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Sample records for group coleoptera scolytidae

  1. CARACTERIZATION OF SCOLYTIDAE FAMILY (INSECTA: COLEOPTERA IN THREE FOREST ENVIRONMENTS

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    Jorge Alberto Müller

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects are potential cause of damage in forests and the family Scolytidae is responsible for major death of trees in the world. This research studied Scolytidae insects at three areas, two in rain forests and one in an eucalyptus plantation, through faunistic indexes, and to determined the correlation between number of Scolytidae and temperature and relative humidity. A total of fifteen ethanolic traps were used from July 1998 to June 1999. A total of 35 species of Scolytidae was identified, with 48.6% of then occurring at all areas. Twenty nine species were xylomicetophagus. The genus Xyleborus presented the higher number of species. In the Eucalyptus plantation area, six species constantly appeared and positive correlation (54.5% was found between the number of insects and monthly mean temperature.

  2. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.

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    Coyle, D R; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the first time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

  3. Coordinated gene expression for pheromone biosynthesis in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

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    Keeling, Christopher I.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    In several pine bark beetle species, phloem feeding induces aggregation pheromone production to coordinate a mass attack on the host tree. Male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), produce the monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo via the mevalonate pathway in the anterior midgut upon feeding. To understand how pheromone production is regulated in this tissue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine feeding-induced changes in gene expression of seven mevalonate pathway genes: acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate 5-diphosphate decarboxylase, isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase, geranyl-diphosphate synthase (GPPS), and farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS). In males, expression of all these genes significantly increased upon feeding. In females, the expression of the early mevalonate pathway genes (up to and including the isomerase) increased significantly, but the expression of the later genes (GPPS and FPPS) was unaffected or decreased upon feeding. Thus, feeding coordinately regulates expression of the mevalonate pathway genes necessary for pheromone biosynthesis in male, but not female, midguts. Furthermore, basal mRNA levels were 5- to 41-fold more abundant in male midguts compared to female midguts. This is the first report of coordinated regulation of mevalonate pathway genes in an invertebrate model consistent with their sex-specific role in de novo pheromone biosynthesis.

  4. Ecological data on some neotropical Scolytidae, Platypodidae and Bostrychidae (Coleoptera), mainly of Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalshoven, L.G.E.

    1963-01-01

    When working at the Tropical Institute, Amsterdam (1952—1957), some cases came to my notice of small borers belonging to the Scolytidae, Platypodidae and Bostrychidae attacking newly felled timber in Surinam and causing the same well-known trouble as in other tropical regions. My interest in the

  5. Evaluation of different models to describe egg and pupal development of Xyleborus fornicatus Eichh. (Coleoptera:Scolytidae), the shot-hole borer of tea in Sri Lanka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAVINDRA SAMPATH WALGAMA; MYRON PHILLIP ZALUCKI

    2006-01-01

    Development data of eggs and pupae ofXyleborusfornicatus Eichh. (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the shot-hole borer of tea in Sri Lanka, at constant temperatures were used to evaluate a linear and seven nonlinear models for insect development. Model evaluation was based on fit to data (residual sum of squares and coefficient of determination or coefficient of nonlinear regression), number of measurable parameters, the biological value of the fitted coefficients and accuracy in the estimation of thresholds. Of the nonlinear models, the Lactin model fitted experimental data well and along with the linear model, can be used to describe the temperature-dependent development of this species.

  6. Suitability of pines and other conifers as hosts for the invasive Mediterranean pine engraver (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America.

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    Lee, Jana C; Flint, Mary Louise; Seybold, Steven J

    2008-06-01

    The invasive Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was detected in North America in 2004, and it is currently distributed in the southern Central Valley of California. It originates from the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and Asia, and it reproduces on pines (Pinus spp.). To identify potentially vulnerable native and adventive hosts in North America, no-choice host range tests were conducted in the laboratory on 22 conifer species. The beetle reproduced on four pines from its native Eurasian range--Aleppo, Canary Island, Italian stone, and Scots pines; 11 native North American pines--eastern white, grey, jack, Jeffrey, loblolly, Monterey, ponderosa, red, Sierra lodgepole, singleleaf pinyon, and sugar pines; and four native nonpines--Douglas-fir, black and white spruce, and tamarack. Among nonpines, fewer progeny developed and they were of smaller size on Douglas-fir and tamarack, but sex ratios of progeny were nearly 1:1 on all hosts. Last, beetles did not develop on white fir, incense cedar, and coast redwood. With loblolly pine, the first new adults emerged 42 d after parental females were introduced into host logs at temperatures of 20-33 degrees C and 523.5 or 334.7 accumulated degree-days based on lower development thresholds of 13.6 or 18 degrees C, respectively.

  7. SURVEY OF SCOLYTIDAE (COLEOPTERA IN PLANTATIONS OF Eucalyptus spp. IN CUIABÁ, STATE OF MATO GROSSO, BRAZIL

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    Fabiano de C. Balieiro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey of Scolytidae population of species of Scolytidae family was made in plantations of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh, Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. f., Eucalyptus pellita F. Muell. and Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, located at Cuiabá city in Mato Grosso state from march 1998 to february 1999, with aid of ethanol traps model “escolitídeo-Curitiba”. The were used 24 traps, six per Eucalyptus plot/specie. Collection was made every 15 days and divided in two periods: drought (may – October and rRainy Season (november – april. There were collected a total of 19.153 individuals, distributed in 11 genera and 42 species. In the dry and rain periods there were collected 9.865 and 9.288 individuals, respectively. In plantations of Eucalyptus pellita and Eucalyptus urophylla were collected the largest amount of individuals, in both analyzed periods. Cryptocarenus diademantus Eggers, 1937; Cryptocarenus seriatus Eggers, 1933; Cryptocarenus heveae (Hagedorni, 1912; Hypothenemus obscurus (Fabricius, 1801 and Xyleborus spinosulus (Schedl, 1934 were in number, the most important in plantations of the four species of Eucalyptus.

  8. Limonene: attractant kairomone for white pine cone beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in an eastern white pine seed orchard in western North Carolina.

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    Miller, Daniel R

    2007-06-01

    I report on the attraction of the white pine cone beetle, Conophthoru.s coniperda (Schwarz) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), to traps baited with the host monoterpene limonene in western North Carolina. Both (+)- and (-)-limonene attracted male and female cone beetles to Japanese beetle traps in an eastern white pine, Pinus strobus L., seed orchard near Murphy, NC. Catches of cone beetles were directly proportional to the release rate of (-)-limonene; (+)-limonene was not tested for dose response. Attraction of cone beetles to the pheromone (+/-)-trans-pityol was increased significantly by both enantiomers of limonene. In all experiments, catches of C. coniperda were strongly male biased with no treatment effect on sex ratio. (- )-Limonene had no effect on trap catches of the predator Enoclerus nigripes (Say) to pityol, whereas (+)-limonene interrupted the attraction of E. nigripes to traps baited with pityol. Of six monoterpenes commonly found in white pine cones, only (-)-alpha-pinene elicited attraction of E. nigripes to Japanese beetle traps.

  9. Biologie, éco-éthologie et dynamique des populations du scolyte des grains de café, Hypothenemus hampei Ferr. (Coleoptera, Scolytidae), en Nouvelle-Calédonie

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    Giordanengo, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    Séminivore strictement monophage, #Hypothenemus hampei$ Ferr. (#Coleoptera, Scolytidae$) est l'ennemi majeur de la caféiculture en Nouvelle-Calédonie. L'accouplement qui a lieu dans la graine d'émergence est facilité par l'intervention de signaux, de nature vraisemblablement olfactive, émis par les femelles. Environ douze jours après leur émergence, ces dernières quittent leur baie d'éclosion à l'issue d'une inversion de leurs comportements phototropique et thigmotactique. La dispersion qui s...

  10. Fluctuación poblacional de Scolytidae (Coleoptera en zonas reforestadas con Eucalyptus grandis (Myrtaceae en Minas Gerais, Brasil

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    Napoleon Eulógio Morales

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available El tamaño de una población y sus variaciones en el tiempo y espacio son variables importantes que permiten determinar el funcionamiento de una comunidad de insectos en el campo. De esta manera, con el uso de trampas etanólicas de intercepción, fue estudiada la fluctuación poblacional de Scolytidae en plantaciones de Eucalyptus grandis. El estudio fue realizado por un período de dos años en la región de Antonio Dias, Minas Gerais, Brasil, donde los insectos fueron recolectados y analizados en función de la temperatura y precipitación. Fueron recolectadas 16 especies de la familia Scolytidae, con predominancia de Xyleborus paraguayensis, Xyleborus affinis y Xyleborus ferrugineus, las cuales representaron el 96.27 % del total de individuos capturados. La temperatura y precipitación fueron las variables que influenciaron directamente en la fluctuación poblacional de estos insecto. Las dos primeras especies presentaron mayores poblaciones durante la época seca, mientras que X. ferrugineus presentó mayor número de individuos en los meses con mayor precipitación.The size of a population and its variations through time and space are important variables that can be used to determine insect community structure in the field. For this reason ethanolic traps were used to study population fluctuation of Scolytidae species in plantations of Eucalyptus grandis. This study was developed during two years in Antônio Dias, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil where these insects were collected and analyzed in function of temperature and rainfall. Out of 16 Scolytidae species collected those with higher number of individuals were Xyleborus paraguayensis, Xyleborus affinis and Xyleborus ferrugineus (96.27 % of individuals. Temperature and rainfall affected numbers of these insects collected with ethanolic traps. The first two species presented larger populations during periods of low rainfall while X. ferrugineus presented the opposite pattern.

  11. Evaluation of funnel traps for characterizing the bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) communities in ponderosa pine forests of north-central Arizona.

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    Hayes, Christopher J; DeGomez, Tom E; Clancy, Karen M; Williams, Kelly K; McMillin, Joel D; Anhold, John A

    2008-08-01

    Lindgren funnel traps baited with aggregation pheromones are widely used to monitor and manage populations of economically important bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). This study was designed to advance our understanding of how funnel trap catches assess bark beetle communities and relative abundance of individual species. In the second year (2005) of a 3-yr study of the bark beetle community structure in north-central Arizona pine (Pinus spp.) forests, we collected data on stand structure, site conditions, and local bark beetle-induced tree mortality at each trap site. We also collected samples of bark from infested (brood) trees near trap sites to identify and determine the population density of bark beetles that were attacking ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, in the area surrounding the traps. Multiple regression models indicated that the number of Dendroctonus and Ips beetles captured in 2005 was inversely related to elevation of the trap site, and positively associated with the amount of ponderosa pine in the stand surrounding the site. Traps located closer to brood trees also captured more beetles. The relationship between trap catches and host tree mortality was weak and inconsistent in forest stands surrounding the funnel traps, suggesting that trap catches do not provide a good estimate of local beetle-induced tree mortality. However, pheromone-baited funnel trap data and data from gallery identification in bark samples produced statistically similar relative abundance profiles for the five species of bark beetles that we examined, indicating that funnel trap data provided a good assessment of species presence and relative abundance.

  12. Levantamento de Scolytidae (Coleoptera em plantações de Eucalyptus spp. em Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso.

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    Alberto Dorval

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um levantamento populacional de espécies da família Scolytidae em plantios de Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. Dehnh. Dehnh., Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. f., Eucalyptus pellita F. Muell. e Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, com auxílio de armadilhas etanólicas, modelo escolitídeo-Curitiba, no município de Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso, de março de 1998 a fevereiro de 1999. Foram utilizadas 24 armadilhas, sendo seis por talhão/espécie de Eucalyptus. As coletas foram quinzenais e divididas em dois períodos: seco (maio-outubro e chuva (novembro-abril. Foram coletados um total de 19.153 indivíduos, distribuídos em 11 gêneros e 42 espécies. Nos períodos seco e chuvoso foram coletados 9.865 e 9.288 indivíduos respectivamente. Nos talhões de Eucalyptus pellita e de Eucalyptus urophylla, foram coletados as maiores quantidades de indivíduos em ambos os períodos analisados. Cryptocarenus diademantus Eggers, 1937; Cryptocarenus seriatus Eggers, 1933; Cryptocarenus heveae (Hagedorni, 1912; Hypothenemus obscurus (Fabricius, 1801 e Xyleborus spinosulus (Schedl, 1934 foram, quantitativamente, as espécies mais importantes nos plantios das quatro espécies de Eucalyptus.

  13. LEVANTAMENTO DE SCOLYTIDAE (COLEOPTERA EM PLANTAÇÕES DE Eucalyptus spp. EM CUIABÁ, ESTADO DE MATO GROSSO

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    Eli Nunes Marques

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um levantamento populacional de espécies da família Scolytidae em plantios de Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. Dehnh. Dehnh., Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. f., Eucalyptus pellita F. Muell. e Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, com auxílio de armadilhas etanólicas, modelo escolitídeo-Curitiba, no município de Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso, de março de 1998 a fevereiro de 1999. Foram utilizadas 24 armadilhas, sendo seis por talhão/espécie de Eucalyptus. As coletas foram quinzenais e divididas em dois períodos: seco (maio-outubro e chuva (novembro-abril. Foram coletados um total de 19.153 indivíduos, distribuídos em 11 gêneros e 42 espécies. Nos períodos seco e chuvoso foram coletados 9.865 e 9.288 indivíduos respectivamente. Nos talhões de Eucalyptus pellita e de Eucalyptus urophylla, foram coletados as maiores quantidades de indivíduos em ambos os períodos analisados. Cryptocarenus diademantus Eggers, 1937; Cryptocarenus seriatus Eggers, 1933; Cryptocarenus heveae (Hagedorni, 1912; Hypothenemus obscurus (Fabricius, 1801 e Xyleborus spinosulus (Schedl, 1934 foram, quantitativamente, as espécies mais importantes nos plantios das quatro espécies de Eucalyptus.

  14. Levantamento de Scolytidae (Coleoptera em plantações de Eucalyptus spp. em Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso

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    Alberto Dorval

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um levantamento populacional de espécies da família Scolytidae em plantios de Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. Dehnh. Dehnh., Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. f., Eucalyptus pellita F. Muell. e Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, com auxílio de armadilhas etanólicas, modelo escolitídeo- Curitiba, no município de Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso, de março de 1998 a fevereiro de 1999. Foram utilizadas 24 armadilhas, sendo seis por talhão/espécie de Eucalyptus. As coletas foram quinzenais e divididas em dois períodos: seco (maio-outubro e chuva (novembro-abril. Foram coletados um total de 19.153 indivíduos, distribuídos em 11 gêneros e 42 espécies. Nos períodos seco e chuvoso foram coletados 9.865 e 9.288 indivíduos respectivamente. Nos talhões de Eucalyptus pellita e de Eucalyptus urophylla, foram coletados as maiores quantidades de indivíduos em ambos os períodos analisados. Cryptocarenus diademantus Eggers, 1937; Cryptocarenus seriatus Eggers, 1933; Cryptocarenus heveae (Hagedorni, 1912; Hypothenemus obscurus (Fabricius, 1801 e Xyleborus spinosulus (Schedl, 1934 foram, quantitativamente, as espécies mais importantes nos plantios das quatro espécies de Eucalyptus.

  15. Morphology observation on the antennal sensilla of Ips acuminatus (Coleoptera:Scolytidae)%松六齿小蠹成虫触角感器的形态学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    运用扫描电镜(SEM)和透射电镜(TEM)技术分析了松六齿小蠹Ips acuminatus(Coleoptera:Scolytidae)成虫触角感器的外部形态和内部结构.结果显示:松六齿小蠹成虫的触角上有毛形感器、刺形感器、锥形感器以及少量的腺孔,它们着生在触角顶端3节缩短聚集成的平面上.在第3节膨大处着生有少量的锯齿形刚毛.

  16. Attraction of Tomicus yunnanensis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae to Yunnan Pine Logs with and without Periderm or Phloem: An Effective Monitoring Bait

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    Rong Chun Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Yunnan pine shoot beetle, Tomicus yunnanensis Kirkendall and Faccoli (Coleoptera: Scolytinae is an important pest of Yunnan pine (Pinus yunnanensis Franch in China. Experiments with host log baits were done to develop a pest monitoring system using host tree kairomone. Five Yunnan pine logs (each 10–15 cm diam. × 30-cm long in a trap-log bundle were treated by peeling periderm (outer bark off to expose the phloem, and half of each log was covered with sticky adhesive to capture any attracted adult beetles. Significantly, more beetles were attracted and caught on the periderm-peeled logs (ca 30 beetles/m2 log surface/day than on untreated control logs with adhesive (ca 2.5/m2/day. No significant differences were observed between catches on logs taken from lower or upper halves of Yunnan pines. T. yunnanensis flies mostly during the afternoon according to trap catches throughout the day. Attraction to the periderm-peeled logs decreased considerably when they were peeled further to remove the phloem, indicating phloem volatiles play a role in selection of the host by the beetle. The readily-available log baits appear useful for monitoring pine shoot beetle populations in integrated pest management programs.

  17. Producción masiva automatizada de la broca del café Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleóptera: Scolytidae) y de sus parasitoides sobre dietas artificiales

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    This article reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the mass rearing system of the coffee berry borer, cbb, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), and its African parasitoids: the ectoparasitoids Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Betrem) and Prorops nasuta ((Waterston) (Hymenop...

  18. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

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    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  19. Dose-Dependent and Species-Specific Responses of Pine Bark Beetles (Coeoptera: Scolytidae) to Monoterpenes in Association with Phermones

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    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden

    2000-01-01

    Monoterpenes affected the attraction of three sympatric species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to pheromone-baited multiple-funnel traps in stands of lodgepole pine. Catches of Ips pini(Say) in traps baited with its pheromone, ipsdienol, were directly related to the release rates of 3-carene, ß-pphellandrene, and ß-pinene. Catches of

  20. Occurrence of Euplatypus parallelus, Euplatypus sp. (col.: Euplatypodidae and Xyleborus affinis (col.: Scolytidae in Pinus sp. in Ribas do Rio Pardo, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Zanuncio José Cola

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood borer species of the families Euplatypodidae and Scolytidae were observed attacking trees of Pinus sp. in the Municipality of Ribas do Rio Pardo, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in March 2000. This plantation had been previously burned in an accidental fire in January 2000, causing the trees to become partially or totally unhealthy, rendering them more susceptible to attack of these pests. Galleries of these wood borers were opened with a chisel to observe parameters such as their direction and form of these galleries. Species observed as wood borers of Pinus sp. were Euplatypus parallelus, Euplatypus sp. (Coleoptera: Euplatypodidae and Xyleborus affinis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae.

  1. 红脂大小蠹的捕食性天敌——大唼蜡甲发育和温度的关系研究%Study on the Relationship between Growth and Environmental Temperature of Rhizophagus grandis (Coleoptera: Rhizophagidae), An Important Predator of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

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    魏建荣; 丁保福; 唐艳龙; 赵建兴; 杨忠岐

    2010-01-01

    @@ 大唼蜡甲(Rhizophagus grandis Gyllenhal) 属鞘翅目唼蜡甲科(Coleoptera: Rhizophagidae),是云杉大小蠹(Dendroctonus micans Kugelann)(鞘翅目:小蠹科)(Coleoptera:Scolytidae)的主要捕食性天敌,其成虫和幼虫均可捕食云杉大小蠹的卵、幼虫和蛹,在自然调节这种重要害虫的种群数量上发挥着重要作用[1-2].云杉大小蠹原分布于前苏联,我国黑龙江、辽宁、青海、甘肃、四川省也有分布,从上世纪初逐渐向西、向南扩散至欧洲的法国、英国,现分布于欧亚大陆的几乎所有的云杉(Picea spp.)的针叶林中.其天敌大唼腊甲随后也跟随云杉大小蠹的扩散而逐步迁移,但自然传播的速度很慢,种群数量较低,在云杉大小蠹新传入区很难达到自然控制的程度.为此,欧洲一些国家开展了大唼腊甲的引进、人工繁殖和释放防治云杉大小蠹的研究.如早在1963年格鲁吉亚就研究利用其防治云杉大小蠹[3].上世纪中后期,云杉大小蠹在欧洲大发生,严重危害挪威云杉(Picea abies (L.) Karst.).为了防治这种重要的蛀干害虫,比利时从上世纪50年代起就开展了利用大唼腊甲生物防治云杉大小蠹的研究.1978年,英国和法国等国家先后从比利时引进大唼蜡甲,取得了良好的控制效果[4-5].随后美国也引进大唼腊甲防治黑脂大小蠹(Dendroctonus terebrans Olivier)[6].

  2. Clave de las especies de Conoderus Grupo II (Coleoptera: Elateridae Key of the species of Conoderus Group II (Coleoptera: Elateridae

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    Marta E. Guzmán De Tomé

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Se presenta una reseña histórica, diagnosis y clave de identificación de 33 especies exclusivamente neotropicales, del género Conoderus Eschscholtz 1829 Grupo II, (Coleoptera, Elateridae proporcionando, datos de su distribución e ilustraciones de cuatro especies representativas de la región.ABSTRACT. An identification of 33 species of Conoderus Group II, Eschscholtz 1829 (Coleoptera, Elateridae with full diagnosis, distribution, with representative illustrations of four species of the neotropical region.

  3. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

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    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  4. Sulawesi Onthophagus: seven new species in select groups (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, J; Huijbregts, J

    2017-03-05

    Eleven species in five small operational groups of the scarab genus Onthophagus Latreille, 1802 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) are treated, all from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and nearby smaller islands. These groups are defined, and their species are keyed, described, and illustrated, including the following seven new species: Onthophagus bisscrutator (O. scrutator group); O. bongkudai (O. holosericus group); O. sopu (O. manguliensis group); O. hollowayi, O. seseba, and O. annulopunctatus (O. seseba group); and O. begoniophilus (O. deflexicollis group). Lectotypes are designated for Onthophagus scrutator Harold, 1877 and O. holosericus Harold, 1877.

  5. Efecto de la dieta artificial MP sobre la emergencia y relacion de sexos de Phymastichus coffea (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae) mantenido sobre su hueped, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scloytidae)a traves de generaciones contin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phymastichus coffea La Salle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is an endoparasitoid that attacks the adult coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). The MP diet developed by Portilla and Streett is the only reported diet that allows cultures of P. coffea to develop and repr...

  6. Peculiarities of the imago Coleoptera (Insecta groups overwintering in various substrata of the Reserve «Galichya Gora»

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    Mikhail N. Tsurikov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the 1997–2006 and 2010–2011winter seasons, in the area of Morozova Gora (the nature reserve "Galichya Gora", in Russia, 1200 samples of various substrata were taken, most of which were 4500 cm3 in volume. In total, 41,854 specimens of 690 species belonging to 52 Coleoptera families were registered at overwintering sites. The analysis of the peculiarities of imago Coleoptera groups in the major winter habitats showed that in most of the investigated substrata representatives of the Staphylinidae family prevailed both in terms of species diversity and number. It is only under the bark of trees and in deadwood that Carabidae are the most numerous, whereas Latridiidae are prevalent in tinder fungi. Turf has the maximal species saturation during the winter season (the highest percentage of species referring to 18 families was registered here, as well as plant litter (10 families, with turf being the preference of 8 families richest in species diversity. The imagos of a number of families relatively rich in species – Cantharidae, Malachiidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Oedemeridae, Meloidae, Scraptiidae and Anthribidae – were not found at overwintering sites, which is explained by the preimaginal overwintering of most representatives of the abovementioned families. It was shown that in substrata which are the least suitable for the overwintering of the imago of most Coleoptera species, the highest percentage of the predominant species was registered since more accessible substrata are used as overwintering sites by the same species from different habitats, which decreases the concentration of imago beetles of certain species there. A study of the peculiarities of species distribution (with no less than 30 specimens among overwintering sites showed that the largest number of stenotopic species was registered in droppings (9 species. Then follow the substrata (in decreasing order: turf (5, hay (grass sward, haymow, meadow (4, decomposing

  7. A review of the Tychobythinus algiricus species group from North Africa (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabella, Giorgio; Viglianisi, Fabio Massimo; D'urso, Vera; Nouira, Said

    2014-12-10

    The species belonging to the Tychobythinus algiricus group are revised and the group is characterized and defined. Tychobythinus algiricus (Raffray, 1871) is redescribed, illustrated and its distribution and its synonymic framework discussed, establishing that Tychobythinus occidentalis Besuchet, 1962 is a junior synonym of Tychobythinus algiricus (syn. nov.). A key for species identification is provided.

  8. A taxonomic revision of the Neoserica (sensu lato calva group (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Sericini

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    Wangang Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The species of the Neoserica (sensu lato calva group are revised. Neoserica calva Frey, 1972, comb. n. is redescribed. Thirteen new species are described from China and South Korea: Neoserica ailaoshanica sp. n., N. anonyma sp. n., N. calvoides sp. n., N. gulinqingensis sp. n., N. koelkebecki sp. n., N. liangi sp. n., N. luxiensis sp. n., N. menghaiensis sp. n., N. mengi sp. n., N. taipingensis sp. n., N. zheijangensis sp. n., N. zhibenshanica sp. n., and N. zongyuani sp. n. A key to Sericini genera with multilamellate antenna and species groups of Neoserica of mainland Asia as well as a key to species of the N. calva group are provided. A map of species distribution is given, habitus and male genitalia are illustrated.

  9. Definition and Revision of the Orthrius-group of genera (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Clerinae

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    Robert Gerstmeier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An “Orthrius-group” of genera is proposed, and defined to include Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Caridopus Schenkling, 1908; Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; Gyponyx Gorham, 1883; Languropilus Pic, 1940; Orthrius Gorham, 1876; Pieleus Pic, 1940; Xenorthrius Gorham, 1892; plus three new genera Neorthrius gen. n., Nonalatus gen. n. and Pseudoastigmus gen. n. A phylogeny of the 11 constituent Orthrius-group genera (analysis of 22 morphological characters using Clerus Geoffroy as the out-group taxon was performed with TNT v1.1 is proposed. Four genera are synonymised: Burgeonus Pic, 1950, syn. n. (with Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Brinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. and Quasibrinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. (both with Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; and Dedana Fairmaire, 1888, syn. n. (with Orthrius Gorham, 1876. The genera Falsoorthrius Pic, 1940 and Mimorthrius Pic, 1940 are transferred from Clerinae to the subfamily Tillinae.

  10. Dietary specialization in European species groups of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Bruchidae: Bruchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delobel, Bernard; Delobel, Alex

    2006-09-01

    Because of their particular biology, seed beetles exhibit a strong relationship with their larval host plants. In Europe, however, field data have long been scarce and unreliable. The results of Legume seed collections of nearly 1,000 samples belonging to 292 species from various locations in Europe are summarized. The status of current Bruchidius species groups is amended on morphological and phylogenetic bases. Recent advances in the knowledge of phylogenetic structures of both Fabaceae and Bruchinae provide a new picture of Bruchinae-Fabaceae interactions. It reveals a certain level of host conservatism. The hypothesis of radiative adaptation seems the most compatible with observed data.

  11. Molecular phylogenetics, systematics and host-plant associations of the Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus) species group (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) with the description of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delobel, Alex; Le Ru, Bruno; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Musyoka, Boaz K; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-03-16

    Bruchidius Schilsky is a large paraphyletic genus of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) which consists of multiple lineages that are usually associated with narrow sets of host-plants. In this study we focus on a group that mostly develops on wattle trees (acacias) belonging to the genus Vachellia Wight & Arn. This group originally included nine species and was designated as the Bruchidius centromaculatus (Allard) species group, but recent phylogenetic analyses revealed that these species belong to a much wider group of species with similar morphologies. For reasons of anteriority we call this enlarged group Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus). Here we review the morphology of species in this group and provide new diagnoses and ecological data for 10 species. The following combinations and synonymies are proposed: Bruchidius tanaensis (Pic, 1921) (= Bruchus tanaensis Pic, 1921) comb. nov. and Bruchidius albosparsus (Fåhraeus, 1839) (= Bruchus spadiceus Fåhraeus, 1839) syn. nov. Four new species are also described: B. eminingensis sp. nov., B. gerrardiicola sp. nov., B. glomeratus sp. nov. and B. haladai sp. nov. Finally we carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses on a multi-marker dataset of 59 specimens and 35 species, including 14 species from the group. The resulting trees allow us to confirm the monophyly of the group of interest and provide a more detailed picture of their evolutionary relationships.

  12. Systematics of the Ceracis furcifer Species-Group (Coleoptera: Ciidae): The Specialized Consumers of the Blood-Red Bracket Fungus Pycnoporus sanguineus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecci-Maddalena, Italo S. C.; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    The Ceracis furcifer species-group (Coleoptera: Ciidae) originally comprised nine species names: Ceracis cornifer (Mellié, 1849); C. cylindricus (Brèthes, 1922); C. furcifer Mellié, 1849; C. hastifer (Mellié, 1849); C. monocerus Lawrence, 1967; C. ruficornis Pic, 1916; C. simplicicornis (Pic, 1916); C. semipallidus Pic, 1922 and C. unicornis Gorham, 1898. Ceracis semipallidus was synonymised with C. furcifer and then no further changes were made to the composition of the group. Here, we provide a taxonomic revision of the Ceracis furcifer species-group and new data on the geographic distribution and host fungi of the included species. Lectotypes are designated for C. cornifer, C. furcifer, C. hastifer, C. ruficornis, C. semipallidus and C. unicornis. As results we: (i) synonymise C. cylindricus, C. monocerus, C. simplicicornis, C. unicornis with C. cornifer; (ii) confirm the synonymy of C. semipallidus with C. furcifer; (iii) redescribe C. cornifer, C. hastifer, C. furcifer and C. ruficornis; and (iv) provide an identification key for species in the furcifer group. The frontoclypeal horn and body coloration showed great intraspecific variation. We show that species in the furcifer group have distributions wider than previously known and use mainly Pycnoporus sanguineus as host fungus. Species of the furcifer group are the only animals specialized in feeding on basidiomes of P. sanguineus. PMID:28714939

  13. The cold-hardiness of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera, Scolytidae) and Rhizophagus grandis (Coleoptera, Rhizophagidae)%红脂大小蠹Dendroctonus valens(Coleoptera,Scolytidae)和大唼蜡甲 Rhizophagus grandis(Coleoptera,Rhizophagidae)的耐寒性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建兴; 杨忠岐; Jean-Claude Gregoire

    2009-01-01

    Dendroctonus valens LeConte(Red turpentine beetle,RTB) was recently found in outbreak in China.Its elder instars and mature larvae mainly over-winter under the roots of the pine stumps and standing trees in China.The cold tolerant capabilities of the pest was estimated in the laboratory by SU-per-cooling points (SCP) and short-term lower lethal temperatures (LLT).The results show that the lowest mean super-cooling point of the RTB over-wintering larvae is-11.98 ± 2.55℃ and it is a species of tolerant-freezing insect.The SCP of RTB is significantly different between different geographical populations,the elder stage larvae have lower cold-hardiness than younger ones,but no significantly different between the larvae in early winter and later winter.The RTB larvae could spend its life in winter below the atmospheric temperie temperature which being lower more than-23.5℃ at least.In contrast,Rhizophagus grandis Gyll.,as a predator of Dendroctonus micans,was introduced to China against RTB since 2001.The mean SCP of Rhizophagus grandis larva is-l8.05 ±2.76℃ which being lower temperature more than ones of any stage of RTB.%红脂大小蠹 Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Red turpentine beetle,RTB)是近年来在中国爆发的入侵生物,在我国主要以老熟幼虫在油松伐桩和立木的根部越冬.室内测定昆虫的过冷却点(SCP)和短时间致死低温(LLT)是评价昆虫耐寒能力的重要方法.实验结果显示,红脂大小蠹越冬幼虫的平均过冷却点为一11.98±2.55℃,是一种耐冰冻的昆虫.红脂大小蠹的过冷却点在不同地理分布区的种群问有明显差异,老熟幼虫的过冷却点明显低于低龄幼虫,在越冬前和越冬后的幼虫问没有明显差异.红脂大小蠹幼虫在冬季至少町以忍受-23.5℃的大气温度安全越冬.从2001年开始引入我国的云杉大小蠹的捕食者大唼蜡甲(Rhizophagus grandis cyll.)幼虫的过冷却点为-18.05±2.76℃,低于红脂大小蠹所有虫态的过冷却点,说明比红脂大小蠹有更强的耐寒能力.

  14. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  15. Taxonomy, host-plant associations and phylogeny of African Crotalaria-feeding seed beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae): the Conicobruchus strangulatus (Fåhraeus) species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ru, Bruno P; Delobel, Alex; György, Zoltán; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Kergoat, Gael J

    2014-12-15

    A small group of six morphologically related seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) belonging to the Conicobruchus genus is reviewed. Species in this group for which host-plants are known feed on various species of Crotalaria (Fabaceae, Crotalarieae). Here we provide diagnoses and a dichotomous key for all six species. The following synonymies are proposed: Conicobruchus cicatricosus (Fåhraeus, 1839) (= Bruchus cicatricosus pallidioripennis Pic, 1941) syn. nov.; Conicobruchus strangulatus (Fåhraeus, 1839) (= Bruchus hargreavesi Pic, 1933) syn. nov. The corresponding Conicobruchus strangulatus species group is hereby designated. New host-plant data are also included, which correspond to the results of recent collections of legume pods in East Africa. In addition we carried out molecular phylogenetic analyses on a representative sampling of Conicobruchus species (including the six species of interest). The latter allow us to assess the monophyly of the group of interest and to unravel their evolutionary relationships. Molecular phylogenetic analyses also indicate that at least two lineages of Conicobruchus successfully shifted toward Crotalarieae during the course of their diversification. 

  16. Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) shoot-feeding characteristics and overwintering behavior in Scotch pine Christmas trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, R A; Lawrence, R K; Heaton, G C

    2001-04-01

    Overwintering behavior of Tomicus piniperda (L.) was studied in a Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) Christmas tree plantation in Indiana (1992-1994) and a plantation in Michigan (1994). In general, adults feed inside shoots during summer, then move to overwintering sites at the base of trees in autumn. In early autumn, adults were most often found in shoot-feeding tunnels that were still surrounded by green needles, whereas few were in tunnels surrounded by yellow or brown needles. For all years and sites combined, the range in the percentage of recently tunneled shoots that contained live T. piniperda adults decreased from 89 to 96% in mid-October, to 15- 66% in early November, to 2-10% in mid-November, and to 0-2% by late November to early December. In each year, the first subfreezing temperatures in autumn occurred in October, before most adults left the shoots. Of 1,285 T. piniperda-tunneled shoots, one to seven tunnels (mean = 1.6) and zero to three adults were found per infested shoot. Of these 1,285 attacked shoots, 55% of the shoots had one tunnel, 33% had two, 9% had three, 3% had four, and trees were dissected in January 1993. Eighty percent of the tunneled shoots were in the upper quarter of the tree crown and 98% were in the upper half. For the four trees inspected in January, one live adult was found in a shoot and 85 adults were found in the outer bark along the lower trunk from 1 cm below the soil line to 19 cm above the soil line. No overwintering adults were found outside the trunk in the duff or soil near the base of each test tree. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of surveying, timing the cutting of Christmas trees, and cutting height for Christmas trees.

  17. The occurrence of Xyleborus perforans (Woll.) and X. similis in Java (Coleoptera, Scolytidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalshoven, L.G.E.

    1964-01-01

    In 1898 a shot-hole borer, identified as X. perforans (Woll.) appeared in an experimental plantation of sugar-cane varieties at Kagok, near Tegal, West Java. Zehntner, the Swiss entomologist on the staff of the Sugar-cane Experimental Station at Kagok, used the opportunity to study the borer

  18. Mites associated with Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmerman (Scolytidae: Coleoptera) in Central America and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Moser; Robert C. Wilkinson; Edgar W. Clark

    1974-01-01

    The pine forests of central and North America continually suffer economic damage from the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmerman 1868***, and associated bark beetles. The most severe epidemic in the history of this insect occured in Honduras from 1962 to 1965 (1, 2). Then and subsequently, studies aimed at determining the biology and...

  19. Sex Pheromone of Conophthorus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in a Coastal Stand of Western White Pine (Pinaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; Harold D. Pierce; Peter de Groot; Nicole Jeans-Williams; Robb Bennett; John H. Borden

    2000-01-01

    An isolated stand of western white pine, Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don, on Texada Island (49°40'N, 124°10'W), British Columbia, is extremely valuable as a seed-production area for progeny resistant to white pine blister rust, Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch. (Cronartiaceae). During the past 5 years, cone beetles, ...

  20. The occurrence of Xyleborus perforans (Woll.) and X. similis in Java (Coleoptera, Scolytidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalshoven, L.G.E.

    1964-01-01

    In 1898 a shot-hole borer, identified as X. perforans (Woll.) appeared in an experimental plantation of sugar-cane varieties at Kagok, near Tegal, West Java. Zehntner, the Swiss entomologist on the staff of the Sugar-cane Experimental Station at Kagok, used the opportunity to study the borer extensi

  1. Colonization of disturbed trees by the southern pine bark beetle guild (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamm, R.O.; Pulley, P.E.; Coulson, R.N. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The southern pine bark beetle guild [Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, D. terebrans (Olivier), Ips calligraphus (Germar), I. grandicollis (Eichhoff), and I. avulsus (Eichhoff)] uses disturbed hosts as habitat for establishment of within-tree populations. The process of colonization of disturbed hosts was examined. Using a procedure designed to emulate effects of a lightning strike, pines were severely disturbed. Response was characterized by measuring beetle populations that (1) arrived at the trees and (2) successfully attacked the trees. Establishment of within-tree populations was characterized by measuring length of egg gallery excavated by attacking adults. The time delay between arrival and attack for D. frontalis and I. calligraphus was also calculated. Attack densities of both species became asymptotic as arrival increased. The percentage of arriving beetles that attacked ranged from 9 to 41 for D. frontalis and from 8 to 59 for I. calligraphus. Numbers of beetles that arrived at the tree but did not attack ranged from 2.7 to 50.2 beetles per dm[sup 2] for D. frontalis and from 0.2 to 10.0 beetles per dm[sup 2] for I. calligraphus. Most D. frontalis and I. calligraphus attacked on the day they arrived. The delay between arrival and attack was longer for I. calligraphus than the D. frontalis. Egg gallery excavated by D. frontalis increased throughout the study. Eventually, the Ips species were excluded from the lower half of the hole. The low attack densities observed in this study illustrate the significance of disturbed trees in providing refuges for enzootic levels of bark beetles. The aggregation behavior of beetle populations colonizing disturbed hosts supported the contention that these trees serve as foci for initiation of infestations. Furthermore, in disturbed pines, small numbers of beetles were capable of overcoming host defense systems.

  2. Life History and Biology of Ips latidens (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)\\t

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Miller; J.H. Borden

    1985-01-01

    The life history and biology of Ips latidens (LeConte) were investigated using bark-sandwich and whole-log rearing methods. In contrast with other Ips spp., some females initiated galleries under conditions of female-biased sex ratios, and sometimes 2 or more males were present in a gallery. In general, however, I....

  3. New species of Scolytodes (Coleoptera: Scolytidae from Costa Rica and Panamá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarte H. Jordal

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of Scolytodes (tribe Ctenophorini are described as new to science: S. concavus and S. circumsetosus (from Ficus branches, La Selva, S. montanus (Monteverde, S. nudifrons (Las Cruces near San Vito, and S. triangulus (fogging sample, La Selva, all from Costa Rica, and S. ungulatus (Cerro Punta and S. punctifrons (from Astronium graveolens, Canal Zone, both from Panama. New distributional and host plant data are given for the following species: S. amoenus (Ficus branch, La Selva, and the first record south of Mexico, S. immanis (Cerro de La Muerte, S. impressus (Xylopia branch, Peninsula de Osa, S. ochromae (Ochroma branch, La Selva, S. piceus (fogging sample, La Selva, the first low altitude record, and S. swieteniae (fogging sample, La Selva and Braulio Carrillo, the first exact locality data, all from Costa Rica, and S. nanellus (Barro Colorado Island from Panama.

  4. On the Biology of the Bark Beetle Scolytus nitidus Schedl (Coleoptera: Scolytidae Attacking Apple Orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAKATOS, Ferenc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological characters of Scolytus nitidus were investigated both in the field and in thelaboratory as well. This common shot-hole borer overwinters in larval stage on apple trees in Kashmir.After emergence the adults fly to suitable trees and undergo maturation feeding for 4-6 days. Thecopulation takes place at the entrance hole. The maternal gallery is one armed longitudinal, in average4.6 cm long. The female lays 52 eggs on an average. The eggs hatch in 5 to 7 days. The larvae have 5instars and complete their development in 38 to 50 days constructing larval galleries 5-8 cm in length.The larvae pupate for 6-18 days and finally the adults emerge to attack new suitable trees. The adultslive for 45-60 days and the total life-span of this species ranges from 97 to 124 days. The seasonaldistribution of various life stages and the number of generations were also recorded.

  5. Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: novas espécies do grupo virescens Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: new species of the virescens group

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    Virgínia Luzia Canhedo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Três novas espécies de Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 são acrescentadas ao grupo virescens: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brasil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai e A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brasil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul e São Paulo. Chave para as espécies do grupo virescens é fornecida.Three new species of Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 are added to the virescensgroup: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brazil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai and A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brazil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo. A key to the species of the group virescens is provided.

  6. Rhinusa Stephens: a taxonomic revision of the species belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The species of Rhinusa Stephens, 1829 (Curculionidae, Curculioninae, Mecinini) belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups are revised. Four of them from Middle East are new to science. The R. bipustulata group includes five species: R. bipustulata (Rossi, 1792); R. pelletieri sp. nov.; R. scrophulariae Caldara, 2009; R. algirica (Brisout de Barneville, 1862); R. emmrichi (Bajtenov, 1979), whereas the R. tetra group includes nine species: R. tetra (Fabricius, 1792); R. verbasci (Rosen...

  7. Definition of the jianfengling species group of the ground beetle genus Orthogonius MacLeay (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Orthogoniini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mingyi; Deuve, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The jianfengling species group of the termitophilous carabid genus Orthogonius MacLeay, 1825 is defined and reviewed. This species group ranges from southern China, crossing Indochina and Myanmar to eastern India. To date, the jianfengling species group is composed of ten species, including six new species which are hereinafter described and illustrated: Orthogonius wrasei sp. n. (Myanmar), Orthogonius bellus sp. n. and Orthogonius limbourgi sp. n. (Vietnam), Orthogonius politior sp. n., Orthogonius aberlenci sp. n. (Laos) and Orthogonius meghalayaensis sp. n. (India). Habitus, elytral apices and male genitalia of all species are illustrated. A key to species and a distribution map of jianfengling species group are provided. PMID:27667943

  8. Description of a new species of Sternocoelis from Morocco with proposal of the Sternocoelis marseulii species group (Coleoptera, Histeridae

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    Tomáš Lackner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Sternocoelis marseulii species group is proposed based on antennal and prosternal characters. Five species are included in the group: S. marseulii (Brisout de Barneville, 1866 (Spain, S. viaticus Lewis, 1892 (Algeria, S. vaucheri Lewis, 1896 (Morocco, S. berberus Lackner & Yélamos, 2001 (Morocco and S. yelamosi sp. n. (Morocco. The external morphology of Sternocoelis yelamosi sp. n. is described and illustrated, the illustrations of genitalia of all species of the group (except for S. vaucheri are provided and a key to the species of the group is given.

  9. Description of a new species of Sternocoelis from Morocco with proposal of the Sternocoelis marseulii species group (Coleoptera, Histeridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Tomáš; Hlaváč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    TheSternocoelis marseulii species group is proposed based on antennal and prosternal characters. Five species are included in the group:Sternocoelis marseulii (Brisout de Barneville, 1866)(Spain), Sternocoelis viaticus Lewis, 1892 (Algeria), Sternocoelis vaucheri Lewis, 1896 (Morocco), Sternocoelis berberus Lackner & Yélamos, 2001 (Morocco)and Sternocoelis yelamosisp. n. (Morocco). The external morphology of Sternocoelis yelamosisp. n. is described and illustrated, the illustrations of genitalia of all species of the group (except for Sternocoelis vaucheri) are provided and a key to the species of the group is given.

  10. A new species of Speonemadus from Portugal, with the revision of the escalerai-group (Coleoptera, Leiodidae

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    Ana Sofia P.S. Reboleira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, intense field work in caves of Portugal has provided new data on the distribution of subterranean Iberian leiodid beetles. Speonemadus algarvensis sp. nov. is described from caves of southern Portugal. The new species is included in the Speonemadus Jeannel, 1922 escalerai-group (Cholevinae; Anemadini. All species of the S. escalerai-group are revised and S. breuili (Jeannel, 1922 is resurrected as a valid species. A key to identify the species of the S. escalerai-group is provided and the distinctive characters are illustrated. The distribution of all species of the group is mapped with new data together with biogeographic considerations.

  11. Description of a new species of Sternocoelis from Morocco with proposal of the Sternocoelis marseulii species group (Coleoptera, Histeridae)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Sternocoelis marseulii species group is proposed based on antennal and prosternal characters. Five species are included in the group: Sternocoelis marseulii (Brisout de Barneville, 1866)(Spain), Sternocoelis viaticus Lewis, 1892 (Algeria), Sternocoelis vaucheri Lewis, 1896 (Morocco), Sternocoelis berberus Lackner & Yélamos, 2001 (Morocco)and Sternocoelis yelamosi sp. n. (Morocco). The external morphology of Sternocoelis yelamosi sp. n. is described and illustrated, the illustrati...

  12. Two new species of the Pterostichus macrogenys species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae discovered in shallow subterranean habitats in northern Honshu, Japan

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    Kôji Sasakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow subterranean environments have recently received attention as a habitat for Carabidae beetles, and many new species have been discovered using collection techniques devised for this habitat. We report the discovery of two new species of the macrogenys species group of the Pterostichus subgenus Nialoe Tanaka, 1958, collected by subterranean baited traps in northern Honshu, Japan. Pterostichus shinbodakensis Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from Mt. Shinbodake, Niigata Prefecture, and P. tateishiyamanus Sasakawa & Itô, sp. n. is described from the southeastern foot of Mt. Tateishiyama, Fukushima Prefecture. Comparative male genital morphology shows that among the known species, the two new species are most closely related to P. falcispinus Sasakawa, 2005 and P. chokaisanus Sasakawa, 2009, respectively. In addition, sympatric occurrence of P. shinbodakensis with a smaller, unidentified species of the species group was also confirmed. The implications of these results for future studies of the macrogenys species group, as well as those of Nialoe, are discussed.

  13. Taxonomic revision of the Lycocerus hanatanii species group (Coleoptera, Cantharidae, with the description of new species from Taiwan

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    Yun Hsiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lycocerus hanatanii species group is revised, with the addition of seven taxa: L. araticollis (Fairmaire, 1897, L. nigripennis (Pic, 1938, L. griseopubens (Pic, 1928, L. aurantiacus sp. nov., L. evangelium sp. nov., L. kintaroi sp. nov., and L. yitingi sp. nov. Supplementary descriptions of the males of L. araticollis and L. griseopubens are provided. Lycocerus nigripennis (Pic, 1938 and L. pictus (Wittmer, 1983 are redescribed in detail. Each species is provided with photos or illustrations of genitalia of both sexes and abdominal ventrite VII of the female if available. Distribution maps and a key to the species of the L. hanatanii species group are presented. In addition, the monophyly of the L. hanatanii species group is supported based on a morphological phylogenetic analysis.

  14. Rhinusa Stephens: a taxonomic revision of the species belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups (Coleoptera Curculionidae

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    Roberto Caldara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The species of Rhinusa Stephens, 1829 (Curculionidae, Curculioninae, Mecinini belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups are revised. Four of them from Middle East are new to science. The R. bipustulata group includes five species: R. bipustulata (Rossi, 1792; R. pelletieri sp. nov.; R. scrophulariae Caldara, 2009; R. algirica (Brisout de Barneville, 1862; R. emmrichi (Bajtenov, 1979, whereas the R. tetra group includes nine species: R. tetra (Fabricius, 1792; R. verbasci (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. ensifer sp. nov.; R. moroderi (Reitter, 1906; R. weilli sp. nov.; R. comosa (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. acifer sp. nov.; R asellus (Gravenhorst, 1807; R. tenuirostris (Stierlin, 1888. The following new synonym is proposed: Rhinusa bipustulata (Rossi, 1792 (= Gymnetron municipale Voss, 1960 syn. nov.. The neotype of Rhynchaenus asellus Gravenhorst, 1807 was designated. Moreover, the following lectotypes are designated: Cionus spilotus Germar, 1821; Gymnetron bipustulatum var. germari Faust, 1889; Gymnetron bodenheimeri Wagner, 1926; Gymnetron cylindrirostre Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron nasutum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron plagiatum Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron polonicum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron tenuirostre Stierlin, 1888. A key to the species, diagnoses of species groups, descriptions or redescriptions, notes on type specimens, synonymies, comparative notes, distribution, bionomics when available, photographs of habitus and drawings of rostra, terminalia and other useful characters for taxonomy are provided.

  15. Phylogenetics, species boundaries and timing of resource tracking in a highly specialized group of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergoat, Gael J; Le Ru, Bruno P; Genson, Gwenaelle; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Delobel, Alex

    2011-06-01

    Though for a long time it was hypothesized that the extraordinary diversity of phytophagous insects was better explained by a synchronous pattern of co-diversification with plants, the results of recent studies have led to question this theory, suggesting that the diversification of insects occurred well after that of their hosts. In this study we address this issue by investigating the timing of diversification of a highly specialized group of seed beetles, which mostly feeds on legume plants from the tribe Indigofereae. To that purpose, a total of 130 specimens were sequenced for six genes and analyzed under a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. Based on the resulting trees we performed several analyses that allowed a better definition of the group boundaries and to investigate the status of several taxa through the use of molecular species delimitation analyses in combination with morphological evidences. In addition the evolution of host plant use was reconstructed and different molecular-dating approaches were carried out in order to assess the ages of several clades of interest. The resulting framework suggests a more ancient than previously thought origin for seed beetles, and a pattern of rapid host plant colonization. These findings call for further similar studies in other highly specialized groups of phytophagous insects.

  16. Coleópteros (Bostrichidae, Platypodidae e Scolytidae em um fragmento de cerrado da baixada Cuiabana / Coleopterans (Bostrichidae, Platypodidae e Scolytidae in fragment of savannah in baixada Cuiabana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Maurício da Rocha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi qualificar e quantificar as populações de Bostrichidae, Platypodidae e Scolytidae que ocorrem associadas a um fragmento de cerrado nos períodos de seca (maio a outubro e de chuva (novembro a abril, no município de Cuiabá, estado de Mato Grosso. As coletas foram quinzenais e ocorreram de abril de 2008 a março de 2009. Foram utilizadas seis armadilhas etanólicas, iscadas com álcool etílico combustível hidratado. Os exemplares coletados foram triados, contados e identificados nos Laboratórios de Proteção Florestal da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso e da Universidade Federal do Paraná. Foram realizados estudos faunísticos de dominância, constância, freqüência, abundância e de diversidade. Também foi desenvolvido estudo de flutuação populacional, de correlação com a tempertura, umidade relativa, precipitação pluvial e testes de médias entre as espécies. Foram identificadas 25 espécies, sendo cinco de Bostrichidae, duas de Platypodidae e 18 de Scolytidae. Foi coletado um total de 874 indivíduos, dos quais 588 foram coletados no período de seca e 286 no período de chuva. Bostrichopsis uncinata, Cryptocarenus diadematus, Xyleborus affinis e Xyleborus retusus foram as espécies mais numerosas no período de seca, enquanto Bostrichopsis uncinata, Xyleborus affinis e Xyleborus ferrugineus foram mais representativas no período de chuvas. As espécies Cryptocarenus diadematus, Xyleborus affinis e Xyleborus retusus ocorreram como dominante, muito abundante, muito frequente e constante somente no período seco, enquanto que no período de chuvas Xyleborus affinis ocorreu como super dominante, super abundante, super frequente e constante. No período de seca, os índices de Equitatibilidade e de Shannon-Wiener foram mais expressivos quando comparados com os obtidos nos meses de chuva.AbstractThe purpose of this research was to qualify and quantify the populations of Bostrichidae, Platypodidae

  17. Frequent discordance between morphology and mitochondrial DNA in a species group of European water beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lucy; Foster, Garth N.

    2017-01-01

    The Hydroporus memnonius species group includes both widespread and range restricted diving beetle taxa in the western Palaearctic, some of which have been divided into a number of geographical subspecies. Of these, Hydroporus necopinatus is distributed in the far west of Europe, from central Spain to southern Britain, and has been split into three subspecies, occurring in Iberia (necopinatus sst.), France (robertorum) and England (roni) respectively—the last of these being a rare example of an insect taxon apparently endemic to northern Europe. Here we explore inter-relationships between populations and subspecies of H. necopinatus and related members of the Hydroporus melanarius subgroup, using mitochondrial COI sequence data. We reveal widespread discordance between mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and morphology in areas where H. necopinatus and H. melanarius come into contact, consistent with historical introgressive hybridization between these taxa. In light of this discordance, the lack of clear genetic divergence between H. necopinatus subspecies, and the fact that both robertorum and roni are morphologically intermediate between H. necopinatus sstr. and H. melanarius, we suggest that these taxa may be of hybridogenic origin, rather than representing discrete evolutionary lineages. PMID:28289570

  18. Frequent discordance between morphology and mitochondrial DNA in a species group of European water beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

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    David T. Bilton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Hydroporus memnonius species group includes both widespread and range restricted diving beetle taxa in the western Palaearctic, some of which have been divided into a number of geographical subspecies. Of these, Hydroporus necopinatus is distributed in the far west of Europe, from central Spain to southern Britain, and has been split into three subspecies, occurring in Iberia (necopinatus sst., France (robertorum and England (roni respectively—the last of these being a rare example of an insect taxon apparently endemic to northern Europe. Here we explore inter-relationships between populations and subspecies of H. necopinatus and related members of the Hydroporus melanarius subgroup, using mitochondrial COI sequence data. We reveal widespread discordance between mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and morphology in areas where H. necopinatus and H. melanarius come into contact, consistent with historical introgressive hybridization between these taxa. In light of this discordance, the lack of clear genetic divergence between H. necopinatus subspecies, and the fact that both robertorum and roni are morphologically intermediate between H. necopinatus sstr. and H. melanarius, we suggest that these taxa may be of hybridogenic origin, rather than representing discrete evolutionary lineages.

  19. Changing Names with Changed Address: Integrated Taxonomy and Species Delimitation in the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli Group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae.

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    Marcus K Drotz

    Full Text Available Species delimitation of geographically isolated forms is a long-standing problem in less studied insect groups. Often taxonomic decisions are based directly on morphologic variation, and lack a discussion regarding sample size and the efficiency of migration barriers or dispersal/migration capacity of the studied species. These problems are here exemplified in a water beetle complex from the Bering Sea region that separates North America from Eurasia. Only a few sampled specimens occur from this particular area and they are mostly found in museum and private collections. Here we utilize the theory of integrated taxonomy to discuss the speciation of the Holarctic Colymbetes paykulli water beetle complex, which historically has included up to five species of which today only two are recognized. Three delimitation methods are used; landmark based morphometry of body shape, variation in reticulation patterns of the pronotum exo-skeleton and sequence variation of the partial mitochondrial gene Cyt b. Our conclusion is that the Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. paykulli are given the status of separate species, based on the fact that all methods showed significant separation between populations. As a consequence the name of the Palearctic species is C. paykulli Erichson and the Nearctic species should be known as C. longulus LeConte. There is no clear support for delineation between Palearctic and Nearctic populations of C. dahuricus based on mtDNA. However, significant difference in size and reticulation patterns from the two regions is shown. The combined conclusion is that the C. dahuricus complex needs a more thorough investigation to fully disentangle its taxonomic status. Therefore it is here still regarded as a Holarctic species. This study highlights the importance to study several diagnosable characters that has the potential to discriminate evolutionary lineage during speciation.

  20. New species and records of Stenus (Nestus of the canaliculatus group, with the erection of a new species group (Insecta: Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Steninae

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    Alexandr B. Ryvkin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The canaliculatus species group of Stenus (Nestus is redefined. Four new Palaearctic species of the group are described and illustrated: S. (N. alopex sp. nov. from the Putorana Highland and Taymyr Peninsula, Russia; S. (N. canalis sp. nov. from SE Siberia and the Russian Far East; S. (N. canosus sp. nov. from the Narat Mt Ridge, Chinese Tien Shan; S. (N. delitor sp. nov. from C & SE Siberia. New distributional data as well as brief analyses of old records for fourteen species described earlier are provided from both Palaearctic and Nearctic material. S. (N. milleporus Casey, 1884 ​(= sectilifer Casey, 1884 is revalidated as a species propria. S. (N. sphaerops Casey, 1884 is redescribed; its aedeagus is figured for the first time; the aedeagus of S. (N. caseyi Puthz, 1972 as well as aedeagi of eight previously described Palaearctic species are illustrated anew. A key for the identification of all the known Palaearctic species of the group is given. A morphology and ecology based analysis of the main evolutionary trends within the group is provided. A lectotype is designated for S. (N. melanopus Marsham, 1802; its Siberian and NE European records are supposed to be erroneous; the monotypic melanopus species group is erected.

  1. Heavy metals in carabids (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Ruslan Butovsky

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae are one of the most studied soil groups in relation to heavy metal (HM accumulation and use for bioindication of environmental pollution. Accumulation of Zn and Cu in carabid beetles was species-, sex- and trophic group-specific. No differences were found in HM contents between omnivorous and carnivorous species. The use of carabid beetles as indicators of HM accumulation appears to be rather limited.

  2. Capture of hypothenemus hampei ferrari (coleoptera, scolytidae in response to trap characteristics Captura da broca-do-café, hypothenemus hampei (coleoptera, scolytidae, em resposta a características de armadilhas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cloclet da Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Traps lured with semiochemical have been proposed to manage the coffee berry borer, coffee planting is however made under several environmental conditions that may affect the efficacy of traps. Several trap designs and variations were proposed and, therefore, a series of field experiments was carried out to capture coffee berry bores in traps disposed in a low density coffee plantations in the Northern part of the State of Paraná, Brazil. Traps were composed of plastic bottles (2 L with a window (13 × 18 cm. Ethanol (E, Methanol (M and coffee oil alone did not improve the capture when transparent traps with a 2 mm hole in the vial dispenser were used; traps lured with E : M mixtures (1:1, 1:2, 1:3 caught similar and higher number of insects than the control. There was synergism with the mixing of E and M; the addition of coffee oil to the mixtures did not improve the capture. Trap lured with E : M (1:1 mixtures at 342, 400, 428 and 710 mg caught similar numbers of insects. Transparent green trap, transparent trap and red trap lured with 642 mg day-1 of the E + M (1:1 mixture caught similar numbers of insects. Interaction between colors (transparent green, transparent and red and semiochemical release rates (540, 720 and 1100 mg day-1 was observed. Transparent green trap, when lured with 720 mg day-1 of the 1 : 1 E : M mixture caught 2.3 and 4.4 times more insects than 540 and 1100 mg day-1; and caught 3.2 times more insects than transparent and red trap at the same release rates.Armadilhas iscadas com semioquímicos têm sido propostas para manejo da broca-do-café. O cafeeiro é cultivado em condições ambientais diversas que podem afetar a eficiência das armadilhas. Vários modelos de armadilha e variações nos modelos são utilizados. Uma série de experimentos de campo objetivou avaliar capturas da broca-do-café em armadilhas numa lavoura de café semi-adensado no Norte do Paraná. Uma garrafa plástica (2 L com uma abertura (13 × 18 cm constituiu a armadilha. O etanol (E, metanol (M e óleo de café, sozinhos, não incrementaram as capturas quando se utilizaram armadilhas transparentes com um frasco difusor com furo de 2 mm; armadilhas iscadas com as misturas 1 : 1, 1 : 2 e 1 : 3 de etanol (E + metanol (M capturaram quantidades similares e superiores à testemunha; sinergismo ocorreu pela mistura de etanol e metanol; a adição do óleo de café às misturas não incrementou as capturas. Armadilhas com taxas de liberação da mistura E:M (1:1 de 342, 400, 428 e 710 mg dia-1 capturaram quantidades similares. Armadilhas verdes transparentes, transparentes e vermelhas, iscadas com E:M (1:1 (642 mg dia-1 capturaram quantidades similares. Foi observada interação entre as cores (verde transparente, transparente, vermelha e taxas de liberação dos semioquímicos (540, 720 e 1100 mg dia-1. Armadilhas verdes transparentes, quando iscadas com doses de 720 mg dia-1 da mistura 1:1 de E:M, capturaram 2,3 e 4,4 mais insetos do que 540 e 1100 mg dia-1; e capturaram 3,2 mais insetos do que armadilhas transparentes e vermelhas.

  3. Inter- and Intrapopulation Variation of the Pheromone, Ipsdienol Produced by Male Pine Engravers Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Miller; J.H. Borden; K.N. Slessor

    1989-01-01

    We determined the chirality of ipsdienol in individual male pine engravers, Ips pini (Say), from New York, California, and two localities in British Columbia (BC). Both quantity and chirality of ipsdienol varied significantly between and within populations of I. pini . Beetles from California and southeastern BC produced...

  4. The great spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus micans Kug.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in Lithuania: occurrence, phenology, morphology and communities of associated fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkis, A; Lynikienė, J; Marčiulynas, A; Gedminas, A; Povilaitienė, A

    2016-11-22

    We studied the occurrence, morphology and phenology of Dendroctonus micans in Lithuania and the fungi associated with the beetle at different developmental stages. The occurrence of D. micans was assessed in 19 seed orchards (at least 40 years old) of Picea abies (L. Karst.) situated in different parts of the country. Bark beetle phenology was studied in two sites: a seed orchard of P. abies and a plantation of Picea pungens (Engelm.). D. micans morphology was assessed under the dissection microscope using individuals at different developmental stages that were sampled during phenology observations. Communities of fungi associated with D. micans were studied using both fungal culturing methods and direct high-throughput sequencing from D. micans. Results showed that the incidence D. micans was relatively rare and D. micans was mainly detected in central and eastern Lithuania. The life cycle included the following stages: adult, egg, I-V developmental stage larvae and pupa. However, development of D. micans was quicker and its nests larger under the bark of P. pungens than of P. abies, indicating the effect of the host species. Fungal culturing and direct high-throughput sequencing revealed that D. micans associated fungi communities were species rich and dominated by yeasts from a class Saccharomycetes. In total, 319 fungal taxa were sequenced, among which Peterozyma toletana (37.5% of all fungal sequences), Yamadazyma scolyti (30.0%) and Kuraishia capsulate (17.7%) were the most common. Plant pathogens and blue stain fungi were also detected suggesting their potentially negative effects to both tree health and timber quality.

  5. Response of Lutz, Sitka, and white spruce to attack by Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and blue stain fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Werner; Barbara L. Illman

    1994-01-01

    Mechanical wounding and wounding plus inoculation with a blue-stain fungus, Leptographium abietinum (Peck), associated with the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), caused an induced reaction zone or lesion around the wound sites in Lutz spruce, Picea lutzii Little, Sitka spruce, P. sitchensis (Bong.) Carr., and white spruce, P. glauca (Moench) Voss, in...

  6. Co-Occurrence of the Invasive Banded and European Elm Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jana C. Lee; Ingrid Aguayo; Ray Aslin; Gail Durham; Shakeer M. Hamud; Bruce D. Moltzan; A. Steve Munson; José F. Negrón; Travis Peterson; Iral R. Ragenovich; Jeffrey J. Witcosky; Steven J. Seybold

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT The invasive European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), was detected in Massachusetts a century ago, and it now occurs throughout the continental United States and southern Canada...

  7. Dose-Dependent Pheromone Responses of Ips pini, Orthotomicus latiden (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), and associates in stands of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden; B. Staffan Lidgren

    2005-01-01

    We conducted four behavioral choice tests in stands of mature lodgepole pine in British Columbia, from 1988 to 1991, to determine the dose-dependent responses of Orthotomicus latidens (LeConte) and Ips pini (Say) to their respective pheromones. Dose-dependent responses were exhibited by I. pini to (±)-ipsdienol and lanierone, with...

  8. Verbenone: Dose-Dependent Interruption of Pheromone-Based Attraction of Three Sympatric Species of Pine Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; John H. Borden; B. Staffan Lindgren

    1995-01-01

    Verbenone significantly reduced catches of Ips latidens (LeConte), I. pini (Say), and Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins in multiple-funnel traps, baited with aggregation pheromones, in stands of lodgepole pine in southern British Columbia. Interruption of attraction was dose dependent for all three species. There...

  9. Responses of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari)(Coleoptera: Scolytidae), to vertical distribution of methanol: ethanol traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura-Lima, Daliana H; Ventura, Maurício U; Mikami, Adriana Y; Silva, Flávia C Da; Morales, Lauro

    2010-01-01

    Captures of the coffee berry borer (CBB) Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) were assessed in traps in the field. IAPAR designed traps [plastic bottles (2 L) lured with methanol:ethanol (1:1) in a vessel] were placed either at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5m high from the ground or simultaneously tested in the 2004 fructification season. Traps placed at the three heights trapped 5.5 times more CBB than the others, mostly at the traps placed at 0.5 m (75%). Treatments using the IAPAR designed trap placed at 1.2 m high; IAPAR trap with a white plastic plate above (IAPAR modified I) at 1.2 m high; IAPAR at 0.5 m high and two additional vessels at 1.0 and 1.5m high (IAPAR modified II) and T-163 trap [three red plastic cups (300 ml) and a red plastic plate as a cover] lured with M:E (1:1) at 1.2m height were compared in the vegetative (2005) and fructification (2006) periods. IAPAR modified II (dispenser vessels placed at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m) trapped more beetles than the remaining types (2.72 times more beetles than IAPAR design); and IAPAR modified I traps trapped more beetles than T 163 and IAPAR traps in the vegetative period. In the reproductive period, IAPAR modified II trapped less beetles than IAPAR and IAPAR modified I. In 2007 vegetative season, IAPAR modified II trap were compared with IAPAR trap and trapped 2.8 times more beetles. The positive responses to a vertical distribution of the volatile attractants in the vegetative period of the planting allow the development of more efficient trapping systems for CBB.

  10. FAUNÍSTIC STUDY OF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA IN A SILVICULTURAL-PASTORAL SYSTEM

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    Alexander Machado Auad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of beetles (Coleoptera in a silvicultural-pastoral system, estimating constancy, abundance, richness, diversity of families and seasonality, from July 2006 to June 2008. The study was carried out at the Embrapa Dairy Cattle station, in Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The beetles were collected in Malaise traps, every two weeks, and taken to the laboratory for analysis. A total of 26 families, 294 morphospecies and 1,606 specimens were found. The Elateridae, Mordelidae, Chrysomelidae, Coccinellidae and Curculionidae families were the most abundant, rich and diverse. The Scarabaeidae and Scolytidae families were also among the most abundant, and the Cerambycidae family was among the richest, while the Bruchidae and Carabidae families presented high diversity.  The largest number of individuals and morphospecies sampled occurred during the period of rain. November 2007 presented the most (n = 535 specimens captures of any month, followed by October 2006, September 2007, March and April of 2008.

  11. Entomofauna Associada a Galhos de Acacia mangium Willd. Roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

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    Gláucia Cordeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da entomofauna associada aos galhos e fustes roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman é importante para conhecermos seus possíveis inimigos naturais. Portanto, este trabalho teve como objetivo registrar os insetos associados aos galhos e fustes de Acacia mangium Willd. roletados por O. saga, em Coimbra-MG. Galhos e fustes roletados de A. mangium foram coletados de janeiro a abril de 2007. Este material foi vistoriado, armazenados em sacolas, feitas com tela plástica, e mantidos em sala com condições controladas (25,4±0,3°C e 66,7±1,4%. Constatou-se a presença de uma espécie, não determinada, de Scolytidae e a emergência de quatro espécies de Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus e Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. Isto posto, fica evidenciada a necessidade de estudos com o objetivo de verificar qual o comportamento destes insetos em relação ao serrador O. saga.Insects associated with branches of Acacia mangium Willd. girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: CerambycidaeAbstract. The study of the insects associated with branches and stems girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman is important to know its possible natural enemies. Therefore, these work had the objective of register the insects associated with branches and stems girdled of Acacia mangium Willd. by this twig girdler beetle, in Coimbra, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Stems and branches of A. mangium were collected in January/2007 to April/2007. This material has been inspected, stored in plastic bags, and kept in a room with controlled conditions (25.4 ± 0.3°C and 66.7 ± 1.4%. It was noted the presence of a non-determined species of Scolytidae and the emergence of four species of Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus and Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. It can be concluded that studies are needed with the objective of

  12. Morfologia comparada dos gêneros do grupo Merobruchus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae: diagnoses e chave Comparative morphology of the genera of the group Merobruchus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae: diagnoses and key

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    José Aldir P. da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizada uma análise comparativa com base na morfologia detalhada do adulto de sete gêneros: Caryedes Hummel, 1827, Ctenocolum Kingsolver & Whitehead, 1974, Gibbobruchus Pic, 1913, Meibomeus Bridwell, 1946, Merobruchus Bridwell, 1946, Penthobruchus Kingsolver, 1973 e Pygiopachymerus Pic, 1911, reunidos no agrupamento Merobruchus. Esse grupo está incluído em Acanthoscelidina Bridwell, maior subtribo de Bruchinae, e com limites imprecisos. Este estudo possibilitou descrever novos caracteres, levantar uma nova hipótese de relacionamento entre os gêneros, e apresentar uma diagnose para o grupo e seus gêneros, além de uma chave dicotômica. Também foi possível registrar pela primeira vez para o Brasil Caryedes godmani (Sharp, 1885 e C. longifrons (Sharp, 1885 e Dioclea virgata (Rich. Amshoff (Papilionoideae como uma nova planta hospedeira para C. godmani.A comparative analysis was carried out based on the detailed morphology of adults of seven genera: Caryedes Hummel, 1827, Ctenocolum Kingsolver & Whitehead, 1974, Gibbobruchus Pic, 1913, Meibomeus Bridwell, 1946, Merobruchus Bridwell, 1946, Penthobruchus Kingsolver, 1973, and Pygiopachymerus Pic, 1911, joined in the Merobruchus group. This group is included in Acanthoscelidina Bridwell, the largest subtribe of Bruchinae, and with imprecise limits. This study describes new characters, suggests a new hypothesis for the relationships among the genera, proposes diagnoses of the group and its genera, and provides a dichotomous key. It was also possible to record Caryedes godmani (Sharp, 1885 and Caryedes longifrons (Sharp, 1885 for the first time from Brazil and Dioclea virgata (Rich. Amshoff (Papilionoideae as a new host plant for C. godmani.

  13. Necrobiont Coleoptera North-West Caucasus

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    Sergey Viktorovich Pushkin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex necrobionts of the alpine girdle of Northwest Caucasus is described ecologically. The specific composition of groups is circumscribed. The legitimacies of creation necrobionts of the complex from a type of a landscape and taxonomic of an accessory of a corpse are detected. Studying of regional features ¬of formation necrobionts complexes has, both scientific, and practical -interest. Throughout 20 years we studied fauna and ecological features necrobiont Coleoptera mountain landscapes of Northwest Caucasus and -adjoining areas of Ciscaucasia.

  14. Coleoptera associated with macrophytes of the genus Salvinia in four oxbow lakes in two river basins in southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Bueno, M C; Fonseca-Gessner, A A

    2015-11-01

    Macrophytes in oxbow lakes represent an important substrate for the Coleoptera. Two oxbow lakes the Rio Paranapanema were studied and the other two Rio Mogi-Guaçu, in the State de São Paulo, Brasil. In this study, there is greater similarity between the communities of Coleoptera of lakes greater connectivity with the main river channel or the difference in the species of Salvinia collected in the lakes studied interferes Coleoptera fauna that uses as substrate. A total of 9,222 specimens of Coleoptera were collected and identified in 10 families and 40 genera. The analysis MDS for abundance of Coleoptera showed the grouping of the oxbow lakes the Paranapanema River and a distancing the oxbow lakes the Mogi-Guaçu. The PERMANOVA test did not reveal any difference in the fauna between the wet and dry periods. It was concluded that the connectivity between river and lake is not decisive for the richness and abundance of aquatic fauna of Coleoptera. Therefore, the richness and abundance of aquatic Coleoptera associated vary with the species of Salvinia used as substrate.

  15. Studies on palearctic Onthophagus associated with burrows of small mammals. IV. A new Iranian species belonging to the furciceps group (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Onthophagini

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    Stefano Ziani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Onthophagus (Palaeonthophagus psychopompus sp. n. is described based on 75 specimens from Iran. The new species belongs to the furciceps species group, and has pholeophile habits, as the other species of the group. It appears to have a wide distribution in Iran, from 600 to 1950 m above sea level. A revised dichotomous key to the group is given.

  16. A revision of the Anthaxia (Haplanthaxia) schah Abeille de Perrin, 1904 species-group, with description of two new species from Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Anthaxiini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocchi, Daniele

    2015-01-10

    Two new species of Anthaxia Eschscholtz, 1829 endemic to Iran, Anthaxia (Haplanthaxia) cadusiana sp. nov. and A. (H.) elamita sp. nov., are described and compared to their most similar species. The A. (H.) schah Abeille de Perrin, 1904 species-group is proposed and revised, and lectotypes for A. (H.) schah Abeille de Perrin, 1904 and A. (H.) wethloi Obenberger, 1940 are designated. All species of the new species-group are illustrated, including type specimens. A short definition of the new species-group and a key to its species are given, together with data on the distribution, bionomy and taxonomic position for each of the species that compose it.

  17. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821530

  18. Review of the largest species group of the New World seed beetle genus Sennius Bridwell (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), with host plant associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Jéssica Herzog; Ribeiro-Costa, Cibele Stramare

    2013-11-15

    Sennius Bridwell is a New World genus of Bruchinae. Most species are placed in eight groups. In this study the species of the S. abbreviatus group are reviewed based on characters of the external morphology and the male genitalia. The group includes 14 species, two of which are new: Sennius abbreviatus (Say, 1824), S. bondari (Pic, 1929), S. durangensis Johnson & Kingsolver, 1973, S. lawrencei Johnson, 1977, S. lebasi (Fåhraeus, 1839), S. leucostauros Johnson & Kingsolver, 1973, S. lojaensis (Pic, 1933), S. medialis (Sharp, 1885), S. nappi Ribeiro-Costa & Reynaud, 1998, S. rufomaculatus (Motschulsky, 1874), S. transversesignatus (Fåhraeus, 1839), S. trinotaticollis (Pic, 1930), S. vivi sp. nov. and S. flinte sp. nov. The S. abbreviatus group differs from other groups by the pattern of sclerites and the shape of the internal sac of the male genitalia, and has three subgroups, defined here. The lectotype of S. lebasi is designated. New host plant records are presented for S. lojaensis and S. transversesignatus, and new distribution records for S. lawrencei, S. lojaensis and S. trinotaticollis. 

  19. Taxonomic revision of New Guinea diving beetles of the Exocelina danae group, with the description of ten new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae

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    Helena Shaverdo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ten new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described: E. andakombensis sp. n., E. garaina sp. n., E. injiensis sp. n., E. kabwumensis sp. n., E. marawaga sp. n., E. posmani sp. n., E. tekadu sp. n., E. varirata sp. n., E. wareaga sp. n., and E. woitapensis sp. n. All of them together with five already described species are united into the newly defined E. danae-group (with E. miriae-subgroup, a polyphyletic complex of related species with lateral setation on the median lobe. In the light of newly available material, all previously described species of the E. rivulus-group are considered to belong to a single species, E. damantiensis (Balke, 1998, which is now placed into the E. danae-group, and three new synonyms are therefore proposed: E. madangensis (Balke, 2001 syn. n., E. patepensis (Balke, 1998 syn. n., and E. rivulus (Balke, 1998 syn. n. Exocelina tarmluensis (Balke, 1998 syn. n. is a junior synonym of E. danae (Balke, 1998. Redescription of E. atratus (Balfour-Browne, 1939 is provided based on its type material. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. Data on the species distribution are given, showing that whilst most species are local endemics, E. damantiensis is extremely widely distributed.

  20. Taxonomic revision of New Guinea diving beetles of the Exocelina danae group, with the description of ten new species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaverdo, Helena; Sagata, Katayo; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ten new species of Exocelina Broun, 1886 from New Guinea are described: Exocelina andakombensissp. n., Exocelina garainasp. n., Exocelina injiensissp. n., Exocelina kabwumensissp. n., Exocelina marawagasp. n., Exocelina posmanisp. n., Exocelina tekadusp. n., Exocelina variratasp. n., Exocelina wareagasp. n., and Exocelina woitapensissp. n. All of them together with five already described species are united into the newly defined Exocelina danae-group (with Exocelina miriae-subgroup), a polyphyletic complex of related species with lateral setation on the median lobe. In the light of newly available material, all previously described species of the Exocelina rivulus-group are considered to belong to a single species, Exocelina damantiensis (Balke, 1998), which is now placed into the Exocelina danae-group, and three new synonyms are therefore proposed: Exocelina madangensis (Balke, 2001) syn. n., Exocelina patepensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n., and Exocelina rivulus (Balke, 1998) syn. n. Exocelina tarmluensis (Balke, 1998) syn. n. is a junior synonym of Exocelina danae (Balke, 1998). Redescription of Exocelina atratus (Balfour-Browne, 1939) is provided based on its type material. An identification key to all known species of the group is provided, and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. Data on the species distribution are given, showing that whilst most species are local endemics, Exocelina damantiensis is extremely widely distributed.

  1. Description of a new species of Epicauta Dejean, 1834 from Mexico with a review of the Epicauta cupraeola species group (Coleoptera, Meloidae

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    García-París, M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a morphologically remarkable new species of the Epicauta cupraeola species group from the highlands of the State of Nayarit, Mexico. The external appearance of Epicauta cora sp. nov., is similar to that of Epicauta rufipennis and Epicauta diana, but it is distinct from both species based on male antennae structure, shape and pilosity of the head and pronotum, color of pronotal pilosity, and male fore-tarsal structure. The nine species integrating now the E. cupraeola species group have been revised. This study of 323 specimens, including diverse type material, confirms the synonymy of Cantharis rufescens with Epicauta basimacula first proposed by Pinto (1991, and reports new geographic records for Mexican taxa. The species of the E. cupraeola group are included in a key and illustrated photographically, including type specimens of five taxa. A phylogenetic re-analysis of the E. cupraeola species group results in the placement of the new species as sister to E. rufipennis, which together form a sister clade to the remaining species of the E. cupraeola group.Se describe una especie nueva, morfológicamente singular, del grupo de especies de Epicauta cupraeola de las zonas altas del Estado de Nayarit, México. La apariencia externa de Epicauta cora sp. nov., es similar a la de Epicauta rufipennis y Epicauta diana, pero difiere de ambas en la estructura de las antenas del macho, forma y pilosidad de la cabeza y pronoto, y estructura de las tibias anteriores del macho. Se revisan las nueve especies incluidas ahora en el grupo de especies de E. cupraeola. Este estudio que incluye 323 especímenes, entre ellos material tipo diverso, confirma la sinonimia de Cantharis rufescens con Epicauta basimacula propuesta por Pinto (1991, y aporta nuevos registros geográficos para las especies de México. Se presenta una clave para las especies del grupo de E. cupraeola y se ilustran foto gráficamente, incluyendo ejemplares tipo de cinco taxones. Un

  2. The tiger-beetles of “hybrida”-species group (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cicindelinae. III. A taxonomic review of the Iberian Cicindela lagunensis Gautier, 1872 complex

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    Matalin, A. V.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available On the base of morphological as well as male’s and female’s genitalia peculiarities of four subspecies of the Iberian tiger beetle Cicindela lagunensis Gautier, 1872 (according to Gebert, 1995 their taxonomic status is discussed. There are three separate species which habitat in the Iberian Peninsula: C. lagunensis, C. iberica Mandl, 1935, stat. nov. and C. lusitanica Mandl, 1935, bona spec., stat. nov. C. lusitanica includes two subspecies: C. l. lusitanica Mandl, 1935 and C. l. silvaticoides W. Horn, 1937 comb. nov. The lectotypus and paralectotypus of Cicindela (s. str. hybrida silvaticoides W. Horn, 1937 were designated. Morphological characters and genitalia of both sexes are described. The geographic distribution is given. The results of phylogenetic analysis are discussed. The Iberian species of “lagunensis”-complex make a monophyletic group with C. hybrida Linnaeus, 1758, and this group has a sister group which was made up by C. sahlbergii Fischer von Waldheim, 1824 and other related species. A key for identify the Iberian species of “lagunensis”-complex is given.Se discute el estatus taxonómico de cuatro subespecies de Cicindela lagunensis Gautier, 1872 (sensu Gebert, 1995 sobre la base tanto de la morfología externa como de las características de las genitalias masculina y femenina. En la Península Ibérica viven tres especies de Cicindela: C. lagunensis, C. iberica Mandl, 1935, stat. nov. y C. lusitanica Mandl, 1935, bona spec., stat. nov. Cidindela lusitanica incluye dos subespecies: C. l. lusitanica Mandl, 1935 y C. l. silvaticoides W. Horn, 1937 comb. nov. Se designan lectotipo y paralectotipos de Cicindela (s. str. hybrida silvaticoides W. Horn, 1937; se describen los caracteres morfológicos y la genitalia de ambos sexos y se proporciona la distribución geográfica de la subespecie. El análisis filogenético muestra que las especies ibéricas del complejo “lagunensis” constituyen un grupo monofilético junto

  3. Notes on Dutch Cryptophagidae (Coleoptera).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorst, O.; Johnson, C.

    2008-01-01

    Aantekeningen over Nederlandse Cryptophagidae (Coleoptera) Zeven soorten cryptophagiden worden hier voor het eerst gemeld voor de Nederlandse fauna. Van twee soorten is duidelijk dat ze hier al geruime tijd voorkomen. Zo werd het enige Nederlandse exemplaar van Atomaria atra al in 1949 verzameld,

  4. Beschermde kevers in Nederland (Coleoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbregts, J.

    2003-01-01

    Protected beetles in the Netherlands (Coleoptera) The status of all by law protected beetles of the Netherlands is discussed. Several specimens of Cerambyx cerdo are known from the Netherlands, but all of these are considered to have been imported with oak-wood. Taking the European distribution into

  5. Fossil history of Mesozoic weevils (Coleoptera:Curculionoidea)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei A.Legalov

    2012-01-01

    The first synopsis of Mesozoic weevils (Curculionoidea: Coleoptera) is presented.Changes of family,genera and species abundance during the Mesozoic revealed three distributional patterns.The Jurassic (Karatau) fauna was dominated by the Nemonychidae.During the Early Cretaceous (beginning at the Jurassic/Cretaceous border),the Ithyceridae was the prevalent group with a significant role played by the Nemonychidae.In the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian and Turonian),the major groups were the Curculionidae and Brentidae.Obviously,the change of weevil fauna during this period was due to the expansion of the angiosperms,which provided multiple niches in their vegetative and reproductive organs for weevil development.

  6. Parasitismo na população da broca-do-café Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae, pelo parasitoide Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae

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    Moisés de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Abstract. The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari attacks coffee plantations, greatly decreasing the production of coffee plants, causing quantitative and qualitative damage to the grains. Biological control of this pest has focused mostly on entomopathogenic fungi. In the state of Rondonia, studies on parasitism levels of the parasitoids of H. hampei are scarce. The parasitoid Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem is a natural enemy of the coffee berry borer and is already used as an agent of biological control in countries of Africa and Latin America. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and parasitism levels of the parasitoid in a coffee plantation in the municipality of Ouro Preto D’Oeste, State of Rondonia. Coffee beans collected directly from the plants and on the ground were analyzed weekly from January to December 2004. Parasitoid occurred in months of the highest pest infestation. During the studied period, parasitism rate in different microenvironments ranged from 2 to 24%.

  7. Boring in response to bark and phloem extracts from North American trees does not explain host acceptance behavior of Orthotomicus erosus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Abigail J; Kells, Stephen A; Venette, Robert C; Seybold, Steven J

    2010-04-01

    When invasive herbivorous insects encounter novel plant species, they must determine whether the novel plants are hosts. The Mediterranean pine engraver, Orthotomicus erosus (Wollaston), an exotic bark beetle poised to expand its range in North America, accepts hosts after contacting the bark. To test the hypothesis that O. erosus accepts hosts on the basis of gustatory cues, we prepared bark and phloem extracts from logs of four North American tree species that we had used in previous host acceptance experiments. Water, methanol, and hexane extracts of red pine, tamarack, balsam fir, and paper birch were presented alone and in combination on a neutral filter paper substrate in a section of a plastic drinking straw. Boring behavior in response to the three-extract combinations differed from the pattern of acceptance previously observed among species when the beetles were in contact with the bark surface. Only the aqueous extracts of tamarack, Larix laricina, increased the initiation and the extent of boring by O. erosus on the filter paper substrate. We conclude that the effects of extracted chemicals do not match the behavior of the beetles observed when penetrating excised bark and phloem discs, indicating that host selection by O. erosus may not be predictable from bark and phloem chemistry alone. Instead, host acceptance may be determined by nongustatory stimuli or by a combination of stimuli including gustatory and nongustatory cues.

  8. 云南横坑切梢小蠹生物学研究%On the bionomics of Tomicus minor (Hartig) (Coleoptera:Scolytidae) in Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶辉; 吕军; Francois LIEUTIER

    2004-01-01

    横坑切梢小蠹Tomicus mi1nor(Hartig)是云南松Pinus yunnanensts Franchet的主要次期性害虫之一.1980年以来,该虫与纵坑切梢小蠹T.piniperda(L.)一起在中国西南部大量发生,导致数十万公顷云南松林受害.本文报道了横坑切梢小蠹在云南地区的生活史、生长、发育、繁殖等生物学特征.横坑切梢小蠹年生活史为一代,前后两代在冬春季有部分重叠.成虫羽化于4月下旬开始陆续,5月下旬结束.成虫羽化后即飞到树冠上蛀食枝梢,直到11月发育成熟,开始繁殖.在此期间,每头成虫可以蛀食4~6个枝梢.横坑切梢小蠹在云南没有越冬习性.繁殖期从11月至次年3月.成虫主要在已经受到纵坑切梢小蠹危害的树木的中、下部产卵.繁殖期较纵坑切梢小蠹约迟1周.由于横坑切梢小蠹从枝梢到树干对云南松持续危害,对树木的危害性较在其它地区更为严重.横坑切梢小蠹利用受到纵坑切梢小蠹蛀害的树木繁殖产卵,加强了蠹虫对云南松树的危害,加速了受害树木的死亡进程.横坑切梢小蠹的上述生物生态学特征是该虫对云南松造成严重危害的重要原因.从横坑切梢小蠹虫体和虫坑中检测到伴生真菌云南半帚孢Leptographium yunnanensis.横坑切梢小蠹对该菌的带菌率在蛀梢期为11.5%;在蛀干中期约为10%~26%.

  9. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles ( coleoptera: scolytidae') in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsten, E.H.; Werner, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of the study, the authors do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central Alaska.

  10. Test of nonhost angiosperm volatiles and verbenone to protect trap trees for Sirex noctilio (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) from attacks by bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in the Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Dodds; Daniel Miller

    2010-01-01

    Sirex noctilio F. (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) is an invasive woodwasp, currently established in northeastern North America. In other regions of the world, stressed trap trees are used to monitor populations of S. noctilio and to provide inoculation points for the biological control nematode Deladenus siricidicola Bedding. However, the operational use of trap trees for S....

  11. Tarsonemus (Acarina: Tarsonemidae) Mites Phoretic on the Southern Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae): Attachment Sites and Numbers of Bluestain (Ascomycetes: Ophiostomataceae) Ascospores Carried

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Moser; J. Robert Bridges

    1986-01-01

    Tarsonemus ips and Tarsonemus krantzi attach to different parts of adult Dendroctonus frontalis. T. ips rides only under the thorax, T. krantzi mostly under the elytra. Over 85% of both tarsonemids carried ascospores of Ceratocystis minor; most individuals carried over 15...

  12. Giselia arizonica, a new genus and species of mite (Acaria: Tarsonemidae) associated with bark beetles of the genus Pseudopityophthorus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciech L. Magowski; Evert E. Lindquist; John C. Moser

    2005-01-01

    A new genus and species of the mite family Tarsonemidae, subfamily Tarsoneminae, is described and illustrated. Its systematic position among genera of Tarsoneminae and its host association with bark beetles of the genus Pseudopityophthorus Swaine, 1918 in North America are briefly discussed.

  13. Virulence of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) commercial strains against adult Xylosandrus germanus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and impact on brood

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ambrosia beetle Xylosandrus germanus is an invasive pest with a wide host range and is a serious pest of orchards and nurseries in the eastern US. In this study we evaluated the potential of entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae as control agents against this beet...

  14. Photochemical oxidant injury and bark beetle coleoptera scolytidae infestation of ponderosa pine. I. Incidence of bark beetle infestation in injured trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, R.W.; Miller, P.R.; Cobb, F.W. Jr.; Wood, D.L.; Parmeter, J.R. Jr.

    1968-05-01

    A total of 107 beetle-killed and 963 nearest-neighbor ponderosa pines were examined to determine the association between severity of atmospheric pollution injury and infestation by bark beetles. Trees exhibiting advanced symptoms of pollution injury were most frequently infested by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, and the mountain pine beetle, D. ponderosae. The degree of injury and incidence of bark beetle infestation were not related to total height, diameter, length of live and dead crown or crown class. As severity of oxidant injury increased, live crown ratio decreased and incidence of bark beetle infestation increased. One hundred noninfested trees in each of three disease categories, advanced, intermediate, and healthy, were examined for evidence of prior beetle attacks. Thirty-six percent of the advanced-diseased trees versus only 5% of the healthy trees were attacked. Thus, the beetles may discriminate between healthy and diseased trees at a distance, upon contact with the host, or both. These studies indicate strongly that atmospheric pollution injury predisposes ponderosa pine to bark beetle infestations. 3 references, 7 tables.

  15. A variabilidade espacial das famílias de Coleoptera (Insecta entre fragmentos de Floresta Ombrófila Mista Montana (Bioma Araucária e plantação de Pinus elliottii Engelmann, no Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná, Brasil Spatial variability of Coleoptera (Insecta families between a Montane Ombrophilous Mixed Forest (Bioma Araucaria and Pinus elliottii Engelmann plantation fragments, in the Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná, Brazil

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    Norma G. Ganho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Várias questões sobre a biodiversidade vêm sendo levantadas nas últimas décadas. Uma delas é o papel que as plantações florestais exóticas monoculturais desempenham na manutenção da fauna nativa, principalmente de insetos. Estudos têm demonstrado que os Coleoptera são sensíveis a variações florísticas e estruturais, em pequena escala espacial. Para analisar as possíveis diferenças na diversidade de Coleoptera entre um ambiente de floresta natural e uma plantação florestal exótica monocultural foi desenvolvido um inventário no Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná. Para tanto, durante 52 semanas (agosto de 2004 a julho de 2005, seis armadilhas malaise foram dispostas ao longo de um transecto através de dois ambientes adjacentes, com diferentes condições florísticas: três em fragmento da floresta natural (Floresta Ombrófila Mista e três na plantação de Pinus elliottii exótico. Neste primeiro estudo, as comunidades de Coleoptera foram analisadas com base na abundância e na riqueza das famílias. Foram coletados 12397 exemplares de 57 famílias. A abundância foi maior na floresta natural, decrescendo do interior desta para o interior da plantação de pinus. O ecótono - borda da floresta natural/borda da plantação de pinus - foi o mais rico em famílias. Como observado em inventários de outras localidades, os estudos apoiados em dados das famílias que se incluem nos primeiros 60% da abundância total de cada área, mostram os mesmos resultados quando são aplicados os dados de todas as famílias. Na plantação de pinus as famílias dominantes foram, pela ordem: Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Curculionidae, Nitidulidae, Lampyridae, Scolytidae, Chrysomelidae; na floresta natural: Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionidae, Lampyridae, Nitidulidae, Staphylinidae.An important question for biodiversity is what is the impact of monocultures of exotic forest trees on native fauna, especially

  16. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas malaise Coleoptera fauna in the Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana, Brazil: abundance and family richness captured with malaise traps

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    Norma G. Ganho

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coleoptera fauna of Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana, was sampled during 52 weeks using malaise traps (from September 1999 to August 2000. Five different sites were selected according to floristic conditions: one site in initial stage of vegetacional succession; one in intermediate stage; one in advanced stage (recognized as a mature forest; one with an Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze plantation, invaded by native forest vegetation; and a fifth site in the edge area. The Coleoptera communities from the five sites were analyzed based on abundance and family richness. The total of specimens collected was 10,822 belonging to 64 families. The most abundant sites were those in initial and intermediate stages of plant succession; the abundance in the edge area was the lowest. The family richness is not related with the level of preservation of the sites. The beetle community structures of the five sites were not significantly different when involving all the families captured; but the more correlated pair-wise site structures reflected the vegetational stages of the sites. A temporal comparison of the beetle community structures was made, based on data gathered in one of the selected site which were sampled 13 years ago (1986/1987. The fauna collected in this year was more related with that of the initial stage of succession, in 1999/2000, than the one collected in the same area, in 1999/2000, nowadays considered as an intermediate stage of succession. This fact probably represents a parallel succession of fauna and flora. The dominant families, about 60% of total abundance, include Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae, Cerambycidae, Elateridae and Staphylinidae. Eventually, one or two of them, were substituted by Scarabaeidae, Ptilodactylidae, Cleridae, Coccinellidae, Lampyridae, Scolytidae, Cucujidae, Nitidulidae, Cantharidae, Scirtidae and Phengodidae. As observed in Vila Velha and other localities, there are a taxonomic

  17. Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae

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    Juliana S. Vieira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae. The rove beetles of the genus Paederus Fabricius, 1775 are the most important group within Coleoptera causing dermatitis around the world. The medical importance of Paederus depends on its toxic hemolymph released when these beetles are crushed on human skin. The effects are mainly dermatitis linearis and some sporadic cases of conjunctivitis. In Brazil seven species of Paederus are known to cause dermatitis: P. amazonicus Sharp, 1876, P. brasiliensis Erichson, 1840, P. columbinus Laporte, 1835, P. ferus Erichson, 1840, P. mutans Sharp, 1876, P. protensus Sharp, 1876 stat. rev., and Paederus rutilicornis Erichson, 1840. Paederus mutans and P. protensus are for the first time recorded as of medical importance, whereas the record of P. rutilicornis in Brazil is doubtful. All seven species are redescribed and a dichotomous key is provided. The geographic distributions of all species are documented. The results provided here include the most recent and relevant taxonomic revision of Paederus of the Neotropical region, the first identification key for Brazilian species and the increase of recorded species of medical importance in the world.

  18. Isparta İlinde Coleoptera Takımına ait Türler Üzerinde Faunistik Çalışmalar(*

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    İ. KARACA

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Isparta ve İlçelerinin Coleoptera faunasıyla ilgili biyolojik zenginliği ortaya koymak amacıyla 2002-2004 yılları arasında çalışmalar sürdürülmüştür. Bölgede özellikle Eğirdir, Beyşehir ve Kovada Gölleri arasındaki değişik habitatlarda, tarım ve tarım dışı alanlarda örneklemeler yapılarak bu araştırma yürütülmüştür. Çalışma konusunu oluşturan Coleoptera takımına ait örnekler değişik bitkiler üzerinden toplanıldığı gibi toprak yüzeyi, taş altı ve bitki döküntüleri altı gibi değişik ortamlardan da toplanmıştır. Çalışma süresince Carabidae, Histeridae, Lucanidae, Geotrupidae, Scarabeidae, Melolonthidae, Cetoniidae, Buprestidae, Elateridae, Coccinellidae, Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae ve Scolytidae familyalarına ait toplam 90 tür saptanmıştır. Carabidae ve Coccinellidae familyalarına ait olduğu belirlenen toplam 16 farklı avcı böcek türü saptanmış ve toplam tür sayısının % 14,4' ünü temsil ettikleri belirlenmiştir. Geriye kalan % 75,6' lik dilimi oluşturan böceklerin ise fitofag türler olduğu belirlenmiştir.

  19. Gold bugs and beyond: a review of iridescence and structural colour mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Ainsley E; Brady, Parrish; Vigneron, Jean-Pol; Schultz, Tom D

    2009-04-01

    Members of the order Coleoptera are sometimes referred to as 'living jewels', in allusion to the strikingly diverse array of iridescence mechanisms and optical effects that have arisen in beetles. A number of novel and sophisticated reflectance mechanisms have been discovered in recent years, including three-dimensional photonic crystals and quasi-ordered coherent scattering arrays. However, the literature on beetle structural coloration is often redundant and lacks synthesis, with little interchange between the entomological and optical research communities. Here, an overview is provided for all iridescence mechanisms observed in Coleoptera. Types of iridescence are illustrated and classified into three mechanistic groups: multilayer reflectors, three-dimensional photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Taxonomic and phylogenetic distributions are provided, along with discussion of the putative functions and evolutionary pathways by which iridescence has repeatedly arisen in beetles.

  20. Using Landsat satellite imagery to detect small-size forest stands of Pinus nigra Arn. and Pinus sylvestris L. affected by Scolytidae; Uso de imagenes satelite Landsat para la deteccion de rodales de Pinus nigra Arn. y Pinus sylvestris L. afectados por escolitidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, E.; Bonet, J. A.; Eizaguirre, M.

    2009-07-01

    Medium resolution images from multispectral sensors like Landsat TM have been extensively used for decades in order to identify decline and defoliation generated by insects and other forest pests. The present work analyses the usefulness of these kinds of images to detect small-size stands of Pinus nigra Arn. and Pinus sylvestris L. affected by Scolytidae attacks. The study area was located in the Solsones region (Eastern Pyrenees), selecting 34 training zones (17 damaged small-size stands and 17 healthy small-size stands). The exploratory analysis of the images was conducted with the ERDAS IMAGINE 8.x. program.The results of the study showed significant differences between the affected and non-affected stands in 5 of the 7 spectral bands analysed. TM5 and TM7 bands were identified as those having the highest power to detect damaged stands. The digital levels obtained and the spaces of characteristics created, both showed trends to group small-size affected stands versus healthy, achieving improvements in the methodological procedure employed. (Author) 31 refs.

  1. Bioindication Potential of the Coleoptera

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    Belitskaya Mariya Nikolaevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different families of Coleoptera ambiguously respond to the pollution of SPZs with industrial emissions. For example, the SPZ of Volgograd aluminum plant has the changing biodiversity of insect communities at different distances from the pollution source. The increasing level of pollution is accompanied by the reduction in species abundance. At a distance of 200 m a special ecological zone with the specific composition of the entomofauna was formed. It is significantly different from other habitats. No Cerambycidae species may survive in the zone of maximum pollution, and the number of Curculionidae species is reduced significantly. The number of Cerambycidae decreases by more than 40 % in the presence of even minimal contamination. The most sensitive bioindicators are represented by such insects as Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Changes in the indices can be described by the function y = arctan (x, where x is the distance from the pollution source (in meters. The specificity of this function is to identify levels of possible changes of species richness and numerical abundance of communities. On the basis of trigonometric functions describing the changes in the species composition and abundance, the authors offered the method for assessing the quality of the environment in SPZs. The use of three families of insects opens up prospects of differentiation zones of technogenic pressure.

  2. Brachylophora, a new brachypterous genus of Rhopalophorini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin O. S. Clarke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Brachylophora, a new brachypterous genus of Rhopalophorini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. Brachylophora auricollis (Bruch, 1918 comb. nov. = Pasiphyle auricollis Bruch, 1918, originally described from Argentina (Salta, is redescribed and illustrated. Although with reduced elytra, the genus is transferred from Rhinotragini to Rhopalophorini based on the following characters: eyes well separated in both sexes, frons between eyes depressed and lacking frontal suture; pro-, meso-, and metasternum planar; mesothorax parallel-sided, not at all declivous before mesosternal process; metasternum large, together with mesosternum twice length of prosternum, metepisternum very wide, entire suture separating it from metasternum clearly visible when viewed from below; female ovipositor shortened with short cylindrical styles; and, more generally, structural features of hind legs, and surface ornamentation. Habitus similar to Coremia group. Bolivian specimens were netted as they visited flowers of Croton sp. (Euphorbiaceae.

  3. Flutuação populacional circanual de coleópteros em granja avícola, em Pelotas, RS, Brasil Fluctuation of Coleoptera population in poultry house, in Pelotas, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla de Lima Bicho

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de conhecer a flutuação populacional de coleópteros na granja de aves do Conjunto Agrotécnico Visconde da Graça, em Pelotas, RS, foram utilizados seis métodos de coleta: 1 (fezes de galinhas com 0 a 7 dias; 2 (7 a 14 dias; 3 (14 a 21 dias; 4 (0 a 21 dias; 5 (fezes acumuladas e 6 (armadilhas de tubo. Análises de regressão polinomial foram realizadas independentemente dos métodos de coleta. O estudo foi realizado de agosto de 1998 a julho de 1999. Foram capturados 12.449 coleópteros representados pelas seguintes espécies Carcinops troglodytes (Paykull, 1811 (Histeridae (6.444; Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797 (Tenebrionidae (2.896; Somotrichus unifasciatus (Dejean, 1792 (Carabidae (1.190; Gnathocerus cornutus (Fabricius, 1798 (Tenebrionidae (947; Euxestus sp. (Cerylonidae (394; Euspilotus rubriculus (Marseul, 1855 (Histeridae (213; Ontholestes sp. (Staphylinidae (190; Dactylosternum sp. (Hydrophilidae (93; Mezium americanum (Laporte, 1840 (Ptinidae (43; Palorus subdepressus (Wollaston, 1864 (Tenebrionidae (27; Tenebroides mauritanicus (L., 1758 (Trogossitidae (8; Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, 1801 (Scolytidae (1; e espécimens não identificados de Dermestidae (3. O maior número de espécies ocorreu nos meses de março e julho e o menor, no mês de setembro. Em março foi registrada a maior abundância de coleópteros (2.159, enquanto que o menor índice de captura foi assinalado em outubro (633. A flutuação populacional foi estimada para C. troglodytes, A. diaperinus, S. unifasciatus, G. cornutus, Euxestus sp., E. rubriculus, Ontholestes sp. e Dactylosternum sp.The population fluctuation of Coleoptera in poultry house "Conjunto Agrotécnico Visconde da Graça" in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil is investigated. Six collection methods were utilized: 1 (0 to 7 day-old chicken feces; 2 (7 to 14 day-old feces; 3 (14 to 21 day-old feces; 4 (0 to 21 day-old feces, 5 (accumulated feces; and 6 (tube trap. An

  4. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the Northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

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    Eugen Nițu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalău" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous, 9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous, 125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- and necrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalău primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slătioara, Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles (Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing of species richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  5. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

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    Eugen Nitu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalãu" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous,9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous,125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- andnecrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalãu primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slãtioara,Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles(Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing ofspecies richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  6. New longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae from Serbia

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    Pil Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent data (Ilić, 2005 indicate the presence of 245 longhorn beetle species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae in Serbia. Not included in the mentioned publication, the following five species should be added to the list: Cortodera discolor Fairmaire, 1866; Stenopterus similatus Holzschuh 1979; Chlorophorus aegyptiacus (Fabricius, 1775; Agapanthia osmanlis (Reiche, 1858; Agapanthia maculicornis (Gyllenhal, 1817 (Pil and Stojanović in press. A total number of 250 species are presently known for the Serbian longhorn beetle fauna.

  7. Biology of Blepharida-group flea beetles with first notes on natural history of Podontia congregata Baly, 1865 an endemic flea beetle from southern India (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathapan, Kaniyarikkal Divakaran; Chaboo, Caroline Simmrita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The biology, host plants, and pest status of Podontia Dalman, 1824 species are reviewed. Natural history of Podontia congregata Baly, 1865 a flea beetle endemic to southern India, is reported for the first time. It is distributed from the Western Ghats Mountains westward to the plains. Clusiaceae is reported as a new host plant family for Blepharida-group species, with Garcinia gummi-gutta (L.) N. Robson (Clusiaceae) as the host plant for Podontia congregata. Pentatomid bugs attack the larvae but not eggs, pupae, or adults. A new egg parasitoid species, Ooencyrtus keralensis Hayat and Prathapan, 2010 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), was discovered. Aspects of Podontia congregata host selection, life cycle, and larval fecal defenses are consistent with its inclusion in the Blepharida-genus group. PMID:22303106

  8. On the family- and genus-series nomina in Gyrinidae Latreille, 1810 (Coleoptera, Adephaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Grey T; Miller, Kelly B

    2013-10-29

    All available genus- and family- group nomina for the Gyrinidae (Coleoptera: Adephaga) are listed along with original citation, original and current status, type nominal taxon with method of designation, and known synonymies and incorrect subsequent spellings. The nomina included follow the most current classification. Discussion is provided clarifying numerous nomenclatural problems with original spellings, correct authorship and type designation. Dineutini Ochs, 1926 syn. nov. is found to be a junior homonym of Dineutini Desmarest, 1851, and Enhydrini Régimbart, 1882 syn. nov. and its justified emendation Enhydrusini (Anonymous 2012) are here synonymized with Dineutini Desmarest, 1851.

  9. The genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the Colombian Andean Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Luis Fernando; Wolff, Martha

    2013-01-01

    The number of species in the genus Phyllophaga Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in Colombia is updated to 33. This group represents one of the most common components of the "white grubs" complex, known to damage important agricultural crops, especially in the Colombian Andean Mountains. A commented taxonomic history of the genus is provided, including five new records for the country (P. schizorhina, P. onoreana, P. densata, P. guanacasteca, and P. gigantea) and Phyllophaga tesorito is described as a new species. A key to the identification of male specimens of 30 species is included with a catalogue illustrating their key structures. Finally, aspects related to their ecological importance, geographic distribution, and phenology are discussed.

  10. Colepotera:Scolytidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DOGAN ISIK

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... physiologically stressed trees for colonization but some species also attack healthy trees. Bark and ... woody plants world-wide (Hulcr and Dunn, 2011) and .... sities than X. saxesenii in both locations during 2006 and. 2007 ...

  11. Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. Casari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Larva and pupa of Eutrypanus dorsalis (Germar, 1928, collected in trunks of Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Paratenthras martinsi Monné, 1998, collected in spathes of Scheelea phalerata (Mart. ex Spreng. Burret, are described and illustrated. Larva and pupa of Lophopoeum timbouvae Lameere, 1884, collected in Hymenaea corbaril L., Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Vell. Morong and Pterogyne nitens Tul., are redescribed and illustrated. A table with all described immatures of Lamiinae, and a comparison among the immatures of Acanthocinini are presented. Biological notes and new records are also included.

  12. Multistate characters and diet shifts: evolution of Erotylidae (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschen, Richard A B; Buckley, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    The dominance of angiosperms has played a direct role in the diversification of insects, especially Coleoptera. The shift to angiosperm feeding from other diets is likely to have increased the rate of speciation in Phytophaga. However, Phytophaga is only one of many hyperdiverse lineages of beetles and studies of host-shift proliferation have been somewhat limited to groups that primitively feed on plants. We have studied the diet-diverse beetle family Erotylidae (Cucujoidea) to determine if diet is correlated with high diversification rates and morphological evolution by first reconstructing ancestral diets and then testing for associations between diet and species number and diet and ovipositor type. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of morphological data that was previously published in Leschen (2003, Pages 1-108 in Fauna of New Zealand, 47; 53 terminal taxa and 1 outgroup, 120 adult characters and 1 diet character) yielded results that are similar to the parsimony analyses of Leschen (2003). Ancestral state reconstructions based on Bayesian and parsimony inference were largely congruent and both reconstructed microfungal feeding (the diet of the outgroup Biphyllidae) at the root of the Erotylidae tree. Shifts among microfungal, saprophagous, and phytophagous diets were most frequent. The largest numbers of species are contained in lineages that are macrofungal feeders (subfamily Erotylinae) and phytophagous (derived Languriinae), although the Bayesian posterior predictive tests of character state correlation were unable to detect any significant associations. Ovipositor morphology correlated with diet (i.e., acute forms were associated with phytophagy and unspecialized forms were associated with a mixture of diets). Although there is a general trend to increased species number associated with the shift from microfungal feeding to phytophagy (based on character mapping and mainly restricted to shifts in Languriinae), there is a large radiation of taxa feeding on

  13. Phylogenetically informative rearrangements in mitochondrial genomes of Coleoptera, and monophyly of aquatic elateriform beetles (Dryopoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial gene order in Coleoptera has been thought to be conservative but a survey of 60 complete or nearly complete genomes revealed a total of seven different gene rearrangements (deletions, gene order reversals), mainly affecting tRNA genes. All of these were found to be limited to a single taxon or a subclade of Coleoptera. The phylogenetic distribution of a translocation of tRNA(Pro) in three species of elateriform beetles was investigated further by sequencing three nearly complete mitochondrial genomes (Dascillidae, Byrrhidae, Limnichidae) and ten additional individuals for a ∼1370 bp diagnostic fragment spanning the relevant region. Phylogenetic analysis consistently recovered the monophyly of families previously grouped in the contentious superfamily Dryopoidea, a group of approximately 10 beetle families with mainly aquatic lifestyles. The Byrrhidae (moss beetles) were not part of this lineage, although they may be its sister group, to recover the widely accepted Byrrhoidea. The tRNA(Pro) translocation was present in all members of Dryopoidea, but not in any other Elateriformia, providing independent support for this lineage and for a single origin of aquatic habits.

  14. DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles (Coleoptera, Elateridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yuichi; Ôhira, Hitoo; Murase, Yukio; Moriyama, Akihiko; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) represent one of the largest groups of beetle insects. Some click beetles in larval form, known as wireworms, are destructive agricultural pests. Morphological identification of click beetles is generally difficult and requires taxonomic expertise. This study reports on the DNA barcoding of Japanese click beetles to enable their rapid and accurate identification. We collected and assembled 762 cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequences from 275 species, which cover approximately 75% of the common species found on the Japanese main island, Honshu. This barcode library also contains 20 out of the 21 potential pest species recorded in Japan. Our analysis shows that most morphologically identified species form distinct phylogenetic clusters separated from each other by large molecular distances. This supports the general usefulness of the DNA barcoding approach for quick and reliable identification of Japanese elaterid species for environmental impact assessment, agricultural pest control, and biodiversity analysis. On the other hand, the taxonomic boundary in dozens of species did not agree with the boundary of barcode index numbers (a criterion for sequence-based species delimitation). These findings urge taxonomic reinvestigation of these mismatched taxa.

  15. Phylogeny of ladybirds (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): are the subfamilies monophyletic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, A; Lecompte, E; Magné, F; Hemptinne, J-L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2010-03-01

    The Coccinellidae (ladybirds) is a highly speciose family of the Coleoptera. Ladybirds are well known because of their use as biocontrol agents, and are the subject of many ecological studies. However, little is known about phylogenetic relationships of the Coccinellidae, and a precise evolutionary framework is needed for the family. This paper provides the first phylogenetic reconstruction of the relationships within the Coccinellidae based on analysis of five genes: the 18S and 28S rRNA nuclear genes and the mitochondrial 12S, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) genes. The phylogenetic relationships of 67 terminal taxa, representative of all the subfamilies of the Coccinellidae (61 species, 37 genera), and relevant outgroups, were reconstructed using multiple approaches, including Bayesian inference with partitioning strategies. The recovered phylogenies are congruent and show that the Coccinellinae is monophyletic but the Coccidulinae, Epilachninae, Scymninae and Chilocorinae are paraphyletic. The tribe Chilocorini is identified as the sister-group of the Coccinellinae for the first time. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The mitochondrial genome of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) and related phylogenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengqing; Wang, Xiaoji; Li, Rongzhou; Guo, Ruijian; Zhang, Wei; Song, Wang; Hao, Chunfeng; Wang, Huapeng; Li, Menglou

    2015-04-10

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) which consists of 13 PCGs, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and a non-coding region (D-loop), is sequenced for its nucleotide sequence of 15,878 bp (GenBank: KF811054.1). The genome has a typical gene order which is identical to other Coleoptera species. Except for COI gene generally starts with non-canonical initial codon, all protein-coding genes start with ATN codon and terminate with the stop codon TA(A) or TAG. The secondary structure of rrnL and rrnS consists of 48 helices (contains four newly proposed helices) and 35 helices (contains two newly proposed helices) respectively. All 22 tRNAs in D. helophoroides are predicted to fold into typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except trnS1 (AGN), in which the dihydrouracil arm (DHU arm) could not form stable stem-loop structure. Thirteen protein-coding genes (nucleotide dataset and nucleic acid dataset) of the available species (29 taxa) have been used to infer the phylogenetic relationships among these orders. Tenebrionoidea and Cucujoidea form a sister group, and D. helophoroides is classified into Cucujoidea (Bothrideridae). The study first research on the phylogenetic analyses involving to the D. helophoroides mitogenome, and the results strongly bolster the current morphology-based hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  18. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  19. A new host plant for the shoot-hole borer, Euwallacea fornicatus (Eichhoff) ( Coleoptera: Scolytidae) from India%印度小圆胸小蠹的一种新寄主植物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh KUMAR; Girin RAJKHOWA; Mattipalli SANKAR; Rama Krishnan RAJAN

    2011-01-01

    自然条件下印度小圆胸小蠹Euwallacea fornicatus(Eichhoff,1868)在茶树枝条虫瘿内取食,是茶的重要害虫之一,以茶蛀虫著称.2010年5-8月,在印度Muga Eri研究中心3号农场(Lahdoigarh,Jorhat-Assam)的黄心树Persea bombycina Kost.(樟科)种植园中发现该虫有自然分布,且已对黄心树造成了明显的危害.黄心树为小圆胸小蠹一种新纪录的寄主植物.本文对小圆胸小蠹的寄主范围、分布、生物学和生活史等进行了讨论.

  20. A review: chemical ecology of Ips typographus (Coleoptera, Scolytidae)%云杉八齿小蠹化学生态的研究进展(鞘翅目,小蠹科)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    本文对云杉八齿小蠹化学生态的研究进展进行了综述.云杉八齿小蠹在中欧的大面积爆发激发了广大林业科学工作者对其化学生态学的广泛研究.在寻找寄主的过程中,雄性找到寄主后释放化学信息物质吸引雄性和雌性的聚集.开始发起进攻的小蠹在找寻寄主的过程中能利用寄主树脂作为利己素,并能够在体内解毒后合成可被利用的化学信息物质.在云杉八齿小蠹雄性的中肠中,我们发现9种单萜类化合物,主要是反式马鞭草烯醇和2-甲基3-己烯2-醇,这两种物质被认为是云杉八齿小蠹聚集信息素的主要成分.小蠹二烯醇的含量虽然很低但是能显著提高马鞭草烯醇和2-甲基3-己烯2-醇的野外诱集作用.马鞭草烯酮和小蠹烯醇是反聚集信息素,在调节攻击密度和树皮下的种群密度的过程中起着重要的作用.本文主要综述了寄主抗性、信息素成分和小蠹虫行为之间的关系.野外生测的结果证明利用信息素防治云杉八齿小蠹是行之有效的防治方法.表1参67.%Chemical ecology of the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L.) was reviewed. The outbreak of I. Typographus in central Europe triggered extensive research on chemical ecology. Males initiate host location and produce semiochemicals which attract both males and females. A successful mass attack must first overcome the resistance of the host tree. Pioneer I. Typographus evolved to use the resin flow of host trees as kairomones in host location, and synthesized semiochemicals initially to detoxify the resin. If small bark beetle populations infest healthy trees, mass attack is prevented by host resistance. Nine monoterpene alcohols were found in male hind-guts, including cis-verbenol (cV) and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MB) which are regarded as primary aggregation pheromones, and a low proportion of Ipsdienol (Id) which increases attractiveness of cV and MB. Verbenone (Vn) and Ipsenol (Ie) are anti-aggregation pheromones, that play important roles in adjusting attack density and insect density under the bark. Non-host volatiles are repellent to I. Typographus, so that beetles do not waste energy boring into non-host trees. The relationship between host resistance, pheromone compounds and behavior, non-host volatiles, bioassays and mass trapping are reviewed. Results of field bioassays stressed that traps baited with specific pheromones could be used as a reasonable protection measure.

  1. New species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) from Colombia and Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2015-12-02

    Three new species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) are described: Chrysaperda mimica sp. nov. and Malacoscylus nearnsi sp. nov. from Ecuador, and Eulachnesia boteroi sp. nov. from Colombia.

  2. Repellency of Hydroethanolic Extracts of Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae) to Scyphophorus acupunctatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cinthia Pacheco-Sánchez; Patricia Villa-Ayala; Roberto Montes-Belmont; Rodolfo Figueroa-Brito; Alfredo Jiménez-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The agave snout weevil Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is an ubiquitous insect and the main pest of blue tequila agave, Agave tequilana Weber, and other agaves...

  3. Noteworthy records of Hispines from Belize (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Robert F C Naczi; Staines, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cephaloleia consanguinea Baly, Cephaloleia fulvolimbata Baly, Cephaloleia ruficollis Baly, Chalepus amabilis Baly, Chalepus brevicornis (Baly), Chalepus pici Descarpentries and Villiers, Microrhopala erebus (Newman), Octhispa bimaculata Uhmann, Octotoma championi Baly, Pseudispa tuberculata Staines, Sceloenopla erudita (Baly), Stenispa guatemalensis Uhmann, Sumitrosis gestroi (Weise), and Sumitrosis terminatus (Baly) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae) are new country records of hispine c...

  4. Elmidae Curtis, 1830 (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea) of the Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Melissa Ottoboni; Dos Passos, Maria Ines Da Silva; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde Aparecida; Froehlich, Claudio Gilberto

    2013-10-29

    A bibliography of significant taxonomic papers on Elmidae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea), and a checklist of valid species and subspecies and their geographic distributions are provided. Forty-seven genera and 430 valid species are included. Maps show the geographic distribution of the genera by country.

  5. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  6. Temperature-dependent development of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a nonnative pest that vectors the pathogenic fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt in trees of the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt is present in the commercial growing areas of avocado (Perse...

  7. Morphometric analysis of instar variation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of head capsule, mandible, metanotum, and body weight were done on larvae of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionide) from the second to the last instar. Instar number varied from 14 to 18, but 15 or 16 instars were the most common. The value of dimensional measurements was evalua...

  8. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  9. A family of chemoreceptors in Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae: Coleoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohatmed Abdel-Latief

    Full Text Available Chemoperception in invertebrates is mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. To date nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms of chemoperception in coleopteran species. Recently the genome of Tribolium castaneum was sequenced for use as a model species for the Coleoptera. Using blast searches analyses of the T. castaneum genome with previously predicted amino acid sequences of insect chemoreceptor genes, a putative chemoreceptor family consisting of 62 gustatory receptors (Grs and 26 olfactory receptors (Ors was identified. The receptors have seven transmembrane domains (7TMs and all belong to the GPCR receptor family. The expression of the T. castaneum chemoreceptor genes was investigated using quantification real- time RT-PCR and in situ whole mount RT-PCR analysis in the antennae, mouth parts, and prolegs of the adults and larvae. All of the predicted TcasGrs were expressed in the labium, maxillae, and prolegs of the adults but TcasGr13, 19, 28, 47, 62, 98, and 61 were not expressed in the prolegs. The TcasOrs were localized only in the antennae and not in any of the beetles gustatory organs with one exception; the TcasOr16 (like DmelOr83b, which was localized in the antennae, labium, and prolegs of the beetles. A group of six TcasGrs that presents a lineage with the sugar receptors subfamily in Drosophila melanogaster were localized in the lacinia of the Tribolium larvae. TcasGr1, 3, and 39, presented an ortholog to CO(2 receptors in D. melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae was recorded. Low expression of almost all of the predicted chemoreceptor genes was observed in the head tissues that contain the brains and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG. These findings demonstrate the identification of a chemoreceptor family in Tribolium, which is evolutionarily related to other insect species.

  10. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Soares Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae. Coleopterans of the family Melolonthidae comprise a large group of species that feed on different food sources, including plant roots, stems, and leaves, in addition to plant materials at different decomposition stages. Several species are found in the genus Leucothyreus, occurring in different regions of Brazil, including the various biomes in the country. Information on the biology of species of the genus Leucothyreus is scarce, therefore, we conducted studies on the biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard, 1850. The period of adult occurrence was determined with a light trap installed between a cropped and pasture area in the municipality of Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Adults collected in the field were used to form insect pairs and the studies were initiated in the entomology laboratory as the adults began ovipositing. Adults were observed flying in the field from October to December. Eggs were obtained as pairs were formed and a colony was established, the embryonic period lasting 14.6 days on average. The larval period in the 1st instar lasted 21.6 days, in the 2nd instar 19.6 days, and in the 3rd instar, 85.6 days. The head capsule width was 1.48 mm in the 1st instar, 2.44 mm in the 2nd, and 3.83 mm in 3rd larval instar. The pupal stage had an average duration of 35.5 days. The egg to adult period lasted 173.3 days. Morphometric information for the larval and adult stages is presented in this study.

  11. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  12. Longhorn beetles of the Ficuzza woods (W Sicily, Italy and their relationship with plant diversity (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso La Mantia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The woods in Sicily are the result of centuries of anthropogenic activities that have reduced the surface of woodand changed the original composition even with the introduction of alien species to native flora. The value interms of biodiversity of these forests remains, however, high for they are the last refuge areas for many animalsand plant species. This study was conducted within the Ficuzza woods (West Sicily, extended about 5,000hectares on the slopes of limestone-dolomite rock of Busambra (1615 m asl, within which lies the largestremaining forest area in western Sicily. It is an area with a wide diversity of vegetation, represented mainly bynative forests (holm oak, cork oak, deciduous oaks, groups of riparian vegetation, shrubs, bushes, grasslands,and of non-native forest formations (Pinus and Eucalyptus woods. The study on Cerambycidae in this area isfragmented and does not specify a relation the species with the surrounding vegetation. This study wasperformed by choosing among various groups of insects, xylophagous Coleoptera Cerambycidae; existingliterature data and extensive collected field data were reviewed. The analysis was also performed by thecollection of dead wood in order to distinguish the relationship between the plant species and coleoptera. Theresults summarize and supplement the data registered so far, shedding further light on the ecological role ofthis group of insects that are also valid biomarkers of the integrity and complexity of the forest.

  13. Morphological and isozymic banding pattern study of white grubs (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae as pest of bark crop in mounth Merapi’s slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available White grub (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae is a group of soil pest at any agrosystem., especially at Salak pondoh (Salacca zalacca (Gaert. Voss. crop. The characteristics of this specimen were very crucial to be studied in order to find the exact biocontrol. The aim of this research was to know the characteristics of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera based on morphological and isozyme banding patterns. This research was conducted on August - November 2007 at Sleman and Magelang districts for the morphological purposes, while for the isozyme data were conducted at Sub Laboratory Biology, Central Laboratory of Sebelas Maret University Surakarta. Sample was taken by using stratified random sampling method, on five stations. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE using the vertical type was taken to isozyme analysis. The enzyme used in this research were peroxidase and esterase to detect the isozyme banding patterns. The results showed that there was no morphological variation of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mounth Merapi’s slope. Based on this character, there was one species of white grub found, i.e. Holotrichia javana. There was a genetic variation based on the variation of isozyme banding patterns.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera occurring in decaying birch (Betula spp. wood in the Kampinos National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawoniewicz Michał

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify the seasonal changes in the number of saproxylic beetles connected with birch in the Kampinos National Park. The research was conducted for 12 consecutive months in research areas representing 10 different site types. The beetles were collected from wood using photoeclectors. The largest number of species was collected in April and the lowest in January. An increase in number occurred during spring and summer months for species associated only with rotting wood, fructifications of tree fungi, the subcortical environment and hollows. In the same period the number of species not associated or potentially associated with decaying trees and wood decreased. During winter months, the differences in the number of trapped specimens were the smallest. The proportion of zoophagous species amongst the collected specimen increased in autumn and winter. The share of saprophagous species was the highest during the summer-autumn period and the share of mycetophages (jointly with myxomycophages was the highest during spring and summer. We distinguished two separate groups of Coleoptera with the first one (‘summer group’ including species trapped during late-spring and summer months, while the second one (‘winter group’ includes species found in autumn, winter and early-spring months. In the ‘summer group’, an average of 55.8 species was trapped each month with 331.2 specimen of Coleoptera, while in the ʻwinter group’ an average of 56.1 species with 228.4 Coleoptera specimen were caught.

  15. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  16. A checklist of stag beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, Luca; Ghahari, Hassan; Sprecher-Uebersax, Eva; Zilioli, Michele

    2014-11-26

    An updated checklist of the Lucanidae (Coleoptera) from Iran is given. New locality records are listed and some dubious distributional records are discussed. Dorcus vavrai Nonfried, 1905 is placed in synonymy with Dorcus peyronis Reiche and Saulcy, 1856 (new synonymy) The female of Lucanus xerxes Král, 2004 is described. A key for the identification of the Iranian stag beetle species is also provided and all the species are figured.

  17. Invasions by ladybugs, ladybirds, and other predatory Coleoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Edward W.; Soares, António O.; Yasuda, Hironori

    2011-01-01

    Copyright © International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) 2011. Species of predatory Coleoptera have become abundant in new geographic regions recently, raising concerns for invaded ecosystems. We address this topic by focusing on invasive alien ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae; known also as ladybugs). Humans appear directly or indirectly responsible for all or most ladybird invasions. Factors hypothesized to have promoted ladybird invasions include genetic diversity (e.g., for ...

  18. Nocturnal Migration of Coleoptera: Carabidae in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Vertical-looking radar (VLR) has allowed long-term automatic monitoring of the altitudinal and temporal dynamics of high-flying insect populations. To investigate whether ground beetle, insect of Coleoptera, was capable of migrating and its migration pattern by taking advantages of capability of the VLR for long-term real-time automatic monitoring, the migration of Coleoptera ground beetle was investigated by setting up radar observation points, making long-term observation using the VLR and related supplementary equipment, and analyzing low altitude air current and large area circulating current in combination with the meteorological data. Information obtained in 2005 and 2006 showed that the seasonal activities of ground beetles traps of trap lamps were mainly from late June to late August, peak period was mainly in August, seasonal traps of high-altitude lamps and ground lamps were featured by sudden increase and sudden decrease; in peak period, the height of radar echo point could be as high as 600 m, while it was mainly below the height of 450 m; night activities mainly occurred from 20:00 to 22:00, in very few nights, radar echo could last until about 04:00, changes in numbers of ground beetles within the searchlights were consistent with radar echo intensity; ground beetle images were successfully trapped in the sweep nets carried by captive balloons at the height of 200 m. Some species of Carabidaes had some degrees of migration, thus providing the foundation for investigating the migration of Coleoptera insects.

  19. Sex- and Size-Related Patterns of Carrion Visitation in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna; Frątczak-Łagiewska, Katarzyna; Matuszewski, Szymon

    2016-12-28

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on successional patterns of adult insects is largely limited, due to the lack of potential PMI markers. Sex and size of adult insects could be easily used for such estimation. In this study, sex- and size-related patterns of carrion attendance by adult insects were analyzed in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). For both species, abundance of males and females changed similarly during decomposition. A slightly female-biased sex ratio was recorded in N. littoralis. Females of N. littoralis started visiting carcasses, on average, one day earlier than males. There was a rise in size of males of N. littoralis at the end of decomposition, whereas for females of both species and males of C. maxillosus, no size-related patterns of carrion visitation were found. Current results demonstrate that size and sex of adult carrion beetles are poor indicators of PMI.

  20. Estados inmaduros de Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini Immature stages of Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon César Neita-Moreno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen y se ilustran por primera vez la larva de tercer estadio y la pupa de Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini. Se aportan datos sobre la biología de la especie y su distribución en Colombia. Se proporciona una clave para la identificación de las larvas de tercer estadio conocidas de las especies del género Ancognatha Erichson.The third instar larva and pupa of Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini are described and illustrated for the first time. New data on larval biology and distribution of the species in Colombia are included. A key to the known third stage larvae of Ancognatha Erichson is provided.

  1. Medically important beetles (insecta: coleoptera of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Nikbakhtzadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on coleopteran species that are responsible for the emergence of recent cases of dermatological manifestations in Iran. To the best of our knowledge, five species of the family Meloidae and nine species of the genus Paederus are by far the only beetles recognized as medically important in Iran. The staphylinids consists of Paederus ilsae, P. iliensis, P. fuscipes, P. kalalovae, P. balcanicus, P. lenkoranus, P. littoralis, P. carpathicus, P. nigricornis, while the meloids are Mylabris impressa, M. guerini, Muzimes iranicus, Alosimus smyrnensis and Epicauta sharpi. Most cases of linear dermatitis in this country occur in areas bordering the Caspian Sea. This problem is caused by beetles of the genus Paederus which are present as adults from mid-April to October with particularly high incidences from May to August. Fars (in southern Iran ranks second in number of cases of insect-induced dermatitis. The third major region in which this type of dermatitis has been recorded is Hamedan Province, in the west of the country. Meloid dermatitis showed its highest severity in 2001, when a considerable number of patients sought medical help in Toyserkan and Nahavand counties. New cases of skin blistering were reported along the Persian Gulf coast and the agent was identified as Epicauta sharpi (Coleoptera: Meloidae. In all these regions, it was observed that recorded cases of lesions coincided precisely with the yearly peaks of the beetles. Paederus fuscipes and P. kalalovae are the predominant species along the Caspian Sea shore. It appears that P. fuscipes is homogeneously distributed throughout the Caspian Sea region while the distribution of the other species is more irregular. Paederus fuscipes is probably the major agent that causes linear dermatitis in northern Iran. Whereas this disease is a rural difficulty in the south, mainly in villages or small towns, it is an urban problem in northern provinces along the Caspian Sea shore

  2. Two new species of the megadiverse lentic diving-beetle genus Hydrovatus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae described from NE Thailand

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    Olof Bistrom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe two new Hydrovatus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Hydrovatini from the province of Khon Kaen, Isan region in NE Thailand. Hydrovatus is the third most species rich genus of diving beetles (Dytiscidae. It occurs on all continents except Antarctica and now numbers 210 currently recognized species. Both new species, H. diversipunctatus sp. n. and H. globosus sp. n., were collected at lights and are only known from the type locality “Khon Kaen” (a city and province. Diagnoses based on morphology for the separation from closely related species are given together with illustrations of male genitalia and habitus photos. We provide a determination key to Old World species of the pustulatus species group and to Oriental species of the oblongipennis species group.

  3. Parasitylenchus sp. (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) parasitizing field populations of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, Susanne; Poinar, George O. Jr.; Dimitrova, Desislava V.;

    2011-01-01

    Adults of the invasive harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), were found to be parasitized by nematodes (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) in Denmark. The nematodes were identified as Parasitylenchus sp. Major morphological characters of the nematodes did not differ...

  4. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  5. Apostasimerini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Baridinae). Rectification of authorship, year of publication, rank, and taxa included

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following nomenclatural changes are proposed in the Coleoptera, Curculionidae: the author of Apostasimerini is Schoenherr (1844), not Lacordaire (1866); Madopterini Lacordaire, 1866 is demoted to subtribe of Apostasimerini; Erirhinus mourei Bondar, 1943 is a new synonym of Apostasimerus serriros...

  6. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  7. First record of Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae in Brazil

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    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae is recorded for the first time in Brazil (Bahia. It was originally described from Europe and is currently widely distributed in that continent and Asia.

  8. A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil

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    José Adriano Giorgi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil. Scymnobius pernambucensis sp. nov. from Pernambuco, Brazil, is described and illustrated. This is the third species of this genus recorded from Brazil.

  9. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  10. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  11. Different Attractive Effects and EAG Responses of Ips subelongatus (Coleoptera, Scolytidae) and Its Predator Thanasimus substriatus (Coleoptera: Cleridae) to Ipslures%不同含量引诱剂对落叶松八齿小蠹及其天敌红胸郭公虫的引诱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁菲; 骆有庆; 石娟; Kari Heli(o)vaara

    2012-01-01

    在内蒙古阿尔山的田间诱捕试验中,落叶松八齿小蠹引诱剂1共诱集到16头落叶松八齿小蠹和1 319头天敌红胸郭公虫,而落叶松八齿小蠹引诱剂2诱集到24 104头落叶松八齿小蠹和776头红胸郭公虫.室内的触角电位试验结果表明:落叶松八齿小蠹对引诱剂2的触角反应(雌虫2.139 mV±0.678 mV,雄虫2.169 mV±0.473my)大于引诱剂1(雌虫0.440 mV±0.232 mV,雄虫0.297 mV±0.142 mV),对引诱剂1的反应值和对照差不多;而红胸郭公虫对引诱剂1的触角反应(雌虫4.618 mV±1.106 mV,雄虫4.534 mV±1.087 mV)明显大于引诱剂2(雌虫2.209 mV±0.680 mV,雄虫1.953 mV±0.601 mV),对引诱剂2也有一定的反应值.触角电位试验与田间诱捕试验结果相符合.GC-MS分析结果表明:引诱剂1、的主要成分为3.06%的cis-geraniol,1.98%的lpsenol,80.36%的(S) -cis-verbenol和1.03%的1-verbcnone;结合卖方公司提供的数据,引诱剂1的主要成分为4.78%的2-methyl3-buten-2-ol,63.71%的Ipsenol(纯度为96.9%),1.46%的Cedrene和22.42%的Isocaryophillene.结合以上数据分析得出:不同成分引诱剂对落叶松八齿小蠹及天敌红胸郭公虫引诱能力显著不同,Ipsenol对诱集落叶松八齿小蠹起重要作用,而(S) -cis-verbenol则对诱集天敌红胸郭公虫起重要作用.%Field experiments conducted in Aershan forest area,Inner Mongolia,showed that Ipslure 1 attracted much more the clerid predator Thanasimus substriatus (1 319 individuals) than Ips subelongatus (16 individuals).On the contrary,Ipslure 2 attracted much more I.subelongatus (24 104 individuals) than its predators (776 individuals).The biological activities of the two ipslures were further evaluated using electroantennogram (EAG) recording with antennae from I.subelongatus and T.substriatus.The EAG amplitude of I.subelongatus to lpslure 2 (2.139 mV ±0.678 mV females,2.169 mV ± 0.473 mV males) was much stronger than to lpslure 1 (0.440 mV ± 0.232 mV females,0.297 mV ±0.142 mV males).In contrast,the response of T.substriatus to Ipslure 1 (4.618 mV ± 1.106 mV females,4.534 mV ± 1.087 mV males) was much stronger than to Ipslnre 2 (2.209 mV ±0.680 mV females,1.953 mV ±0.601mV males).The EAG results were in agreement with those obtained from field experiments.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that Ipslure 1 mainly cis-geraniol ( 3.06% ),Ipsenol ( 1.98 % ),( S ) -cisverbenol (80.36% ),1-verbenone ( 1.03% ) and Ipslure 2 consisted of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (4.78% ),Ipsenol (63.71%),Cedrene (1.46%) and isocaryophillene (22.42% ).The ipsenol-dominant blend attracted a high number of I.subelongatus while the (S)-cis-verbenol-dominant blend attracted a high number of T.substriatus.The knowledge can be applied for population monitoring and biological control of I.subelongatus.

  12. Passalidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) of the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ferbans, Larry; Reyes-Castillo, Pedro; Schuster, Jack C

    2015-05-12

    We present a synthesis of the state of knowledge concerning the species of Passalidae (Coleoptera) of the West Indies and we present a key to the species. The recently described genus Antillanax Boucher renders the subgenus Passalus (Pertinax) Kaup paraphyletic, therefore we place Antillanax in synonymy with Passalus (Pertinax) and we propose a new combination for Passalus (Pertinax) doesburgi (Boucher). The island richest in species is Hispaniola, with five species, three of them endemic. Excluding Trinidad and Tobago, the passalid fauna of the West Indies comprises 13 species; this is low richness, but with high endemism (50%), especially for the Greater Antilles.

  13. Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich(Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschoal C. Grossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae. The South American genus Altitatiayus Weinreich is revised and now includes six species, A. rotundatus (Boileau, A. ruficollis (Lüderwaldt, A. godinhorum (Bomans & Arnaud, A. dulceae (Bomans & Arnaud, A. trifurcatus (Grossi & Racca-Filho and A. koikei sp. nov. (Minas Gerais, Brazil. All species are described and illustrated. For the first time male and female genitalia are illustrated for five species and observations on the behavior of two species are included.

  14. The tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Figueroa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the occurrence of the tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru based on the collection at Museo de Historia Natural of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and on data provided in literature. Each species is presented with citations of its diagnosis, distribution and related comments. Peruvian Phanaeini includes 30 species in nine genera: Coprophanaeus, Dendropaemon, Gromphas, Oruscatus, Oxysternon, Phanaeus, Sulcophanaeus, Tetramereia and Megatharsis. Oruscatus davus is the only species distributed in the high Andes; Phanaeus lunaris and P. achilles occur in the northern arid zone shared by Peru and Ecuador; the remaining species are Amazonian.

  15. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączyński, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-05-20

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  16. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  17. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  18. Electrophysiological responses of chafer beetle, Holotrichia serrata (F. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavan Subaharan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The chafer beetle, Holotrichia serrata F. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae in its larval stage is a serious pest on sugarcane, vegetables, groundnut and coconut in many parts of India. The antennal response of adults to host volatiles and pheromone gland extracts was assessed by electroantennography. Among the preferred host of H. serrata, the volatiles from neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss leaf extract elicited higher antennal response than gulmohar Delonix regia L. flowers and Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb leaf extracts. The order of response was the same irrespective of the sex. In general the antennal response to pheromone gland and host extracts was higher in males than in females.

  19. Determination of Coleoptera fauna on carcasses in Ankara province, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Senem; Sert, Osman

    2009-01-10

    In this study, 40 species from Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Dermestidae, Silphidae, Nitidulidae and Cleridae families of Coleoptera which were found in 12 pig (Sus scrofa L.) carcasses were identified and recorded during a one-year period at the Hacettepe University Beytepe Campus located in Ankara, Turkey. According to the duration of their presence on the carcasses, 22 of these species were accepted to be important in decomposition. Their distribution over the months and the duration of their presence in the various decomposition stages over the seasons were determined.

  20. BESOUROS COPRÓFAGOS (COLEOPTERA; SCARABAEIDAE) COLETADOS EM PIRACICABA, SP

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES, S. R.; MARCHINI,L.C.

    1998-01-01

    Através do uso de armadilhas "pitfall" iscadas com massa fecal fresca de bovinos, realizou-se a coleta de besouros coprófagos (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae), durante o período de 15 de abril de 1995 a 17 de fevereiro de 1996, em área de pastagem ao lado de confinamento de bovinos, em Piracicaba, SP. Coletou-se um total de 11 espécies distribuidas nos gêneros Aphodius, Ataenius, Trichillum, Eurysternus, Dichotomius e Canthon. Os besouros coprófagos de comportamento endocoprídeo representaram 72,73...

  1. Current Knowledge of Mesozoic Coleoptera from Daohugou and Liaoning (Northeast China)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander G.KIREJTSHUK; Alexander G.PONOMARENKO; Alexander A.PROKIN; CHANG Huali; Georgy V.NIKOLAJEV; REN Dang

    2010-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to an overview on fossil Coleoptera studied from Inner Mongolia,Daohugou (Middle Jurassic,Jiulongshan Formation) and Liaoning (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous,Yixian Formation) deposited in Chinese collections.As a result,species of the tribe Sperchopsini and Hydrophilini from Hydrophilidae,families and subfamilies Silphidae,Syndesinae from Lucanidae,Pleocomidae,Trogidae,Trogissitidae,Pyrochroidae,Diaperinae from Tenebrionidae,and Cerambycidae were first registered in the Mesozoic and some families were defined as new.It was shown that many superfamilies represented in the Recent Fauna were formed within the Middle Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous.The materials examined confirm the hypothesis that Cucujiformian beetles are a younger group than other infraordera of Polyphaga (Staphyliniformia and Elateriformia) and,therefore,they appeared in the fossil record only in the late Mesozoic.It was shown and confirmed that most superfamilies appeared in the fossil records before Cucujoidea.The synonymy of Notocupes Ponomarenko,1964;Sinocupes Lin,1976,syn.nov.;Amblomma Tan,Ren et Liu 2005,syn.nov.;Euryomma Tan,Ren et Shih,2006,syn.nov.,non Stein,1899 and Ovatocupes Tan et Ren,2006,syn.nov.;synonymy of Tetraphalerus Waterhouse,1901 and Odontomma Tan,Ren et Ge 2006,syn.nov.;and synonymy of Priacmopsis Ponomarenko,1966 and Latocupes Tan et Ren,2006,syn.nov.are proposed.Sinorhombocoleus papposus Tan et Ren,2009 is transferred from the family Rhombocoleidae to Schizophoridae.Cervicatinius complanus Tan,Ren et Shih,2007 and Forticatinius elegans Tan,Ren et Shih,2007 are transferred from the family Catiniidae (suborder Archostemata) to superfamily Cleroidea (suborder Polyphaga:first among the family Peltidae and second as a closely related group to the latter family).The family Parandrexidae is transferred from the superfamily Cucujoidea to Cieroidea.The ecological circumstances of the past ecosystems and hypotheses of historical development of the order

  2. ECOLOGICAL AND FAUNISTIC REVIEW OF COCCINELLIDAE (COLEOPTERA, COCCINELLIDAE IN THE REPUBLIC OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Mukhtarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study is to conduct ecological and faunal studies of coccinellidae in Dagestan as well as to consider the chorologic, trophic and phenological aspects in connection with the peculiarities of the environment.Materials and methods. As the basis for the research we used the materials obtained by the authors from 1999 to 2016 in various parts of Dagestan. We also conducted expeditions, stationary and semi-stationary studies using traditional methods of entomological research.Results. Inventory of coccinellidae fauna in Dagestan allowed identifying 27 species from 18 genera. It also revealed multiple and rare species. We carried out an analysis on distribution of the species in the high altitude range; identified environmental groups by biotopic preferendum: xerophyllous, mesophyll meadow-steppe, mesophyll forest, and Hygrophila and polytopic species; according to trophic adaptation: Aphidophages, Coccidophages, Mycetophages, Entomophages and Phytophages; We held a zoogeographical analysis of coccinellidae of Dagestan and according to habitat type, 8 zoogeographic groups were identified; We conducted phenological observations of the study sites, stages and timing of winter and winter dormancy, the beginning of mating, egg-laying, the duration of certain stages, the number of generations and other features.Conclusion. This research represents the first comprehensive summary of ladybugs (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae of Dagestan and includes the findings of the composition study, ecological and zoogeographical aspects of coccinellidae fauna of the study area.

  3. Obrieniolus, a new monotypic genus of Naupactini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae from the Peruvian Andes and its phylogenetic placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Rio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new monotypic genus of Naupactini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Obrieniolus del Río is described based on the new species Obrieniolus robustus del Río, endemic to Peru. This genus is easily recognized by the black, denuded and shiny integument, with imbricate microsculpture and the rounded body, with short, cordiform and moderately convex elytra. According to a cladistic analysis based on 69 continuous and discrete morphological characters, the new genus is the sister taxon of a group formed by Amitrus Schoenherr, Trichocyphus Heller, Amphideritus Schoenherr, Asymmathetes Wibmer & O’Brien and Galapaganus Lanteri. The paper includes habitus photographs, line drawings of genitalia, mouthparts, and other external features of taxonomic value, and a dichotomous key to the genera of Naupactini distributed in the South American Transition Zone.

  4. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair.

  5. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  6. Fossil mesostigmatid mites (Mesostigmata: Gamasina, Microgyniina, Uropodina), associated with longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Baltic amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A.; Kontschán, Jenő; Zwanzig, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fossil mesostigmatid mites are extremely rare. Inclusions assignable to the tortoise mites (Mesostigmata, Uropodina) are described here for the first time from Eocene (ca. 44-49 Ma) Baltic amber. This is the oldest record of Uropodina and documents the first unequivocal amber examples potentially assignable to the extant genus Uroobovella Berlese, 1903 (Uropodoidea: Urodinychidae). Further mites in the same amber pieces are tentatively assigned to Microgynioidea (Microgyniina) and Ascidae (Gamasina), both potentially representing the oldest records of their respective superfamily and family groups. This new material also preserves behavioural ecology in the form of phoretic deutonymphs attached to their carriers via a characteristic anal pedicel. These deutonymphs in amber are intimately associated with longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), probably belonging to the extinct species Nothorhina granulicollis Zang, 1905. Modern uropodines have been recorded phoretic on species belonging to several beetle families, including records of living Uroobovella spp. occurring on longhorn beetles. Through these amber inclusions, a uropodine-cerambycid association can now be dated back to at least the Eocene.

  7. Predaceous diving beetle, Dytiscus sharpi sharpi (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) larvae avoid cannibalism by recognizing prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoda, Toshio

    2012-09-01

    Larvae of diving beetles such as the various Dytiscus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) are carnivorous and usually prey on other aquatic animals. Cannibalism among larvae of Dytiscus sharpi sharpi (Wehncke) was observed to begin when they were starved for more than two days under artificial breeding conditions. However, the 2-day starved larvae did not show cannibalism in the presence of intact, motionless, frozen tadpoles, or frozen shrimps. The beetle larvae attacked and captured intact tadpoles faster (15 sec) than other motionless and frozen tadpoles (120 sec), indicating that prey movement was an important factor in stimulating feeding behavior in larvae. Prey density does not have an effect on larval cannibalism. In cases in which preys are present at lower densities than that of larvae, a group of beetle larvae frequently fed on single prey. This feeding behavior, therefore, provides direct evidence of self-other recognition at the species level. Using two traps in one aquarium that allows the larvae to detect only prey smell, one containing tadpoles and another empty, the beetle larvae were attracted to the trap with tadpoles at high frequency, but not to the empty trap. In another experiment, the beetle larvae were not attracted to the trap containing a beetle larva. These results suggest that the larvae of D. sharpi sharpi are capable of recognizing prey scent, which enables the promotion of foraging behavior and the prevention of cannibalism.

  8. Volatiles released from Vaccinium corymbosum were attractive to Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an olfactometric bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Leonardo; Mutis, Ana; Ceballos, Ricardo; Lizama, Marcelo; Pardo, Fernando; Perich, Fernando; Quiroz, Andrés

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of host volatiles in the relationship between a blueberry plant Vaccinium corymbosum L. and the raspberry weevil Aegorhinus superciliosus (Guérin) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the principal pest of blueberry in the south of Chile. Volatiles from the aerial part of different phenological stages of the host were collected on Porapak Q and analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several chemical groups were identified including green leaf volatiles, aromatic compounds, and terpenes. The olfactometric responses of A. superciliosus toward different odor sources were studied in a four-arm olfactometer. Blueberry shoots at the phenological stages of fruit set, and blue-pink fruit color elicited the greatest behavioral responses from weevils. Five compounds (2-nonanone, eucalyptol, R- and S-limonene, and 4-ethyl benzaldehyde) elicited an attractant behavioral response from A. superciliosus. The results suggest the host location behavior of A. superciliosus could be mediated by volatiles derived from V. corymbosum. This work has identified a number of compounds with which it is possible to develop a lure for the principal pest of blueberry in southern Chile.

  9. Endemic epigean Tenebrionids (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) from the Andean Region: exploring the patagonian-diversification hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; Flores, Gustavo E

    2015-08-26

    Tenebrionidae is a diverse insect family of Coleoptera that shows high levels of endemicity in epigean species. For the Andean region, which is divided into three subregions: Central Chilean, Subantarctic and Patagonian, it has been hypothesized that epigean tenebrionids have diversified in the Patagonian subregion and subsequently, they dispersed to Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions. In this work, based on information obtained from museum collections and scientific studies, we presented the first list of endemic epigean tenebrionids from the Andean region with their taxonomic arrangement and geographic distribution. Moreover, we used these data to explore the veracity of the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis. A total of 416 species grouped into six subfamilies, 17 tribes and 41 genera were identified as endemic to the Andean region. Considering the spatial distribution it was observed that subfamilies, tribes, genera and species were unequally distributed across subregions. Results did not support the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis; to the contrary, they were more concordant with processes of isolation among subregions that have promoted speciation by interrupting gene flow among populations, resulting in endemism because species can not expand their range sizes. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings to be considered in biodiversity conservation, because endemic species, by their high extinction risk, are primary targets in conservation strategies.

  10. Identification, distribution, and adult phenology of the carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Patricia L; Riley, Edward G; Oswald, John D

    2013-01-01

    The carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae) of Texas are surveyed. Thirteen of the 14 species, and five of the six genera, of this ecologically and forensically important group of scavengers that have previously been reported from Texas are confirmed here based on a study of 3,732 adult specimens. The one reported, but unconfirmed, species, Oxelytrum discicolle, was probably based on erroneous label data and is excluded from the Texas fauna. Two additional species, Nicrophorus sayi and N. investigator are discussed as possible, but unconfirmed, components of the fauna. Taxonomic diagnoses, Texas distribution range maps, seasonality profiles, and biological notes are presented for each confirmed species. The confirmed Texas silphid fauna of 13 species comprises 43% of the 30 species of this family that are known from America north of Mexico. The highest richness (11 species) is found in the combined Austroriparian and Texan biotic provinces of eastern Texas. Phenologically, three species (Necrophila americana, O. rugulosum and Nicrophorus tomentosus) exhibit bimodal adult temporal occurrence patterns with peaks in the spring and late summer or fall; four species (Oiceoptoma noveboracense, Necrodes surinamensis, Nicrophorus carolinus, and N. orbicollis) exhibit unimodal occurrence patterns with a single peak in late spring or early summer; one species (Oiceoptonia inaequale) exhibits a unimodal occurrence pattern with a single peak in early spring; and five species (Thanatophilus truncatus, Nicrophorus americanus, N. marginatus, N. mexicanus and N. pustulatus) display unimodal occurrence patterns with peaks in late summer or early fall.

  11. Shared Ancestry of Symbionts? Sagrinae and Donaciinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae Harbor Similar Bacteria

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    Dimitra Synefiaridou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available When symbioses between insects and bacteria are discussed, the origin of a given association is regularly of interest. We examined the evolution of the symbiosis between reed beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Donaciinae and intracellular symbionts belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae. We analyzed the partial sequence of the 16S rRNA to assess the phylogenetic relationships with bacteria we found in other beetle groups (Cerambycidae, Anobiidae, other Chrysomelidae. We discuss the ecology of each association in the context of the phylogenetic analysis. The bacteria in Sagra femorata (Chrysomelidae, Sagrinae are very closely related to those in the Donaciinae and are located in similar mycetomes. The Sagrinae build a cocoon for pupation like the Donaciinae, in which the bacteria produce the material required for the cocoon. These aspects support the close relationship between Sagrinae and Donaciinae derived in earlier studies and make a common ancestry of the symbioses likely. Using PCR primers specific for fungi, we found Candida sp. in the mycetomes of a cerambycid beetle along with the bacteria.

  12. Characterization of olfactory sensory neurons in the white clover seed weevil, Apion fulvipes (Coleoptera: Apionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin N; Larsson, Mattias C; Svensson, Glenn P; Birgersson, Göran; Rundlöf, Maj; Lundin, Ola; Lankinen, Åsa; Anderbrant, Olle

    2012-10-01

    Seed-eating Apion weevils (Coleoptera: Apionidae) cause large economic losses in white and red clover seed production across Europe. Monitoring and control of clover weevils would be facilitated by semiochemical-based methods. Until now, however, nothing was known about physiological or behavioral responses to semiochemicals in this insect group. Here we analyzed the antenna of the white clover (Trifolium repens L.) specialist Apion fulvipes Geoffroy with scanning electron microscopy, and used single sensillum recordings with a set of 28 host compounds to characterize 18 classes of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Nine of the OSN classes responded strongly to synthetic compounds with high abundance in clover leaves, flowers, or buds. Eight classes responded only weakly to the synthetic stimuli, whereas one collective class responded exclusively to volatiles released from a crushed clover leaf. The OSNs showed a remarkable degree of specificity, responding to only one or a few chemically related compounds. In addition, we recorded a marked difference in the temporal dynamics of responses between different neurons, compounds, and doses. The identified physiologically active compounds will be screened for behavioral activity, with the ultimate goal to develop an odor-based control strategy for this pest. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis (Coleoptera: Meloidae) and phylogenetic analysis among Coleopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; He, Shilin; Song, Xuhao; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-03-10

    The blister beetle is an important resource insect due to its defensive substance cantharidin, which was widely used in pharmacology and plant protection. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis Laporte (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidae: Meloidae). The circular genome is 15,717 bp long, encoding 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNAs and 22 tRNAs and containing a A+T-rich region with gene arrangement identical to other Coleopteran species. Twelve PCGs start with typical ATN codon, while ATP8 gene initiate with GTT for first report in Insecta. All PCGs terminate with conventional stop codon TAA or TAG. All tRNAs in E. chinensis are predicted to fold into typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except tRNA-Ser(AGN), in which the dihydrouracil arm (DHU arm) could not form stable stem-loop structure. The secondary structure of lrRNA and srRNA comprises 48 helices and 32 helices respectively. The 1101 bp A+T-rich region contains a 15 bp poly-T stretch and microsatellite-like repeats rather than large tandem repetitive sequences. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 13 PCGs of 45 Coleopteran species, show that E. chinensis grouped with Tenebrionidae species. It also support the topology of (((Chrysomelidae+Curculionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+Cleroidea))+Tenebrionoidea) within Cucujiformia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Species limits in polymorphic mimetic Eniclases net-winged beetles from New Guinean mountains (Coleoptera, Lycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocek, Matej; Bocak, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Species delimitation was compared in a group of closely related lineages of aposematically colored Eniclases (Coleoptera, Lycidae) using morphology, genetic distances, and Bayesian implementation of the Poisson Tree Processes model. A high diversity of net-winged beetles was found in previously unsampled regions of New Guinea and ten new species are described: Eniclases bicolor sp. n., Eniclases bokondinensis sp. n., Eniclases brancuccii sp. n., Eniclases elelimensis sp. n., Eniclases infuscatus sp. n., Eniclases niger sp. n., Eniclases pseudoapertus sp. n., Eniclases pseudoluteolus sp. n., Eniclases tikapurensis sp. n., and Eniclases variabilis sp. n. Different levels of genetic and morphological diversification were identified in various sister-species pairs. As a result, both morphological and molecular analyses are used to delimit species. Sister-species with uncorrected pairwise genetic divergence as low as 0.45% were morphologically distinct not only in color pattern, but also in the relative size of eyes. Conversely, differences in color pattern regardless of their magnitude did not necessarily indicate genetic distance and intraspecific mimicry polymorphism was common. Additionally, genetic divergence without morphological differentiation was detected in one sister-species pair. Low dispersal propensity, diverse mimicry patterns, and mimetic polymorphism resulted in complex diversification of Eniclases and uncertain species delimitation in recently diversified lineages.

  15. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

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    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  16. Molecular evidence of facultative intraguild predation by Monochamus titillator larvae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on members of the southern pine beetle guild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeller, Erich N.; Husseneder, Claudia; Allison, Jeremy D.

    2012-11-01

    The southern pine bark beetle guild (SPBG) is arguably the most destructive group of forest insects in the southeastern USA. This guild contains five species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): Dendroctonus frontalis, Dendroctonus terebrans, Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis. A diverse community of illicit receivers is attracted to pheromones emitted by the SPBG, including the woodborers Monochamus carolinensis and Monochamus titillator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). These woodborers have been traditionally classified as resource competitors; however, laboratory assays suggest that larval M. carolinensis may be facultative intraguild predators of SPBG larvae. This study used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular gut content analyses to characterize subcortical interactions between M. titillator and members of the SPBG. The half-lives of SPBG DNA were estimated in the laboratory prior to examining these interactions in the field. A total of 271 field-collected M. titillator larvae were analyzed and 26 (9.6 %) tested positive for DNA of members of the SPBG. Of these larvae, 25 (96.2 %) tested positive for I. grandicollis and one (3.8 %) for I. calligraphus. Failure to detect D. terebrans and D. frontalis was likely due to their absence in the field. I. avulsus was present, but primers developed using adult tissues failed to amplify larval tissue. Results from this study support the hypothesis that larval Monochamus spp. are facultative intraguild predators of bark beetle larvae. Additionally, this study demonstrates the capabilities of PCR in elucidating the interactions of cryptic forest insects and provides a tool to better understand mechanisms driving southern pine beetle guild population fluctuations.

  17. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  18. Tolerance of wheat (Poales: Poaceae) seedlings to wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Ryan W; Froese, Paul S; Carter, Arron H

    2014-04-01

    Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae), the subterranean larval stage of the click beetle, are becoming more prevalent in many cropping systems and posing an increasing economic threat to wheat growers in the Pacific Northwest following the cancellation of the insecticide lindane in 2006. Current insecticide seed treatments alone are not adequate for wireworm control. The objective of this study was to evaluate a diverse set of 163 wheat genotypes for tolerance to wireworm feeding. Entries were planted in replicated field trials over 3 yr and evaluated for their performance when grown in the presence of wireworms. Entries were rated based on survival and given a tolerance score. Results indicated that differences exist among wheat genotypes in their level of tolerance to wireworm feeding. In particular, consistently high-ranking genotypes of interest may be 'BR 18', 'Sonalika', 'Safed Lerma', and 'Hollis'. These genotypes, used in conjunction with other cultural or chemical control methods, may help provide an economic means of controlling wireworms.

  19. On the mysterious Hylobius huguenini Reitter, 1891 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae

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    Christoph Germann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available During verifications of museum material for the Catalogue of the Palaearctic Coleoptera, the type specimen of Hylobius huguenini Reitter, 1891 conserved in the Hungarian National Museum was examined. The type specimen had been found by Gustav Huguenin in the Emmental region in Switzerland. The species was never found again and remained therefore mysterious. After the examination of the type specimen, it became clear that Hylobius huguenini belongs to the American genus Heilipodus Kuschel, 1955 (comb. nov., and there it ranks as a good species next to Heilipodus goeldii sp. nov., described here, and H. polyspilus (Pascoe, 1889, both from Brazil. The type specimens of Heilipodus goeldii sp. nov. were found in the Emil August Göldi-collection in the Natural History Museum of the Burgergemeinde Bern. 

  20. The genus Leptostylopsis of Hispaniola (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Acanthocinini

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    Steven Lingafelter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The generic differences and similarities between Leptostylus LeConte and Leptostylopsis Dillon (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Acanthocinini are discussed. Leptostylopsis is redescribed and the following species are transferred from Leptostylus to Leptostylopsis: Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942, comb. n.; Leptostylopsis poeyi (Fisher 1925, comb. n.; and Leptostylopsis viridicomus (Fisher 1942, comb. n. Leptostylopsis hispaniolae (Fisher 1942 is a syn. n. of Leptostylopsis annulipes (Fisher 1942. Seven new species of Leptostylopsis from Hispaniola are diagnosed, described, and illustrated: L. basifulvus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. caliginosus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. chlorescens Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. humerofulvus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. perfasciatus Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; L. puntacanaensis Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n.; and L. thomasi Lingafelter and Micheli, sp. n. Redescriptions and distributional data are provided for the six previously described species known from Hispaniola, and a dichotomous key to all thirteen species of Leptostylopsis from Hispaniola is provided.

  1. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the sex-determination gene doublesex in the sexually dimorphic broad-horned beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Ishiguro, Mai; Nishikawa, Hideto; Morita, Shinichi; Okada, Kensuke; Miyatake, Takahisa; Yaginuma, Toshinobu; Niimi, Teruyuki

    2016-07-11

    Various types of weapon traits found in insect order Coleoptera are known as outstanding examples of sexually selected exaggerated characters. It is known that the sex determination gene doublesex (dsx) plays a significant role in sex-specific expression of weapon traits in various beetles belonging to the superfamily Scarabaeoidea. Although sex-specific weapon traits have evolved independently in various Coleopteran groups, developmental mechanisms of sex-specific expression have not been studied outside of the Scarabaeoidea. In order to test the hypothesis that dsx-dependent sex-specific expression of weapon traits is a general mechanism among the Coleoptera, we have characterized the dsx in the sexually dimorphic broad-horned beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Tenebrionidea, Tenebirionidae). By using molecular cloning, we identified five splicing variants of Gnatocerus cornutus dsx (Gcdsx), which are predicted to code four different isoforms. We found one male-specific variant (GcDsx-M), two female-specific variants (GcDsx-FL and GcDsx-FS) and two non-sex-specific variants (correspond to a single isoform, GcDsx-C). Knockdown of all Dsx isoforms resulted in intersex phenotype both in male and female. Also, knockdown of all female-specific isoforms transformed females to intersex phenotype, while did not affect male phenotype. Our results clearly illustrate the important function of Gcdsx in determining sex-specific trait expression in both sexes.

  2. The mitochondrial genome of the multicolored Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and a phylogenetic analysis of the Polyphaga (Insecta: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fang-Fang; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Su; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the multicolored Asian lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) (GenBank accession No. KR108208). This is the first species with sequenced mitochondrial genome from the genus Harmonia. The current length with partitial A + T-rich region of this mitochondrial genome is 16,387 bp. All the typical genes were sequenced except the trnI and trnQ. As in most other sequenced mitochondrial genomes of Coleoptera, there is no re-arrangement in the sequenced region compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Five, five and three protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA, TA and T, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian method based on the first and second codon positions of the protein-coding genes supported that the Scirtidae is a basal lineage of Polyphaga. The Harmonia and the Coccinella form a sister lineage. The monophyly of Staphyliniformia, Scarabaeiformia and Cucujiformia was supported. The Buprestidae was found to be a sister group to the Bostrichiformia.

  3. Diversity of forensic rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) associated with decaying pig carcass in a forest biotope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederick, Christine; Verheggen, Francois J; Drugmand, Didier; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Most forensic studies are focused on Diptera pattern colonization while neglecting Coleoptera succession. So far, little information is available on the postmortem colonization by beetles and the decomposition process they initiate under temperate biogeoclimatic countries. These beetles have, however, been referred to as being part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. Forensic entomologists need increased databases detailing the distribution, ecology, and phenology of necrophagous insects, including staphylinids (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). While pig carcasses are commonly used in forensic entomology studies to surrogate human decomposition and to investigate the entomofaunal succession, very few works have been conducted in Europe on large carcasses. Our work reports the monitoring of the presence of adult rove beetles (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) on decaying pig carcasses in a forest biotope during four seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter). A total of 23 genera comprising 60 species of rove beetles were collected from pig carcasses.

  4. Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

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    Alberto Romo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Distributional patterns of the species belonging to the tribe Entimini from the Neotropical region were analyzed. Based on a track analysis of 22 species of Entimus, Rhigus, and Phaedropus, for which distributional data were available, two generalized tracks were found. One is located in northern Brazil, corresponding to the Amazonian subregion, and is determined by Phaedropus candidus and Rhigus speciosus. The other is located in southern Brazil, corresponding to the Parana subregion, and is determined by Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus, and R. tribuloides. The development of the Chacoan subregion is hypothesized to have been the dynamic vicariant event that fragmented the former Amazonian-Parana forest.Análisis de trazos de Entimini Neotropical (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Se analizaron los patrones de distribución de la tribu Entimini en la región Neotropical. Con base en un análisis de los trazos de 22 especies de Entimus, Rhigus y Phaedropus, para los cuales se contaba con datos de distribución, se hallaron dos trazos generalizados. Uno se localiza en el norte de Brasil, en la subregión Amazónica, y está sustentado por Phaedropus candidus y Rhigus speciosus. El otro se localiza en el sur de Brasil, en la subregión Paranaense, y está sustentado por Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus y R. tribuloides. Se hipotetiza que el desarrollo de la subregión Chaqueña constituyó el evento de vicarianza dinámica que fragmentó el antiguo bosque Amazónico-Paranaense.

  5. Walking stability of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792 (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Results obtained in studies can contribute to the advancement of science and innovative methods and techniques for developing practical activities. Reporting conditions that may restrict the implementation of research is critical to ensure the optimal development of further technical studies. The objective of this study was to assess the walking stability of R. dominica on a flat and smooth surface. The study was based on the determination of mortality, morphology and walking stability of the insect outside the grain mass, on a flat and smooth surface. Mortality of adults of this Coleoptera in conditions with and without food was similar, which explains the difficulty that this insect had for accessing the food source on the flat and smooth surface. The measurements of body length (BOL, width (BOW and height (BOH of R. dominica were compared with those of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, which showed good ability to walk in these conditions. This study indicated that the former presents lower BOL and BOW, and greater BOH than the second, and all these variables showed differences when analyzed simultaneously by means of the construction of multivariate morphometric indices (Width × Height, Length × Height and Height × Length × Width. These morphometric variables, together with the definition of the geometry most similar to the body shape, resulted in determination of the center of gravity (CG and static rollover threshold (SRTgeom for both species. Rhyzopertha dominica and T. castaneum presented CGs considered high and low, respectively, and together with the values obtained for SRTgeom, may justify that R. dominica can be considered a less stable species during movement, and presents greater risk of rollover on flat and smooth surfaces.

  6. Diversidad de la familia Carabidae (Coleoptera en Chile Diversity of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO ROIG-JUÑENT

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Carabidae constituye dentro de los coléopteros chilenos, la cuarta familia en importancia por su cantidad de especies. El presente trabajo incluye una breve compilación acerca de la historia de la familia y de las primeras expediciones realizadas en Chile. También se realizan comparaciones de la diversidad de carábidos chilenos con respecto a otros países y el Neotrópico. Para Chile, se conocen 21 tribus, con 95 géneros y 365 especies, que representan el 38,8, 28,8 y 7,9 % de la fauna del Neotrópico, respectivamente. Chile posee un bajo número de tribus comparado con otros países, sin embargo, constituye un área importante por la presencia de seis tribus relictuales, principalmente pangeicas o gondwánicas. Chile posee 18 géneros endémicos (18,5 % de su fauna de Carabidae, 28 cuya distribución está restringida a Chile y Argentina y seis restringidos a Chile, Argentina y Uruguay. La cantidad de especies presentes en Chile es inferior a la que poseen otros países de América del Sur, pero la cantidad de especies endémicas es muy alta (204 y representa el 55,8 % de su fauna de carábidos. El alto grado de endemismo que posee Chile con respecto a otros países de América del Sur puede deberse a su condición de aislamiento, siendo las barreras más importantes la región desértica del norte y la cordillera de Los Andes. Este hecho también se vislumbra por la ausencia de importantes tribus neotropicales como Galeritini, Scaritini y Brachinini. También se incluyen en este trabajo claves para la identificación de todas las tribus y géneros presentes en Chile, como así también una breve descripción acerca de la diversidad y ambientes en los que se encuentra cada géneroThe family Carabidae is the fourth largest Coleoptera family in Chile. The present work includes a brief compilation on the taxonomic history of the family and the first expeditions to Chile. In addition, knowledge of carabid diversity in Chile is compared with

  7. Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B.A.; Swanson, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

  8. Novas espécies de Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies de Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Novas espécies de Pteropliini descritas: Esthlogena (E. nigrosuturalis do México e Panamá; E. (E. chicacaoensis e E. (E. amaliae da Guatemala; E. (E. dissimilis do Peru. Todas as espécies são ilustradas.New species of Esthlogena s. str. Thomson (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. New species described of Pteropliini: Esthlogena (E. nigrosuturalis from Mexico and Panama; E. (E. chicacaoensis and E. (E. amaliae from Guatemala; E. (E. dissimilis from Peru. All species are illustrated.

  9. Influence of growing location and cultivar on Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infestation of rough rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FRANK H. ARTHUR; RUSTY C. BAUTISTA; TERRENCE J. SIEBENMORGEN

    2007-01-01

    Long-grain rice cultivars Cocodrie, Wells, and XP 723 grown in three locations (Hazen, MO; Essex and Newport, AR, USA), and medium-grain rice cultivars Bengal and XP 713 grown in two locations (Jonesboro and Lodge Corner, AR, USA), were harvested and assayed for susceptibility to Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), the lesser grain borer, and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the rice weevil, on rice held at 27℃ 57% and 75% relative humidity (RH).Separate samples from the same harvest lots were also analyzed for the physical characteristics of brown rice yield, percentage whole kernels and kernel thickness. Progeny production and feeding damage of R. dominica were significantly different among long-grain cultivars within two of the three locations (P < 0.05), but not for location or RH (P ≥ 0.05), while progeny production of S. oryzae was different among cultivars, location, and RH (P < 0.05). On medium-grain rice, both cultivar and location were significant for progeny production of R. dominica, but not RH, while cultivar and RH were significant for progeny production of S. oryzae, but not location. On both rice types, feeding damage of R. dominica followed the same trends and was always strongly positively correlated with progeny production (P < 0.05), but for S. oryzae there were several instances in which progeny production was not correlated with feeding damage (P ≥ 0.05). Physical characteristics of both rice types were statistically significant (P < 0.01) but actual numerical differences were extremely small, and were generally not correlated with progeny production of either species. Results indicate that the location in which a particular rice cultivar is grown, along with its characteristics, could affect susceptibility of the rice to R. dominica and S. oryzae.

  10. The head morphology of Clambidae and its implications for the phylogeny of Scirtoidea (Coleoptera: Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Eric; Yavorskaya, Margarita I; Beutel, Rolf G

    2016-05-01

    External and internal structures of the head of adults of Clambus are described and illustrated in detail. The results are compared with structural features found in the clambid genus Calyptomerus, in representatives of other scirtoid families, and also in species of other coleopteran suborders, notably Myxophaga. The results tentatively support the monophyly of Scirtoidea and a close relationship between Clambidae and Eucinetidae is suggested by one shared derived feature of the mandible, a long and slender apical tooth with a serrate edge. The monophyly of Clambidae is very strongly supported and Acalyptomerus is probably the sistergroup of a clade Calyptomerus + Clambinae. Potential scirtoid autapomorphies are the loss of the dorsal tentorial arms, a bulging gula, a strongly transverse labrum, and a ridge separating the mediostipes from the lacinia. However, all these features are homoplasious. The monophyly of Clambidae is supported by modifications of the head capsule which is strongly flattened and broadened, by a deep clypeofrontal incision enabling vertical antennal movements, and a series of antennal features. Synapomorphies of Clambinae + Calyptomerus (Clambidae excluding Acalyptomerus) are the conglobate body form with the ventral side of the head capsule in contact with the mesocoxae, and compound eyes integrated in the contour of the head. The completely subdivided eye is an autapomorphy of Clambus. An entire series of features is shared by Clambidae (or Scirtoidea) and Myxophaga. Most of them are apomorphies that apparently evolved independently in both groups. However, the presence of well-developed maxillary and labial glands is arguably a retained groundplan feature of Coleoptera, with parallel loss in Archostemata, Adephaga and various groups of Polyphaga.

  11. Morphological and genetic variation in Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cicindelinae: implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of taxonomic and geographical boundaries is a common problem when analysing clinal distributions. This is of particular concern when the assessment of intraspecific groupings is required for conservation management. The tiger beetle Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae is a typical case in which two recognised subspecies are distributed in a clinal latitudinal fashion in the dune systems along the Atlantic coast of Portugal. This habitat is increasingly under threat, and conservation measures are needed. We investigated the validity of the two named subspecies, based on a re-analysis of elytral and genitalic measurements using multivariate analysis. We also analysed variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene for a total of six populations along the cline. Multivariate analysis supported the idea of a morphological cline and revealed a clear distinction of the southernmost population and also some degree of distinctiveness of the most northern populations, partially supporting the recognised subspecific ranking. The mtDNA analysis identified two main groups corresponding to northern and southern populations. Both sets of markers showed that variation within the C. lusitanica assemblage is complex, with the boundaries between morphological and mtDNA groups not in agreement. However, populations at either end of the distributional range are clearly distinct from each other, and should be considered as provisional units for conservation programmes.El reconocimiento de límites taxonómicos y geográficos de la variabilidad observada es un problema habitual cuando se analizan distribuciones clinales. Esto es particularmente problemático cuando se requiere la determinación de agrupamientos intraespecíficos para tomar medidas de conservación. El cicindélido Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae constituye un caso típico en el que dos subespecies reconocidas se hayan distribuidas a

  12. The influence of silhouette color and orientation on arrival and emergence of Ips pine engravers and their predators in loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Goyer; G.J. Lenhard; Brian L. Strom

    2004-01-01

    Insects that rely upon aggressive bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) for generating appropriate habitats (natural enemies and associated species) must respond to a variety of stimuli used by bark beetles, including semiochemical and visual cues. In the southeastern US, Ips engraver beetles are non-aggressive bark beetles that exploit both standing...

  13. Evaluation of traps used to monitor southern pine beetle aerial populations and sex ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Cronin; Jane L. Hayes; Peter. Turchin

    2000-01-01

    Various kinds of traps have been employed to monitor and forecast population trends of the southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann; Coleoptera: Scolytidae), but their accuracy in assessing pine-beetle abundance and sex ratio in the field has not been evaluated directly.In trus study, we...

  14. Host plant oviposition preference of Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera:Apionidae), a potential biological control agent of yellow starthistle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceratapion basicorne (Coleoptera: Apionidae) is a weevil native to Europe and western Asia that is being evaluated as a prospective classical biological control agent of Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) in the United States. Choice oviposition experiments were conducted under laboratory ...

  15. Detection of reproducing populations of Coccinella novemnotata within coccinellid assemblages (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in western South Dakota and western Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults of three native species of lady beetles [Coccinella novemnotata Herbst, Coccinella transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Adalia bipunctata (L.); Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] of conservation interest were detected during recent surveys at several locations in western South Dakota and western ...

  16. Un nouveau genre, une nouvelle espèce de Torneutini : Gnathopraxithea sarryi nov. sp. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. C. Seabra; Tavakilian, Gérard

    1986-01-01

    Description de #Gnathopraxithea sarryi$, nouveau genre, nouvelle espèce, illustrée par deux photographies, avec son insertion dans la clef des genres de #Torneutini$ (#Coleoptera$, #Cerambycidae$). (Résumé d'auteur)

  17. Typhlocharis vicariantes del Estrecho de Gibraltar. I: Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969 (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez González, S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This first part about the vicariant Typhlocharis from Gibraltar Strait is dedicated to Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969; a second paper will cover T. silvanoides Dieck, 1869. The studied material was obtained in four field campaigns carried out in the south of Spain and north of Morocco between 1997 and 2001 (Zaballos & Banda, 2000; Zaballos, 2005. In these campaigns abundant specimens of Typhlocharis (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae were collected in different localities, the majority of them belonging to the species T. armata Coiffait, 1969. Their study and the comparison with the type series of this species allowed its complete redescription and clarification of its status within the genus. Contrary to what has been considered traditionally, the marginal umbilicate series of elytra in T. armata is composed of three, instead of four posterior setae. The taxonomical affinities of this species are established, the morphological weight of the umbilicate group of elytral setae as a lineage and species group defining character is discussed, and the theory of Jeanne (1973 about the relation between shortening of elytra and umbilicate series reduction with a decrease in body size is revised. The dispersal abilities are evaluated and a biogeographical explanation for the new distribution of the species is proposed.Esta primera parte sobre las especies de Typhlocharis vicariantes del Estrecho de Gibraltar está dedicada a Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969; mientras que en un segundo artículo se tratará T. silvanoides Dieck, 1869. El material estudiado procede de cuatro campañas entomológicas realizadas en el sur de España y en el norte de Marruecos entre 1997 y 2001 (Zaballos & Banda, 2000; Zaballos, 2005. En estas campañas se recolectaron, en localidades diferentes, abundantes ejemplares de Typhlocharis (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae, la mayoría de los cuales han resultado pertenecer a la especie T. armata Coiffait, 1969. Su estudio y

  18. Upper lethal temperature limits of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    1996-01-01

    The susceptibility of the egg, larval and adult stages of Anobium punctatum De Geer (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) to heat (46-54°C, 25-30% RH) was investigated. The larval stage was found to be most tolerant to heat. Very short exposure (5 min) of the larvae to temperatures of 52°C and above led to 100...

  19. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) in Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Wang, Zhiliang; Guo, Jianjun; Nápoles, Jesús Romero; Ji, Yingchao; Jiang, Chunyan; Zhang, Runzhi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, Bruchus atomarius L., 1761, Bruchus loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species. PMID:25610333

  20. Diversity of Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attracted to avocado, lychee, and essential oil lures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and native Persea species (redbay, swampbay). As part...

  1. Chemical Control of the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is an exotic pest of U.S. trees in the family Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana) and redbay (P. borbonia). It threatens avocado production in Florida by transmitting Raffaelea lauricola, the fungal...

  2. EPURAEA DEUBELI REITTER, 1898, A CONFIRMED SAPROXYLIC SAP BEETLE FOR THE ITALIAN FAUNA (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During ecological investigations on saproxylic beetle communities at Monte Baldo (Veneto, Verona province, two specimens of Epuraea deubeli Reitter, 1898 (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae were recently collected. It is the first known sure record of this species in Italy (previously known from Northern, Eastern, and Central Europe, southwards to Austria, and from Western Siberia.

  3. Tylenchids nematodes (Tylenchida parasitizing field population of Harmonia axyridis, and Cycloneda sanguinea (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora B. Camino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in Argentina, we report that in Harmonia axyridis Pallas, 1773, and Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae parasitizing by nematodes which belong to the family of Allantonematidae (Nematoda, Tylenchida. The genera are Metaparasitylenchus Wachek, 1955 (Nickle, 1967, Sulphuretylenchus Rühm, 1956 (Nickle, 1967 and Contortylenchus Rühm, 1956. They will be described and photographied afterwards.

  4. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  5. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in narrow hedgerows in a Danish agricultural landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, G. L.; Magura, T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of hedgerows in supporting ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a Danish agricultural landscape was examined. Nine old, well established single-row hedges were selected for the study, three each of a native species (hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna), a non-native deciduous one (rowan...

  6. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  7. Effect of light quality on movement of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allema, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study the effect of red light on night time behaviour of Pterostichus melanarius (Coleoptera: Carabidae). An experiment was conducted in experimental arenas in the autumn of 2008. Beetles were recorded 20 min per hour during a period of 8 hours under red light, near in

  8. Host boring preferences of the tea shot-hole borer Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The non-native shot-hole borer, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), was discovered in Florida’s avocado production area in Homestead in 2010. It is a highly polyphagous ambrosia beetle that carries Fusarium fungal symbionts. In susceptible host trees, the fung...

  9. Diapause and post-diapause quiescence demonstrated in overwintering Harmonia axyeidis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raak-van den Berg, C.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is regarded as an invasive species in many parts of the world. In a previous study we hypothesised that H. axyridis enters diapause at the end of October and then shifts to a quiescent state in December in northwestern Europe.

  10. A new species and first record of Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) for Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor Jaime; Deloya, Cuauhtémoc

    2015-04-20

    A new Cotinis Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Gymnetini) species from Venezuela is described and illustrated. The new species is compared with Cotinis barthelemyi (Gory & Percheron) from Colombia. The Neotropical distribution of Cotinis is expanded to Venezuela. A revised key to the species of Cotinis is provided in both English and Spanish.

  11. Study on the genus Daptus ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik Je Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A genus Daptus Fischer von Waldheim, 1823 of the tribe Harpalini Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera: Carabidae is reported for the first time from Korea, based on the Daptus vittatus Fischer von Waldheim from Incheon, Korea. Redescription of the species and illustrations of diagnostic characteristics, including genitalia characteristics of both sexes, are provided.

  12. Contribution to the knowledge of seed-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae in Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen species of seed-beetles belonging to the subfamily Bruchinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae were collected in Xinjiang, China. Of these, the following four were new records for China: Bruchus affinis Frolich, 1799, B. atomarius L., 1761, B. loti Paykull, 1800 and Kytorhinus kergoati Delobel & Legalov, 2009. We provide an annotated checklist, illustrations and a key to the 19 species.

  13. Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S. Robbins; Steven R. Alm; Charles D. Armstrong; Anne L. Averill; Thomas C. Baker; Robert J. Bauernfiend; Frederick P. Baxendale; S. Kris Braman; Rick L. Brandenburg; Daniel B. Cash; Gary J. Couch; Richard S. Cowles; Robert L. Crocker; Zandra D. DeLamar; Timothy G. Dittl; Sheila M. Fitzpatrick; Kathy L. Flanders; Tom Forgatsch; Timothy J. Gibb; Bruce D. Gill; Daniel O. Gilrein; Clyde S. Gorsuch; Abner M. Hammond; Patricia D. Hastings; David W. Held; Paul R. Heller; Rose T. Hiskes; James L. Holliman; William G. Hudson; Michael G. Klein; Vera L. Krischik; David J. Lee; Charles E. Linn; Nancy J. Luce; Kenna E. MacKenzie; Catherine M. Mannion; Sridhar Polavarapu; Daniel A. Potter; Wendell L. Roelofs; Brian M. Rovals; Glenn A. Salsbury; Nathan M. Schiff; David J. Shetlar; Margaret Skinner; Beverly L. Sparks; Jessica A. Sutschek; Timothy P. Sutschek; Stanley R. Swier; Martha M. Sylvia; Niel J. Vickers; Patricia J. Vittum; Richard Weidman; Donald C. Weber; R. Chris Williamson; Michael G. Villani

    2006-01-01

    The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera...

  14. A redescription of Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont with notes on other interesting brazilian Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    OpenAIRE

    Ratcliffe,Brett C.

    1981-01-01

    Abstract Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont (Coleoptera: Scarabeidae: Scarabaeinae) is redescribed because of errors in the original description. New distribution records are presented for Trichillum hirsutum Boucomont, Ipselissus alvarengai Pereira and Martinez (new state records); and Trichillum boucomonti Saylor and Cryptccanthon peckorum Howden (new country records for Brazil).

  15. Het voorkomen van de snuitkevers Ceratapion gibbirostre en C. carduorum in Nederland (Coleoptera: Apionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, T.; Alders, K.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of Ceratapion gibbirostre and C. carduorum in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Apionidae) We re-examined the Dutch material of Ceratapion carduorum, present in the main Dutch museum collections and some private collections. It was found that in the past C. carduorum was confused with C.

  16. A contribution to the rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, Paederinae in north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Mohammadi Dehcheshmeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 19 species of rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae, belonging to the subfamily Paederinae Fleming 1821, were collected from Mazandaran province, north of Iran, during 2015-2016. Two species, Rugilus angustatus Geoffroy 1758 and Astenus lyonessius (joy 1908 are reported for the first time from Iran.

  17. Faunistic study of the aquatic beetles (Coleoptera: Polyphaga of Markazi Province (Central Iran with new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaei R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we establish the presence of 24 aquatic beetle (Coleoptera: Polyphaga species belonging to 13 genera and five families in Markazi Province of Central Iran. Specimens were collected between 2001 and 2005. Eleven species and four genera are recorded from Iran for the first time. The ecological significance of the new records is briefly discussed. .

  18. High-level phylogeny of the Coleoptera inferred with mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhong-Long; Liu, Yong-Jian; Shen, Yu-Ying; Shao, Renfu

    2016-11-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) exhibits tremendous morphological, ecological, and behavioral diversity. To better understand the phylogenetics and evolution of beetles, we sequenced three complete mitogenomes from two families (Cleridae and Meloidae), which share conserved mitogenomic features with other completely sequenced beetles. We assessed the influence of six datasets and three inference methods on topology and nodal support within the Coleoptera. We found that both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood with homogeneous-site models were greatly affected by nucleotide compositional heterogeneity, while the heterogeneous-site mixture model in PhyloBayes could provide better phylogenetic signals for the Coleoptera. The amino acid dataset generated more reliable tree topology at the higher taxonomic levels (i.e. suborders and series), where the inclusion of rRNA genes and the third positions of protein-coding genes improved phylogenetic inference at the superfamily level, especially under a heterogeneous-site model. We recovered the suborder relationships as (Archostemata+Adephaga)+(Myxophaga+Polyphaga). The series relationships within Polyphaga were recovered as (Scirtiformia+(Elateriformia+((Bostrichiformia+Scarabaeiformia+Staphyliniformia)+Cucujiformia))). All superfamilies within Cucujiformia were recovered as monophyletic. We obtained a cucujiform phylogeny of (Cleroidea+(Coccinelloidea+((Lymexyloidea+Tenebrionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+(Chrysomeloidea+Curculionoidea))))). This study showed that although tree topologies were sensitive to data types and inference methods, mitogenomic data could provide useful information for resolving the Coleoptera phylogeny at various taxonomic levels by using suitable datasets and heterogeneous-site models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  20. Diapause and post-diapause quiescence demonstrated in overwintering Harmonia axyeidis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raak-van den Berg, C.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Asian ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is regarded as an invasive species in many parts of the world. In a previous study we hypothesised that H. axyridis enters diapause at the end of October and then shifts to a quiescent state in December in northwestern Europe.

  1. Incorporating a sorghum habitat for enhancing lady beetles (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae) in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are important predators of cotton insect pests. The objective of this 2-yr on-farm study was to examine the ability of a sorghum trap crop with Euschistus spp. pheromone baited capture traps to enhance these predators in cotton in Georgia. Scymnus spp., Cocci...

  2. New record of predatory ladybird beetle (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae feeding on extrafloral nectaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia M. Almeida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available New record of predatory ladybird beetle (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae feeding on extrafloral nectaries. Feeding by Exoplectra miniata (Germar on extrafloral nectaries of Inga edulis Mart. was observed in Nova Friburgo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first record of this behavior for Exoplectrini.

  3. The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Neorthopleurinae), with description of a new species from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-23

    The genus Platytenerus Miyatake, 1985 (Coleoptera: Cleridae) is redescribed and classified into the subfamily Neorthopleurinae Opitz, 2009. A phylogenetic tree is supplementally provided for Platytenerus based on twenty morphological and two geographical characters. A new species of the genus, Platytenerus iriomotensis sp. n. is described from Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

  4. Review of the genus Ceresium Newman, 1842 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    A taxonomic review of the genus Ceresium (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) found within the Fiji Islands is presented. A total of 17 species is treated. Full morphological descriptions and comparative images of each species are included, along with a dichotomous key for their identification....

  5. Novel method for determining sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Shepherd; Michael Montgomery; Brian Sullivan; Albert (Bud) Mayfield

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the sex of live adult Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera:Derodontidae) is described. Beetles were briefly chilled and positioned ventral-side-up under a dissecting microscope. Two forceps with blunted ends were used to gently brace the beetle and press on the centre of the abdomen to extrude its terminal segments. Male beetles were...

  6. Het voorkomen van Carabus auronitens in Oost-Nederland (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, E.; Haken, ten B.

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of Carabus auronitens in the eastern part of the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Carabus auronitens Fabricius, 1792 is a carabid beetle with two distinct (meta)populations in the eastern part of The Netherlands: Achterhoek en Twente. The first recording in the Achterhoek was don

  7. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  8. Life cycle, development, and culture of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a wood-boring pest that transmits the fungal pathogen Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt disease in American Lauraceae. This study documents the gallery formation patterns of X. gla...

  9. A new species of Golinca Thomson (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae): first record of the genus for Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valois, M; Silva, F

    2015-02-16

    Golinca trevisani Valois & Silva, new species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Trichiini: Incina) from Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondônia, and Amazonas, Brazil is described, representing the first record of the genus Golinca for Brazil. Diagnosis, illustrations of key morphological characters, the first male genitalia description in the genus, and a key for identification of four species of Golinca are provided.

  10. Bioacoustics of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) on Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an economically important pest of common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae) in the tropics and subtropics. It is difficult to detect the presence of A. obtectus because the larvae are cryptic and spend most of their developmental time...

  11. Testing abundance-range size relationships in European carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotze, J.; Niemelä, J.; O'Hara, R.B.; Turin, H.

    2003-01-01

    Four of the eight hypotheses proposed in the literature for explaining the relationship between abundance and range size (the sampling artifact, phylogenetic non-independence, range position and resource breadth hypotheses) were tested by using atlas data for carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

  12. Impact of Adult Weight, Density, and Age on Reproduction of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of adult weight, age, and density on reproduction of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied. The impact of adult weight on reproduction was determined in two ways: 1) counting the daily progeny of individual adult pairs of known weight and analyzing the data with line...

  13. Use of nutrient self selection as a diet refining tool in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method to refine existing dietary supplements for improving production of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), was tested. Self selected ratios of 6 dietary ingredients by T. molitor larvae were used to produce a dietary supplement. This supplement was compared...

  14. Testing abundance-range size relationships in European carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotze, J.; Niemelä, J.; O'Hara, R.B.; Turin, H.

    2003-01-01

    Four of the eight hypotheses proposed in the literature for explaining the relationship between abundance and range size (the sampling artifact, phylogenetic non-independence, range position and resource breadth hypotheses) were tested by using atlas data for carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

  15. Chaves para a identificação dos principais Coleoptera (Insecta associados com produtos armazenados Keys for the identification of Coleoptera (Insecta associated with stored products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated key to identify nine families of Coleoptera commonly found in stored products is presented. Keys for the identification of Anobiidae [Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792, Stegobium paniceum (Linnaeus, 1761], Bruchidae [Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say, 1831, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833], Curculionidae [Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763, S. zeamais Motschulsky, 1885], Silvanidae [Ahasverus advena (Waltl, 1832, Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin, 1892, Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel, 1889, O. surinamensis (Linnaeus, 1758] and Tenebrionidae [Gnathocerus cornutus (Fabricius, 1798, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797, T. confusum du Val, 1868] are also provided. These keys cover the most frequent Coleoptera found in stored products, specially grains, and are to the adult stage only. Illustrations of external morphology and general characteristics are provided for each species reported.

  16. First record of necrophagy by Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae Primeiro relato de necrofagia por Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri F. Messas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available First record of necrophagy by Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae. The S. nigriceps specimen was observed making small cuts and removing portions of the carcass of a frog Haddadus binotatus (Spix in February 24, 2011, in Serra do Japi, São Paulo State, Brazil. This note presents another record of necrophagy for Scybalocanthon.Primeiro relato de necrofagia por Scybalocanthon nigriceps Harold (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae. O espécime de S. nigriceps foi observado fazendo pequenos cortes e removendo porções da carcaça da rã Haddadus binotatus (Spix em 24 de fevereiro de 2011 na Serra do Japi, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Esta nota apresenta mais um registro de negrofagia para Scybalocanthon.

  17. Investigation of the current population of Dendroctonus micans (Kugelann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and colonization rate of Rhizophagus grandis Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Monotomidae in spruce forests of Artvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazan Alkan Akıncı

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, current population of Dendroctonus micans (Kugelann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, and colonization status of its specific predator Rhizophagus grandis Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Monotomidae in spruce forests of Artvin were investigated. Field works were conducted in a total of 30 sampling plots and along 20 transects. Sampling plots were 30 × 10 m in size and transects 50 m long. Presently, D. micans has a “very low infestation” rate in Artvin spruce forests and D. micans infestation rate is 4.1 times lower than the early 2000s. The trees at the stands edges were attacked more than trees in stand closure. All the larval galleries of D. micans were colonized by R. grandis. R. grandis could colonize larval galleries of its prey even in endemic conditions.

  18. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musaspp. EN COLOMBIA Dryophthorinae Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Associted to Platain and Banana crops (Musaspp. in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.This synopsis is about beetle&#’;s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  19. Impacts of Contrasting Alfalfa Production Systems on the Drivers of Carabid Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Community Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosey, H B; McKenzie, S C; Rolston, M G; O'Neill, K M; Menalled, F D

    2015-08-01

    Growing concerns about the environmental consequences of chemically based pest control strategies have precipitated a call for the development of integrated, ecologically based pest management programs. Carabid or ground beetles (Coleoptera:Carabidae) are an important group of natural enemies of common agricultural pests such as aphids, slugs, and other beetles. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most common forage crop species in the semi-arid western United States. In 2011, Montana alone produced 4.0 × 10(6 )Mg of alfalfa on 8.1 × 10(5 )ha for gross revenue in excess of US$4.3 × 10(8), making it the third largest crop by revenue. We conducted our study over the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. Each year, our study consisted of three sites each with adjacent systems of monoculture alfalfa, alfalfa nurse cropped with hay barley, and an uncultivated refuge consisting of a variety of forbs and grasses. Carabid community structure differed and strong temporal shifts were detected during both 2012 and 2013. Multivariate fuzzy set ordination suggests that variation in canopy height among the three vegetation systems was primarily responsible for the differences observed in carabid community structure. Land managers may be able to enhance carabid species richness and total abundance by creating a heterogeneous vegetation structure, and nurse cropping in particular may be effective strategy to achieve this goal. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil

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    Renata C. Campos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil. The beetles of the subfamily Scarabaeinae are important organisms that participate in the cycle of decomposition, especially in tropical ecosystems. Most species feed on feces (dung or carcasses (carrion and are associated with animals that produce their food resources. Dung beetles are divided into three functional groups: rollers, tunnelers and dwellers. This present work aims to study the diversity of dung beetle communities inhabiting fragments of the Atlantic Forest, with the purpose of describing the ecology of the species in southern Brazil. This study was conducted in the region of Campos Novos, in Santa Catarina, where twenty sites of Atlantic forest fragments were sampled. Samplings of dung beetles were conducted using 200 pitfall traps, of which 100 were baited with human feces and another 100 with carrion. Size and environmental complexity were also measured for each forest fragment. A total of 1,502 dung beetles, belonging to six tribes, 12 genera and 33 species, were collected. Results of the Levin's index of niche breadth indicated that 11 species were categorized as being coprophagous, ten as generalists, and two as necrophagous. Most species are tunnelers (19, nine of rollers and four of dwellers. The great diversity of Scarabaeinae in the region of Campos Novos, including several rare species, adds important data to the Scarabaeinae fauna in the central-western region of Santa Catarina. It may also help choosing priority areas for conservation in the region, where human impact, with large areas of monoculture, increasingly threatens the fragments of Mixed Ombrophilous Forest.

  1. Endophyte isolate and host grass effects on Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Olivier J P; Gwinn, Kimberly D; Pless, Charles D; Popay, Alison J

    2011-04-01

    Endophytic fungi belonging to the genus Neotyphodium, confer resistance to infected host grasses against insect pests. The effect of host species, and endophtye species and strain, on feeding and survival of the corn flea beetle, Chaetocnema pulicaria Melsheimer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was investigated. The grass-endophyte associations included natural and artificially derived associations producing varying arrays of common endophyte-related alkaloids or alkaloid groups, peramine, lolitrem B, ergovaline, and the lolines. Preference and nonpreference tests showed that C. pulicaria feeding and survival were reduced by infection of tall fescue with the wild-type strain of N. coenophialum, the likely mechanism being antixenosis rather than antibiosis. In the preference tests, endophyte and host species effects were observed. Of the 10 different Neotyphodium strains tested in artificially derived tall fescue associations, eight strongly deterred feeding by C. pulicaria, whereas the remaining two strains had little or no effect on feeding. Infection of tall fescue with another fungal symbiont, p-endophyte, had no effect. Perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L., infected with six strains of endophyte, was moderately resistant to C. pulicaria compared with endophyte-free grass, but four additional strains were relatively inactive. Six Neotyphodium-meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds., associations, including the wild-type N. uncinatum-meadow fescue combination, were resistant, whereas three associations were not effective. Loline alkaloids seemed to play a role in antixenosis to C. pulicaria. Effects not attributable to the lolines or any other of the alkaloids examined also were observed. This phenomenon also has been reported in tests with other insects, and indicates the presence of additional insect-active factors.

  2. A Bacillus thuringiensis S-Layer Protein Involved in Toxicity against Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Guadalupe; Miranda-Rios, Juan; de la Riva, Gustavo; Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-01-01

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis as a biopesticide is a viable alternative for insect control since the insecticidal Cry proteins produced by these bacteria are highly specific; harmless to humans, vertebrates, and plants; and completely biodegradable. In addition to Cry proteins, B. thuringiensis produces a number of extracellular compounds, including S-layer proteins (SLP), that contribute to virulence. The S layer is an ordered structure representing a proteinaceous paracrystalline array which completely covers the surfaces of many pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we report the identification of an S-layer protein by the screening of B. thuringiensis strains for activity against the coleopteran pest Epilachna varivestis (Mexican bean beetle; Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We screened two B. thuringiensis strain collections containing unidentified Cry proteins and also strains isolated from dead insects. Some of the B. thuringiensis strains assayed against E. varivestis showed moderate toxicity. However, a B. thuringiensis strain (GP1) that was isolated from a dead insect showed a remarkably high insecticidal activity. The parasporal crystal produced by the GP1 strain was purified and shown to have insecticidal activity against E. varivestis but not against the lepidopteran Manduca sexta or Spodoptera frugiperda or against the dipteran Aedes aegypti. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and sequenced. It corresponded to an S-layer protein highly similar to previously described SLP in Bacillus anthracis (EA1) and Bacillus licheniformis (OlpA). The phylogenetic relationships among SLP from different bacteria showed that these proteins from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, B. anthracis, B. licheniformis, and B. thuringiensis are arranged in the same main group, suggesting similar origins. This is the first report that demonstrates that an S-layer protein is directly involved in toxicity to a coleopteran pest. PMID:16391064

  3. Suscetibilidade de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae ao enxofre Susceptibility of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae to sulfur

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    José Roberto Gonçalves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As criações de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae são freqüentemente infestadas pelo ácaro Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross e Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar doses de enxofre, acaricida eficaz contra A. lacunatus, não-prejudiciais ao desenvolvimento de R. dominica. As unidades experimentais foram constituídas de placas de Petri contendo 30 g de grãos de trigo infestados com 30 adultos de R. dominica. Os tratamentos consistiram na utilização de doses de enxofre sobre os grãos, correspondentes a 0,0; 0,6; 0,9; 1,2; 1,5; 3,0; 6,0; 12,0; 24,0 e 48,0mg i a g-1, em dez repetições. As unidades experimentais foram armazenadas por 60 dias a 30±1°C, 60±5% UR e escotofase de 24h. O desenvolvimento de R. dominica foi afetado pela utilização de doses de enxofre maiores que 3,0mg i a g-1.The laboratory rearing of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae is frequently infested by the parasite mite Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross and Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. This study was aimed at evaluating the sulfur doses, an effective acaricide against A. lacunatus, not harmful to the development of with R. dominica. The experimental units were Petri dishes containing 30g of whole wheat grains powdered with the different doses of the sulfur (0.0, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, 24.0 and 48.0mg a i g-1 infested with 30 adults of R. dominica, in ten replicates. All treatments were maintained under controlled conditions (30±1°C, 60±5% r h and 24h scotophase for 60 days after the insect infestation. Sulfur doses higher than 3.0mg a i g-1 negatively affected R. dominica development.

  4. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer.

  5. Bruchid (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) ovicidal phenylbutanoid from Zingiber purpureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, K A Nimal P; Kumar, Vijaya; Saxena, Ramesh C; Ramdas, Puthenveetil K

    2005-08-01

    The larvicidal activity of the dichloromethane extract of Zingiber purpureum Roscoe (Zingiberaceae) rhizome against the second instar of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is shown to be due to 4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)buta-1,3-diene. The diene also showed ovicidal activity against the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Most of the eggs laid by bruchids on treated cowpea seeds were transparent, and very few of them contained developing embryos. The few larvae produced from these embryos were unable to penetrate the seed coat and enter the seed. Similar effects were seen when adults were exposed to the compound and then placed on untreated cowpea seeds, suggesting that a new type of maternally mediated ovicidal effect was involved. Coated and impregnated granular formulations of the extract were evaluated for use in the control of bruchid infestation of stored cowpea seeds. Coated granules showed activity similar to that of the crude extract but were found to lose activity rapidly. Impregnated granules were found to be less active than the crude extract.

  6. Rove Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, East Malaysia

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    Fauziah Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the abundance of rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae was conducted from 15 to 28 June, 2008 at the dipterocarp forest of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, Malaysia. Collections were made at five sites namely Kawi River, Menyaring II, Satap, Begua and Joh River. A total of 175 rove beetles comprising of 17 species were sampled from all 5 sites of Lanjak Entimau. There was a high abundance (Margalef index, 3.097 and moderate diversity (Simpson diversity index, 0.798 of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau. Four species were identified to species level, Orphnebius bakerianus Motschulscky, 1858, Eleusis kraatzi LeConte, 1863, Belonuchus quadratu Nordman, 1837, Bledius gracilicornis Casey, 1889. Seven species were identified to genus level Orphnebius sp., Coproporus sp., Paederus sp1, Paederus sp2, Hesperus sp., Lispinus sp., Bledius sp. and six species could not be identified even to genus level. Six unidentified species probably new for Science. Moderate diversity and high abundance of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau are due to diverse habitats. Some differences in species sampled from peninsular Malaysia is explained in terms of isolation between Sarawak in Borneo island with peninsular Malaysia.

  7. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  8. Strategies of karyotype differentiation in Elateridae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marielle Cristina; Rosa, Simone Policena; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Costa, Cleide; Cella, Doralice Maria

    2007-01-01

    The chromosome study of five species of the family Elateridae, belonging to the subfamilies Agrypninae and Elaterinae, and the analysis of the cytogenetic data previously recorded for this family permitted the establishment of the main strategies of karyotypic differentiation that has occurred in the elaterids. In Agrypninae, the three species studied (Conoderus fuscofasciatus, Conoderus rufidens, and Conoderus sp.) showed the male karyotype 2n=16+X0. This karyotypic uniformity detected in these Conoderus species has also been shared with other species of the same genus, differing considerably from chromosomal heterogeneity verified in the subfamily Agrypninae. The use of the C-banding technique in C. fuscofasciatus and Conoderus sp. revealed constitutive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of the majority of the chromosomes. In C. fuscofasciatus, additional constitutive heterochromatin were also observed in the long arm terminal region of almost all chromosomes. Among the representatives of Elaterinae, the karyotype 2n=18+Xy(p) of Pomachilius sp.2 was similar to that verified in the majority of the Coleoptera species, contrasting with the chromosomal formula 2n=18+X0 detected in Cardiorhinus rufilateris, which is most common in the species of Elaterinae. In the majority of the elaterids, the chromosomal differentiation has frequently been driven by reduction of the diploid number; but, among the four cytogenetically examined subfamilies, there are some differences in relation to the trends of karyotypic evolution.

  9. The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina and adjacent countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Osvaldo Di; Turienzo, Paola

    2016-03-14

    The family Cavognathidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) in Argentina is represented by three species of the genus Taphropiestes Reitter, 1875: T. fusca Reitter, 1875 [Chubut], T. magna Ślipiński & Tomaszewska, 2010 [Río Negro; Chubut], and T. plaumanni Ślipiński & Tomaszewska 2010 [Buenos Aires]. A total of 2565 larvae (multiple instars), 83 pupae, 2028 live adults, and 16 dead adults of T. plaumanni were found in Argentina between 2005 and 2013 in the nests of birds representing the families Columbidae, Emberizidae, Falconidae, Furnariidae, Hirundinidae, Mimidae, Passeridae, Psittacidae, Troglodytidae and Tyrannidae. The adults were most abundant in closed mud nests of Furnarius rufus (Gmelin, 1788) [Furnariidae] and its inquiline birds, but the larvae were most abundant in wood nest boxes. When T. plaumanni was scarcely represented in bird nests from some localities, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, 1797), an exotic darkling beetle [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Tenebrioninae], and one native species, Phobelius crenatus Blanchard, 1842 [Col.: Tenebrionidae: Lagriinae], were most abundant in stick nests of Furnariidae. In contrast, when A. diaperinus and P. crenatus were absent in one locality from the province of Buenos Aires, T. plaumanni was the most abundant beetle. A complete account of data is provided for these collections of T. plaumanni in Argentina. Known distributional data for all Argentinian species of Taphropiestes are plotted on maps with biogeographical provinces indicated.

  10. Structure and development of ovaries in the weevil, Anthonomus pomorum (Coleoptera, Polyphaga). II. Germ cells of the trophic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatek, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the germ cell cluster formation in Anthonomus pomorum (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Curculionidae) has revealed that both linear and branched clones of cystocytes occur in the pupa stage. In the branched clones a poorly developed polyfusome is formed and cystocytes with maximally 3 intercellular bridges were found. In the linear clones the polyfusomes are absent. Further divisions of cystocytes produce exclusively linearly arranged cells. Just after metamorphosis (Imago-A stage), the process of the germ cell membrane reduction starts. Only 2 groups of cells retain cell membranes: i.e the most anteriorly localized group of cystocytes and the posteriorly located presumptive oocytes. The former cells divide mitotically during the summer. As a result an anterior-posterior gradient of the syncytialization process arises in the Imago-B stage (females preparing for hibernation). In the sexually mature females (Imago-C) the trophic chamber consists of a huge syncytial area with numerous nurse cell nuclei embedded in a common cytoplasm, and posteriorly located young oocytes surrounded by prefollicular cells. In the light of recent hypothesis concerning the germ cell cluster formation and telotrophy anagenesis in Polyphaga the significance of the presented results is discussed.

  11. Entomofauna Associada a Galhos de Acacia mangium Willd. Roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

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    Gláucia Cordeiro

    2010-04-01

    Abstract. The study of the insects associated with branches and stems girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman is important to know its possible natural enemies. Therefore, these work had the objective of register the insects associated with branches and stems girdled of Acacia mangium Willd. by this twig girdler beetle, in Coimbra, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Stems and branches of A. mangium were collected in January/2007 to April/2007. This material has been inspected, stored in plastic bags, and kept in a room with controlled conditions (25.4 ± 0.3°C and 66.7 ± 1.4%. It was noted the presence of a non-determined species of Scolytidae and the emergence of four species of Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus and Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. It can be concluded that studies are needed with the objective of verify the behavior of these insects in relation with twig girdler O. saga.

  12. Variação de Abundância, Diversidade Ecológica e Similaridade de Coleoptera (Insecta entre Restinga e Marisma do Estuário da Lagoa dos Patos, Rio Grande, RS

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    Katiele Dummel

    2011-07-01

    Abstract. Insecta is the most diverse, abundant and dominant group of arthropods, being used in diversity studies as biological indicators. Despite this, there are few studies regard to coleopterofauna and its relation to coastal environments. Salt marshes and sandbanks are characterized by their ecological importance of coastal regions of the southwest Atlantic. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the fauna of Coleoptera captured in a sandbank area with the fauna of a salt marsh in the estuary of the lagoon Lagoa dos Patos, RS. Samples were collected from August 2007 to July 2008 in sandbank area; and from September 2008 to August 2009 in the salt marsh area. A total of 826 beetles were collected, distributed in 26 families. The results suggest that both sandbank and salt marsh presented equally rich families, but with alternation of dominance between the areas. Coleoptera communities flutuactions in each area were different in the period; however, the peak abundance of both areas coincided with the warmer months. The diversity of families was higher in the area of sandbank, while families caught in sandbanks have greater similarity to those found in both areas. Groups classified as rare surpassed common. Families of varied habit appeared in both environments; nonetheless, the herbivorous dominated in the sandbank and carnivorous in the salt marsh.

  13. A DNA barcode library of the beetle reference collection (Insecta: Coleoptera in the National Science Museum, Korea

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    Sang Woo Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coleoptera is a group of insects that are most diverse among insect resources. Although used as indicator species and applied in developing new drugs, it is difficult to identify them quickly. Since the development of a method using mitochondrial DNA information for identification, studies have been conducted in Korea to swiftly and accurately identify species. The National Science Museum of Korea (NSMK has been collecting and morphologically identifying domestic reference insects since 2013, and building a database of DNA barcodes with digital images. The NSMK completed construction of a database of digital images and DNA barcodes of 60 beetle species in the Korean National Research Information System. A total of 179 specimens and 60 species were used for the analysis, and the averages of intraspecific and interspecific variations were 0.70±0.45% and 26.34±6.01%, respectively, with variation rates ranging from 0% to 1.45% and 9.83% to 56.23%, respectively.

  14. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  15. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera. Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Hanula, James L. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Horn, Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    2012-04-02

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  16. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, B L; Smith, S L; Brownie, C

    2013-04-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey pine and its primary insect pest. Despite the importance of P. jeffreyi, difficult terrain, environmental concerns, and lack of roads can constrain pest management activities. Semiochemicals are often easier to apply and more environmentally acceptable than other options, but they are lacking in this system. Attractants have been identified, but field bioassays have been limited because of infrequent or short duration outbreaks and a lack of beetles during nonoutbreak periods. Disruptant semiochemicals have not been assessed for D. jeffreyi during outbreak conditions; however, commercially available semiochemicals have been implicated as disruptants for this bark beetle. The objective of this study was to identify the most effective commercially available attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for D. jeffreyi. Our highest observed catch occurred with the blend of 5% 1-heptanol and 95% n-heptane. When this was used to challenge potential disruptant semiochemicals, the combination of S-(-)-verbenone and the green leaf volatile blend (cis-3-Hexenol and 1-Hexanol) reduced trap catch by ≍80%. However, frontalin was most effective, reducing the number of D. jeffreyi caught by >96%. Within each year of the study, the percentage female of D. jeffreyi caught with our attractant decreased from start to end of the experimental period. On average, our first collection in a year (mid-June to early July) was 59% female, whereas our last (mid-August) was 34%. Frontalin was equally or more effective against females (the pioneering sex) than males, providing optimism that semiochemical disruption may be possible for protecting Jeffrey pines from D

  17. Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp. (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae parasitizing Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

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    Poinar George O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While it proved to be a good biological control agent, its rapid spread and buildup of large populations made it a nuisance, since it overwinters in homes, emits unpleasant odors, stains fabrics, occasionally bites humans and feeds on apples, pears and grapes. Aside from the above, the ravenous appetite of H. axyridis results in their consumption of harmless native insects, including even other ladybird beetles. A study of the natural enemies of H. axyridis in Denmark revealed the presence of nematodes. The present study describes this nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development and ecology. Methods Adult harlequin ladybird beetles were collected from March to November from four localities in Copenhagen on different plant species. In addition, groups of last-instar larvae and pupae (n = 50 were examined for the presence of nematodes. Living and recently dead nematodes were removed from adult H. axyridis in 0.5% saline solution, the nematodes were then heat killed (at 75C, fixed in 5% formalin and transferred to glycerin on slides for further examination and measurements. Results A new species of Allantonematidae (Tylenchida, Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp., is described from adults of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis in Denmark. The new species is characterized by a straight stylet lacking basal thickenings, a bursa and a forked tail tip in the vermiform (infective females and juvenile males. The new species is compared with P. coccinellinae previously described from ladybird beetles in France. Parasitism resulted in depletion of the fat body and partial or complete atrophy of the reproductive organs of the beetles. Infections occurred throughout the year with rates of parasitism reaching up to 35%. The rate increased to 60

  18. Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp. (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae) parasitizing Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While it proved to be a good biological control agent, its rapid spread and buildup of large populations made it a nuisance, since it overwinters in homes, emits unpleasant odors, stains fabrics, occasionally bites humans and feeds on apples, pears and grapes. Aside from the above, the ravenous appetite of H. axyridis results in their consumption of harmless native insects, including even other ladybird beetles. A study of the natural enemies of H. axyridis in Denmark revealed the presence of nematodes. The present study describes this nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development and ecology. Methods Adult harlequin ladybird beetles were collected from March to November from four localities in Copenhagen on different plant species. In addition, groups of last-instar larvae and pupae (n = 50) were examined for the presence of nematodes. Living and recently dead nematodes were removed from adult H. axyridis in 0.5% saline solution, the nematodes were then heat killed (at 75C), fixed in 5% formalin and transferred to glycerin on slides for further examination and measurements. Results A new species of Allantonematidae (Tylenchida), Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp., is described from adults of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis in Denmark. The new species is characterized by a straight stylet lacking basal thickenings, a bursa and a forked tail tip in the vermiform (infective) females and juvenile males. The new species is compared with P. coccinellinae previously described from ladybird beetles in France. Parasitism resulted in depletion of the fat body and partial or complete atrophy of the reproductive organs of the beetles. Infections occurred throughout the year with rates of parasitism reaching up to 35%. The rate increased to 60% when field

  19. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRISNANDARI TITIK MARYATI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2009. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Bioteknologi 6: 80-87. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter morfologi hanya satu spesies yaitu Holotrichia sp. Karakter pola pita protein sampel lundi putih dari Sleman dan Magelang mempunyai perbedaan jumlah pita protein dan berat molekulnya.

  20. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern

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    SUGIYARTO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. This research aims to find out the white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera variability based on the morphological characteristic and protein banding pattern found in ”salak pondoh” farm in Regencies of Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang, Central Java. Each area has five sampling points. Morphological analysis on white grub was conducted using descriptive method and analysis on protein banding pattern was conducted using qualitative analysis based on the presence or absent of band pattern on the gel, and qualitatively based on the relative mobility value (Rf of protein. The result indicated that the white grub in Sleman and Magelang, based on morphology characteristic is only one species, namely Holothricia sp. Based on the protein banding pattern, the white grub sample have differences of protein band number and protein molecular weight. Key words: Salacca zalacca, white grub, morphology, protein banding pattern.Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter

  1. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Romo; Morrone, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae) y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus). Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de...

  2. A checklist of the genus Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae of the world

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    G. Mahendiran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae comprising 101 species with their updated nomenclature, synonyms and distribution is given. The distribution pattern indicates that the genus is diversified mostly in the Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia regions. Out of 101 species, 92 occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. From India, eight species were recorded. In India, the distribution is mainly in West Bengal, Assam, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

  3. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about ...

  4. Sobre la presencia de Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846 en los Pirineos (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae, Catopini

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    Fresneda, J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On the presence of Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846 in the Pyrenees (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, Cholevinae, Catopini We provide new distribution data for Catops subfuscus Kellner, 1846. We update the geonemy of the species and, based on recent data, we confirm its presence in the subterranean environment on both sides of the Pyrenean massif. Illustrations of the aedeagus and a distribution map are provided.

  5. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae

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    Anelia M. Stojanova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are presented.

  6. A New Seed Beetle Species to the Bulgarian Fauna: Bruchidius siliquastri, Delobel (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Anelia M. Stojanova; Zoltán György; Zoltán László

    2011-01-01

    A seed beetle Bruchidius siliquastri DELOBEL, 2007 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was reared from ripe pods of Cercis siliquastrum (Fabaceae) in Bulgaria and this is the first record of the species to the Bulgarian fauna. New host plants of the bruchid species were established on the basis of material collected in Hungary: Cercis occidentalis, Cercis chinensis and Cercis griffithii. A rich hymenopteran complex associated with the seed beetle was reared and comments on it are prese...

  7. New species and records of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) from Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Pérez, Roberto; Morón, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-28

    Two new species of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from Bolivia are described and illustrated: M. megaphyllus new species (from Comarapa, Santa Cruz and Sehuenca, Cochabamba) and M. yunganus new species (from Mairana and Comarapa, Santa Cruz). In addition, the species Macrodactylus bolivianus Moser, M. gracilis Moser, and M. nobilis Frey are redescribed and illustrated to help facilitate identification of these species. A key to the 10 species of Macrodactylus presently known from Bolivia is provided. 

  8. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred; Palmquist,Debra

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about a...

  9. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Fred J.; Debra E. Palmquist

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about ...

  10. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

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    PAULA A. SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  11. Tiger Beetles' (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) pupal stage: current state of knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, André S; Mermudes, José R M

    2017-01-26

    The tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) include about 2,822 species and 120 genera around the world. They are one of the most widely studied families of Coleoptera. However, the knowledge about their immature stages is incipient and usually restricted to the larval stages. Pupal characteristics have been among the most ignored aspects of tiger beetle biology. Here we compile and update the current knowledge of tiger beetle pupae.

  12. Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia Mauruto Chernaki-Leffer; Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez; Lúcia M. de Almeida; Ivani de Oliveira Negrão Lopes

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil. The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer), is an important insect pest in poultry houses in Brazil. Susceptibility of the lesser mealworm collected from eight poultry houses in Paraná state, southern Brazil, was evaluated for cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron. Adult A. diaperinus were tested in bioassays with cypermethrin and dichlorvo...

  13. Kuršių nerijos nacionalinio parko vabalai (Coleoptera): sistema, fauna ir ekologija

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenca, Romas

    2005-01-01

    The results of faunistical and ecological research on beetles (Coleoptera) of Curonian Spit were presented in this work. A species composition of different habitats: Baltic sea coastal area and the foredune ridge,wooded dunes, humid dune slacks, white and grey dunes and Curonian lagoons was established on the basis of research. The greatest species diversity was established in humid dune slacks (234 species), the lowest species diversity was established eudominant, dominant, subdominant an...

  14. The Alticini (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae) of Sicily: Recent records and updated checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Cosimo Baviera; Maurizio Biondi

    2015-01-01

    This paper compiles an updated checklist of the Sicilian flea beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini) by a critical bibliographic screening and adding new material, mainly collected by the first author in the last few decades. The data provided expand the known distribution of many poorly known species in Sicily. An updated checklist of the species recorded from the island, including those based on unpublished data or extracted from recently examined material, is sup...

  15. Development of Steinernema feltiae (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae in larvae of Chaetonyx robustus (Coleoptera: Orphnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Gradinarov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev, 1934 infects and reproduces in larvae of Chaetonyx robustus Schaum, 1862 (Coleoptera: Orphnidae, isolated from soil of the same habitat. Insects of the family Orphnidae are reported for the first time as hosts of entomopathogenic nematodes. Lack of establishment of natural infected larvae may be due to the lower susceptibility of C. robustus to nematode invasion and random factors related to the spatial distribution of infective juveniles in soil.

  16. Wireworms’ Management: An Overview of the Existing Methods, with Particular Regards to Agriotes spp. (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Barsics

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae are important soil dwelling pests worldwide causing yield losses in many crops. The progressive restrictions in the matter of efficient synthetic chemicals for health and environmental care brought out the need for alternative management techniques. This paper summarizes the main potential tools that have been studied up to now and that could be applied together in integrated pest management systems and suggests guidelines for future research.

  17. New distribution record of Cybocephalus kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Curbelo-Rodríguez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New distribution record of Cybocephalus Kathrynae (Coleoptera, Cybocephalidae on Mona Island, Puerto Rico. A new record of Cybocephalus kathrynae T.R. Smith (Cybocephalidae is reported for Puerto Rico. Adults were collected from the flowers of Mammillaria nivosa (Cactaceae on Mona Island Reserve. Prior to this study, this beetle species was only reported for Monroe and Miami-Dade Counties, Florida, USA.

  18. Species of beetles (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae associated to banana (Musa spp. in Ceballos, Ciego de Avila, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Sisne Luis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A white light trap was placed in bananas plantations, according to Sisne, 2009 and MINAG, 1985, in the Citric enterprise of Ciego de Ávila during the period between May and July of 2010 with the objective of determining the composition of genus and species of the order Coleoptera family Scarabaeidae associated to the agroecosystem. The species Cyclocephala cubana Chapin, Phyllophaga puberula Duval, and Phyllophaga patruelis Chev. are associated to bananas crops in these areas.

  19. Novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae da Bolívia

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    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas da Bolívia, Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.New species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae from Bolivia. New species described from Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.

  20. Occurrence of Faustinus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Southeastern Brazil tomato crops

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    Gustavo Dias de Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of Faustinus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. plantations in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil, was confirmed through field observations carried out between April 2006 and March 2008. Larvae of Faustinus sp. bore the stems of tomato plants, whereas adults feed on the leaves. Bored stems are then easily broken by the wind, by manual handling or by plant weight itself. Crop rotation and removal of crop residues may help reduce pest population levels.

  1. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2015-04-01

    Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde.

  3. Walking Responses of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to Its Aggregation Pheromone and Odors of Wheat Infestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, B J; Cai, L; Faucher, C; Michie, M; Berna, A; Ren, Y; Anderson, A; Chyb, S; Xu, W

    2017-03-03

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is a worldwide pest of stored grains. Using "Y"-tube olfactometry we studied the response of T. castaneum to odors from simulated wheat infestations containing conspecifics, and infestations containing the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and the granary weevil Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Tribolium castaneum larvae were significantly attracted to odors from all three test species. Tribolium castaneum adults were attracted to grains infested by R. dominica and flour infested by T. castaneum but repelled from grains infested by S. granarius. Further behavioral analysis with pheromones showed that T. castaneum were significantly attracted to their aggregation pheromone, dimethyldecanal (DMD), but not to the R. dominica aggregation pheromone, a mixture of dominicalure 1 and 2. Female T. castaneum adults were attracted to ∼50-fold less DMD than larvae and 100-fold less than male adults, suggesting they are more sensitive to DMD. This study improves our understanding of T. castaneum behaviors to infested grain volatile compounds and pheromones, and may help develop new control methods for grain pest species.

  4. Espécies de Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini ocorrentes na Bolívia Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia

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    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia. The genus Gorybia (Cerambycinae, Piezocerini consists of 45 described species with seven species recorded from Bolivia. Nine new species are described herein from Bolivia: G. abnormalis sp. nov.; G. alveolata sp. nov.; G. asyka sp. nov.; G. florida sp. nov.; G. inarmata sp. nov.; G. longithorax sp. nov.; G. guenda sp. nov.; G. tuberosa sp. nov. and G. wappesi sp. nov. A key to the species now known to occur in Bolivia is included.

  5. Oxylopsebus brachypterus: a new genus and species of Oxycoleini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae from Bolivia

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    Robin O. S. Clarke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylopsebus brachypterus new genus and species from humid tropical forest, Department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia is described and illustrated. Although with reduced elytra, the genus is placed in Oxycoleini based on the following characters: female urosternites modified, the first as long as the second to fourth together, the second with a brush for covering the eggs with detritus after being laid; the male with six visible urosternites, the first twice as long as the second; eyes with superior lobes; prothorax divergent behind, disc of pronotum with calli; procoxal cavities closed behind. Oxylopsebus gen. nov. would seem to fall between the Oxycoleini and Psebiini and be less closely related to the Obriini and Luscosmodicini, the four tribes in which the females have modified urosternites (the " Obriini group" sensu Martins, 2003. All the specimens were netted as they visited flowers of the vine Serjania lethalis (Sapindaceae.Oxylopsebus brachypterus, um novo gênero e espécie de Oxycoleini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae da Bolívia. Oxylopsebus brachypterus, gênero e espécie nova do bosque tropical úmido do Departamento de Santa Cruz, Bolívia, são descritos e ilustrados. Embora com élitros reduzidos, o gênero é incluído em Oxycoleini com base nos seguintes caracteres: urosternitos modificados nas fêmeas, primeiro tão longo quanto o segundo ao quarto somados, o segundo com uma escova de pêlos para cobrir com detritos os ovos recém-postos; abdome dos machos com seis urosternitos visíveis, o primeiro com o dobro do comprimento do segundo; lobos superiores dos olhos presentes; protórax divergente posteriormente, disco do pronotum com calos; cavidades procoxais fechadas posteriormente. Oxylopsebus gen. nov. parece se incluir entre Oxycoleini e Psebiini e ser menos próximo a Obriini e Luscosmodicini. Nestas quatro tribos, as fêmeas têm urosternitos modificados (" grupo Obriini" sensu Martins, 2003. Todos os espécimes foram

  6. 微流控芯片技术用于三种小蠹COⅠ-COⅡ区的PCR-RFLP分析%Analysis of PCR-RFLP data on the COⅠ-COⅡ gene of three bark beetle species (Coleoptera : Scolytidae) by microfluidics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙霞; 李惠萍; 裴雁曦

    2012-01-01

    PCR-RFLP was used to amplify and analyze the COⅠ -COⅡ genes in the mtDNA of Dendroctonus valens LeConte, Hylurgops longipilis Reiher and Ips acuminatus Gyllenhal. Specific restriction enzymes were screened by comparison of restriction recognition sites. The amplified gene fragments could be analyzed quickly by microfluidics following enzyme digestion. The results indicate that this technique can accurately and rapidly identify these three beetle species.%本研究运用PCR-RFLP对红脂大小蠹Dendroctonus valens LeConte、长毛干小蠹Hylurgops longipilis Reiher 和六齿小蠹Ips acuminatus Gyllenhal mtDNA的COⅠ-COⅡ基因进行扩增.通过酶切位点的分析比较,筛选特异性的内切酶,结合微流控芯片技术对酶切产物进行快速检测.建立3种小蠹的准确、快速区分鉴定方法.

  7. Anatomical characteristics in xylem tissue of Pinus armandi infected by the bark beetle Dendroctonus armandi(Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and its associated blue-stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica%华山松大小蠹及其伴生蓝变真菌对华山松木质部危害的解剖学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢寿安; 吕淑杰; Axel SHOPF2; 丁彦; 侯秋实; 李彩棉

    2008-01-01

    为揭示华山松大小蠹和伴生蓝变真菌引起秦岭华山松枯萎的机制,选择秦岭北坡沣峪林场境35年树龄的健康华山松Pinus armandi为研究对象,对接种华山松大小蠹Dendroctonus armandi及与其伴生的蓝变真菌Ceratocystis polonica引起的寄主树木木质部形态变化进行了解剖观察.结果表明:接种致病性蓝变真菌C.polonica 1周后的4株华山松的木质部组织内,蓝变区域显著增加.4~6周后蓝变区域不再增加;而在接种无菌琼脂的2株对照华山松的木质部组织内,没有检测到蓝变区域.研究结果提示蓝变真菌C.polonica,是致死秦岭华山松的重要病原菌,该伴生菌随华山松大小蠹入侵健康寄主华山松木质部组织,在木质部定居并分解木质部,堵塞树脂道,致使寄主华山松树脂代谢和水分代谢紊乱.该研究结果表明,虽然华山松大小蠹长期以来被认为是致死华山松的毁灭性小蠹虫,但是其共生蓝变真菌C.polonnica对成熟华山松的致害作用不应该被忽视.

  8. 红脂大小蠹后肠挥发性物质的鉴定、触角电位和室内趋向实验%Identification and electroantennal olfactory and behavioral tests of hindgut-produced volatiles of the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte( Coleoptera:Scolytidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫争亮; 方宇凌; 孙江华; 张钟宁

    2004-01-01

    对外来松树害虫红脂大小蠹Dendroctonus valens LeConte的信息化学物质进行了研究.通过GC-MS测定,鉴定出红脂大小蠹后肠挥发性物质中,除了含有松树挥发性物质α-蒎烯、β-蒎烯、3-蒈烯、月桂烯和柠檬烯外,还含有马鞭草烯醇和马鞭草烯酮;利用触角电位技术,对马鞭草烯醇、马鞭草烯酮以及在林间引诱效果最好的3-(+)-蒈烯进行了触角电生理测试;利用Y-型双向选择嗅觉仪对这些物质进行了室内趋向实验.实验结果表明:1 μg的马鞭草烯醇、马鞭草烯酮和3-(+)-蒈烯引起雌雄触角的电位反应分别达416 μV/470 μV、597 μV/630 μV和926 μV/1 099 μV.浓度为1 μL/mL的马鞭草烯酮引起红脂大小蠢的正趋向反应,而在100 μL/mL浓度下引起红脂大小蠹的负趋向反应;在1 μL/mL的浓度下,3-(+)-蒈烯引起了红脂大小蠹正趋向反应,而马鞭草烯醇则对红脂大小蠹具有驱避作用,说明这些物质在红脂大小蠹搜寻寄主和调节虫口密度方面起着重要作用.

  9. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S.; Bilton, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this

  10. Self-selection of two diet components by Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae and its impact on fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramos, J A; Rojas, M G; Shapiro-Ilan, D I; Tedders, W L

    2011-10-01

    We studied the ability of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to self-select optimal ratios of two dietary components to approach nutritional balance and maximum fitness. Relative consumption of wheat bran and dry potato flakes was determined among larvae feeding on four different ratios of these components (10, 20, 30, and 40% potato). Groups of early instars were provided with a measured amount of food and the consumption of each diet component was measured at the end of 4 wk and again 3 wk later. Consumption of diet components by T. molitor larvae deviated significantly from expected ratios indicating nonrandom self-selection. Mean percentages of dry potato consumed were 11.98, 19.16, 19.02, and 19.27% and 11.89, 20.48, 24.67, and 25.97% during the first and second experimental periods for diets with 10, 20, 30, and 40% potato, respectively. Life table analysis was used to determine the fitness of T. molitor developing in the four diet mixtures in a no-choice experiment. The diets were compared among each other and a control diet of wheat bran only. Doubling time was significantly shorter in groups consuming 10 and 20% potato than the control and longer in groups feeding on 30 and 40% potato. The self-selected ratios of the two diet components approached 20% potato, which was the best ratio for development and second best for population growth. Our findings show dietary self-selection behavior in T. molitor larvae, and these findings may lead to new methods for optimizing dietary supplements for T. molitor.

  11. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S; Bilton, David T

    2016-01-01

    Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this biodiverse

  12. Alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus-Ramos, Rafael; Ventura, Daniel; Bensusan, Keith; Coello-García, Pedro; György, Zoltán; Stojanova, Anelia

    2014-07-01

    Under the framework of the DAISIE consortium, whose main mission is to make an inventory of the alien invasive species of Europe and its islands, we review the current state of knowledge and provide an up-to-date catalogue and distributional status for alien seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Europe. This work is based on studies of the species detected from the last century to the present, but with greater emphasis on the beginning of the 21st century, during which new biological studies have been carried out and findings made in European countries. The main objective of this paper is to focus on this last fact, which has promoted new views on the existing and potential threat of exotic bruchids in relation to climate change. This must now be regarded as a matter of concern for European agricultural and environmental policies. Only species of exotic origin introduced in European regions outside their native range were considered. Therefore, species of European origin spreading to new countries within Europe are not treated. Also, we provide a new approach to classifying alien seed beetle species according to their ability to become established, distinguishing between the well-established and those that may appear in seed stores but are not capable of invading natural and agricultural ecosystems. We present a taxonomic characterization of the alien bruchids found in Europe, providing an illustrated key based on external morphological characters of adults. The key facilitates the identification of the sixteen most frequently recorded genera, which represent 37 of the 42 species of exotic species recorded in Europe up to the present, whether established, not established or occasional. Finally, we provide a summary of the state of knowledge of the taxonomy and biology of the 20 most worrying species as pests, both established and non-established. This includes, where appropriate, an illustrated key for the identification of species. The study

  13. Evaluation of Standard Loose Plastic Packaging for the Management of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebriondiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Waqar; Gulraize; Ali, Usman; Ur Rehman, Fazal; Najeeb, Hafsa; Sohail, Maryam; Irsa, Bakhtawar; Muzaffar, Zubaria; Chaudhry, Muhammad Shafiq

    2016-01-01

    Three standard foodstuff plastic packaging namely polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were evaluated for management of lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Resistance parameters in packaging were recorded as punctures, holes, penetrations, sealing defects, and invasions with two thicknesses and tested for two lengths of time. Damages like punctures, holes and penetrations by both insects were more in PE packaging however R. dominica made more penetrations in PP than in PE. For both insects sealing defects and invasions were predominant in PVC than in others. Thickness did not affect significantly damage types but significantly more holes and penetrations by R. dominica were in less thickness. Punctures and holes by R. dominica were more after less time period but other damages in packaging were more after more time period. However for T. castaneum all sorts of damages were seen more after more time period. Overall categorization between two insects showed R. dominica made more penetrations and T. castaneum made more invasions compared with their counterparts. Pictures were taken under camera fitted microscope to magnify punctures and holes in different packaging and thicknesses. Insect mortality due to phosphine was more in PP and PE packaging and least in PVC packaging and thickness effect was marginal. T. castaneum mortality was significantly more after 48 h than after 24 h. Damages extent in packaging and fumigation results showed PP to be the best of three packaging materials to manage these insects.

  14. Evaluation of Standard Loose Plastic Packaging for the Management of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebriondiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Waqar; Gulraize; Ali, Usman; Ur Rehman, Fazal; Najeeb, Hafsa; Sohail, Maryam; Irsa, Bakhtawar; Muzaffar, Zubaria; Chaudhry, Muhammad Shafiq

    2016-01-01

    Three standard foodstuff plastic packaging namely polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyvinylchloride (PVC) were evaluated for management of lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Resistance parameters in packaging were recorded as punctures, holes, penetrations, sealing defects, and invasions with two thicknesses and tested for two lengths of time. Damages like punctures, holes and penetrations by both insects were more in PE packaging however R. dominica made more penetrations in PP than in PE. For both insects sealing defects and invasions were predominant in PVC than in others. Thickness did not affect significantly damage types but significantly more holes and penetrations by R. dominica were in less thickness. Punctures and holes by R. dominica were more after less time period but other damages in packaging were more after more time period. However for T. castaneum all sorts of damages were seen more after more time period. Overall categorization between two insects showed R. dominica made more penetrations and T. castaneum made more invasions compared with their counterparts. Pictures were taken under camera fitted microscope to magnify punctures and holes in different packaging and thicknesses. Insect mortality due to phosphine was more in PP and PE packaging and least in PVC packaging and thickness effect was marginal. T. castaneum mortality was significantly more after 48 h than after 24 h. Damages extent in packaging and fumigation results showed PP to be the best of three packaging materials to manage these insects. PMID:27638958

  15. Comparative Growth and Survival of Hylurgus ligniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Reared on Artificial or Natural Diet at 15 or 25°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, C M; Bader, M K-F; Pawson, S M

    2016-02-01

    Two saproxylic forest insects, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Mulsant)(Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), were reared on artificial or natural diet at 15 or 25°C to compare larval growth rates and survival. A significant diet by temperature interaction was observed in the growth of H. ligniperda larvae,which developed faster when reared on natural diet at 15°C, but grew faster and pupated significantly earlier when reared on artificial diet at 25°C. However, H. ligniperda survival by the end of the experiment was low on both diets when reared at 25°C (10.1%, 95% CI: 5.2–15.1%), which suggests that rearing at lower temperatures may be required. A. ferus larvae gained significantly larger body size when reared on artificial diet than on natural diet at both temperatures. Survival of A. ferus reared on artificial diet was significantly lower than larvae reared on natural diet at 25°C. The significant differences between A. ferus larval development rates when reared on artificial and natural diets preclude the use of artificial diet to collect meaningful data to construct temperature development models for ecological comparisons. Artificial diet provided a suitable medium for mass production of individuals for research purposes, e.g., test mortality in response to treatments. However, additional rearing studies are needed to determine whether the larger artificially reared larvae result in adults that are healthier, more productive, and live longer.

  16. Key to larvae of the South American subfamilies of weevils (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea Clave para larvas de las subfamilias sudamericanas de gorgojos (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA E. MARVALDI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from South America are classsified into seven families and 28 subfamilies as follows: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae and Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae and Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae and Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae and Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae and Platypodinae. A dichotomous key for the larval stage is provided for identification of the families and subfamilies of Curculionoidea present in South America. The key is based on external morphological characters and contains data on larval feeding habitsLos gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea de Sudamérica están clasificados en siete familias y 28 subfamilias como se muestra a continuación: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae y Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae y Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae y Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae y Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae y Platypodinae. Se brinda una clave dicotómica para el estado de larva de Curculionoidea en Sudamérica, para su determinación a nivel de familias y subfamilias. La clave está basada sobre caracteres morfológicos externos y se presentan además datos de hábitos alimentarios

  17. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de las 5 especies de curculiónidos asociados con agaves. Se establecen las siguientes sinonimias: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; y Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891 y Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated with agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae from Mexico are analyzed. Five species were recorded associated with species of Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes, and Yucca. Four of these species belong to the subfamily Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis, and Cactophagus spinolae and 1 belongs to the subfamily Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Diagnoses, illustrations and a key are presented for identifying the 5 species of weevils found on agaves. The following synonymies are established: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; and Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891, and Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.

  18. Acoustic Detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) Trees and Offshoots in Saudi Arabian Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, R W; Al-Ayedh, H Y; Aldryhim, Y; Rohde, B

    2016-04-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal tissue-feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect; consequently, infestations may remain hidden until they are widespread in an orchard. Infested trees and propagable offshoots that develop from axillary buds on the trunk frequently are transported inadvertently to previously uninfested areas. Acoustic methods can be used for scouting and early detection of R. ferrugineus, but until now have not been tested on multiple trees and offshoots in commercial date palm orchard environments. For this report, the acoustic detectability of R. ferrugineus was assessed in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards in the presence of commonly occurring wind, bird noise, machinery noise, and nontarget insects. Signal analyses were developed to detect R. ferrugineus and another insect pest, Oryctes elegans Prell (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), frequently co-occurring in the orchards, and discriminate both from background noise. In addition, it was possible to distinguish R. ferrugineus from O. elegans in offshoots by differences in the temporal patterns of their sound impulses. As has been observed often with other insect pests, populations of the two species appeared clumped rather than uniform or random. The results are discussed in relation to development of automated methods that could assist orchard managers in quickly identifying infested trees and offshoots so that R. ferrugineus infestations can be targeted and the likelihood of transferring infested offshoots to uninfested areas can be reduced.

  19. Phylogeny of the genus Yumtaax Boucher (Coleoptera, Passalidae, Proculini: Taxonomic and evolutionary implications with descriptions of three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fernando Beza-Beza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yumtaax Boucher (Coleoptera: Passalidae is an endemic genus from the temperate sierras of Mexico and includes six narrowly distributed species. Yumtaax species have been assigned to several genera of Passalidae throughout history, and a phylogenetic approach is necessary to understand species delimitation and interspecific relationships. This study reconstructed the molecular phylogeny of six Yumtaax morphotypes using parsimony and Bayesian analysis of DNA sequence data from the ribosomal nuclear gene region 28S and the mitochondrial gene regions 12S and cytochrome oxidase I (COI in addition to morphological characters. Analyses recovered two well-supported Yumtaax clades (the Yumtaax laticornis and Yumtaax imbellis clades that are possible sister lineages. One synapomorphic morphological character state and the geographic isolation of the group provide corroborative evidence for monophyly. Molecular phylogenetic analyses and traditional morphological examinations also resulted in the discovery of two undescribed Yumtaax species and the discovery of two separate evolutionary lineages (cryptic species within Yumtaax recticornis. As a result we describe three new species (Yumtaax veracrucensis Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., Yumtaax cameliae Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., and Yumtaax jimenezi Beza-Beza, Reyes-Castillo & Jameson, sp. n., redescribe two species (Yumtaax recticornis [Burmeister 1847] and Yumtaax laticornis [Truqui 1857], and provide a key to all nine Yumtaax species. This study is one of two studies to use molecular data to evaluate the evolutionary relationships of a genus of Bess Beetles (Passalidae, an ecologically important insect group exhibiting low morphological variability and heretofore lacking molecular phylogenetic study.

  20. Influence of age and diet on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gómez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of age and feeding on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae, a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae was investigated in the laboratory. Groups of female parasitoids were subject to the following treatments: a group fed during one, five and ten days after emergence of adults with coffee borer larvae; another group fed only with honey solution during five days after emergence; and as a control, a third group was kept without food for five days. At the end of each treatment, survivorship, parasitoid activity (walking and flying capacity in an arena, search capacity for finding coffee borer-infested berries, host feeding and oviposition (on immature hosts, were assessed. Unfed females showed a significant decrease in survivorship compared to individuals that were fed. The type of meal (insects or honey did not significantly influence parasitoid activity, search and oviposition capacities. Females fed with honey solution significantly consumed less immature coffee borers. Younger females (one day old walked and flew out of the arena significantly faster than older ones (5 and 10 days old. Implications of these results are discussed on the performance of C. stephanoderis as a biological control agent of the coffee berry borer.

  1. Un nuevo Trechus (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechini hipogeo de la Sierra de Parapanda (Andalucía, España: taxonomía, sistemática y biología

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    Ortuño, V. M.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new hypogean Trechus (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechini from Sierra de Parapanda (Andalucía, España: taxonomy, systematics and biology Sampling of arthropod fauna by pitfall traps in the cavern ‘Sima de San Rafael’ in Íllora (Granada, Spain has revealed a new carabid beetle species, Trechus parapandus n. sp., with remarkable troglobiomorphic characteristics: eyes visible only as scars, depigmentation, and elongation of antennae and legs. In consonance with these characteristics, this new species, Trechus parapandus n. sp. is absent in the upper region of the cave. The species belongs to the Trechus fulvus species group (that has five species in Andalusia according to the characteristics of both male and female genitalia. Study of the fauna in the cave suggests that Collembola might be the prey of this new species since they are the most abundant group and have a coincidental phenology. A key for the 11 Trechus species present in Andalusia is provided.

  2. New myrmecomorphous longhorned beetles from Haiti and the Dominican Republic with a key to Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini of Hispaniola (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    First records of the tribes Anaglyptini and Tillomorphini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) are documented for Hispaniola. A new genus of highly myrmecomorphic longhorned beetle (Licracantha, new genus) is described and illustrated based on one species (Licracantha formicaria, new species) a...

  3. Leaf beetles are ant-nest beetles: the curious life of the juvenile stages of case-bearers (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cryptocephalinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although some species of Cryptocephalinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) have been documented with ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) for almost 200 years, information on this association is fragmentary. This contribution synthesizes scattered literature to determine the patterns in ant host use. Some degr...

  4. The influence of vegetation and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy farmland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgio, G.; Sommaggio, D.; Marini, M.; Chiarucci, A.; Landi, S.; Fabbri, R.; Pesarini, F.; Genghini, M.; Ferrari, R.; Muzzi, E.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Masetti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera:

  5. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  6. Development and characterization of 11 microsatellite markers in the root-gall-forming weevil, Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host race of Ceutorhynchus assimilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that specifically develops on Lepidium draba (Brassicales: Brassicaceae), an invasive weed in North America, is being considered for use as a biocontrol agent. Because there are other races that attack other plants, it is important...

  7. Description and phylogeny of a new microsporidium from the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1766 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes a new genus and species of microsporidia which is a pathogen of the elm leaf beetle, Xanthogaleruca luteola Muller, 1776 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The beetles were collected from Istanbul in Turkey. All developmental stages are uninucleate and in direct contact with the host ...

  8. Behavioral responses of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to different enantiomer concentrations and blends of the synthetic aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host plant odors are important for insect location of food and mates. Synergy between host plant odors and aggregation pheromones occurs in many Curculionidae species. The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Males produce t...

  9. Nuevos datos de distribución de los Cholevinae hipogeos del Atlas marroquí (Coleoptera, Leiodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresneda, J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available New distribution data for the hypogean Cholevinae from the Moroccan Atlas (Coleoptera, Leiodidae The authors report new findings on the distribution of Speonemadus maroccanus (Jeannel, 1936, Nargus (Demochrus rufipennis (Lucas, 1846, Choleva (Choleva kocheri Henrot, 1962 and Catops fuscus fuscoides Reitter, 1909. The geonemy of these species is updated and the research is illustrated with maps of their distribution.

  10. From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most devastating insect pest of coffee throughout the world. The insect is endemic to Africa but can now be found throughout nearly all coffee producing countries. One area of the basic biology of the insec...

  11. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Reichert; M.T. Johnson; E. Chacon; R.S. Anderson; T.A. Wheeler

    2010-01-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil...

  12. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sex

  13. Effect of temperature on reproduction and embryonic development of the cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L., (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Helle; Sørensen, Helle; Bligaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of winter oilseed rape. Despite the importance of this pest, detailed information on reproduction to predict risk of crop damage is lacking. This study investigates the effect of temperature...

  14. Book review: Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book entitled Leaf and Seed Beetles of South Carolina (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae and Orsodacnidae), by J. C. Ciegler. (246 pages, 324 black and white illustrations, 8.5 “ x 11"; ISBN 0-9753471-8-7. Forty dollars, paperback. Biota of South Carolina. Volume 5. Clemson University, Clemson, S. ...

  15. Biology and natural enemies of Agrilus fleischeri (Coleoptera:Buprestidae), a newly emerging destructive buprestid pest in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The jewel beetle Agrilus fleischeri Obenberger (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a newly emerging major pest of poplar trees (Populus spp.) in northeast China and is responsible for the poplar mortality throughout its distribution range. In order to determine how to manage this pest effectively, we stud...

  16. Microcenoscelis n. gen. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Ulomini) from tropical Africa, with description of a blind species from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawaller, Wolfgang

    2015-10-05

    Microcenoscelis n. gen. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Ulomini) caeca n. sp. is described from Zimbabwe, a small and completely blind species. A second known species, however with completely developed eyes, and originally described as Uloma minuscula Ardoin, 1969, was also placed in the new genus. Microcenoscelis n. gen. seems to be mostly related to the genera Cenoscelis Wollaston, 1867, and Cneocnemis Gebien, 1914.

  17. Veranderingen in de lijst van Nederlandse snuitkevers: Simo hirticornis vervalt voor onze fauna en S. variegates wordt toegevoegd (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, T.

    2002-01-01

    Changes to the Dutch list of weevils: Simo hirticornis to be deleted and S. variegatus to be added (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Some years ago Palm (1995) discovered that the weevil ‘Simo hirticornis’ was a mixture of two species: S. hirticornis en S. variegatus. Dutch material from institutional co

  18. Biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in China, a promising biological control agent of Chinese privet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Z Zhang; J. Sun; J.L. Hanula

    2009-01-01

    The biology and life history of Argopistes tsekooni Chen (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential biological control agent of Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., was studied under laboratory and outdoor conditions in Huangshan City of Anhui Province, China, in 2006. A. tsekooni larvae are leafminers that...

  19. Seasonal flight activity and distribution of metallic woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) collected in North Carolina and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallic wood boring insects (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) species are responsible for high levels of host plant injury to deciduous shade and flowering trees in commercial nurseries, urban forests, and managed landscapes. Ornamental plant producers in the southeastern U.S. have ranked borers, includin...

  20. Het lieveheersbeestje Harmonia axyridis in Nederland: een aanwinst voor onze fauna of een ongewenste indringer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, J.; Heijerman, Th.; Wielink, van P.; Loomans, A.

    2004-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis in the Netherlands: a gain for the fauna or an unwanted intruder (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)? The coccinellid Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773), a well-known aphid predator originating from Asia, was found for the first time in the Netherlands (Heilige Landstichting near Nijmegen) i

  1. Adult survival of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), on diets of whiteflies, honeydew and honey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a predator that is commercially sold for the management of whiteflies. A study was conducted to assay the effect of selected diets on the survival of adult D. catlinae. Treatments of water (as a control), 10% honey, honeydew, and whiteflie...

  2. Verification of a useful character for separating the sexes of the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.W. Coleman; S.J. Seybold

    2010-01-01

    The goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a new threat to several native oak species in California (CA) (Coleman & Seybold 2008a, b). The beetle larvae feed in and damage the outer xylem, cambium, and phloem of coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia Née (Fagaceae),...

  3. Redescrição e transferência do gênero Fregolia Gounelle, 1911 para Callidiopini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ricardo M. Mermudes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Redescription and transference of the genus Fregolia Gounelle, 1911 to Callidiopini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. The genus Fregolia is transferred from Cleomenini Lacordaire, 1869 to Callidiopini Lacordaire, 1869. The genus and its type species, Fregolia listropteroides Gounelle, 1911, the only known species to the genus, are redescribed including characters of the mouth pieces, endosternites, wing venation, and male and female terminalia.

  4. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) Invasion in Eastern U.S. Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.H. Koch; W.D. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a signiÞcant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. SpeciÞcally, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia...

  5. Self-selection of two diet components by Tennebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae and its impact on fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied the ability of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to self-select optimal ratios of two dietary components to approach nutritional balance and maximum fitness. Life table analysis was used to determine the fitness of T. molitor developing in diet mixtures comprised of four dif...

  6. Developmental plasticity in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): Analysis of Instar Variation in Number and Development Time under Different Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The variation in instar number and the pattern of sequential instar development time of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied under 4 different diet regimes. Addition of dietary supplements consisting of dry potato or a mix of dry potato and dry egg whites significantly reduced...

  7. The historical role of Ips hauseri (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the spruce forest of Ile-Alatausky and Medeo National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Mukhamadiev; A. Lynch; C. O' Connor; A. Sagitov; N. Ashikbaev; I. Panyushkina

    2014-01-01

    On 17 May and 27 June 2011 severe cyclonic storms damaged several hundred hectares of spruce forest (Picea schrenkiana) in the Tian Shan Mountains. Bark beetle populations increased rapidly in dead and damaged trees, particularly Ips hauseri, I. typographus, I. sexdentatus, and Piiyogenesperfossus (all Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and there is concern about the...

  8. Release and distribution of Lilioceris cheni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of air potato (Dioscorea bulbilfera: Dioscoreaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 2012 to 2015, 429,668 Lilioceris cheni Gressit and Kimoto (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were released in Florida for biological control of air potato [Dioscorea bulbilfera L. (Dioscoreaceae)]. The spatial distribution of releases was highly aggregated, with several areas of high density releases ...

  9. Records of unsuccessful attack by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on broadleaf trees of questionable suitability in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery of the non-native Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Ontario, Canada, in 2003 led to the implementation of an eradication program. The plan consisted of removing all infested trees and all trees within 400 m of an infested tree belonging to a genus consider...

  10. Acoustic assessment of Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) effects on Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larval activity and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae), the red palm weevil, is an economically important palm tree pest in subtropical regions of the world. Previous studies have shown that R. ferrugineus can be infected and killed by the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. Howev...

  11. Distribution of ground-dwelling beetles (Coleoptera) across a forest-clearcut ecotone in Wolong Natural Reserve, southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-DONG YU; TIAN-HONG LUO; JIAN YANG; HONG-ZHANG ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    The influence of edge effect on ground-dwelling beetles (Coleoptera) across a forest-clearcut ecotone was studied in Wolong Natural Reserve, southwestern China. During the field research, a total of 30 739 beetles were collected with pitfall traps along transects, which extending 100 m from the edge into the forest interior and 100 m into the clearcut. Of the collection, Carabidae comprised 92%, Staphylinidae 3%, Curculionidae 2%, and Tenebrionidae 2%, and these four families can be considered as abundant groups. Family richness, Shannon diversity and equitability display a significant decrease from forest interior, edge to clearcut. Based on the family composition and abundance, ground-dwelling beetles of the forest interior can be separated from those in the clearcut by Principal coordinate analysis ordination, and beetle assemblages in the forest edge were more similar to forest assemblages than to those found in the clearcut by cluster analysis. Seasonal dynamics of family richness showed a monotone peak in the middle season, with a highest value in the forest interior and a lowest value in the clearcut. Family abundance showed two peaks in the middle season, always with more individuals in the clearcut than in the forest interior or in the edge. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the cover of shrub and fitter were the two most important factors in determining family richness, Shannon diversity, equitability and abundance. Our results show that the forest edge and clearcut have obviously different composition and diversity of ground-dwelling beetles from forest interior at the family level. However, more edges have been formed due to increasing forest fragmentation (clearcutting or logging), so it is necessary to preserve large and intact forest to protect the diversity of ground-dwelling beetles in Wolong Natural Reserve.

  12. Digitonthophagus Balthasar, 1959: taxonomy, systematics, and morphological phylogeny of the genus revealing an African species complex (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génier, François; Moretto, Philippe

    2017-03-31

    The taxonomy and systematics of the genus Digitonthophagus Balthasar (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Onthophagini) is revised. A detailed study of the male genitalia combined with external morphology suggests that the variability, previously recognized, for D. gazella is hiding a species complex within the Afrotropical region and the Arabian Peninsula. The current study recognizes 16 species; 13 from the Afrotropical region and Arabian Peninsula and three from the eastern portion of the Saharo-Arabian region and the continental Indomalayan region. Species are organized into six species groups based on the results of the morphology-based phylogenetic analysis. The following 12 species are described as new: D. aksumensis Génier new species; D. biflagellatus Génier new species; D. dilatatus Génier new species; D. eucatta Génier new species; D. falciger Génier new species; D. fimator Génier new species; D. namaquensis Génier new species; D. petilus Génier new species; D. sahelicus Moretto new species; D. uks Génier new species; D. ulcerosus Génier new species; and D. viridicollis Génier new species. In order to stabilize nomenclature, lectotypes are designated for Scarabaeus bonasus Fabricius, 1775; Scarabaeus catta Fabricius, 1787, and Onthophagus gazella lusinganus d'Orbigny. A neotype is designated for Scarabaeus dorcas Olivier, 1789 whose status and synonymy need to be altered in order to clarify the status of Scarabaeus gazella auctorum, the widely introduced species with economic importance. A naming scheme is presented for the sclerites of the internal sac. External and male genitalia are illustrated and distribution maps are provided for each species.

  13. Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) attracted to dung of the largest herbivorous rodent on earth: a comparison with human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puker, Anderson; Correa, César M A; Korasaki, Vanesca; Ferreira, Kleyton R; Oliveira, Naiara G

    2013-12-01

    The capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (L.) (Rodentia: Caviidae), is the largest herbivorous rodent on Earth and abundant in the Neotropical region, which can provide a stable food source of dung for dung beetle communities (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae). However, the use of capybara dung by dung beetles is poorly known. Here, we present data on the structure of the dung beetle community attracted to capybara dung and compare with the community attracted to human feces. Dung beetles were captured with pitfall traps baited with fresh capybara dung and human feces in pastures with exotic grass (Brachiaria spp.), patches of Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), and points of degraded riparian vegetation along the Aquidauana river in Anastácio and Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. In traps baited with human feces, 13,809 individuals of 31 species were captured, and in those baited with capybara dung 1,027 individuals belonging to 26 species were captured. The average number of individuals and species captured by the traps baited with human feces was greater than for capybara dung in all habitats studied. Composition of the communities attracted to human feces and capybara dung formed distinct groups in all habitats. Despite the smaller number of species and individuals captured in capybara dung when compared with human feces, capybara dung was attractive to dung beetles. In Brazil, the legalization of hunting these rodents has been debated, which would potentially affect the community and consequently the ecological functions performed by dung beetles that use the feces of these animals as a resource. In addition, the knowledge of the communities associated with capybaras may be important in predicting the consequences of future management of their populations.

  14. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Furquim Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil. Beetles of the family Melolonthidae make up a large group and some species are considered pests of planted crops. Little information is available on the basic biological aspects of the genus Leucothyreus, such as association with cultivated crops and their occurrence periods. Therefore studies were developed in soybean and corn crops in Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso, Brazil, with the objective of studying the occurrence and biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus. For acquisition of immature specimens of both species, in April 2011 sampling was performed in corn fields, in July and October in the fallow area, and in soybeans fields planted in December; in 2012 sampling was performed in January and February in soybean fields and in March in corn fields. In 2011 the total number of larvae obtained in April, July, October and December were 100, 6, 30 and 27, and in January, February and March of 2012 these quantities were 32, 52 and 65 larvae, respectively. In all sampling events the larvae of L. alvarengai were collected in greater quantity. At the beginning of the reproductive period of L. alvarengai and L. aff. semipruinosus, it was observed that the adults began to fly and soon after started oviposition in the field in September. The appearance of larvae coincides with the time of soybean planting in the field, thus the larvae feed on roots of soybean plants at the beginning of their development and the cycle from egg to adult of the two species was completed in one year.

  15. Involvement of larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) on human cadavers: a review of 81 forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Colard, Thomas; Vincent, Benoit; Pasquerault, Thierry; Hedouin, Valery

    2014-11-01

    From 1994 to 2013, French forensic entomology laboratories investigated 1,093 cases. Larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) were observed in 81 (7.5%) of these cases. To describe and analyze these 81 cases, eight parameters were used: city, location (indoor or outdoor), decay stage (fresh, decay, or dry), dermestid species and instar (adults and/or larvae), presence of living calliphorid larvae, presence of calliphorid pupae or adults, and presence of other necrophagous species. Eight Dermestidae species were observed: Dermestes frischii (42% of cases), Dermestes undulatus (35.8%), Dermestes peruvianus (12.3%), Dermestes lardarius (9.9%), Dermestes haemorrhoidalis (8.6%), Dermestes maculatus (7.4%), Dermestes bicolor (3.7%), and Dermestes ater (1.2%). Larder beetles primarily developed on human cadavers in outdoor locations in areas with a dry climate and were never reported in oceanic areas (which are characterized by frequent rainfall and high ambient humidity). The number of dermestid species on a single corpse never exceeded three. Typically, one species was found per corpse. Species differed between indoor and outdoor cases, with D. frischii and D. undulatus dominant in outdoor cases, while D. peruvianus dominant in indoor cases. Calliphoridae was found in 88% of the cases, while Hydrotaea and Piophilidae were observed 40% of the time. Regarding Coleoptera, Necrobia spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) was observed in 46% of the cases. Lastly, we observed a typical decomposition pattern, with preferential feeding areas on the face, hands, and feet (i.e., the extremities). Pupation chambers on or inside the bones were not observed.

  16. Inconspicuous structural coloration in the elytra of beetles Chlorophila obscuripennis (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yin, Haiwei; Dong, Biqin; Qing, Youhua; Zhao, Li; Meyer, Serge; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian; Chen, Bin

    2008-01-01

    The elytra of male beetles Chlorophila obscuripennis (Coleoptera) display an inconspicuous iridescent bluish green color. By structural characterizations we find that the outermost elytral surface comprises a sculpted multilayer, which is the origin of structural coloration. In elytra both structural green and cyan colors are observed which arise from the modulations imposed on the multilayer, leading to a bluish green color by color mixing. The adoption of the sculpted multilayer can render structural coloration inconspicuous, which could be advantageous for camouflage. In addition, it can cause light emergence at nonspecular angles.

  17. Espécies de Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini ocorrentes na Bolívia

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    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia. The genus Gorybia (Cerambycinae, Piezocerini consists of 45 described species with seven species recorded from Bolivia. Nine new species are described herein from Bolivia: G. abnormalis sp. nov.; G. alveolata sp. nov.; G. asyka sp. nov.; G. florida sp. nov.; G. inarmata sp. nov.; G. longithorax sp. nov.; G. guenda sp. nov.; G. tuberosa sp. nov. and G. wappesi sp. nov. A key to the species now known to occur in Bolivia is included.

  18. Male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna V. P. Simões

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae. The male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar, 1824 are described and illustrated for the first time. The male reproductive system shows no difference from the subfamily pattern, which is a tubular well-developed median lobe; "Y", "V" or T-shaped tegmen; reduced pygidium; internal sac membranous and tubular; flagellum generally well developed needle-like structured and gastral spiculum absent. However, the female differs from the pattern proposed for Stolas in two aspects: ovary with 28 ovarioles and a reduced ampulla with indistinct velum.

  19. Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gohain Barua; S Hazarika; N M Saikia; G D Baruah

    2009-06-01

    We recorded the in vivo emission and time-resolved spectra of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae). The emission spectrum shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for this particular species is 55 nm, which is significantly narrower than the in vivo half-widths reported till now. The time-resolved spectrum reveals that a flash of about 100 ms duration is, in fact, composed of a number of microsecond pulses. This suggests that the speed of the enzyme-catalysed chemiluminescence reaction in the firefly for the emission of light is much faster than was previously believed.

  20. Resfriamento artificial para o controle de Coleoptera em arroz armazenado em silo metálico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Noemberg Lazzari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Resfriamento artificial para o controle de Coleoptera em arroz armazenado em silo metálico. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar o efeito do resfriamento artificial de grãos de arroz para o controle de coleópteros-praga. O ar frio foi insuflado pelo sistema de aeração em um silo metálico com arroz-em-casca. A avaliação do tratamento foi feita quinzenalmente usando armadilhas caladores. As espécies de Coleoptera capturadas foram: Oryzaephilus surinamensis (60%; Cryptolestes ferrugineus (9%; Rhyzopertha dominica (16,5% e Sitophilus spp. (0,5%. Aos 28 dias, a temperatura média da massa de grãos era de 15ºC, e o número médio de insetos havia diminuído 76,8%. A aplicação de ar frio manteve as populações sob controle por aproximadamente 60 dias. Os resultados do monitoramento dos insetos e da temperatura indicaram que um novo ciclo de ar frio deveria ser aplicado nesse período para manter as populações sob controle. Também o manejo adequado da massa de grãos faz-se necessário para garantir resultados satisfatórios do resfriamento artificial.Artificial chilling to control Coleoptera in paddy rice stored in metallic silo. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of artificial chilling for the control of coleopterans in stored paddy rice. The cold air was insufflated through the aeration system of a metallic silo with paddy rice. Evaluation of insect number was made every 15 days using probe traps. The species of Coleoptera captured were: Oryzaephilus surinamensis (60%; Cryptolestes ferrugineus (9%; Rhyzopertha dominica (16.5% and Sitophilus spp. (0.5%. By the 28th day the average temperature of the grain mass was 15ºC, and the mean number of insects decreased 76.8%. The cold air application kept the insect populations under control for approximately 60 days. The results of temperature and insect monitoring indicated that a new cycle of cold air should be applied by that time to keep the populations under

  1. Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gohain Barua; S Hazarika; N M Saikia; G D Baruah

    2009-09-01

    We recorded the in vivo emission and time-resolved spectra of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae). The emission spectrum shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for this particular species is 55 nm, which is significantly narrower than the in vivo half-widths reported till now. The time-resolved spectrum reveals that a flash of about 100 ms duration is, in fact, composed of a number of microsecond pulses. This suggests that the speed of the enzyme-catalysed chemiluminescence reaction in the firefly for the emission of light is much faster than was previously believed.

  2. [Invasions of Paederus sabaeus (Coleoptera Staphylinidae) in central Africa. 1. Entomological and epidemiological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchenier, L; Mouchet, J; Cros, B; Legall, P; Cosnefroy, J Y; Quézédé, P; Chandenier, J

    1994-01-01

    In May 1993, at the end of the rainy season, outbreaks of Paederus sabaeus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) were recorded in Brazzaville (Congo), Kinshasa (Zaire), Franceville and Libreville (Gabon) and even in Bangui (CAR) at the North of the equator. A short review of previous outbreaks in Africa and on vesicant substances is given by the authors. These beetles are attracted to neon lights and they rest on the walls or on the skin of the occupants. When the insects are crushed on the bare skin their haemolymph liberate pederine and related vesicant components which provocate dermatitis. The insects disappeared spontaneously after three to four weeks.

  3. Ancient hastisetae of Cretaceous carrion beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in Myanmar amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, George; Poinar, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    Hastisetae are extremely elaborate and intricate insect setae that occur solely on dermestid larvae (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). The present work characterizes hastisetae found in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar and compares them to hastisetae found on extant dermestid larvae. The presence of hastisetae in Myanmar amber shows that lineages of dermestid beetles had already developed hastisetae by the mid-Cretaceous and their presence allows us to follow the evolutionary development of this particular arthropod structure over the past 100 million years. Hastisetae attached to a parasitic wasp in the same piece of amber indicates that ancient dermestid beetles used their hastisetae for defense, similar to their function today.

  4. Evaluating Alpha and Beta Taxonomy in Ant-Nest Beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Paussini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fattorini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated completeness, accuracy, and historical trend of the taxonomic knowledge on the myrmecophilous ground beetle tribe Paussini (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Paussinae. Accumulation curves for valid names and synonyms of species, subgenera, and genera were modelled using logistic functions. Analyses of trends in synonymies suggest that few currently accepted taxa will be recognized to be synonymous in the future. This may indicate that Paussini are a taxonomically relatively stable tribe of carabid beetles. However, this result might also be due to the lack of recent taxonomic work in some biogeographical regions.

  5. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE SPECIES OF BEETLES (INSECTA: COLEOPTERA FROM WHEAT CROP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Tălmaciu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera between in wheat crops from Tişiţa, in Vrancea county. The observations were made in a crop of wheat in 2013, who were placed the soil traps type Barber, during the two months, May and June. It was used three variants: • Variant 1 - consumption wheat untreated • Variant 2 - consumption wheat treaty • Variant 3 - treated wheat seed The gathering of samples from the traps was done periodically, every 12-15 days. The most species frequent gathered was: Pentodon idiota, Epicometis hirta, Opatrum sabulosum, Phyllotreta atra, Phyllotreta nemorum, Tanymecus dilaticollis.

  6. An annotated checklist of click-beetles (Coleoptera, Elateridae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platia, Giuseppe; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-07-11

    The fauna of Iranian Elateridae (Coleoptera: Elateroidea) is summarized in this paper. In total 245 species from 58 genera and 7 subfamilies Agrypninae Candèze (13 genera, 36 species), Cardiophorinae Candèze (4 genera, 55 species), Cebrioninae Latreille (2 genera, 6 species), Dendrometrinae Gistel (13 genera, 28 species), Elaterinae Leach (23 genera, 104 species), Lissominae Laporte (1 genus, 1 species) and Negastriinae Nakane & Kishii (2 genera, 15 species) are listed in literature as the fauna of Iran. Totally 74 species are endemic to Iran.

  7. An annotated checklist of the aquatic Polyphaga (Coleoptera) of Egypt I. Family Hydraenidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Mohamed; Cueto, Juan Antonio Régil; Valladares, Luis F

    2014-10-16

    Data from previous literature were used to compile a checklist of the Egyptian fauna of Hydraenidae (Coleoptera). The checklist includes data on the type localities, type specimens, descriptors, distributions and previous literature for 15 valid species belonging to 3 genera (Hydraena, Limnebius and Ochthebius). Ochthebius was represented by 13 species, while Hydraena and Limnebius were represented only by a single species for each of them. The present study provides a summary that can serve as the basis for future progress in the knowledge of the Egyptian Hydraenidae. 

  8. Redescription of Platynaspisflavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspiskapuri Chakraborty & Biswas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Platynaspisflavoguttata (Gorham) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang, 1983) is a new junior synonym of Platynaspisbimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym). Platynaspiskapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007), is also the new replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang, 1983), as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspisbimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms. Platynaspishoangi Ukrainsky (2007) is an unnecessary replacement name for Platynaspisbimaculata (Hoang).

  9. Redescription of Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae and notes on nomenclature of Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Poorani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Platynaspis flavoguttata (Gorham (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is redescribed and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. It is also recorded from Sri Lanka for the first time. Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983 is a new junior synonym of Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 (new synonym. Platynaspis kapuri Chakraborty & Biswas, 2000, the replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata Pang & Mao, 1979 established by Ukrainsky (2007, is also the new replacement name for Platynaspis bimaculata (Hoang, 1983, as both are junior homonyms of Platynaspis bimaculata Weise, 1888 besides being synonyms. Platynaspis hoangi Ukrainsky (2007 is an unnecessary replacement name for P. bimaculata (Hoang.

  10. Development of an attractant-baited trap for Oxythyrea funesta Poda (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuts, József; Imrei, Zoltán; Töth, Miklós

    2008-01-01

    In electroantennographic tests isosafrol, methyl salicylate, (+/-)-lavandulol, geraniol, (E)-anethol, and beta-ionone evoked the largest responses from antennae of female or male Oxythyrea funesta (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae) adult beetles. In field trapping tests in Hungary the 1:1 blend of (+/-)-lavandulol and 2-phenylethanol attracted significantly more adult O. funesta than the single compounds. The addition of (E)-anethol, a previously described attractant for the species, was without effect. There was no difference in the responses of male or female beetles. The binary 2-phenylethanol/(+/-)-lavandulol bait described, in this study is recommended for the use in traps of O. funesta for agricultural purposes.

  11. DAPSA GEMINA AUDISIO & DE BIASE, 1996, A NEW SPECIES OF THE EUROPEAN FAUNA (Coleoptera, Endomychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During entomological research carried out in the Pontine Islands (central Italy, Latium, Latina province, Dapsa gemina Audisio & De Biase, 1996 (Coleoptera, Endomychidae, previously known only from coastal areas of NE Algeria, has been recorded in Italy and in Europe for the first time. This new record suggested the authors to shortly discuss the possible scenario of a relatively recent, late Pleistocene passive transportation of Dapsa gemina and of the related D. obscurissima Pic, 1904 (sharing a very similar disjunct geographic distribution by marine drift of masses of vegetal debris from North Africa.

  12. Toxomerus duplicatus Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Syrphidae preying on Microtheca spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae larvae

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    VS Sturza

    Full Text Available Microtheca spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae are insect pests primarily related to Brassicaceae crops. In the State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS, southern Brazil, they are found on forage turnip, Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiferus Metzg., which is commonly grown during fall/winter seasons. This work reports the predation of Microtheca spp. larvae by Toxomerus duplicatus Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Syrphidae larvae, on forage turnip crop, in Santa Maria, RS. This register provides new information about Microtheca spp. natural enemies in Brazil, which might be a new option for integrate pest management of these species.

  13. Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico

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    Miguel A. Morón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico. Larvae of four species of Cyclocephala are described for the first time based on specimens collected in Mexican localities: C. barrerai Martínez, 1969 from Puebla, C. sinaloae Howden & Endrödi, 1966 from Sinaloa, C. fasciolata Bates, 1888 from Veracruz, and C. jalapensis Casey, 1915 from Hidalgo. Larva of C. lunulata Burmeister, 1847, is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican states of Morelos, Puebla, and Veracruz. Diagnostic structures are illustrated and the differences and similarities of each species with other previously described larvae of the genus are commented.

  14. PITYOPHAGUS QUERCUS REITTER, 1877, A NEW SAPROXYLIC SAP BEETLE FOR THE ITALIAN FAUNA (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae

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    Paolo Audisio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During ecological investigations on saproxylic beetle communities of central Italy (Latium, at Bosco Polverino (a mixed evergreen/deciduous forest fragment dominated by cork oaks, and at Allumiere (a small fragment of beech forest surrounded by turkey oak stands, the authors found three specimens of Pityophagus quercus Reitter, 1877 (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae. These are the first known records of this species in Italy, and the first one in association with an evergreen oak, Quercus suber. This discovery led us to review both bionomical and faunistic data so far available on this exceedingly rare and poorly known species.

  15. Gross anatomy of central nervous system in firefly, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudawiyah, Nur; Wahida, O. Nurul; Norela, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes for the first time the organization and fine structure of the central nervous system (CNS) in the fireflies, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae). The morphology of the CNS was examined by using Carl Zeiss AxioScope A1 photomicroscope with iSolution Lite software. Some specific structural features such as the localization of protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum in the brain region were analyzed. Other than that, the nerve cord and its peripheral structure were also analyzed. This study suggests that, there is a very obvious difference between male and female central nervous system which illustrates that they may differ in function in controlling physiological and behavioral activities.

  16. Australian marsh beetles (Coleoptera: Scirtidae). 2. Pachycyphon, a new genus of presumably terrestrial Australian Scirtidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The genus Pachycyphon is erected for marsh beetles (Coleoptera: Scirtidae) from tropical rainforests in Queensland, Australia. The following species are included: P. corpulentus sp. n., P. crassus sp. n., P. elegans sp. n., P. funicularis sp. n., P. gravis sp. n., P. monteithi sp. n., P. obesus sp. n., P. pinguis sp. n., P. serratus sp. n., P. turgidus sp. n. (the type species). Females are wingless and have fossorial ovipositors, a terrestrial larval life is therefore hypothesized. Pachycyphon is compared with other genera, especially probable relatives from temperate rainforests in southeastern Australia.

  17. Estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra insetos das ordens Lepidoptera, Coleoptera e Diptera Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against insects of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian Botelho Praça

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar entre 300 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis as efetivas simultaneamente contra larvas de Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith e Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus e Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Foram selecionadas duas estirpes de B. thuringiensis, denominadas S234 e S997, que apresentaram atividade contra as três ordens de insetos. As estirpes foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos, bioquímicos e moleculares. As mesmas apresentaram duas proteínas principais de 130 e 65 kDa, produtos de reação em cadeia da polimerase de tamanho esperado para a detecção dos genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B e cry2 e cristais bipiramidais, cubóides e esféricos.The aim of this work was to select among 300 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis those which are simultaneously effective against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Two strains of B. thuringiensis were selected, S234 and S997, which presented activity against those three insect orders. Both strains were characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular methods. They have presented two main proteins with 130 and 65 kDa, polimerase chain reaction products with expected sizes for detection of the genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B and cry2 and bipiramidal, cubical and spherical crystals.

  18. Efficacies of spinosad and a combination of chlorpyrifos-methyl and deltamethrin against phosphine-resistant Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) on wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, N S; Opit, George P; Talley, J; Jones, C L

    2013-10-01

    Highly phosphine-resistant populations of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) have recently been found in Oklahoma grain storage facilities. These findings necessitate development of a phosphine resistance management strategy to ensure continued effective use of phosphine. Therefore, we investigated the efficacies of two grain insecticides, namely, spinosad applied at label rate of 1 ppm and a mixture of chlorpyrifos-methyl and deltamethrin applied at label rates of 3 and 0.5 ppm, respectively, against highly phosphine-resistant R. dominica and T. castaneum. Adult mortality and progeny production suppression of spinosad- or chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin mixture-treated wheat that had been stored for 2, 84, 168, 252, and 336 d posttreatment were assessed. We found that both spinosad and chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin were effective against phosphine-resistant R. dominica and caused 83-100% mortality and also caused total progeny production suppression for all storage periods. Spinosad was not effective against phosphine-resistant T. castaneum; the highest mortality observed was only 3% for all the storage periods. Chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin was effective against phosphine-resistant T. castaneum only in treated wheat stored for 2 and 84 d, where it caused 93-99% mortality. However, chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin was effective and achieved total suppression of progeny production in T. castaneum for all the storage periods. Spinosad was not as effective as chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin mixture at suppressing progeny production of phosphine-resistant T. castaneum. These two insecticides can be used in a phosphine resistance management strategy for R. dominica and T. castaneum in the United States.

  19. Fauna de Coleoptera Associada a Carcaças de Coelhos Expostas em uma Área Urbana no Sul do Brasil

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    Richard Silva

    2012-11-01

    Abstract. Study of Coleoptera fauna associated with rabbit carcasses, Oryctolagus cuniculus Linnaeus (Lagomorpha, Leporidae, during the summer of 2010 and winter of 2011, is present at an urban area of Northern Paraná State, Southern Brazil. To capture the beetles were used pan, pitfall and modified Shannon traps. We collected 236 beetles belonging to 12 families and at least 25 species. Staphylinidae (52.5% and Histeridae (26.7% were the most abundant families in both seasons represented mainly by Aleochara bonariensis Lynch and Euspilotus "group" azureus sp., respectively. Among the seasons, both the decomposition of the carcasses and the succession of coleopterofauna of forensic interest occurred differently due to significant variation of abiotic factors. During the winter, most individuals of Euspilotus "group" azureus sp. (96.8% was captured at the stage of Black Putrefaction, showing an association at this stage. Despite the environment seasonality, there wasn’t significant difference of the abundance among seasons by main beetles neither by coleopterofauna.

  20. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Renata O; Via, Allegra; Brandão, Marcelo M; Tramontano, Anna; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-03-01

    Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic L-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  1. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, Renata O.

    2015-03-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic l-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  2. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  3. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada agroekosistem salak pondoh di Gunung Merapi berdasarkan pola pita isozim

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    SRI WARDANI

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Wardani S, Sugiyarto. 2009. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleopterapada agroekosistem salak pondoh di Gunung Merapi berdasarkan pola pita isozim.Bioteknologi 6: 49-54. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui karakteristik lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera didasarkan pada pola pita isozim. Penelitian morfologi dilakukan di Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Sampel diambil dari lima tempat dengan ketinggian yang berbeda dimana lima sampel diambil dari setiap lokasi. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah elektroforesis gel poliakrilamida (PAGE menggunakan jenis vertikal. Sistem enzim yang digunakan adalah peroksidase dan esterase untuk mendeteksi pola pita isozim. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terdapat variasi pola pita isozim lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada agroekosistem salak pondoh di lereng Gunung Merapi (peroksidase di stasiun II dan IV sedangkan esterase di stasiun III dan V. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa terdapat variasi genetik pada populasi lundi putih pada agroekosistem salak pondoh di lereng Gunung Merapi. Kondisi lingkungan juga berpengaruh terhadap munculnya variasi pola pita isozim karena setiap lokasi memiliki kondisi lingkungan yang berbeda.

  4. Male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae

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    Marianna V. P. Simões

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae. The male and female reproductive systems of Stolas conspersa (Germar, 1824 are described and illustrated for the first time. The male reproductive system shows no difference from the subfamily pattern, which is a tubular well-developed median lobe; "Y", "V" or T-shaped tegmen; reduced pygidium; internal sac membranous and tubular; flagellum generally well developed needle-like structured and gastral spiculum absent. However, the female differs from the pattern proposed for Stolas in two aspects: ovary with 28 ovarioles and a reduced ampulla with indistinct velum.Sistema reprodutivo masculino e feminino de Stolas conspersa (Germar (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae. O sistema reprodutivo do macho e fêmea de Stolas conspersa (Germar, 1824 são descritos pela primeira vez. Neste estudo, foi observado que o macho não diverge do padrão proposto para a subfamília, que é edeago tubular e bem desenvolvido; tégmen em forma de "Y", "V" ou "T"; pigídio reduzido; saco interno membranoso e tubular; flagellum geralmente bem desenvolvido, em forma de agulha e espículo gastral ausente. Por outro lado, o sistema reprodutor feminino diverge do padrão usual proposto para o gênero Stolas em dois aspectos: ovário com 28 ovaríolos e ampola reduzida com velum não distinto.

  5. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera

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    Jiyu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings. When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  6. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

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    SEPULVEDA-CANO PAULA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN

    Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

    Palabras clave: picudos, plátano, banano, Polytus, Colombia.

    ABSTRACT

    This synopsis is about beetle’s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

    Key words: weevils, plantain, banana, Polytus, Colombia.

  7. Novos táxons em Hippopsini, Desmiphorini, Xenofreini e Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

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    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Descrição de novos táxons em Hippopsini, Desmiphorini, Xenofreini e Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Espécies novas descritas da Bolívia: Trichohippopsis exilis sp. nov., Megacera acuminata sp. nov., Acanthoderes onca sp. nov., Psapharochrus pinima sp. nov., Ateralphus lacteus sp. nov., Nesozineus simile sp. nov. e do México (Chiapas, Guerrero X. guttata sp. nov. O nome novo Monnetyra é proposto para Anhanga Galileo & Martins, 2003 non Anhanga Distant, 1887 (Hemiptera. Nova combinação: Monnetyra diabolica (Galileo & Martins, 2003. Registra-se para a Bolívia Xenofrea pseudomurina Tavakilian & Néouze, 2006.New taxa of Hippopsini, Desmiphorini, Xenofreini and Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. The following species are described, from Bolivia: Trichohippopsis exilis sp. nov., Megacera acuminata sp. nov., Acanthoderes onca sp. nov., Psapharochrus pinima sp. nov., Ateralphus lacteus sp. nov., and Nesozineus simile sp. nov.; and from Mexico (Chiapas, Guerrero Xenofrea gutata sp. nov. The new name Monnetyra is proposed for Anhanga Galileo & Martins, 2003 non Anhanga Distant, 1887 (Hemiptera and new combination: Monnetyra diabolica (Galileo & Martins, 2003. Xenofrea pseudomurina Tavakilian & Néouze is recorded for Bolivia.

  8. Antennal sensilla of Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis (Olivier) and Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian-Qian; Liu, Zhen-Kai; Chen, Chong; Wen, Junbao

    2013-09-01

    Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and E. brandti (Harold) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are the two most important pests of tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and its variety Ailanthus altissima var. Qiantouchun in China. They are also considered potential biological control agents for tree-of-heaven in North America. In this study, the external morphologies and antennal sensilla of both species were examined using scanning electron microscopy to better understand their host-finding mechanisms. Eleven morphological sensilla types were recorded, that is, Böhm bristles, six types of sensilla chaetica (Sch. 1-6), two types of sensilla basiconica (Sb. 1-2), and two types of sensilla trichodea (St. 1-2). Sch. 5 were absent from the antennae of E. chinensis, while Sch. 2 were absent from the antennae of E. brandti. Abundant cuticular pores were present on the antennae of both species. Three types of sensilla on the antennae of E. chinensis that were not found in a previous study, and ten different types of sensilla on the antennae of E. brandti were identified for the first time. The possible functions of the sensilla types are discussed based on a comparison with previous studies. Four types of sensilla (Sb. 1, Sb. 2, St. 2, and Sch. 6) on the antennae of both species indicate chemoreception may play a significant role in host location. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  10. Diversity and community structure of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae across a habitat disturbance gradient in Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi

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    SHAHABUDDIN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Shahabuddin (2010 Diversity and community structure of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae across habitat disturbance gradient in Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi. Biodiversitas 11: 29-33. Dung beetles are important component of most terrestrial ecosystems and used to assess the effects of habitat disturbance and deforestation. This study aimed at comparing dung beetle assemblages among several habitat types ranging from natural tropical forest and agroforestry systems to open cultivated areas at the margin of Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP, Central Sulawesi (one of Indonesia’s biodiversity hotspots. Therefore, 10 pitfall traps baited with cattle dung were exposed at each habitat type (n = 4 replicate sites per habitat type to collect the dung beetles. The results showed that species richness of dung beetles declined significantly from natural forest to open area. However cacao agroforestry systems seemed to be capable of maintaining a high portion of dung beetle species inhabiting at forest sites. The closer relationship between dung beetle assemblages recorded at forest and agroforestry sites reflects the high similarity of some measured habitat parameters (e.g. vegetation structure and microclimate between both habitat types, while species assemblages at open areas differed significantly from both other habitat groups. These results indicated that habitat type has importance effect on determining the species richness and community structure of dung beetles at the margin of LLNP.

  11. Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities

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    Keilor Rojas-Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

  12. The Influence of Vegetation and Landscape Structural Connectivity on Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and Sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy Farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Giovanni; Sommaggio, Daniele; Marini, Mario; Puppi, Giovanna; Chiarucci, Alessandro; Landi, Sara; Fabbri, Roberto; Pesarini, Fausto; Genghini, Marco; Ferrari, Roberto; Muzzi, Enrico; van Lenteren, Joop C; Masetti, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta). Vegetation analysis and insect samplings were carried out in nine sites within an intensively farmed landscape in northern Italy. Plant species richness and the percentage of tree, shrub, and herb cover were determined by means of the phytosociological method of Braun-Blanquet. Landscape structural connectivity was measured as the total length of hedgerow network (LHN) in a radius of 500 m around the center of each sampling transect. Butterflies species richness and abundance were positively associated both to herb cover and to plant species richness, but responded negatively to tree and shrub cover. Shrub cover was strictly correlated to both species richness and activity density of carabids. The species richness of syrphids was positively influenced by herb cover and plant richness, whereas their abundance was dependent on ligneous vegetation and LHN. Rarefaction analysis revealed that sawfly sampling was not robust and no relationship could be drawn with either vegetation parameters or structural connectivity. The specific responses of each insect group to the environmental factors should be considered in order to refine and optimize landscape management interventions targeting specific conservation endpoints. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  14. ESCARABAJOS TIGRE (COLEOPTERA: CICINDELIDAE DEL MUSEO ENTOMOLÓGICO FRANCISCO LUÍS GALLEGO: NUEVOS REGISTROS PARA DEPARTAMENTOS DE COLOMBIA TIGER BEETLES (COLEOPTERA: CICINDELIDAE AT THE ENTOMOLOGICAL MUSEUM FRANCISCO LUÍS GALLEGO: NEW RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Alejandro Ramírez Mora

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registran por primera vez las especies de escarabajos tigre (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae presentes en el Museo Entomológico Francisco Luis Gallego (MEFLG. Se identificaron 167 especimenes distribuidos en ocho géneros y 27 especies, se reportan 24 nuevos registros para diferentes departamentos de Colombia. Se señalan aspectos importantes de la taxonomía y sistemática del grupo. Además, se presentan comentarios biológicos y de distribución de las especies.Tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae species at the Museo Entomológico Francisco Luis Gallego (MEFLG are registered by first time. 167 specimens in 8 genus and 27 species were identified, 24 new records for different Colombian states are reported. Some important aspects of the group’s taxonomy and systematic are pointed. Additionally, species’ biological and distributional comments are presented.

  15. The beetle Costalimaita ferruginea (Coleoptera: Chysomelidae) in Eucalyptus plantations in transition area of Amazon and Cerrado Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, T K R; Pires, E M; Souza, A P; Tanaka, A A; Monteiro, E B; Wilcken, C F

    2017-05-25

    Costalimaita ferruginea (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) attacks Eucalyptus plants causing severe damage through netting of the leaves. Recently, this Coleoptera has been reported attacking Myrtaceae in Mato Grosso State and, studies about the occurrence of this beetle in commercial plantations of eucalypts has been the subject of researchers through monitoring programmes in the forest protection area. With the beginning of the rainy season, adults were observed causing damage in eucalypt plantations in four cities that are part of the transition region of Amazon and Cerrado Biomes. The spots where these insects were observed are located in Feliz Natal, Lucas do Rio Verde, Sorriso and Vera. The purpose of this study was to report the new occurrences and to characterize the attack period of the beetle C. ferruginea in Eucalyptus plantations in Middle-North region of Mato Grosso State, region of Biomes Transition.

  16. A new genus and species of Schizogyniidae (Acari: Mesostigmata) associated with carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) from Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trach, Viacheslav A; Seeman, Owen D

    2014-04-29

    A new genus and species of Schizogyniidae (Acari: Mesostigmata: Celaenopsoidea), Euroschizogynium calvum gen. nov. and sp. nov., associated with Scarites terricola Bonelli, 1813 (Coleoptera: Carabidae) is described from Ukraine, representing the first record of the family from the Palaearctic. Fusura civica Valle & Fox, 1966 is moved out of the Schizogyniidae and placed into the Megacelaenopsidae. A new diagnosis for the family Schizogyniidae and a key to genera are provided.

  17. Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida, Hystrignathidae, first record of a nematode parasitizing a Panamanian Passalidae (Insecta, Coleoptera

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    Jans Rodríguez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida: Hystrignathidae is described from an unidentified passalid beetle (Coleoptera: Passalidae from Panama. It resembles Hystrignathus cobbi Travassos & Kloss, 1957 from Brazil, bya similar form of the cephalic end, extension of cervical spines and absence of lateral alae. It differs from the latter species bythe body shorter, the oesophagus and tail comparatively larger, the vulva situated more posterior and the eggs ridged. This species constitutes the first record of a nematode parasitizing a Panamanian passalid.

  18. Ácaros asociados al coleóptero Passalus cognatus (Coleoptera: Passalidae) de Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, México

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel A. Villegas-Guzmán; Tila M. Pérez; Pedro Reyes-Castillo

    2008-01-01

    Mites associated to the Coleopteran Passalus cognatus (Coleoptera:Passalidae) from Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico. There are few records of mites associated with the tropical coleopterans of Mexico. We examined 35 passalid beetles (bessbugs) Passalus cognatus from Los Tuxtlas region in Veracruz State, Mexico. Twenty of them had a total of 245 mites (representing eight species, eight genera, eight families and three suborders). The most abundant species were Uroobovella californiana Wisniewski ...

  19. Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida, Hystrignathidae), first record of a nematode parasitizing a Panamanian Passalidae (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Jans Rodríguez; Nayla Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida: Hystrignathidae) is described from an unidentified passalid beetle (Coleoptera: Passalidae) from Panama. It resembles Hystrignathus cobbi Travassos & Kloss, 1957 from Brazil, by having a similar form of the cephalic end, extension of cervical spines and absence of lateral alae. It differs from the latter species by having the body shorter, the oesophagus and tail comparatively larger, the vulva situated more posterior and the eggs ridged. This...

  20. Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida, Hystrignathidae), first record of a nematode parasitizing a Panamanian Passalidae (Insecta, Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morffe, Jans; García, Nayla

    2010-09-21

    Hystrignathus dearmasi sp. n. (Oxyurida: Hystrignathidae) is described from an unidentified passalid beetle (Coleoptera: Passalidae) from Panama. It resembles Hystrignathus cobbi Travassos & Kloss, 1957 from Brazil, by having a similar form of the cephalic end, extension of cervical spines and absence of lateral alae. It differs from the latter species by having the body shorter, the oesophagus and tail comparatively larger, the vulva situated more posterior and the eggs ridged. This species constitutes the first record of a nematode parasitizing a Panamanian passalid.

  1. Survei Korelasi Populasi Sitophylus oryzae Linn.(Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Dengan beberapa Faktor Gudang Penyimpanan Beras di Bulog Medan Dan Sekitarnya

    OpenAIRE

    Sibuea, Pulungan

    2011-01-01

    Pulungan Sibuea "Correlation Population Survey Sitophylus oryzae Linn. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) With several factors Warehouse Storage Bulog Rice in Medan and its surroundings" under the guidance of Ir. Yuswani Pangestiningsih, MS as chairman of the commission supervising and Ir. Marheni, MP as a member of the supervising committee. Research carried out in several rice warehouses in Medan and surrounding BULOG in June to August 2010. This study aimed to know To know the relationship betwee...

  2. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    OpenAIRE

    Dakshina R. Seal; Martin, Cliff G.

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether ...

  3. Activités insecticides de Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth (Scrophulariaceae) sur Callosobrichus maculatus (Fab.) (Coleoptera : Bruchidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Nacoulma OG.; Ouedraogo AP.; Kiendrebeogo M.

    2006-01-01

    Insecticidal activities of Striga hermonthica (Del.) Benth (Scrophulariacecae) on Callobruchus maculatus (Fab.) (Coleptera Bruchidae). This paper deals with insecticidal potentialities of Striga hermonthica (Del.) (Scrophulariaceae) in protection of cowpea Vigna unguculata (L.) Walp against Callosobruchus maculatus (Fab.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) during storage. Crude acetone extract at 0,5% w/w (100 mg of extract for 20 g of grain) exhibits 48% of ovicidal effect and then reduces by half emer...

  4. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    OpenAIRE

    Seal, Dakshina R.; Cliff G. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether ...

  5. First record of Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Doryctinae as parasitoid of Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Loni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The species Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae was reared from the larvae of the xylophagous beetle Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, an exotic pest of Ficus and Morus species native to eastern Asia. It was recorded in the north of Italy in September 2005. This discovery is the first report of this species as parasitoids of the yellow spotted longicorn beetle all over the world.

  6. Alphus marinonii sp. nov., nova espécie para o Peru e Brasil (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego de Santana Souza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alphus marinonii sp. nov., new species from Peru and Brazil (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. A new species of Alphus, A. marinonii sp. nov., from Peru and Brazil (Rondônia is described. Key to identification and pictures for the four species of the genus are provided. Notes on distribution of A. tuberosus are included, with a new record for Peru and Brazil (Goiás and Mato Grosso do Sul.

  7. MonotomidGen – A matrix-based interactive key to the New World genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. McElrath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A matrix-based LucidTM key is presented for the twelve genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea represented in the New World. A general overview is given for the features and technical specifications of an original interactive key for the identification of these genera. The list of terminal taxa included with the key provides a current summary of monotomid generic diversity for the Nearctic and Neotropical regions.

  8. MonotomidGen - A matrix-based interactive key to the New World genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrath, Thomas C; Boyd, Olivia F; McHugh, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    A matrix-based Lucid(TM) key is presented for the twelve genera of Monotomidae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea) represented in the New World. A general overview is given for the features and technical specifications of an original interactive key for the identification of these genera. The list of terminal taxa included with the key provides a current summary of monotomid generic diversity for the Nearctic and Neotropical regions.

  9. A new species of Falsocaenia Pic, 1922 from Amazonian Rainforest (Coleoptera: Lycidae) with an updated key to the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vinicius S

    2016-04-25

    While searching for Calochromini (Coleoptera: Lycidae) specimens in entomological collections and identifying other Lycidae, a new species of Falsocaenia Pic, 1922 was found in the collection of Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA). This genus is one of the smallest in the tribe Calopterini with 13 known species, two of which were recently described by Bocákova et al. (2012) in their revision of the genus, and can be found in Central and South America.

  10. Volatile Organic Chemicals in the Rhizosphere of Barley, and their Role on the Foraging Behavior of Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Barsics, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Many species of wireworms, the larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), are known as worldwide belowground pests of a large range of crops including cereals. Pesticide based agricultural practices seem to have allowed significant population reduction in the past, but there is an increasing need for alternative control methods. In the first Chapter of this work, we review the current knowledge concerning 1) Integrated Pest Management (IPM) of wireworms and 2) their chemical ecology. T...

  11. Especies de Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae y sus plantas hospederas en Yucatán Megacerus species (Coleoptera: Bruchidae and their host plants in Yucatán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Reyes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se registra la incidencia de Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae en semillas de 7 especies de Convolvulaceae de 6 sitios al norte de Yucatán. Las semillas de Ipomoea crinicalyx, I. hederifolia, I. nil, I. triloba, Jacquemontia penthanta, Merremia aegyptia y M. cissoides recolectadas en etapa de dispersión fueron colocadas en sobres limpios de papel y puestas en condiciones de laboratorio hasta la emergencia de los brúquidos. Se obtuvieron 1111 coleópteros pertenecientes a 5 especies: Megacerus (Megacerus cubiculus, M. (M. porosus, Megacerus (M. sp., M. (M. tricolor, y M. (Serratibruchus cubiciformis. Las semillas de I. crinicalyx, M. aegyptia y M. cissoides fueron infestadas principalmente por M. (M. porosus, las de I. hederifolia e I. triloba por M. (M. cubiculus y las de I. nil por M. (M. tricolor. Todos los individuos de Megacerus (M. sp., fueron encontrados en semillas de J. penthanta. En el nivel génerico de hospedero se encontró que las semillas de Ipomoea fueron infestadas principalmente por M. (M. cubiculus y las de Merremia por M. (M. porosus. Estos resultados amplían el rango de plantas hospederas registrado para las especies de Megacerus y resaltan la estrecha asociación que existe entre un linaje de depredadores de semillas Bruchidae y plantas de la familia Convolvulaceae.Seed-attacking by Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae is reported for 7 Convolvulaceae species from 6 sites at the North of Yucatan. Seeds of Ipomoea crinicalyx, I. hederifolia, I. nil, I. triloba, Jacquemontia penthanta, Merremia aegyptia and M. cissoides were collected and placed in clean envelopes under laboratory conditions to collect all bruchids emerged from seeds. A total of 1111 coleopterans were hatched from seeds, and 5 taxa were identify: Megacerus (Megacerus cubiculus, M. (M. porosus, Megacerus (M. sp., M. (M. tricolor, and M. (Serratibruchus cubiciformis. Seeds of I. crinicalyx, M. aegyptia and M. cissoides were attacked mainly by M. (M. porosus; I

  12. Insecticidal efficacy of silica gel with Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus (Pinales: Cupressaceae) essential oil against Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas C; Evergetis, Epameinondas; Katsoula, Anna-Maria; Haroutounian, Serkos A

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory bioassays were carried out to evaluate the effect of silica gel enhanced with the essential oil (EO) of Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. oxycedrus (Pinales: Cupressaceae) (derived from berry specimens from Greece) against adults of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). For that purpose, a dry mixture consisting of 500 mg of silica gel that had absorbed 2.18 mg of EO (total weight: 502.18 mg) was tested at three doses; 0.125, 0.250, and 0.5 g/kg of wheat, corresponding to 125, 250, and 500 ppm, respectively, and silica gel alone at 0.5 g/kg of wheat corresponding to 500 ppm, at different exposure intervals (24 and 48 h and 7 and 14 d for S. oryzae; 24 and 48 h and 7, 14, and 21 d for T. confusum). The chemical content of the specific EO was determined by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses indicating the presence of 31 constituents with myrcene and germacrene-D being the predominant compounds. The bioactivity results for S. oryzae indicated that 48 h of exposure in wheat resulted in an 82% mortality for treatment with 500 ppm of the enhanced silica gel. For 7 d of exposure, 100 and 98% of S. oryzae adults died when they were treated with 500 and 250 ppm of enhanced silica gel, respectively. At 14 d of exposure, all adults died both at 250 and 500 ppm of enhanced silica gel. At 48 h, 7 and 14 d of exposure significantly less S. oryzae adults died in wheat treated with silica gel alone than at 250 or 500 ppm of enhanced silica gel. In the case of T. confusum, at 7 d of exposure, mortality in wheat treated with silica gel only was significantly higher in comparison to the other treatments. At the 14 d of exposure mortality in wheat treated with 500 ppm of silica gel alone was significantly higher than 125 and 250 ppm of the enhanced silica gel. Similar trends were also noted at 21 d of exposure, indicating that there is no enhancement effect from the addition of

  13. Catalogue of Geadephaga (Coleoptera: Adephaga of America, north of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available All scientific names of Trachypachidae, Rhysodidae, and Carabidae (including cicindelines recorded from America north of Mexico are catalogued. Available species-group names are listed in their original combinations with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, type locality, location of the name-bearing type, and etymology for many patronymic names. In addition, the reference in which a given species-group name is first synonymized is recorded for invalid taxa. Genus-group names are listed with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, type species with way of fixation, and etymology for most. The reference in which a given genus-group name is first synonymized is recorded for many invalid taxa. Family-group names are listed with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, and type genus. The geographical distribution of all species-group taxa is briefly summarized and their state and province records are indicated.One new genus-group taxon, Randallius new subgenus (type species: Chlaenius purpuricollis Randall, 1838, one new replacement name, Pterostichus amadeus new name for Pterostichus vexatus Bousquet, 1985, and three changes in precedence, Ellipsoptera rubicunda (Harris, 1911 for Ellipsoptera marutha (Dow, 1911, Badister micans LeConte, 1844 for Badister ocularis Casey, 1920, and Agonum deplanatum Ménétriés, 1843 for Agonum fallianum (Leng, 1919, are proposed. Five new genus-group synonymies and 65 new species-group synonymies, one new species-group status, and 12 new combinations (see Appendix 5 are established.The work also includes a discussion of the notable private North American carabid collections, a synopsis of all extant world geadephagan tribes and subfamilies, a brief faunistic assessment of the fauna, a list of valid species-group taxa, a list of North American fossil Geadephaga (Appendix 1, a list of North American Geadephaga larvae described or illustrated (Appendix 2, a list of Geadephaga species

  14. Characterization of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mount Merapi based on isozymic banding patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI WARDANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Wardani S, Sugiyarto. 2009. Characterization of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mount Merapi based on isozymic banding patterns. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 38-42. The aim of this research is to know the characteristics of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera based on isozyme banding patterns. This research was conducted at Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang-Central Java for the morphological purposes. The sample was taken from 5 places with different height in wich 5 samples were taken from each location. The method used in this research was polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE using the vertical type. The enzyme system used in this research were peroxidase and esterase to detect the isozyme banding patterns. The results showed that there was a variation in isozyme banding patterns of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mount Merapi’s slope (peroxidase in station II and IV while esterase in station III and V. It’s mean that genetic variation on white grubs population at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mount Merapi’s slope was found. The environmental condition also contributed to the influence of the appear of isozyme banding pattern’s variation because each location had a different condition.

  15. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...

  16. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  17. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  18. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  19. Estudos bioecológicos de Syphraea uberabensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Bechyné 1956

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Wikler

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Tibouchina herbacea (DC. Cog. é uma planta ornamental introduzida propositadamente no arquipélago do Havaí e, devido à ausência de inimigos naturais e condições edafo-climáticas adequadas, está se dispersando rapidamente pelas florestas nativas e regiões úmidas das principais ilhas havaianas. Por ser originária do Brasil, foram realizadas diversas viagens exploratórias em busca de por inimigos naturais específicos que pudessem controlar esta planta. Dentre os agentes selecionados com impacto e potencial de especificidade à T. herbacea encontra-se Syphraea uberabensis (Bechyne, 1955 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae. Este trabalho visa estudos sobre a biologia, ecologia e especificidade deste inseto e também uma avaliação criteriosa dos possíveis impactos causados por este inimigo natural na população da planta.

  20. THE ROLE OF HALTICA SP. (COLEOPTERA: HALTICIDAE AS BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENT OF POLYGONUM CHINENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN JAY A

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Haltica sp. (Coleoptera: Halticidae with emphasis on host specificity and damage potential in controlling Polygonum chinense was evaluated under laboratory condition. Starvation test of the weevil on 33 weeds and 14 crop plant species indicated that only 6 weed species were attacked: Polygonum chinense, P. nepalense, P. barbatum, P. longisetum, Ludwigia octovalvis and L. parennis with P. chinense as the most preferred host plant. Preliminary damage potential test indicated that a population of 0, 1,2 and 3 pairs of adult weevil reduced the percentage of fresh weight increment of P. chinense by 0; 46.2; 74.7 and 75.5% respectively. Field observations indicated that the larvae as well as adult weevils are potential biological control agents of P. chinense. Further studies are, however, on the host-range of this weevil.

  1. Beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera) associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, W E; Alves, A C F; Creão-Duarte, A J

    2014-08-01

    The species richness, abundance and seasonality of Coleoptera fauna associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area were examined. Tray, pitfall and modified Shannon traps were settled together to collect these insects during two seasons (dry and rainy). 4,851 beetles were collected, belonging to 19 families and 88 species. Staphylinidae (2,184) and Histeridae (1,264) were the most abundant families and accounted for 71.1% of the specimens collected. Scarabaeidae (15) showed the highest species richness. The most abundant species were Atheta iheringi Bernhauer, 1908 (Staphylinidae) (1,685), Euspilotus sp. (Histeridae) (461), Stelidota geminata (Say, 1825) (Nitidulidae) (394), Xerosaprinus diptychus (Marseul, 1855) (Histeridae) (331) and Dermestes maculatus De Geer, 1774 (Dermestidae). Amongst these species, X. diptychus showed to be strongly influenced by seasonality, since 96.1% of the specimens were collected during the dry season.

  2. Effects of pitfall trap preservative on collections of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCravy, K.W.; Willand, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of six pitfall trap preservatives (5% acetic acid solution, distilled water, 70% ethanol, 50% ethylene glycol solution, 50% propylene glycol solution, and 10% saline solution) on collections of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) were studied in a west-central Illinois deciduous forest from May to October 2005. A total of 819 carabids, representing 33 species and 19 genera, were collected. Saline produced significantly fewer captures than did acetic acid, ethanol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol, while distilled water produced significantly fewer captures than did acetic acid. Significant associations between numbers of captures and treatment were seen in four species: Amphasia interstitialis (Say), Calathus opaculus LeConte, Chlaenius nemoralis Say, and Cyclotrachelus sodalis (LeConte). Results of this study suggest that type of preservative used can have substantial effects on abundance and species composition of carabids collected in pitfall traps.

  3. Description of the immature stages of nine species of Veturius (Coleoptera: Passalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Niño, Karen; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2015-02-26

    The third instar of Veturius aspina Kuwert, V. assimilis (Weber), V. simillimus Kuwert, V. sinuatocollis Kuwert, V. sinuatus (Eschscholtz), V. crassus (Smith), V. impressus Hincks (as well as pupal stage), V. negroensis Boucher, and the first instar of V. oberthuri (Hincks) (Coleoptera: Passalidae) are described for the first time based on specimens from Argentina, Brazil, and Colombia. The most distinctive characters for these species are the presence and distribution of primary setae and the position, number, and size of the teeth of the metathoracic legs. An evident difference in the number of micro-conical projections on the maxillary stipes and measurements of the pars stridens (mesocoxae) suggests that these characters are useful for species identification. We present an identification key to the species of known larval Veturius (13), representing the 17.6% of total species recognized into genus. Light micrographs and scanning electronic micrographs are included for detailed characters.

  4. Discovery of mycangia and the associated xylose-fermenting yeasts in stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Masahiko; Kubota, Kôhei; Matsushita, Norihisa; Togashi, Katsumi

    2010-03-01

    Most wood-feeding insects need an association with microbes to utilize wood as food, and some have special organs to store and convey the microbes. We report here the discovery of the microbe-storage organ (mycangium) in stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), which develop in decayed wood. The mycangium, which was discovered in the abdomen, is present in all adult females of 22 lucanid species examined in this study, but absent in adult males. By contrast, adult insects of both sexes of selected Passalidae, Geotrupidae, and Scarabaeidae, which are related to Lucanidae, lacked mycangia similar to those of the lucanid species. Yeast-like microbes were isolated from the mycangium of five lucanid species. DNA sequence analyses indicate that the microbes are closely related to the xylose-fermenting yeasts Pichia stipitis, Pichia segobiensis, or Pichia sp. known from the gut of a passalid species.

  5. Cerambycidae (Coleoptera coletados na Venezuela na copa de Matayba (Sapindaceae e Vochysia (Vochysiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerambycidae coletados em Surumoni, Amazonas, Venezuela, com o auxílio de uma grua, por armadilha de interceptação de vôo e armadilha luminosa nas copas de Matayba guianensis Aubl e Vochysia sp. resultaram em novos registros para 14 espécies e descrição de quatro novas: Erythropterus urucuri sp. nov. (Heteropsini, Eriphus ruBELLus sp. nov. (Trachyderini, Lissonotus kuaiuba sp. nov. (Lissonotini e Acyphoderes itaiuba sp. nov. (Rhinotragini.Cerambycidae (Coleoptera collected in Venezuela at the canopy of Matayba (Sapindaceae and Vochysia (Vochysiaceae. Cerambycidae collected in Surumoni, Amazonas, Venezuela, with help of a crane, made with interception and light traps in the canopy of Matayba guianensis Aubl and Vochysia sp. resulted in new records for 14 species and descriptions of four new species: Erythropterus urucuri sp. nov. (Heteropsini, Eriphus ruBELLus sp. nov. (Trachyderini, Lissonotus kuaiuba sp. nov. (Lissonotini and Acyphoderes itaiuba sp. nov. (Rhinotragini.

  6. Influence of trap placement and design on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Oliver, Jason B; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Youssef, Nadeer; Sawyer, Alan J; Mastro, Victor C

    2008-12-01

    The key to an effective pest management program for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera Buprestidae), is a survey program equipped with tools for detecting and delimiting populations. We studied the effects of trap design, color, and placement on the efficacy of sticky traps for capturing the emerald ash borer. There were significant differences in trap catch along a transect gradient from wooded to open field conditions, with most beetles being caught along the edge, or in open fields, 15-25 m outside an ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) (Oleaceae) woodlot. Greater emerald ash borer catch occurred on purple traps than on red or white traps. Traps placed in the mid-canopy of ash trees (13 m) caught significantly more beetles than those placed at ground level. We also describe a new trap design, a three-sided prism trap, which is relatively easy to assemble and deploy.

  7. New and emended descriptions of gregarines from flour beetles (Tribolium spp. and Palorus subdepressus: Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovy, J; Detwiler, J; Schwank, S; Bolek, M G; Knipes, A K; Langford, G J

    2007-10-01

    The following new gregarine taxa are described from larvae of flour beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): Awrygregarina billmani, n. gen., n. sp., from Tribolium brevicornis; Gregarina cloptoni, n. sp., from Tribolium freemani; Gregarina confusa, n. sp., from Tribolilum confusum; and Gregarina palori, n. sp., from Palorus subdepressus. In addition, the description of Gregarina minuta Ishii, 1914, from Tribolium castaneum, is emended. Scanning electron micrograph studies of these species' oocysts reveal differences in surface architecture. The Gregarina species have oocysts with longitudinal ridges, visible with SEM, whereas Awrygregarina billmani oocysts have fine circumferential striations; surface architecture is the main feature distinguishing the 2 gregarine genera. Although parasites from adult beetles are not included in the descriptions, adults of all host species can be infected experimentally using oocysts from the new taxa.

  8. Beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WE Santos

    Full Text Available The species richness, abundance and seasonality of Coleoptera fauna associated with pig carcasses exposed in a Caatinga area were examined. Tray, pitfall and modified Shannon traps were settled together to collect these insects during two seasons (dry and rainy. 4,851 beetles were collected, belonging to 19 families and 88 species. Staphylinidae (2,184 and Histeridae (1,264 were the most abundant families and accounted for 71.1% of the specimens collected. Scarabaeidae (15 showed the highest species richness. The most abundant species were Atheta iheringi Bernhauer, 1908 (Staphylinidae (1,685, Euspilotus sp. (Histeridae (461, Stelidota geminata (Say, 1825 (Nitidulidae (394, Xerosaprinus diptychus(Marseul, 1855 (Histeridae (331 and Dermestes maculatus De Geer, 1774 (Dermestidae. Amongst these species, X. diptychus showed to be strongly influenced by seasonality, since 96.1% of the specimens were collected during the dry season.

  9. The mortality of Oryzaephilus surinamensis Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Silvanidae induced by powdered plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłyś Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether powdered plants of different species namely: peppermint Mentha piperita (L. (Lamiaceae, wormwood Artemisia absinthium (L. (Asteraceae, common sage Salvia officinalis (L. (Lamiaceae, allspice Pimenta dioica (Linnaeus et Merrill (Myrtaceae and common garlic Allium sativum (L. (Amaryllidaceae, added to semolina using concentrations of 1.23, 3.61, and 5.88%, influence the mortality rate in the saw-toothed grain beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Silvanidae. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory at 28°C and relative humidity 60±5%. At the concentration of 1.23%, allspice seeds caused the highest mortality amongst the saw-toothed grain beetle. When concentrations of 3.61 and 5.88% were used, sage, peppermint and wormwood caused the highest statistically significant mortality of O. surinamensis

  10. Defensive Glands of the Darkling Beetle Mesomorphus villiger Blanchard (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae

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    C. M. Seena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive home invasion by the darkling beetle Mesomorphus villiger Blanchard 1853 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae during monsoon season make it a nuisance pest in many regions of south India. Morphology of defensive glands and mode of release and dispersal of the defensive secretion were analysed. Defensive glands were separated from the abdominal sternites by cutting along the posterior margin of the seventh sternite. Glands are evaginations of intersegmental membrane between the seventh and eighth sternites consisting of two long sac-like reservoirs, and glandular secretion is released by exudation and spread through epipleural gutter of elytra. Gradual release of the secretion is a strategy to repel the predators for a longer duration.

  11. Review of the Madagascan Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) with a revision of the genus Triodontus Westwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Andrey V; Montreuil, Olivier; Akhmetova, Lilia A

    2016-12-13

    The subfamily Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is reviewed from Madagascar. A total of four genera and 39 species were found, all being endemic to the island. The following five new species are described: Triodontus ankarafantsikae, Triodontus lemoulti, Triodontus viettei, Triodontus fairmairei, and Triodontus inexpectatus. The following new synonymies are proposed: Orphnus nigrita Brancsik, 1893 is synonym of Triodontus hova (Fairmaire, 1868); Triodontus occidentalis Paulian, 1977 and Orphnus obsoletus Brancsik, 1893 are synonyms of Triodontus nitidulus (Guérin-Méneville, 1844); Triodontus vadoni Paulian, 1977 and Triodontus perrotorum Paulian, 1977 are synonyms of Triodontus owas Westwood, 1852. Lectotypes are designated for the following names: Orphnus nitidulus Guérin-Méneville, 1844 and Orphnidius modestus Benderitter, 1914. Keys, descriptions, illustrations of habitus and male genitalia, and distributional records maps are given for all species.

  12. New species and records of pollen and sap beetles for Iran (Coleoptera: Kateretidae, Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audisio, Paolo; Cline, Andrew R; Lasoń, Andrzej; Jelínek, Josef; Sabatelli, Simone; Serri, Sayeh

    2017-01-09

    During recent expeditions in North and Southwest Iran, 10 species of Kateretidae and Nitidulidae (Coleoptera) were found. One species of Kateretidae, Brachyleptus bicoloratus Reitter, 1896, and three nitidulid species, Afrogethes schilskyi (Reitter, 1897), Stachygethes khnzoriani (Kirejtshuk, 1979), and S. nigerrimus (Rosenhauer, 1856) are recorded for the first time for the Iranian fauna (the latter is also a new record for Asia). Thymogethes ahriman (Jelínek, 1981) is herein resurrected to species rank, and two species, Thymogethes kassites sp. nov. and T. khorasanicus sp. nov., are described as new. An updated key to the known Near East and Afghan species of the genus Thymogethes Audisio & Cline, 2009 is also provided. Available and recently collected biological and distributional data, as well as short taxonomic comments, are given for the discussed species.

  13. Novas espécies de Cometes Audinet-Serville, 1828 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

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    Frank T. Hovore

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies de Cometes Audinet-Serville, 1828 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Disteniinae. São descritas treze novas espécies de Cometes Audinet-Serville, 1828, provenientes do México, América Central e do Sul: C. riley (Mexico, C. solis, C. morrisi e C. nearnsi (Costa Rica, C. turnbowi e C. giesberti (Panamá, C. lingafelteri, C. marcelae (Colômbia, C. hovorei e C. thomasi (Peru, C. solangeae (Bolívia e Brasil, C. monnei e C. mariahelenae (Brasil.Thirteen new species of Cometes Audinet-Serville, 1828 from Mexico, Central and South America are described and illustrated: C. rileyi from Mexico, C. solisi, C. nearnsi, and C. morrisifrom Costa Rica, C. turnbowi and C. giesberti from Panama, C. lingafelteri and C. marcelae from Colombia, C. hovorei and C. thomasi from Peru, C. solangeae from Bolivia and Brazil, and C. monnei and C. mariahelenae from Brazil.

  14. The Alticini (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae of Sicily: Recent records and updated checklist

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    Cosimo Baviera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper compiles an updated checklist of the Sicilian flea beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Galerucinae, Alticini by a critical bibliographic screening and adding new material, mainly collected by the first author in the last few decades. The data provided expand the known distribution of many poorly known species in Sicily. An updated checklist of the species recorded from the island, including those based on unpublished data or extracted from recently examined material, is supplied: 161 species are reported, about half of the whole Italian flea beetle fauna presently known. The new records for Sicily include seven species: Altica carduorum Meneville-Guerin, 1858; Chaetocnema obesa (Boieldieu, 1859; Longitarsus helvolus Kutschera, 1863; L. monticola Kutschera, 1863; L. rectilineatus (Foudras, 1860; Mniophila muscorum (Koch, 1803 and the alien species Epitrix hirtipennis (Melsheimer, 1847, an invasive pest of tobacco from North America. Finally, we question the occurrence of Longitarsus membranaceus (Foudras, 1960 in Sicily.

  15. Incorporating a Sorghum Habitat for Enhancing Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae in Cotton

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    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae prey on insect pests in cotton. The objective of this 2 yr on-farm study was to document the impact of a grain sorghum trap crop on the density of Coccinellidae on nearby cotton. Scymnus spp., Coccinella septempunctata (L., Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, Cycloneda munda (Say, and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant were found in sorghum over both years. Lady beetle compositions in sorghum and cotton and in yellow pyramidal traps were similar. For both years, density of lady beetles generally was higher on cotton with sorghum than on control cotton. Our results indicate that sorghum was a source of lady beetles in cotton, and thus incorporation of a sorghum habitat in farmscapes with cotton has great potential to enhance biocontrol of insect pests in cotton.

  16. Sinopse do gênero Strongylaspis Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Prioninae, Macrotomini

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    Monné Marcela L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Synopsis of the genus Strongylaspis Thomson, 1860 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Prioninae, Macrotomini. The genus Strongylaspis Thomson, 1860 with its twelve known species are briefly treated herein: S. batesi Lameere, 1903, S. bullatus Bates, 1872, S. championi Bates, 1884, S. corticarius (Erichson, 1848, S. dohrni Lameere, 1903, S. fryi Lameere, 1912, S. graniger Bates, 1884, S. hirticollis Tippmann, 1953, S. kraepelini Lameere, 1903, S. macrotomoides Tippmann, 1953, S. sericans Tippmann, 1953, S. sericeus Zajciw, 1970. The genus as well as the species, Strongylaspis championi, S. bullatus and S. corticarius are redescribed; the last one including characterization of wings and male and female terminalia. Four new species are added: S. aureus sp. nov. (BRASIL, Amazonas, S. migueli sp. nov. (BRASIL, Mato Grosso, S. christianae sp. nov. (BRASIL, Mato Grosso and S. bolivianus sp. nov. (BOLIVIA. All the species, but S. dohrni, are illustrated and keyed. Maps of distribution are also given.

  17. What do we know about winter active ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe?

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    Radomir Jaskula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the current knowledge on winter active Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe. In total 73 winter active species are listed, based on literature and own observations. Ground beetles are among the three most numerous Coleoptera families active during the autumn to spring period. The winter community of Carabidae is composed both of larvae (mainly autumn breeding species and adults, as well as of epigeic species and those inhabiting tree trunks. Supranivean fauna is characterized by lower species diversity than the subnivean fauna. The activity of ground beetles decreases in late autumn, is lowest during mid-winter and increases in early spring. Carabidae are noted as an important food source in the diet of insectivorous mammals. They are also predators, hunting small winter active invertebrates.

  18. DAMAGE CAUSED BY TRIBOLIUM CASTANEUM (COLEOPTERA: TENEBRIONIDAE IN STORED BRAZIL NUT

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    E. M. Pires

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tribolium castaneum is an insect that occurs worldwide and it is a pest that attacks stored products, in particular, grains and seeds. The adult and immature forms are categorized as secondary pests which feed on grains or seeds previously damage in storage conditions. The objective of this study was to describe the type of damage caused by adults and immature of T. castaneum in Brazil nuts and identify the type of damage caused by Coleoptera. It was also verified whether the shell can protect the almond from the attack of this pest. The lesions inflicted by this insect starts as a scratched surface, which evolves into galleries and even injuries capable of modifying the original shape of the almond. Due to its capacity to promote considerable damage with consequent losses in the value of the nuts, T. castaneum may be listed among pests of Brazil nut categorized as primary pest by its ability to initiate injuries in the intact almond.

  19. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Sweeney, Jon D; Demerchant, Ian; Turgeon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We report ten new species records for the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick, Canada from the families Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae. Anthrenus fuscus Olivier and Anthrenus museorum (Linnaeus) of the family Dermestidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Endecatomus rugosus (Randall) and the family Endecatomidae are recorded for the first time for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Two Bostrichidae, the adventive Dinoderus minutus (Fabricius) and the native Stephanopachys substriatus (Paykull), are newly recorded for the province. Five species of Ptinidae, the adventive Anobium punctatum (DeGeer) and Microbregma emarginatum emarginatum (Duftschmid), and the native Hadrobregmus notatus (Say), Ptilinus lobatus Casey, and Ptilinus ruficornis Say are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species.

  20. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae

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    Reginald Webster

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report ten new species records for the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick, Canada from the families Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae. Anthrenus fuscus Olivier and Anthrenus museorum (Linnaeus of the family Dermestidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Endecatomus rugosus (Randall and the family Endecatomidae are recorded for the first time for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Two Bostrichidae, the adventive Dinoderus minutus (Fabricius and the native Stephanopachys substriatus (Paykull, are newly recorded for the province. Five species of Ptinidae, the adventive Anobium punctatum (DeGeer and Microbregma emarginatum emarginatum (Duftschmid, and the native Hadrobregmus notatus (Say, Ptilinus lobatus Casey, and Ptilinus ruficornis Say are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species.

  1. The scarab beetle tribe Pentodontini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) of Colombia: taxonomy, natural history, and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Margarita M; Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor J; Amat-García, Germán

    2015-11-27

    Pentodontini is the most diverse tribe of Dynastinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), and most of the genera are restricted to a single biogeographic region. In this work, the taxonomic composition of the Pentodontini in Colombia was determined, and genera and species were diagnosed based on external morphology and male genitalia. Records of 1,580 specimens from 31 departments and 398 localities in Colombia were obtained from 24 species in the genera Bothynus Hope, Denhezia Dechambre, Euetheola Bates, Hylobothynus Ohaus, Oxyligyrus Arrow, Parapucaya Prell, Pucaya Ohaus, and Tomarus Erichson. Oxyligyrus cayennensis Endrödi, Tomarus cicatricosus (Prell), and T. pullus (Prell) are reported for the first time from Colombia. Pucaya punctata Endrödi is reduced to synonymy with Pucaya pulchra Arrow. Possible changes in the classification of Denhezia Dechambre are discussed. Dichotomous keys are provided for Colombian genera and species. Taxonomic descriptions and distribution maps are included for all species.

  2. Improved Visualization of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae—Part II: Alimentary Canal Components and Measurements

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    Tawni L. Crippen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae is a pest of stored food products and problematic to every type of poultry production facility. Larvae and adults can ingest and harbor foodborne and poultry pathogens. Determining the efficiency of this insect’s capacity to transmit disease is critical to improving management of A. diaperinus on poultry facilities and providing a safe food supply for human consumption. However, a deficiency exists in the literature reporting measurements of the gut and its defined segments. Previous reports include line drawing depictions, which aid little in the determination of the pathogen reservoir potential of these insects. Advances in technology allowed more accurate visualization and precise measurement of gross anatomical features of the alimentary canal. A photographic depiction to aid the researcher in the visualization of anatomical features and accurate measurements of the alimentary canal for these insects is presented here.

  3. The tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) of Angola: a descriptive catalogue and designation of neotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Artur R M; Capela, Rúben A

    2013-11-01

    An annotated catalogue of the species and subspecies of tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Cicindelinae) hitherto known from Angola is given. A total of 89 forms (74 species and 15 subspecies) is recorded from this southwestern country of Africa. Within this assemblage there are 31 endemic forms (33.3%). Some species are represented by only the holotype specimen (some without locality) or the type series. Others were recorded based on a single specimen. Records for six species previously unknow from Angola are given: Foveodromica sp. n. 1, Foveodromica sp. n. 2, Ophryodera rufomarginata bradshawi Péringuey, 1888, Elliptica muata parallelestriata (W. Horn, 1923), Lophyra differens (W. Horn, 1892) and Myriochila jucunda (Péringuey, 1892). A historical review, as well as some considerations on the distribution and conservation status of these beetles in Angola are also presented.

  4. Identification of candidate chemosensory genes in the antennal transcriptome of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Feng, Ming-Feng; He, Meng-Zhu; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-03-01

    We present the first antennal transcriptome sequencing information for the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Analysis of the transcriptome dataset obtained 52,216,616 clean reads, from which 35,363 unigenes were assembled. Of these, 18,820 unigenes showed significant similarity (E-value molitor OBPs and CSPs are closely related to those of T. castaneum. Real-time quantitative PCR assays showed that eight TmolOBP genes were antennae-specific. Of these, TmolOBP5, TmolOBP7 and TmolOBP16 were found to be predominantly expressed in male antennae, while TmolOBP17 was expressed mainly in the legs of males. Several other genes were identified that were neither tissue-specific nor sex-specific. These results establish a firm foundation for future studies of the chemosensory genes in T. molitor.

  5. A SEM study of the antenna and mouthparts of Omosita colon (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Kun; Huang, Min

    2016-12-01

    There are direct relationships between the behavioral mechanisms and sensilla. To obtain a better understanding of the behavioral mechanisms in Omosita colon (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), we investigated the types, quantities, and distribution of sensilla on the antenna and mouthparts of O. colon by scanning electron microscopy. The clavate antenna comprised the scape, pedicel, and nine segment flagellomeres and had six types of sensilla, including two subtypes of sensilla chaetica (SC), three subtypes of sensilla basiconica (SB) and sensilla trichodea (ST), and one type of sensilla cavity, sensilla styloconica, and Böhm bristles (BB). The chewing mouthparts of O. colon consist of the labrum, mandible, maxillae, labium, and hypopharynx and had seven types sensilla, including two subtypes of SC and sensilla placodea, seven subtypes of SB, and one type of BB, ST, sensilla coeloconica, and sensilla campaniformia. In this research, we also deduced the relationships between the sensilla on the antenna and mouthparts and their functions.

  6. ALGUNS ASPECTOS DA BIOLOGIA DO SERRADOR, Oncideres dejeani THOMPSON, 1868 (COLEOPTERA : CERAMBYCIDAE

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    Adriane Brill Thum

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se este trabalho objetivando determinar alguns parâmetros comparativos da biologia do serrador, Oncideres dejeani Thomson,1868 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae sobre aroeira preta, Lithraea brasiliensis L. March (Anacardiaceae e pau de leite, Sebastiania brasiliensis Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae, em São Sepé - RS, durante o período 1989-1990. Mediu-se o comprimento e a largura do orifício de emergência dos adultos do serrador e, o comprimento e volume da galeria larval-pupal. O orifício de emergência do adulto de O. dejeani apresenta formato ovalado em pau de leite e quase circular em aroeira preta. A larva se desenvolve em galhos de vários diâmetros, independente da espécie de planta hospedeira, consome igual volume de madeira e constroi galeria de comprimento similar nas duas espécies botânicas estudadas

  7. Effects of rearing conditions on reproduction of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Juli R; Ayer, Tracy; Fraser, Ivich

    2011-04-01

    Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) can be successfully reared on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), larvae feeding in chambers drilled in small ash twigs that are wrapped with floral tape. Females maintained in groups with males for one week can receive enough sperm for production of female progeny throughout their lives. Volatiles released by emerald ash borer adults feeding on ash foliage increased parasitoid fecundity over ash foliage alone or no stimulus. The temperature at which the parasitoids were reared ranged from 20 to 25 degrees C in a daily cycle; however, raising the daily maximum temperature to 28 degrees C did not affect parasitoid longevity or fecundity. Adult females lived between 12 and 127 d, with an average of 60.8 +/- 4.5 d. Males lived slightly longer, with an average of 66 +/- 4.5 d. The first clutch of eggs was laid when the female was between 2 and 42 d old, with the average preoviposition period lasting 11.4 +/- 1.4 or 19.5 +/- 2.0 d in 2007 and 2009 trials, respectively. A higher proportion of the emerald ash borer larvae were feeding and thus attractive to parasitoids in the 2009 trial, and female S. agrili laid an average of 9.5 +/- 1.0 clutches containing 5.4 +/- 0.2 eggs, for an average of 51.2 eggs per female. Approximately three quarters of the progeny were female. The number of eggs per clutch was significantly greater when deposited on larger emerald ash borer larvae, further highlighting the need for quality larvae in rearing. Chilling S. agrili pupae at 10 degrees C to stockpile them for summer release was not successful; chilling resulted in lower survival and lower fecundity of emerging progeny. Female S. agrili proved capable of attacking emerald ash borer larvae through even the thickest bark of an ash tree that was 30-cm diameter at breast height. Even emerald ash borer larvae that were creating overwintering chambers in the outer sapwood of the tree were successfully

  8. Does a shift in host plants trigger speciation in the Alpine leaf beetle Oreina speciosissima (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae?

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    Borer Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the Coleoptera, the largest order in the animal kingdom, the exclusively herbivorous Chrysomelidae are recognized as one of the most species rich beetle families. The evolutionary processes that have fueled radiation into the more than thirty-five thousand currently recognized leaf beetle species remain partly unresolved. The prominent role of leaf beetles in the insect world, their omnipresence across all terrestrial biomes and their economic importance as common agricultural pest organisms make this family particularly interesting for studying the mechanisms that drive diversification. Here we specifically focus on two ecotypes of the alpine leaf beetle Oreina speciosissima (Scop., which have been shown to exhibit morphological differences in male genitalia roughly corresponding to the subspecies Oreina speciosissima sensu stricto and Oreina speciosissima troglodytes. In general the two ecotypes segregate along an elevation gradient and by host plants: Oreina speciosissima sensu stricto colonizes high forb vegetation at low altitude and Oreina speciosissima troglodytes is found in stone run vegetation at higher elevations. Both host plants and leaf beetles have a patchy geographical distribution. Through use of gene sequencing and genome fingerprinting (AFLP we analyzed the genetic structure and habitat use of Oreina speciosissima populations from the Swiss Alps to examine whether the two ecotypes have a genetic basis. By investigating a wide range of altitudes and focusing on the structuring effect of habitat types, we aim to provide answers regarding the factors that drive adaptive radiation in this phytophagous leaf beetle. Results While little phylogenetic resolution was observed based on the sequencing of four DNA regions, the topology and clustering resulting from AFLP genotyping grouped specimens according to their habitat, mostly defined by plant associations. A few specimens with intermediate morphologies

  9. Family-Level Sampling of Mitochondrial Genomes in Coleoptera: Compositional Heterogeneity and Phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Barton, Christopher; Haran, Julien; Ahrens, Dirk; Culverwell, C Lorna; Ollikainen, Alison; Dodsworth, Steven; Foster, Peter G; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial genomes are readily sequenced with recent technology and thus evolutionary lineages can be densely sampled. This permits better phylogenetic estimates and assessment of potential biases resulting from heterogeneity in nucleotide composition and rate of change. We gathered 245 mitochondrial sequences for the Coleoptera representing all 4 suborders, 15 superfamilies of Polyphaga, and altogether 97 families, including 159 newly sequenced full or partial mitogenomes. Compositional heterogeneity greatly affected 3rd codon positions, and to a lesser extent the 1st and 2nd positions, even after RY coding. Heterogeneity also affected the encoded protein sequence, in particular in the nad2, nad4, nad5, and nad6 genes. Credible tree topologies were obtained with the nhPhyML ("nonhomogeneous") algorithm implementing a model for branch-specific equilibrium frequencies. Likelihood searches using RAxML were improved by data partitioning by gene and codon position. Finally, the PhyloBayes software, which allows different substitution processes for amino acid replacement at various sites, produced a tree that best matched known higher level taxa and defined basal relationships in Coleoptera. After rooting with Neuropterida outgroups, suborder relationships were resolved as (Polyphaga (Myxophaga (Archostemata + Adephaga))). The infraorder relationships in Polyphaga were (Scirtiformia (Elateriformia ((Staphyliniformia + Scarabaeiformia) (Bostrichiformia (Cucujiformia))))). Polyphagan superfamilies were recovered as monophyla except Staphylinoidea (paraphyletic for Scarabaeiformia) and Cucujoidea, which can no longer be considered a valid taxon. The study shows that, although compositional heterogeneity is not universal, it cannot be eliminated for some mitochondrial genes, but dense taxon sampling and the use of appropriate Bayesian analyses can still produce robust phylogenetic trees.

  10. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  11. A systematic revision of Operclipygus Marseul (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini

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    Michael Caterino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We revise the large Neotropical genus Operclipygus Marseul, in the histerid tribe Exosternini (Histeridae: Histerinae. We synonymize 3 species, move 14 species from other genera, sink the genus Tribalister Horn into Operclipygus, and describe 138 species as new, bringing the total to 177 species of Operclipygus. Keys are provided for the identification of all species, and the majority of the species are illustrated by habitus and male genitalia illustrations. The species are diverse throughout tropical South and Central America, with only a few species extending into the temperate parts of North America. The majority of species can be recognized by the presence of a distinct stria or sulcus along the apical margin of the pygidium, though it is not exclusive to the genus. Natural history details for species of Operclipygus are scant, as most specimens have been collected through the use of passive flight interception traps. Many are probably generally associated with decaying vegetation and leaf litter, where they prey on small arthropods. But a small proportion are known inquilines, with social insects such as ants and termites, and also with some burrowing mammals, such as Ctenomys Blainville. The genus now includes the following species groups and species: Operclipygus sulcistrius group [O. lucanoides sp. n., O. schmidti sp. n., O. simplistrius sp. n., O. sulcistrius Marseul, 1870], O. mirabilis group [O. mirabilis (Wenzel & Dybas, 1941 comb. n., O. pustulifer sp. n., O. plaumanni sp. n., O. sinuatus sp. n., O. mutuca sp. n., O. carinistrius (Lewis, 1908 comb. n., O. parensis sp. n., O. schlingeri sp. n.], O. kerga group [O. kerga (Marseul, 1870, O. planifrons sp. n., O. punctistrius sp. n.], O. conquisitus group [O. bicolor sp. n., O. conquisitus (Lewis, 1902, O. friburgius (Marseul, 1864], O. impuncticollis group [O. bickhardti sp. n., O. britannicus sp. n., O. impuncticollis (Hinton, 1935], O. panamensis group [O. crenatus (Lewis, 1888, O

  12. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an Inter

  13. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  14. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...... of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would...

  15. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...

  16. Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of Physodactylinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Policena Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A phylogeny based on male morphological characters and taxonomic revision of the Physodactylinae genera are presented. The phylogenetic analysis based on 66 male characters resulted in the polyphyly of Physodactylinae which comprises four independent lineages. Oligostethius and Idiotropia from Africa were found to be sister groups. Teslasena from Brazil was corroborated as belonging to Cardiophorinae clade. The South American genera Physodactylus and Dactylophysus were found to be sister groups and phylogenetically related to Heterocrepidius species. The Oriental Toxognathus resulted as sister group of that clade plus (Dicrepidius ramicornis (Lissomus sp, Physorhynus erythrocephalus. Taxonomic revisions include diagnoses and redescriptions of genera and distributional records and illustrations of species. Key to species of Teslasena, Toxognathus, Dactylophysus and Physodactylus are also provided. Teslasena lucasi is synonymized with T. femoralis. A new species of Dactylophysus is described, D. hirtus sp. nov., and lectotypes are designated to non-conspecific D. mendax sensu Fleutiaux and Heterocrepidius mendax Candèze. Physodactylus niger is removed from synonymy under P. oberthuri; P. carreti is synonymized with P. niger; P. obesus and P. testaceus are synonymized with P. sulcatus. Nine new species are described in Physodactylus: P. asper sp. nov., P. brunneus sp. nov., P. chassaini sp. nov., P. flavifrons sp. nov., P. girardi sp. nov., P. gounellei sp. nov., P. latithorax sp. nov., P. patens sp. nov. and P. tuberculatus sp. nov.

  17. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  18. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  19. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  20. İstanbul-Beylerbeyi Sarayı’nda Coleoptera Türlerine Karşı Sülfüril Florit Kullanılarak Yapılan Fumigasyon Uygulaması

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Neşe; Taşkın, Hatice; KARAMAN, Rıfat

    2012-01-01

    ÖzetBeylerbeyi Sarayı’nın ahşap olan taşıyıcı sistem elemanlarında ve tarihi ahşap mobilyalarında, Coleoptera takımına ait, yaygın olarak Anobium punctatum (De Geer, 1774) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), az miktarda Lyctus brunneus (Stephens, 1830) (Coleoptera: Lyctidae) ve Hylotrupes bajulus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)’un neden olduğu yoğun bir enfeksiyon tespit edilmiştir. Beylerbeyi Sarayı’ndaki ahşaplarda oluşan böcek enfeksiyonunu yok etmek için Türkiye’de ilk kez sülfüril flori...

  1. Locomotor activity of Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae on Chilean sandy beaches Actividad locomotora de Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, enebrionidae en playas arenosas chilenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO JARAMILLO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The locomotor activity of the beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera Tenebrionidae was studied on the surface of the substrate in two sandy beaches of the Chilean coast: one in north central (ca. 29ºS and the other in south central Chile (ca.39ºS. During the summer period of 1991 the circadian locomotor activity was studied in the southern beach, while during that of 1997 in both beaches. To analyze the activity, pitfall traps were used which were ordered along two transects extended between the upper beach and the resurgence zone. The traps were checked (i.e. collection of captured insects every two hours for a total period of 26 hours. The results showed that the adults of P. maculata were mostly active during the night hours, whereas the larvae were active during both, the day and night. Studies carried out in the beach located in south central Chile show that differences in the tidal range (neap vs. spring tides do not affect the activity patterns. During the locomotor activity, adult and larvae move to lower intertidal levels than those usually occupied while buried. Results of laboratory experiments using actographs under conditions of darkness and constant temperature, suggest that adults and larvae of P. maculata presented a circadian rhythm similar to that observed in the field experiments. It is concluded that P. maculata presents a behaviour that appear to be under control of an endogenous rhythm, without showing differences in the circadian rhythm of activity when beaches located at different latitudes are comparedSe estudió la actividad locomotriz del escarabajo Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae sobre la superficie del sustrato de dos playas arenosas de la costa de Chile: una en el centro norte (ca. 29ºS y otra en el centro sur (ca. 39ºS. Durante el período estival de 1991 se estudió la actividad locomotriz circadiana en la playa del centro sur y durante el de 1997 en ambas playas. Para analizar

  2. Revision of the pollen beetle genus Meligethes (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Audisio

    2014-10-01

    , and M. melleus Grouvelle, 1908. The male of Meligethes lloydi Easton, 1968, is described and figured for the first time. The female genitalia of Meligethes auricomus Rebmann, 1956, M. cinereus Jelínek, 1978, and M. griseus Jelínek, 1978 are described and figured for the first time. Available information on insect-host-plant relationships and ecology are summarized for each species; probably all are associated as larvae with flowers of Rosaceae, chiefly of members of the closely related genera Rosa L., Rubus L., Prunus L., and Crataegus Tourn. ex L. All treated species are grouped in two here revaluated subgenera (Meligethes s.str. and Odonthogethes Reitter, 1871, and tentatively grouped also in species-groups and (when necessary species-complexes, based on their morphology.

  3. Nuevas citas de Coleoptera para la Argentina (Carabidae, Lucanidae, Scarabaeidae y Tenebrionidae New records of Coleoptera for Argentina (Carabidae, Lucanidae, Scarabeidae and Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roig-Juñent

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En enero de 2003, se realizó un viaje de campaña con el fin de recolectar materiales en áreas poco prospectadas de la estepa patagónica de Mendoza y Neuquén, Argentina, así como en ambientes de bosques de Nothofagus en la provincia de Neuquén. Las recolecciones se realizaron en forma manual, usando trampas con cebo y trampas de luz de mercurio. El material recolectado permite citar por primera vez para la Argentina los géneros Nothobroscus Roig-Juñent & Ball y Mimophilorizus Mateu (Carabidae, Callyntra Solier y Homocyrtus Reitter (Tenebrionidae. Además, se citan por primera vez para la Argentina las especies Cnemalobus sulciferus Philippi (Carabidae, Allidiostoma landbecki (Philippi, Macrodactylus chilensis Solier y Brachysternus marginatus (Germain (Scarabeidae y Pycnosiphorus philippii (Westwood (Lucanidae. Se provee una breve descripción de los ambientes en donde estas especies fueron encontradas.A short expedition to northern Patagonia was made in January 2003. The main goal of the trip was to survey the diversity of some families of Coleoptera in the insufficient explored steppes in Mendoza and Neuquén provinces, Argentina and Nothofagus forests of Neuquén province. The techniques included manual collection and the use of different kinds of traps, such as with bite or artificial light of mercury. The study of the material revealed four new genera records and four new species records for the country: Nothobroscus Roig-Juñent & Ball and Mimophilorizus Mateu (Carabidae, Callyntra Solier and Homocyrtus Reitter (Tenebrionidae are the new genus records. Cnemalobus sulciferus Philippi (Carabidae, Allidiostoma landbecki (Philippi, Macrodactylus chilensis Solier, and Brachysternus marginatus (Germain (Scarabeidae, and Pycnosiphorus philippii (Westwood (Lucanidae are the new species records. A brief description of the habitats where the species were collected is provided.

  4. Molecular phylogeny of the burying beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Nicrophorinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Derek S; Venables, Chandra

    2013-12-01

    Burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus) are well-known for their monopolization of small vertebrate carcasses in subterranean crypts and complex biparental care behaviors. They have been the focus of intense behavioral, ecological, and conservation research since the 1980s yet no thorough phylogenetic estimate for the group exists. Herein, we infer relationships, test past hypotheses of relationships, and test biogeographic scenarios among 55 of the subfamily Nicrophorinae's currently valid and extant 72 species. Two mitochondrial genes, COI and COII, and two nuclear genes, the D2 region of 28S, and the protein coding gene CAD, provided 3,971 nucleotides for 58 nicrophorine and 5 outgroup specimens. Ten partitions, with each modeled by GTR+I+G, were used for a 100 M generation MrBayes analysis and maximum likelihood bootstrapping with Garli. The inferred Bayesian phylogeny was mostly well-resolved with only three weak branches of biogeographic relevance. The common ancestor of the subfamily and of the genus Nicrophorus was reconstructed as Old World with four separate transitions to the New World and four reverse colonizations of the Old World from the New. Divergence dating from analysis with BEAST indicate the genus Nicrophorus originated in the Cretaceous, 127-99 Ma. Most prior, pre-cladistic hypotheses of relationships were strongly rejected while most modern hypotheses were largely congruent with monophyletic groups in our estimated phylogeny. Our results reject a recent hypothesis that Nicrophorus morio Gebler, 1817 (NEW STATUS as valid species) is a subspecies of N. germanicus (L., 1758). Two subgenera of Nicrophorus are recognized: NecroxenusSemenov-Tian-Shanskij, 1933, and NicrophorusFabricius, 1775.

  5. Searching for natural lineages within the Cerylonid Series (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James A; Whiting, Michael F; McHugh, Joseph V

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the diverse beetle superfamily Cucujoidea are poorly known. The Cerylonid Series (C.S.) is the largest of all proposed superfamilial cucujoid groups, comprising eight families and representing most of the known cucujoid species diversity. The monophyly of the C.S., however, has never been formally tested and the higher-level relationships among and within the constituent families remain equivocal. Here we present a phylogenetic study based on 18S and 28S rDNA for 16 outgroup taxa and 61 C.S. ingroup taxa, representing seven of the eight C.S. families and 20 of 39 subfamilies. We test the monophyly of the C.S., investigate the relationships among the C.S. families, and test the monophyly of the constituent families and subfamilies. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the combined data was achieved via standard static alignment parsimony analyses, Direct Optimization using parsimony, and partitioned Bayesian analysis. All three analyses support the paraphyly of Cucujoidea with respect to Tenebrionoidea and confirm the monophyly of the C.S. The C.S. families Bothrideridae, Cerylonidae, Discolomatidae, Coccinellidae and Corylophidae are supported as monophyletic in all analyses. Only the Bayesian analysis recovers a monophyletic Latridiidae. Endomychidae is recovered as polyphyletic in all analyses. Of the 14 subfamilies with multiple terminals in this study, 11 were supported as monophyletic. The corylophid subfamily Corylophinae and the coccinellid subfamilies Chilocorinae and Scymninae are recovered as paraphyletic. A sister grouping of Anamorphinae+Corylophidae is supported in all analyses. Other taxonomic implications are discussed in light of our results.

  6. Una nueva especie de Meloe Linnaeus, 1758 del suroeste de Marruecos incluida en el grupo de M. (Eurymeloe rugosus Marsham, 1802 (Coleoptera: Meloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz, José L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific collections of the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC, Madrid hold an extense set of entomological materials collected in Morocco along the first decades of the XXth century by the preeminent naturalist M. Martínez de la Escalera. Morphological studies of the specimens of the genus Meloe Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Meloidae reveals the existence of populations morphologically differentiated along the coastal regions of Essaouira and Ifni. These populations are included within the Meloe rugosus Marsham, 1802 species group in the subgenus Eurymeloe Reitter, 1911. Their differential traits with respect to all other North African and European species of the Meloe rugosus species group are constant, and permit considering these populations as a taxonomic independent unit described herein, Meloe baamarani n. sp. This new species is characterized by having a black, opaque, general coloration all over the body and appendages; black short vestiture; broad head with broadly rounded temples, without median longitudinal groove; long antennae, with segments III to VIII subcylindrical and longer than wide; pronotum transverse, with convergent sides toward the base, without median groove; head and pronotum punctuation dense; aedeagus narrow, median lobe wide and strong, dorsally sinuous, with ventral hooks close to the apex. Meloe baamarani can be only confused on the western regions of northern Africa with Meloe mediterraneus Müller, 1925. This species shares a general appearance with M. baamarani, but differs in many morphological traits. Among those, tegument micro-reticulation, absence of median groove along the head, pronotum morphology and macrosculpture, and configuration of the male genitalia, are included.Las colecciones científicas del Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC, Madrid albergan un extenso material entomológico recogido en Marruecos a principios del siglo XX por el insigne naturalista M. Mart

  7. Efficacy of traps, lures, and repellents for Xylosandrus compactus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and other ambrosia beetles on Coffea arabica plantations and Acacia koa nurseries in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. G. Burbano; M.G. Wright; N.E. Gillette; S. Mori; N. Dudley; N. Jones; M. Kaufmann

    2012-01-01

    The black twig borer, Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a pest of coffee and many endemic Hawaiian plants. Traps baited with chemical attractants commonly are used to capture ambrosia beetles for purposes of monitoring, studying population dynamics, predicting outbreaks, and mass trapping to reduce damage...

  8. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica v. virgifera (16,747 bp) and D. barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and...

  9. Distribution of trunk-injected 14C-imidacloprid in ash trees and effects on emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Mota-Sánchez; Bert M. Cregg; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert M. Hollingworth

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive exotic pest of North American ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. Trunk injection of imidacloprid is commonly used to protect landscape ash trees from A. planipennis damage. Efficacy can vary and little is known about the...

  10. 伊朗北部Golestan省天牛科(鞘翅目)昆虫种类%The species of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) from Golestan province, northern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Najmeh SAMIN; Hamid SAKENIN

    2015-01-01

    天牛(鞘翅目Coleoptera:天牛科Cerambycidae)是树木和灌木最重要的害虫.本文记录了伊朗北部Golestan省的天牛种类,总计采集和鉴定了5亚科(Aseminae,Cerambycinae,Lamiinae,Lepturinae和Prioninae)30种天牛.

  11. Effects of exposure to agricultural drainage ditch water on survivorship, distribution, and abundnance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae) in headwater streams of the Cedar Creek watershed, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle Beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae) require very good water quality, mature streams with riffle habitat, and high dissolved oxygen content. As such, they prove to be good indicators of ecological health in agricultural headwater streams. We conducted static renewal aquatic bioassays using water fro...

  12. CONTRIBUTION TO THE COGNITION OF THE FAUNAS OF CARABIDAES (COLEOPTERA - CARABIDAE FROM THE VINEYARDS FROM THE VINEGROWING CENTER IN COPOU - IASSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M TALMACIU

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The researches were made during 1992-2001. There were collected 10704 specimens of carabidaes (Coleoptera- Carabidae. The species with the largest number of collected specimens were: Pseudophonus rufi pes, Harpalus distinguendus, Pseudophonus griseus, Brachynus explodens, Brachynus crepitans and Amara familiaris.

  13. A new species of oobius trjapitzin (hymenoptera:encyrtidae) from the russian far east that parasitizes eggs of emerald ash borer (coleoptera:buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from the Russian Far East, Oobius primorskyensis Yao et Duan is described. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from the previ...

  14. Releases, distribution and abundance of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum, Solanaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biological control program against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) released 176,643 Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Florida from 2003 to 2008. The spatial distribution of releases was clustered with more beetles released in south/central Flor...

  15. First record of Braconidae as parasitoids of Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with notes on the ecology of Spathius erythrocephalus Wesmael (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonsignore, C.P.; Achterberg, van C.; Vacante, V.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time an ichneumonoid parasitoid is reported from the peach flatheaded rootborer Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in a heavily infested plum and apricot orchard in south-western Sicily. In 2005 and 2006 the ecology of the ectoparasitoid Spathius erythrocep

  16. The host range and impact of Bikasha collaris (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a promising candidate agent for biological control of Chinese tallow, Triadica sebifera (Euphorbiaceae) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native to China, the Chinese tallow, Triadica sebifera (Euphorbiaceae) is an aggressive woody invader in the southeastern United States. The flea beetle, Bikasha collaris (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a common herbivore attacking this plant in China. To evaluate its potential as a biological contr...

  17. Establishing abiotic and biotic factors necessary for reliable male pheromone production and attraction to pheromones by female plum curculios Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a key pest of stone and pome fruit. Though grandisoic acid was identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone for this species, other components likely exist, as have been identified various curculionids. To determ...

  18. Effects of combined thiamethoxam and diatomaceous earth on mortality and progeny production of four Pakistani populations of Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae) on wheat, rice and maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioassays were conducted to evaluate the effects of combining thiamethoxam at 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg with the diatomaceous earth (DE) formulation, SilicoSec, at the rate of 100 mg/kg against four diverse populations of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae) th...

  19. Mites of the families Neopygmephoridae and Scutacaridae associated with variegated mud-loving beetles (Coleoptera: Heteroceridae) from Russia and Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, Alexander A; Sazhnev, Alexey S

    2016-10-14

    In this paper we describe a new monotypic genus Protoallopygmephorus gen. nov. and two new species of the genus Allopygmephorus Cross, 1965, A. spinisetus sp. nov. and A. punctatus sp. nov. Specimens were collected phoretic on beetles of the family Heteroceridae (Coleoptera) in Russia and Kazakhstan. Scutacarus sphaeroideus Karafiat, 1959 (Acari: Scutacaridae) is recorded on Heteroceridae for the first time.

  20. Efficacy of fipronil for protecting individual pines from mortality attributed to attack by western pine beetle and mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.J. Fettig; A.S. Munson; C.I. Jorgenson; D.M. and Grosman

    2010-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: C~rculionidae, Scolytinae) are commonly recognized as important tree mortality agents in coniferous forests of the western U.S. Most species feed on the phloem and cambium, or xylem tissue of woody plants; and a few are recognized as the most destructive of all forest insect pests. The last decade has seen elevated levels of bark beetle caused...

  1. Immunofluorescence localization and ultrastructure of Stewart’s wilt disease bacterium Pantoea stewartii in maize leaves and in its flea beetle vector Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea stewartii is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, the most serious bacterial disease of sweet corn and maize in the North-Central and Eastern USA. P. stewartii is transmitted mainly by the corn flea beetle Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and this bacterium is a...

  2. Post entry interception of the yellow-spotted longhorned beetle,Psacothea hilaris (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Italy Genbank Accession Number GU244486

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psacothea hilaris (Pascoe) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) known as the yellow-spotted longhorned beetle is native from eastern Asia (China, Japan including Ryukyu, Shikoku and Honshu archipelago and Taïwan) where it attacks plants belonging to Moraceae family, in particular to Morus and Ficus genera. In...

  3. Preliminary evaluation of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae)as a predator of the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predatory lady beetle Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was evaluated as a potential biological control agent against the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), a newly-invasive pest of ficus plants. Adult D. catalinae females were starved for ...

  4. Nonhost angiosperm volatiles and verbenone protect individual ponderosa pines from attack by western pine beetle and red turpentine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Christopher P. Dabney; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Dezene P.W. Huber

    2008-01-01

    Nonhost angiosperm volatiles (NAV) and verbenone were tested for their ability to protect individual ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws., from attack by western pine beetle (WPB), Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, and red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae). A combination of (

  5. Evaluation of lure combinations containing essential oils and volatile spiroketals for detection of host-seeking Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a disease responsible for widespread mortality of trees in the Lauraceae in the southeastern U.S. Early detection of in...

  6. Biology and host associations of redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), exotic vector of laurel wilt killing redbay trees in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Hanula; Albert E. Mayfield; Stephen W. Fraedrich; Robert J. Babaglia

    2008-01-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolyhnae), and its fungal symbiont, Rafaelea sp., are new introductions to the southeastern United States responsible for the wilt of mature redbay, Persea borbonia (L) Spreng., trees. In 2006 and 2007, we investigated the...

  7. Entomopathogenic fungi as a biological control agents for the vector of the laurel wilt disease, the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB), Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt (LW), a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae, including the most commercially important crop in this family, avocado, Pe...

  8. Effect of trap size, trap height, and age of lure for on sampling Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and its flight periodicity and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is a non-native pest that vectors laurel wilt disease in plants within the family Lauraceae. To better understand the dynamics and behavior of this newly introduced pest, flight behavior was studied in natural areas with host species in Ala...

  9. First record of Braconidae as parasitoids of Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with notes on the ecology of Spathius erythrocephalus Wesmael (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonsignore, C.P.; Achterberg, van C.; Vacante, V.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time an ichneumonoid parasitoid is reported from the peach flatheaded rootborer Capnodis tenebrionis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in a heavily infested plum and apricot orchard in south-western Sicily. In 2005 and 2006 the ecology of the ectoparasitoid Spathius

  10. Trapping sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera: Brentidae), with high doses of sex pheromone: Catch enhancement and weathering rate in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamarck, one of the top ten staple crops produced worldwide, has increased in production in Hawaii in recent years. The sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers)(Coleoptera: Brentidae), is a major economic and quarantine pest of sweetpotato in Hawa...

  11. New records of Paracrias Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae as parasitoids on weevil larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Brazil, with the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Palmieri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paracrias strii Schauff, 1985 and P. ceratophaga Palmieri & Hansson sp. nov. are first record in Brazil and both are associated with Ceratopus Schoenherr larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae reared from syconia of two species of fig-trees. Both Paracrias species are diagnosed and illustrated. Males of P. ceratophaga sp. nov. are described. The association of Paracrias with weevil larvae is briefly discussed.

  12. Oviposition and development of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on hosts and potential hosts in no-choice bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; Deborah L. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive phloem-feeding pest native to Asia. It was first identified in North America in 2002 and has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeast Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Since then, additional populations have been discovered...

  13. First field collection of the Rough Sweetpotato Weevil, Blosyrus asellus(Olivier)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Hawaii Island, with notes on detection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough sweetpotato weevil, Blosyrus asellus(Olivier)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was first detected in the state of Hawaii at a commercial Okinawan sweetpotato farm in Waipio, Oahu, on 14 November 2008. Reported here is, the first detection of this pest in sweetpotato fields on the island of Hawaii (...

  14. Descrição da larva de último instar e pupa de Epacroplon cruciatum (Aurivillius (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae e notas biológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juares Fuhrmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Descrição da larva de último instar e pupa de Epacroplon cruciatum (Aurivillius (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae e notas biológicas. Último instar larval e pupa do Hexoplonini sul-americano Epacroplon cruciatum (Aurivillius, 1899 são descritos, ilustrados e disponibilizadas notas biológicas.

  15. Feromônios de agregação em curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera e sua implicação taxonômica Aggregation pheromone in curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera and their taxonomic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Giuliano Ambrogi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pheromones of the weevils has been the most studied and used so far for Coleoptera species. The majority of reported weevil pheromones is produced by males and usually attract both sexes. The identified pheromone compounds are classified in two categories: ten-carbon compounds with terpenoid branching and compounds of various sizes, apparently of fatty-acid origin. These pheromone structural categories are consistent within subfamilies. This review aims to give an overview of the aggregation pheromones identified for Curculionidae pests, describing the relationship of the molecules structural pattern among subfamilies, and propose an identification key based on the structure of the pheromone components.

  16. OCORRÊNCIA E DANOS DE Compsocerus violaceus (White, 1853) (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) EM POMAR DE CITROS OCCURRENCE AND DAMAGE CAUSED BY Compsocerus violaceus (White, 1953) (coleoptera, cerambycidae) IN A CITRIC YARD

    OpenAIRE

    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Relatou-se no presente trabalho a ocorrência e os danos causados por Compsocerus violaceus (White, 1853) (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) em pomar cítrico misto e sem tratos culturais, formado pelas tangerinas rio e cravo, laranjas baianinha e natal, tangor sabará e limão cravo, num total de 357 plantas. A ocorrência e os danos provocados pelas larvas foi veri...

  17. Desenvolvimento de Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae com Zophobas confusa Gebien (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae comparado à duas outras presas alternativas Development of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae fed with Zophobas confusa Gebien (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae compared with two another alternative preys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresinha V Zanuncio

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nymphs of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851 were fed with Zophobas confusa Gebien, 1906, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae and Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae under 25±0.5ºC, 60±10% of RH and photophase of 12h. Nymphal viability of P. nigrispinus were 64.0%, 80.0% and 92.0% with Z. confusa, M. domestica and T. molitor, respectively. No differences were found for pre-oviposition period, number of egg masses, number of eggs, egg viability, and longevity for females of this predator fed with any of these preys.

  18. The Mecyclothorax beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini of Tahiti, Society Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Liebherr

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The 101 species of Mecyclothorax Sharp known to inhabit Tahiti Island, French Polynesia are taxonomically revised, including 28 species that are newly described: M. claridgeiae sp. n., M. jeanyvesi sp. n., M. poria sp. n., M. aano sp. n., M. papau sp. n., M. manina sp. n., M. everardi sp. n., M. ramagei sp. n., M. pitohitiensis sp. n., M. curtisi sp. n., M. hoeahiti sp. n., M. ninamu sp. n., M. kokone sp. n., M. paahonu sp. n., M. kayballae sp. n., M. ehu sp. n., M. papuhiti sp. n., M. tuea sp. n., M. taatitore sp. n., M. konemata sp. n., M. arboricola sp. n., M. rahimata sp. n., M. oaoa sp. n., M. maninapopoti sp. n., M. hunapopoti sp. n., M. fefemata sp. n., M. maninamata sp. n., and M. niho sp. n. Mecyclothorax muriauxioides Perrault, 1984 is newly synonymized with M. muriauxi Perrault, 1978. Lectotypes are designated for: Thriscothorax altiusculus Britton, 1938; T. bryobius Britton, 1938; Mecyclothorax globosus Britton, 1948: and M. sabulicola Britton, 1948. Dichotomous identification keys augmented by dorsal habitus and male aedeagal photographs are provided to the various species-groups and all included species. The spermatophore of M. papau sp. n. is described, with the ampulla and collar found to correspond dimensionally to the length of the internal sac flagellar plate. Variation among characters of the female reproductive tract is presented for all newly described plus other representative species comprising the radiation. Taxa are assigned to species groups, modified from the classification of G.G. Perrault, based on derived character states polarized using the Australian outgroup taxon Mecyclothorax punctipennis (MacLeay. Much of the species-level diversity on this small Pacific island is partitioned allopatrically over very small distributional ranges. No species is shared between Tahiti Nui and Tahiti Iti, and nearly all species in Tahiti Nui are geographically restricted to one ridgelike massif of that volcano. Cladistically

  19. Avaliação de inseticidas no controle de Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae e Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae em trigo armazenado Efficacy of insecticides to control Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae and Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae in stored wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui S. Furiatti

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of insecticides against Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae and Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792 (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae was determined exposing them to treated wheat in laboratory. Each plot, which was composed by 1.2 kg of wheat grain, was treated with 5 ml of the concentration/kg of wheat using a propelling air atomizer. Fifteen days after treatment 50 g samples of the grain were taken, from each plot, placed in plastic jars into which 10 adult insects of each species were released. This was repeated every 30 days until 165 days after treatment. The number of dead insects was counted 15 days after each infestation thus the evaluations were made at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days after the insecticide application. Esfenvalerate+fenitrothion+pyperonil butoxide (0,375+7,5+3,0 and 0,5+10,0+4,0 g a.i./t, fenitrothion+esfen-valerate (7,5+0,375 and 10,0+0,375 g a.i./t, fenitrothion+synergised deltamethrin (7,5+0,375 g a.i./t and fenitrothion (7,5 g a.i./t were effective against Sitophilus oryzae until 180 days after treatment. Esfenvalerate+fenitrothion+pyperonil butoxide (0,5+10,0+4,0 g a.i./t, fenitrothion+esfenvalerate (7,5+0,375 and 10,0+0,375 g a.i./t, fenitrothion+synergised deltamethrin (7,5+0,375 g a.i./t were effective against R. dominica until 180 days after treatment. Synergised deltamethrin (0,375 g a.i./t was effective against S. oryzae until 150 days and against R. dominica until 120 days after treatment. Esfenvalerate (0,5 g a.i./t was ineffective against S. oryzae and effective until 60 days after treatment against R. dominica. Fenitrothion (7,5 g a.i./t was ineffective against R. dominica. The use of mixtures of organophosphorus plus pyrethroids were more effective against S. oryzae and R. dominica when compared with these insecticides used alone.

  20. Drivers of species richness in European Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, Simone; Ulrich, Werner

    2012-08-01

    The species-area relationship (SAR) and the latitudinal gradient in species richness are the most widespread and best-documented patterns in ecology, yet few studies have explored how the two patterns are interrelated. We used tenebrionid beetles as a species rich invertebrate group to investigate how area, habitat heterogeneity, climate, and ecological history act together in shaping species richness across Europe. We tested the effects of various climatic gradients on tenebrionid richness, with separate analyses for endemics and non-endemics. To take into account differences in area size among geographical units, we included species-area relationships using simultaneous autoregressive models. Although area had a significant effect on richness, the signal associated with temperature is so strong that it is still evident as a major driver. Also, the effect of area was only apparent when the effect of spatial coordinates had been accounted for, which has important implications for the use of SARs to locate diversity hotspots. The influence of latitude was mainly explained by a temperature gradient. Our findings support a postglacial European colonisation mainly from glacial southern refuges. Large Mediterranean islands were also important refugial areas.

  1. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae by Amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Sloggett

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura, with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups.

  2. Predation of Ladybird Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloggett, John J

    2012-07-18

    Studies of predation of ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae) have focused on a limited number of predator taxa, such as birds and ants, while other potential predators have received limited attention. I here consider amphibians as predators of ladybirds. Published amphibian gut analyses show that ladybirds are quite often eaten by frogs and toads (Anura), with recorded frequencies reaching up to 15% of dietary items. Salamanders (Caudata) eat ladybirds less frequently, probably as their habits less often bring them into contact with the beetles. Amphibians do not appear to be deleteriously affected by the potentially toxic alkaloids that ladybirds possess. Amphibians, especially frogs and toads, use primarily prey movement as a release cue to attack their food; it is thus likely that their ability to discriminate against ladybirds and other chemically defended prey is limited. Because of this poor discriminatory power, amphibians have apparently evolved non-specific resistance to prey defensive chemicals, including ladybird alkaloids. Although amphibian-related ladybird mortality is limited, in certain habitats it could outweigh mortality from more frequently studied predators, notably birds. The gut analyses from the herpetological literature used in this study, suggest that in studying predation of insects, entomologists should consider specialized literature on other animal groups.

  3. Olive trees protected from the olive bark beetle, Phloeotribus scarabaeoides (Bernard 1788) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) with a pyrethroid insecticide: Effect on the insect community of the olive grove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Francisca; Campos, Mercedes; Sánchez-Raya, A Juan; Peña, Aránzazu

    2010-06-01

    Field studies were performed in two successive years, 2005 and 2006, in different olive groves of the province of Granada (South-eastern Spain) by spraying olive trees (Olea europaea) with a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, for the control of the olive bark beetle Phloeotribus scarabaeoides (Bernard 1788) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae). Three olive groves received each year three treatments in June consisting of water (control) and two insecticide doses, which were halved the second year. From June to September six olives trees per site were inspected every 15d for feeding galleries in olive branches; the arthropods, collected in traps placed below the olive trees (three traps per site), were identified and counted. Results show that feeding galleries were significantly reduced, what proves that the pyrethroid insecticide efficiently protected the olive trees from the olive bark beetle with a single application and even at the lower dose employed in 2006. Some repellent effect may occur as deduced from the number of P. scarabaeoides individuals captured. Other individuals from the insect community were also affected to a great extent by insecticide application, though no statistical differences were found among the treatments due to the high variability in insect captures. Among the parasitoids, Scelionidae, Encyrtidae, Eurytomidae and Pteromalidae were captured in great numbers. Mirids were the predators whose numbers drastically increased in traps placed under the treated trees, while spiders and ants were less affected. A knock-down effect was noticed for some insect groups, for instance mirids and Euphyllura olivina. Approximately 80% of their captures corresponded to the first date of sampling after insecticide application.

  4. Incidence of Male-Killing Rickettsia spp. (α-Proteobacteria) in the Ten-Spot Ladybird Beetle Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Schulenburg, J. Hinrich Graf; Habig, Michael; Sloggett, John J.; Webberley, K. Mary; Bertrand, Dominique; Hurst, Gregory D. D.; Majerus, Michael E. N.

    2001-01-01

    The diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria that kill male host offspring during embryogenesis and their frequencies in certain groups of host taxa suggest that the evolution of male killing and the subsequent spread of male-killing symbionts are primarily determined by host life history characteristics. We studied the 10-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia decempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in which male killing has not been recorded previously, to test this hypothesis, and we also assessed the evolution of the male killer identified by DNA sequence analysis. Our results show that A. decempunctata harbors male-killing Rickettsia (α-proteobacteria). Male-killing bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsia have previously been reported only for the congeneric two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. Phylogenetic analysis of Rickettsia DNA sequences isolated from different populations of the two host species revealed a single origin of male killing in the genus Rickettsia. The data also indicated possible horizontal transfer of symbionts between host species. In addition, A. bipunctata is known to bear at least four different male-killing symbionts in its geographic range two of which coexist in the two locations from which A. decempunctata specimens were obtained for the present study. Since only a single male-killing taxon was found in A. decempunctata, we assume that the two closely related ladybird beetle species must differ in the number and/or geographic distribution of male killers. We discuss the importance of these findings to our understanding of the evolution and dynamics of symbiotic associations between male-killing bacteria and their insect hosts. PMID:11133455

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  7. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  8. Coleoptera and microbe biomass in Antarctic Dry Valley paleosols adjacent to the Inland Ice: Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, William C.; Hart, Kris M.; O'Reilly, Shane S.; Allen, Christopher C. R.; Dohm, James M.; Hancock, Ronald G. V.; Kelleher, Brian P.; Milner, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk paleosol samples collected from a Middle to Early Miocene moraine in the New Mountain area of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, yielded Coleoptera exoskeletons and occasional endoskeletons showing considerable diagenetic effects along with several species of bacteria, all lodged in a dry-frozen but salt-rich horizon at shallow depth to the land surface. The till is at the older end of a chronologic sequence of glacial deposits, thought to have been deposited before the transition from wet-based to cold-based ice (∼15 Ma), and hence, entirely weathered in contact with the subaerial atmosphere. It is possible, though not absolutely verifiable, that the skeletons date from this early stage of emplacement having undergone modifications whenever light snowmelt occurred or salt concentrations lowered the freezing temperature to maintain water as liquid. Correlation of the Coleoptera species with cultured bacteria in the sample and the likelihood of co-habitation with Beauveria bassiani found in two adjacent, although younger paleosols, leads to new questions about the antiquity of the Coleoptera and the source of N and glucose from chitinase derived from the insects. The skeletons in the 831 section may date close to the oldest preserved chitin (Oligocene) yet found on Earth. While harsh Martian conditions make it seemingly intolerable for complex, multicellular organisms such as insects to exist in the near-surface and subaerially, life within similar cold, dry paleosol microenvironments (Cryosols) of Antarctica point to life potential for the Red Planet, especially when considering the relatively diverse microbe (bacteria and fungi) population.

  9. Genus-level revision of the family Phalacridae (Coleoptera: Cucujoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmel, Matthew L

    2013-01-15

    Conte)), Paracylomus, gen. nov. (type species: P. asiaticus (Champion)), Platyphalacrus, gen. nov. (type species: P. lawrencei, sp. nov.), Ranomafanacrinus, gen. nov. (type species: R. nigrinus, sp. nov.), Steinerlitrus, gen. nov. (type species: S. warreni, sp. nov.), Sveculus, gen. nov. (type species: S. lewisi, sp. nov.). Generic reassignments resulted in 194 new combinations. Nine new names have been established for junior primary and secondary homonyms: Acylomus bicoloratus nom. nov. for Tinodemus bicolor Švec 2002; Acylomus lyubarskyi nom. nov. for Olibrus capriviensis Lyubarsky 1998; Acylomus sveci nom. nov. for Tinodemus reticulatus Švec 2002; Acylomus orientalis nom. nov. for Stilbus similis Švec 1992; Acylomus zdeneki nom. nov. for Afronyrus snizeki Švec 2006; Apallodes championi nom. nov. for Litolibrus ocellatus Champion 1925; Olibrus peringueyi nom. nov. for Olibrus consanguineus Péringuey 1892; Augasmus exquisitus nom. nov. for Litochrus pulchellus Blackburn 1895; Litochrus pronotalis nom. nov. for Augasmus bimaculatus Lyubarsky 1996. A type species is designated for Phalacrinus Blackburn 1891 (P. australis Blackburn 1891). Six new species-group synonymies are established: Acylomus ergoti Casey 1890 (=Tinodemus grouvellei Guillebeau 1894, syn. nov.), Acylomus curvolineatus (Champion 1924) (=Tinodemus meridianus (Švec 1992), syn. nov.; Olibrus stuporatus Lyubarsky 1994, syn. nov.), Xanthocomus attenuatus (Casey, 1890) (=Xanthocomus concinnus (Casey, 1916), syn. nov.; Stilbus thoracicus Casey, 1916, syn. nov.; Stilbus quadrisetosus Casey, 1916, syn. nov.). One name, Olibrus sternalis Casey 1916, is resurrected from synonymy. Lectotypes are designated for 23 nominal species. One genus and two species are excluded from Phalacridae: Sternosternus Guillebeau 1894 (with its type and only species, S. grouvelleiGuillebeau 1894) and Parasemus parvopallidus Lea 1932, both of which belong in Hydrophilidae. All 34 resulting genera in the family Phalacridae are keyed, described

  10. A new species of Synchroa Newman from China (Coleoptera: Synchroidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun; Li, Yun; Liu, Zhenhua; Pang, Hong

    2016-03-24

    The family Synchroidae Lacordaire, 1859 is a small group of beetles with an elongate, tapered, and slightly flattened body and brownish to black coloration. Members exhibit morphological similarity to some genera of Melandryidae, but can be distinguished based on larval morphology and the unmodified apical maxillary palpomeres. They are widely distributed throughout the Oriental, Palaearctic and Nearctic regions and possess the highest species diversity in Eastern Asia (Nikitsky 1999; Hsiao 2015). Synchroa bark beetles had been viewed as members of the Melandryidae for a long time, but were treated as an independent family in Böving & Craighead (1931). Crowson (1966) followed Böving & Craighead's treatment and suggested close relatives among the members of Zopheridae and Stenotrachelidae based on both larval and adult characters. Currently, only 8 species distributed amongst three genera have been described in this family: Mallodrya Horn, 1888 is a monotypical genus from North America; Synchroa Newman, 1838, the nominal genus and the largest genus widely distributed in North America, east Palearctic region and the Oriental region, including 5 species; Synchroina Fairmaire, 1898 is from the Oriental region and includes two species. (Nikitsky 1999; Hsiao 2015).Recently, the first author had the opportunity to examine the collection of the Museum of Biology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China (SYSBM) discovering one remarkable species of Synchroa with dark coloration and a narrow prothorax, which are very different from previously described species of this genus. After careful examination and comparisons to other described species it is described here as new. In addition, an updated key to the world species of Synchroa is provided.

  11. Redefinition of the genus Silphitrombium (Trombidiformes: Neothrombiidae) with description of two new species parasitizing beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae, Tenebrionidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashakor, Samaneh; Hajiqanbar, Hamidreza; Saboori, Alireza

    2013-11-15

    Two new species of Silphitrombium Fain, 1992 (Acari: Prostigmata: Neothrombiidae), ectoparasites of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera), are described from Sistan and Baluchestan Province, eastern Iran: S. elateridum sp. nov. on Heteroderes heideni Reitter, 1891 (Col.: Elateridae) and S. iranicum sp. nov. on Opatroides punctulatus Brullé, 1832 (Col.: Tenebrionidae) and the genus Silphitrombium is redefined. It is the first record of the relationship between beetles of the families Elateridae and Tenebrionidae, and mites of the genus Silphitrombium. A key to the species of the genus is presented.

  12. Sucinolivolia torpida--a new genus and species of flea-beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae) from Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukejs, Andris; Biondi, Maurizio; Alekseev, Vitalii I

    2015-12-15

    Sucinolivolia torpida gen. nov. et sp. nov. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) is described and illustrated from Eocene Baltic amber. The new monotypic genus is compared with fossil and extant flea-beetle genera. Sucinolivolia gen. nov. is similar to the extant Livolia Jacoby and Orthaltica Crotch, but difference include the absence of an antebasal pronotal sulcus, not crenulate lateral pronotal margins, possessing very short genae, more robust legs, and the shape of tibiae. Including this new record, six described species of Alticini are known from Baltic amber.

  13. A new species of Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae) from southern Argentina, with a key to the species of the genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the forensically interesting genus Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae), Oxelytrum selknan, is described from Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces, Argentina. The new species resembles Oxelytrum biguttatum (Philippi) in outer aspect, but has different male genitalia, in particular a median lobe longer than the paramera. All the described species of Oxelytrum have the median lobe shorter than the paramera. The internal sac, as far as it could be reconstructed from dry-pinned specimens, also shows differences between the two species. A key to the species of Oxelytrum is given and illustrated. PMID:22773910

  14. Cinco citas nuevas de Elmidae (Coleoptera para la Argentina, con la redescripción de Austrolimnius (Telmatelmis nyctelioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica MANZO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se citan por primera vez para la Argentina Austrolimnius (Helonoma eris Hinton, Austrolimnius (Telmatelmis formosus (Sharp, Austrolimnius (Telmatelmis nyctelioides (Germain, Macrelmis aequalis (Hinton y Microcylloepus plaumanni Hinton, todas especies de la subfamilia Elminae (Coleoptera: Elmidae. Se describe por primera vez el macho de A. (Telmatelmis nyctelioides. Todas las especies se comparan con las especies conocidas más relacionadas, dentro de cada género. Se ilustran con más detalle los genitalia masculinos y femeninos, así como algunos caracteres de importancia específica. Se provee una clave para los adultos de las especies argentinas de Austrolimnius Carter & Zeck.

  15. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaenia (Coleoptera: Iberobaeniidae): first rearrangement of protein-coding genes in the beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Linard, Benjamin; Kundrata, Robin; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the recently discovered beetle family Iberobaeniidae is described and compared with known coleopteran mitogenomes. The mitochondrial sequence was obtained by shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina Miseq technology and resulted in an average coverage of 130 × and a minimum coverage of 35×. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaeniidae includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs genes, and 1 putative control region, and showed a unique rearrangement of protein-coding genes. This is the first rearrangement affecting the relative position of protein-coding and ribosomal genes reported for the order Coleoptera.

  16. New state records and updated checklist of Aphodiini and Eupariini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Pablo

    2017-03-22

    Thirty one new state records of species of Aphodiinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Mexico are presented, 24 species belong to Aphodiini and seven species to Eupariini into the genera Agrilinellus, Alloblackburneus, Aphotaenius, Ataenius, Blackburneus, Cephalocyclus, Coelotrachelus, Euparia, Euparixia, Geomyphilus, Gonaphodiellus, Gonaphodiopsis, Haroldiellus, Liothorax, Nialaphodius, Odontolytes, Oscarinus, Pharaphodius, and Planolinellus. New records are from the states of Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Campeche, Colima, Chiapas, Estado de México, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, Puebla, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Zacatecas, and Distrito Federal. A checklist with updated nomenclature is included for the recorded species of Aphodiini and Eupariini from Mexico.

  17. Molecular analysis reveals two new dimorphic species of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) parasitic on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex; Rossi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Four morphotypes of Hesperomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) were found on the ladybird Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) from Costa Rica and Ecuador. Partial SSU and ITS rDNA sequence analysis revealed that these belong to two phylogenetic species, each with a pair of morphotypes displaying position specificity. Confirmation of dimorphism in Laboulbeniales highlights the need for a thorough systematic revision of species concepts within the order. The theory of 'position specificity' also needs to be revisited. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fauna božjih ovčica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) u agro-eko sustavu vinograda

    OpenAIRE

    Franin, Kristijan; Barić, Božena; Kuštera, Gabrijela

    2014-01-01

    Sastavni elementi ekološke infrastrukture kao što su cvjetne trake, zatravljena površina unutar vinograda te korovima obrasli rubni dijelovi polja i vinograda imaju važnu ulogu u ekološkoj proizvodnji. Ovaj rad prikazuje rezultate istraživanja utjecaja korova na brojnost i bioraznolikost božjih ovčica. Istraživanje je obavljeno u periodu od svibnja do listopada (2011.–2012.) u vinogradima u okolici Zadra (Sjeverna Dalmacija – Hrvatska). Božje ovčice (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) sakupljane su m...

  19. Registros y distribución de la especie afroasiática Digitonthophagus gazella (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae en Argentina

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    María C. ÁLVAREZ BOHLE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez el escarabajo coprófago Digitonthophagus gazella Fabricius (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae para Argentina, por lo que se amplía su área de distribución geográfica en Sudamérica. Esta especie de origen afro-asiático fue capturada mediante colecta manual en estiércol de ganado bovino y equino, con trampas de luz y trampas de caída cebadas con estiércol en seis provincias del centro y norte argentino entre los años 2006 y 2009.

  20. Coleoptera scarabaeoidea de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, México

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián Muñoz Hernández; Miguel Angel Morón; Agustín Aragón

    2008-01-01

    Con el propósito de evaluar la riqueza, abundancia y fenología de las especies de Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea o Lamellicornia de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, se realizaron colectas mensuales entre mayo de 1999 y junio de 2000, en sitios con bosques de pino-encino-liquidámbar o zonas de cultivo situados entre 1,990 y 2,000 m de altitud. Se capturaron 2,082 ejemplares que representan a 59 especies de 29 géneros, 18 tribus y 7 subfamilias de Melolonthidae, Scarabaeidae y Passalidae, entre las qu...