conference on Recent Cognizance in Wireless Communication & Image Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Vishnu; Singh, Ghanshyam; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises the proceedings of the International Conference on Recent Cognizance in Wireless Communication & Image Processing. It brings together content from academicians, researchers, and industry experts in areas of Wireless Communication and Image Processing. The volume provides a snapshot of current progress in computational creativity and a glimpse of future possibilities. The proceedings include two kinds of paper submissions: (i) regular papers addressing foundation issues, describing original research on creative systems development and modeling; and (ii) position papers describing work-in-progress or research directions for computational creativity. This work will be useful to professionals and researchers working in the core areas of wireless communications and image processing.

  17. What children know about communication : a language biographical approach of the heterogeneity of plurilingual groups

    OpenAIRE

    Le Pichon-Vorstman, E.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    What do children know about communication? In the increasingly globalized world we live in, nowadays children more often come into contact with multiple languages at different ages and in variable contexts. Consequently, children may at times be required to communicate in situations in which they lack sufficient understanding of the language used. These situations of communication are characterized by an uneven proficiency of the language used and can lead to breakdowns in communication if th...

  18. Striding Networks of Inter-Process Communication Based on TCP/IP Protocol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄毅; 陈海春; 钱静; 陈灼民

    2004-01-01

    A mode of process/thread communication between QNX and WINDOWS operating systems in isomerous computers is described. It is proved in practice to be an entirely feasible mode with high efficiency and reliability. A socket created by Socket API is used to communicate between two operating systems.

  19. 12 CFR 617.7005 - When may electronic communications be used in the borrower rights process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... borrower rights process? Qualified lenders may use, with the parties' agreement, electronic commerce (E-commerce), including electronic communications for borrower rights disclosures. Part 609 of this chapter... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When may electronic communications be used...

  20. A Field Investigation of Peer Assessment as Part of the Student Group Grading Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaten, James A.; Richardson, M. Elizabeth

    A study examined the effectiveness of an experimental system of peer assessment. Two speech communication classes consisting of 22 student groups (110 participants) served as subjects. At the beginning of the semester, students in both classes were assigned to groups. Each group was responsible for presenting a project. The groups met both inside…

  1. Falling rings: Group and ritual process in a divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, A L

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes, analyzes, interprets, and spells out some implications of a divorce as it was faced and handled by a pastor and congregation. The challenge to work creatively with divorce came when both the husband and wife wished to remain in the congregation as members. The paper briefly sets forth theological perspectives on marriage, divorce, and discipline in the Mennonite Church, a brief case history of the couple, a description of the group and ritual process with which the pastor and congregation responded, and the reflections of the couple and members a year later. The paper offers not a model but, rather, a symbol as presented in the title, "Falling Rings." It is hoped that the symbol will not only give rise to thought, but will also spark the imagination so as to enable other congregations to respond more assertively, creatively, and caringly to those who divorce in their midst.

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (78th, Washington, DC, August 9-12, 1995). Science Communications Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Science Communication Interest Group section of the proceedings contains the following seven papers: "Using Television to Foster Children's Interest in Science" (Marie-Louise Mares and others); "Trends in Newspaper Coverage of Science over Three Decades: A Content Analytic Study" (Marianne G. Pellechia); "Media…

  3. Satisfaction with Online Commercial Group Chat: The Influence of Perceived Technology Attributes, Chat Group Characteristics, and Advisor Communication Style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dolen, W.M.; Dabholkar, P.A.; de Ruyter, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines online commercial group chat from a structuration theory perspective. The findings support the influence of perceived technology attributes (control, enjoyment, reliability, speed, and ease of use) and chat group characteristics (group involvement, similarity, and receptivity) on

  4. Evaluation methodology for comparing memory and communication of analytic processes in visual analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Provenance tools can help capture and represent the history of analytic processes. In addition to supporting analytic performance, provenance tools can be used to support memory of the process and communication of the steps to others. Objective evaluation methods are needed to evaluate how well provenance tools support analyst s memory and communication of analytic processes. In this paper, we present several methods for the evaluation of process memory, and we discuss the advantages and limitations of each. We discuss methods for determining a baseline process for comparison, and we describe various methods that can be used to elicit process recall, step ordering, and time estimations. Additionally, we discuss methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses of process memory. By organizing possible memory evaluation methods and providing a meta-analysis of the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches, this paper can inform study design and encourage objective evaluation of process memory and communication.

  5. Community responses to communication campaigns for influenza A (H1N1: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Lesley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This research was a part of a contestable rapid response initiative launched by the Health Research Council of New Zealand and the Ministry of Health in response to the 2009 influenza A pandemic. The aim was to provide health authorities in New Zealand with evidence-based practical information to guide the development and delivery of effective health messages for H1N1 and other health campaigns. This study contributed to the initiative by providing qualitative data about community responses to key health messages in the 2009 and 2010 H1N1 campaigns, the impact of messages on behavioural change and the differential impact on vulnerable groups in New Zealand. Methods Qualitative data were collected on community responses to key health messages in the 2009 and 2010 Ministry of Health H1N1 campaigns, the impact of messages on behaviour and the differential impact on vulnerable groups. Eight focus groups were held in the winter of 2010 with 80 participants from groups identified by the Ministry of Health as vulnerable to the H1N1 virus, such as people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, children, Pacific Peoples and Māori. Because this study was part of a rapid response initiative, focus groups were selected as the most efficient means of data collection in the time available. For Māori, focus group discussion (hui is a culturally appropriate methodology. Results Thematic analysis of data identified four major themes: personal and community risk, building community strategies, responsibility and information sources. People wanted messages about specific actions that they could take to protect themselves and their families and to mitigate any consequences. They wanted transparent and factual communication where both good and bad news is conveyed by people who they could trust. Conclusions The responses from all groups endorsed the need for community based risk management including information dissemination. Engaging

  6. Designing a Repetitive Group Sampling Plan for Weibull Distributed Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijun Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptance sampling plans are useful tools to determine whether the submitted lots should be accepted or rejected. An efficient and economic sampling plan is very desirable for the high quality levels required by the production processes. The process capability index CL is an important quality parameter to measure the product quality. Utilizing the relationship between the CL index and the nonconforming rate, a repetitive group sampling (RGS plan based on CL index is developed in this paper when the quality characteristic follows the Weibull distribution. The optimal plan parameters of the proposed RGS plan are determined by satisfying the commonly used producer’s risk and consumer’s risk at the same time by minimizing the average sample number (ASN and then tabulated for different combinations of acceptance quality level (AQL and limiting quality level (LQL. The results show that the proposed plan has better performance than the single sampling plan in terms of ASN. Finally, the proposed RGS plan is illustrated with an industrial example.

  7. USAGE OF SOCIAL SERVICES IN THE PROCESS OF ORGANIZATION OF COMMUNICATION FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myloslava M. Chernii

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Today especially urgent problem is communication and the development of communication skills of future teachers as well as communicative culture is the main structural component of his professionalism. Schools and classes, both conventional and virtual, must have teachers, armed with technology resources and skills, and able to effectively teach the subject using information and communication technologies. It all comes down to the fact that the modern teacher has to be aware of the latest technologies that can help him to organize trainings and communication. Therefore, a special role is given to the training of future teachers and vector of application of social services in the organization of communication in the learning process.

  8. Social communication skills group treatment: a feasibility study for persons with traumatic brain injury and comorbid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Cynthia; Hawley, Lenore; Newman, Jody; Morey, Clare; Gerber, Don; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of improving impaired social communication skills in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concomitant neurological or psychiatric conditions, using an intervention with evidence of efficacy in a TBI cohort without such complications. Cohort study with pre-post intervention and follow-up assessments. Thirty individuals with TBI ≥ 1 year post-injury and identified social communication problems participated in a group intervention to improve social communication skills. Group Interactive Structured Treatment (GIST) for Social Competence; 13 week, 1.5 hour manualized intervention. Profile of Pragmatic Impairment in Communication (PPIC); Social Communication Skills Questionnaire-Adapted (SCSQ-A); LaTrobe Communication Questionnaire (LCQ); Goal Attainment Scale (GAS), Awareness Questionnaire (AQ), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS); Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools (PART). Participants made statistically significant gains on the SCSQ-A, GAS and SWLS post-treatment and at 6 months follow-up, using self and other ratings. Gains on the PPIC did not reach statistical significance but trended toward improvement. Treatment effects were not noted in analyses of the AQ or the PART. The LCQ showed statistically significant gains post-treatment and at follow-up. Participants showed improvement on subjective social communication skills measures post-treatment and at follow-up, demonstrating potential efficacy of the intervention in a broader population of persons with TBI, worthy of further investigation.

  9. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaska, William C.; Jensen, Craig M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  10. Stalling the Learning Process: Group Dynamics in Cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mike; Ralph, Sue

    2001-01-01

    Findings of a study of 10 graduate student sin an online course conducted via computer conferencing included (1) the need to familiarize participants with software and ensure access; (2) differences in online and face-to-face communication and participation; and (3) the need for careful structuring and attention to detail in online courses.…

  11. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: ADVANCE IN THE PROCESS OF HUMANIZATION OR ALIENATION PHENOMENON?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito de Jesus Pinheiro Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to contribute to the debate on the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in education, under the reference of the historical-critical pedagogy. We highlight aspects to be taken into account in this debate, from the conception that education is a specific field of class struggle. We discuss the possibilities of fetishization of these technologies in a world where technological determinism is part of hegemonic thinking, largely marked by disputes meanings, and the pressures of hegemonic groups to the production and movement of goods. From the criticism of this hegemonic sense, we emphasize the potential of ICT as enriching the educational work, provided these are appropriate for purposes subject to autonomously defined aims, connected to the humanization process of education.

  12. 77 FR 65580 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  13. Managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Parker, Jeffrey J; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-05-20

    A parallel computer includes nodes, each having main memory and a messaging unit (MU). Each MU includes computer memory, which in turn includes, MU message buffers. Each MU message buffer is associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node. In the parallel computer, managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process includes: receiving, by an MU of a compute node, one or more data communications messages in an MU message buffer associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node; determining, by an application agent, that the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process is full prior to initialization of the uninitialized process; establishing, by the application agent, a temporary message buffer for the uninitialized process in main computer memory; and moving, by the application agent, data communications messages from the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process to the temporary message buffer in main computer memory.

  14. Is sociality required for the evolution of communicative complexity? Evidence weighed against alternative hypotheses in diverse taxonomic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Terry J; Garcia-Porta, Joan

    2012-07-05

    Complex social communication is expected to evolve whenever animals engage in many and varied social interactions; that is, sociality should promote communicative complexity. Yet, informal comparisons among phylogenetically independent taxonomic groups seem to cast doubt on the putative role of social factors in the evolution of complex communication. Here, we provide a formal test of the sociality hypothesis alongside alternative explanations for the evolution of communicative complexity. We compiled data documenting variations in signal complexity among closely related species for several case study groups--ants, frogs, lizards and birds--and used new phylogenetic methods to investigate the factors underlying communication evolution. Social factors were only implicated in the evolution of complex visual signals in lizards. Ecology, and to some degree allometry, were most likely explanations for complexity in the vocal signals of frogs (ecology) and birds (ecology and allometry). There was some evidence for adaptive evolution in the pheromone complexity of ants, although no compelling selection pressure was identified. For most taxa, phylogenetic null models were consistently ranked above adaptive models and, for some taxa, signal complexity seems to have accumulated in species via incremental or random changes over long periods of evolutionary time. Becoming social presumably leads to the origin of social communication in animals, but its subsequent influence on the trajectory of signal evolution has been neither clear-cut nor general among taxonomic groups.

  15. Serial optical communications and ultra-fast optical signal processing of Tbit/s data signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Hu, Hao;

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews our recent advances in ultra-high speed serial optical communications. It describes Tbit/s optical signal processing and various materials allowing for this, as well as network scenarios embracing this technology......This paper reviews our recent advances in ultra-high speed serial optical communications. It describes Tbit/s optical signal processing and various materials allowing for this, as well as network scenarios embracing this technology...

  16. Communication behaviours of skilled and less skilled oncologists: a validation study of the Medical Interaction Process System (MIPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Sarah; Hall, Angela

    2004-09-01

    The Medical Interaction Process System (MIPS) was originally developed in order to create a reliable observation tool for analysing doctor-patient encounters in the oncology setting. This paper reports a series of analyses carried out to establish whether the behaviour categories of the MIPS can discriminate between skilled and less skilled communicators. This involved the use of MIPS coded cancer consultations to compare the MIPS indices of 10 clinicians evaluated by an independent professional as skilled communicators with 10 who were considered less skilled. Eleven out of the 15 MIPS variables tested were able to distinguish the skilled from the less skilled group. Although limitations to the study are discussed, the results indicate that the MIPS has satisfactory discriminatory power and the results provide validity data that meet key objectives for developing the system. There is an ever-increasing need for reliable methods of assessing doctors' communication skills and evaluating medical interview teaching programmes.

  17. Communication in crisis situations in the process of immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravlija, Jelena; Vasilj, Ivan

    2012-09-01

    Immunization is one of the most effective medical interventions in the prevention of the disease and represents the easiest and most cost-effective investment in health. The strategy of controlling contagious diseases that can be prevented through immunization has a long tradition in B&H. Mandatory immunizations are administered against ten diseases. Although the development of new technologies, the efforts of the pharmaceutical industry, the development of new vaccines provides better vaccines in terms of greater safety and effectiveness it should be pointed out that no vaccine is "absolutely effective and safe", and it will not achieve the immune response in 100% vaccinated, also there are possible side effects and unexpected reactions that could occur. Vaccination is often a media issue because previously unnoticed local, isolated events-side effects and complications of vaccination are now accompanied by media attention as there are now numerous and fast communication channels (internet, e-mail, TV1 etc.) and media evolved from being less "controlled" to more "commercial". Doubt in benefit of vaccination is growing even among health professionals who are expected to provide up-to-date, understandable information, and issue information about immunization benefits and potential risks. It is therefore important for health professionals to be well informed, to be a good source of authoritative, scientific and reasonable advice, and to speak openly about the benefits and risks of vaccination so that consumers fully understand both possible outcomes of vaccination. This takes communication skills, particularly in crisis situations connected with vaccination. Health professionals are thus faced with a changing attitude toward importance of immunization in the social climate where risk is less tolerated than ever before.

  18. Exploring the Communication Preferences of MOOC Learners and the Value of Preference-Based Groups: Is Grouping Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Peck, Kyle L.; Hristova, Adelina; Jablokow, Kathryn W.; Hoffman, Vicki; Park, Eunsung; Bayeck, Rebecca Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of learners complete Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs); the absence of peer and professor support contributes to retention issues. MOOC leaders often form groups to supplement in-course forums and Q&A sessions, and students participating in groups find them valuable. Instructors want to assist in the formation of groups,…

  19. Development of the Chalmers Grouped Actinide Extraction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halleröd Jenny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several solvents for Grouped ActiNide EXtraction (GANEX processes have been investigated at Chalmers University of Technology in recent years. Four different GANEX solvents; cyclo-GANEX (CyMe4- -BTBP, 30 vol.% tri-butyl phosphate (TBP and cyclohexanone, DEHBA-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 20 vol.% N,N-di-2(ethylhexyl butyramide (DEHBA and cyclohexanone, hexanol-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and hexanol and FS-13-GANEX (CyMe4-BTBP, 30 vol.% TBP and phenyl trifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13 have been studied and the results are discussed and compared in this work. The cyclohexanone based solvents show fast and high extraction of the actinides but a somewhat poor diluent stability in contact with the acidic aqueous phase. FS-13-GANEX display high separation factors between the actinides and lanthanides and a good radiolytic and hydrolytic stability. However, the distribution ratios of the actinides are lower, compared to the cyclohexanone based solvents. The hexanol-GANEX is a cheap solvent system using a rather stable diluent but the actinide extraction is, however, comparatively low.

  20. An Investigation of Collaboration Processes in an Online Course: How Do Small Groups Develop over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Namsook

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated communication patterns and behavior in problem-solving groups in a graduate online course. An inductive qualitative analysis method was employed to analyze 732 messages that were retrieved from small group forums. The current study identified a temporal pattern of group development was in comparison with existing…

  1. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AT THE MODERN STAGE OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P. Osobov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses attention on the analysis of the role and place of the concept of "information and communication technologies" among the concepts related to technology training. In the article it is analyzed the aspects of nascence of the concept "Information and communication technologies", modern approaches to its identification. The author shows potential and possibility to use ICT at the modern stage of educational process. The paper analyzes the arsenal of modern information and communication technologies, their importance in the development of the potential of students. There are considered conditions of effective functioning of information and communication technologies in educational process. The author discusses possible directions of implementation of informatization in the educational process.

  2. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment.

  3. Shared-Screen Interaction: Engaging Groups in Map-Mediated Nonverbal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos; Rieniets, Tim

    This chapter describes the design and development of an interactive video installation that allows participants to explore a map narrative, and engage in group interactions through a shared screen. For this purpose, several layers of cartographic information were employed in a computer application, which was programmed with motion-tracking libraries in the open source tool processing. The interactive video installation has been chosen as a medium to achieve the following aims: (1) The visualization of urban-conflict as an interactive map narrative, and (2) the encouragement of social encounters through a shared screen. The development process begins with the design of interaction between the system and the participants, as well as between the participants themselves. Then we map the interaction design concepts into multimedia and architectural design. Finally, we provide a discussion on the creative process and the collaboration between different disciplines, such as architecture, urban planning, cartography, computer engineering, and media studies.

  4. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Green, Manfred S; Soskolne, Varda; Neumark, Yehuda

    2017-06-24

    Israel is a high-income country with an advanced health system and universal health-care insurance. Overall, the health status has improved steadily over recent decades. We examined differences in morbidity, mortality, and risk factors for selected non-communicable diseases (NCDs) between subpopulation groups. Between 1975 and 2014, life expectancy in Israel steadily increased and is currently above the average life expectancy for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Nevertheless, life expectancy has remained lower among Israeli Arabs than Israeli Jews, and this gap has recently widened. Age-adjusted mortality as a result of heart disease, stroke, or diabetes remains higher in Arabs, whereas age-adjusted incidence and mortality of cancer were higher among Jews. The prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in Israel is considerably higher among Arabs than Jews. Smoking prevalence is highest for Arab men and lowest for Arab women. Health inequalities are also evident by the indicators of socioeconomic position and in subpopulations, such as immigrants from the former Soviet Union, ultra-Orthodox Jews, and Bedouin Arabs. Despite universal health coverage and substantial improvements in the overall health of the Israeli population, substantial inequalities in NCDs persist. These differences might be explained, at least in part, by gaps in social determinants of health. The Ministry of Health has developed comprehensive programmes to reduce these inequalities between the major population groups. Sustained coordinated multisectoral efforts are needed to achieve a greater impact and to address other social inequalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconfigurable Signal Processing and Hardware Architecture for Broadband Wireless Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ying-Chang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a broadband wireless transceiver which can be reconfigured to any type of cyclic-prefix (CP -based communication systems, including orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM, single-carrier cyclic-prefix (SCCP system, multicarrier (MC code-division multiple access (MC-CDMA, MC direct-sequence CDMA (MC-DS-CDMA, CP-based CDMA (CP-CDMA, and CP-based direct-sequence CDMA (CP-DS-CDMA. A hardware platform is proposed and the reusable common blocks in such a transceiver are identified. The emphasis is on the equalizer design for mobile receivers. It is found that after block despreading operation, MC-DS-CDMA and CP-DS-CDMA have the same equalization blocks as OFDM and SCCP systems, respectively, therefore hardware and software sharing is possible for these systems. An attempt has also been made to map the functional reconfigurable transceiver onto the proposed hardware platform. The different functional entities which will be required to perform the reconfiguration and realize the transceiver are explained.

  6. The role of nonverbal and verbal communication in a multimedia informed consent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasek, Joseph M; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Mahnke, Andrea N; McCarty, Catherine A; Starren, Justin B; Westra, Bonnie L

    2011-01-01

    Nonverbal and verbal communication elements enhance and reinforce the consent form in the informed consent process and need to be transferred appropriately to multimedia formats using interaction design when re-designing the process. Observational, question asking behavior, and content analyses were used to analyze nonverbal and verbal elements of an informed consent process. A variety of gestures, interruptions, and communication styles were observed. In converting a verbal conversation about a textual document to multimedia formats, all aspects of the original process including verbal and nonverbal variation should be one part of an interaction community-centered design approach.

  7. Adolescent sexuality in the light of group processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, O F

    1980-01-01

    Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is used to illustrate several connected theses regarding the relation of the couple to its surrounding social group: these include a couple's oedipal rebellion, the unconscious longing for and hatred of the idealized couple by the large group, the denial of aggression within the couple and its projection onto the group, the impotence of rationality and the conventionalization of sexuality in the large group, and the pervading dynamics of aggression in group formation. Pertinent psychoanalytic theories are briefly summarized, and this combined analysis is applied to the psychoanalyst's attitude regarding adolescent patients' love life.

  8. What children know about communication : a language biographical approach of the heterogeneity of plurilingual groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pichon-Vorstman, E.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    What do children know about communication? In the increasingly globalized world we live in, nowadays children more often come into contact with multiple languages at different ages and in variable contexts. Consequently, children may at times be required to communicate in situations in which they

  9. Effects of Communication Strategy Training on EFL Students' Performance in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Stuart; Fischer, Danielle; Geluso, Joe; Von Joo, Lucius

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been conducted with regard to communication strategy training and performance on communicative tasks (Lam, 2009; Nakatani, 2010; Naughton, 2006). This study aims to add to the literature by examining how two strategies, clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation, and two methods of teaching the…

  10. What children know about communication : a language biographical approach of the heterogeneity of plurilingual groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pichon-Vorstman, E.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    What do children know about communication? In the increasingly globalized world we live in, nowadays children more often come into contact with multiple languages at different ages and in variable contexts. Consequently, children may at times be required to communicate in situations in which they la

  11. The new inter process communication middle-ware for the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, Serguei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger & Data Acquisition (TDAQ) project was started almost twenty years ago with the aim of providing scalable distributed data collection system for the experiment. While the software dealing with physics data flow was implemented by directly using the low-level communication protocols, like TCP and UDP, the control and monitoring infrastructure services for the TDAQ system were implemented on top of the CORBA communication middle-ware. CORBA provides a high-level object oriented abstraction for the inter process communication, hiding communication complexity from the developers. This approach speeds up and simplifies development of communication services but incurs some extra cost in terms of performance and resources overhead. Our experience of using CORBA for control and monitoring data exchange in the distributed TDAQ system was very successful, mostly due to the outstanding quality of the CORBA brokers, which have been used in the project: omniORB for C++ and JacORB for Java. However, du...

  12. The new inter process communication middle-ware for the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, Serguei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger & Data Acquisition (TDAQ) project was started almost twenty years ago with the aim of providing scalable distributed data collection system for the experiment. While the software dealing with physics data flow was implemented by directly using the low-level communication protocols, like TCP and UDP, the control and monitoring infrastructure services for the TDAQ system were implemented on top of the CORBA communication middle-ware. CORBA provides a high-level object oriented abstraction for the inter process communication, hiding communication complexity from the developers. This approach speeds up and simplifies development of communication services but incurs some extra cost in terms of performance and resources overhead. Our experience of using CORBA for control and monitoring data exchange in the distributed TDAQ system was very successful, mostly due to the outstanding quality of the CORBA brokers, which have been used in the project: omniORB for C++ and JacORB for Java. However, du...

  13. "Getting Our Story Straight: Taking the scientific process out of science communication"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschland, M.

    2011-12-01

    Conveying the implications and applications of our science is becoming more, not less difficult. With media and policy debates around scientific issues fraught with gridlock, misinformation and confusion, we must recognize that the scientific process itself often contributes more noise than clarity. For science to occupy more of a privileged and influential place in the public and policy discourse, this must change. From the perspective of a communications professional, this presentation offers solutions. Efforts to remedy this have disproportionately focused on training scientists to be "better" communicators. While this is necessary, it is far from sufficient in building the type of public trust and authority that really moves the credibility needle and our impact. By itself, a train the scientist approach actually complicates the issue by unleashing hoards of trained "science communicators", trumpeting disconnected, qualified, and sometimes contradictory messages. The result, from the public's perspective, is a focus on the sausage making elements of science, rather than the sausages - or the real consensus messages resulting from our work. What is required is much better coordination in terms of framing and amplifying clear messages and findings around areas where real consensus exists, and a similar focus on deemphasizing those that occupy the opinion tails. Other sectors including government, corporates and medical sciences understand and practice this to better effect in building public consensus. The correctives to this are threefold: -Recognize that the scientific process, while excellent for doing science, is an awful way to communicate clearly. Publicly airing out the debates that are part and parcel of a healthy scientific discourse is a sure recipe for confusion. -Create and bolster better coordination mechanisms for consensus message building and delivery. Professional associations can and must play a more central convening and shaping role when it

  14. Process and Outcome in Encounter Groups: The Effects of Group Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stava, Lawrence J.; Bednar, Richard L.

    1979-01-01

    Examines relative efficacy of dissonance theory and interpersonal attraction theory over random composition in composing groups that will work best in group therapy. Treatment variables were a tape-recorded treatment condition, a placebo condition, and a no-treatment control condition. No clear support for either theory of group support was found.…

  15. From individual preference construction to group decisions: framing effects and group processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milch, K.F.; Weber, E.U.; Appelt, K.C.; Handgraaf, M.J.J.; Krantz, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Two choice tasks known to produce framing effects in individual decisions were used to test group sensitivity to framing, relative to that of individuals, and to examine the effect of prior, individual consideration of a decision on group choice. Written post-decision reasons and pre-decision group

  16. G-Lets: Signal Processing Using Transformation Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rajathilagam, B; Soman, K P

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm using transformation groups and their irreducible representations to generate an orthogonal basis for a signal in the vector space of the signal. It is shown that multiresolution analysis can be done with amplitudes using a transformation group. G-lets is thus not a single transform, but a group of linear transformations related by group theory. The algorithm also specifies that a multiresolution and multiscale analysis for each resolution is possible in terms of frequencies. Separation of low and high frequency components of each amplitude resolution is facilitated by G-lets. Using conjugacy classes of the transformation group, more than one set of basis may be generated, giving a different perspective of the signal through each basis. Applications for this algorithm include edge detection, feature extraction, denoising, face recognition, compression, and more. We analyze this algorithm using dihedral groups as an example. We demonstrate the results with an ECG signal and the standard...

  17. Using Delphi Technique and the P-Process model to assess health communication programmes in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Onigbanjo-Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Strategic health communication is an integral part of the programmes and development that influence decisions regarding health. Health communication is often integrated into public health interventions to improve programme outcomes. Despite the massive donor funding for public health programmes in Nigeria, there is limited information on the current status of health communication programmes. This study aims to identify the knowledge gaps, describe the future direction and highlight recommendations for strengthening health communication programmes in Nigeria. Using a purposive sampling methodology, the online study used a two-staged Delphi Technique and the P-Process model to collect data from key stakeholders. Stakeholders included donors, government, civil society organisations, research institutions, education and training institutions, and communities. Descriptive analysis was done using SPSS. Capacity-building gaps were identified and a conceptual framework was developed. These gaps included: the low technical capacity of stakeholders in health communication, limited resources for organisations to implement activities, the lack of a strategic framework to guide the implementation of health communication programmes, and minimal collaboration with stakeholders. These findings provided an insight into the current state of health communication programmes, which is mainly at the programme activity level. In this study, the findings highlighted a critical need to develop and strengthen health communication programmes in Nigeria with a view to improving performance and health outcomes and optimising healthservice delivery in the country.

  18. An Analysis of Malaysian Political Communication and Its Role in Electoral Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saabar Suhaimee Saahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to discuss political communication in Malaysia especially after the 12th General Elections (GE12. The purpose of this study is to analyse the political efficacy or sense making process which involve analysing the techniques and creative execution that had been used by political parties and its effects on Malaysian voters. The results of GE 12 had fashioned a political tsunami that influenced many important aspects in the Malaysian political landscape, be it national and economic policies, social unity or campaign strategies. Therefore, the main focus of this paper is to discuss the elements and importance of political communication research in Malaysian political communication campaign by focusing on the aspects of creative execution, political information efficacy and sense making process and its impact on the choice of communication tools amongst Malaysian voters.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF FORMAL COMMUNICATION IN THE PROCESS OF ACCESSING EUROPEAN FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Zait

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Present article aims, based on direct research, to identify of main sources of information in the process of accessing European funds. Performed within Trotus Valley, Bacau, the proposed research provides pertinent information from the perspective of the main sources of influence on the manifestation of interest in accessing funding and in terms of highlighting the influence of various socio-demographic variables on such information sources. According to the Romanian experience of accessing European funds, apparently formal communication efforts prove ineffective, being less reliable and stimulating compared to the informal interpersonal communication. Because most of the potential beneficiaries of EU funds precept this process as one dominated by sinuous and powerful bureaucracy, we tend to believe that in the expressions of interest in accessing EU funds, formal communication only meet the cognitive structure of attitude, affective and conative entering under the influence of informal communication.

  20. Investigating Factors Affecting Group Processes in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Sunil; Thompson, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread popularity of distance learning, there is a need to investigate elements of online courses that continue to pose significant challenges for educators. One of the challenges relates to creating and managing group projects. This study investigated business students' perceptions of group work in online classes. The constructs of…

  1. Exploring the impact of common assessment instrumentation on communication and collaboration in inpatient and community-based mental health settings: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynn; Hirdes, John P

    2014-10-03

    Recognition that integrated services can lead to more efficient and effective care has made the principle of integration a priority for health systems worldwide for the last decade. However, actually bringing fully integrated services to life has eluded most health care organizations. Mental health has followed the rule, rather than the exception, when it comes integrating services. The lack of effective mechanisms to evaluate the needs of persons across mental health care services has been an important barrier to communication between professionals involved in care. This study sought to understand communication among inpatient and community-based mental health staff during transfers of care, before and after implementation of compatible assessment instrumentation. Two focus groups were held with staff from inpatient (n = 10) and community (n = 10) settings in an urban, specialized psychiatric hospital in Ontario (Canada) - prior to and one year after implementation of compatible instrumentation in the community program. Transcripts were coded and aggregated into themes. Very different views of current communication patterns during transfers of care emerged. Inpatient mental health staff described a predictable, well-known process, whereas community-based staff emphasized unpredictability. Staff also discussed issues related to trust and the circle of care. All agreed that compatible assessments in inpatient and community mental health settings would facilitate communication through use of a common assessment language. However, no change in communication patterns was reported one year post implementation of compatible instrumentation. Though all participants agreed on the potential for compatible instrumentation to improve communication during transfers of care, this cannot happen overnight. A number of issues related to trust, evidence-based practice, and organizational factors act as barriers to communication. In particular, staff noted the need for the results

  2. Effects of the two-way communication checklist (2-COM): a one-year cluster randomized study in a group of severely mentally ill persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Hans; Olin, Elisabeth; Strand, Jennifer; Tidefors, Inga

    2014-02-01

    In a health-care service with the emphasis on improvement related to functioning and well-being, the communication process between patient and professionals is essential. There is a lack of research on this matter. The aim was to investigate, in a group of severely mentally ill persons, whether the use of a simple communication tool could influence the sense of empowerment, satisfaction with care, therapeutic alliance and unmet needs. The study had a cluster randomized design. The intervention was a communication tool (2-COM) applied in two teams during one year. In a comparison group of two other teams, the treatment was as usual. At baseline, after six months, and after one year, assessments were made. After one year the 2-COM groups seemed to have a larger reduction in unmet needs compared to the treatment-as-usual group. However, there were large problems with attrition in the study, and it was not possible to draw relevant conclusions. The methodological problems were substantial, and the study may be considered as a pilot study. In a main study the researchers ought to take control over the selection of patients on the basis of the experiences from this study.

  3. Polar communications: Status and recommendations. Report of the Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, T. J. (Editor); Jezek, K. C. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The capabilities of the existing communication links within the polar regions, as well as between the polar regions and the continental United States, are summarized. These capabilities are placed in the context of the principal scientific disciplines that are active in polar research, and in the context of how scientists both utilize and are limited by present technologies. Based on an assessment of the scientific objectives potentially achievable with improved communication capabilities, a list of requirements on and recommendations for communication capabilities necessary to support polar science over the next ten years is given.

  4. Computed radiographic image post-processing for automatic optimal display in picture archiving and communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhou, Zheng; Zhuang, Jun; Huang, H. K.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents the key post-processing algorithms and their software implementing for CR image automatic optimal display in picture archiving and communication system, which compliant with DICOM model of the image acquisition and presentation chain. With the distributed implementation from the acquisition to the display, we achieved the effects of better image visual quality, fast image communication and display, as well as data integrity of archived CR images in PACS.

  5. A we-centric service for mobile police officers to support communication in ad-hoc groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, R. van; Koning, N.M. de; Steen, M.D.; Reitsma, E.

    2007-01-01

    We-centric services are meant to stimulate and facilitate people to communicate and cooperate with others in dynamic or ad-hoc groups. Typically, a we-centric service provides hints and reasons to contact others, and, because these other people receive similar hints and reasons, stimulates and

  6. The Effect of Computer-Assisted Cooperative Learning Methods and Group Size on the EFL Learners' Achievement in Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, Ali Farhan

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effect of cooperative learning small group size and two different instructional modes (positive interdependence vs. individual accountability) on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) undergraduate learners' communication skills (speaking and writing) achievement in computer-based environments. The study also examined the…

  7. Group Projects as a Method of Promoting Student Scientific Communication and Collaboration in a Public Health Microbiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kristen L. W.; Baker, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication of scientific and medical information and collaborative work are important skills for students pursuing careers in health professions and other biomedical sciences. In addition, group work and active learning can increase student engagement and analytical skills. Students in our public health microbiology class were required to work…

  8. How Male, Female, and Mixed-Gender Groups Regard Interaction and Leadership Differences in the Business Communication Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Janet K.; Neal, Joan C.; Waner, Karen K.

    2001-01-01

    Offers five recommendations for teachers or facilitators of team communication: (1) students should avoid groupthink; (2) offer students methods for reaching agreement in a timely manner; (3) vary subjects of group writing assignments; (4) encourage all students to be active participants; and (5) emphasize the importance of good writing skills to…

  9. Interpersonal frontopolar neural synchronization in group communication: An exploration toward fNIRS hyperscanning of natural interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Takayuki; Sasaki, Yukako; Sakaki, Kohei; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-06-01

    Research of interpersonal neural synchronization (INS) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) hyperscanning is an expanding nascent field. This field still requires the accumulation of findings and establishment of analytic standards. In this study, we therefore intend to extend fNIRS-based INS research in three directions: (1) verifying the enhancement of frontopolar INS by natural and unstructured verbal communication involving more than two individuals; (2) examining timescale dependence of the INS modulation; and (3) evaluating the effects of artifact reduction methods in capturing INS. We conducted an fNIRS hyperscanning study while 12 groups of four subjects were engaged in cooperative verbal communication. Corresponding to the three objectives, our analyses of the data (1) confirmed communication-enhanced frontopolar INS, as expected from the region's roles in social communication; (2) revealed the timescale dependency in the INS modulation, suggesting the merit of evaluating INS in fine timescale bins; and (3) determined that removal of the skin blood flow component engenders substantial improvement in sensitivity to communication-enhanced INS and segregation from artifactual synchronization, and that caution for artifact reduction preprocessing is needed to avoid excessive removal of the neural fluctuation component. Accordingly, this study provides a prospective technical basis for future hyperscanning studies during daily communicative activities.

  10. Temporally selective processing of communication signals by auditory midbrain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliott, Taffeta M; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Kelley, Darcy B

    2011-01-01

    of auditory neurons in the laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis (TS) of X. laevis specializes in encoding vocalization click rates. We recorded single TS units while pure tones, natural calls, and synthetic clicks were presented directly to the tympanum via a vibration-stimulation probe. Synthesized...... click rates ranged from 4 to 50 Hz, the rate at which the clicks begin to overlap. Frequency selectivity and temporal processing were characterized using response-intensity curves, temporal-discharge patterns, and autocorrelations of reduplicated responses to click trains. Characteristic frequencies...

  11. American Psychologist Task Force Report: Clarifying Mission, Coverage, Communication, and Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2002-01-01

    An American Psychological Association task force reviewed the role and function of "American Psychologist," (AP) focusing on its coverage domain and issues related to its editorial review process. This report examines AP editorial domain, AP editorial instructions, AP editorship, communications within the AP editorial process, use of ad…

  12. Model checking process algebra of communicating resources for real-time systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudjadar, Jalil; Kim, Jin Hyun; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new process algebra, called PACoR, for real-time systems which deals with resource- constrained timed behavior as an improved version of the ACSR algebra. We define PACoR as a Process Algebra of Communicating Resources which allows to explicitly express preemptiveness...

  13. Model Checking Process Algebra of Communicating Resources for Real-time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudjadar, Jalil; Kim, Jin Hyun; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new process algebra, called PACOR, for real-time systems which deals with resource constrained timed behavior as an improved version of the ACSR algebra. We define PACOR as a Process Algebra of Communicating Resources which allows to express preemptiveness, urgent ness...

  14. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  15. BLENDED LEARNING FACILITATION OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PROCESSES IN LARGE GROUPS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    PÜTZ Claus; INTVEEN Geesche

    2010-01-01

    By supplying various combinations of advanced instructions and different forms of exercises individual learning processes within the impartation of basic knowledge can be activated and supported at best...

  16. Analysis of a Group Decision-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of group decision and group thinking in the organization of a firm, taking as reference theoretical models and their practical applications. Organizational goals are often blocked by a pattern of thinking that develops within organizations. The article will also underline the importance oforganizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to reach, finally, to the desired result in the main goals of the organization.

  17. Analysis of a Group Decision-Making Process

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of group decision and group thinking in the organization of a firm, taking as reference theoretical models and their practical applications. Organizational goals are often blocked by a pattern of thinking that develops within organizations. The article will also underline the importance of organizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to reach, finally, to the desired result in the main goals of the organization.

  18. Social Information Processing and Group-Induced Response Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    shifts when initial individual tendencies are cautious, and a more general label for the shift, group polarization ( Moscovici ’ & Zavalloni, 1969), is...attitudes (e.g., Doise, 1969; Moscovici & Zavalloni, 1969). One earlier article (Cummings and Chertkoff, 1971) proposed management implications of...Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology, 1978, 11, 145-195. I , Moscovici , S., & Zavolloni, M. The group as a polarizer of

  19. Building the Group: Using Personal Affirming to Create Healthy Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise

    1995-01-01

    Group leaders who offer affirmations to participants in outdoor education encourage healthy relationships and group cohesion and increase individuals' self-esteem. Personal affirming includes actions and statements that make participants feel comfortable in their environment, support capable work, and encourage behavior change in a supportive and…

  20. Analysis of Feedback processes in Online Group Interaction: a methodological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Espasa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the feedback. Research on feedback processes has predominantly focused on feedback design rather than on how students utilize feedback to improve learning. This methodological model fills this gap contributing to analyse the implementation of the feedback processes while students discuss collaboratively in a specific case of writing assignments. A review of different methodological models was carried out to define a framework adjusted to the analysis of the relationship of written and asynchronous group interaction, and students' activity and changes incorporated into the final text. The model proposed includes the following dimensions: 1 student participation 2 nature of student learning and 3 quality of student learning. The main contribution of this article is to present the methodological model and also to ascertain the model's operativity regarding how students incorporate such feedback into their essays.

  1. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  2. Energy saving in data processing and communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iazeolla, Giuseppe; Pieroni, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The power management of ICT systems, that is, data processing (Dp) and telecommunication (Tlc) systems, is becoming a relevant problem in economical terms. Dp systems totalize millions of servers and associated subsystems (processors, monitors, storage devices, etc.) all over the world that need to be electrically powered. Dp systems are also used in the government of Tlc systems, which, besides requiring Dp electrical power, also require Tlc-specific power, both for mobile networks (with their cell-phone towers and associated subsystems: base stations, subscriber stations, switching nodes, etc.) and for wired networks (with their routers, gateways, switches, etc.). ICT research is thus expected to investigate into methods to reduce Dp- and Tlc-specific power consumption. However, saving power may turn into waste of performance, in other words, into waste of ICT quality of service (QoS). This paper investigates the Dp and Tlc power management policies that look at compromises between power saving and QoS.

  3. "Processing Instruction": un tipo di grammatica comunicativa per la classe di lingua straniera. Il caso del futuro italiano. (Processing Instruction: One Type of Communicative Grammar for the Foreign Language Classroom. The Case of the Italian Future Tense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, Alessandro

    2000-01-01

    Examines the theoretical and practical rationale for processing instruction as a method of incorporating grammar instruction in a communicative foreign language approach. Presents results of a study on the role of processing instruction on the learning of the Italian future indicative tense by a group of English-speaking students. Results…

  4. "Processing Instruction": un tipo di grammatica comunicativa per la classe di lingua straniera. Il caso del futuro italiano. (Processing Instruction: One Type of Communicative Grammar for the Foreign Language Classroom. The Case of the Italian Future Tense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, Alessandro

    2000-01-01

    Examines the theoretical and practical rationale for processing instruction as a method of incorporating grammar instruction in a communicative foreign language approach. Presents results of a study on the role of processing instruction on the learning of the Italian future indicative tense by a group of English-speaking students. Results…

  5. Quick Test for Evaluating Processed Food Quality (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Vasudish

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Quick test for quality check of processed food will be handy for Defence Forces.  Aciditybeing one of the most important quality parameters, as per the ASC, BIS, PFA specifications,limits have been laid down as not to exceed 2 per cent in meat and fish products, 0.1 per centin cereal products, 1.25 per cent in ice cream powder, 1.5 per cent in milk powder, 0.3 per centin sweetened condensed milk, and 0.15 per cent in butter.  In the present study, a simple, quick,semi-quantitative test has been developed for checking acidity in processed foods to ascertaintheir quality.  The test is based on a colour reaction with the sample. The test solution givesblue to green to yellow colour depending on the concentration of acid in the sample.  Greencolour is the cut-off point for non-acceptance.  The large number of samples of meat (155, fishproducts (48, cereal products (222, ice cream powder (200, butter (200, milk powder (200 andsweetened condensed milk (202 were analysed by the quick test method and the results werecompared with those from the standard titrimetric method.  Acidity ranged form 0.68 per centto 2.40 per cent in meat products, 0.70 per cent to 2.50 per cent in fish products, 0.06 per centto 1.25 per cent in butter, 0.60 per cent to 1.91 per cent in milk powder, 0.05 per cent to 0.54 percent in ice cream powder, 0.32 per cent to 0.60 per cent in sweatened condensed milk, 0.05 percent to 1.10 per cent in cereal products. Some samples were found to be unacceptable havingacidity more than the specified limits.  The data were analysed statistically and the quick testwas found to correlate very well with the standard titrimetric method.

  6. Energy Saving in Data Processing and Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Iazeolla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power management of ICT systems, that is, data processing (Dp and telecommunication (Tlc systems, is becoming a relevant problem in economical terms. Dp systems totalize millions of servers and associated subsystems (processors, monitors, storage devices, etc. all over the world that need to be electrically powered. Dp systems are also used in the government of Tlc systems, which, besides requiring Dp electrical power, also require Tlc-specific power, both for mobile networks (with their cell-phone towers and associated subsystems: base stations, subscriber stations, switching nodes, etc. and for wired networks (with their routers, gateways, switches, etc.. ICT research is thus expected to investigate into methods to reduce Dp- and Tlc-specific power consumption. However, saving power may turn into waste of performance, in other words, into waste of ICT quality of service (QoS. This paper investigates the Dp and Tlc power management policies that look at compromises between power saving and QoS.

  7. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

  8. Selected Functions of Narrative Structures in the Process of Social and Cultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Alberski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The art of narrative stems from the art of rhetoric and modes of persuasion and in this meaning is understood not just as a form of entertainment but also as a tool of communication. Any narrative communicates and conveys a message. Narrative is an important aspect of culture and as a ubiquitous component of human communication is conveyed by different works of art (literature, music, painting, sculpture, and illustrates events, emotions, phenomena and occurrences. Narrative as a form of communication involves its participants, a teller and a receiver of the message. The relation and the distance between the participants of the narrative communication process may have a different configuration and presents different effect of closeness and distance in narrative. In this meaning narrative is not just the art of telling stories, but it serves various functions, it communicates information, expresses emotions and personal events, transmits morals and cultural knowledge, provides entertainment and also helps in many ways to depict thoughts and feelings, along with disclosing the beauty of language. Narrative knowledge and narrative perception of social and cultural processes, is one of the most natural ways for a human being to acquire and organize their knowledge about the world. The ability to create narratives leads to a better understanding of the surrounding reality, and significantly influences the interpretation of social and cultural relationships.

  9. 21st Century Parent-Child Sex Communication in the United States: A Process Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Dalmacio; Barroso, Julie

    2017-01-06

    Parent-child sex communication results in the transmission of family expectations, societal values, and role modeling of sexual health risk-reduction strategies. Parent-child sex communication's potential to curb negative sexual health outcomes has sustained a multidisciplinary effort to better understand the process and its impact on the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. This review advances what is known about the process of sex communication in the United States by reviewing studies published from 2003 to 2015. We used the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, SocINDEX, and PubMed, and the key terms "parent child" AND "sex education" for the initial query; we included 116 original articles for analysis. Our review underscores long-established factors that prevent parents from effectively broaching and sustaining talks about sex with their children and has also identified emerging concerns unique to today's parenting landscape. Parental factors salient to sex communication are established long before individuals become parents and are acted upon by influences beyond the home. Child-focused communication factors likewise describe a maturing audience that is far from captive. The identification of both enduring and emerging factors that affect how sex communication occurs will inform subsequent work that will result in more positive sexual health outcomes for adolescents.

  10. Application of Focal Conflict Theory to Psychoeducational Groups: Implications for Process, Content, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Group psychoeducation is a common group type used for a range of purposes. The literature presents balancing content and process as a challenge for psychoeducational group leaders. While the significance of group psychoeducation is supported, practitioners are given little direction for addressing process in these groups. Focal Conflict Theory…

  11. Group-by Skyline Query Processing in Relational Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Luk, Ming-Hay; Lo, Eric

    2009-01-01

    the missing cost model for the BBS algorithm. Experimental results show that our techniques are able to devise the best query plans for a variety of group-by skyline queries. Our focus is on algorithms that can be directly implemented in today's commercial database systems without the addition of new access...

  12. "Peer Pressure" and the Group Process: Building Cultures of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Thomas F.; Copas, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    Peer group treatment has been subject to two main lines of criticism. Some suggest any program which aggregates antisocial youth inevitably fosters negative peer influence. Others are concerned that certain peer programs are based on coercive peer confrontation. Positive Peer Culture [PPC] is an antidote to both of these varieties of toxic group…

  13. Online Group Work Design: Processes, Complexities, and Intricacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Robert; Hong, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges of designing and implementing online group work. We are responsible for a seven-and-a-half week's online literacy and bi-literacy graduate course in a Bilingual/English as a Second Language (BLE/ESL) Master of Arts program. One of the tasks includes online literacy circle exchanges where students are encouraged…

  14. Digital signal processing techniques for coherent optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Gilad

    Coherent detection with subsequent digital signal processing (DSP) is developed, analyzed theoretically and numerically and experimentally demonstrated in various fiber-optic transmission scenarios. The use of DSP in conjunction with coherent detection unleashes the benefits of coherent detection which rely on the preservaton of full information of the incoming field. These benefits include high receiver sensitivity, the ability to achieve high spectral-efficiency and the use of advanced modulation formats. With the immense advancements in DSP speeds, many of the problems hindering the use of coherent detection in optical transmission systems have been eliminated. Most notably, DSP alleviates the need for hardware phase-locking and polarization tracking, which can now be achieved in the digital domain. The complexity previously associated with coherent detection is hence significantly diminished and coherent detection is once gain considered a feasible detection alternative. In this thesis, several aspects of coherent detection (with or without subsequent DSP) are addressed. Coherent detection is presented as a means to extend the dispersion limit of a duobinary signal using an analog decision-directed phase-lock loop. Analytical bit-error ratio estimation for quadrature phase-shift keying signals is derived. To validate the promise for high spectral efficiency, the orthogonal-wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is suggested. In this scheme the WDM channels are spaced at the symbol rate, thus achieving the spectral efficiency limit. Theory, simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Infinite impulse response filtering is shown to be an efficient alternative to finite impulse response filtering for chromatic dispersion compensation. Theory, design considerations, simulation and experimental results relating to this topic are presented. Interaction between fiber dispersion and nonlinearity remains the last major challenge

  15. A Design of the Signal Processing Hardware Platform for Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Sung Ho

    In this letter, an efficient hardware platform for the digital signal processing for OFDM communication systems is presented. The hardware platform consists of a single FPGA having 900K gates, two DSPs with maximum 8,000 MIPS at 1GHz clock, 2-channel ADC and DAC supporting maximum 125MHz sampling rate, and flexible data bus architecture, so that a wide variety of baseband signal processing algorithms for practical OFDM communication systems may be implemented and tested. The IEEE 802.16d software modem is also presented in order to verify the effectiveness and usefulness of the designed platform.

  16. The Role of Corporate Communication and Perception of Justice during Organizational Change Process

    OpenAIRE

    Saruhan, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    Today, researchers have been exploring employee’s resistance to change and how to foresee these aversive behaviors during organizational change process (Armenakis & Harris, 2002, Dent & Goldberg, 1999, Oreg & Sverdlik, 2011). Some employees view organizational change in a negative way even if change efforts will results in favorable consequences for them. At this point, communication process has a crucial effect on the perception of employees towards change process. In addition, several studi...

  17. Temporal motifs reveal homophily, gender-specific patterns and group talk in mobile communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kovanen, Lauri; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Electronic communication records provide detailed information about temporal aspects of human interaction. Previous studies have shown that individuals' communication patterns have complex temporal structure, and that this structure has system-wide effects. In this paper we use mobile phone records to show that interaction patterns involving multiple individuals have non-trivial temporal structure that cannot be deduced from a network presentation where only interaction frequencies are taken into account. We apply a recently introduced method, temporal motifs, to identify interaction patterns in a temporal network where nodes have additional attributes such as gender and age. We then develop a null model that allows identifying differences between various types of nodes so that these differences are independent of the network based on interaction frequencies. We find gender-related differences in communication patters, and show the existence of temporal homophily, the tendency of similar individuals to partic...

  18. Online Scheduling on a Single Machine with Grouped Processing Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the online scheduling problem on a single machine with the assumption that all jobs have their processing times in [p,(1+αp], where p>0 and α=(5-1/2. All jobs arrive over time, and each job and its processing time become known at its arrival time. The jobs should be first processed on a single machine and then delivered by a vehicle to some customer. When the capacity of the vehicle is infinite, we provide an online algorithm with the best competitive ratio of (5+1/2. When the capacity of the vehicle is finite, that is, the vehicle can deliver at most c jobs at a time, we provide another best possible online algorithm with the competitive ratio of (5+1/2.

  19. Treating the Information and Communication Technologies in the Offshore Outsourcing Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Christoffersen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    A qualitative research, based on 12 in-depth interviews within 12 companies has been conducted in order to explore information and communication technologies’ (ICT) utilisation in outsourcing. Three groups of companies regarding the consideration of ICT in the pre-transition phase, and ICT...

  20. Light-Weight Process Groups in the ISIS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Marc Rozier. Multi- threaded Processes in Chorus/MIX. Technical Report CS/TR-89-37.3, Chorus Systbmes, 6, avenue Gustave Eiffel , F-78182, Saint-Quentin...Systbmes, 6, avenue Gustave Eif- fel, F-78182, Saint-Quentin-En-Yvelines, France, October 1989. [5] Francois Armand, Frederic Herrmann, Jim Lipkis, and

  1. 'Information on the fly': Challenges in professional communication in high technological nursing. A focus group study from a radiotherapy department in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmark, Catarina; Tishelman, Carol; Gustafsson, Helena; Sharp, Lena

    2012-07-23

    Radiotherapy (RT) units are high-tech nursing environments. In Sweden, RT registered nurses (RNs) provide and manage RT in close collaboration with other professional groups, as well as providing nursing care for patients with cancer. Communication demands on these RNs are thus particularly complex. In this study, we aimed to better understand problems, strengths and change needs related to professional communication with and within the RT department, as a basis for developing a situation-specific intervention. Focus groups discussions (FGDs) were conducted with different professional (RNs, assistant nurses, physicians, engineers and physicists) and user stakeholders. Transcripts of the FGDs were inductively analyzed by a team of researchers, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. These findings give insight into RT safety climate and are presented under three major headings: Conceptualization of professional domains; Organization and leadership issues; and Communication forms, strategies and processes. The impact of existing hierarchies, including how they are conceptualized and acted out in practice, was noted throughout these data. Despite other differences, participating professionals agreed about communication problems related to RT, i.e. a lack of systems and processes for information transfer, unclear role differentiation, a sense of mutual disrespect, and ad hoc communication taking place 'on the fly'. While all professional groups recognized extensive communication problems, none acknowledged the potential negative effects on patient safety or care described in the FGD with patient representatives. While RNs often initially denied the existence of a hierarchy, they placed themselves on a hierarchy in their descriptions, describing their own role as passive, with a sense of powerlessness. Potential safety hazards described in the FGDs include not reporting medical errors and silently ignoring or actively opposing new guidelines and regulations

  2. ‘Information on the fly’: Challenges in professional communication in high technological nursing. A focus group study from a radiotherapy department in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widmark Catarina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT units are high-tech nursing environments. In Sweden, RT registered nurses (RNs provide and manage RT in close collaboration with other professional groups, as well as providing nursing care for patients with cancer. Communication demands on these RNs are thus particularly complex. In this study, we aimed to better understand problems, strengths and change needs related to professional communication with and within the RT department, as a basis for developing a situation-specific intervention. Methods Focus groups discussions (FGDs were conducted with different professional (RNs, assistant nurses, physicians, engineers and physicists and user stakeholders. Transcripts of the FGDs were inductively analyzed by a team of researchers, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. Results These findings give insight into RT safety climate and are presented under three major headings: Conceptualization of professional domains; Organization and leadership issues; and Communication forms, strategies and processes. The impact of existing hierarchies, including how they are conceptualized and acted out in practice, was noted throughout these data. Despite other differences, participating professionals agreed about communication problems related to RT, i.e. a lack of systems and processes for information transfer, unclear role differentiation, a sense of mutual disrespect, and ad hoc communication taking place ‘on the fly’. While all professional groups recognized extensive communication problems, none acknowledged the potential negative effects on patient safety or care described in the FGD with patient representatives. While RNs often initially denied the existence of a hierarchy, they placed themselves on a hierarchy in their descriptions, describing their own role as passive, with a sense of powerlessness. Potential safety hazards described in the FGDs include not reporting medical errors and silently ignoring

  3. Communicative Learning Aided by AR for Activity with Students within a Group HCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Warden, Fernando; Barrera, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Communicative learning progress in industry and education must gain focus and commitment otherwise innovation efforts by new technologies and recent researches will produce scarce results. Frequently, it appears gaps in quality and efficiency due to lack of ideas assimilation, matter that can be noticed. Investigators may discourse about platforms…

  4. The computer as means of communication for peer-review groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, van der Thea; Remmers, Tim

    1994-01-01

    In a scientific-writing course, 15 of 54 students used a review-supporting computer program, PREP-EDITOR (PREP), to communicate with their peers about drafts. In an exploratory study, 10 students were interviewed regularly: 5 used PREP and 5 met face-to-face to exchange comments on drafts. The study

  5. Communication as an Essential Component of Effective Leadership across Low Socio-Economic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Sarah E.; Bradfield, Gail A.; Wingert, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    This project describes a problem-based learning project focusing on communication between high school principals and students and families from poverty. Review of current research indicated a lack of effective interactions between school administrators and families in poverty. There were many identified factors which contribute to this…

  6. A Sympathetic Reaction to the SM and DLCM as Group Communication Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavitt, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This article considers three issues. First, through a rephrased summary of the argument in Pavitt and Johnson (1999), the author describes why he feels that the socioegocentric model (SM) is unlikely to be an accurate portrayal of communicative influence. Second, based on considerations addresses in more detail in Pavitt (in press), the author…

  7. A Sympathetic Reaction to the SM and DLCM as Group Communication Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavitt, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This article considers three issues. First, through a rephrased summary of the argument in Pavitt and Johnson (1999), the author describes why he feels that the socioegocentric model (SM) is unlikely to be an accurate portrayal of communicative influence. Second, based on considerations addresses in more detail in Pavitt (in press), the author…

  8. Community Partners' Assessment of Service Learning in an Interpersonal and Small Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimel, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    This assessment explored community partners' perceptions of service learning in a required communication course. Semi-structured interviews revealed that community partners believed that students were providing needed and valuable service, students were learning about the community, and students were learning through their application of course…

  9. Communication as an Essential Component of Effective Leadership across Low Socio-Economic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Sarah E.; Bradfield, Gail A.; Wingert, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    This project describes a problem-based learning project focusing on communication between high school principals and students and families from poverty. Review of current research indicated a lack of effective interactions between school administrators and families in poverty. There were many identified factors which contribute to this…

  10. Significance of librarian’s self-concept in the communication process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Kobal-Grum

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the significance of the librarian’s self-concept in the communication process. First, it underlines the meaning of reference interviews, and second, it focuses on other micro and macro aspects of communication. The analysis shows that the librarian’s self-concept is hierarchically organised, structured, and therefore it consists of different areas. Each area equally contributes to the development and preservation of the appropriate librarian’s self-concept; although some areas have more direct influence than others. To attain a high self-concept, it is of fundamental importance, that the librarian develops all self-concept areas, from individual ones to social ones. It was found that a structured and positive specialist’s self-concept is highly significant for the contribution of effective reference interviews, and finally, the article offers some directions for a successful development of the communication process.

  11. Electroweak renormalization group corrections in high energy processes

    CERN Document Server

    Melles, M

    2001-01-01

    At energies ($\\sqrt{s}$) much higher than the electroweak gauge boson masses ($M$) large logarithmic corrections of the scale ratio $\\sqrt{s}/M$ occur. While the electroweak Sudakov type double (DL) and universal single (SL) logarithms have recently been resummed, at higher orders the electroweak renormalization group (RG) corrections are folded with the DL Sudakov contributions and must be included for a consistent subleading treatment to all orders. In this paper we derive first all relevant formulae for massless as well as massive gauge theories including all such terms up to order ${\\cal O} (\\alpha^n \\beta_0 \\log^{2n-1} \\frac{s}{M^2})$ by integrating over the corresponding running couplings. The results for broken gauge theories in the high energy regime are then given in the framework of the infrared evolution equation (IREE) method. The analogous QED-corrections below the weak scale $M$ are included by appropriately matching the low energy solution to the renormalization group improved high energy resul...

  12. Effect of group organization on the performance of cooperative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reia, Sandro M

    2016-01-01

    Problem-solving competence at group level is influenced by the structure of the social networks and so it may shed light on the organization patterns of gregarious animals. Here we use an agent-based model to investigate whether the ubiquity of hierarchical networks in nature could be explained as the result of a selection pressure favoring problem-solving efficiency. The task of the agents is to find the global maxima of NK fitness landscapes and the agents cooperate by broadcasting messages informing on their fitness to the group. This information is then used to imitate, with a certain probability, the fittest agent in their influence networks. For rugged landscapes, we find that the modular organization of the hierarchical network with its high degree of clustering eases the escape from the local maxima, resulting in a superior performance as compared with the scale-free and the random networks. The optimal performance in a rugged landscape is achieved by letting the main hub to be only slightly more prop...

  13. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Soren Ventegodt; Niels Jorgen Andersen; Joav Merrick

    2003-01-01

    In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person�s wholeness. This includes the body, the person�s philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the ...

  14. Focus group findings about the influence of culture on communication preferences in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H; Kutner, Jean S; Richardson, Terri; Mularski, Richard A; Fischer, Stacy; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2005-08-01

    Little guidance is available for health care providers who try to communicate with patients and their families in a culturally sensitive way about end-of-life care. To explore the content and structure of end-of-life discussions that would optimize decision making by conducting focus groups with two diverse groups of patients that vary in ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Six focus groups were conducted; 3 included non-Hispanic white patients recruited from a University hospital (non-Hispanic white groups) and 3 included African-American patients recruited from a municipal hospital (African-American groups). A hypothetical scenario of a dying relative was used to explore preferences for the content and structure of communication. Thirty-six non-Hispanic white participants and 34 African-American participants. Content analysis of focus group transcripts. Non-Hispanic white participants were more exclusive when recommending family participants in end-of-life discussions while African-American participants preferred to include more family, friends and spiritual leaders. Requested content varied as non-Hispanic white participants desired more information about medical options and cost implications while African-American participants requested spiritually focused information. Underlying values also differed as non-Hispanic white participants expressed more concern with quality of life while African-American participants tended to value the protection of life at all costs. The groups differed broadly in their preferences for both the content and structure of end-of-life discussions and on the values that influence those preferences. Further research is necessary to help practitioners engage in culturally sensitive end-of-life discussions with patients and their families by considering varying preferences for the goals of end-of-life care communication.

  15. Sequential grouping constraints on across-channel auditory processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Dau, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    , 1958–1965 (1985)]. Søren explained this surprising result in terms of the spread of masker excitation and across-channel processing of envelope fluctuations. A later study [S. Buus and C. Pan, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1445–1457 (1994)] pioneered the use of the same stimuli in tasks where across......, the perceptual segregation of off-frequency from on-frequency components, using sound sequences preceding or following the target, leads to results similar to those found in the absence of the off-frequency components. This suggests a high-level locus for some across-channel effects, and may help provide...

  16. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Collision Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    Since our last report (Peach & Dimitrijević 2012), a large number of new publications on the results of research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening have been published. Due to the limited space available, we have only included work of importance for astrophysics. Additional relevant papers, not included in this report, can be found in the databases at the web addresses provided in Section 6. Elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included, as well as charge transfer in collisions between heavy particles which can be very important.

  17. Predicting psychological ripple effects: the role of cultural identity, in-group/out-group identification, and attributions of blame in crisis communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagondahalli, Deepa; Turner, Monique Mitchell

    2012-04-01

    Incidents of intentional food contamination can produce ripple effects in consumers such as reduced trust and increased anxiety. In their postcrisis communication, food companies often direct the blame at the perpetrator in an effort to mitigate potential losses and regain consumer trust. The attempt to placate consumers may, in itself, potentially create psychological ripple effects in message readers. This study examined the interacting influence of two message characteristics: identity of the perpetrator of the crime (in-group/out-group membership), and the attribution of blame (reason why the perpetrator committed the crime), with message receiver characteristic (cultural identity) on psychological ripple effects such as blame, trust, anxiety, and future purchase intention. Results indicated that although group membership of the perpetrator was not significant in predicting outcomes for the organization, the attribution communicated in the message was. American message receivers blamed the organization more and trusted it less when personal dispositional attributions were made about the perpetrator. Asian message receivers blamed the organization more and trusted it less when situational attributions were made about the perpetrator. Lowered trust in the company and increased anxiety correlated with lower purchase intent for both American and Asian message receivers. Implications for crisis message design are discussed.

  18. Cultural immersion through ethnography: the lived experience and group process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sandra J; Schulze, Mary W

    2004-06-01

    A baccalaureate nursing class studying community/public health is a rich setting in which to initiate change in ethnocentric perspectives and foster an understanding of diverse cultures. This teaching strategy requires students to randomly select one of seven ethnographies to read, and then to write an analysis based on required guidelines. The results of the ethnographic analyses show that students immerse themselves within the culture of their respective texts. Ultimately, in-class learning groups are formed for each ethnography, and participants discuss their respective analyses. After exploring their commonalities and differences, students present the results to the entire class. This activity affords everyone a multicultural experience by sharing the different ethnographies and each student's perspective. This critical thinking activity serves to awaken one's ethnocentricity and paves the way to insightful changes and beliefs about diverse cultures.

  19. Group-normalized processing of complex wavelet packets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石卓尔; 保铮

    1997-01-01

    Linear phase is not possible for real valued FIR QMF, while linear phase FIR biorthogonal wavelet filter banks make the mean squared error of the constructed signal exceed that of the quantization error. W Lawton’ s method for complex valued wavelets construction is extended to generate the complex valued compactly supported wavelet packets that are symmetrical and unitary orthogonal; then well-defined wavelet packets are chosen by the analysis remarks on their time-frequency characteristics. Since the traditional wavelel packets transform coefficients do not exactly represent the strength of signal components, a modified adaptive wavelets transform, group-normalized wavelet packet transform (GNWPT), is presented and utilized for target extraction from formidable clutter or noises with the time-frequency masking technique. The extended definition of lp-norm entropy improves the performance cf GNWPT. Similar method can also be applied to image enhancement, clutter and noise suppression, optimal detection

  20. [Recommendations to improve the scientific communication process in the Revista Médica del IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Ivón

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the position of the Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social among the different journals, in this editorial we enumerate a series of recommendations to ameliorate the practices of the different actors who participate in the scientific communication process of this journal.

  1. Exploring residents’ communication learning process in the workplace: a five-phase model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, V. van den; Vleuten, C. van der; Stalmeijer, R.; Dalen, J. van; Scherpbier, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Context: Competency-based education is a resurgent paradigm in professional medical education. However, more specific knowledge is needed about the learning process of such competencies, since they consist of complex skills. We chose to focus on the competency of skilled communication and want to fu

  2. Exploring residents' communication learning process in the workplace: a five-phase model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, V. van den; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Stalmeijer, R.; Dalen, J. Van; Scherpbier, A.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Competency-based education is a resurgent paradigm in professional medical education. However, more specific knowledge is needed about the learning process of such competencies, since they consist of complex skills. We chose to focus on the competency of skilled communication and want to fu

  3. A Change Process at German University--Innovation through Information and Communication Technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentel, Peter; Bett, Katja; Meister, Dorothee M.; Rinn, Ulrike; Wedekind, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we describe the current situation of virtual universities in Germany and pursue the question of whether innovation processes taking place throughout the entire higher education landscape. Our study shows that the integration of ICT [information and communication technologies] not only changes the medial characteristics of the…

  4. The Model of Forming Communicative Competence of Students in the Process of Teaching the English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrutdinova, Rezida A.; Fahrutdinov, Rifat R.; Yusupov, Rinat N.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the topic is specified by the necessity of forming the communicative competence of students in the process of teaching of the English language in the institute of higher education. This article is intended to define interactive methods of teaching foreign language, which are based on interactive conception of interaction between…

  5. The Application of Natural Language Processing to Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, D. Jeffery; Lesher, Gregory W.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Roark, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the application of natural language processing (NLP) to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), particularly in the areas of interface design and word prediction. This article will survey the current state-of-the-science of NLP in AAC and discuss its future applications for the development of next…

  6. A model for communication of sensory quality in the seafood processing chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green-Petersen, Ditte; Nielsen, Jette; Hyldig, Grethe

    2012-01-01

    Sensory quality has a key influence of consumer perception of a product. It is therefore of great importance for the processing industry that the sensory quality fulfils the expectations of the consumer. Sensory evaluations are the ultimate tool to measure and communicate sensory quality...

  7. The Application of Natural Language Processing to Augmentative and Alternative Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, D. Jeffery; Lesher, Gregory W.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Roark, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the application of natural language processing (NLP) to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), particularly in the areas of interface design and word prediction. This article will survey the current state-of-the-science of NLP in AAC and discuss its future applications for the development of next…

  8. The Coaching and Mentoring Process: The Obvious Knowledge and Skill Set for Organizational Communication Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Robert H.; Barker, Randolph T.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the uses of coaching and mentoring as they apply to organizational communication professors. The authors contend that these professors already are proficient at coaching and mentoring and the coaching and mentoring processes are routinely undertaken as part of their standard university teaching responsibilities. As coaches,…

  9. Negotiating the equivocality of palliative care: a grounded theory of team communicative processes in inpatient medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Kalish, Virginia B

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of U.S. hospitals, inpatient medicine teams make palliative care decisions in the absence of a formalized palliative system. Using a grounded theory approach, interviews with inpatient team members were systematically analyzed to uncover how participants conceptualize palliative care and how they regard the communicative structures that underlie its delivery. During analysis, Weick's model of organizing emerged as a framework that fit the data. The 39 participant inpatient team members discussed palliative care as primarily a communicative process. Themes describing the meaning of palliative care emerged around the concepts of receiver of care, timeline of care, and location of care. The emerging model included four stages in the communicative processes of inpatient palliative care: (a) interpret the need, (b) initiate the conversation, (c) integrate the processes, and (d) identify what works. In contrast to stable, focused palliative care teams or hospice care teams, which have prescribed patient populations and processes, the inpatient medicine team faces the equivocality of providing palliative care within a broader practice. This research offers a four-phase model to show how these inpatient teams communicate within this context. Implications for the provision of palliative care are discussed.

  10. An Overview on the Applications of Matrix Theory in Wireless Communications and Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper overviews the key applications enabled by matrix theory in two major fields of interest in electrical engineering, namely wireless communications and signal processing. The paper focuses on the fundamental role played by matrices in modeling and optimization of wireless communication systems, and in detection, extraction and processing of the information embedded in signals. Among the major applications in wireless communications, the role of matrix representations and decompositions in characterizing multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM communication systems is described. In addition, this paper points out the important contribution made by matrices in solving signal estimation and detection problems. Special attention is given to the implementation of matrices in sensor array signal processing and the design of adaptive filters. Furthermore, the crucial role played by matrices in representing and processing digital images is depicted by several illustrative applications. This paper concludes with some applications of matrix theory in the area of compressive sensing of signals and by outlining a few open research problems for future study.

  11. 77 FR 28621 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International...

  12. Platinum group metal recovery and catalyst manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.

    1998-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metal such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solution was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400 m{sup 2}/g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 10 wt.%. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of 93 % to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its actively is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 63 refs., 38 tabs., 36 figs.

  13. Potential donor families' experiences of organ and tissue donation-related communication, processes and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, C H; Neate, S L; Skinner, M; Dwyer, B; Hickey, B B; Radford, S T; Weiland, T J; Jelinek, G A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to describe the experiences of families of potential organ and tissue donors eligible for donation after circulatory death or brain death. Forty-nine family members of potential donors from four Melbourne hospitals were interviewed to assess their experiences of communication, processes and the outcomes of donation. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Families expressed a range of perspectives on themes of communication, hospital processes and care, the processes of consent and donation and reflected on decisions and outcomes. They expressed satisfaction overall with communication when receiving bad news, discussing death and donation. Honest and frank communication and being kept up-to-date and prepared for potential outcomes were important aspects for families, especially those of post circulatory death donors. Participants reported high levels of trust in healthcare professionals and satisfaction with the level of care received. Many donor families indicated the process was lengthy and stressful, but not significantly enough to adversely affect their satisfaction with the outcome. Both the decision itself and knowing others' lives had been saved provided them with consolation. No consenting families, and only some non-consenting families, regretted their decisions. Many expressed they would benefit from a follow-up opportunity to ask questions and clarify possible misunderstandings. Overall, while experiences varied, Australian families valued frank communication, trusted health professionals, were satisfied with the care their family member received and with donation processes, despite some apparent difficulties. Family satisfaction, infrequently assessed, is an important outcome and these findings may assist education for Australian organ donation professionals.

  14. Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This work provides the first direct evidence that the puzzling dielectric Debye process observed in mono-alcohols is coupled to density fluctuations. The results open up for an explanation of the Debye process within the framework of conventional liquid-statetheory. The spectral shape of the dyna...

  15. Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This work provides the first direct evidence that the puzzling dielectric Debye process observed in mono-alcohols is coupled to density fluctuations. The results open up for an explanation of the Debye process within the framework of conventional liquid-statetheory. The spectral shape of the dyna...

  16. Signal Conditioning An Introduction to Continuous Wave Communication and Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Apurba

    2012-01-01

    "Signal Conditioning” is a comprehensive introduction to electronic signal processing. The book presents the mathematical basics including the implications of various transformed domain representations in signal synthesis and analysis in an understandable and lucid fashion and illustrates the theory through many applications and examples from communication systems. The ease to learn is supported by well-chosen exercises which give readers the flavor of the subject. Supplementary electronic materials available on http://extras.springer.com including MATLAB codes illuminating applications in the domain of one dimensional electrical signal processing, image processing and speech processing. The book is an introduction for students with a basic understanding in engineering or natural sciences.

  17. Analysis of Feedback Processes in Online Group Interaction: A Methodological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espasa, Anna; Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the…

  18. The communicative process of weather forecasts issued in the probabilistic form (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Raimondi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main purposes of weather forecasting is that of protecting weather-sensitive human activities. Forecasts issued in the probabilistic form have a higher informative content, as opposed to deterministic one, since they bear information that give also a measure of their own uncertainty. However, in order to make an appropriate and effective use of this kind of forecasts in an operational setting, communication becomes significatively relevant.The present paper, after having briefly examined the weather forecasts concerning Hurricane Charley (August 2004, tackles the issue of the communicative process in detail.The bottom line of this study is that for the weather forecast to achieve its best predictive potential, an in-depth analysis of communication issues is necessary.

  19. The communicative process of weather forecasts issued in the probabilistic form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Raimondi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main purposes of weather forecasting is that of protecting weather-sensitive human activities. Forecasts issued in the probabilistic form have a higher informative content, as opposed to deterministic one, since they bear information that give also a measure of their own uncertainty. However, in order to make an appropriate and effective use of this kind of forecasts in an operational setting, communication becomes significatively relevant.The present paper, after having briefly examined the weather forecasts concerning Hurricane Charley (August 2004, tackles the issue of the communicative process in detail.The bottom line of this study is that for the weather forecast to achieve its best predictive potential, an in-depth analysis of communication issues is necessary.

  20. [Psychological processes predicting the English communication behavior of Japanese high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    This study presents a new model of psychological processes to predict English communication behaviors of Japanese high school students. Various models have been proposed in Japan, based mainly on Canadian models, to predict second-language communication behaviors. This study shows problems with the previous models in Japan and introduces a new model from the perspective of "Expectancy-Value Theory". Questionnaire Survey 1 compared the previous model and the modified models which suggested that a new psychological variable, "Value in English Communication", was necessary to construct the new model. In Survey 2, the new model was further modified by incorporating into it various English learning values which the Japanese have. This study makes a significant contribution to studies and practices of teaching English as a foreign language in Japan.