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Sample records for group cc structure

  1. DSIbin : Identifying dynamic data structures in C/C++ binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupprecht, Thomas; Chen, Xi; White, David H.; Boockmann, Jan H.; Luttgen, Gerald; Bos, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Reverse engineering binary code is notoriously difficult and, especially, understanding a binary's dynamic data structures. Existing data structure analyzers are limited wrt. program comprehension: they do not detect complex structures such as skip lists, or lists running through nodes of different

  2. Asynchronous Group Key Distribution on top of the CC2420 Security Mechanisms for Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    2009-01-01

    scheme with no time synchronization requirements. The scheme decreases the number of key updates by providing them on an as needed basis according to the amount of network traffic. We evaluate the CC2420 radio security mechanism and show how to use it as a basis to implement secure group communication......A sensor network is a network consisting of small, inexpensive, low-powered sensor nodes that communicate to complete a common task. Sensor nodes are characterized by having limited communication and computation capabilities, energy, and storage. They often are deployed in hostile environments...... creating a demand for encryption and authentication of the messages sent between them. Due to severe resource constraints on the sensor nodes, efficient key distribution schemes and secure communication protocols with low overhead are desired. In this paper we present an asynchronous group key distribution...

  3. MemPick : High-level data structure detection in C/C++ binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haller, Istvan; Slowinska, Asia; Bos, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Many existing techniques for reversing data structures in C/C++ binaries are limited to low-level programming constructs, such as individual variables or structs. Unfortunately, without detailed information about a program's pointer structures, forensics and reverse engineering are exceedingly hard.

  4. Scalable data structure detection and classification for C/C++ binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haller, I.; Slowinska, J.M.; Bos, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many existing techniques for reversing data structures in C/C ++ binaries are limited to low-level programming constructs, such as individual variables or structs. Unfortunately, without detailed information about a program's pointer structures, forensics and reverse engineering are exceedingly

  5. Synthesis and structural characterization of PHP[(C(5)Me(4))(2)], a monodentate chiral phosphine derived from intramolecular C-C coupling of tetramethylcyclopentadienyl groups: an evaluation of steric and electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J H; Bridgewater, B M; Churchill, D G; Parkin, G

    2001-10-22

    The chiral monodentate phosphine PhP[(C(5)Me(4))(2)] is readily obtained by oxidation of the lithium complex Li(2)[PhP(C(5)Me(4))(2)] with I(2), which couples the two cyclopentadienyl groups to form a five-membered heterocyclic ring. The steric and electronic properties of PhP[(C(5)Me(4))(2)] have been evaluated by X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopic studies on a variety of derivatives, including Ph[(C(5)Me(4))(2)]PE (E = S, Se), Cp*MCl(4)[P[(C(5)Me(4))(2)]Ph] (M = Mo, Ta), Ir[P[(C(5)Me(4))(2)]Ph](2)(CO)Cl, and CpFe(CO)[PhP[(C(5)Me(4))(2)

  6. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  7. Trajectory grouping structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Buchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective motion of a set of moving entities like people, birds, or other animals, is characterized by groups arising, merging, splitting, and ending. Given the trajectories of these entities, we define and model a structure that captures all of such changes using the Reeb graph, a concept from topology. The trajectory grouping structure has three natural parameters that allow more global views of the data in group size, group duration, and entity inter-distance. We prove complexity bounds on the maximum number of maximal groups that can be present, and give algorithms to compute the grouping structure efficiently. We also study how the trajectory grouping structure can be made robust, that is, how brief interruptions of groups can be disregarded in the global structure, adding a notion of persistence to the structure. Furthermore, we showcase the results of experiments using data generated by the NetLogo flocking model and from the Starkey project. The Starkey data describe the movement of elk, deer, and cattle. Although there is no ground truth for the grouping structure in this data, the experiments show that the trajectory grouping structure is plausible and has the desired effects when changing the essential parameters. Our research provides the first complete study of trajectory group evolvement, including combinatorial,algorithmic, and experimental results.

  8. Comparison of the Cc and R3c space groups for the superlattice phase of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Ragini; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2005-01-01

    Recent controversy about the space group of the low temperature superlattice phase of Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 is settled. It is shown that the R3c space group for the superlattice phase cannot correctly account for the peak positions of the superlattice reflections present in the neutron diffraction patterns. The correct space group is reconfirmed to be Cc. A comparison of the atomic coordinates of Cc and Cm space groups is also presented to show that in the absence of superlattice reflections, as is the case with x-ray diffraction data, one would land up in the Cm space group. This superlattice phase is found to coexist with another monoclinic phase of the Cm space group

  9. High prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotype C/C1 in the Minangkabau ethnic group in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siburian Marlinang D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Minangkabau is one of the major ethnic groups in Indonesia. Previous studies with a limited number of samples have shown a different prevalence of HBV/C in the Minangkabau compared to the Indonesian population in general. The aim of this study was to assess the HBV genotype distribution pattern and the prevalence of pre-S, T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations among the Minangkabau HBV carriers. The samples were collected from Padang, West Sumatera and from western Java. Mixed primers for specific genotypes were used to determine the HBV genotype. Pre-S or S genes were amplified, sequenced and aligned with reference sequences from GenBank to derive a phylogenetic tree for subgenotyping. Pre-S genes were also analyzed for mutations. The basal core promoter (BCP region was amplified and directly sequenced to analyze T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations. Results The predominant HBV genotype among the Minangkabau HBV carriers (n=117 was C (72.6% followed by B (24.8% and co-infection with B and C (2.6%. The prevalence of pre-S mutations, including both the pre-S deletion and pre-S2 start codon mutation, was 41.0%, and the T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations were found in 51.9% and 71.2% respectively. HBV/C1 was the predominant HBV subgenotype in the Minangkabau HBV carriers, and was found in 66.2%, followed by B3, B7, C8, B2, B9, C2, and C10 (18.3%, 7.0%, 2.8%, 1.4%, 1.4%, 1.4%, and 1.4% respectively. From samples that were found to be co-infected with HBV B and C, two samples were successfully cloned and subgenotyped, including one with mixed subgenotypes of B3 and C1, and another one with mixed subgenotypes of B7, C1, putative intergenotypic of B/A, and C/A. Furthermore, three samples from donors of non-Minangkabau ethnicity from Padang were found to be infected with an intragenotypic recombination form, including a putative recombinant of B8/B3 and B9/B7. Conclusion HBV/C with subgenotype C1 was the predominant HBV genotype among

  10. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  11. Unusual C-C bond cleavage in the formation of amine-bis(phenoxy) group 4 benzyl complexes: Mechanism of formation and application to stereospecific polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Gowda, Ravikumar R.

    2014-08-11

    Group 4 tetrabenzyl compounds MBn4 (M = Zr, Ti), upon protonolysis with an equimolar amount of the tetradentate amine-tris(phenol) ligand N[(2,4-tBu2C6H2(CH 2)OH]3 in toluene from -30 to 25 °C, unexpectedly lead to amine-bis(phenoxy) dibenzyl complexes, BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn2 (M = Zr (1), Ti (2)) in 80% (1) and 75% (2) yields. This reaction involves an apparent cleavage of the >NCH2-ArOH bond (loss of the phenol in the ligand) and formation of the >NCH 2-CH2Bn bond (gain of the benzyl group in the ligand). Structural characterization of 1 by X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the complex formed is a bis(benzyl) complex of Zr coordinated by a newly derived tridentate amine-bis(phenoxy) ligand arranged in a mer configuration in the solid state. The abstractive activation of 1 and 2 with B(C6F 5)3·THF in CD2Cl2 at room temperature generates the corresponding benzyl cations {BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn(THF)}+[BnB(C6F5) 3]- (M = Zr (3), Ti, (4)). These cationic complexes, along with their analogues derived from (imino)phenoxy tri- and dibenzyl complexes, [(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=C(3,5- tBu2C6H2)O]ZrBn3 (5) and [2,4-Br2C6H2(O)(6-CH2(NC 5H9))CH2N=CH(2-adamantyl-4-MeC 6H2O)]ZrBn2 (6), have been found to effectively polymerize the biomass-derived renewable β-methyl-α-methylene- γ-butyrolactone (βMMBL) at room temperature into the highly stereoregular polymer PβMMBL with an isotacticity up to 99% mm. A combined experimental and DFT study has yielded a mechanistic pathway for the observed unusual C-C bond cleavage in the present protonolysis reaction between ZrBn4 and N[(2,4-tBu2C 6H2(CH2)OH]3 for the formation of complex 1, which involves the benzyl radical and the Zr(III) species, resulting from thermal and photochemical decomposition of ZrBn4, followed by a series of reaction sequences consisting of protonolysis, tautomerization, H-transfer, oxidation, elimination, and radical coupling. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Structure of a supergravity group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogievetsky, V.; Sokatchev, E.

    1978-01-01

    The supergravity group is found to be the direct product of general covariance groups in complex conjugated left and right handed superspaces. The ordinary space-time coordinate and the axial gravitational superfield are the real and imaginary parts of the complex coordinate, respectively. It is pointed out that a number of questions concerning the formalism remains open. For instance how to define superfields with external indices, supercovariant derivatives and invariants of the group, etc. However, the extremely simple and clear geometrical picture of the supergravity group given here will provide an adequate basis for the supergravity theory

  13. Self assembly of dialkoxo bridged dinuclear Fe(III) complex of pyridoxal Schiff base with C-C bond formation - structure, spectral and magnetic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Murašková, V.; Szabó, N.; Pižl, M.; Hoskovcová, I.; Dušek, Michal; Huber, Š.; Sedmidubský, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 461, May (2017), s. 111-119 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12653S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron(III) dinuclear complex * dialkoxo bridged pyridoxal Schiff base * C-C bond * crystal structure * magnetic properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  14. Pyridine group assisted addition of diazo-compounds to imines in the 3-CC reaction of 2-aminopyridines, aldehydes, and diazo-compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulevich, Anton V; Helan, Victoria; Wink, Donald J; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2013-02-15

    A novel three-component coupling (3-CC) reaction of 2-aminoazines, aromatic aldehydes, and diazo-compounds producing polyfunctional β-amino-α-diazo-compounds has been developed. The reaction features an unprecedented heterocycle-assisted addition of a diazo-compound to an imine. The obtained diazoesters were efficiently converted into valuable heterocycles as well as β-amino acid derivatives.

  15. Dreamweaver CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Turn your wonderful website dreams into robust realities with the help of Dreamweaver CC For Dummies! Creating dynamic websites is easy with Dreamweaver CC and this friendly, full-color guide. Updated for the latest version of Adobe's world-renowned web development tool, Dreamweaver CC For Dummies covers all aspects of creating websites, from understanding web design basics to using style sheets, integrating multimedia, implementing responsive design, testing and publishing your sites, and more. With the professional guidance of Web design expert Jan

  16. The Structure of Group Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Albert A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the literature on unidimensional and multidimensional models of cohesion and describes cohesion as a multidimensional construct with primary and secondary dimensions. Found that primary dimensions described the cohesiveness of all or most types of groups, whereas secondary dimensions only described the cohesiveness of specific types of…

  17. Pyridine Group-Assisted Addition of Diazo-Compounds to Imines in the 3-CC Reaction of 2-Aminopyridines, Aldehydes, and Diazo-Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulevich, Anton V.; Helan, Victoria; Wink, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    A novel three-component (3-CC) coupling reaction of 2-aminoazines, aromatic aldehydes and diazo-compounds producing polyfunctional β-amino-α-diazo-compounds has been developed. The reaction features an unprecedented heterocycle-assisted addition of a diazo-compound to an imine. The obtained diazoesters were efficiently converted into valuable heterocycles, as well as to β-amino acid derivatives. PMID:23373731

  18. Triangles and squares for a unique molecular crystal structure. Unsupported two-coordinate lithium cations and CC agostic interactions in cyclopropyllithium derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufrois, Quentin; Daran, Jean-Claude; Vendier, Laure; Dinoi, Chiara; Etienne, Michel [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination du CNRS (LCC), Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, Toulouse (France)

    2018-02-12

    Understanding and controlling the aggregation state is germane to alkyllithium chemistry. Lewis base-free alkyllithium compounds normally form tetrahedral tetramers or octahedral hexamers in the solid state with the lithium cations being three-coordinate. We report that the unsupported cyclopropyl derivative 1-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopropyllithium [{μ-c-C(SiMe_3)C_2H_4}Li]{sub 4} (1), synthesized by the reduction of 1-(phenylthio)-1-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopropane, crystallizes as a tetramer in the space group I-4 with the two-coordinate lithium atoms forming a square. CC agostic interactions complete the coordination sphere around each lithium. The aggregate is preserved in hydrocarbon solution. Furthermore, CC agostic interactions compete intra- and intermolecularly with Lewis base donation as in the unsaturated dimer of 1-(phenylthio)cyclopropyllithium [Li(thf){sub 2}{μ-c-C(SPh)C_2H_4}{sub 2}Li (thf)] (3) which is also fully characterized. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Group structure of the Sierpinski gasket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nencka-Ficek, H.

    1984-08-01

    The group structure of the object with non-integer dimension is investigated. It is shown that some extended group based on the point group of the substructure of the fractal is required. The extended group for the Sierpinski gasket, i.e. the fractal with dimension D approx.= 1.58, is based on the permutation group s 3 . This group of the Sierpinski gasket is a hierarchical and permutational one. It is shown that such a hierarchical structure of the group is caused by the self-similarity of the investigated fractal. (author)

  20. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection...... of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected...... among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock...

  1. The structure of complex Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dong Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Complex Lie groups have often been used as auxiliaries in the study of real Lie groups in areas such as differential geometry and representation theory. To date, however, no book has fully explored and developed their structural aspects.The Structure of Complex Lie Groups addresses this need. Self-contained, it begins with general concepts introduced via an almost complex structure on a real Lie group. It then moves to the theory of representative functions of Lie groups- used as a primary tool in subsequent chapters-and discusses the extension problem of representations that is essential for studying the structure of complex Lie groups. This is followed by a discourse on complex analytic groups that carry the structure of affine algebraic groups compatible with their analytic group structure. The author then uses the results of his earlier discussions to determine the observability of subgroups of complex Lie groups.The differences between complex algebraic groups and complex Lie groups are sometimes subtle ...

  2. Illustrator CC digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A complete training package lets you learn Adobe Illustrator CC at your own speed Adobe Illustrator is the leading drawing and illustration software used to create artwork for a variety of media. This book-and-DVD package provides 13 self-paced lessons that get you up to speed on the latest version of Illustrator (Creative Cloud). Step-by-step instructions in the full-color book are supported by video tutorials on the DVD. Together, these tools will help you learn Adobe Illustrator basics, essential skills, and all the new capabilities in Illustrator CC-in no time.  Includes step-by-step in

  3. Photoshop CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stretch your creativity beyond the cloud with this fully-updated Photoshop guide!Photoshop puts amazing design and photo-editing tools in the hands of creative professionals and hobbyists everywhere, and the latest version - Photoshop CC - is packed with even more powerful tools to help you manage and enhance your images. This friendly, full-color guide introduces you to the basics of Photoshop CC and provides clear explanations of the menus, panels, tools, options, and shortcuts you'll use the most. Plus, you'll learn valuable tips for fixing common photo flaws, improvin

  4. Lead identification and structure-activity relationships of heteroarylpyrazole arylsulfonamides as allosteric CC-chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Afjal H; Copley, Royston C B; O'Flynn, Daniel; Percy, Jonathan M; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2014-03-21

    A knowledge-based library of aryl 2,3-dichlorophenylsulfonamides was synthesised and screened as human CCR4 antagonists, in order to identify a suitable hit for the start of a lead-optimisation programme. X-ray diffraction studies were used to identify the pyrazole ring as a moiety that could bring about intramolecular hydrogen bonding with the sulfonamide NH and provide a clip or orthogonal conformation that was believed to be the preferred active conformation. Replacement of the core phenyl ring with a pyridine, and replacement of the 2,3-dichlorobenzenesulfonamide with 5-chlorothiophenesulfonamide provided compound 33 which has excellent physicochemical properties and represents a good starting point for a lead optimisation programme. Electronic structure calculations indicated that the preference for the clip or orthogonal conformation found in the small molecule crystal structures of 7 and 14 was in agreement with the order of potency in the biological assay.

  5. Structural, electronic, and optical properties of the C-C complex in bulk silicon from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timerkaeva, Dilyara; Attaccalite, Claudio; Brenet, Gilles; Caliste, Damien; Pochet, Pascal

    2018-04-01

    The structure of the CiCs complex in silicon has long been the subject of debate. Numerous theoretical and experimental studies have attempted to shed light on the properties of these defects that are at the origin of the light emitting G-center. These defects are relevant for applications in lasing, and it would be advantageous to control their formation and concentration in bulk silicon. It is therefore essential to understand their structural and electronic properties. In this paper, we present the structural, electronic, and optical properties of four possible configurations of the CiCs complex in bulk silicon, namely, the A-, B-, C-, and D-forms. The configurations were studied by density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory. Our results suggest that the C-form was misinterpreted as a B-form in some experiments. Our optical investigation also tends to exclude any contribution of A- and B-forms to light emission. Taken together, our results suggest that the C-form could play an important role in heavily carbon-doped silicon.

  6. Structuring group medical practices: tax planning aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman, A S; Conetta, T F

    1992-01-01

    This article is the first in a series addressing the structuring of group medical practice entities, shareholder relationships, and general representation factors. In this article, a general background in federal tax planning is provided, including strategies for minimization of income tax payment and the potential problems that may be encountered when a group practice is not carefully structured.

  7. Permutation 2-groups I: structure and splitness

    OpenAIRE

    Elgueta, Josep

    2013-01-01

    By a 2-group we mean a groupoid equipped with a weakened group structure. It is called split when it is equivalent to the semidirect product of a discrete 2-group and a one-object 2-group. By a permutation 2-group we mean the 2-group $\\mathbb{S}ym(\\mathcal{G})$ of self-equivalences of a groupoid $\\mathcal{G}$ and natural isomorphisms between them, with the product given by composition of self-equivalences. These generalize the symmetric groups $\\mathsf{S}_n$, $n\\geq 1$, obtained when $\\mathca...

  8. Comparison of high group velocity accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is well known that waveguides with no perturbations have phase velocities greater than the velocity of light c. If the waveguide dimensions are chosen so that the phase velocity is only moderately greater than c, only small perturbations are required to reduce the phase velocity to be synchronous with a high energy particle bunch. Such a lightly loaded accelerator structure will have smaller longitudinal and transverse wake potentials and hence will lead to lower emittance growth in an accelerated beam. Since these structures are lightly loaded, their group velocities are only slightly less than c and not in the order of 0.01c, as is the case for the standard disk-loaded structures. To ascertain that the peak and average power requirements for these structures are not prohibitive, we examine the elastance and the Q for several traveling wave structures: phase slip structures, bellows-like structures, and lightly loaded disk-loaded structures

  9. Null structure groups in eleven dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariglia, Marco; Mac Conamhna, Oisin A. P.

    2006-01-01

    We classify all the structure groups which arise as subgroups of the isotropy group (Spin(7)xR 8 )xR, of a single null Killing spinor in 11 dimensions. We construct the spaces of spinors fixed by these groups. We determine the conditions under which structure subgroups of the maximal null structure group (Spin(7)xR 8 )xR may also be embedded in SU(5), and hence the conditions under which a supersymmetric spacetime admits only null, or both timelike and null, Killing spinors. We discuss how this purely algebraic material will facilitate the direct analysis of the Killing spinor equation of 11 dimensional supergravity, and the classification of supersymmetric spacetimes therein

  10. c-C5H5 on a Ni(1 1 1) surface: Theoretical study of the adsorption, electronic structure and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, E.; Simonetti, S.; Pronsato, E.; Juan, A.; Brizuela, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the ASED-MO method is applied to study the adsorption of cyclopentadienyl anion on a Ni(1 1 1) surface. The adsorption with the centre of the aromatic ring placed above the hollow position has been identified to be energetically the most favourable. The aromatic ring remains almost flat, the H atoms are tilted 17 deg. away from the metal surface. We modelled the metal surface by a two-dimensional slab of finite thickness, with an overlayer of c-C 5 H 5 - , one c-C 5 H 5 - per nine surface Ni atoms. The c-C 5 H 5 - molecule is attached to the surface with its five C atoms bonding mainly with three Ni atoms. The Ni-Ni bond in the underlying surface and the C-C bonds of c-C 5 H 5 - are weakened upon adsorption. We found that the band of Ni 5d z 2 orbitals plays an important role in the bonding between c-C 5 H 5 - and the surface, as do the Ni 6s and 6p z bands

  11. Single crystal X-ray structural features of aromatic compounds having a pentafluorosulfuranyl (SF5) functional group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Du, J.; Hua, G.; Beier, Petr; Slawin, A. M. Z.; Woollins, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2017), s. 723-733 ISSN 1040-0400 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pentafluorosulfuranyl (SF5) group * aromatic compounds * single crystal X-ray structure * intramolecular interactions * intermolecular interactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2016

  12. Synthesis and structure determination of new open-framework chromium carboxylate MIL-105 or CrIII(OH).{O2C-C6(CH3)4-CO2}.nH2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, Christian; Millange, Franck; Devic, Thomas; Audebrand, Nathalie; Van Beek, Wouter

    2006-01-01

    Two new three-dimensional chromium(III) dicarboxylate, MIL-105 or Cr III (OH).{O 2 C-C 6 (CH 3 ) 4 -CO 2 }.nH 2 O, have been obtained under hydrothermal conditions, and their structures solved using X-ray powder diffraction data. Both solids are structural analogs of the known Cr benzenedicarboxylate compound (MIL-53). Both contain trans corner-sharing CrO 4 (OH) 2 octahedral chains connected by tetramethylterephthalate di-anions. Each chain is linked by the ligands to four other chains to form a three-dimensional framework with an array of 1D pores channels. The pores of the high temperature form of the solid, MIL-105ht, are empty. However, MIL-105ht re-hydrates at room temperature to finally give MIL-105lt with pores channels filled with free water molecules (lt: low temperature form; ht: high temperature form). The thermal behaviour of the two solids has been investigated using TGA. Crystal data for MIL-105ht: monoclinic space group C2/c with a = 19.653(1) A, b = 9.984(1) A, c = 6.970(1) A, β = 110.67(1) o and Z = 4. Crystal data for MIL-105lt: orthorhombic space group Pnam with a = 17.892(1) A, b = 11.165(1) A, c = 6.916(1) A and Z = 4

  13. Structures, Bonding, and Energetics of Potential Triatomic Circumstellar Molecules Containing Group 15 and 16 Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Walter E; Agarwal, Jay; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery of PN in the oxygen-rich shell of the supergiant star VY Canis Majoris points to the formation of several triatomic molecules involving oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus; these are also intriguing targets for main-group synthetic inorganic chemistry. In this research, high-level ab initio electronic structure computations were conducted on the potential circumstellar molecule OPN and several of its heavier group 15 and 16 congeners (SPN, SePN, TePN, OPP, OPAs, and OPSb). For each congener, four isomers were examined. Optimized geometries were obtained with coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] using large Dunning basis sets [aug-cc-pVQZ, aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z, and aug-cc-pVQZ-PP], and relative energies were determined at the complete basis set limit of CCSDT(Q) from focal point analyses. The linear phosphorus-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 15 congeners by at least 6 kcal mol(-1), resulting from double-triple and single-double bond resonances within the molecule. The linear nitrogen-centered molecules were consistently the lowest in energy of the group 16 congeners by at least 5 kcal mol(-1), due to the electronegative central nitrogen atom encouraging electron delocalization throughout the molecule. For OPN, OPP, and SPN, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and vibrationally corrected rotational constants are predicted; good agreement with available experimental data is observed.

  14. Exceptional groups and elementary-particle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Truini, P.

    1981-09-01

    A new finite-dimensional quantum mechanical space is constructed over the complex octonionic plane using the recently developed algebraic techniques of Jordan pairs and inner ideals. The automorphism group of this structure is E 6 x U(1), realized on precisely two E 6 irreps which is abstracted as a (topless) model for grand unification

  15. Exceptional groups and elementary-particle structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Truini, P.

    1981-09-01

    A new finite-dimensional quantum mechanical space is constructed over the complex octonionic plane using the recently developed algebraic techniques of Jordan pairs and inner ideals. The automorphism group of this structure is E/sub 6/ x U(1), realized on precisely two E/sub 6/ irreps which is abstracted as a (topless) model for grand unification.

  16. Action Recognition Using Discriminative Structured Trajectory Groups

    KAUST Repository

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati

    2015-01-06

    In this paper, we develop a novel framework for action recognition in videos. The framework is based on automatically learning the discriminative trajectory groups that are relevant to an action. Different from previous approaches, our method does not require complex computation for graph matching or complex latent models to localize the parts. We model a video as a structured bag of trajectory groups with latent class variables. We model action recognition problem in a weakly supervised setting and learn discriminative trajectory groups by employing multiple instance learning (MIL) based Support Vector Machine (SVM) using pre-computed kernels. The kernels depend on the spatio-temporal relationship between the extracted trajectory groups and their associated features. We demonstrate both quantitatively and qualitatively that the classification performance of our proposed method is superior to baselines and several state-of-the-art approaches on three challenging standard benchmark datasets.

  17. Unusual C-C bond cleavage in the formation of amine-bis(phenoxy) group 4 benzyl complexes: Mechanism of formation and application to stereospecific polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Gowda, Ravikumar R.; Caporaso, Lucia; Cavallo, Luigi; Chen, Eugene You Xian

    2014-01-01

    Group 4 tetrabenzyl compounds MBn4 (M = Zr, Ti), upon protonolysis with an equimolar amount of the tetradentate amine-tris(phenol) ligand N[(2,4-tBu2C6H2(CH 2)OH]3 in toluene from -30 to 25 °C, unexpectedly lead to amine-bis(phenoxy) dibenzyl

  18. Correlations between polymorphisms in the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A and C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 genes and infection with the hepatitis B virus in three ethnic groups in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chan; He, Yan; Shan, Ke-Ren; Tan, Kui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Chan-Juan; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A ( UGT1A) and the C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 ( CCR5) genes are associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Yi, Yao and Han ethnic groups in the Guizhou Province of China. Methods The study enrolled subjects with and without HBV infection. Whole blood was used for DNA genotyping using standard techniques. The study determined the frequencies of several polymorphic alleles ( UGT1A6 [rs2070959], UGT1A1 [rs8175347], CCR5-59029 [rs1799987] and CCR5Δ32 [rs333]) and then characterized their relationship with HBV infection. Results A total of 404 subjects were enrolled in the study: 138 from the Yao group, 101 from the Yi group and 165 from the Han group. There was a significant difference in the frequency of UGT1A1 rs8175347 polymorphisms among the three groups. The rates of 7TA carriers of UGT1A1 rs8175347 in all three groups were significantly higher than the other genotypes. Individuals with genotype AA of UGT1A6 rs2070959 in the Yi group had a higher risk for HBV infection than in the Yao and Han groups. The frequency of genotype GG in CCR5-59029 in the Yao group was significantly higher than in the Yi group. The genotypes of CCR5Δ32 were not associated with HBV infection. Conclusion These findings provide genetic and epidemiological evidence for an association of UGT1A and CCR5-59029 polymorphisms with HBV infection in Chinese Yi and Yao populations.

  19. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the specific binding between Ag⁺ ion and C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA to form C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Itaru; Dairaku, Takenori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Metal ion-nucleic acid interactions have attracted considerable interest for their involvement in structure formation and catalytic activity of nucleic acids. Although interactions between metal ion and mismatched base pair duplex are important to understand mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions, they have not been well-characterized. We recently found that the Ag(+) ion stabilized a C:C mismatched base pair duplex DNA. A C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair was supposed to be formed by the binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C mismatched base pair to stabilize the duplex. Here, we examined specificity, thermodynamics and structure of possible C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair. UV melting indicated that only the duplex with the C:C mismatched base pair, and not of the duplexes with the perfectly matched and other mismatched base pairs, was specifically stabilized on adding the Ag(+) ion. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion specifically bound with the C:C base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with a binding constant of 10(6) M(-1), which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also supported the specific 1:1 binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C base pair. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the Ag(+) ion may bind with the N3 positions of the C:C base pair without distorting the higher-order structure of the duplex. We conclude that the specific formation of C-Ag-C base pair with large binding affinity would provide a binding mode of metal ion-DNA interactions, similar to that of the previously reported T-Hg-T base pair. The C-Ag-C base pair may be useful not only for understanding of molecular mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions but also for wide variety of potential applications of metal-mediated base pairs in various fields, such as material, life and environmental sciences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  20. Notes on projective structures and Kleinian groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, K.; Velling, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    From the three classes of projective structures defined on an arbitrary hyperbolic Riemann surface, namely bounded discrete projective structures, bounded Kleinian projective structures and bounded covering projective structures, the last one is discussed in this paper. 21 refs, 2 figs

  1. Learning Based on CC1 and CC4 Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    We propose that a general learning system should have three kinds of agents corresponding to sensory, short-term, and long-term memory that implicitly will facilitate context-free and context-sensitive aspects of learning. These three agents perform mututally complementary functions that capture aspects of the human cognition system. We investigate the use of CC1 and CC4 networks for use as models of short-term and sensory memory.

  2. Morphological Variation and Ecological Structure of Iroko (Milicia excelsa Welw. C.C. Berg) Populations across Different Bio geographical Zones in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouinsavi, C.; Sokpon, N.

    2010-01-01

    Iroko (Milicia excelsa) is a commercially important timber tree species formerly known by local people in Benin. Because of the highly attractive technological properties of its wood and its multipurpose uses, the species was subjected to intensive human pressure. Apart from strong climate oscillation during the Pleistocene, human caused habitat fragmentation through continuous land clearing for agriculture, extensive forests exploitation and urbanization induced the occurrence of many isolated forest plots and trees species among which Milicia excelsa trees. As fragmentation was proved to have deleterious effects on genetic diversity within a species and its morphological structure, it was of interest to investigate the current demographic, morphological and genetic structure of M. excelsa before coming up with conservation strategies. In the current study, morphological variation and ecological structure of M. excelsa populations were assessed in Benin using transect sampling method and multivariate analyses including principal component, cluster and canonical discriminant analyses. On the basis of morphological parameters, M. excelsa individuals and populations were clustered into four and discrimination of groups indicated that most of variations were highly related to edaphic factors and annual rainfall. Erratic diameter distribution was found for many populations although most of them showed bell shaped diameter distribution.

  3. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R.; Stranges, S.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the σ/π hyperconjugation in EtFC and the π-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  4. Expeditionary Strike Group: Command Structure Design Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchins, Susan G; Kemple, William G; Kleinman, David L; Hocevar, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    An Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) is a new capability mix that combines the combat power of three surface combatants and one submarine with an Amphibious Readiness Group/ Marine Expeditionary Unit...

  5. $\\Xi_{cc}$ decays and properties

    CERN Multimedia

    Traill, Murdo Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The $\\Xi$ particles are baryons contains 2 constituent charm quarks in their structure which are expected to decay to high multi-body final states. The LHCb detector is ideally designed for studies of them due to its excellent particle identification and vertex reconstruction. Its capabilities in this area of physics was firmly demonstrated when LHCb announced the discovery of the first ever doubly charmed baryon, $\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$, in decays of $\\Xi^{++}_{cc} \\to \\Lambda^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ in 2017. This doubly charmed baryon was observed as a highly significant structure in the $\\Lambda^+_c K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ mass spectrum from proton-proton collision data recorded by the LHCb detector in Run2. A yield of 313 $\\pm$ 33 $\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$ candidates is measured and the local significances is in excess of 12 $\\sigma$ in the 13 TeV data. The properties of the peak suggest it is inconsistent with being a strongly decaying state. From the 13 TeV data, the mass is measured to be $3621.40\\pm 0.72(stat.) \\pm 0.27(syst....

  6. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  7. Structuring agreements for seismic group shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeping, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    Sigma Explorations Inc. sells licenses to use Sigma owned seismic data. The company participates with exploration and production companies in the joint acquisition of semi-private participation surveys. This paper discusses three major types of seismic group shoots and the essential elements of the agreements that govern or should govern them. They are: (1) exploration and production company joint ventures, (2) publicly offered spec shoots, and (3) semi-private participation surveys. The key issue with the exploration and production company joint ventures is that the companies are owners of the seismic data in proportion to their contribution towards the cost of the program. Their use of the data should be restricted to those situations permitted by the other owners. These are not often well documented, and there is much concern in the industry as a result. The key issue with publicly offered spec shoots is that the seismic company ultimately owns the data and the client exploration and production company is a licensee and must behave as such. In most such cases the rights and responsibilities are well documented in formal agreements that are signed in advance of the program's beginning date

  8. Energy group structure determination using particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Ce; Sjoden, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Particle swarm optimization is applied to determine broad group structure. ► A graph representation of the broad group structure problem is introduced. ► The approach is tested on a fuel-pin model. - Abstract: Multi-group theory is widely applied for the energy domain discretization when solving the Linear Boltzmann Equation. To reduce the computational cost, fine group cross libraries are often down-sampled into broad group cross section libraries. Cross section data collapsing generally involves two steps: Firstly, the broad group structure has to be determined; secondly, a weighting scheme is used to evaluate the broad cross section library based on the fine group cross section data and the broad group structure. A common scheme is to average the fine group cross section weighted by the fine group flux. Cross section collapsing techniques have been intensively researched. However, most studies use a pre-determined group structure, open based on experience, to divide the neutron energy spectrum into thermal, epi-thermal, fast, etc. energy range. In this paper, a swarm intelligence algorithm, particle swarm optimization (PSO), is applied to optimize the broad group structure. A graph representation of the broad group structure determination problem is introduced. And the swarm intelligence algorithm is used to solve the graph model. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated using a fuel-pin model

  9. Structure of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 with a Potent Chemokine Antagonist Reveals Mechanisms of Chemokine Recognition and Molecular Mimicry by HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Han, Gye Won; Abagyan, Ruben; Wu, Beili; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M. (USC); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2017-06-01

    CCR5 is the primary chemokine receptor utilized by HIV to infect leukocytes, whereas CCR5 ligands inhibit infection by blocking CCR5 engagement with HIV gp120. To guide the design of improved therapeutics, we solved the structure of CCR5 in complex with chemokine antagonist [5P7]CCL5. Several structural features appeared to contribute to the anti-HIV potency of [5P7]CCL5, including the distinct chemokine orientation relative to the receptor, the near-complete occupancy of the receptor binding pocket, the dense network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the similarity of binding determinants with the FDA-approved HIV inhibitor Maraviroc. Molecular modeling indicated that HIV gp120 mimicked the chemokine interaction with CCR5, providing an explanation for the ability of CCR5 to recognize diverse ligands and gp120 variants. Our findings reveal that structural plasticity facilitates receptor-chemokine specificity and enables exploitation by HIV, and provide insight into the design of small molecule and protein inhibitors for HIV and other CCR5-mediated diseases.

  10. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1991-05-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Electrochemical Technologies, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity. In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materialsrelated inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current active membership is listed on the following four pages. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The Chairman of EMaCC for FY 1990 was Scott L. Richlen; the Executive Secretary was Dr. Jerry Smith.

  11. Teach yourself visually Photoshop CC

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Get savvy with the newest features and enhancements of Photoshop CC The newest version of Photoshop boasts enhanced and new features that afford you some amazing and creative ways to create images with impact, and this popular guide gets visual learners up to speed quickly. Packed with colorful screen shots that illustrate the step-by-step instructions, this visual guide is perfect for Photoshop newcomers as well as experienced users who are looking for some beginning to intermediate-level techniques to give their projects the ""wow"" factor! Veteran and bestselling authors Mik

  12. Adobe Photoshop CC for photographers

    CERN Document Server

    Evening, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adobe Photoshop for Photographers 2014 Release by Photoshop hall-of-famer and acclaimed digital imaging professional Martin Evening has been fully updated to include detailed instruction for all of the updates to Photoshop CC 2014 on Adobe's Creative Cloud, including significant new features, such as Focus Area selections, enhanced Content-Aware filling, and new Spin and Path blur gallery effects. This guide covers all the tools and techniques photographers and professional image editors need to know when using Photoshop, from workflow guidance to core skills to advanced techniques for profess

  13. Structuring group medical practices: shareholder and partnership agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman, A S

    1992-01-01

    This article is the second in a series addressing the structuring of group medical entities, shareholder relationships, and general representation factors. In this article, a number of the legal and business considerations for entering into shareholder and partnership agreements are discussed, and various types of practice structures and recommended group practice agreement provisions are described.

  14. DELINQUENCY AND THE STRUCTURE OF ADOLESCENT PEER GROUPS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreager, Derek A.; Rulison, Kelly; Moody, James

    2010-01-01

    Gangs and group-level processes were once central phenomena for criminological theory and research. By the mid-1970's, however, gang research was primarily displaced by studies of individual behavior using randomized self-report surveys, a shift that also removed groups from the theoretical foreground. In this project, we return to the group level to test competing theoretical claims about delinquent group structure. We use network-based clustering methods to identify 897 friendship groups in two ninth grade cohorts of 27 Pennsylvania and Iowa schools. We then relate group-level measures of delinquency and drinking to network measures of group size, friendship reciprocity, transitivity, structural cohesion, stability, average popularity, and network centrality. We find significant negative correlations between group delinquency and all of our network measures, suggesting that delinquent groups are less solidary and less central to school networks than non-delinquent groups. Further analyses, however, reveal that these correlations are primarily explained by other group characteristics, such as gender composition and socioeconomic status. Drinking behaviors, on the other hand, show net positive associations with most of the network measures, suggesting that drinking groups have higher status and are more internally cohesive than non-drinking groups. Our findings shed light on a longstanding criminological debate by suggesting that any structural differences between delinquent and non-delinquent groups may be attributable to other attributes coincidental with delinquency. In contrast, drinking groups appear to provide peer contexts of greater social capital and cohesion. PMID:21572969

  15. Syntheses, structures and redox properties of some complexes containing the Os(dppe)Cp* fragment, including [{Os(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C triple bondCC triple bond C)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Michael I; Costuas, Karine; Davin, Thomas; Halet, Jean-François; Kramarczuk, Kathy A; Low, Paul J; Nicholson, Brian K; Perkins, Gary J; Roberts, Rachel L; Skelton, Brian W; Smith, Mark E; White, Allan H

    2007-12-14

    The sequential conversion of [OsBr(cod)Cp*] (9) to [OsBr(dppe)Cp*] (10), [Os([=C=CH2)(dppe)Cp*]PF6 ([11]PF6), [Os(C triple bond CH)(dppe)Cp*] (12), [{Os(dppe)Cp*}2{mu-(=C=CH-CH=C=)}][PF6]2 ([13](PF6)2) and finally [{Os(dppe)Cp*}(2)(mu-C triple bond CC triple bond C)] (14) has been used to make the third member of the triad [{M(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C triple bond CC triple bond C)] (M = Fe, Ru, Os). The molecular structures of []PF6, 12 and 14, together with those of the related osmium complexes [Os(NCMe)(dppe)Cp*]PF6 ([15]PF6) and [Os(C triple bond CPh)(dppe)Cp*] (16), have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Comparison of the redox properties of 14 with those of its iron and ruthenium congeners shows that the first oxidation potential E1 varies as: Fe approximately Os < Ru. Whereas the Fe complex has been shown to undergo three sequential 1-electron oxidation processes within conventional electrochemical solvent windows, the Ru and Os compounds undergo no fewer than four sequential oxidation events giving rise to a five-membered series of redox related complexes [{M(dppe)Cp*}2(mu-C4)]n+ (n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4), the osmium derivatives being obtained at considerably lower potentials than the ruthenium analogues. These results are complimented by DFT and DT DFT calculations.

  16. Major Lipid Body Protein: A Conserved Structural Component of Lipid Body Accumulated during Abiotic Stress in S. quadricauda CASA-CC202

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Muthu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress in oleaginous microalgae enhances lipid accumulation and is stored in a specialised organelle called lipid droplets (LDs. Both the LDs and body are enriched with major lipid droplet protein (MLDP. It serves as a major structural component and also plays a key role in recruiting other proteins and enzymes involved in lipid body maturation. In the present study, the presence of MLDP was detected in two abiotic stress condition namely nitrogen starvation and salt stress condition. Previous research reveals that nitrogen starvation enhances lipid accumulation. Therefore, the effect of salt on growth, biomass yield, and fatty acid profile is studied in detail. The specific growth rate of S. quadricauda under the salt stress of 10mM concentration is about 0.174μ and in control, the SGR is 0.241μ. An increase in the doubling time of the cells shows that the rate of cell division decreases during salt stress (2.87–5.17. The dry biomass content also decreased drastically at 50mM salt-treated cells (129mg/L compared to control (236mg/L on the day 20. The analysis of fatty acid composition also revealed that there is a 20% decrease in the saturated fatty acid level and 19.9% increment in monounsaturated fatty acid level, which makes salt-mediated lipid accumulation as a suitable biodiesel precursor.

  17. Major Lipid Body Protein: A Conserved Structural Component of Lipid Body Accumulated during Abiotic Stress in S. quadricauda CASA-CC202

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javee, Anand; Sulochana, Sujitha Balakrishnan; Pallissery, Steffi James; Arumugam, Muthu

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress in oleaginous microalgae enhances lipid accumulation, which is stored in a specialized organelle called lipid droplets (LDs). Both the LDs or lipid body are enriched with major lipid droplet protein (MLDP). It serves as a major structural component and also plays a key role in recruiting other proteins and enzymes involved in lipid body maturation. In the present study, the presence of MLDP was detected in two abiotic stress condition namely nitrogen starvation and salt stress condition. Previous research reveals that nitrogen starvation enhances lipid accumulation. Therefore, the effect of salt on growth, biomass yield, and fatty acid profile is studied in detail. The specific growth rate of Scenedesmus quadricauda under the salt stress of 10mM concentration is about 0.174 μ and in control, the SGR is 0.241 μ. An increase in the doubling time of the cells shows that the rate of cell division decreases during salt stress (2.87–5.17). The dry biomass content also decreased drastically at 50mM salt-treated cells (129 mg/L) compared to control (236 mg/L) on the day 20. The analysis of fatty acid composition also revealed that there is a 20% decrease in the saturated fatty acid level and 19.9% increment in monounsaturated fatty acid level, which makes salt-mediated lipid accumulation as a suitable biodiesel precursor.

  18. Major Lipid Body Protein: A Conserved Structural Component of Lipid Body Accumulated during Abiotic Stress in S. quadricauda CASA-CC202

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javee, Anand [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Trivandrum (India); Sulochana, Sujitha Balakrishnan [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Trivandrum (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), New Delhi (India); Pallissery, Steffi James [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Trivandrum (India); Arumugam, Muthu, E-mail: arumugam@niist.res.in [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Trivandrum (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), New Delhi (India)

    2016-11-23

    Abiotic stress in oleaginous microalgae enhances lipid accumulation, which is stored in a specialized organelle called lipid droplets (LDs). Both the LDs or lipid body are enriched with major lipid droplet protein (MLDP). It serves as a major structural component and also plays a key role in recruiting other proteins and enzymes involved in lipid body maturation. In the present study, the presence of MLDP was detected in two abiotic stress condition namely nitrogen starvation and salt stress condition. Previous research reveals that nitrogen starvation enhances lipid accumulation. Therefore, the effect of salt on growth, biomass yield, and fatty acid profile is studied in detail. The specific growth rate of Scenedesmus quadricauda under the salt stress of 10mM concentration is about 0.174 μ and in control, the SGR is 0.241 μ. An increase in the doubling time of the cells shows that the rate of cell division decreases during salt stress (2.87–5.17). The dry biomass content also decreased drastically at 50mM salt-treated cells (129 mg/L) compared to control (236 mg/L) on the day 20. The analysis of fatty acid composition also revealed that there is a 20% decrease in the saturated fatty acid level and 19.9% increment in monounsaturated fatty acid level, which makes salt-mediated lipid accumulation as a suitable biodiesel precursor.

  19. On superspinor structure of homogeneous superspace of orthosymplectic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.V.; Soroka, V.A.; Tkach, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Superspinor structure of homogeneous superspaces of orthosymplectic groups are considered. It is shown how the properties of orthosymplectic group superspaces of OSp(N, 2K) group playing an important role in the supersymmetry theory can be described using superspinors. An example confirming a possibility of the relation between . canonical ratios of Butten bracket and conventional methods of quantization is considered

  20. Multivariate sparse group lasso for the multivariate multiple linear regression with an arbitrary group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanming; Nan, Bin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-06-01

    We propose a multivariate sparse group lasso variable selection and estimation method for data with high-dimensional predictors as well as high-dimensional response variables. The method is carried out through a penalized multivariate multiple linear regression model with an arbitrary group structure for the regression coefficient matrix. It suits many biology studies well in detecting associations between multiple traits and multiple predictors, with each trait and each predictor embedded in some biological functional groups such as genes, pathways or brain regions. The method is able to effectively remove unimportant groups as well as unimportant individual coefficients within important groups, particularly for large p small n problems, and is flexible in handling various complex group structures such as overlapping or nested or multilevel hierarchical structures. The method is evaluated through extensive simulations with comparisons to the conventional lasso and group lasso methods, and is applied to an eQTL association study. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  1. Reinforcing Visual Grouping Cues to Communicate Complex Informational Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Juhee; Watson, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    In his book Multimedia Learning [7], Richard Mayer asserts that viewers learn best from imagery that provides them with cues to help them organize new information into the correct knowledge structures. Designers have long been exploiting the Gestalt laws of visual grouping to deliver viewers those cues using visual hierarchy, often communicating structures much more complex than the simple organizations studied in psychological research. Unfortunately, designers are largely practical in their work, and have not paused to build a complex theory of structural communication. If we are to build a tool to help novices create effective and well structured visuals, we need a better understanding of how to create them. Our work takes a first step toward addressing this lack, studying how five of the many grouping cues (proximity, color similarity, common region, connectivity, and alignment) can be effectively combined to communicate structured text and imagery from real world examples. To measure the effectiveness of this structural communication, we applied a digital version of card sorting, a method widely used in anthropology and cognitive science to extract cognitive structures. We then used tree edit distance to measure the difference between perceived and communicated structures. Our most significant findings are: 1) with careful design, complex structure can be communicated clearly; 2) communicating complex structure is best done with multiple reinforcing grouping cues; 3) common region (use of containers such as boxes) is particularly effective at communicating structure; and 4) alignment is a weak structural communicator.

  2. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting.

  3. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia eLauro Grotto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: 1 they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious emotions to combine into structured group patterns; 2 they have a certain degree of stability in time; 3 they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; 4 they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical 'leadership’ pattern, and in 'cognitive’ terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e. the group behaves 'as if’ it was assuming that…. Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: 1 are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? 3 can these states be differentiated in structural terms? 3 to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  4. Group structure and group process for effective space station astronaut teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, J. M.; Kagan, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Space Station crews will encounter new problems, many derived from the social interaction of groups working in space for extended durations. Solutions to these problems must focus on the structure of groups and the interaction of individuals. A model of intervention is proposed to address problems of interpersonal relationships and emotional stress, and improve the morale, cohesiveness, and productivity of astronaut teams.

  5. Structural features and electronic properties of group-III-, group-IV-, and group-V-doped Si nanocrystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L E; Degoli, Elena; Cantele, G; Ossicini, Stefano; Ninno, D; Furthmueller, J; Bechstedt, F

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the incorporation of group-III (B and Al), group-IV (C and Ge), and group-V (N and P) impurities in Si nanocrystallites. The structural features and electronic properties of doped Si nanocrystallites, which are faceted or spherical-like, are studied by means of an ab initio pseudopotential method including spin polarization. Jahn-Teller distortions occur in the neighborhood of the impurity sites and the bond lengths show a dependence on size and shape of the nanocrystallites. We find that the acceptor (group-III) and donor (group-V) levels become deep as the nanocrystallites become small. The energy difference between the spin-up and spin-down levels of group-III and group-V impurities decreases as the size of the Si nanocrystallite increases and tends to the value calculated for Si bulk. Doping with carbon introduces an impurity-related level in the energy gap of the Si nanocrystallites

  6. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kin groups and trait groups: population structure and epidemic disease selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, A G

    1984-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based on the population structure of a small-scale human population, the Semai Senoi of Malaysia, has been developed to study the combined effects of group, kin, and individual selection. The population structure resembles D.S. Wilson's structured deme model in that local breeding populations (Semai settlements) are subdivided into trait groups (hamlets) that may be kin-structured and are not themselves demes. Additionally, settlement breeding populations are connected by two-dimensional stepping-stone migration approaching 30% per generation. Group and kin-structured group selection occur among hamlets the survivors of which then disperse to breed within the settlement population. Genetic drift is modeled by the process of hamlet formation; individual selection as a deterministic process, and stepping-stone migration as either random or kin-structured migrant groups. The mechanism for group selection is epidemics of infectious disease that can wipe out small hamlets particularly if most adults become sick and social life collapses. Genetic resistance to a disease is an individual attribute; however, hamlet groups with several resistant adults are less likely to disintegrate and experience high social mortality. A specific human gene, hemoglobin E, which confers resistance to malaria, is studied as an example of the process. The results of the simulations show that high genetic variance among hamlet groups may be generated by moderate degrees of kin-structuring. This strong microdifferentiation provides the potential for group selection. The effect of group selection in this case is rapid increase in gene frequencies among the total set of populations. In fact, group selection in concert with individual selection produced a faster rate of gene frequency increase among a set of 25 populations than the rate within a single unstructured population subject to deterministic individual selection. Such rapid evolution with plausible rates of

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Humpback Whales Competitive Groups in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Félix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the social structure and behavior of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae competitive groups off Ecuador between July and August 2010. During this time we followed 185 whales in 22 competitive groups for 41.45 hr. The average group size was 8.4 animals (SD = 2.85. The average sighting time was 113.05 min/group (SD = 47.1. We used photographs of dorsal fins and video to record interactions and estimate an association index (AI between each pair of whales within the groups. Sightings were divided into periods, which were defined by changes in group membership. On average, group composition changed every 30.2 min, which confirms that the structure of competitive groups is highly dynamic. Interactions between escorts characterized by low level of aggression. At least 60% of escorts joined or left together the group in small subunits between two and five animals, suggesting some type of cooperative association. Although singletons, as well as pairs or trios were able to join competitive groups at any moment, escorts that joined together were able to stay longer with the group and displace dominant escorts. Genetic analysis showed that in three occasions more than one female was present within a competitive group, suggesting either males are herding females or large competitive groups are formed by subunits. Males and females performed similar surface displays. We propose that competition and cooperation are interrelated in humpback whales’ competitive groups and that male cooperation would be an adaptive strategy either to displace dominant escorts or to fend off challengers.

  9. A Possible Neural Representation of Mathematical Group Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomi, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Every cognitive activity has a neural representation in the brain. When humans deal with abstract mathematical structures, for instance finite groups, certain patterns of activity are occurring in the brain that constitute their neural representation. A formal neurocognitive theory must account for all the activities developed by our brain and provide a possible neural representation for them. Associative memories are neural network models that have a good chance of achieving a universal representation of cognitive phenomena. In this work, we present a possible neural representation of mathematical group structures based on associative memory models that store finite groups through their Cayley graphs. A context-dependent associative memory stores the transitions between elements of the group when multiplied by each generator of a given presentation of the group. Under a convenient election of the vector basis mapping the elements of the group in the neural activity, the input of a vector corresponding to a generator of the group collapses the context-dependent rectangular matrix into a virtual square permutation matrix that is the matrix representation of the generator. This neural representation corresponds to the regular representation of the group, in which to each element is assigned a permutation matrix. This action of the generator on the memory matrix can also be seen as the dissection of the corresponding monochromatic subgraph of the Cayley graph of the group, and the adjacency matrix of this subgraph is the permutation matrix corresponding to the generator.

  10. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. MRSA CC398 in the pig production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Wolf, van der P.J.; Giessen, van de A.W.; Duijkeren, van E.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Nes, van A.; Mevius, D.J.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, a distinct clone of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398) was found in pigs and people in contact with pigs. The structure of the pig production chain in high technology pig husbandry enables pathogens to spread during animal trading, with an increasing prevalence in

  12. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-31

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  13. Les cardiopathies congenitales (cc) au Togo aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The petrology of the. Follot (16.96%) and the CIA (06.25%) 112 patients have been transferred to foreign countries of which 74.10% Suisse 107 CC have been operated. The evolution has been favourable in 89.18%. In Togo, the discovery of the CC has been done lately posing therefore a problem of therapeutic choice.

  14. Application of group representation theory to symmetric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Structures with symmetry occur in various problems, such as static and dynamic elastic response, and it is possible to gain partial information about their behaviour from their symmetry alone, using group representation theory. Due to the nature of the method, no numerical results other than the vanishing of certain quantities can be derived, but subsequent numerical calculations may be greatly shortened, and in simple structures, be rendered trivial. Among the applications to simple structures, those of interest in a nuclear context include, hexagonal tubes, bending of a circular tube under hexagonal loading patterns, and hexagonal arrays of fuel pins. (author)

  15. Root Structures of Infinite Gauge Groups and Supersymmetric Field Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, Sultan; Gürcan, Yasemin; Khalfan, Amish; Kurt, Levent

    2013-01-01

    We show the relationship between critical dimensions of supersymmetric fundamental theories and dimensions of certain Jordan algebras. In our approach position vectors in spacetime or in superspace are endowed with algebraic properties that are present only in those critical dimensions. A uniform construction of super Poincaré groups in these dimensions will be shown. Some applications of these algebraic methods to hidden symmetries present in the covariant and interacting string Lagrangians and to superparticle will be discussed. Algebraic methods we develop will be shown to generate the root structure of some infinite groups that play the role of gauge groups in a second quantized theory of strings

  16. Nuclear Structure Group annual progress report June 1974 -May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This is the first annual progress report of the Nuclear Structure Group of the University of Birmingham. The introduction lists the main fields of study of the Group as: polarisation penomena and optical model studies using 3 He and 4 He probes; photonuclear physics; heavy-ion physics; and K- meson physics. The programme is related to particle accelerators at Birmingham, Oxford, Harwell and the Rutherford Laboratory. The body of the report consists of summaries of 38 experiments undertaken by members of the Group. The third section contains 10 notes on instrumentation topics. Appendices contain lists of (a) personnel, (b) papers published or submitted during the period. (U.K.)

  17. Lie group structures on automorphism groups of real-analytic CR manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    ZAITSEV, DMITRI

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Given any real-analytic CR manifold M, we provide general conditions on M guar- anteeing that the group of all its global real-analytic CR automorphisms AutCR(M) is a Lie group (in an appropriate topology). In particular, we obtain a Lie group structure for AutCR(M) when M is an arbitrary compact real-analytic hypersurface embedded in some Stein manifold. The first author was supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF, Project P17111 and Project P19667. The second ...

  18. Structure of NCI Cooperative Groups Program Prior to NCTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how the National Cancer Institute’s Cooperative Groups Program was structured prior to its being replaced by NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). The NCTN gives funds and other support to cancer research organizations to conduct cancer clinical trials.

  19. Extending a scatterplot for displaying group structure in multivariate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... when regarded as extensions of ordinary scatterplots to describe variation and group structure in multivariate observations, is demonstrated by presenting a case study from the South African wood pulp industry. It is shown how multidimensional standards specified by users of a product may be added to the biplot in the ...

  20. Dynamical behavior of price forecasting in structures of group correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyuseong; Kim, Soo Yong; Kim, Kyungsik

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the prediction of the future prices from the structures and the networks of the companies in special financial groups. After the financial group network has been constructed from the value of the high cross-correlation, each company in a group is simulated and analyzed how it buys or sells stock is anaylzed and how it makes rational investments is forecasted. In the shortmemory behavior rather than the long-memory behavior, each company among a group can make a rational investment decision by using a stochastic evolution rule in the financial network. In particular, we simulate and analyze the investment situation in connection with the empirical data and the simulated result.

  1. Understanding `galaxy groups' as a unique structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; John, R. S.; Gupta, P.; Kumar, H.

    2017-10-01

    'Galaxy groups' have hardly been realized as a separate class of objects with specific characteristics in the structural hierarchy. The presumption that the self-similarity of dark matter structures is a valid prescription for the baryonic universe at all scales has rendered smaller structures undetectable by current observational facilities, leading to lesser dedicated studies on them. Some recent reports that indicate a deviation from LX-T scaling in groups compared to clusters have motivated us to study their physical properties in depth. In this article, we report the extensive study on physical properties of groups in comparison to the clusters through cosmological hydrodynamic plus N-body simulations using enzo 2.2 code. As additional physics, radiative cooling, heating due to supernova and star motions, star formation and stellar feedback have been implemented. We have produced a mock sample of 362 objects with mass ranging from 5 × 1012 M⊙ to 2.5 × 1015 M⊙. Strikingly, we have found that objects with mass below ˜8 × 1013 M⊙ do not follow any of the cluster self-similar laws in hydrostatics, not even in thermal and non-thermal energies. Two distinct scaling laws are observed to be followed with breaks at ˜8 × 1013 M⊙ for mass, ˜1 keV for temperature and ˜1 Mpc for radius. This places groups as a distinct entity in the hierarchical structures, well demarcated from clusters. This study reveals that groups are mostly far away from virialization, suggesting the need for formulating new models for deciphering their physical parameters. They are also shown to have high turbulence and more non-thermal energy stored, indicating better visibility in the non-thermal regime.

  2. Understanding 'Galaxy Groups' as a Unique Structure in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Reju Sam; Paul, Surajit; Gupta, Prateek; Kumar, Harish

    2017-07-01

    'Galaxy groups' have hardly been realized as a separate class of objects with specific characteristics in the structural hierarchy of the universe. The presumption that the self-similarity of dark matter structures is a valid prescription for the baryonic universe also at all scales has rendered smaller structures undetectable by current observational facilities, leading to lesser dedicated studies on them. Some recent reports on deviation of {L_x}-T scaling in groups from that of clusters have motivated us to study their physical properties in depth. In this article, we report the extensive study on physical properties of groups in comparison with clusters through cosmological hydrodynamic plus N-body simulations using ENZO 2.2 code. We have included cooling and heating physics and star formation feedback in the simulation. And produced a mock sample of 362 objects with mass ranging from 5×10^{12} M_{⊙} to 2.5×10^{15} M_{⊙}. Strikingly, we have found that objects with a mass below ˜ 8×10^{13} M_{⊙} do not follow any of the cluster self-similar laws in hydrostatics, not even in thermal and non-thermal regimes. Two distinct scaling laws are observed to be followed with breaks at ˜ 6-8× 10^{13} M_{⊙} for mass, ˜1 keV for temperature and ˜1 Mpc for radius. This places groups as a distinct entity in the hierarchical structures, well demarcated from clusters. This study reveals that groups are mostly far away from virialization, suggesting the need for formulating new models for deciphering their physical parameters. They are also shown to have high turbulence and more non-thermal energy stored, indicating better visibility in the non-thermal regime.

  3. Confinement in F4 Exceptional Gauge Group Using Domain Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Shahlaei, Amir

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the potential between static quarks in the fundamental representation of the F4 exceptional gauge group using domain structures of the thick center vortex model. As non-trivial center elements are absent, the asymptotic string tension is lost while an intermediate linear potential is observed. SU(2) is a subgroup of F4. Investigating the decomposition of the 26 dimensional representation of F4 to the SU(2) representations, might explain what accounts for the intermediate linear potential, in the exceptional groups with no center element.

  4. Identification of a cobia (Rachycentron canadum) CC chemokine gene and its involvement in the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Jiang, Jingzhe; Wang, Jiangyong; Feng, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The chemokines regulate immune cell migration under inflammatory and physiological conditions. We investigated a CC chemokine gene (RcCC1) from cobia (Rachycentron canadum). The full-length RcCC1 cDNA is comprised 673 nucleotides and encodes a four-cysteine arrangement 99-amino-acid protein typical of known CC chemokines. The genomic DNA of RcCC1 consists of three exons and two introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RcCC1 was closest to the MIP group of CC chemokines. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed RcCC1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with relative strong expression in gill, blood, kidney, spleen, and head kidney. The RcCC1 transcripts in the head kidney, spleen, and liver were quickly up-regulated after stimulation with formalin-inactivated Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C). These results indicate RcCC1 not only plays a role in homeostasis, but also may be involved in inflammatory responses to bacterial and viral infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Isosteres of Phosphate Groups in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuezhou; Borrel, Alexandre; Ghemtio, Leo; Regad, Leslie; Boije Af Gennäs, Gustav; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Xhaard, Henri

    2017-03-27

    We developed a computational workflow to mine the Protein Data Bank for isosteric replacements that exist in different binding site environments but have not necessarily been identified and exploited in compound design. Taking phosphate groups as examples, the workflow was used to construct 157 data sets, each composed of a reference protein complexed with AMP, ADP, ATP, or pyrophosphate as well other ligands. Phosphate binding sites appear to have a high hydration content and large size, resulting in U-shaped bioactive conformations recurrently found across unrelated protein families. A total of 16 413 replacements were extracted, filtered for a significant structural overlap on phosphate groups, and sorted according to their SMILES codes. In addition to the classical isosteres of phosphate, such as carboxylate, sulfone, or sulfonamide, unexpected replacements that do not conserve charge or polarity, such as aryl, aliphatic, or positively charged groups, were found.

  6. [Comporison Sduty of Microstructure by Metallographicalk on the Polarized Light and Texture by XRD of CC 5083 and CC 5182 Aluminium Alloy after Cold Rolling and Recrystallization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-biao; Li, Yong-wei; Tan, Yuan-biao; Ma, Min; Wang, Xue-min; Liu, Wen-chang

    2015-03-01

    At present the study of relation between microstructure, texture and performance of CC 5083 aluminium alloy after cold tolling and recrystallization processes is still finitude. So that the use of the CC 5083 aluminium alloy be influenced. Be cased into electrical furnace, hot up with unlimited speed followed the furnace hot up to different temperature and annealed 2h respectively, and be cased into salt-beth furnace, hot up quickly to different temperature and annealed 30 min respectively for CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy after cold roling with 91.5% reduction. The microstructure be watched use metallographic microscope, the texture be inspected by XRD. The start temperature of recrystallization and grain grow up temperature within annealing in the electric furnace of CC 5083 aluminum alloy board is 343 degrees C, and the shap of grain after grow up with long strip (the innovation point ); The start temperature of recrystallization within annealling in the salt bath furnace of CC 5083 is 343 degrees C. The start temperature and end temperature of recrystallization within annealling of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is 371 degrees C. The grain grow up outstanding of cold rooled CC 5152 aluminum alloy after annealed with 454 degrees C in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace. The start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5083 alluminurn alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively is higher than the start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5182 alluminum alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively. The strat temperature of recrystallization grain grow up is higher than which annealled with other three manner annealing process. The recrystallization temperature of CC 5182 annealed in the salt bath furnace is higher than which annealed in the electric furnace. The recrystallization temperature of the surface layer of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is higher than the inner layer (the innovation

  7. Structure and content of competitive group compositions in sports aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Moshenska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to make the analysis of modern competitive group compositions in sports aerobics. Material & Methods: pedagogical, sociological and methods of mathematical statistics were used. 10 coaches took part in the experimental part; analysis of protocols and video records of competitions of the aged category of children of 9–11 years old, who perform in the nomination of triplets and quintuples (group exercises, is carried out. Results: the content of competitive compositions and the allocated indicators are studied which defined it. Conclusions: the basic structural elements, which characterize competitive compositions, are allocated. Their components, quantity and time of performance are defined. It is established that variety of aerobic contents, spaces, and means of registration, musical compliance and logicality of creation of the whole competitive composition at high quality of performance characterizes teams – winners.

  8. On the algebraic structure of differential calculus on quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad'ko, O.V.; Vladimirov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Intrinsic Hopf algebra structure of the Woronowicz differential complex is shown to generate quite naturally a bicovariant algebra of four basic objects within a differential calculus on quantum groups - coordinate functions, differential forms, Lie derivatives, and inner derivatives - as the cross-product algebra of two mutually dual graded Hopf algebras. This construction, properly taking into account Hopf-algebraic properties of Woronowicz's bicovariant calculus, provides a direct proof of the Cartan identity and of many other useful relations. A detailed comparison with other approaches is also given

  9. Phase structure of NJL model with weak renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ken-Ichi; Kumamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the chiral phase structure of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and density by using the functional renormalization group (FRG). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the fermionic effective potential V (σ ; t) is given as a partial differential equation, where σ : = ψ bar ψ and t is a dimensionless RG scale. When the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DχSB) occurs at a certain scale tc, V (σ ; t) has singularities originated from the phase transitions, and then one cannot follow RG flows after tc. In this study, we introduce the weak solution method to the RG equation in order to follow the RG flows after the DχSB and to evaluate the dynamical mass and the chiral condensate in low energy scales. It is shown that the weak solution of the RG equation correctly captures vacuum structures and critical phenomena within the pure fermionic system. We show the chiral phase diagram on temperature, chemical potential and the four-Fermi coupling constant.

  10. A quantum group structure in integrable conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss a quantization prescription of the conformal algebras of a class of d=2 conformal field theories which are integrable. We first give a geometrical construction of certain extensions of the classical Virasoro algebra, known as classical W algebras, in which these algebras arise as the Lie algebra of the second Hamiltonian structure of a generalized Korteweg-de Vries hierarchy. This fact implies that the W algebras, obtained as a reduction with respect to the nilpotent subalgebras of the Kac-Moody algebra, describe the intergrability of a Toda field theory. Subsequently we determine the coadjoint operators of the W algebras, and relate these to classical Yang-Baxter matrices. The quantization of these algebras can be carried out using the concept of a so-called quantum group. We derive the condition under which the representations of these quantum groups admit a Hilbert space completion by exploring the relation with the braid group. Then we consider a modification of the Miura transformation which we use to define a quantum W algebra. This leads to an alternative interpretation of the coset construction for Kac-Moody algebras in terms of nonlinear integrable hierarchies. Subsequently we use the connection between the induced braid group representations and the representations of the mapping class group of Riemann surfaces to identify an action of the W algebras on the moduli space of stable curves, and we give the invariants of this action. This provides a generalization of the situation for the Virasoro algebra, where such an invariant is given by the so-called Mumford form which describes the partition function of the bosonic string. (orig.)

  11. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  12. Structure of ganglioside with CAD blood group antigen activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, B.K.; Blanchard, D.; Cartron, J.P.; van Kuik, G.A.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Marcus, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The novel erythrocyte ganglioside which carries the blood group Cad determinant has been isolated, and its structure has been determined. The ganglioside contained Glu:Gal:GalNAc:GlcNAc in a molar ratio of 1.00:1.94:0.93:0.95. The ganglioside binds Helix pomatia lectin and its chromatographic mobility is similar to G/sub D3/. After treatment with β-hexosaminidase (human placenta HexA) the product migrated with sialosylparagloboside (SPG), no longer binds Helix lectin, and binds a human anti-SPG antibody. Treatment of this material with neuraminidase (V. cholera) yielded a product with the mobility of paragloboside that bound monoclonal antibody 1B2. NMR analysis revealed that the terminal GalNAc is linked β1-4 to Gal, and confirms the structure proposed previously: GalNAcβ1-4(NeuAcα2-3)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4Glc-Cer. This structure is consistent with the previous demonstration that a compound with the same chromatographic mobility as the Cad ganglioside could be synthesized by enzymatic transfer of GalNAc to sialosylparagloboside

  13. InDesign CC digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Learn the newest version of Adobe's premiere page design software-InDesign CC- with this complete package Written by a team of expert instructors, this complete book-and-DVD package teaches even the most inexperienced beginner how to design eye-popping layouts for brochures, magazines, e-books, and flyers. Step-by-step instructions in the full-color book are enhanced by video tutorials on the companion DVD. Thirteen self-paced lessons let you learn Adobe InDesign CC (Creative Cloud) at your own speed; it's like having your own personal tutor teaching you the hottest new version of this leadi

  14. Adobe Edge Animate CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Rohde, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The easy way to build HTML5 mobile and web apps using Adobe's new Edge Animate CC Edge Animate CC is an approachable WYSIWYG alternative for leveraging the power of languages like HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to design and develop for the web and mobile devices, even if you have no programming experience. Written by Michael Rohde, the book calls on this seasoned web developer's wealth of experience using Edge Animate CC, and a companion website includes all code from the book to help you apply what you learn as you go. Features an easy-to-use interface, with a propert

  15. Global spread of mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus lineages CC1, CC15, and CC88 among mouse breeding facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Daniel M; Grumann, Dorothee; Schulz, Daniel; Gumz, Janine; Trübe, Patricia; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen; Johnson, Sarah; Nicklas, Werner; Kirsch, Petra; Martelet, Karine; Brandt, Jens van den; Berg, Sabine; Bröker, Barbara M; Wiles, Siouxsie; Holtfreter, Silva

    2017-11-20

    We previously reported that laboratory mice from all global vendors are frequently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Genotyping of a snap sample of murine S. aureus isolates from Charles River, US, showed that mice were predominantly colonized with methicillin-sensitive CC88 strains. Here, we expanded our view and investigated whether laboratory mice from other global animal facilities are colonized with similar strains or novel S. aureus lineages, and whether the murine S. aureus isolates show features of host adaptation. In total, we genotyped 230 S. aureus isolates from various vendor facilities of laboratory mice around the globe (Charles River facilities in the USA, Canada, France, and Germany; another US facility) and university- or company-associated breeding facilities in Germany, China and New Zealand. Spa typing was performed to analyse the clonal relationship of the isolates. Moreover, multiplex PCRs were performed for human-specific virulence factors, the immune-evasion cluster (IEC) and superantigen genes (SAg). We found a total of 58 different spa types that clustered into 15 clonal complexes (CCs). Three of these S. aureus lineages had spread globally among laboratory mice and accounted for three quarters of the isolates: CC1 (13.5%), CC15 (14.3%), and CC88 (47.0%). Compared to human colonizing isolates of the same lineages, the murine isolates frequently lacked IEC genes and SAg genes on mobile genetic elements, implying long-term adaptation to the murine host. In conclusion, laboratory mice from various vendors are colonized with host-adapted S. aureus-strains of a few lineages, predominantly the CC88 lineage. S. aureus researchers must be cautioned that S. aureus colonization might be a relevant confounder in infection and vaccination studies and are therefore advised to screen their mice before experimentation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  16. Minority group status and healthful aging: social structure still matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Jacqueline L; Angel, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    During the last 4 decades, a rapid increase has occurred in the number of survey-based and epidemiological studies of the health profiles of adults in general and of the causes of disparities between majority and minority Americans in particular. According to these studies, healthful aging consists of the absence of disease, or at least of the most serious preventable diseases and their consequences, and findings consistently reveal serious African American and Hispanic disadvantages in terms of healthful aging. We (1) briefly review conceptual and operational definitions of race and Hispanic ethnicity, (2) summarize how ethnicity-based differentials in health are related to social structures, and (3) emphasize the importance of attention to the economic, political, and institutional factors that perpetuate poverty and undermine healthful aging among certain groups.

  17. On the underlying gauge group structure of D=11 supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandos, I.A.; Azcarraga, J.A. de; Izquierdo, J.M.; Picon, M.; Varela, O.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying gauge group structure of D=11 supergravity is revisited. It may be described by a one-parametric family of Lie supergroups Σ-bar (s)x-bar SO(1,10), s 0. The family of superalgebras E-bar (s) associated to Σ-bar (s) is given by a family of extensions of the M-algebra {Pa,Qα,Zab,Za1...a5} by an additional fermionic central charge Qα'. The Chevalley-Eilenberg four-cocycle ω4∼Πα-bar Πβ-bar Πa-bar ΠbΓabαβ on the standard D=11 supersymmetry algebra may be trivialized on E-bar (s), and this implies that the three-form field A3 of D=11 supergravity may be expressed as a composite of the Σ-bar (s) one-form gauge fields ea, ψα, Bab, Ba1...a5 and ηα. Two superalgebras of E-bar (s) recover the two earlier D'Auria and Fre decompositions of A3. Another member of E-bar (s) allows for a simpler composite structure for A3 that does not involve the Ba1...a5 field. Σ-bar (s) is a deformation of Σ-bar (0), which is singularized by having an enhanced Sp(32) (rather than just SO(1,10)) automorphism symmetry and by being an expansion of OSp(1 vertical bar 32)

  18. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1975-01-01

    The success of the first edition of this book has encouraged us to revise and update it. In the second edition we have attempted to further clarify por­ tions of the text in reference to point symmetry, keeping certain sections and removing others. The ever-expanding interest in solids necessitates some discussion on space symmetry. In this edition we have expanded the discus­ sion on point symmetry to include space symmetry. The selection rules in­ clude space group selection rules (for k = 0). Numerous examples are pro­ vided to acquaint the reader with the procedure necessary to accomplish this. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the use of group theory in the interpretation of molecular spectra and in the determination of molecular structure. The text is intended for scientists and students with only a limited theoretical background in spectroscopy. For this reason we have presented detailed procedures for carrying out the selection rules and normal coor­ dinate treatment of ...

  19. Observation of the Doubly Charmed Baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjoern, M B; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Borysova, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddock, B; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombacher, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-09-15

    A highly significant structure is observed in the Λ_{c}^{+}K^{-}π^{+}π^{+} mass spectrum, where the Λ_{c}^{+} baryon is reconstructed in the decay mode pK^{-}π^{+}. The structure is consistent with originating from a weakly decaying particle, identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}. The difference between the masses of the Ξ_{cc}^{++} and Λ_{c}^{+} states is measured to be 1334.94±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)  MeV/c^{2}, and the Ξ_{cc}^{++} mass is then determined to be 3621.40±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)±0.14(Λ_{c}^{+})  MeV/c^{2}, where the last uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the Λ_{c}^{+} mass. The state is observed in a sample of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7  fb^{-1}, and confirmed in an additional sample of data collected at 8 TeV.

  20. Dynamical analysis of critical assembly CC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman Fernandez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The computer code CC-1, elaborated for the analysis of transients in Critical Assemblies is described. The results by the program are compared with the ones presented in the Safety Report for the Critical Assembly of ''La Quebrada'' Nuclear Research Centre (CIN). 7 refs

  1. A bonding study of c-C5H8 adsorption on Pt(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, S.; Jasen, P.; Gonzalez, E.; Juan, A.; Brizuela, G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemisorption of cyclopentane (c-C 5 H 8 ) on Pt(111) has been studied using a qualitative band-structure calculations in the framework of tight-binding implementation with the YAeHMOP package. We modeled the metal surface by a two-dimensional slab of finite thickness with an overlayer of c-C 5 H 8 , in a (3x3) di-σ geometry. The c-C 5 H 8 molecule is attached to the surface with its C?C atoms bonded mainly with two Pt atoms while the opposite CH 2 bends towards the surface. The Pt?Pt bonds in the underlying surface and the C?C bonds of c-C 5 H 8 are weakened upon the chemisorption. A noticeable Pt-H and Pt-C interactions has been observed. We found that of Pt 5d z 2 band plays an important role in the bonding between c-C 5 H 8 and the surface, as do the Pt 6s and 6p z bands. The HOMO-LUMO bands of c-C 5 H 8 are very dispersed, indicative of a strong interaction with the metal surface

  2. Engineering of Olfactory Receptor OlfCc1 for Directed Ligand Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Berke, Allison Paige

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Engineering of Olfactory Receptor OlfCc1 for Directed Ligand Sensitivityby Allison Paige Berke Joint Doctor of Philosophywith the University of California San FranciscoUniversity of California, Berkeley Professor Song Li, ChairDue to structural similarity, OlfCc1and its mammalian analogue V2R2 are hypothesized to respond to amino acid ligands in a calcium-mediated fashion. By analyzing receptor structure and making targeted mutations, the specificity and sensitivity of the receptor s...

  3. PENGARUH KELOMPOK REFERENSI TERHADAP KEPUTUSAN PEMBELIAN KAWASAKI NINJA 250 CC

    OpenAIRE

    Kartika WB, Sylvia; Sidig, Rosyid

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the affect of reference groups  on purchasing decision of  Kawasaki Ninja 250 cc in the city of Jambi. Size of sample consist of 100 unit that chousen randomly. While data analysis used  multiple regression analysis. The results showed that simultaneouly   normative, value expression, and  informative have significant role. But, based on partiall test  normative has no significant affect. Hence,  reference group h...

  4. Incorporating User-oriented Security into CC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Current versions of the Common Criteria concentrate very heavily on technical security issues which are relevant for the design of secure systems. This approach largely ignores a number of questions which can have great significance for whether or not the system can be operated securely in an env...... not currently dealt with in CC. Tentative proposals for extensions to the current classes of SFRs will be made on the basis of the analysis of the case....

  5. Operational Aspects of C/C++ Concurrency

    OpenAIRE

    Podkopaev, Anton; Sergey, Ilya; Nanevski, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a family of operational semantics that gradually approximates the realistic program behaviors in the C/C++11 memory model. Each semantics in our framework is built by elaborating and combining two simple ingredients: viewfronts and operation buffers. Viewfronts allow us to express the spatial aspect of thread interaction, i.e., which values a thread can read, while operation buffers enable manipulation with the temporal execution aspect, i.e., determining the order in...

  6. Working group report on the structure of the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badelek, B.; Vogt, A.; Gehrmann, T.; Martin, A.D.; Lancaster, M.

    1996-03-01

    We summarize the developments on the structure of the proton that we studied at the Workshop on HERA physics that was held in Durham in September 1995. We survey the latest structure function data; we overview the QCD interpretations of the measurements of the structure functions and of final state processes; we discuss charm production and the spin properties of the proton. (orig.)

  7. Quantification of C=C and C=O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ~5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C=C carbon fraction is only 1.1 ± 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or “bucky diamond” shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ~5% each. C=O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 °C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed C–H, C–OH, C=O, and C=C groups account for 12–14% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  8. Application of C/C composites to the combustion chamber of rocket engines. Part 1: Heating tests of C/C composites with high temperature combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Ueda, Shuichi; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) has various superior properties, such as high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures of more than 1800 K. Therefore, C/C composite is expected to be useful for many structural applications, such as combustion chambers of rocket engines and nose-cones of space-planes, but C/C composite lacks oxidation resistivity in high temperature environments. To meet the lifespan requirement for thermal barrier coatings, a ceramic coating has been employed in the hot-gas side wall. However, the main drawback to the use of C/C composite is the tendency for delamination to occur between the coating layer on the hot-gas side and the base materials on the cooling side during repeated thermal heating loads. To improve the thermal properties of the thermal barrier coating, five different types of 30-mm diameter C/C composite specimens constructed with functionally gradient materials (FGM's) and a modified matrix coating layer were fabricated. In this test, these specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of the rocket engine using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) / monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) to evaluate the properties of thermal and erosive resistance on the thermal barrier coating after the heating test. It was observed that modified matrix and coating with FGM's are effective in improving the thermal properties of C/C composite.

  9. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Machura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim: We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods : Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results: The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions : An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation.

  10. Purification and characterization of Cc-Lec, C-type lactose-binding lectin: A platelet aggregation and blood-clotting inhibitor from Cerastes cerastes venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samah, Saoud; Fatah, Chérifi; Jean-Marc, Berjeaud; Safia, Kellou-Taîri; Fatima, Laraba-Djebari

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we reported for the first time the biochemical and structural characterization of Cc-Lec, a C-type lectin purified from Cerastes cerastes venom by affinity chromatography. This lectin was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE, and was shown to be a 34 271.59Da polypeptide by Electrospray mass spectrometry MS-ES-TOF. Its identified sequence of 160 amino acids corresponding to one subunit, revealed a high identity with other related proteins. Cc-Lec modeled 3D structure appeared as homodimer cross-linked by one disulfide bridge. Cc-Lec exhibited a calcium dependent hemagglutinating activity against human group O erythrocytes. Cc-Lec inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, arachidonic acid or fibrinogen suggesting its interaction with their specific receptors namely P2Y1 and/or P2Y12, GPIIb/IIIa and TPα respectively. Cc-Lec was not lethal for mice until 10mg/kg administered by i.p. route. The lectin displayed a lasting anticoagulation on mice plasma even two days post-injection. This anticoagulation seems to be related to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa and IXa. Therefore, Cc-Lec prevented FXa amidolytic activity with Km=4.3310 -4 μg/mL and ki=14.4μg/mL. It seems to interact with these targets through CRD domain which could make it a good target as a pharmacological promising molecule in thrombosis diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rh-Catalyzed decarbonylative coupling with alkynes via C-C activation of isatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-02-04

    Herein we report a [5 + 2 - 1] transformation though catalytic decarbonylative coupling between isatins and alkynes, which provides a unique way to synthesize 2-quinolinone derivatives. A broad range of alkynes can be coupled efficiently with high regioselectivity. This reaction is proposed to go through C-C activation of isatins, followed by decarbonylation and alkyne insertion. Directing group (DG) plays a critical role in this transformation. Assisted by the DG, the C-C cleavage of isatins occurs at room temperature.

  12. Theoretical determination of molecular structure and conformation. 20. Reevaluation of the strain energies of cyclopropane and cyclobutane - CC and CH bond energies, 1,3 interactions, and sigma-aromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, D.; Gauss, J.

    1986-11-26

    In order to rationalize the striking similarity of the strain energies (SE) of cyclopropane (1, 28 kcal/mol) and cyclobutane (2, 27 kcal/mol), the energetic consequences of Pitzer strain, Baeyer strain, hybridization effects (CH bond strengthening), Dunitz-Schomaker strain (1,3 CC interactions), and bond stretching effects have been quantitatively assessed at the HF/6-31G** level of theory. Calculations have been based on chemically meaningful definitions of bond length, bond angle, bond energy, and bending force constant in strained molecules. Results reveal that Pitzer strain in both 1 and 2 is just 4 kcal/mol and that CH bond strengthening stabilizes 1 by 6 kcal/mol (2 by 3 kcal/mol), far less than has been assumed previously. The calculated Baeyer strain of 1 and 2 is 41 and 13 kcal/mol, respectively. SE(1) and SE(2) can only be compared if a correction term of 9 kcal/mol due to Dunitz-Schomaker strain (present in 2, but absent in 1) is taken into account. The analysis of the various energy contributions to the SEs of 1 and 2 reveals that 1 is stabilized by at least 17 kcal/mol. Both MO and electron density analysis suggest that 1 is totally different from the other cycloalkanes in being stabilized by 3-center 2-electron delocalization. sigma-Electrons are delocalized in the surface of the three-membered ring, a phenomenon which may be described by the term sigma-aromaticity.

  13. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legeza, Ö.; Veis, Libor; Poves, A.; Dukelsky, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2015), 051303 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : INITIO QUANTUM- CHEMISTRY * GROUP ALGORITHM * SHELL-MODEL Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.146, year: 2015

  14. Consolidated techniques for groups of enterprises with complex structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ciuraru-Andrica

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and disclosure of the financial statements of a group of enterprises involves some consolidation techniques. The Literature presents many techniques, but in practice are used two of them. They will be described first of all in a particular manner and after that in a comparative one. The group of entities can choose one of these techniques, the final result (the consolidated financial statements being the same, whatever the option.

  15. Possible Existence of (cc¯)–Nucleus Bound States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Akira; Oka, Makoto; Hiyama, Emiko

    2014-01-01

    Charmonium (cc¯) bound states in few-nucleon systems, 2 H, 4 He and 8 Be, are studied via Gaussian Expansion Method (GEM). We adopt a Gaussian potential as an effective (cc¯)–nucleon (N) interaction. The relation between two-body (cc¯)–N scattering length a cc¯−N and the binding energies B of (cc¯)–nucleus bound states are given. Recent lattice QCD data of a cc¯−N corresponds to B≃0.5 MeV for (cc¯)− 4 He and 2 MeV for (cc¯)− 8 Be in our results. (author)

  16. Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, Balazs; Barrat, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. We analyse how the adaptivity of the network of contacts between agents to the underlying social dynamics affects the size and topological properties of groups and the convergence time to the stable final state. We find that, while on static networks these properties are determined by percolation phenomena, on adaptive networks the rewiring process leads to different behaviors: adaptive rewiring fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. We show how the convergence time is determined by the characteristic time of link rearrangement. We finally investigate how the adaptivity yields nontrivial correlations between the internal topology and the size of the groups of agreeing agents

  17. A possible global group structure for exotic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue-Qian [Nankai University, School of Physics, Tianjin (China); Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-12-01

    Based on the fact that the long expected pentaquark which possesses the exotic quantum numbers of B = 1 and S = 1 was not experimentally found, although exotic states of XY Z have been observed recently, we conjecture that the heavy flavors may play an important role in stabilizing the hadronic structures beyond the traditional q anti q and qqq composites. (orig.)

  18. Extending a scatterplot for displaying group structure in multivariate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is awarded a credibility rating of A, B, C or D according to various financial ... of finding groups in data (see for example Kaufman and Rousseeuw (1990), McLachlan ..... Kraft liner. Sack paper. Min. Max. Min. Max. Total Yield. 43. 50. 43. 50. Alkali. 70 ..... ley J, Gourlay ID, O'Brien E, Plumptre RA & Quilter AK, 2003, Effect of.

  19. Structural analysis of a sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from the coenocytic green seaweed Caulerpa cupressoides var. lycopodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ariévilo Gurgel Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Researches on structural chemistry of sulfated polysaccharides (SPs have been mainly focused on red and brown algae. Caulerpa cupressoides var. lycopodium (Chlorophyta contains three SPs fractions (Cc-SP1, Cc-SP2 and Cc-SP3. Cc-SP1 and Cc-SP2 had anticoagulant (in vitro and anti- and prothrombotic, antinociceptive and/or anti-inflammatory (in vivo effects. However, their structural features have not yet been investigated. This study analyzed the chemical composition, elemental microanalysis and structural features by infrared (IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy of Cc-SPs. Fractionation of SPs by DEAE-cellulose yielded Cc-SP1, Cc-SP2 and CcSP3 containing differences among the relative proportions of sulfate (14.67-26.72%, total sugars (34.92-49.73% and uronic acid (7.15-7.22%. Carbon (21.76-29.62%, sulfate (2.16-4.55%, nitrogen (0.85-1.57% and hydrogen (4.57-5.86% contents were obtained using a CHN equipment. Data from IR indicated occurrence of sulfate ester, galactose-6-sulfate, uronic acid and glycoside linkages. For 1H NMR spectrum of the soluble Cc-SP1 fraction, it was mainly found β-galactopyranose residues and CH3 group. The results showed that Cc-SPs fractions have some structural features similar to others studied Caulerpaceae SPs.

  20. Basis set effects on coupled cluster benchmarks of electronically excited states: CC3, CCSDR(3) and CC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Schreiber, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies and one-electron properties of 28 medium-sized molecules from a previously proposed benchmark set are revisited using the augmented correlation-consistent triple-zeta aug-cc-pVTZ basis set in CC2, CCSDR(3), and CC3 calculations. The results are compared...... to those obtained previously with the smaller TZVP basis set. For each of the three coupled cluster methods, a correlation coefficient greater than 0.994 is found between the vertical excitation energies computed with the two basis sets. The deviations of the CC2 and CCSDR(3) results from the CC3 reference...... values are very similar for both basis sets, thus confirming previous conclusions on the intrinsic accuracy of CC2 and CCSDR(3). This similarity justifies the use of CC2- or CCSDR(3)-based corrections to account for basis set incompleteness in CC3 studies of vertical excitation energies. For oscillator...

  1. Conformal maps and group contractions in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonatsos, D.

    2011-01-01

    In mathematics, a conformal map is a function which preserves angles. We show how this procedure can be used in the framework of the Bohr Hamiltonian, leading to a Hamiltonian in a curved space, in which the mass depends on the nuclear deformation β, while it remains independent of the collective variable γ and the three Euler angles. This Hamiltonian is proved to be equivalent to that obtained using techniques of Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics. Group contraction is a procedure in which a symmetry group is reduced into a group of lower symmetry in a certain limiting case. Examples are provided in the large boson number limit of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model by a) the contraction of the SU(3) algebra into the [R 5 ]SO(3) algebra of the rigid rotator, consisting of the angular momentum operators forming SO(3), plus 5 mutually commuting quantities, the quadrupole operators, b) the contraction of the O(6) algebra into the [R 5 ]SO(5) algebra of the γ-unstable rotator. We show how contractions can be used for constructing symmetry lines in the interior of the symmetry triangle of the IBA model. (author)

  2. The Effect of Wave Grouping on On-Shore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1979-01-01

    generated solely in accordance with an energy spectrum obtained from field data can be used. To investigate the importance of the succession of waves to the impact on coastal structures, run-up/down on permeable and impermeable slopes and stability of dolos armour were investigated in model tests by using......-up/down and to the stability of dolos armour is shown. A proposal to establish a set of universal graphs for the stability of dolos blocks (or any other “interlocking” blocks) is made....

  3. Structural analysis of the RH-like blood group gene products in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvignol, I. [Centre Regional de Transfusion Sanguine, Toulouse (France); Calvas, P.; Blancher, A. [Universitaire d`Immunogenetique moleculaire, Toulouse (France); Socha, W.W. [University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Colin, Y.; Le Van Kim, C.; Bailly, P.; Cartron, J.P. [Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine, Paris (France); Ruffie, J.; Blancher, A. [College de France, Paris (France)

    1995-03-01

    Rh-related transcripts present in bone marrow samples from several species of nonhuman primates (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, crab-eating macaque) have been amplified by RT-polymerase chain reaction using primers deduced from the sequence of human RH genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the nonhuman transcripts revealed a high degree of similarity to human blood group Rh sequences, suggesting a great conservation of the RH genes throughout evolution. Full-length transcripts, potentially encoding 417 amino acid long proteins homologous to Rh polypeptides, were characterized, as well as mRNA isoforms which harbored nucleotide deletions or insertions and potentially encode truncated proteins. Proteins of 30-40,000 M{sub r}, immunologically related to human Rh proteins, were detected by western blot analysis with antipeptide antibodies, indicating that Rh-like transcripts are translated into membrane proteins. Comparison of human and nonhuman protein sequences was pivotal in clarifying the molecular basis of the blood group C/c polymorphism, showing that only the Pro103Ser substitution was correlated with C/c polymorphism. In addition, it was shown that a proline residue at position 102 was critical in the expression of C and c epitopes, most likely by providing an appropriate conformation of Rh polypeptides. From these data a phylogenetic reconstruction of the RH locus evolution has been calculated from which an unrooted phylogenetic tree could be proposed, indicating that African ape Rh-like genes would be closer to the human RhD gene than to the human RhCE gene. 55 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular and functional roles of 6C CC chemokine 19 in defense system of striped murrel Channa striatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Bhatt, Prasanth; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have reported the molecular information of chemokine-19 (Chem19) from striped murrel Channa striatus (Cs). CsCC-Chem19 cDNA sequence was 555 base pair (bp) in length which is 68bp 5' untranslated region (UTR), 339bp translated region and 149bp 3' UTR. The translated region is encoded for a polypeptide of 112 amino acids. CsCC-Chem19 peptide contains a signal sequence between 1 and 26 and an interleukin (IL) 8 like domain between 24 and 89. The multiple sequence alignment showed a 'DCCL' motif, an indispensable motif present in all CC chemokines which was conserved throughout the evolution. Phylogenetic tree showed that CsCC-Chem19 formed a cluster with chemokine 19 from fishes. Secondary structure of CsCC-Chem19 revealed that the peptide contains maximum amount of coils (61.6%) compared to α-helices (25.9%%) and β-sheet (12.5%). Further, 3D analysis indicated that the cysteine residues at 33, 34, 59 and 75 making the disulfide bridges as 33 = 59 and 34 = 75. Significantly (P coding region of CsCC-Chem19, recombinant CsCC-Chem19 protein was produced. The recombinant CsCC-Chem19 protein induced the cellular proliferation and respiratory burst activity of C. striatus peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the chemotactic activity showed that the recombinant CsCC-Chem19 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the movement of PBL of C. striatus. Conclusively, CsCC-Chem19 is a 6C CC chemokine having an ability to perform both inflammatory and homeostatic functions. However, further research is necessary to understand the potential of 6C CC chemokine 19 of C. striatus, particularly their regulatory ability on different cellular components in the defense system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Connecting the Dots: Social Network Structure, Conflict, and Group Cognitive Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curseu, Petru L.; Janssen, Steffie E. A.; Raab, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The current paper combines arguments from the social capital and group cognition literature to explain two different processes through which communication network structures and intra group conflict influence groups' cognitive complexity (GCC). We test in a sample of 44 groups the mediating role of intra group conflict in the relationship between…

  6. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1969-01-01

    This volume is a consequence of a series of seminars presented by the authors at the Infrared Spectroscopy Institute, Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, over the last nine years. Many participants on an intermediate level lacked a sufficient background in mathematics and quantum mechan­ ics, and it became evident that a non mathematical or nearly nonmathe­ matical approach would be necessary. The lectures were designed to fill this need and proved very successful. As a result of the interest that was developed in this approach, it was decided to write this book. The text is intended for scientists and students with only limited theore­ tical background in spectroscopy, but who are sincerely interested in the interpretation of molecular spectra. The book develops the detailed selection rules for fundamentals, combinations, and overtones for molecules in several point groups. Detailed procedures used in carrying out the normal coordinate treatment for several molecules are also presented. Numerous examples...

  7. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łukasik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duffy (Fy blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1 and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+, identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-, frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally.

  8. Analysis specifications for the CC3 biosphere model BIOTRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szekely, J.G.; Wojciechowski, L.C.; Stephens, M.E.; Halliday, H.A.

    1994-12-01

    AECL Research is assessing a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) has been developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system to take into account parameter variation. For the postclosure assessment, the system model, CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3), was developed to describe a hypothetical disposal system that includes a disposal vault, the local geosphere and the biosphere in the vicinity of any discharge zones. BIOTRAC (BIOsphere TRansport And Consequences) is the biosphere model in the CC3 system model. The specifications for BIOTRAC, which were developed over a period of seven years, were subjected to numerous walkthrough examinations by the Biosphere Model Working Group to ensure that the intent of the model developers would be correctly specified for transformation into FORTRAN code. The FORTRAN version of BIOTRAC was written from interim versions of these specifications. Improvements to the code are based on revised versions of these specifications. The specifications consist of a data dictionary; sets of synopses, data flow diagrams and mini specs for the component models of BIOTRAC (surface water, soil, atmosphere, and food chain and dose); and supporting calculations (interface to the geosphere, consequences, and mass balance). (author). 20 refs., tabs., figs

  9. Stress analysis of two-dimensional C/C composite components for HTGR's core restraint techanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoshi Hanawa; Taiju Shibata; Jyunya Sumita; Masahiro Ishihara; Tatsuo Iyoku; Kazuhiro Sawa

    2005-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix composite (C/C composite) is one of the most promising materials for HTGRs core components due to their high strength as well as high temperature resistibility. One of the most attractive applications of C/C composite is the core restraint mechanism. The core restraint mechanism is located around the reflector block and it works to tighten reactor core blocks so as to restrict un-supposition flow pass of coolant gas (bypass flow) in the core. The restriction of bypass flow reads to the high efficiency of coolant flow rate inside of the reactor core. For the future HTGRs and VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor), it is important to develop the core restraint mechanism with C/C composite substitute for metallic materials as used for HTTR. For the application of C/C composite to core restraint mechanism, it is important to investigate the applicability of C/C composite in viewpoint of structural integrity. In the present study, supposing the application of 2D-C/C composite to core restraint mechanism, thermal stress behavior was analyzed by considering the thickness of the C/C composite and the gap between reflector block and core restraint. It was shown from the thermal stress analysis that the circumferential stress decreases with increasing the gap and that the restraint force increases with increasing the thickness. By optimizing the thickness of C/C composite and gap between reflector block and core restraint, the C/C composite is applicable to the core restraint mechanism. (authors)

  10. Structure and age of the local association (Pleiades group)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggen, O.J.

    1975-01-01

    The available photometric and motion parameters for some 500 early-type stars brighter than M/sub V/ = -1/sup m/ are used to compute space-motion vectors. It is concluded that (a) about one-third of the stars are members of the local association (Pleiades group) which are easily isolated from the other interarm stars because V = -25 km sec -1 ; (b) some 50 stars with aberrant velocity vectors, and often referred to as ''runaway stars'', may actually be members of the old-disk, or even the halo, population; (c) perhaps the local association (or Gould Belt) stars cannot be separated from other interarm objects on the basis of positional criteria alone; and (d) the age spread in the local association ranges from that of the cluster NGC 2287 to pre-main-sequence stars in several star-producing regions within the association including the large Taurus Aurigae dark cloud and isolated small clouds, such as that near HR 5999/6000. (19 figures, 11 tables, 47 references) (U.S.)

  11. Integrative and distributive negotiation in small groups : Effects of task structure, decision rule, and social motive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Bianca; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the interactive effects of task structure, decision rule, and social motive on small-group negotiation processes and outcomes. Three-person groups negotiated either within an asymmetrical task structure (in which a majority of group members have compatible interests) or within a

  12. First North American 50 cc Total Artificial Heart Experience: Conversion from a 70 cc Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalpey, Zain; Kazui, Toshinobu; Ferng, Alice S; Connell, Alana; Tran, Phat L; Meyer, Mark; Rawashdeh, Badi; Smith, Richard G; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Friedman, Mark; Lick, Scott; Slepian, Marvin J; Copeland, Jack G

    2016-01-01

    The 70 cc total artificial heart (TAH) has been utilized as bridge to transplant (BTT) for biventricular failure. However, the utilization of 70 cc TAH has been limited to large patients for the low output from the pulmonary as well as systemic vein compression after chest closure. Therefore, the 50 cc TAH was developed by SynCardia (Tucson, AZ) to accommodate smaller chest cavity. We report the first TAH exchange from a 70 to 50 cc due to a fit difficulty. The patient failed to be closed with a 70 cc TAH, although the patient met the conventional 70 cc TAH fit criteria. We successfully closed the chest with a 50 cc TAH.

  13. Programmer's guide for the CC3 computer models of the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is assessing a concept for disposing of CANDU reactor fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) was developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept, and for environmental assessments of other systems. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system, which is described by the CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model. The CC3 model is comprised of the disposal vault submodel, the local geosphere submodel and the biosphere submodel. The CC3 Proarammer's Guide describes the programming philosophy and programming conventions not covered in the project standards. The guide includes a description of the overall logic for the CC3 vault, geosphere, and biosphere submodels. Each of the CC3 submodels is also isolated from the other two submbdels to create autonomous or 'stand-alone' submodels. The techniques used to isolate a CC3 submodel, and in particular to determine the submodells input and output data interface, are described. Structure charts are provided for the CC3 model and stand-alone submodels. This guide is meant as a companion document to the CC3 User's Manual. This guide does not describe how to use the CC3 software. The user should consult the CC3 User's Manual to determine how to configure, compile, link, and run the CC3 source code, as well as how to modify the data in the input files. It is intended that the CC3 code version CC305 be executed with SYVAC3 version SV309 and the Modelling Algorithm Library (ML3) version ML303, both developed for the assessment of the concept. SYVAC3-CC3-ML3 (also referred to as 'SC3') can be run on any platform containing an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compliant compiler. Recommended hardware environments are specified in the CC3 User's Manual. (author)

  14. Replacement of Neisseria meningitidis C cc11/ET-15 variant by a cc103 hypervirulent clone, Brazil 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Guilherme; Cordeiro, Soraia; Gomes, Erica; Romanelli, Cinthia; Andrade, Claudia; Reis, Joice; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-08-01

    Outbreaks caused by serogroup C meningococci in the northeast region of Brazil from 2005 to 2011 were associated to the emergence of variant ET-15 of cc11, which has been replaced by cc103 from 2006 to date. The increase of cc103 should be closely monitored to prevent the spread of this clone to neighbouring regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Group actions, non-Kähler complex manifolds and SKT structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poddar Mainak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We give a construction of integrable complex structures on the total space of a smooth principal bundle over a complex manifold, with an even dimensional compact Lie group as structure group, under certain conditions. This generalizes the constructions of complex structure on compact Lie groups by Samelson and Wang, and on principal torus bundles by Calabi-Eckmann and others. It also yields large classes of new examples of non-Kähler compact complex manifolds. Moreover, under suitable restrictions on the base manifold, the structure group, and characteristic classes, the total space of the principal bundle admits SKT metrics. This generalizes recent results of Grantcharov et al. We study the Picard group and the algebraic dimension of the total space in some cases. We also use a slightly generalized version of the construction to obtain (non-Kähler complex structures on tangential frame bundles of complex orbifolds.

  16. Optical implementation of (3, 3, 2) regular rectangular CC-Banyan optical network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junbo; Su, Xianyu

    2007-07-01

    CC-Banyan network plays an important role in the optical interconnection network. Based on previous reports of (2, 2, 3) the CC-Banyan network, another rectangular-Banyan network, i.e. (3, 3, 2) rectangular CC-Banyan network, has been discussed. First, according to its construction principle, the topological graph and the routing rule of (3, 3, 2) rectangular CC-Banyan network have been proposed. Then, the optically experimental setup of (3, 3, 2) rectangular CC-Banyan network has been designed and achieved. Each stage of node switch consists of phase spatial light modulator (PSLM) and polarizing beam-splitter (PBS), and fiber has been used to perform connection between adjacent stages. PBS features that s-component (perpendicular to the incident plane) of the incident light beam is reflected, and p-component (parallel to the incident plane) passes through it. According to switching logic, under the control of external electrical signals, PSLM functions to control routing paths of the signal beams, i.e. the polarization of each optical signal is rotated or not rotated 90° by a programmable PSLM. Finally, the discussion and analysis show that the experimental setup designed here can realize many functions such as optical signal switch and permutation. It has advantages of large number of input/output-ports, compact in structure, and low energy loss. Hence, the experimental setup can be used in optical communication and optical information processing.

  17. An NMR study of the covalent and noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scahill, T.A.; Jensen, R.M.; Swenson, D.H.; Hatzenbuhler, N.T.; Petzold, G.; Wierenga, W.; Brahme, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of the antitumor drug CC-1065 has been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This study involves two parts, the elucidation of the covalent binding site of the drug to DNA and a detailed investigation of the noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 with a DNA fragment through analysis of 2D NOE (NOESY) experiments. A CC-1065-DNA adduct was prepared, and an adenine adduct was released upon heating. NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) analysis of the adduct shows that the drug binds to N3 of adenine by reaction of its cyclopropyl group. The reaction pathway and product formed were determined by analysis of the 13 C DEPT spectra. An octamer duplex, d(CGATTAGC·GCTAATCG), was synthesized and used in the interaction study of CC-1065 and the oligomer. The duplex and the drug-octamer complex were both analyzed by 2D spectroscopy (COSY, NOESY). The relative intensity of the NOEs observed between the drug (CC-1065) and the octamer duplex shows conclusively that the drug is located in the minor groove, covalently attached to N3 of adenine 6 and positioned from the 3' → 5' end in relation to strand A [d(CGATTA 6 GC)]. A mechanism for drug binding and stabilization can be inferred from the NOE data and model-building studies

  18. Repression of CC16 by cigarette smoke (CS exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxiang Zhu

    Full Text Available Club (Clara Cell Secretory Protein (CCSP, or CC16 is produced mainly by non-ciliated airway epithelial cells including bronchiolar club cells and the change of its expression has been shown to associate with the progress and severity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. In an animal model, the lack of CC16 renders the animal susceptible to the tumorigenic effect of a major CS carcinogen. A recent population-based Tucson Epidemiological Study of Airway Obstructive Diseases (TESAOD has indicated that the low serum CC16 concentration is closely linked with the smoke-related mortality, particularly that driven by the lung cancer. However, the study of CC16 expression in well-defined smoke exposure models has been lacking, and there is no experimental support for the potential causal link between CC16 and CS-induced pathophysiological changes in the lung. In the present study, we have found that airway CC16 expression was significantly repressed in COPD patients, in monkey CS exposure model, and in CS-induced mouse model of COPD. Additionally, the lack of CC16 exacerbated airway inflammation and alveolar loss in the mouse model. Therefore, CC16 may play an important protective role in CS-related diseases.

  19. Radiological diagnosis and intervention of cholangiocarcinomas (CC); Radiologische Diagnostik und Intervention von Cholangiokarzinomen (CC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Eichler, K.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Weisser, P. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Trojan, J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I: Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie, Pneumologie/Allergologie

    2012-10-15

    To present current data on diagnosis, indication and different therapy options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC) based on an analysis of the current literature and clinical experience. The diagnostic routine includes laboratory investigations with parameters of cholestasis and also serum tumor markers CA19 - 9 and CEA. After ultrasound for clarifying a tumor and/or dilated bile ducts, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed with magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP). The accuracy (positive predictive value) for diagnosing a CC is 37 - 84 % (depending on the location) for ultrasound, 79 - 94 % for computed tomography (CT), and 95 % for MRI and MRCP. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) can then be planned, especially if biliary drainage or cytological or histological specimen sampling is intended. A curative approach can be achieved by surgical resection, rarely by liver transplantation. However, many patients are not eligible for surgery. In addition to systemic chemotherapy, locoregional therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) - also known as chemoperfusion -, drug eluting beads-therapy (DEB) as well as thermoablative procedures, such as laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), microwave ablation (MWA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be provided with a palliative intention.

  20. Nest Digging by Leaf-Cutting Ants: Effect of Group Size and Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto da Silva Camargo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-cutting ant workers dig underground chambers, for housing their symbiotic fungus, interconnected by a vast quantity of tunnels whose function is to permit the entrance of food (leaves, gaseous exchanges, and movement of workers, offspring, and the queen. Digging is a task executed by a group of workers, but little is known about the group effect and group-constructed functional structures. Thus, we analyzed the structures formed by worker groups (5, 10, 20, and 40 individuals of the leaf-cutting ant, Atta sexdens rubropilosa, for 2 days of excavation. The digging arena was the same for the 4 groups, with each group corresponding to a different density. Our results verified a pattern of tunneling by the workers, but no chamber was constructed. The group effect is well known, since the 40-worker group dug significantly more than the groups of 5, 10, and 20. These groups did not differ statistically from each other. Analysis of load/worker verified that workers of the smallest group carried the greatest load. Our paper demonstrates the group effect on the digging of nests, namely, that excavation is proportional to group size, but without emergence of a functional structure such as a chamber.

  1. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration...... variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends...

  2. Classical r-matrices and Poisson bracket structures on infinite-dimensional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratyn, H.; Nissimov, E.; Pacheva, S.

    1992-01-01

    Starting with a canonical symplectic structure defined on the contangent bundle T * G we derive, via Dirac hamiltonian reduction, Poisson brackets (PBs) on an arbitrary infinite-dimensional group G (admitting central extension). The PB structures are given in terms of an r-operator kernel related to the two-cocycle of the underlying Lie algebra and satisfying a differential classical Yang-Baxter equation. The explicit expressions of the PBs among the group variables for the (N, 0) for N=0, 1, ..., 4 (super-) Virasoro groups and the group of area-preserving diffeomorphisms on the torus are presented. (orig.)

  3. Single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI semiconductors: Structural stability, electronic structures, optical properties, and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-He; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, single-layer group III monochalcogenides have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest at their potential applications in photonic devices, electronic devices, and solar energy conversion. Excited by this, we theoretically design two kinds of highly stable single-layer group IV-V (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P) and group V-IV-III-VI (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P; III =Al ,Ga , and In; VI =O and S) compounds with the same structures with single-layer group III monochalcogenides via first-principles simulations. By using accurate hybrid functional and quasiparticle methods, we show the single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI are indirect bandgap semiconductors with their bandgaps and band edge positions conforming to the criteria of photocatalysts for water splitting. By applying a biaxial strain on single-layer group IV-V, single-layer group IV nitrides show a potential on mechanical sensors due to their bandgaps showing an almost linear response for strain. Furthermore, our calculations show that both single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI have absorption from the visible light region to far-ultraviolet region, especially for single-layer SiN-AlO and SnN-InO, which have strong absorption in the visible light region, resulting in excellent potential for solar energy conversion and visible light photocatalytic water splitting. Our research provides valuable insight for finding more potential functional two-dimensional semiconductors applied in optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and photocatalytic water splitting.

  4. A New Characterization of ACC0 and Probabilistic CC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Barrington, Straubing & Thérien (1990) conjectured that the Boolean And function can not be computed by polynomial size constant depth circuits built from modular counting gates, i.e., by CC0 circuits. In this work we show that the And function can be computed by uniform probabilistic CC0 circuits...... that use only O(log n) random bits. This may be viewed as evidence contrary to the conjecture. As a consequence of our construction we get that all of ACC0 can be computed by probabilistic CC0 circuits that use only O(log n) random bits. Thus, if one were able to derandomize such circuits, one would obtain...... a collapse of circuit classes giving ACC0 = CC0. We present a derandomization of probabilistic CC0 circuits using And and Or gates to obtain ACC0 = And ο Or ο CC0 = Or ο And ο CC0. (And and Or gates of sublinear fan-in suffice in non-uniform setting.) Both these results hold for uniform as well as non...

  5. Thermal structure and flow patterns around Seychelles group of Islands (Indian Ocean) during austral autumn

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; RameshBabu, V.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    Properties of thermal structure in the upper 750 m around the Seychelles group of islands in the Indian Ocean, based on Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) data collected in March 1984, are presented along with the inferred flow patterns...

  6. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.; Jiang, Chao; Grimes, Robin W.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a

  7. Extensive Genomic Diversity among Bovine-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus: Evidence for a Genomic Rearrangement within CC97.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen E Budd

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen associated with both human and veterinary disease and is a common cause of bovine mastitis. Genomic heterogeneity exists between S. aureus strains and has been implicated in the adaptation of specific strains to colonise particular mammalian hosts. Knowledge of the factors required for host specificity and virulence is important for understanding the pathogenesis and management of S. aureus mastitis. In this study, a panel of mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates (n = 126 was tested for resistance to antibiotics commonly used to treat mastitis. Over half of the isolates (52% demonstrated resistance to penicillin and ampicillin but all were susceptible to the other antibiotics tested. S. aureus isolates were further examined for their clonal diversity by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. In total, 18 different sequence types (STs were identified and eBURST analysis demonstrated that the majority of isolates grouped into clonal complexes CC97, CC151 or sequence type (ST 136. Analysis of the role of recombination events in determining S. aureus population structure determined that ST diversification through nucleotide substitutions were more likely to be due to recombination compared to point mutation, with regions of the genome possibly acting as recombination hotspots. DNA microarray analysis revealed a large number of differences amongst S. aureus STs in their variable genome content, including genes associated with capsule and biofilm formation and adhesion factors. Finally, evidence for a genomic arrangement was observed within isolates from CC97 with the ST71-like subgroup showing evidence of an IS431 insertion element having replaced approximately 30 kb of DNA including the ica operon and histidine biosynthesis genes, resulting in histidine auxotrophy. This genomic rearrangement may be responsible for the diversification of ST71 into an emerging bovine adapted subgroup.

  8. Non-coboundary Poisson–Lie structures on the book group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, Ángel; Blasco, Alfonso; Musso, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    All possible Poisson–Lie (PL) structures on the 3D real Lie group generated by a dilation and two commuting translations are obtained. Their classification is fully performed by relating these PL groups to the corresponding Lie bialgebra structures on the corresponding ‘book’ Lie algebra. By construction, all these Poisson structures are quadratic Poisson–Hopf algebras for which the group multiplication is a Poisson map. In contrast to the case of simple Lie groups, it turns out that most of the PL structures on the book group are non-coboundary ones. Moreover, from the viewpoint of Poisson dynamics, the most interesting PL book structures are just some of these non-coboundaries, which are explicitly analysed. In particular, we show that the two different q-deformed Poisson versions of the sl(2, R) algebra appear as two distinguished cases in this classification, as well as the quadratic Poisson structure that underlies the integrability of a large class of 3D Lotka–Volterra equations. Finally, the quantization problem for these PL groups is sketched. (paper)

  9. Human and Swine Hosts Share Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium CC17 and CC5 and Enterococcus faecalis CC2 Clonal Clusters Harboring Tn1546 on Indistinguishable Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitas, Ana R.; Coque, Teresa M.; Novais, Carla

    2011-01-01

    clonally related Enterococcus faecium clonal complex 5 (CC5) isolates (17 sequence type 6 [ST6], 6 ST5, 5 ST185, 1 ST147, and 1 ST493) were obtained from feces of swine and healthy humans. This collection included isolates widespread among pigs of European Union (EU) countries since the mid-1990s. Each ST...... comprised isolates showing similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns (≤6 bands difference; >82% similarity). Some CC5 PFGE subtype strains from swine were indistinguishable from hospital vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) causing infections. A truncated variant of Tn1546 (encoding...... resistance to vancomycin) and tcrB (coding for resistance to copper) were consistently located on 150- to 190-kb plasmids (rep(pLG1)). E. faecium CC17 (ST132) isolates from pig manure and two clinical samples showed identical PFGE profiles and contained a 60-kb mosaic plasmid (rep(Inc18) plus rep...

  10. The influence of age-group structure on genetic gain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    51 to 69 between different herds and cowage-group struc- tures. All three herds required at ... Keywords: Age-group structure, genetic gain, productivity, beef cattle ... 2160 to 210 898 during the same period (Hofmeyr, 1978 and. Bosman, 1982). .... Using the information in Figure 1to determine the reproduc- tion rate of herds ...

  11. Molecules and Models The molecular structures of main group element compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, Arne

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a systematic description of the molecular structures and bonding in simple compounds of the main group elements with particular emphasis on bond distances, bond energies and coordination geometries. The description includes the structures of hydrogen, halogen and methyl derivatives of the elements in each group, some of these molecules are ionic, some polar covalent. The survey of molecules whose structures conform to well-established trends is followed byrepresentative examples of molecules that do not conform. We also describe electron donor-acceptor and hydrogen bonded co

  12. On the chromospheric network structure around deVeloped groups of sunspots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartashova, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The chromospheric network structure around several developed groups of sunspots were studied on the basis of the observations in the Hsub(α) line. The resolution on the filtergrams was of 2. The following was found: 1) in the neighbourhood of the groups of sunspots 70% (from 870) of network cells stretch along fibrils direction (with accuracy 30 deg), and 15% of cells stretch approximately across that (at angles 70-90 deg); 2) out of the boundary of the main radial fibrils structure the groups of sunspots is often rounded by the system of network cells stretched approximately perpendicular to radial direction

  13. Search for the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A search for the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ in the decay mode $\\Xi_{cc}^{+} \\to \\Lambda_c^+ K^- \\pi^+$ is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.65 fb$^{-1}$, of $pp$ collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. No significant signal is found in the mass range 3300--3800 MeV$/c^2$. Upper limits at the 95\\% confidence level on the ratio of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ production cross-section times branching fraction to that of the $\\Lambda_c^+$, $R$, are given as a function of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ mass and lifetime. The largest upper limits range from $R<1.5 \\times 10^{-2}$ for a lifetime of 100 fs to $R<3.9 \\times 10^{-4}$ for a lifetime of 400 fs.

  14. The ModelCC Model-Driven Parser Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Berzal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syntax-directed translation tools require the specification of a language by means of a formal grammar. This grammar must conform to the specific requirements of the parser generator to be used. This grammar is then annotated with semantic actions for the resulting system to perform its desired function. In this paper, we introduce ModelCC, a model-based parser generator that decouples language specification from language processing, avoiding some of the problems caused by grammar-driven parser generators. ModelCC receives a conceptual model as input, along with constraints that annotate it. It is then able to create a parser for the desired textual syntax and the generated parser fully automates the instantiation of the language conceptual model. ModelCC also includes a reference resolution mechanism so that ModelCC is able to instantiate abstract syntax graphs, rather than mere abstract syntax trees.

  15. Description of symmetry of magnetic structures by representations of space groups. [Tables, projecton operator methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W

    1974-10-15

    A description of magnetic structures based on the use of representations of space groups is given. Representations of the space groups were established for each compound on the basis of experimental data by the method of projection operators. The compounds contained in the list are collected according to crystal systems, alphabetically within each system. The description of each compound consists of the four parts. The first part contain the chemical symbol of the compound, the second its space group. The next part contains the chemical symbol of the magnetic atom and its positions in Wychoff notation with the number of equivalent positions in the crystal unit cell. The main description of a compound magnetic structure is given in the fourth part. It contains: K vector defined in the reciprocal space, the representation according to which a magnetic structure is transformed and the axial vector function S which describes the magnetic structure.

  16. Search for the doubly charmed baryon Ξcc +

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, P.R.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M-O.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.D.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Van Den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca-Pelaz, A.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, C.R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; Paula, L.E.; da-Silva, W.S.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, Mark; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Carvalho-Gaspar, M.; Gauld, Rhorry; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T. J.; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.Q.; Gorbounov, P.; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, G.E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, J.T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.M.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T. E.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Di Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, S.C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli-Boneschi, F.; Martinez-Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B. T.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran-Zenteno, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, Karl; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, R.P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, D.A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, C.A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, Y.W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, Al.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, L.E.T.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, van Hapere; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, R. H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; de Souza, D.K.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M. N.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, N.T.M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, M.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, James F; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.J.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-01-01

    A search for the doubly charmed baryon Ξcc + in the decay mode Ξcc + → Λc +K-π+ is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.65 fb-1, of pp collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeV. No significant signal is found in the mass range 3300-3800 MeV/c2.

  17. Characterization of Exopolysaccharide Produced by Streptococcus thermophilus CC30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Ramya Krishna Kanamarlapudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An exopolysaccharide (EPS producing strain CC30 was isolated from raw milk and identified as Streptococcus thermophilus with morphological and 16S sequencing analysis. The strain was shown to produce 1.95 g/L of EPS when grown in skim milk lactose medium at 30°C by increasing the viscosity of the medium. The EPS was isolated and purified, and it was shown to consist of glucose and galactose in 1 : 1 ratio, with molecular weights ranging from 58 to 180 kDa. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the EPS to have amide, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups. Under Atomic Force Microscopy, EPS showed spike-like lumps of EPS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies showed that it had irregular lumps with a coarse surface. The EPS displayed pseudoplastic nature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA reported a degradation temperature of 110.84°C. The purified EPS exhibited reducing activity, hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging activity, and emulsification activity. The results of the present study indicated that EPS producing Streptococcus thermophilus could serve as a promising candidate for further exploitation in food industry.

  18. ccPDB: compilation and creation of data sets from Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2012-01-01

    ccPDB (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ccpdb/) is a database of data sets compiled from the literature and Protein Data Bank (PDB). First, we collected and compiled data sets from the literature used for developing bioinformatics methods to annotate the structure and function of proteins. Second, data sets were derived from the latest release of PDB using standard protocols. Third, we developed a powerful module for creating a wide range of customized data sets from the current release of PDB. This is a flexible module that allows users to create data sets using a simple six step procedure. In addition, a number of web services have been integrated in ccPDB, which include submission of jobs on PDB-based servers, annotation of protein structures and generation of patterns. This database maintains >30 types of data sets such as secondary structure, tight-turns, nucleotide interacting residues, metals interacting residues, DNA/RNA binding residues and so on.

  19. Backbone dynamics of the human CC-chemokine eotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Jiqing; Mayer, Kristen L.; Stone, Martin J. [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    1999-10-15

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine with potent chemoattractant activity towards eosinophils. {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data have been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of recombinant human eotaxin. {sup 15}N longitudinal (R{sub 1}) and transverse (R{sub 2}) auto relaxation rates, heteronuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N steady-state NOEs, and transverse cross-relaxation rates ({eta}{sub xy}) were obtained at 30 deg. C for all resolved backbone secondary amide groups using {sup 1} H-detected two-dimensional NMR experiments. Ratios of transverse auto and cross relaxation rates were used to identify NH groups influenced by slow conformational rearrangement. Relaxation data were fit to the extended model free dynamics formalism, yielding parameters describing axially symmetric molecular rotational diffusion and the internal dynamics of each NH group. The molecular rotational correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) is 5.09{+-}0.02 ns, indicating that eotaxin exists predominantly as a monomer under the conditions of the NMR study. The ratio of diffusion rates about unique and perpendicular axes (D{sub parallel}/D{sub perpendicular}) is 0.81{+-}0.02. Residues with large amplitudes of subnanosecond motion are clustered in the N-terminal region (residues 1-19), the C-terminus (residues 68-73) and the loop connecting the first two {beta}-strands (residues 30-37). N-terminal flexibility appears to be conserved throughout the chemokine family and may have implications for the mechanism of chemokine receptor activation. Residues exhibiting significant dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale are located close to the two conserved disulfide bonds, suggesting that these motions may be coupled to disulfide bond isomerization.

  20. How Are Distributed Groups Affected by an Imposed Structuring of their Decision-Making Process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Anders Lorentz; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Groups often suffer from ineffective communication and decision making. This experimental study compares distributed groups solving a preference task with support from either a communication system or a system providing both communication and a structuring of the decision-making process. Results...... show that groups using the latter system spend more time solving the task, spend more of their time on solution analysis, spend less of their time on disorganized activity, and arrive at task solutions with less extreme preferences. Thus, the type of system affects the decision-making process as well...... as its outcome. Notably, the task solutions arrived at by the groups using the system that imposes a structuring of the decision-making process show limited correlation with the task solutions suggested by the system on the basis of the groups’ explicitly stated criteria. We find no differences in group...

  1. Structured Play Therapy Groups for Preschoolers: facilitating the emergence of social competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan; Stark, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, we have developed a working model of Structured Play Therapy Groups for Preschoolers, an innovative treatment approach designed to address the needs of young children ages 3 to 5 struggling to adjust to the social demands of their preschool classrooms. These short-term therapy groups facilitate development of the young child's social competence and capacity to participate effectively in a classroom environment. Although the literature on therapy groups for children suggests that preschoolers are not yet evolved enough developmentally to engage actively in a group process, our experience indicates otherwise. The model of treatment presented here will therefore challenge that contention with the claim that not only can preschoolers participate in a structured therapy group of peers but they can, by virtue of that very participation, benefit in ways that will prepare them (as they transition from preschool to kindergarten) for the ever-increasing demands of their ever-expanding social milieus.

  2. The structure of compact groups a primer for the student, a handbook for the expert

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Karl H

    2013-01-01

    Dealing with subject matter of compact groups that is frequently cited in fields like algebra, topology, functional analysis, and theoretical physics, this book - now in its third revised and augmented edition - has been conceived with the dual purpose of providing a text book for upper level graduate courses or seminars, and of serving as a source book for research specialists who need to apply the structure and representation theory of compact groups. After a gentle introduction to compact groups and their representation theory, the book presents self-contained courses on linear Lie groups,

  3. Identifying the structure of group correlation in the Korean financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghyun; Choi, Jaewon; Lim, Gyuchang; Cha, Kil Young; Kim, Sooyong; Kim, Kyungsik

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the structure of the cross-correlation in the Korean stock market. We analyze daily cross-correlations between price fluctuations of 586 different Korean stock entities for the 6-year time period from 2003 to 2008. The main purpose is to investigate the structure of group correlation and its stability by undressing the market-wide effect using the Markowitz multi-factor model and the network-based approach. We find the explicit list of significant firms in the few largest eigenvectors from the undressed correlation matrix. We also observe that each contributor is involved in the same business sectors. The structure of group correlation can not remain constant during each 1-year time period with different starting points, whereas only two largest eigenvectors are stable for 6 years 8-9 eigenvectors remain stable for half-year. The structure of group correlation in the Korean financial market is disturbed during a sufficiently short time period even though the group correlation exists as an ensemble for the 6-year time period in the evolution of the system. We verify the structure of group correlation by applying a network-based approach. In addition, we examine relations between market capitalization and businesses. The Korean stock market shows a different behavior compared to mature markets, implying that the KOSPI is a target for short-positioned investors.

  4. Adaptive structured dictionary learning for image fusion based on group-sparse-representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajie; Sun, Bin; Luo, Chengwei; Wu, Yuzhong; Xu, Limei

    2018-04-01

    Dictionary learning is the key process of sparse representation which is one of the most widely used image representation theories in image fusion. The existing dictionary learning method does not use the group structure information and the sparse coefficients well. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive structured dictionary learning algorithm and a l1-norm maximum fusion rule that innovatively utilizes grouped sparse coefficients to merge the images. In the dictionary learning algorithm, we do not need prior knowledge about any group structure of the dictionary. By using the characteristics of the dictionary in expressing the signal, our algorithm can automatically find the desired potential structure information that hidden in the dictionary. The fusion rule takes the physical meaning of the group structure dictionary, and makes activity-level judgement on the structure information when the images are being merged. Therefore, the fused image can retain more significant information. Comparisons have been made with several state-of-the-art dictionary learning methods and fusion rules. The experimental results demonstrate that, the dictionary learning algorithm and the fusion rule both outperform others in terms of several objective evaluation metrics.

  5. Comparison of micelle structure of glycolipids with different head groups by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton; Hartmann, Thorsten; Niemeyer, Bernd; Garamus, V.M.; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Glycolipids such as n-alkyl- beta-D-glucopyranoside and n-alkyl- beta-D-maltopyranoside can self-assemble into different structures depending on solution conditions. Their amphiphilic properties enable them to serve as biosurfactants in biology and biotechnology, especially for solubilizing membrane proteins. The physicochemical properties of glycolipids have attracted attentions from several research groups, aiming to better understand their application in biological and environmental processes. For example, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering have been used to study micelle structures formed by glycolipids. Our previous work has shown that n-octyl-beta- D-glucopyranoside and n-octyl- beta-D-maltopyranoside form micelles with different structure, suggesting an important role of the sugar head group in micelle formation. In the present work, we further compare micelle structures of n-octyl- beta-Dglucopyranoside and n-octyl- beta-D-galactopyranoside. These two glycolipids have the same hydrophobic tail and their head sugar groups differ only in the conformation with one hydroxyl group pointing to different direction. Our SANS data together with phase behaviours reported by other group have suggested that a slight alteration of head group conformation can significantly affect self-assembly of glycolipids. (authors)

  6. Population genetic structure of peninsular Malaysia Malay sub-ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatin, Wan Isa; Nur-Shafawati, Ab Rajab; Zahri, Mohd-Khairi; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Tan, Soon-Guan; Rizman-Idid, Mohammed; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi

    2011-04-05

    Patterns of modern human population structure are helpful in understanding the history of human migration and admixture. We conducted a study on genetic structure of the Malay population in Malaysia, using 54,794 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data generated in four Malay sub-ethnic groups in peninsular Malaysia (Melayu Kelantan, Melayu Minang, Melayu Jawa and Melayu Bugis). To the best of our knowledge this is the first study conducted on these four Malay sub-ethnic groups and the analysis of genotype data of these four groups were compiled together with 11 other populations' genotype data from Indonesia, China, India, Africa and indigenous populations in Peninsular Malaysia obtained from the Pan-Asian SNP database. The phylogeny of populations showed that all of the four Malay sub-ethnic groups are separated into at least three different clusters. The Melayu Jawa, Melayu Bugis and Melayu Minang have a very close genetic relationship with Indonesian populations indicating a common ancestral history, while the Melayu Kelantan formed a distinct group on the tree indicating that they are genetically different from the other Malay sub-ethnic groups. We have detected genetic structuring among the Malay populations and this could possibly be accounted for by their different historical origins. Our results provide information of the genetic differentiation between these populations and a valuable insight into the origins of the Malay sub-ethnic groups in Peninsular Malaysia.

  7. Population Genetic Structure of Peninsular Malaysia Malay Sub-Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatin, Wan Isa; Nur-Shafawati, Ab Rajab; Zahri, Mohd-Khairi; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Tan, Soon-Guan; Rizman-Idid, Mohammed; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of modern human population structure are helpful in understanding the history of human migration and admixture. We conducted a study on genetic structure of the Malay population in Malaysia, using 54,794 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data generated in four Malay sub-ethnic groups in peninsular Malaysia (Melayu Kelantan, Melayu Minang, Melayu Jawa and Melayu Bugis). To the best of our knowledge this is the first study conducted on these four Malay sub-ethnic groups and the analysis of genotype data of these four groups were compiled together with 11 other populations' genotype data from Indonesia, China, India, Africa and indigenous populations in Peninsular Malaysia obtained from the Pan-Asian SNP database. The phylogeny of populations showed that all of the four Malay sub-ethnic groups are separated into at least three different clusters. The Melayu Jawa, Melayu Bugis and Melayu Minang have a very close genetic relationship with Indonesian populations indicating a common ancestral history, while the Melayu Kelantan formed a distinct group on the tree indicating that they are genetically different from the other Malay sub-ethnic groups. We have detected genetic structuring among the Malay populations and this could possibly be accounted for by their different historical origins. Our results provide information of the genetic differentiation between these populations and a valuable insight into the origins of the Malay sub-ethnic groups in Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:21483678

  8. Group Lifting Structures For Multirate Filter Banks, II: Linear Phase Filter Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, Christopher M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The theory of group lifting structures is applied to linear phase lifting factorizations for the two nontrivial classes of two-channel linear phase perfect reconstruction filter banks, the whole-and half-sample symmetric classes. Group lifting structures defined for the reversible and irreversible classes of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are shown to satisfy the hypotheses of the uniqueness theorem for group lifting structures. It follows that linear phase lifting factorizations of whole-and half-sample symmetric filter banks are therefore independent of the factorization methods used to compute them. These results cover the specification of user-defined whole-sample symmetric filter banks in Part 2 of the ISO JPEG 2000 standard.

  9. Analyses of the structure of group correlations in Korean financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jeung Su; Lim, Gyuchang; Kim, Kyungsik

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we construct and analyze the structure of cross-correlations in two Korean stock markets, the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) and the Korea Securities Dealers Automated Quotation (KOSDAQ). We investigate a remarkable agreement between the theoretical prediction and the empirical data concerning the density of eigenvalues in the KOSPI and the KOSDAQ. We estimate daily cross-correlations with respect to price fluctuations of 629 KOSPI and 650 KOSDAQ stock entities for the period from 2006 to 2010. The research for the structure of group correlations undress the market-wide effect by using the Markowitz multi-factor model and network-based approach. We find stock entities that involve the same business sectors and verify the structure of group correlations by applying a network-based approach. In particular, the KOSPI has a dense correlation besides overall group correlations for stock entities, whereas both correlations are less for the KOSDAQ than for the KOSPI.

  10. The structure of EAP-groups and self-autopermutable subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housieni, Shima; Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza Rajabzadeh

    2014-01-01

    A subgroup H of a given group G is said to be autopermutable, if HH(α) = H(α)H for all α ∈ Aut(G). We also call H a self-autopermutable subgroup of G, when HH(α) = H(α)H implies that H(α) = H. Moreover, G is said to be EAP-group, if every subgroup of G is autopermutable. One notes that if α runs over the inner automorphisms of the group, one obtains the notions of conjugate-permutability, self-conjugate-permutability, and ECP-groups, which were studied by Foguel in 1997, Li and Meng in 2007, and Xu and Zhang in 2005, respectively. In the present paper, we determine the structure of a finite EAP-group when its centre is of index 4 in G. We also show that self-autopermutability and characteristic properties are equivalent for nilpotent groups.

  11. Iterative Tensor Voting for Perceptual Grouping of Ill-Defined Curvilinear Structures: Application to Adherens Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Leandro A.; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is proposed for perceptual grouping and localization of ill-defined curvilinear structures. Our approach builds upon the tensor voting and the iterative voting frameworks. Its efficacy lies on iterative refinements of curvilinear structures by gradually shifting from an exploratory to an exploitative mode. Such a mode shifting is achieved by reducing the aperture of the tensor voting fields, which is shown to improve curve grouping and inference by enhancing the concentration of the votes over promising, salient structures. The proposed technique is applied to delineation of adherens junctions imaged through fluorescence microscopy. This class of membrane-bound macromolecules maintains tissue structural integrity and cell-cell interactions. Visually, it exhibits fibrous patterns that may be diffused, punctate and frequently perceptual. Besides the application to real data, the proposed method is compared to prior methods on synthetic and annotated real data, showing high precision rates. PMID:21421432

  12. A study of new rare-earth metal group-13 chalcohalides. Structures, chemistry, and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorhout, P.K.; Van Calcar, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Several new quaternary compounds from the rare-earth metal group-13 chalcohalide family have been prepared from alkaline earth halide flux reactions of binary and elemental starting materials. One compound, for example, Ca 2 La 6G a 2 S 1 4 , crystallizes as needles in an hexagonal cell while another, more disordered structure, La 11 Ga 19 Cl 6 S 42 , crystallizes as monoclinic plates. The former is a condensed structure with channels that contain the alkaline earth element while the latter forms a layered structure containing rare-earth halide clusters within interlayer galleries. These compounds are new members of a family of rare-earth metal main-group chalcogenides which show promise as electroluminescent materials. Structural and spectroscopic studies of these and related compounds will be discussed

  13. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie A Wieters

    Full Text Available We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km and local (10's m scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against

  14. Pitch structure, but not selective attention, affects accent weightings in metrical grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jon B

    2014-10-01

    Among other cues, pitch and temporal accents contribute to grouping in musical sequences. However, exactly how they combine remains unclear, possibly because of the role of structural organization. In 3 experiments, participants rated the perceived metrical grouping of sequences that either adhered to the rules of tonal Western musical pitch structure (musical key) or did not (atonal). The tonal status of sequences did not provide any grouping cues and was irrelevant to the task. Experiment 1 established equally strong levels of pitch leap accents and duration accents in baseline conditions, which were then recombined in subsequent experiments. Neither accent type was stronger or weaker for tonal and atonal contexts. In Experiment 2, pitch leap accents dominated over duration accents, but the extent of this advantage was greater when sequences were tonal. Experiment 3 ruled out an attentional origin of this effect by replicating this finding while explicitly manipulating attention to pitch or duration accents between participant groups. Overall, the presence of tonal pitch structure made the dimension of pitch more salient at the expense of time. These findings support a dimensional salience framework in which the presence of organizational structure prioritizes the processing of the more structured dimension regardless of task relevance, independent from psychophysical difficulty, and impervious to attentional allocation.

  15. Diversity and population structure of Marine Group A bacteria in the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Allers, Elke; Wright, Jody J; Konwar, Kishori M; Howes, Charles G; Beneze, Erica; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a candidate phylum of Bacteria that is ubiquitous and abundant in the ocean. Despite being prevalent, the structural and functional properties of MGA populations remain poorly constrained. Here, we quantified MGA diversity and population structure in relation to nutrients and O2 concentrations in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean using a combination of catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) and ...

  16. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-01-01

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner

  17. An optimized ultra-fine energy group structure for neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huria, Harish; Ouisloumen, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an optimized energy group structure that was developed for neutron transport calculations in lattices using the Westinghouse lattice physics code PARAGON. The currently used 70-energy group structure results in significant discrepancies when the predictions are compared with those from the continuous energy Monte Carlo methods. The main source of the differences is the approximations employed in the resonance self-shielding methodology. This, in turn, leads to ambiguous adjustments in the resonance range cross-sections. The main goal of developing this group structure was to bypass the self-shielding methodology altogether thereby reducing the neutronic calculation errors. The proposed optimized energy mesh has 6064 points with 5877 points spanning the resonance range. The group boundaries in the resonance range were selected so that the micro group cross-sections matched reasonably well with those derived from reaction tallies of MCNP for a number of resonance absorbers of interest in reactor lattices. At the same time, however, the fast and thermal energy range boundaries were also adjusted to match the MCNP reaction rates in the relevant ranges. The resulting multi-group library was used to obtain eigenvalues for a wide variety of reactor lattice numerical benchmarks and also the Doppler reactivity defect benchmarks to establish its adequacy. (authors)

  18. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-08-08

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The EMaCC Charter and the memorandum approving it are presented in the Appendix of this report. The FY 2002 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2002 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2002 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  19. On the representation matrices of the spin permutation group. [for atomic and molecular electronic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of the representation matrices of the spin permutation group (symmetric group), a detailed knowledge of these matrices being required in the study of the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. The method is characterized by the use of two different coupling schemes. Unlike the Yamanouchi spin algebraic scheme, the method is not recursive. The matrices for the fundamental transpositions can be written down directly in one of the two bases. The method results in a computationally significant reduction in the number of matrix elements that have to be stored when compared with, say, the standard Young tableaux group theoretical approach.

  20. [Characterization and transcriptional analysis of a new CC chemokine associated with innate imimune response in cobia (Rachycentron canadum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y; Feng, J; Sun, X; Guo, Z; Xu, L; Jiang, J

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides, known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations under both pathological and physiological conditions. On the basis of previously constructed express sequence tags (ESTs) of the head kidney and spleen cDNA library of the perciform marine fish Rachycentron canadum (common name cobia). We used bi-directional rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and obtained a full-length cDNA of a new CC chemokine gene (designated RcCC3). The RcCC3 putative peptide exhibits sequence similarity to the group of CCL19/21/25 CC chemokines. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used in transcript expression studies of RcCC3. We examined the constitutive expression of the transcripts in 12 tissues of non-stressed cobia; RcCC3 transcripts were detected in all tissues examined, with the highest expression in gill and liver, following by head kidney, kidney, spleen, skin, intestine, muscle, stomach, heart, blood and brain. Transcript expression of RcCC3 was examined in immune-related organs, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of phosphate-buffered saline control, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine). The transcripts in these tissues were quickly up-regulated by the injection of poly(I:C) and bacterial vaccine at early time points, although with different expression profiles. These results indicate RcCC3 represents an important component of innate immunity in cobia.

  1. On the Effect of Group Structures on Ranking Strategies in Folksonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Fabian; Henze, Nicola; Krause, Daniel; Kriesell, Matthias

    Folksonomies have shown interesting potential for improving information discovery and exploration. Recent folksonomy systems explore the use of tag assignments, which combine Web resources with annotations (tags), and the users that have created the annotations. This article investigates on the effect of grouping resources in folksonomies, i.e. creating sets of resources, and using this additional structure for the tasks of search & ranking, and for tag recommendations. We propose several group-sensitive extensions of graph-based search and recommendation algorithms, and compare them with non group-sensitive versions. Our experiments show that the quality of search result ranking can be significantly improved by introducing and exploiting the grouping of resources (one-tailed t-Test, level of significance α=0.05). Furthermore, tag recommendations profit from the group context, and it is possible to make very good recommendations even for untagged resources- which currently known tag recommendation algorithms cannot fulfill.

  2. Discovery of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Spradlin, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announced the first observation of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$, which was discovered decaying to a $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$ final state. A highly significant structure is found in the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$ mass spectrum in proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV and 8 TeV. The peak contains $313 \\pm 33$ decays in the 13 TeV sample and $113 \\pm 21$ decays in the 8 TeV, with local significances in excess of $12\\sigma$ and $7\\sigma$ respectively. The narrow structure has a width that is consistent with experimental resolution, and its properties are consistent with those of a weakly decaying state and inconsistent with those of a strongly decaying state. The difference between the masses of the structure, identified as $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$, and the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$ baryon is $1334.94 \\pm 0.72(\\mbox{stat.}) \\pm 0.27(\\mbox{syst.})\\,\\mbox{MeV}/c^{2}$, and the mass of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$ baryon ...

  3. Structure of Symmetry Groups via Cartan's Method: Survey of Four Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg I. Morozov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss four recent methods for computing Maurer-Cartan structure equations of symmetry groups of differential equations. Examples include solution of the contact equivalence problem for linear hyperbolic equations and finding a contact transformation between the generalized Hunter-Saxton equation and the Euler-Poisson equation.

  4. Structure of Vocational Interests for Diverse Groups on the 2005 Strong Interest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantamneni, Neeta; Fouad, Nadya

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the structure of vocational interests in a diverse sample of individuals who completed the 2005 revision of the Strong Interest Inventory. We examined the fit of three racial/ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Latino/a), both genders, and three levels of professional status (GRS participant, student,…

  5. Transformation Education: A Vehicle for Structuring Group Care Organizations to Increase Service Quality and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Transformation Education, an organizational philosophy and operating system, is designed to increase service quality and effectiveness of group care through aligning its organizational structure with its purpose. This alignment is achieved through creating a culture designed to dispense transformation rather than treatment. The author presents how…

  6. Association of serum Clara cell protein CC16 with respiratory infections and immune response to respiratory pathogens in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Marcin; Jurczyk, Janusz; Jarzębska, Marzanna; Moskwa, Sylwia; Makowska, Joanna S; Krysztofiak, Hubert; Kowalski, Marek L

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory epithelium integrity impairment caused by intensive exercise may lead to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clara cell protein (CC16) has anti-inflammatory properties and its serum level reflects changes in epithelium integrity and airway inflammation. This study aimed to investigate serum CC16 in elite athletes and to seek associations of CC16 with asthma or allergy, respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and immune response to respiratory pathogens. The study was performed in 203 Olympic athletes. Control groups comprised 53 healthy subjects and 49 mild allergic asthmatics. Serum levels of CC16 and IgG against respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were assessed. Allergy questionnaire for athletes was used to determine symptoms and exercise pattern. Current versions of ARIA and GINA guidelines were used when diagnosing allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. Asthma was diagnosed in 13.3% athletes, of whom 55.6% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis without asthma was diagnosed in 14.8% of athletes. Mean CC16 concentration was significantly lower in athletes versus healthy controls and mild asthmatics. Athletes reporting frequent RTIs had significantly lower serum CC16 and the risk of frequent RTIs was more than 2-fold higher in athletes with low serum CC16 (defined as equal to or less than 4.99 ng/ml). Athletes had significantly higher anti-adenovirus IgG than healthy controls while only non-atopic athletes had anti-parainfluenza virus IgG significantly lower than controls. In all athletes weak correlation of serum CC16 and anti-parainfluenza virus IgG was present (R = 0.20, p athletes a weak positive correlations of CC16 with IgG specific for respiratory syncytial virus (R = 0.29, p = 0.009), parainfluenza virus (R = 0.31, p = 0.01) and adenovirus (R = 0.27, p = 0.02) were seen as well. Regular high-load exercise is associated with decrease in serum CC16 levels. Athletes with decreased CC16 are

  7. HfC plasma coating of C/C composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncoeur, M.; Schnedecker, G.; Lulewicz, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface properties of C/C composites such as hardness and corrosion or erosion resistance can be modified by a ceramic coating applied by plasma torch. The technique of plasma spraying in controlled temperature and atmosphere, that was developed and patented by the CEA, makes it possible to apply coatings to the majority of metals and ceramics without affecting the characteristics of the composite. An example of hard deposit of HfC on a C/C composite is described. The characteristics of the deposit and of the bonding with the C/C composite were studied before and after a heat treatment under vacuum for 2 hours at 1000 C. 2 refs

  8. Efficient C/C++ programming smaller, faster, better

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Efficient C/C++ Programming describes a practical, real-world approach to efficient C/C++ programming. Topics covered range from how to save storage using a restricted character set and how to speed up access to records by employing hash coding and caching. A selective mailing list system is used to illustrate rapid access to and rearrangement of information selected by criteria specified at runtime.Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins by discussing factors to consider when deciding whether a program needs optimization. In the next chapter, a supermarket price lookup system is used to

  9. [The Effect of Structured Group Reminiscence Therapy on the Life Satisfaction of Institutionalized Elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Chen, Mei-Rong; Lee, Lai-Ling; Lee, Pi-Yueh; Wang, Shu-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Long-term care institutions have become an option for older people who are dependent in daily living. However, insufficient attention has been focused on assessing the life satisfaction of those currently residing in these institutions in Taiwan. Previous research indicates that group reminiscence may improve the life satisfaction of older adults. However, there is currently no consensus regarding the implementation and evaluation of reminiscence interventions. To examine the effect of a structured group reminiscence protocol on the life satisfaction of institutionalized older adults. The study used a quasi-experimental design. A total of 48 older adults were conveniently recruited from two long-term care institutions in southern Taiwan. The experimental group (n = 23) received 8 weeks of structured-group reminiscence for 40 minutes weekly, while the control group (n = 25) received routine care from the institution. Both groups were evaluated using a life-satisfaction questionnaire before and after the intervention and again four weeks later. Life satisfaction scores were statistically similar on the pre-test and significantly different on both post-test questionnaires for the two groups. The scores for the experimental and control groups were pre-test: 24.22 vs 23.36 (p = .063); post-test I: 27.22 vs 23.32 (p < .001); and post-test II: 26.43 vs 23.00 (p < .001). The mean post-test scores for the experimental group were significantly higher than the pre-test score (p < .001). The generalized estimating equation test showed that the overall score of life satisfaction for the experimental group increased by 0.85-points (p = .042) more than the control group, which is a significant difference. The results support that the 8-week structured group reminiscence protocol effectively enhances life satisfaction in older adults. The results of this study may be referenced in the continuing education of nurses working in long-term care institutions in the context of helping

  10. Toward a standardized structural-functional group connectome in MNI space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Andreas; Blankenburg, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the structural architecture of the human brain in terms of connectivity between its subregions has provided profound insights into its underlying functional organization and has coined the concept of the "connectome", a structural description of the elements forming the human brain and the connections among them. Here, as a proof of concept, we introduce a novel group connectome in standard space based on a large sample of 169 subjects from the Enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (eNKI-RS). Whole brain structural connectomes of each subject were estimated with a global tracking approach, and the resulting fiber tracts were warped into standard stereotactic (MNI) space using DARTEL. Employing this group connectome, the results of published tracking studies (i.e., the JHU white matter and Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) could be largely reproduced directly within MNI space. In a second analysis, a study that examined structural connectivity between regions of a functional network, namely the default mode network, was reproduced. Voxel-wise structural centrality was then calculated and compared to others' findings. Furthermore, including additional resting-state fMRI data from the same subjects, structural and functional connectivity matrices between approximately forty thousand nodes of the brain were calculated. This was done to estimate structure-function agreement indices of voxel-wise whole brain connectivity. Taken together, the combination of a novel whole brain fiber tracking approach and an advanced normalization method led to a group connectome that allowed (at least heuristically) performing fiber tracking directly within MNI space. Such an approach may be used for various purposes like the analysis of structural connectivity and modeling experiments that aim at studying the structure-function relationship of the human connectome. Moreover, it may even represent a first step toward a standard DTI template of the human brain

  11. The Hopf algebra structure of the character rings of classical groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D; King, Ronald C

    2013-01-01

    The character ring Char-GL of covariant irreducible tensor representations of the general linear group admits a Hopf algebra structure isomorphic to the Hopf algebra Symm-Λ of symmetric functions. Here we study the character rings Char-O and Char-Sp of the orthogonal and symplectic subgroups of the general linear group within the same framework of symmetric functions. We show that Char-O and Char-Sp also admit natural Hopf algebra structures that are isomorphic to that of Char-GL, and hence to Symm-Λ. The isomorphisms are determined explicitly, along with the specification of standard bases for Char-O and Char-Sp analogous to those used for Symm-Λ. A major structural change arising from the adoption of these bases is the introduction of new orthogonal and symplectic Schur–Hall scalar products. Significantly, the adjoint with respect to multiplication no longer coincides, as it does in the Char-GL case, with a Foulkes derivative or skew operation. The adjoint and Foulkes derivative now require separate definitions, and their properties are explored here in the orthogonal and symplectic cases. Moreover, the Hopf algebras Char-O and Char-Sp are not self-dual. The dual Hopf algebras Char-O * and Char-Sp are identified. Finally, the Hopf algebra of the universal rational character ring Char-GLrat of mixed irreducible tensor representations of the general linear group is introduced and its structure maps identified. (paper)

  12. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson,J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered {alpha}-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin.

  13. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered α-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an α-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin

  14. Preferences of group-housed female mice regarding structure of softwood bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J; Hackbarth, H; Stelzer, H D; Tsai, P-P

    2012-04-01

    Bedding influences various parameters in the housing of laboratory mice, such as health, physiology and behaviour (often considered as being integral parts of welfare). Notwithstanding existent studies about bedding preferences of individually tested mice, data about group-housed mice are still lacking. The aim of this study was to find out the structure preference for softwood bedding of group-housed mice. One hundred and eight 8-week-old female mice (C57BL6/JOlaHsd and BALB/cOlaHsd) were housed in groups of three and were given one-week free access to two different bedding structures at a time. In three test combinations, softwood shaving bedding was tested versus softwood chip bedding products of three different particle sizes (fine/medium/coarse-grained). The preference test was performed in a DoubleCage system composed of two Makrolon type IIL cages, connected by a perspex tunnel. This validated system was able to detect the crossings of each individual animal with correct crossing time and direction. On the basis of these data, dwelling times on the particular bedding structures were statistically analysed as a parameter for bedding preferences. In all three test combinations, a highly significant shaving preference was detected. On average, mice spent 70% of their dwelling time on the shavings. This preference was more explicit during the light period and in C57BL/6J mice. The relative ranking of the bedding structures was: shavings > coarse-grained chips > medium chips = fine chips. By means of these results, a shaving structure as bedding can be recommended for laboratory mice, whereas fine chip structures should be avoided.

  15. Report of the task group on the seismic behaviour of structures: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    In 1995, the CSNI Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations) approved a new mandate for PWG-3 and the new title 'Integrity of Components and Structures'. The PWG-3 is assisted by three task groups, one of which is addressing the problem of seismic behavior of structures. Ten topics were identified: engineering characterization of seismic input, site response, soil structure interaction, identification of functions and classification of systems, structures and components, structural response and capacity evaluation (including effects of aging and degradation), component and equipment response and capacity evaluation (including effects of aging and degradation), response and capacity evaluation of distribution systems (piping, cable trays, conduit, HVAC), load combination and acceptance criteria, uncertainties (PSA and margins), plant seismic instrumentation and trip. This report summarizes the seismic issues and activities in various member countries (Canada, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) and international organizations (IAEA), provides a summary of the important issues that are of collective interest to the group members, and recommends a future programme of work to address these issues

  16. Iterative tensor voting for perceptual grouping of ill-defined curvilinear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Leandro A; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is proposed for perceptual grouping and localization of ill-defined curvilinear structures. Our approach builds upon the tensor voting and the iterative voting frameworks. Its efficacy lies on iterative refinements of curvilinear structures by gradually shifting from an exploratory to an exploitative mode. Such a mode shifting is achieved by reducing the aperture of the tensor voting fields, which is shown to improve curve grouping and inference by enhancing the concentration of the votes over promising, salient structures. The proposed technique is validated on delineating adherens junctions that are imaged through fluorescence microscopy. However, the method is also applicable for screening other organisms based on characteristics of their cell wall structures. Adherens junctions maintain tissue structural integrity and cell-cell interactions. Visually, they exhibit fibrous patterns that may be diffused, heterogeneous in fluorescence intensity, or punctate and frequently perceptual. Besides the application to real data, the proposed method is compared to prior methods on synthetic and annotated real data, showing high precision rates.

  17. Addition by subtraction in coupled-cluster theory: a reconsideration of the CC and CI interface and the nCC hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rodney J; Musiał, Monika

    2006-11-28

    The nCC hierarchy of coupled-cluster approximations, where n guarantees exactness for n electrons and all products of n electrons are derived and applied to several illustrative problems. The condition of exactness for n=2 defines nCCSD=2CC, with nCCSDT=3CC and nCCSDTQ=4CC being exact for three and four electrons. To achieve this, the minimum number of diagrams is evaluated, which is less than in the corresponding CC model. For all practical purposes, nCC is also the proper definition of a size-extensive CI. 2CC is also an orbitally invariant coupled electron pair approximation. The numerical results of nCC are close to those for the full CC variant, and in some cases are closer to the full CI reference result. As 2CC is exact for separated electron pairs, it is the natural zeroth-order approximation for the correlation problem in molecules with other effects introduced as these units start to interact. The nCC hierarchy of approximations has all the attractive features of CC including its size extensivity, orbital invariance, and orbital insensitivity, but in a conceptually appealing form suited to bond breaking, while being computationally less demanding. Excited states from the equation of motion (EOM-2CC) are also reported, which show results frequently approaching those of EOM-CCSDT.

  18. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  19. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Coia

    Full Text Available Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet

  20. The structure of social exchange in self-help support groups: development of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louis D; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L

    2014-03-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics.

  1. Get more control over your C/C++ service

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Are you looking for a way to better diagnose or monitor your C/C++ programs? Find out more about CMX - a neat, lightweight library (<32Kb) which targets this need. It allows to expose information from inside a process through a simple API, enabling pre-failure detection in combination with your favourite monitoring system.

  2. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...

  3. Oxidative electrochemical aryl C-C coupling of spiropyrans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivashenko, Oleksii; van Herpt, Jochem T.; Rudolf, Petra; Feringa, Ben L.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and definitive assignment of the species formed upon electrochemical oxidation of nitro-spiropyran (SP) is reported. The oxidative aryl C-C coupling at the indoline moiety of the SP radical cation to form covalent dimers of the ring-closed SP form is demonstrated. The coupling is

  4. Cell volume regulation in hemoglobin CC and AA erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, L.R.; Orringer, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Swelling hemoglobin CC erythrocytes stimulates a ouabain-insensitive K flux that restores original cell volume. Studies were performed with the K analog, 86 Rb. This volume regulatory pathway was characterized for its anion dependence, sensitivity to loop diuretics, and requirement for Na. The swelling-induced K flux was eliminated if intracellular chloride was replaced by nitrate and both swelling-activated K influx and efflux were partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide or bumetanide. K influx in swollen hemoglobin CC cells was not diminished when Na in the incubation medium was replaced with choline, indicating Na independence of the swelling-induced flux. Identical experiments with hemoglobin AA cells also demonstrated a swelling-induced increase in K flux, but the magnitude and duration of this increase were considerably less than that seen with hemoglobin CC cells. The increased K flux in hemoglobin AA cells was likewise sensitive to anion replacement and to loop diuretics and did not require the presence of Na. These data indicate that a volume-activated K pathway with similar transport characteristics exists in both hemoglobin CC and AA red cells

  5. Special quasirandom structures for binary/ternary group IV random alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-06-01

    Simulation of defect interactions in binary/ternary group IV semiconductor alloys at the density functional theory level is difficult due to the random distribution of the constituent atoms. The special quasirandom structures approach is a computationally efficient way to describe the random nature. We systematically study the efficacy of the methodology and generate a number of special quasirandom cells for future use. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the electronic structures of E centers in Si1-xGex and Si1-x -yGexSny alloys are discussed for a range of nearest neighbor environments. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. F4 , E6 and G2 exceptional gauge groups in the vacuum domain structure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaei, Amir; Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh

    2018-03-01

    Using a vacuum domain structure model, we calculate trivial static potentials in various representations of F4 , E6, and G2 exceptional groups by means of the unit center element. Due to the absence of the nontrivial center elements, the potential of every representation is screened at far distances. However, the linear part is observed at intermediate quark separations and is investigated by the decomposition of the exceptional group to its maximal subgroups. Comparing the group factor of the supergroup with the corresponding one obtained from the nontrivial center elements of S U (3 ) subgroup shows that S U (3 ) is not the direct cause of temporary confinement in any of the exceptional groups. However, the trivial potential obtained from the group decomposition into the S U (3 ) subgroup is the same as the potential of the supergroup itself. In addition, any regular or singular decomposition into the S U (2 ) subgroup that produces the Cartan generator with the same elements as h1, in any exceptional group, leads to the linear intermediate potential of the exceptional gauge groups. The other S U (2 ) decompositions with the Cartan generator different from h1 are still able to describe the linear potential if the number of S U (2 ) nontrivial center elements that emerge in the decompositions is the same. As a result, it is the center vortices quantized in terms of nontrivial center elements of the S U (2 ) subgroup that give rise to the intermediate confinement in the static potentials.

  7. Braided matrix structure of the Sklyanin algebra and of the quantum Lorentz group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, S.

    1993-01-01

    Braided groups and braided matrices are novel algebraic structures living in braided or quasitensor categories. As such they are a generalization of super-groups and super-matrices to the case of braid statistics. Here we construct braided group versions of the standard quantum groups U q (g). They have the same FRT generators l ± but a matrix braided-coproduct ΔL=LxL, where L=l + Sl - , and are self-dual. As an application, the degenerate Sklyanin algebra is shown to be isomorphic to the braided matrices BM 1 (2); it is a braided-commutative bialgebra in a braided category. As a second application, we show that the quantum double D(U q (sl 2 )) (also known as the 'quantum Lorentz group') is the semidirect product as an algebra of two copies of U q (sl 2 ), and also a semidirect product as a coalgebra if we use braid statistics. We find various results of this type for the doubles of general quantum groups and their semi-limits as doubles of the Lie algebras of Poisson Lie groups. (orig.)

  8. Virtual study groups and online Observed Structured Clinical Examinations practices - enabling trainees to enable themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Dennisa; Evans, Lois

    2018-03-01

    To explore online study groups as augmentation tools in preparing for the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) for fellowship. An online survey of New Zealand trainees was carried out to assess exam preparedness and openness to virtual study groups and results analysed. Relevant material around virtual study groups for fellowship examinations was reviewed and used to inform a pilot virtual study group. Four New Zealand trainees took part in the pilot project, looking at using a virtual platform to augment OSCE preparation. Of the 50 respondents 36% felt adequately prepared for the OSCE. Sixty-four per cent were interested in using a virtual platform to augment their study. Virtual study groups were noted to be especially important for rural trainees, none of whom felt able to form study groups for themselves. The pilot virtual study group was trialled successfully. All four trainees reported the experience as subjectively beneficial to their examination preparation. Virtual platforms hold promise as an augmentation strategy for exam preparation, especially for rural trainees who are more geographically isolated and less likely to have peers preparing for the same examinations.

  9. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittger, Jens

    1994-01-01

    This review contains a summary of work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables -the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself - and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  10. Line group techniques in description of the structural phase transitions in some superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, C.; Bankuti, J. [Roland Eoetvoes Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Balint, A. [Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Goedoello (Hungary)

    1994-12-31

    The main features of the theory of line groups, and their irreducible representations are briefly discussed, as well as the most important applications of them. A new approach in the general symmetry analysis of the modulated systems is presented. It is shown, that the line group formalism could be a very effective tool in the examination of the structural phase transitions in High Temperature Superconductors. As an example, the material YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} is discussed briefly.

  11. The Clinical Study on Acupuncture Sensation in CC, CF and BV Herbal Acupuncture -The Basic Study on Placebo Herbal Acupuncture-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jung-Chul

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out whether NS(normal saline is able to be constituted as an appropriate control group for CC(Cervi Cornu Parvum herbal acupuncture, CF(Carthami-Flos herbal acupuncture and BV(bee venom herbal acupuncture. Methods : NS and three herbal acupuncture were inserted into Quchi(LI 11 of the subjects. After 5 minutes the subjects completed a questionnaire rating the intensity of 21 kinds of acupuncture sensation; hurting, penetrating, sharp, aching, intense, spreading, radiating, tingling, pricking, stinging, pulling, heavy, dull, numb, electric, shocking, hot, burning, cool, pulsing, and throbbing. We compared subjective evaluations of acupuncture sensation between or among the groups. Results : As for CC half items of the acupuncture sensation were significantly different from NS. As for CF all items were not significantly different from NS. As for CC all items were significantly different from NS except one item. In general the score of CF acupuncture sensation was lower than the others and the score of BV acupuncture sensation was higher than the others from comparison of sensation among herbal acupunctures(CC, CF, BV. Conclusion : We found that NS is able to be an appropriate placebo herbal acupuncture for CF. Further study is needed for new placebo herbal acupuncture for CC and BV.

  12. Structural Mimics of the [Fe]-Hydrogenase: A Complete Set for Group VIII Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Chandan Kr; Ganguly, Rakesh; Li, Yongxin; Leong, Weng Kee

    2018-06-18

    A set of structural mimics of the [Fe]-hydrogenase active site comprising all the group VIII metals, viz., [M(2-NHC(O)C 5 H 4 N)(CO) 2 (2-S-C 5 H 4 N)], has been synthesized. They exist as a mixture of isomers in solution, and the relative stability of the isomers depends on the nature of the metal and the substituent at the 6-position of the pyridine ligand.

  13. Application of the renormalization group to the study of structure function in the deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation law of truncated pertubation theory observables under changes of renormalization scheme is deduced. Based on this, a criticism of the calculus of the moments of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering, obtaining that the A 2 coefficient not renormalization group invariant is done. The PMS criterion is used to optimize the perturbative productions of the moments, truncated to 2nd order. (author) [pt

  14. Using machine learning to identify structural breaks in single-group interrupted time series designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Yarnold, Paul R

    2016-12-01

    Single-group interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) is a popular evaluation methodology in which a single unit of observation is being studied, the outcome variable is serially ordered as a time series and the intervention is expected to 'interrupt' the level and/or trend of the time series, subsequent to its introduction. Given that the internal validity of the design rests on the premise that the interruption in the time series is associated with the introduction of the treatment, treatment effects may seem less plausible if a parallel trend already exists in the time series prior to the actual intervention. Thus, sensitivity analyses should focus on detecting structural breaks in the time series before the intervention. In this paper, we introduce a machine-learning algorithm called optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) as an approach to determine if structural breaks can be identified in years prior to the initiation of the intervention, using data from California's 1988 voter-initiated Proposition 99 to reduce smoking rates. The ODA analysis indicates that numerous structural breaks occurred prior to the actual initiation of Proposition 99 in 1989, including perfect structural breaks in 1983 and 1985, thereby casting doubt on the validity of treatment effects estimated for the actual intervention when using a single-group ITSA design. Given the widespread use of ITSA for evaluating observational data and the increasing use of machine-learning techniques in traditional research, we recommend that structural break sensitivity analysis is routinely incorporated in all research using the single-group ITSA design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Behavioral responses in structured populations pave the way to group optimality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Erol; Van Cleve, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    An unresolved controversy regarding social behaviors is exemplified when natural selection might lead to behaviors that maximize fitness at the social-group level but are costly at the individual level. Except for the special case of groups of clones, we do not have a general understanding of how and when group-optimal behaviors evolve, especially when the behaviors in question are flexible. To address this question, we develop a general model that integrates behavioral plasticity in social interactions with the action of natural selection in structured populations. We find that group-optimal behaviors can evolve, even without clonal groups, if individuals exhibit appropriate behavioral responses to each other's actions. The evolution of such behavioral responses, in turn, is predicated on the nature of the proximate behavioral mechanisms. We model a particular class of proximate mechanisms, prosocial preferences, and find that such preferences evolve to sustain maximum group benefit under certain levels of relatedness and certain ecological conditions. Thus, our model demonstrates the fundamental interplay between behavioral responses and relatedness in determining the course of social evolution. We also highlight the crucial role of proximate mechanisms such as prosocial preferences in the evolution of behavioral responses and in facilitating evolutionary transitions in individuality.

  16. Incentive structure in team-based learning: graded versus ungraded Group Application exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Adam S; Moore, Jeremy A; McCormick, Colleen; Koles, Paul G; Borges, Nicole J

    2014-04-21

    Previous studies on team-based learning (TBL) in medical education demonstrated improved learner engagement, learner satisfaction, and academic performance; however, a paucity of information exists on modifications of the incentive structure of "traditional" TBL practices. The current study investigates the impact of modification to conventional Group Application exercises by examining student preference and student perceptions of TBL outcomes when Group Application exercises are excluded from TBL grades. During the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 academic years, 175 students (95.6% response rate) completed a 22-item multiple choice survey followed by 3 open response questions at the end of their second year of medical school. These students had participated in a TBL supplemented preclinical curriculum with graded Group Application exercises during year one and ungraded Group Application exercises during year two of medical school. Chi-square analyses showed significant differences between grading categories for general assessment of TBL, participation and communication, intra-team discussion, inter-team discussion, student perceptions of their own effort and development of teamwork skills. Furthermore, 83.8% of students polled prefer ungraded Group Application exercises with only 7.2% preferring graded and 9.0% indicating no preference. The use of ungraded Group Application exercises appears to be a successful modification of TBL, making it more "student-friendly" while maintaining the goals of active learning and development of teamwork skills.

  17. The impact of structured support groups for pregnant South African women recently diagnosed HIV positive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Jonathan P; Visser, Maretha J; Makin, Jennifer D; Kershaw, Trace S; Forsyth, Brian W C; Jeffery, Bridget; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2011-08-31

    The authors of this study evaluated a structured 10-session psychosocial support group intervention for newly HIV-diagnosed pregnant South African women. Participants were expected to display increases in HIV disclosure, self-esteem, active coping and positive social support, and decreases in depression, avoidant coping, and negative social support. Three hundred sixty-one pregnant HIV-infected women were recruited from four antenatal clinics in Tshwane townships from April 2005 to September 2006. Using a quasi-experimental design, assessments were conducted at baseline and two and eight months post-intervention. A series of random effects regression analyses were conducted, with the three assessment points treated as a random effect of time. At both follow-ups, the rate of disclosure in the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the comparison group (p<0.001). Compared to the comparison group at the first follow-up, the intervention group displayed higher levels of active coping (t=2.68, p<0.05) and lower levels of avoidant coping (t=-2.02, p<0.05), and those who attended at least half of the intervention sessions exhibited improved self-esteem (t=2.11, p<0.05). Group interventions tailored for newly HIV positive pregnant women, implemented in resource-limited settings, may accelerate the process of adjusting to one's HIV status, but may not have sustainable benefits over time.

  18. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts

  19. Resolving Microzooplankton Functional Groups In A Size-Structured Planktonic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, D.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Follows, M. J.; Jahn, O.; Menden-Deuer, S.

    2016-02-01

    Microzooplankton are important marine grazers, often consuming a large fraction of primary productivity. They consist of a great diversity of organisms with different behaviors, characteristics, and rates. This functional diversity, and its consequences, are not currently reflected in large-scale ocean ecological simulations. How should these organisms be represented, and what are the implications for their biogeography? We develop a size-structured, trait-based model to characterize a diversity of microzooplankton functional groups. We compile and examine size-based laboratory data on the traits, revealing some patterns with size and functional group that we interpret with mechanistic theory. Fitting the model to the data provides parameterizations of key rates and properties, which we employ in a numerical ocean model. The diversity of grazing preference, rates, and trophic strategies enables the coexistence of different functional groups of micro-grazers under various environmental conditions, and the model produces testable predictions of the biogeography.

  20. Crystal structure of bassetite and saleeite. New insight into autunite-group minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Bo, Fabrice; Hatert, Frederic [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Mineralogie; Mees, Florias [Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren (Belgium); Philippo, Simon [Musee National d' Histoire Naturelle, Luxembourg (Luxembourg). Section Mineralogie; Baijot, Maxime; Fontaine, Francois [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Dept. de Geologie

    2016-06-15

    The crystal structures of two autunite-group minerals have been solved recently. The crystal structure of bassetite, Fe{sup 2+}[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}, from the type locality in Cornwall, United Kingdom (Basset Mines) was solved for the first time. Bassetite is monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 6.961(1), b = 20.039(2), c = 6.974(1) Aa and β = 90.46(1) . The crystal structure of saleeite, Mg[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}, from Shinkolobwe, Democratic Republic of Congo, was also solved. Saleeite is monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 6.951(1), b = 19.942(1), c = 6.967(1) Aa and β = 90.58(1) . The crystal structure investigation of bassetite (R{sub 1} = 0.0658 for 1879 observed reflections with vertical stroke F{sub o} vertical stroke ≥ 4σ{sub F}) and saleeite (R{sub 1} = 0.0307 for 1990 observed reflections with vertical stroke F{sub o} vertical stroke ≥ 4σ{sub F}) confirms that both minerals are topologically identical and that bassetite contains ten water molecules per formula unit. Their structure contains autunite-type sheets, [(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sup -}, consisting of corner-sharing UO{sub 6} square bipyramids and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Iron and magnesium are surrounded by water molecules to form Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} or Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} octahedra located in interlayer, between the autunite-type sheets. Two isolated independent water molecules are also located in interlayer. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis confirmed the chemical composition obtained from structure refinement. These new data prompt a re-assessment of minerals of the autunite and meta-autunite groups.

  1. On the structure and applications of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, Francesco; Esposito, Giampiero

    This work is a pedagogical review dedicated to a modern description of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group. Minkowski space-time has an interesting and useful group of isometries, but, for a generic space-time, the isometry group is simply the identity and hence provides no significant informations. Yet symmetry groups have important role to play in physics; in particular, the Poincaré group describing the isometries of Minkowski space-time plays a role in the standard definitions of energy-momentum and angular-momentum. For this reason alone it would seem to be important to look for a generalization of the concept of isometry group that can apply in a useful way to suitable curved space-times. The curved space-times that will be taken into account are the ones that suitably approach, at infinity, Minkowski space-time. In particular we will focus on asymptotically flat space-times. In this work, the concept of asymptotic symmetry group of those space-times will be studied. In the first two sections we derive the asymptotic group following the classical approach which was basically developed by Bondi, van den Burg, Metzner and Sachs. This is essentially the group of transformations between coordinate systems of a certain type in asymptotically flat space-times. In the third section the conformal method and the notion of “asymptotic simplicity” are introduced, following mainly the works of Penrose. This section prepares us for another derivation of the BMS group which will involve the conformal structure, and is thus more geometrical and fundamental. In the subsequent sections we discuss the properties of the BMS group, e.g. its algebra and the possibility to obtain as its subgroup the Poincaré group, as we may expect. The paper ends with a review of the BMS invariance properties of classical gravitational scattering discovered by Strominger, that are finding application to black hole physics and quantum gravity in the literature.

  2. Monoclinic Cc-phase stabilization in magnetically diluted lead free Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3—Evolution of spin glass like behavior with enhanced ferroelectric and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelu, Karthik; Asthana, Saket

    2015-09-01

    The effect of magnetic cation substitution on the phase stabilization, ferroelectric, dielectric and magnetic properties of a lead free Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 (NBT) system prepared by O2 atmosphere solid state sintering were studied extensively. Cobalt (Co) was chosen as the magnetic cation to substitute at the Ti-site of NBT with optimized 2.5 mol%. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffraction data favours the monoclinic Cc phase stabilization strongly rather than the parent R3c phase. FE-SEM micrograph supports the single phase characteristics without phase segregation at the grain boundaries. The stabilized Cc space group was explained based on the collective local distortion effects due to spin-orbit stabilization at Co3+ and Co2+ functional centres. The phonon mode changes as observed in the TiO6 octahedral modes also support the Cc phase stabilization. The major Co3+-ion presence was revealed from corresponding crystal field transitions observed through solid state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The enhanced spontaneous polarization (Ps) from ≅38 μC cm-2 to 45 μC cm-2 could be due to the easy rotation of polarization vector along the {(1\\bar{1}0)}{{pc}} in Cc phase. An increase in static dielectric response (ɛ) from ɛ ≅ 42 to 60 along with enhanced diffusivity from γ ≅ 1.53 to 1.75 was observed. Magneto-thermal irreversibility and their magnetic field dependent ZFC/FC curves suggest the possibility of a spin glass like behaviour below 50 K. The monoclinic Cc phase stabilization as confirmed from structural studies was well correlated with the observed ferroic properties in magnetically diluted NBT.

  3. Do common eiders nest in kin groups? Microgeographic genetic structure in a philopatric sea duck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.; Lanctot, Richard B.; McCracken, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated local genetic associations among female Pacific common eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigrum) nesting in a stochastic Arctic environment within two groups of barrier islands (Simpson Lagoon and Mikkelsen Bay) in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Nonrandom genetic associations were observed among nesting females using regional spatial autocorrelation analyses for distance classes up to 1000 m in Simpson Lagoon. Nearest-neighbour analyses identified clusters of genetically related females with positive lr values observed for 0-13% and 0-7% of the comparisons in Simpson Lagoon and Mikkelsen Bay, respectively, across years. These results indicate that a proportion of females are nesting in close proximity to more genetically related individuals, albeit at low frequency. Such kin groupings may form through active association between relatives or through natal philopatry and breeding site fidelity. Eiders nest in close association with driftwood, which is redistributed annually by seasonal storms. Yet, genetic associations were still observed. Microgeographic structure may thus be more attributable to kin association than natal philopatry and site fidelity. However, habitat availability may also influence the level of structure observed. Regional structure was present only within Simpson Lagoon and this island group includes at least three islands with sufficient driftwood for colonies, whereas only one island at Mikkelsen Bay has these features. A long-term demographic study is needed to understand more fully the mechanisms that lead to fine-scale genetic structure observed in common eiders breeding in the Beaufort Sea. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Protic ammonium carboxylate ionic liquids: insight into structure, dynamics and thermophysical properties by alkyl group functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Th Dhileep N; Mallik, Bhabani S

    2017-04-19

    This study is aimed at characterising the structure, dynamics and thermophysical properties of five alkylammonium carboxylate ionic liquids (ILs) from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The structural features of these ILs were characterised by calculating the site-site radial distribution functions, g(r), spatial distribution functions and structure factors. The structural properties demonstrate that ILs show greater interaction between cations and anions when alkyl chain length increases on the cation or anion. In all ILs, spatial distribution functions show that the anion is close to the acidic hydrogen atoms of the ammonium cation. We determined the role of alkyl group functionalization of the charged entities, cations and anions, in the dynamical behavior and the transport coefficients of this family of ionic liquids. The dynamics of ILs are described by studying the mean square displacement (MSD) of the centres of mass of the ions, diffusion coefficients, ionic conductivities and hydrogen bonds as well as residence dynamics. The diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivity decrease with an increase in the size of the cation or anion. The effect of alkyl chain length on ionic conductivity calculated in this article is consistent with the findings of other experimental studies. Hydrogen bond lifetimes and residence times along with structure factors were also calculated, and are related to alkyl chain length.

  5. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-08-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  6. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-09-29

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  7. (cc)-(anti canti c) (diquark-antidiquark) states in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K T [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)

    1981-01-01

    The mass spectrum and decay modes of the (cc)-(anti canti c) states are estimated in a quark-gluon model. We argue that the peculiar resonance-like structures of R(e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadrons) for ..sqrt..s = 6 to 7 GeV may be due to production of the P-wave (cc)-(anti canti c) states. They are predicted to lie in the range 6.4 to 6.8 GeV and mainly decay into charmed mesons.

  8. (cc)-(anti canti c) (diquark-antidiquark) states in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K T

    1981-02-01

    The mass spectrum and decay modes of the (cc)-(anti canti c) states are estimated in a quark-gluon model. We argue that the peculiar resonance-like structures of R(e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. hadrons) for ..sqrt..s = 6-7 GeV may be due to production of the P-wave (cc)-(anti canti c) states. They are predicted to lie in the range 6.4-6.8 GeV and mainly decay into charmed mesons.

  9. Comprehensive Wavelengths, Energy Levels, and Hyperfine Structure Parameters of Singly-Ionized Iron-Group Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Gillian

    We propose to measure wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters of Ni II, Mn II, Sc II and other singly-ionized iron-group elements, covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm. We shall use archival data from spectrometers at NIST and Kitt Peak National Observatory for spectra above 140 nm. Additional experimental observations will be taken if needed using Fourier transform spectrometers at NIST. Spectra will be taken using our normal incidence grating spectrograph to provide better sensitivity than the FT spectra and to extend the wavelength range down to 80 nm. We aim to produce a comprehensive description of the spectra of all singly-ionized iron- group elements. The wavelength uncertainty of the strong lines will be better than 1 part in 10^7. For most singly-ionized iron-group elements available laboratory data have uncertainties an order of magnitude larger than astronomical observations over wide spectra ranges. Some of these laboratory measurements date back to the 1960's. Since then, Fourier transform spectroscopy has made significant progress in improving the accuracy and quantity of data in the UV-vis-IR region, but high quality Fourier transform spectra are still needed for Mn II, Ni II and Sc II. Fourier transform spectroscopy has low sensitivity in the VUV region and is limited to wavelengths above 140 nm. Spectra measured with high-resolution grating spectrographs are needed in this region in order to obtain laboratory data of comparable quality to the STIS and COS spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope. Currently, such data exist only for Fe II and Cr II. Lines of Sc II, V II, and Mn II show hyperfine structure, but hyperfine structure parameters have been measured for relatively few lines of these elements. Significant errors can occur if hyperfine structure is neglected when abundances are determined from stellar spectra. Measurements of hyperfine structure parameters will be made using Fourier transform spectroscopy

  10. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985.

  11. Commercial Biocides Induce Transfer of Prophage Φ13 from Human Strains of Staphylococcus aureus to Livestock CC398

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyue Tang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration of ΦSa3 in LA-MRSA CC398 occurs at multiple positions and the integration site influences the stability of the prophage. We did not observe integration in hlb encoding β-hemolysin that contains the preferred ΦSa3 attachment site in human strains, and we demonstrate that this is due to allelic variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends on the integration site. Knowledge of ΦSa3 transfer and stability between human and livestock strains may lead to new intervention measures directed at reducing human infection by LA-MRSA strains.

  12. Commercial Biocides Induce Transfer of Prophage Φ13 from Human Strains of Staphylococcus aureus to Livestock CC398.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene N; Hvitved, Annemette; Haaber, Jakob K; Wirtz, Christiane; Andersen, Paal S; Larsen, Jesper; Wolz, Christiane; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration of ΦSa3 in LA-MRSA CC398 occurs at multiple positions and the integration site influences the stability of the prophage. We did not observe integration in hlb encoding β-hemolysin that contains the preferred ΦSa3 attachment site in human strains, and we demonstrate that this is due to allelic variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends on the integration site. Knowledge of ΦSa3 transfer and stability between human and livestock strains may lead to new intervention measures directed at reducing human infection by LA-MRSA strains.

  13. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985

  14. Monogamy, strongly bonded groups, and the evolution of human social structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapais, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Human social evolution has most often been treated in a piecemeal fashion, with studies focusing on the evolution of specific components of human society such as pair-bonding, cooperative hunting, male provisioning, grandmothering, cooperative breeding, food sharing, male competition, male violence, sexual coercion, territoriality, and between-group conflicts. Evolutionary models about any one of those components are usually concerned with two categories of questions, one relating to the origins of the component and the other to its impact on the evolution of human cognition and social life. Remarkably few studies have been concerned with the evolution of the entity that integrates all components, the human social system itself. That social system has as its core feature human social structure, which I define here as the common denominator of all human societies in terms of group composition, mating system, residence patterns, and kinship structures. The paucity of information on the evolution of human social structure poses substantial problems because that information is useful, if not essential, to assess both the origins and impact of any particular aspect of human society. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: analysis of D2 cc hot spot in three-dimensional and anatomic factors affecting D2 cc hot spot in organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Robert Y; Dragovic, Alek F; Whitley, Alexander C; Shen, Sui

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the D2 cc hot spot in three-dimensional CT and anatomic factors affecting the D2 cc hot spot in organs at risk (OARs). Thirty-one patients underwent pelvic CT scan after insertion of the applicator. High-dose-rate treatment planning was performed with standard loading patterns. The D2 cc structures in OARs were generated in three dimensional if the total equivalent dose in 2 Gy exceeded our defined dose limits (hot spot). The location of D2 cc hot spot was defined as the center of the largest D2 cc fragment. The relationship between the hot spot and the applicator position was reported in Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine coordinates. The location of sigmoid, small bowel, and bladder D2 cc hot spots was around the endocervix: The mean location of sigmoid hot spot for lateral view was 1.6 cm posteriorly and 2.3 cm superiorly (Y, 1.6 and Z, 2.3), small bowel was 1.6 cm anteriorly and 2.7 cm superiorly (Y, -1.6 and Z, 2.7). The mean location of bladder hot spot was 1.6 cm anteriorly and 1.6 cm superiorly (Y, -1.6 and Z, 1.6). These hot spots were near the plane of Point A (X, 2.0 or -2.0; Y, 0; and Z, 2.0). The mean location of rectal hot spot was 1.6 cm posteriorly and 1.9 cm inferiorly (Y, 1.6 and Z, -1.9). D2 cc hot spot was affected by uterine wall thickness, uterine tandem position, fibroids, bladder fullness, bowel gas, and vaginal packing. Because of the location of the D2 cc hot spots, larger tumors present a challenge for adequate tumor coverage with a conventional brachytherapy applicator without an interstitial implant. Additionally, anatomic factors were identified which affect the D2 cc hot spot in OARs. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal structure of ilyukhinite, a new mineral of the eudialyte group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@crys.ras.ru; Rozenberg, K. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Crystallography and Photonics Federal Scientific Research Center (Russian Federation); Chukanov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Aksenov, S. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Crystallography and Photonics Federal Scientific Research Center (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The crystal structure of ilyukhinite, a new mineral of the eudialyte group, is studied by X-ray diffraction. The mineral found in pegmatite bodies of the Kukisvumchorr Mountain (Khibiny alkaline complex) is characterized by low sodium content, high degree of hydration, and predominance of manganese over iron. The trigonal cell has the following parameters: a = 14.1695(6) and c = 31.026(1) Å; space group R3m. The structure is refined to final R = 0.046 in the anisotropic approximation of atomic displacements using 1527F > 3σF. The idealized formula of ilyukhinite (Z = 3) is written as (H{sub 3}O,Na){sub 14}Ca{sub 6}Mn{sub 2}Zr{sub 3}Si{sub 26}O{sub 72}(OH){sub 2} · 3H{sub 2}O. The new mineral differs from other representatives of the eudialyte group by the predominance of both oxonium in the N positions of extra-framework cations and manganese in the Ðœ2 position centering the tetragonal pyramid.

  17. Functional renormalization group approach to electronic structure calculations for systems without translational symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Evers, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    A formalism for electronic-structure calculations is presented that is based on the functional renormalization group (FRG). The traditional FRG has been formulated for systems that exhibit a translational symmetry with an associated Fermi surface, which can provide the organization principle for the renormalization group (RG) procedure. We here advance an alternative formulation, where the RG flow is organized in the energy-domain rather than in k space. This has the advantage that it can also be applied to inhomogeneous matter lacking a band structure, such as disordered metals or molecules. The energy-domain FRG (ɛ FRG) presented here accounts for Fermi-liquid corrections to quasiparticle energies and particle-hole excitations. It goes beyond the state of the art G W -BSE , because in ɛ FRG the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) is solved in a self-consistent manner. An efficient implementation of the approach that has been tested against exact diagonalization calculations and calculations based on the density matrix renormalization group is presented. Similar to the conventional FRG, also the ɛ FRG is able to signalize the vicinity of an instability of the Fermi-liquid fixed point via runaway flow of the corresponding interaction vertex. Embarking upon this fact, in an application of ɛ FRG to the spinless disordered Hubbard model we calculate its phase boundary in the plane spanned by the interaction and disorder strength. Finally, an extension of the approach to finite temperatures and spin S =1 /2 is also given.

  18. Healthcare professionals' views of group structured education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkley, K; Upsher, R; Keij, S M; Chamley, M; Ismail, K; Forbes, A

    2018-04-06

    To determine healthcare professionals' (HCP) views of group structured education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews to ascertain primary care HCPs' views and experiences of education for people with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. A thematic framework method was applied to analyse the data. Participants were HCPs (N = 22) from 15 general practices in three south London boroughs. All but one HCP viewed diabetes education favourably and all identified that low attendance was a problem. Three key themes emerged from the qualitative data: (1) benefits of diabetes education, including the group mode of delivery, improved patient interactions, saving HCPs' time and improved patient outcomes; (2) factors limiting uptake of education, including patient-level problems such as access and the appropriateness of the programme for certain groups, and difficulties communicating the benefits to patients and integration of education management plans into ongoing diabetes care; and (3) suggestions for improvement, including strategies to improve attendance at education with more localized and targeted marketing and enhanced programme content including follow-up sessions and support for people with pre-existing psychological issues. Most HCPs valued diabetes education and all highlighted the lack of provision for people with different levels of health literacy. Because there was wide variation in terms of the level of knowledge regarding the education on offer, future studies may want to focus on how to help HCPs encourage their patients to attend. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  19. Comparison of measurements and calculations of fuel for different structures in the libraries of effective sections (44 groups/238 groups)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Rivada, A.; Tore, C.

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted for the use of the sections effective in 44 groups, based on the libraries of effective sections ENDF/B-V, for the calculation of the isotopy of the spent fuel. These effective sections have been developed to be used in the system codes SCALE for the analysis the fresh nuclear fuel as the spent and their radioactive waste.

  20. Recent Advances in Ring-Opening Functionalization of Cycloalkanols by C-C σ-Bond Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinxin; Zhu, Chen

    2018-06-01

    Cycloalkanols prove to be privileged precursors for the synthesis of distally substituted alkyl ketones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by virtue of cleavage of their cyclic C-C bonds. Direct functionalization of cyclobutanols to build up other chemical bonds (e. g., C-F, C-Cl, C-Br, C-N, C-S, C-Se, C-C, etc.) has been achieved by using the ring-opening strategy. Mechanistically, the C-C cleavage of cyclobutanols can be involved in two pathways: (a) transition-metal catalyzed β-carbon elimination; (b) radical-mediated 'radical clock'-type ring opening. The recent advances of our group for the ring-opening functionalization of tertiary cycloalkanols are described in this account. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Forging C-C Bonds Through Decarbonylation of Aryl Ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Rosie J; Martin, Ruben

    2017-06-06

    The ability of nickel to cleave strong σ-bonds is again in the spotlight after a recent report that demonstrates the feasibility of using nickel complexes to promote decarbonylation of diaryl ketones. This transformation involves the cleavage of two strong C-C(O) bonds and avoids the use of noble metals, hence reinforcing the potential of decarbonylation as a technique for forging C-C bonds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Spatio-temporal structure, path characteristics and perceptual grouping in immediate serial spatial recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo De Lillo

    2016-11-01

    observer changed dynamically during encoding and recall. This suggested that the effects of structure in spatial span are not dependent on perceptual grouping processes induced by the aerial view of the stimulus array typically afforded by spatial recall tasks. These results demonstrate the independence of coding strategies based on structure from effects of path characteristics and perceptual grouping in immediate serial spatial recall.

  3. CC1, a novel crenarchaeal DNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Schwarz-Linek, Uli; Botting, Catherine H; Hensel, Reinhard; Siebers, Bettina; White, Malcolm F

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of the related crenarchaea Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Thermoproteus tenax lack any obvious gene encoding a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). SSBs are essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair and are found in all other genomes across the three domains of life. These two archaeal genomes also have only one identifiable gene encoding a chromatin protein (the Alba protein), while most other archaea have at least two different abundant chromatin proteins. We performed a biochemical screen for novel nucleic acid binding proteins present in cell extracts of T. tenax. An assay for proteins capable of binding to a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide resulted in identification of three proteins. The first protein, Alba, has been shown previously to bind single-stranded DNA as well as duplex DNA. The two other proteins, which we designated CC1 (for crenarchaeal chromatin protein 1), are very closely related to one another, and homologs are restricted to the P. aerophilum and Aeropyrum pernix genomes. CC1 is a 6-kDa, monomeric, basic protein that is expressed at a high level in T. tenax. This protein binds single- and double-stranded DNAs with similar affinities. These properties are consistent with a role for CC1 as a crenarchaeal chromatin protein.

  4. Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Bahcall, J N; Peña-Garay, C; Bahcall, John N; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 4) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favore...

  5. A typical wave wake from high-speed vessels: its group structure and run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High-amplitude water waves induced by high-speed vessels are regularly observed in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, causing intense beach erosion and disturbing marine habitants in the coastal zone. Such a strong impact on the coast may be a result of a certain group structure of the wave wake. In order to understand it, here we present an experimental study of the group structure of these wakes at Pikakari beach, Tallinn Bay. The most energetic vessel waves at this location (100 m from the coast at the water depth 2.7 m have amplitudes of about 1 m and periods of 8–10 s and cause maximum run-up heights on a beach up to 1.4 m. These waves represent frequency modulated packets where the largest and longest waves propagate ahead of other smaller amplitude and period waves. Sometimes the groups of different heights and periods can be separated even within one wave wake event. The wave heights within a wake are well described by the Weibull distribution, which has different parameters for wakes from different vessels. Wave run-up heights can also be described by Weibull distribution and its parameters can be connected to the parameters of the distribution of wave heights 100 m from the coast. Finally, the run-up of individual waves within a packet is studied. It is shown that the specific structure of frequency modulated wave packets, induced by high-speed vessels, leads to a sequence of high wave run-ups at the coast, even when the original wave heights are rather moderate. This feature can be a key to understanding the significant impact on coasts caused by fast vessels.

  6. Simulating the service life performance of an inspected group of jacket-type structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Ronald; Thöns, Sebastian; Rogge, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    and risk. We intend to adopt this approach to optimize inspection, monitoring and repair activities for offshore wind park support structures. As a first step, we simulate – in analogy to an offshore wind park – the service life performance of an inspected group of jacket-type frames. The performance......A novel method for risk-based optimization of inspection and repair strategies for deteriorating structural systems has recently been proposed. The method defines heuristics at the system level to reduce the number of possible strategies. For each defined strategy, it computes the updated system...... failure probability conditional on simulated inspection and repair histories, and evaluates the associated costs and risk. The expected total service life costs and risk for a strategy are finally determined using Monte Carlo simulation. The optimal strategy minimizes the expected total service life costs...

  7. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, J.

    1995-07-01

    This review contains a summary of the work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables — the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself — and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  8. The Electronic Structure and Spectra of Triphenylamines Functionalized by Phenylethynyl Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Grigoras, M.

    2018-01-01

    We study the features of the electronic structure and the IR, UV, and visible spectra of a series of triphenylamines substituted with phenylethynyl groups. The analysis is performed at the level of the density functional theory (DFT) and its nonstationary version in comparison with the experimental data of IR and electron spectroscopy. It is shown that, in the excited state, there is a change in the alternation of single, double, and triple bonds in accordance with the character of bonding and antibonding in the lowest vacant molecular orbital. The gradual introduction of additional phenylethynyl groups does not cause frequency shifts in the IR spectra of the molecules under study, but significantly affects the intensity of the corresponding IR bands. A similar effect is also observed in the electronic-absorption spectra of these compounds. This can be used for optical tuning of triphenylamines as promising materials for organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  9. An evolutionary theory of large-scale human warfare: Group-structured cultural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefferman, Matthew R; Mathew, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    When humans wage war, it is not unusual for battlefields to be strewn with dead warriors. These warriors typically were men in their reproductive prime who, had they not died in battle, might have gone on to father more children. Typically, they are also genetically unrelated to one another. We know of no other animal species in which reproductively capable, genetically unrelated individuals risk their lives in this manner. Because the immense private costs borne by individual warriors create benefits that are shared widely by others in their group, warfare is a stark evolutionary puzzle that is difficult to explain. Although several scholars have posited models of the evolution of human warfare, these models do not adequately explain how humans solve the problem of collective action in warfare at the evolutionarily novel scale of hundreds of genetically unrelated individuals. We propose that group-structured cultural selection explains this phenomenon. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Personality traits of a group of young adults from different family structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, J; Nel, E M; Steel, H R

    1992-07-01

    The impact of parental divorce and remarriage and young adults' gender on second-order personality traits, such as extraversion, anxiety, tough poise and independence, was examined. The responses of 227 young adults on the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF; Cattell, Eber, & Tatsuoka, 1970) were subjected to a parametric multivariate analysis of variance. Results revealed significant differences between the anxiety scores of the young men and women as well as between those of the three different family-structure groups, but divorce and remarriage was not associated with either positive or negative personality development in this sample.

  11. Renewable energy projects: structuring a multi-criteria group decision making framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralambopoulos, D.A.; Polatiidis, H. [UnIversity of the Aegean, Mytilene (Greece). Dept. of Environmental Studies

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes an applicable group decision-making framework for assisting with multi-criteria analysis in renewable energy projects, utilizing the PROMETHEE II outranking method. The proposed framework is tested in a case study concerning the exploitation of a geothermal resource, located in the island of Chios, Greece. The presented structure provides a serial, decomposed agenda and enhances overall process transparency. Additional, innovatory elements are the incorporation of differing levels of resource exploitation within the decision framework and the direct determination of the PROMETHEE preference thresholds. The developed methodology provides a user-friendly approach, promotes the synergy between different actors, and could pave a way towards consensus. (Author)

  12. Crust and upper mantle structure in the Caribbean region by group velocity tomography and regionalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, Gonzalez; Alvarez, L.; Chimera, G.; Panza, G.F.

    2004-04-01

    An overview of the crust and upper mantle structure of the Central America and Caribbean region is presented as a result of the processing of more than 200 seismograms recorded by digital broadband stations from SSSN and GSN seismic networks. By FTAN analysis of the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh waves, group velocity dispersion curves are obtained in the period range from 10 s to 40 s; the error of these measurements varies from 0.06 and 0.10 km/s. From the dispersion curves, seven tomographic maps at different periods and with average spatial resolution of 500 km are obtained. Using the logical combinatorial classification techniques, eight main groups of dispersion curves are determined from the tomographic maps and eleven main regions, each one characterized by one kind of dispersion curves, are identified. The average dispersion curves obtained for each region are extended to 150 s by adding data from the tomographic study of and inverted using a non-linear procedure. As a result of the inversion process, a set of models of the S-wave velocity vs. depth in the crust and upper mantle are found. In six regions, we identify a typically oceanic crust and upper mantle structure, while in the other two the models are consistent with the presence of a continental structure. Two regions, located over the major geological zones of the accretionary crust of the Caribbean region, are characterized by a peculiar crust and upper mantle structure, indicating the presence of lithospheric roots reaching, at least, about 200 km of depth. (author)

  13. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Haber

    Full Text Available Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia.

  14. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Ashrafian Bonab, Maziar; Youhanna, Sonia C; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Douaihy, Bouchra; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Rafatpanah, Hoshang; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Whale, John; Balanovsky, Oleg; Wells, R Spencer; Comas, David; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2012-01-01

    Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia.

  15. Tetrafluorophenolate of HBED-CC: a versatile conjugation agent for 68Ga-labeled small recombinant antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, Matthias; Waengler, Bjoern; Eisenhut, Michael; Knackmuss, Stefan; LeGall, Fabrice; Little, Melvyn; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The success of 68 Ga-labeled peptides for positron emission tomography of neuroendocrine tumors is mainly depending on the complex chemistry of this radioisotope. 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), the chelator of choice has however limitations if its application is expanded to heat-sensitive proteins. Recombinant antibodies like single chain Fv or diabodies belong to this class of proteins. They are suited to provide imaging contrast despite the short-lived 68 Ga because of their rapid blood clearances and nanomolar affinities. The heterobifunctional agent N,N'-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) was chosen as an alternative ligand because this agent is complexing [ 68 Ga]Ga 3+ much faster than DOTA at ambient temperatures. A versatile technology for HBED-CC conjugation of proteins and 68 Ga-labeling has been developed. This included HBED-CC-tetrafluorophenol (TFP) ester synthesis, coupling to the antibody at various pH and complexation reactions performed in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer under different conditions. The synthesis of the monoreactive 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenolate of HBED-CC at a carboxyl group not participating in complex formation used [Fe(HBED-CC)] - for ester formation. The removal of Fe 3+ from purified (HBED-CC)TFP ester was achieved with RP 18 cartridge technology. The conjugation chemistry was performed with mAb425 which binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This protein was used for optimizing purposes only. The influence of complexation parameters like temperature, pH, reaction time, and HBED-CC/antibody ratio on the biological activity of this model antibody was investigated. Furthermore, the outcome of this labeling procedure on the biological activity of a recombinant diabody (50 kDa) was studied. It is known that small HBED-CC/antibody ratios are prerequisites for minimal interference of labels with antigen

  16. Dancing multiplicity states supported by a carboxylated group in dicopper structures bonded to O2

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2013-01-29

    The present study pretends to assign the correct multiplicity state to dinuclear copper complexes when interacting with free molecular oxygen. Recently, the formation of a bridge butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo dicopper core structure stabilized by the direct interaction of the counterion, a carboxylate group that allows the double bridge linking both metal-centre atoms, was characterized by crystallography. This system was assigned as a diradical singlet with Ms = 0. However, after new calculations it has turned out to be triplet (Ms = 1) despite the stabilization for this latter multiplicity state is not high. Here, the factors that contribute to make this structure display a multiplicity different with respect to the previously expected diradical singlet are described. In the present theoretical study, the roles of the αSp ligand constraints and the counterion are unravelled. On the other hand, the relative stability between the butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo structure and the isomeric bis(μ-oxo) species is also on discussion. Despite the relative stabilities of all these either structural or electronic isomeric species are supposed to depend on the computational method, which is a difficulty to reach a definite conclusion about the nature of the active species, all DFT methods using either pure or not pure DFT functionals here reach the same conclusion, favoring the triplet as the ground state for the butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo dicopper core structure, and the bis(μ-oxo) species when removing the benzoate counterion. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  17. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  18. Effects of concentration, head group, and structure of surfactants on the degradation of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Danyue; Jiang Xia; Jing Xin; Ou Ziqing

    2007-01-01

    The effects of concentration, polar/ionic head group, and structure of surfactants on the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aqueous phase, as well as their effects on the bacterial activity were investigated. The toxicity ranking of studied surfactants is: non-ionic surfactants (Tween 80, Brij30, 10LE and Brij35) -1 ) served the sole carbon and energy resource. However, the degradation of 14 C-phenanthrene showed either a decrease or no obvious change with the surfactants present at all tested concentrations (5-40 mg L -1 ). Thus, the surfactant addition is not beneficial to the removal of phenanthrene or other PAH contaminants due presumably to the preferential utilization of surfactants at low levels as the non-toxic nutrient resource and to the high toxicity of the surfactants at high levels to the microorganism activity. Biodegradation of phenanthrene was also influenced by the surfactant concentration, head group type, and structure. Much more research has yet to be completed on the use of surfactants for soil remediation due to the surfactant toxicity or biodegradation effect

  19. Transcriptomes of Frankia sp. strain CcI3 in growth transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bickhart Derek M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains are actinobacteria that form N2-fixing root nodules on angiosperms. Several reference genome sequences are available enabling transcriptome studies in Frankia sp. Genomes from Frankia sp. strains differ markedly in size, a consequence proposed to be associated with a high number of indigenous transposases, more than 200 of which are found in Frankia sp. strain CcI3 used in this study. Because Frankia exhibits a high degree of cell heterogeneity as a consequence of its mycelial growth pattern, its transcriptome is likely to be quite sensitive to culture age. This study focuses on the behavior of the Frankia sp. strain CcI3 transcriptome as a function of nitrogen source and culture age. Results To study global transcription in Frankia sp. CcI3 grown under different conditions, complete transcriptomes were determined using high throughput RNA deep sequencing. Samples varied by time (five days vs. three days and by culture conditions (NH4+ added vs. N2 fixing. Assembly of millions of reads revealed more diversity of gene expression between five-day and three-day old cultures than between three day old cultures differing in nitrogen sources. Heat map analysis organized genes into groups that were expressed or repressed under the various conditions compared to median expression values. Twenty-one SNPs common to all three transcriptome samples were detected indicating culture heterogeneity in this slow-growing organism. Significantly higher expression of transposase ORFs was found in the five-day and N2-fixing cultures, suggesting that N starvation and culture aging provide conditions for on-going genome modification. Transposases have previously been proposed to participate in the creating the large number of gene duplication or deletion in host strains. Subsequent RT-qPCR experiments confirmed predicted elevated transposase expression levels indicated by the mRNA-seq data. Conclusions The overall pattern of

  20. Recognition and repair of the CC-1065-(N3-Adenine)-DNA adduct by the UVRABC nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.; Lee, C.S.; Doisy, R.; Ross, L.; Needham-VanDevanter, D.R.; Hurley, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The recognition and repair of the helix-stabilizing and relatively nondistortive CC-1065-(N3-adenine)-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease has been investigated both in vivo with phi X174RFI DNA by a transfection assay and in vitro by a site-directed adduct in a 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1. CC-1065 is a potent antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces zelensis which binds within the minor groove of DNA through N3 of adenine. In contrast to the helix-destabilizing and distortive modifications of DNA caused by ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene, CC-1065 increases the melting point of DNA and decreases the S1 nuclease activity. Using a viral DNA-Escherichia coli transfection system, the authors have found that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes, which code for the major excision repair proteins for UV- and NAAAF-induced DNA damage, are also involved in the repair of CC-1065-DNA adducts. In contrast, the uvrD gene product, which has been found to be involved in the repair of UV damage, has no effect in repairing CC-1065-DNA adducts. Purified UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins must work in concert to incise the drug-modified phi X174RFI DNA. Using a site-directed and multiple CC-1065 modified (MspI-BstNI) 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1, they have found that UVRABC nuclease incises at the eight phosphodiester bond on the 5' side of the CC-1065-DNA adduct on the drug-modified strand. The enzymes do not cut the noncovalently modified strand. The DNA sequence and/or helix-stabilizing effect of multiple adducts may determine the recognition and/or incision of the drug-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease. These results are discussed in relation to the structure of the CC-1065-DNA adduct and the effect of drug binding on local DNA structure

  1. Structural analysis of sheath folds in the Sylacauga Marble Group, Talladega slate belt, southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mies, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Remnant blocks of marble from the Moretti-Harrah dimension-stone quarry provide excellent exposure of meter-scale sheath folds. Tubular structures with elliptical cross-sections (4 ???Ryz ??? 5) are the most common expression of the folds. The tubes are elongate subparallel to stretching lineation and are defined by centimeter-scale layers of schist. Eccentrically nested elliptical patterns and opposing asymmetry of folds ('S' and 'Z') are consistent with the sheath-fold interpretation. Sheath folds are locally numerous in the Moretti-Harrah quarry but are not widely distributed in the Sylacauga Marble Group; reconnaissance in neighboring quarries provided no additional observations. The presence of sheath folds in part of the Talladega slate belt indicates a local history of plastic, non-coaxial deformation. Such a history of deformation is substantiated by petrographic study of an extracted hinge from the Moretti-Harrah quarry. The sheath folds are modeled as due to passive amplification of initial structures during simple shear, using both analytic geometry and graphic simulation. As indicated by these models, relatively large shear strains (y ??? 9) and longitudinal initial structures are required. The shear strain presumably relates to NW-directed displacement of overlying crystalline rocks during late Paleozoic orogeny. ?? 1993.

  2. Slope variation and population structure of tree species from different ecological groups in South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Edmilson; Garcia, Cristina C; Pimenta, José A; Torezan, José M D

    2010-09-01

    Size structure and spatial arrangement of 13 abundant tree species were determined in a riparian forest fragment in Paraná State, South Brazil (23°16'S and 51°01'W). The studied species were Aspidosperma polyneuron Müll. Arg., Astronium graveolens Jacq. and Gallesia integrifolia (Spreng) Harms (emergent species); Alseis floribunda Schott, Ruprechtia laxiflora Meisn. and Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. (shade-intolerant canopy species); Machaerium paraguariense Hassl, Myroxylum peruiferum L. and Chrysophyllum gonocarpum (Mart. & Eichler ex Miq.) Engl. (shade-tolerant canopy species); Sorocea bonplandii (Baill.) Bürger, Trichilia casaretti C. Dc, Trichilia catigua A. Juss. and Actinostemon concolor (Spreng.) Müll. Arg. (understory small trees species). Height and diameter structures and basal area of species were analyzed. Spatial patterns and slope correlation were analyzed by Moran's / spatial autocorrelation coefficient and partial Mantel test, respectively. The emergent and small understory species showed the highest and the lowest variations in height, diameter and basal area. Size distribution differed among emergent species and also among canopy shade-intolerant species. The spatial pattern ranged among species in all groups, except in understory small tree species. The slope was correlated with spatial pattern for A. polyneuron, A. graveolens, A. floribunda, R. laxiflora, M. peruiferum and T. casaretti. The results indicated that most species occurred in specific places, suggesting that niche differentiation can be an important factor in structuring the tree community.

  3. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Frank [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  4. Stochastic Geometric Network Models for Groups of Functional and Structural Connectomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eric J.; Landsberg, Adam S.; Owen, Julia P.; Li, Yi-Ou; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Structural and functional connectomes are emerging as important instruments in the study of normal brain function and in the development of new biomarkers for a variety of brain disorders. In contrast to single-network studies that presently dominate the (non-connectome) network literature, connectome analyses typically examine groups of empirical networks and then compare these against standard (stochastic) network models. Current practice in connectome studies is to employ stochastic network models derived from social science and engineering contexts as the basis for the comparison. However, these are not necessarily best suited for the analysis of connectomes, which often contain groups of very closely related networks, such as occurs with a set of controls or a set of patients with a specific disorder. This paper studies important extensions of standard stochastic models that make them better adapted for analysis of connectomes, and develops new statistical fitting methodologies that account for inter-subject variations. The extensions explicitly incorporate geometric information about a network based on distances and inter/intra hemispherical asymmetries (to supplement ordinary degree-distribution information), and utilize a stochastic choice of networks' density levels (for fixed threshold networks) to better capture the variance in average connectivity among subjects. The new statistical tools introduced here allow one to compare groups of networks by matching both their average characteristics and the variations among them. A notable finding is that connectomes have high “smallworldness” beyond that arising from geometric and degree considerations alone. PMID:25067815

  5. Multivariate analysis of chromatographic retention data as a supplementary means for grouping structurally related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoula, S; Zisi, Ch; Sampsonidis, I; Virgiliou, Ch; Theodoridis, G; Gika, H; Nikitas, P; Pappa-Louisi, A

    2015-03-27

    In the present study a series of 45 metabolite standards belonging to four chemically similar metabolite classes (sugars, amino acids, nucleosides and nucleobases, and amines) was subjected to LC analysis on three HILIC columns under 21 different gradient conditions with the aim to explore whether the retention properties of these analytes are determined from the chemical group they belong. Two multivariate techniques, principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis (DA), were used for statistical evaluation of the chromatographic data and extraction similarities between chemically related compounds. The total variance explained by the first two principal components of PCA was found to be about 98%, whereas both statistical analyses indicated that all analytes are successfully grouped in four clusters of chemical structure based on the retention obtained in four or at least three chromatographic runs, which, however should be performed on two different HILIC columns. Moreover, leave-one-out cross-validation of the above retention data set showed that the chemical group in which an analyte belongs can be 95.6% correctly predicted when the analyte is subjected to LC analysis under the same four or three experimental conditions as the all set of analytes was run beforehand. That, in turn, may assist with disambiguation of analyte identification in complex biological extracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Shake table test of soil-pile groups-bridge structure interaction in liquefiable ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Ling, Xianzhang; Xu, Pengju; Gao, Xia; Wang, Dongsheng

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes a shake table test study on the seismic response of low-cap pile groups and a bridge structure in liquefiable ground. The soil profile, contained in a large-scale laminar shear box, consisted of a horizontally saturated sand layer overlaid with a silty clay layer, with the simulated low-cap pile groups embedded. The container was excited in three El Centro earthquake events of different levels. Test results indicate that excessive pore pressure (EPP) during slight shaking only slightly accumulated, and the accumulation mainly occurred during strong shaking. The EPP was gradually enhanced as the amplitude and duration of the input acceleration increased. The acceleration response of the sand was remarkably influenced by soil liquefaction. As soil liquefaction occurred, the peak sand displacement gradually lagged behind the input acceleration; meanwhile, the sand displacement exhibited an increasing effect on the bending moment of the pile, and acceleration responses of the pile and the sand layer gradually changed from decreasing to increasing in the vertical direction from the bottom to the top. A jump variation of the bending moment on the pile was observed near the soil interface in all three input earthquake events. It is thought that the shake table tests could provide the groundwork for further seismic performance studies of low-cap pile groups used in bridges located on liquefiable groun.

  7. Genetic differentiation and population structure of five ethnic groups of Punjab (North-West India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gagandeep; Talwar, Indu; Sharma, Rubina; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Bhanwer, A J S

    2016-12-01

    The state of Punjab in the North-West part of India has acted as the main passage for all the major human invasions into the Indian subcontinent. It has resulted in the mixing of foreign gene pool into the local populations, which led to an extensive range of genetic diversity and has influenced the genetic structure of populations in Punjab, North-West India. The present study was conducted to examine the genetic structure, relationships, and extent of genetic differentiation in five Indo-European speaking ethnic groups of Punjab. A total of 1021 unrelated samples belonging to Banias, Brahmins, Jat Sikhs, Khatris, and Scheduled castes were analyzed for four human-specific Ins/Del polymorphic loci (ACE, APO, PLAT, and D1) and three restriction fragment length polymorphisms ESR (PvuII), LPL (PvuII), and T2 (MspI) using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the loci were found to be polymorphic among the studied populations. The frequency of the Alu insertion at APO locus was observed to exhibit the highest value (82.6-96.3 %), whereas D1 exhibited the lowest (26.5-45.6 %) among all the ethnic groups. The average heterozygosity among the studied populations ranged from 0.3816 in Banias to 0.4163 in Khatris. The F ST values ranged from 0.0418 to 0.0033 for the PLAT and LPL loci, respectively, with an average value being 0.0166. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Banias and Khatris are genetically closest to each other. The Jat Sikhs are genetically close to Brahmins and are distant from the Banias. The Jat Sikhs, Banias, Brahmins, and Khatris are genetically very distant from the Scheduled castes. Overall, Uniform allele frequency distribution patterns, high average heterozygosity values, and a small degree of genetic differentiation in this study suggest a genetic proximity among the selected populations. A low level of genetic differentiation was observed in the studied population groups indicating that genetic drift might have been small or negligible in shaping

  8. Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2015-08-01

    A flow velocimetry method, cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV), is presented as a robust, simplified, and high dynamic range implementation of the Doppler global/planar Doppler velocimetry technique. A sweep of several gigahertz of the vapor absorption spectrum is used for each velocity sample, with signals acquired from both Doppler-shifted scattered light within the flow and a non-Doppler shifted reference beam. Cross-correlation of these signals yields the Doppler shift between them, averaged over the duration of the scan. With presently available equipment, velocities from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1 can notionally be measured simultaneously, making the technique ideal for high speed flows. The processing routine is shown to be robust against large changes in the vapor pressure of the iodine cell, benefiting performance of the system in facilities where ambient conditions cannot be easily regulated. Validation of the system was performed with measurements of a model wind turbine blade boundary layer made in a 1.83 m by 1.83 m subsonic wind tunnel for which laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements were acquired alongside the CC-DGV results. CC-DGV uncertainties of ±1.30 ms-1, ±0.64 ms-1, and ±1.11 ms-1 were determined for the orthogonal stream-wise, transverse-horizontal, and transverse-vertical velocity components, and root-mean-square deviations of 2.77 ms-1 and 1.34 ms-1 from the LDV validation results were observed for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million and 2 million, respectively. Volumetric mean velocity measurements are also presented for a supersonic jet, with velocity uncertainties of ±4.48 ms-1, ±16.93 ms-1, and ±0.50 ms-1 for the orthogonal components, and self-validation done by collapsing the data with a physical scaling.

  9. Photoshop CC top 100 simplified tips and tricks

    CERN Document Server

    Sholik, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Take your Photoshop skill set to the next level with these essential techniques If you're already familiar with Photoshop basics and are ready to learn some new tips, tricks, and techniques, then this is the book for you! Full-color, step-by-step instructions take you beyond the essentials and show you how to make the most of the newest features of Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud). Beautiful photos will inspire you to experiment with Photoshop's features, and numbered instructions make the techniques easy to learn. Encourages you to expand your skill set with creative, or

  10. CC-3 CAMAC crate controller for IBM PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, A.N.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.; Bairi, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    The specifications and implementation details of CAMAC Crate Controller CC-3 for IBM-PC compatible as a host computer, having capability to transfer high speed data with direct memory access (DMA) scheme and logic to execute CAMAC cycles directly from the crate controller, to implement the block algorithms specified in ANSI/IEEE Std. 683-1976 (Reaff-1981) are described. The maximum data transfer rate measured with 8 bit interface of PC-AT is 240K byte per second. This work is carried out under Seventh Five Year Plan Project on Modernisation of reactor Control Instrumentation and Development of CAMAC and Fastbus Instrumentation. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 appendixes

  11. Analysis specifications for the CC3 biosphere model biotrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekely, J G; Wojciechowski, L C; Stephens, M E; Halliday, H A

    1994-12-01

    The CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model BIOTRAC (Biosphere Transport and Consequences) describes the movement in the biosphere of releases from an underground disposal vault, and the consequent radiological dose to a reference individual. Concentrations of toxic substances in different parts of the biosphere are also calculated. BIOTRAC was created specifically for the postclosure analyses of the Environmental Impact Statement that AECL is preparing on the concept for disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste. The model relies on certain assumptions and constraints on the system, which are described by Davis et al. Accordingly, great care must be exercised if BIOTRAC is used for any other purpose.

  12. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input ...

  13. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.; Ahimian, Nariman R.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  14. The resonating group method three cluster approach to the ground state 9 Li nucleus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.A.; Terenetsky, K.O.; Verbitsky, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-cluster approach for light atomic nuclei is formulated in frame of the algebraic version of resonating group method. Overlap integral and Hamiltonian matrix elements on generating functions are obtained for 9 Li nucleus. All permissible by Pauli principle 9 Li different cluster nucleon permutations were taken into account in the calculations. The results obtained can be easily generalised on any three-cluster system up to 12 C. Matrix elements obtained in the work were used in the variational calculations of the ground state energetic and geometric 9 Li characteristics. It is shown that 9 Li ground state is not adequate to the shell model limit and has pronounced three-cluster structure. (author). 16 refs., 4 tab., 2 figs

  15. Structure of some relative relation modules of finite p-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamin, M.

    1990-06-01

    Let G be a finite p-group generated by (g i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d), G i the cyclic subgroup generated by g i , E the free product of the G i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d, and S the kernel of the natural epimorphism of E onto G. The largest elementary abelian p-quotient S-circumflex = S/S'S p , regarded as an IF p G-module via conjugation in E, is called a relative relation module of G. If d is the minimum number of generaters for G, the author has proved that S-circumflex is nonprojective and indecomposable. The aim of this paper is to give an alternative proof for the indecomposability of S-circumflex; the proof here is more informative as it deals with Loewy structure and generating sets of S-circumflex and other associated modules. (author). 9 refs

  16. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  17. Renormalization group structure for sums of variables generated by incipiently chaotic maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Robledo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We look at the limit distributions of sums of deterministic chaotic variables in unimodal maps and find a remarkable renormalization group (RG) structure associated with the operation of increment of summands and rescaling. In this structure—where the only relevant variable is the difference in control parameter from its value at the transition to chaos—the trivial fixed point is the Gaussian distribution and a novel nontrivial fixed point is a multifractal distribution that emulates the Feigenbaum attractor, and is universal in the sense of the latter. The crossover between the two fixed points is explained and the flow toward the trivial fixed point is seen to be comparable to the chaotic band merging sequence. We discuss the nature of the central limit theorem for deterministic variables

  18. Structure of production costs of different energy sources (fossile fuels and nuclear energy) (group 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the work of a group of students from the ''Ecole Nationale d'Administration'', they had to study the structure of the costs of the different energy sources. This analysis shows some common features between the energy sources. The cost is very dependent on the partial costs of technological constraints due to exploration, production, transport and distribution. For primary energies the market appears to be not very competitive, the price depends strongly on the market power of the operator and benefits are generally important. In France, taxes play a role to assure competitiveness of gas and coal against oil. Uranium fuel presents the lowest production and transformation costs at the same energy content. Transport costs are important for natural gas which implies a strong mutual dependence between gas producers and consumers. The irreplaceable use of oil in transport assures regular high revenues for oil companies. (A.C.)

  19. Biocide Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 and CC30 Isolates from Pigs and Identification of the Biocide Resistance Genes, qacG and qacC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seier-Petersen, Maria Amalie; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular clonal complex (CC) 398, is increasingly found in livestock. Recently, MRSA CC30 was identified in Danish pigs. We determined the susceptibility of porcine S. aureus isolates of CC398 and CC30 to disinfectants used in pig......)-encoding virulence factors were investigated. Methods: Susceptibilities to biocides and antimicrobial agents of 79 porcine S. aureus isolates were determined by the microdilution method. Isolates comprised 21 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 MRSA isolates belonging to CC398 and 13 MSSA and 5 MRSA...... isolates belonging to CC30. The presence of quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) resistance efflux pumps was analyzed using an ethidium bromide accumulation assay. The presence of qac resistance genes in active efflux pump positive isolates was determined by whole-genome sequencing data. All isolates were...

  20. Phosphodiesterase activity is regulated by CC2D1A that is implicated in non-syndromic intellectual disability

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza

    2013-07-04

    Background: Cyclic adenosine 3?5?-monophosphate (cAMP) is a key regulator of many cellular processes, including in the neuronal system, and its activity is tuned by Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activation. Further, the CC2D1A protein, consisting of N-Terminal containing four DM14 domains and C-terminal containing C2 domain, was shown to regulate the cAMP-PKA pathway. A human deletion mutation lacking the fourth DM14 and the adjacent C2 domain results in Non Syndromic Intellectual Disability (NSID) also referred to as Non Syndromic Mental Retardation (NSMR). Findings. Here we demonstrate that in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEF) CC2D1A co-localizes with PDE4D in the cytosol before cAMP stimulation and on the periphery after stimulation, and that the movement to the periphery requires the full-length CC2D1A. In CC2D1A mouse mutant cells, the absence of three of the four DM14 domains abolishes migration of the complex to the periphery and causes constitutive phosphorylation of PDE4D Serine 126 (Sssup126esup) via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) resulting in PDE4D hyperactivity. Suppressing PDE4D activity with Rolipram in turn restores the down-stream phosphorylation of the "cAMP response element-binding protein" (CREB) that is defective in mouse mutant cells. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CC2D1A is a novel regulator of PDE4D. CC2D1A interacts directly with PDE4D regulating its activity and thereby fine-tuning cAMP-dependent downstream signaling. Based on our in vitro evidence we propose a model which links CC2D1A structure and function to cAMP homeostasis thereby affecting CREB phosphorylation. We speculate that CC2D1A and/or PDE4D may be promising targets for therapeutic interventions in many disorders with impaired PDE4D function such as NSID. 2013 Al-Tawashi and Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Molecular cloning and protein structure of a human blood group Rh polypeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherif-Zahar, B.; Bloy, C.; Le Van Kim, C.; Blanchard, D.; Bailly, P.; Hermand, P.; Salmon, C.; Cartron, J.P.; Colin, Y.

    1990-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding a human blood group Rh polypeptide were isolated from a human bone marrow cDNA library by using a polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA fragment encoding the known common N-terminal region of the Rh proteins. The entire primary structure of the Rh polypeptide has been deduced from the nucleotide sequence of a 1384-base-pair-long cDNA clone. Translation of the open reading frame indicates that the Rh protein is composed of 417 amino acids, including the initiator methionine, which is removed in the mature protein, lacks a cleavable N-terminal sequence, and has no consensus site for potential N-glycosylation. The predicted molecular mass of the protein is 45,500, while that estimated for the Rh protein analyzed in NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gels is in the range of 30,000-32,000. These findings suggest either that the hydrophobic Rh protein behaves abnormally on NaDodSO 4 gels or that the Rh mRNA may encode a precursor protein, which is further matured by a proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal region of the polypeptide. Hydropathy analysis and secondary structure predictions suggest the presence of 13 membrane-spanning domains, indicating that the Rh polypeptide is highly hydrophobic and deeply buried within the phospholipid bilayer. These results suggest that the expression of the Rh gene(s) might be restricted to tissues or cell lines expressing erythroid characters

  2. Optimization of dendrimer structure for sentinel lymph node imaging: Effects of generation and terminal group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Yuichiro; Ogawa, Mikako; Makiura, Rie; Magata, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Chie

    2015-11-01

    The detection of the sentinel lymph node (SLN), the first lymph node draining tumor cells, is important in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Dendrimers are synthetic macromolecules with highly controllable structures, and are potent multifunctional imaging agents. In this study, 12 types of dendrimer of different generations (G2, G4, G6, and G8) and different terminal groups (amino, carboxyl, and acetyl) were prepared to determine the optimal dendrimer structure for SLN imaging. Radiolabeled dendrimers were intradermally administrated to the right footpads of rats. All G2 dendrimers were predominantly accumulated in the kidney. Amino-terminal, acetyl-terminal, and carboxyl-terminal dendrimers of greater than G4 were mostly located at the injection site, in the blood, and in the SLN, respectively. The carboxyl-terminal dendrimers were largely unrecognized by macrophages and T-cells in the SLN. Finally, SLN detection was successfully performed by single photon emission computed tomography imaging using carboxyl-terminal dendrimers of greater than G4. The early detection of tumor cells in the sentinel draining lymph nodes (SLN) is of utmost importance in terms of determining cancer prognosis and devising treatment. In this article, the authors investigated various formulations of dendrimers to determine the optimal one for tumor detection. The data generated from this study would help clinicians to fight the cancer battle in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The quantum group, Harper equation and structure of Bloch eigenstates on a honeycomb lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliashvili, M; Tsitsishvili, G; Japaridze, G I

    2012-01-01

    The tight-binding model of quantum particles on a honeycomb lattice is investigated in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field. Provided the magnetic flux per unit hexagon is a rational of the elementary flux, the one-particle Hamiltonian is expressed in terms of the generators of the quantum group U q (sl 2 ). Employing the functional representation of the quantum group U q (sl 2 ), the Harper equation is rewritten as a system of two coupled functional equations in the complex plane. For the special values of quasi-momentum, the entangled system admits solutions in terms of polynomials. The system is shown to exhibit a certain symmetry allowing us to resolve the entanglement, and a basic single equation determining the eigenvalues and eigenstates (polynomials) is obtained. Equations specifying the locations of the roots of polynomials in the complex plane are found. Employing numerical analysis, the roots of polynomials corresponding to different eigenstates are solved and diagrams exhibiting the ordered structure of one-particle eigenstates are depicted. (paper)

  4. Hydroxyl group as IR probe to detect the structure of ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Deng, Geng; Zhou, Yu; Ashraf, Hamad; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2018-06-01

    Task-specific ionic liquids (ILs) are those with functional groups introduced in the cations or anions of ILs to bring about specific properties for various tasks. In this work, the hydrogen bonding interactions between a hydroxyl functionalized IL 1-(2-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C2OHMIM][BF4]) and acetonitrile were investigated in detail by infrared spectroscopy, excess spectroscopy, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, combined with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations (DFT). The hydroxyl group rather than C2sbnd H is found to be the main interaction site in the cation. And the ν(Osbnd H) is more sensitive than v(C-Hs) to the environment, which has been taken as an intrinsic probe to reflect the structural change of IL. Examining the region of ν(Osbnd H), by combining excess spectroscopy and DFT calculation, a number of species were identified in the mixtures. Other than the hydrogen bond between a cation and an anion, the hydroxyl group allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between two like-charged cations. The Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding interactions in the hydroxyl-mediated cation-cation complexes are cooperative, while Osbnd H⋯F and C2sbnd H⋯F hydrogen bonding interactions in cation-anion complexes are anti-cooperative. These in-depth studies on the properties of the ionic liquid-acetonitrile mixtures may shed light on exploring their applications as mixed solvents and understanding the nature of doubly ionic hydrogen bonds.

  5. Does the interpersonal model apply across eating disorder diagnostic groups? A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Iryna V; Tasca, Giorgio A; Proulx, Geneviève; Bissada, Hany

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal model has been validated with binge-eating disorder (BED), but it is not yet known if the model applies across a range of eating disorders (ED). The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the interpersonal model in anorexia nervosa (restricting type; ANR and binge-eating/purge type; ANBP), bulimia nervosa (BN), BED, and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Data from a cross-sectional sample of 1459 treatment-seeking women diagnosed with ANR, ANBP, BN, BED and EDNOS were examined for indirect effects of interpersonal problems on ED psychopathology mediated through negative affect. Findings from structural equation modeling demonstrated the mediating role of negative affect in four of the five diagnostic groups. There were significant, medium to large (.239, .558), indirect effects in the ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS groups but not in the ANBP group. The results of the first reverse model of interpersonal problems as a mediator between negative affect and ED psychopathology were nonsignificant, suggesting the specificity of these hypothesized paths. However, in the second reverse model ED psychopathology was related to interpersonal problems indirectly through negative affect. This is the first study to find support for the interpersonal model of ED in a clinical sample of women with diverse ED diagnoses, though there may be a reciprocal relationship between ED psychopathology and relationship problems through negative affect. Negative affect partially explains the relationship between interpersonal problems and ED psychopathology in women diagnosed with ANR, BN, BED and EDNOS. Interpersonal psychotherapies for ED may be addressing the underlying interpersonal-affective difficulties, thereby reducing ED psychopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mnemonic transmission, social contagion, and emergence of collective memory: Influence of emotional valence, group structure, and information distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hae-Yoon; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Rajaram, Suparna

    2017-09-01

    Social transmission of memory and its consequence on collective memory have generated enduring interdisciplinary interest because of their widespread significance in interpersonal, sociocultural, and political arenas. We tested the influence of 3 key factors-emotional salience of information, group structure, and information distribution-on mnemonic transmission, social contagion, and collective memory. Participants individually studied emotionally salient (negative or positive) and nonemotional (neutral) picture-word pairs that were completely shared, partially shared, or unshared within participant triads, and then completed 3 consecutive recalls in 1 of 3 conditions: individual-individual-individual (control), collaborative-collaborative (identical group; insular structure)-individual, and collaborative-collaborative (reconfigured group; diverse structure)-individual. Collaboration enhanced negative memories especially in insular group structure and especially for shared information, and promoted collective forgetting of positive memories. Diverse group structure reduced this negativity effect. Unequally distributed information led to social contagion that creates false memories; diverse structure propagated a greater variety of false memories whereas insular structure promoted confidence in false recognition and false collective memory. A simultaneous assessment of network structure, information distribution, and emotional valence breaks new ground to specify how network structure shapes the spread of negative memories and false memories, and the emergence of collective memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Comparison of clinical outcome and costs with CC + gonadotropins and gnrha + gonadotropins during Ivf/ICSI cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Peter; Matyas, Szabolcs; Bernard, l Artur; Kaali, Steven G

    2004-06-01

    To compare clinical outcome and costs of CC + gonadotropins with GnRHa + gonadotropins during IVF/ICSI cycles. Clinical outcome and expenses of 382 CC + gonadotropin and 964 GnRHa + gonadotropin cycles were compared. Medication costs were calculated on the basis of the mean number of ampoules and the proportion of various gonadotropins. Costs per clinical pregnancy were calculated on the basis of expenses and clinical pregnancy rates. Women in the CC + gonadotropin group were younger, and had fewer follicles, oocytes, embryos, and embryos transferred. Clinical pregnancy rates were higher in the GnRHa group (35.9 % vs 26.2%, p costs per cycle were higher in the GnRHa group (US dollars 357 vs 248). Expenses per pregnancy however were lower in the GnRHa group (USdollars 4197 vs 5335 with IVF; USdollars 5590 vs 7244 with ICSI). When different age subgroups with similar baseline characteristics and stimulation parameters were compared, pregnancy rates were significantly higher in the GnRHa groups. Medication cost per cycle was higher in the GnRHa subgroups, and the expense per pregnancy was lower with GnRHa protocol. Cost per cycle is higher with GnRHa + gonadotropin. However, because of the better performance of the GnRHa + gonadotropin stimulation, the cumulative costs are reduced by the time a clinical pregnancy is achieved.

  8. Diversity and population structure of Marine Group A bacteria in the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Elke; Wright, Jody J; Konwar, Kishori M; Howes, Charles G; Beneze, Erica; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-02-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a candidate phylum of Bacteria that is ubiquitous and abundant in the ocean. Despite being prevalent, the structural and functional properties of MGA populations remain poorly constrained. Here, we quantified MGA diversity and population structure in relation to nutrients and O(2) concentrations in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean using a combination of catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) and 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequencing (clone libraries and 454-pyrotags). Estimates of MGA abundance as a proportion of total bacteria were similar across all three methods although estimates based on CARD-FISH were consistently lower in the OMZ (5.6%±1.9%) than estimates based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (11.0%±3.9%) or pyrotags (9.9%±1.8%). Five previously defined MGA subgroups were recovered in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and five novel subgroups were defined (HF770D10, P262000D03, P41300E03, P262000N21 and A714018). Rarefaction analysis of pyrotag data indicated that the ultimate richness of MGA was very nearly sampled. Spearman's rank analysis of MGA abundances by CARD-FISH and O(2) concentrations resulted in significant correlation. Analyzed in more detail by 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing, MGA operational taxonomic units affiliated with subgroups Arctic95A-2 and A714018 comprised 0.3-2.4% of total bacterial sequences and displayed strong correlations with decreasing O(2) concentration. This study is the first comprehensive description of MGA diversity using complementary techniques. These results provide a phylogenetic framework for interpreting future studies on ecotype selection among MGA subgroups, and suggest a potentially important role for MGA in the ecology and biogeochemistry of OMZs.

  9. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A; Bar-On, Benny; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns ( Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum ) and angiosperms ( Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta ) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata ( Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum ). Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn could be a consequence of differences in

  10. Intergenerational Groups: Rediscovering our Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Anstadt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Intergenerational groups are a community-based group concept designed to engage and mobilize often untapped resources of older adults in effective interaction with younger populations. These groups support an atmosphere of synergistic interaction. Members of each generation share reflections on interpersonal strengths and capacities and rediscover emotional and spiritual anchors and bonding. Illustrated here is Community Connections (CC, developed using the phase driven participatory culture-specific intervention model (PCSIM; Nastasi, Moore & Varjas, 2004 that included self selected local older adults, caregivers, and multicultural exchange students. The program was structured to offer mutual opportunities for activities built around exchanging cultural and life experiences. The goals were: 1 to reduce social isolation due to age, culture, or disability 2 for international students to practice English and learn about local cultural traditions, and 3 to build intergenerational ‘extended family’ relationships.

  11. Effect of crack closing and cyclic fracture toughness evaluation of structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Andrusiv, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanisms of crack closing (CC), methods of its evalution as well as CC effect on cyclic fracture toughness of structural alloys are considered based on literature and experimental datas several CC mechanisms are suggested. It is noted that evaluation of fatigue crack closing is exercised, mainly, experimentally, though analytical methods of its determination are also suggested. Experimental Methods may be divided in two main groups. The first one comprises techniques based on direct determination of strains and displacements, the second one includes methods based on physical methods of investigations. High importance of CC effect accountancy in investigation of growth kinetics and machanism of corrosion-fatigue cracks in structural materials is noted. Besides, it should be taken into account that cyclic loading changes electrochemical conditions in the apex of corrosion crack

  12. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianlong, E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 4 North Jianshe Rd., 2nd Section, Chengdu 610054 (China); Mallory, Frank B. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Mallory, Clelia W. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A., E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  13. Group theory for magnetic structure determination: Recent developments and quadrupolar ordering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: sikora@novell.ftj.agh.edu.pl; Pytlik, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Bialas, F. [Nowy Sacz School of Busines-National Louis University, 33-300 Nowy Sacz (Poland); Malinowski, J. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-09-13

    In this paper, the recent developments in practical applications of symmetry analysis are described. The theoretical basis shortly described in Section 1 has been implemented in several computer applications, one of which is the program 'MODY-win', developed by the authors of the paper. The program calculates the so-called basis vectors of irreducible representations of a given symmetry group, which can be used for calculation of possible ordering modes. Its practical application is demonstrated on some examples, presenting the recent aspects of using the symmetry analysis to description of various types of ordering encountered in solids. The scalar-type ordering (occupation probability) is discussed shortly for occupation of interstitial sites by hydrogen atoms in inter-metallic compounds. The description of vector ordering is demonstrated on the magnetic ordering modes, with special attention focused on the freedom that is left in the structure after imposing all the symmetry constraints. In practice, the final ordering mode usually contains some free parameters that cannot be determined from the symmetry itself. The last application presented in the paper is the description of quadrupolar ordering, recently found in some compounds of 4f (5f) elements. For the latter case, an additional advantage is demonstrated by calculation of possible displacements of neighboring atoms after the establishment of non-zero quadrupolar order parameter on the central atom.

  14. The Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience: building communication skills in the clinical reasoning context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopasek, Lyuba; Kelly, Kevin V; Bylund, Carma L; Wenderoth, Suzanne; Storey-Johnson, Carol

    2014-07-01

    Students are rarely taught communication skills in the context of clinical reasoning training. The purpose of this project was to combine the teaching of communication skills using SPs with clinical reasoning exercises in a Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience (GOSCE) to study feasibility of the approach, the effect on learners' self-efficacy and attitude toward learning communication skills, and the effect of providing multiple sources of immediate, collaborative feedback. GOSCE sessions were piloted in Pediatrics and Medicine clerkships with students assessing their own performance and receiving formative feedback on communication skills from peers, standardized patients (SPs), and faculty. The sessions were evaluated using a retrospective pre/post-training questionnaire rating changes in self-efficacy and attitudes, and the value of the feedback. Results indicate a positive impact on attitudes toward learning communication skills and self-efficacy regarding communication in the clinical setting. Also, learners considered feedback by peers, SPs, and faculty valuable in each GOSCE. The GOSCE is an efficient and learner-centered method to attend to multiple goals of teaching communication skills, clinical reasoning, self-assessment, and giving feedback in a formative setting. The GOSCE is a low-resource, feasible strategy for experiential learning in communication skills and clinical reasoning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Potamophylax nigricornis group (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae: resolution of phylogenetic species by fine structure analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Applying the phylogenetic species concept and the sexual selection theory we have reviewed some natal aspects of incipient species and their accelerated evolution. How can we recognise early stages of divergence? Which selection pressures are at work during speciation? Which pathways accelerate the speed of speciation? Which kinds of trait variabilities makes difficult to find initial split criteria? Elaborating the principles of Fine Structure Analysis (FSA and the morphological Initial Split Criteria (ISP it was discovered that the European spring dwelling caddisfly Potamophylax nigricornis doesn’tbelong to a single species. It represents an entire species group with seventeen peripatric species evolving on the southernperipheries of the distributional area. Four new species subgroups have been erected: Potamophylax nigricornis new species subgroup, P. elegantulus new species subgroup, P. horgos new species subgroup, P. simas new species subgroup. Eleven new species have been described: Potamophylax apados sp. nov., P. fules sp. nov., P. fureses sp. nov., P. hasas sp. novov., P. horgos sp. nov., P. kethas sp. nov., P. lemezes sp. nov., P. peremes sp. nov., P. simas sp. nov., P. tuskes sp. nov., P. ureges sp. nov. One Potamophylax sp. nov. has been differentiated and three new species status have been documented:Potamophylax elegantulus (Klapálek stat. n., P. mista (Navás stat. nov., P. testaceus (Zetterstedt stat. nov.

  16. A NOVEL APPROACH TO FIND OPTIMIZED NEUTRON ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE IN MOX THERMAL LATTICES USING SWARM INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. AKBARI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy group structure has a significant effect on the results of multigroup transport calculations. It is known that UO2–PUO2 (MOX is a recently developed fuel which consumes recycled plutonium. For such fuel which contains various resonant nuclides, the selection of energy group structure is more crucial comparing to the UO2 fuels. In this paper, in order to improve the accuracy of the integral results in MOX thermal lattices calculated by WIMSD-5B code, a swarm intelligence method is employed to optimize the energy group structure of WIMS library. In this process, the NJOY code system is used to generate the 69 group cross sections of WIMS code for the specified energy structure. In addition, the multiplication factor and spectral indices are compared against the results of continuous energy MCNP-4C code for evaluating the energy group structure. Calculations performed in four different types of H2O moderated UO2–PuO2 (MOX lattices show that the optimized energy structure obtains more accurate results in comparison with the WIMS original structure.

  17. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. L.

    2006-03-01

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  18. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B. L

    2006-03-15

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  19. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning" Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an updated WWC (What Works Clearinghouse) Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning". The study examined the effects of different reward systems used in group learning situations on the math skills of African-American and White students. The…

  20. WWC Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning" examined the effects of different reward systems used in group learning situations on the math skills of African-American and white students. The study analyzed data on 75 African-American and 57 white fourth- and fifth-grade students from urban…

  1. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), fiscal year 1985. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meeting/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees on Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Steel are established and are continuing their own program. The FY 1985 and FY 1986 meeting program is given. The EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Brief summaries of the materials research programs associated with each office and division are presented, including tables listing individual projects and the FY 1985 budgets for each. More details on the individual projects within the divisions and the specific tasks or subcontracts within the various projects are given in the paragraph descriptions

  2. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), fiscal year 1985. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-05-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meeting/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees on Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Steel are established and are continuing their own program. The FY 1985 and FY 1986 meeting program is given. The EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Brief summaries of the materials research programs associated with each office and division are presented, including tables listing individual projects and the FY 1985 budgets for each. More details on the individual projects within the divisions and the specific tasks or subcontracts within the various projects are given in the paragraph descriptions.

  3. Synthesis of chondroitin sulfate CC and DD tetrasaccharides and interactions with 2H6 and LY111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kenya; Nakata, Tomomi; Takeda-Okuda, Naoko; Nadanaka, Satomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Jun-Ichi

    2018-03-01

    We synthesized the biotinylated chondroitin sulfate tetrasaccharides CS-CC [-3)βGalNAc6S(1-4)βGlcA(1-] 2 and CS-DD [-3)βGalNAc6S(1-4)βGlcA2S(1-] 2 which possess sulfate groups at O-6 of GalNAc and an additional sulfate group at O-2 of GlcA, respectively. We also analyzed interactions among CS-CC and CS-DD and the antibodies 2H6 and LY111, both of which are known to bind with CS-A, while CS-DD was shown for the first time to bind with both antibodies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chinese inpatients' subjective experiences of the helping process as viewed through examination of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Lin, Shu-Mei; Liao, Hsiao-Yuan; Lai, Mei-Chih

    2004-10-01

    This study examined Chinese inpatients' views on what aspects of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group worked to help their psychological and interpersonal problems and what traditional Chinese cultural values influenced their viewpoints. Nine Chinese inpatients with mental illness participated in the four-session nurses' focused, structured therapy group. After they completed the last session of therapy, they were invited to participate in a structured interview and a semi-structured interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms in nurses' focused, structured group therapy. The semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed to be further analysed according to the principal of content analysis. The results indicate that (i) all patients believed that a nurses' focused, structured group psychotherapy enhanced their interpersonal learning and improved the quality of their lives, (ii) traditional Chinese cultural values--those emphasizing the importance of maintaining harmonious interpersonal relationships--influenced the Chinese inpatients' expression of negative emotions in the group and their motivation on interpersonal learning. In conclusion, we found that transcultural modification for applying Western group psychotherapy in Chinese culture was needed. The modification included establishing a 'pseudo-kin' or 'own people' relationship among group members and the therapists, organizing warm-up exercises and structured activities, applying projective methods and focusing on the issues of interpersonal relationships and interpersonal problems. The small sample size of the present study raises questions regarding how representative the views of the sample are with respect to the majority of Chinese inpatients. Nevertheless, this preliminary study revealed a cultural aspect in nursing training that requires significant consideration in order to work effectively with Chinese patients. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  5. Optimization of labelling PSMA-HBED-CC peptide with 68Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcarde, Lais F.; Dias, Luis A.P.; Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of metastases or recurrent prostate cancer (PC) lesions is of clinical relevance in terms of clinical staging, prognosis and therapy management. When PC is not treated, it is potentially lethal. Clinical methods for diagnosis of PC include the dosage of prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and the rectal touch. Unfortunately, these initial procedures are not specific for PC detection. The level of PSA, in about 20 to 30% of the cases is high, due to benign pathologies, that result in false positive and unneeded biopsy. The prostatic specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein and differs from the PSA that is a free protein in blood. High levels of PSMA are observed in almost all prostatic pathologies and low levels were observed in brain, kidneys, salivary glands and small intestine. This fact stimulated the development of PSMA inhibitor molecules that could be used as a vector for imaging tumor agents and that could perfuse in the tumor microvasculature. Recent studies suggest that the chelator HBED-CC contributes intrinsically for the labelling of the PSMA inhibitor peptide based in urea - Glu-urea-Lys (Ahx) – to the pharmacophore group. This work describes the study of labelling conditions of PSMA-HBED-CC with 68 Ga and determined the ideal conditions to obtaining the high radiochemical purity (≥ 95%) and stability, without final purification, and stimulates the in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine the potential of the radiopharmaceutical for clinical application. (author)

  6. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  7. MP Finance Group CC (In Liquidation) V C: SARS: Adding to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Business Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. MP Finance Group CC (In Liquidation) V C: SARS: Adding to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses the interpretation of the phrase “received by, accrued to or in favour of” in the gross income definition of the Income Tax Act, as applied to illegal receipts. During the last few decades, South Africans have been victims of a number of Ponzi-type schemes. In MP Finance, the Supreme Court of Appeal ...

  9. Group composition and network structure in school classes : a multilevel application of the p* model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Miranda J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of social networks of students within school classes and examines differences in network structure between classes. In order to examine the network structure within school classes, we focused in particular on the principle of homophily, i.e. the tendency that

  10. Responses of Aquatic Bacteria to Terrestrial Runoff: Effects on Community Structure and Key Taxonomic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huong T.; Ho, Cuong T.; Trinh, Quan H.; Trinh, Duc A.; Luu, Minh T. N.; Tran, Hai S.; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean L.; Merroune, Asmaa; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Pommier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Organic fertilizer application is often touted as an economical and effective method to increase soil fertility. However, this amendment may increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff into downstream aquatic ecosystems and may consequently alter aquatic microbial community. We focused on understanding the effects of DOC runoff from soils amended with compost, vermicompost, or biochar on the aquatic microbial community of a tropical reservoir. Runoff collected from a series of rainfall simulations on soils amended with different organic fertilizers was incubated for 16 days in a series of 200 L mesocosms filled with water from a downstream reservoir. We applied 454 high throughput pyrosequencing for bacterial 16S rRNA genes to analyze microbial communities. After 16 days of incubation, the richness and evenness of the microbial communities present decreased in the mesocosms amended with any organic fertilizers, except for the evenness in the mesocosms amended with compost runoff. In contrast, they increased in the reservoir water control and soil-only amended mesocosms. Community structure was mainly affected by pH and DOC concentration. Compared to the autochthonous organic carbon produced during primary production, the addition of allochthonous DOC from these organic amendments seemed to exert a stronger effect on the communities over the period of incubation. While the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria classes were positively associated with higher DOC concentration, the number of sequences representing key bacterial groups differed between mesocosms particularly between the biochar runoff addition and the compost or vermi-compost runoff additions. The genera of Propionibacterium spp. and Methylobacterium spp. were highly abundant in the compost runoff additions suggesting that they may represent sentinel species of complex organic carbon inputs. Overall, this work further underlines the importance of studying the off-site impacts of organic fertilizers as

  11. Lack of congruence in species diversity indices and community structures of planktonic groups based on local environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Nishibe, Yuichiro; Imai, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The importance of analyzing the determinants of biodiversity and community composition by using multiple trophic levels is well recognized; however, relevant data are lacking. In the present study, we investigated variations in species diversity indices and community structures of the plankton taxonomic groups-zooplankton, rotifers, ciliates, and phytoplankton-under a range of local environmental factors in pond ecosystems. For each planktonic group, we estimated the species diversity index by using linear models and analyzed the community structure by using canonical correspondence analysis. We showed that the species diversity indices and community structures varied among the planktonic groups and according to local environmental factors. The observed lack of congruence among the planktonic groups may have been caused by niche competition between groups with similar trophic guilds or by weak trophic interactions. Our findings highlight the difficulty of predicting total biodiversity within a system, based upon a single taxonomic group. Thus, to conserve the biodiversity of an ecosystem, it is crucial to consider variations in species diversity indices and community structures of different taxonomic groups, under a range of local conditions.

  12. Slope variation and population structure of tree species from different ecological groups in South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson Bianchini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Size structure and spatial arrangement of 13 abundant tree species were determined in a riparian forest fragment inParaná State, South Brazil (23"16'S and 51"01'W. The studied species were Aspidosperma polyneuron Müll. Arg., Astronium graveolens Jacq. and Gallesia integrifolia (Spreng Harms (emergent species; Alseis floribunda Schott, Ruprechtia laxiflora Meisn. and Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. (shade-intolerant canopy species; Machaerium paraguariense Hassl, Myroxylum peruiferum L. and Chrysophyllum gonocarpum (Mart. & Eichler ex Miq. Engl. (shade-tolerant canopy species; Sorocea bonplandii (Baill. Bürger, Trichilia casaretti C. Dc, Trichilia catigua A. Juss. and Actinostemon concolor (Spreng. Müll. Arg. (understory small trees species. Height and diameter structures and basal area of species were analyzed. Spatial patterns and slope correlation were analyzed by Moran's / spatial autocorrelation coefficient and partial Mantel test, respectively. The emergent and small understory species showed the highest and the lowest variations in height, diameter and basal area. Size distribution differed among emergent species and also among canopy shade-intolerant species. The spatial pattern ranged among species in all groups, except in understory small tree species. The slope was correlated with spatial pattern for A. polyneuron, A. graveolens, A. floribunda, R. laxiflora, M. peruiferum and T. casaretti. The results indicated that most species occurredin specific places, suggesting that niche differentiation can be an important factor in structuring the tree community.Visando contribuir para o conhecimento das estratégias devida de espécies em fragmentos florestais, foram determinadas as estruturas de tamanho e espacial de 13 espécies arbóreas do remanescente de floresta ciliar no Estado do Paraná, no Sul do Brasil (23"16'S e 51"01'W. Foram analisadas as espécies: Aspidosperma polyneuron Müll. Arg., Astronium graveolens Jacq. e Gallesia

  13. Comparison of Assemblies of Four-Link Structural Groups of 3rd Class on the Transmission Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsyuk I.N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of various assemblies of four-link structural group of 3rd class with revolute joints on the transmission angle is performed. Equations of the trajectories of plug points of one of the groups of joint are obtained to determine transmission angles. Derived functions of these equations enable to determine the values of transmission angles for each assembly group. It is shown that only two assemblies of maximum possible assembling number of such group (six have practical value. The solution of this problem was performed with the help of Mathcad program.

  14. Influence of landscape structure on the functional groups of an aphidophagous guild: Active-searching predators, furtive predators and parasitoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie-Éléonore Maisonhaute

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A lot of studies focusing on the effect of agricultural landscapes demonstrate that many arthropod species are influenced by landscape structure. In particular, non–crop areas and landscape diversity are often associated with a higher abundance and diversity of natural enemies in fields. Numerous studies focused on the influence of landscape structure on ground beetles, spiders and ladybeetles but few on other natural enemies or different functional groups. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine the influence of landscape structure on the functional groups, i.e., active-searching predators, furtive predators and parasitoids of aphidophagous guilds. Natural enemies were sampled on milkweed infested with aphids, growing along the borders of ditches adjacent to cornfields. The sampling occurred weekly from June to September in 2006 and 2007, in the region of Lanaudičre (Quebec, Canada. The landscapes within a radius 200 and 500 m around each site were analyzed. The abundance, richness and species composition (based on functional groups of natural enemies were related to landscape structure. The results indicated that landscape structure explained up to 21.6% of the variation in natural enemy assemblage and confirm the positive effects of non-crop areas and landscape diversity. A lower influence of landscape structure on species composition was observed (6.4 to 8.8% and varied greatly among the functional groups. Coccinellidae and furtive predators were the group most influenced by landscape structure. In conclusion, the influence of landscape varied greatly among the different species of the same functional group.

  15. Fixed geometric formation structure in formation control problem for group of robots with dynamically changing number of robots in the group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Morozova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a problem of the decentralization-based approach to formation control of a group of agents, which simulate mobile autonomous robots. The agents use only local information limited by the covering range of their sensors. The agents have to build and maintain the formation, which fits to the defined target geometric formation structure with desired accuracy during the movement to the target point. At any point in time the number of agents in the group can change unexpectedly (for example, as a result of the agent failure or if a new agent joins the group.The aim of the article is to provide the base control rule, which solves the formation control problem, and to develop its modifications, which provide the correct behavior in case the agent number in the group is not equal to the size of the target geometric formation structure. The proposed base control rule, developed by the author, uses the method of involving virtual leaders. The coordinates of the virtual leaders and also the priority to follow the specific leader are calculated by each agent itself according to specific rules.The following results are presented in the article: the base control rule for solving the formation control problem, its modifications for the cases when the number of agents is greater/less than the size of the target geometric formation structure and also the computer modeling results proving the efficiency of the modified control rules. The specific feature of the control rule, developed by the author, is that each agent itself calculates the virtual leaders and each agent performs dynamic choice of the place within the formation (there is no predefined one-to-one relation between agents and places within the geometric formation structure. The results, provided in this article, can be used in robotics for developing control algorithms for the tasks, which require preserving specific relational positions among the agents while moving. One of the

  16. Neutronic Analysis of the RSG-GAS Compact Core without CIP Silicide 3.55 g U/cc and 4.8 g U/cc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jati S; Lily S; Tukiran S

    2004-01-01

    Fuel conversion from U 3 O 8 -Al to U 3 Si 2 -Al 2.96 g U/cc density in the RSG-GAS core had done successfully step by step since 36 th core until 44 th core. So that, since the 45 th core until now (48 th core) had been using full of silicide 2.96 g U/cc. Even though utilization program of silicide fuel with high density (3.55 g U/cc and 4.8 g U/cc) and optimize operation of RSG-GAS core under research. Optimalitation of core with increasing operation cycle have been analyzing about compact core. The mean of compact core is the RSG-GAS core with decrease number of IP or CIP position irradiation. In this research, the neutronic calculation to cover RSG-GAS core and RSG-GAS core without CIP that are using U 3 Si 2 -Al 2.96 g U/cc, 3.55 g U/cc and 4.8 g U/cc had done. Two core calculation done at 15 MW power using SRAC-ASMBURN code. The calculation result show that fuel conversion from 2.96 g U/cc density to 3.55 g U/cc and 4.8 g U/cc will increasing cycle length for both RSG-GAS core and RSG-GAS compact core without CIP. However, increasing of excess reactivity exceeded from nominal value of first design that 9.2%. Change of power peaking factor is not show significant value and still less than 1.4. Core fuelled with U 3 Si 2 -Al 4.8 g U/cc density have maximum discharge burn-up which exceeded from licensing value (70%). RSG-GAS compact core without CIP fuelled U 3 Si 2 -Al 2.96 g U/cc have longer cycle operation then RSG-GAS core and fulfil limitation neutronic parameter at the first design value. (author)

  17. Influences of the Capital Structure and the Cost of Capital on Financial Performance. Case Study on ENGIE Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Valentina IVASCU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the company's financial management are to ensure financial performances and to choose the capital structure that corresponds to the lowest total cost of capital. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between the capital structure and cost, and the financial performance of Engie Transnational Group, one of the most important global electricity producers. The data used were extracted from the Amadeus and Bloomberg databases for the period 2010-2015. Financial performance was analysed both by creating and proposing an aggregate index, as well as based on the Z Conan & Holder score. The company's financial structure was analysed on the basis of the total leverage ratio and for the total cost of capital, the weighted average capital cost formula was used. The results obtained at the Engie Group level show that the capital structure is predominantly indebted, and the maximum financial performance is obtained when the financial structure is minimal and the weighted average capital cost is maximum. The reversed relationship between the financial structure and the financial performance is in accordance with the financial structure theories of information asymmetry, pecking order and dynamic trade-off. The reversed relationship is confirmed in all Engie Group companies, except one company from United Kingdom.

  18. Thermal-mechanical and isothermal fatigue of IN 792 CC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.; Pitz, G.; Lang, K.-H.; Loehe, D.

    1997-01-01

    The cyclic deformation and lifetime behaviour of the cast Ni-base superalloy IN 792 CC was investigated both under thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) and isothermal fatigue (IF) conditions. During TMF the phase relations between temperature and mechanical strain were in-phase and out-of-phase, respectively. For both phase relations a similar cyclic deformation behaviour is observed. In all cases out-of-phase TMF causes tensile mean stresses, whereas in-phase TMF leads to compressive mean stresses. At T max below 800 C out-of-phase cycling results in smaller lifetimes than in-phase loading. In spite of the rather high compressive mean stresses developing at T max above 800 C, at these temperatures in-phase loading causes shorter lifetimes than out-of-phase TMF. This effect is due to the different damage mechanisms caused by in-phase and out-of-phase loadings: at higher T max considerable intergranular damage caused by in-phase loading reduces the lifetime below the respective values measured during out-of-phase TMF, after which no intergranular damage could be detected. A comparison of the TMF data with the cyclic deformation and lifetime behaviour under IF conditions shows that the material's reactions under TMF cannot be assessed satisfactorily by the results obtained from isothermal fatigue tests. (orig.)

  19. Analysis specifications for the CC3 geosphere model GEONET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    AECL is assessing a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a sealed vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program has been developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure assessment case study, a system model, CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3), has been developed to describe a hypothetical disposal system. This system model includes separate models for the engineered barriers within the disposal vault, the geosphere in which the vault is emplaced, and the biosphere in the vicinity of any discharge zones. The system model is embedded within a computer code SYVAC3, (SYstems Variability Analysis Code, generation 3), which takes parameter uncertainty into account by repeated simulation of the system. GEONET (GEOsphere NETwork) is the geosphere model component of this system model. It simulates contaminant transport from the vault to the biosphere along a transport network composed of one-dimensional transport segments that are connected together in three-dimensional space. This document is a set of specifications for GEONET that were developed over a number of years. Improvements to the code will be based on revisions to these specifications. The specifications consist of a model synopsis, describing all the relevant equations and assumptions used in the model, a set of formal data flow diagrams and minispecifications, and a data dictionary. (author). 26 refs., 20 figs

  20. On the structure of finite-sheeted coverings of compact connected groups

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorian, S. A.; Gumerov, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    Finite-sheeted covering mappings onto compact connected groups are studied. It is shown that a finite-sheeted covering mapping from a connected Hausdorff topological space onto a compact connected abelian group G must be a homeomorphism provided that the character group of G admits division by the degree of given covering mapping. Using this result, we obtain criteria of triviality for finite coverings of G in terms of its character group and means on G. In order to establish these facts, for...

  1. Relative Effects of Three Questioning Strategies in Ill-Structured, Small Group Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Hyunjung; Lee, Jung; Cerreto, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the relative effectiveness of using three different question-prompt strategies on promoting metacognitive skills and performance in ill-structured problem solving by examining the interplay between peer interaction and cognitive scaffolding. An ill-structured problem-solving task was given to three…

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of SiC on C-C composites as plasma facing materials for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. J.; Lee, M. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Hong, G. W.; Kim, J. I.; Choi, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the low activation and excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, carbon-fiber reinforced carbon(C-C) composites have received much attention for plasma facing materials for fusion reactor and high-temperature structural applications such as aircrafts and space vehicles. These proposed applications have been frustrated by the lack of resistance to hydrogen erosion and oxidation on exposure to ambient oxidizing conditions at high temperature. Although Silicon Carbide (SiC) has shown excellent properties as an effective erosion-and oxidation-protection coating, many cracks are developed during fabrication and thermal cycles in use due to the Coefficients of Thermal Expansion(CTE) mismatch between SiC and C-C composite. In this study, we adopted a pyrolitic carbon as an interlayer between SiC and C-C substrate in order to minimize the CTE mismatch. The oxidation-protection performance of this composite was investigated as well

  3. Oxidative C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-diols by silver(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation of ethylene glycol and related compounds by Ag(II) has been investigated. Complexation of these substrates by Ag(II) precedes their oxidation. Oxidation occurs through electron transfer from an OH group to the Ag(II) within the complex resulting in the formation of alkoxyl-type radicals. The radicals thus formed undergo β-scission to give cleavage products. For ethylene glycol a complexation rate 1.3 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 and oxidation rate approx. 3 x 10 3 s -1 were observed. A general trend for the type of the substrates which would undergo C-C bond scission by Ag(II) is discussed

  4. Social Loafing on Group Projects: Structural Antecedents and Effect on Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Praveen; O'Brien, Connie L.

    2008-01-01

    To respond to the expectations of the industry and business school accreditation bodies, marketing faculty have been making extensive use of group projects in their curricula. A common problem with the use of student groups, however, is that of social loafing. In this study, we identify some easy-to-implement project set-up factors and examine…

  5. Linking Structure, Process, and Outcome to Improve Group Home Services for Foster Youth in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rex S.; Ellis, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    The California Youth Connection obtained funding from two foundations to evaluate the performance of group homes serving foster youth in Alameda County, California, in order to inform state policy-making. The evaluation team initially included 14 foster youth that personally experienced group home living. Three inter-related aspects of service…

  6. Bayesian population structure analysis reveals presence of phylogeographically specific sublineages within previously ill-defined T group of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Reynaud

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic structure, and evolutionary history have been studied for years by several genotyping approaches, but delineation of a few sublineages remains controversial and needs better characterization. This is particularly the case of T group within lineage 4 (L4 which was first described using spoligotyping to pool together a number of strains with ill-defined signatures. Although T strains were not traditionally considered as a real phylogenetic group, they did contain a few phylogenetically meaningful sublineages as shown using SNPs. We therefore decided to investigate if this observation could be corroborated using other robust genetic markers. We consequently made a first assessment of genetic structure using 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs data extracted from the SITVIT2 database (n = 607 clinical isolates collected in Russia, Albania, Turkey, Iraq, Brazil and China. Combining Minimum Spanning Trees and Bayesian population structure analyses (using STRUCTURE and TESS softwares, we distinctly identified eight tentative phylogenetic groups (T1-T8 with a remarkable correlation with geographical origin. We further compared the present structure observed with other L4 sublineages (n = 416 clinical isolates belonging to LAM, Haarlem, X, S sublineages, and showed that 5 out of 8 T groups seemed phylogeographically well-defined as opposed to the remaining 3 groups that partially mixed with other L4 isolates. These results provide with novel evidence about phylogeographically specificity of a proportion of ill-defined T group of M. tuberculosis. The genetic structure observed will now be further validated on an enlarged worldwide dataset using Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS.

  7. Rapid visual grouping and figure-ground processing using temporally structured displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Samuel; Usher, Marius; Müller, Hermann J

    2010-08-23

    We examine the time course of visual grouping and figure-ground processing. Figure (contour) and ground (random-texture) elements were flickered with different phases (i.e., contour and background are alternated), requiring the observer to group information within a pre-specified time window. It was found this grouping has a high temporal resolution: less than 20ms for smooth contours, and less than 50ms for line conjunctions with sharp angles. Furthermore, the grouping process takes place without an explicit knowledge of the phase of the elements, and it requires a cumulative build-up of information. The results are discussed in relation to the neural mechanism for visual grouping and figure-ground segregation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influences of the Capital Structure and the Cost of Capital on Financial Performance. Case Study on ENGIE Group

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Valentina IVASCU; Nicoleta BARBUTA-MISU

    2017-01-01

    The main objectives of the company's financial management are to ensure financial performances and to choose the capital structure that corresponds to the lowest total cost of capital. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between the capital structure and cost, and the financial performance of Engie Transnational Group, one of the most important global electricity producers. The data used were extracted from the Amadeus and Bloomberg databases for the period 2010-2015. Fin...

  9. JACoW SIP4C/C++ at CERN - Status and lessons learned

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Steen; Dworak, Andrzej; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Hoguin, Frederic; Lauener, Joel; Locci, Frank; Sigerud, Katarina; Sliwinski, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    After 4 years of promoting the Software Improvement Process for C/C++ (SIP4C/C++) initiative at CERN, we describe the current status for tools and procedures along with how they have been integrated into our environment. Based on feedback from four project teams, we present reasons for and against their adoption. Finally, we show how SIP4C/C++ has improved development and delivery processes as well as the first-line support of delivered products.

  10. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belknap John

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC. The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6 × DBA/2J (D2 F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA. Results Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Conclusions Despite the marked

  11. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  12. Structuring collaboration scripts for mastership skills: Optimizing online group play on classroom dilemmas in teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Geerts, Walter; Slootmaker, Aad; Kuipers, Derek; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Serious games can facilitate workplace learning, for instance when collaboration on solving professional problems is involved. The optimal structure in collaboration scripts for such games has appeared to be a key success factor. Free collaboration does not systematically produce effective

  13. Measurements of psi -> K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c. and psi -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Duan, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV and collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present studies of the decays psi(3686) -> K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c.

  14. Incentive structure in team-based learning: graded versus ungraded Group Application exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Deardorff

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The use of ungraded Group Application exercises appears to be a successful modification of TBL, making it more “student-friendly” while maintaining the goals of active learning and development of teamwork skills.

  15. Group formation in a public good experiment: on the dynamics of social ties structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnemans, J.H.; van Dijk, F.; van Winden, F.A.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Economic behavior often takes place in groups of small numbers of peopleinteracting with each other (like work teams, neighborhoods, socialnetworks, etc.). Characteristic of such interaction is the development of(affective) interpersonal relationships, or social ties. According tosociologists, the

  16. Jubilite: A 4-,8-connected Cubic Structural Pattern in Space Group Pm3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Castro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In the course of investigating structural modifications of the 3-,4-connected net known as the Pt3O4 structure-type (waserite, a novel 4-,8-connected structure-type was discovered. This lattice is generated by replacing the 3-connected trigonal planar vertices of the Pt3O4 structure-type with 4-connected tetrahedral vertices, to achieve a structure which possesses a generic empirical formula of JK6L8. In such a topological modification, the four 3-fold axes of the parent cubic, Pm3n, Pt3O4 structure-type are retained. Thus the 4-connected tetrahedral vertices are oriented so as to preserve cubic symmetry in the resulting Pm3, JK6L8 (jubilite lattice. The unit cell contains a single 8-connected cubecentered vertex, six 4-connected distorted square planar vertices and eight 4-connected distorted tetrahedral vertices. It is a Wellsean structure with a Wells point symbol given by (4166484(42826(43838 and a Schläfli symbol of (53/4, 4.2667. This latter index reveals a decrease in the lattice’s polygonality and concomitant increase in the connectivity through the transformation from waserite to jubilite. The topology of the parent waserite lattice (Pt3O4 corresponds to that of the Catalan structures with the Wells point symbol (843(834, which has the Schläfli symbol (8, 3.4285. Finally, it can be seen that a sequence of structure-types starting with waserite (Pt3O4 and moving to jubilite (JK6L8 and finally to fluorite (CaF2 represents a continuous crystallographic structural transformation in which the symmetry and topology undergo concomitant changes from one structure-type (waserite to the other structure-types. The topology of the fluorite lattice, represented by the Wells point symbol (424(462, and the Schläfli symbol (4, 51/3, indicates a discontinuous topological transformation from the intermediate jubilite lattice; like the discontinuous topological transformation from Pt3O4 to JK6L8; in which the

  17. Integrated Analysis and Visualization of Group Differences in Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity: Applications in Typical Ageing and Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn D Langen

    Full Text Available Structural and functional brain connectivity are increasingly used to identify and analyze group differences in studies of brain disease. This study presents methods to analyze uni- and bi-modal brain connectivity and evaluate their ability to identify differences. Novel visualizations of significantly different connections comparing multiple metrics are presented. On the global level, "bi-modal comparison plots" show the distribution of uni- and bi-modal group differences and the relationship between structure and function. Differences between brain lobes are visualized using "worm plots". Group differences in connections are examined with an existing visualization, the "connectogram". These visualizations were evaluated in two proof-of-concept studies: (1 middle-aged versus elderly subjects; and (2 patients with schizophrenia versus controls. Each included two measures derived from diffusion weighted images and two from functional magnetic resonance images. The structural measures were minimum cost path between two anatomical regions according to the "Statistical Analysis of Minimum cost path based Structural Connectivity" method and the average fractional anisotropy along the fiber. The functional measures were Pearson's correlation and partial correlation of mean regional time series. The relationship between structure and function was similar in both studies. Uni-modal group differences varied greatly between connectivity types. Group differences were identified in both studies globally, within brain lobes and between regions. In the aging study, minimum cost path was highly effective in identifying group differences on all levels; fractional anisotropy and mean correlation showed smaller differences on the brain lobe and regional levels. In the schizophrenia study, minimum cost path and fractional anisotropy showed differences on the global level and within brain lobes; mean correlation showed small differences on the lobe level. Only

  18. NMR studies of chemical structural variation of insoluble organic matter from different carbonaceous chondrite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, George D.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.

    2005-02-01

    Solid-state 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments have been performed on isolated meteoritic Insoluble Organic Matter (IOM) spanning four different carbonaceous chondrite meteorite groups; a CR2 (EET92042), a CI1 (Orgueil), a CM2 (Murchison), and the unique C2 meteorite, Tagish Lake. These solid state NMR experiments reveal considerable variation in bulk organic composition across the different meteorite group's IOM. The fraction of aromatic carbon increases as CR2 meteorite groups. Single pulse (SP) 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments reveal the presence of nanodiamonds with an apparent concentration ranking in the IOM of CR2 IOM of all four meteoritic IOM fractions are highly substituted. Fast spinning SP 1H MAS NMR spectral data combined with other NMR experimental data reveal that the average hydrogen content of sp 3 bonded carbon functional groups is low, requiring a high degree of aliphatic chain branching in each IOM fraction. The variation in chemistry across the meteorite groups is consistent with alteration by low temperature chemical oxidation. It is concluded that such chemistry principally affected the aliphatic moieties whereas the aromatic moieties and nanodiamonds may have been largely unaffected.

  19. Analysis of admixture and genetic structure of two Native American groups of Southern Argentinean Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Andrea; Corach, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Argentinean Patagonia is inhabited by people that live principally in urban areas and by small isolated groups of individuals that belong to indigenous aboriginal groups; this territory exhibits the lowest population density of the country. Mapuche and Tehuelche (Mapudungun linguistic branch), are the only extant Native American groups that inhabit the Argentinean Patagonian provinces of Río Negro and Chubut. Fifteen autosomal STRs, 17 Y-STRs, mtDNA full length control region sequence and two sets of Y and mtDNA-coding region SNPs were analyzed in a set of 434 unrelated individuals. The sample set included two aboriginal groups, a group of individuals whose family name included Native American linguistic root and urban samples from Chubut, Río Negro and Buenos Aires provinces of Argentina. Specific Y Amerindian haplogroup Q1 was found in 87.5% in Mapuche and 58.82% in Tehuelche, while the Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups were present in all the aboriginal sample contributors investigated. Admixture analysis performed by means of autosomal and Y-STRs showed the highest degree of admixture in individuals carrying Mapuche surnames, followed by urban populations, and finally by isolated Native American populations as less degree of admixture. The study provided novel genetic information about the Mapuche and Tehuelche people and allowed us to establish a genetic correlation among individuals with Mapudungun surnames that demonstrates not only a linguistic but also a genetic relationship to the isolated aboriginal communities, representing a suitable proxy indicator for assessing genealogical background.

  20. The Power to Detect Sex Differences in IQ Test Scores Using Multi-Group Covariance and Means Structure Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; Wicherts, Jelle M.

    2009-01-01

    Research into sex differences in general intelligence, g, has resulted in two opposite views. In the first view, a g-difference is nonexistent, while in the second view, g is associated with a male advantage. Past research using Multi-Group Covariance and Mean Structure Analysis (MG-CMSA) found no sex difference in g. This failure raised the…

  1. Integrated analysis and visualization of group differences in structural and functional brain connectivity: Applications in typical ageing and schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.D. Langen (Carolyn); T.J.H. White (Tonya); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); W.J. Niessen (Wiro)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStructural and functional brain connectivity are increasingly used to identify and analyze group differences in studies of brain disease. This study presents methods to analyze uniand bi-modal brain connectivity and evaluate their ability to identify differences. Novel visualizations of

  2. Integrated Analysis and Visualization of Group Differences in Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity : Applications in Typical Ageing and Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langen, C.D.; White, T.; Ikram, M.A.; Vernooij, M.W.; Niessen, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and functional brain connectivity are increasingly used to identify and analyze group differences in studies of brain disease. This study presents methods to analyze uni- and bi-modal brain connectivity and evaluate their ability to identify differences. Novel visualizations of

  3. Conformational control of cofactors in nature: The effect of methoxy group orientation on the electronic structure of ubisemiquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Almeida, Wagner B.; O'Malley, Patrick J.

    2018-03-01

    Ubiquinone is the key electron and proton transfer agent in biology. Its mechanism involves the formation of its intermediate one-electron reduced form, the ubisemiquinone radical. This is formed in a protein-bound form which permits the semiquinone to vary its electronic and redox properties. This can be achieved by hydrogen bonding acceptance by one or both oxygen atoms or as we now propose by restricted orientations for the methoxy groups of the headgroup. We show how the orientation of the two methoxy groups of the quinone headgroup affects the electronic structure of the semiquinone form and demonstrate a large dependence of the ubisemiquinone spin density distribution on the orientation each methoxy group takes with respect to the headgroup ring plane. This is shown to significantly modify associated hyperfine couplings which in turn needs to be accounted for in interpreting experimental values in vivo. The study uncovers the key potential role the methoxy group orientation can play in controlling the electronic structure and spin density of ubisemiquinone and provides an electronic-level insight into the variation in electron affinity and redox potential of ubiquinone as a function of the methoxy orientation. Taken together with the already known influence of cofactor conformation on heme and chlorophyll electronic structure, it reveals a more widespread role for cofactor conformational control of electronic structure and associated electron transfer in biology.

  4. Phylogenetic continuum indicates "galaxies" in the protein universe: preliminary results on the natural group structures of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladunga, I

    1992-04-01

    The markedly nonuniform, even systematic distribution of sequences in the protein "universe" has been analyzed by methods of protein taxonomy. Mapping of the natural hierarchical system of proteins has revealed some dense cores, i.e., well-defined clusterings of proteins that seem to be natural structural groupings, possibly seeds for a future protein taxonomy. The aim was not to force proteins into more or less man-made categories by discriminant analysis, but to find structurally similar groups, possibly of common evolutionary origin. Single-valued distance measures between pairs of superfamilies from the Protein Identification Resource were defined by two chi 2-like methods on tripeptide frequencies and the variable-length subsequence identity method derived from dot-matrix comparisons. Distance matrices were processed by several methods of cluster analysis to detect phylogenetic continuum between highly divergent proteins. Only well-defined clusters characterized by relatively unique structural, intracellular environmental, organismal, and functional attribute states were selected as major protein groups, including subsets of viral and Escherichia coli proteins, hormones, inhibitors, plant, ribosomal, serum and structural proteins, amino acid synthases, and clusters dominated by certain oxidoreductases and apolar and DNA-associated enzymes. The limited repertoire of functional patterns due to small genome size, the high rate of recombination, specific features of the bacterial membranes, or of the virus cycle canalize certain proteins of viruses and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively, to organismal groups.

  5. Performance of the Radioprotection Engineering Group in the new structure of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, A.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison between the old and now CNEN (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission) organizational structure was performed. The new structure lead to a new IPEN (Nuclear and Energetics Research Institute) organization and also to gave use to a Radioprotection Engineering Area, The principal modification raised a second block already in accomplishment. The main aim of the Radioprotection Engineering Area is to turn personnel team interested, concerned, dexterous, dynamic and competitive on their activities besides to provide it of a continuously improvement and updating about technical activities in radiation protection. From these results an evaluation of possible drawbacks and ways to overcome them will be performed. (author)

  6. Data structure techniques for the graphical special unitary group approach to arbitrary spin representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, R.D.; Schlesinger, M.

    1987-01-01

    For the purpose of computing matrix elements of quantum mechanical operators in complex N-particle systems it is necessary that as much of each irreducible representation be stored in high-speed memory as possible in order to achieve the highest possible rate of computations. A graph theoretic approach to the representation of N-particle systems involving arbitrary single-particle spin is presented. The method involves a generalization of a technique employed by Shavitt in developing the graphical group approach (GUGA) to electronic spin-orbitals. The methods implemented in GENDRT and DRTDIM overcome many deficiencies inherent in other approaches, particularly with respect to utilization of memory resources, computational efficiency in the recognition and evaluation of non-zero matrix elements of certain group theoretic operators and complete labelling of all the basis states of the permutation symmetry (S N ) adapted irreducible representations of SU(n) groups. (orig.)

  7. A molecular analysis of African lion (Panthera leo) mating structure and extra-group paternity in Etosha National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, M M; Dubach, J; Briggs, M B

    2013-05-01

    The recent incorporation of molecular methods into analyses of social and mating systems has provided evidence that mating patterns often differ from those predicted by group social organization. Based on field studies and paternity analyses at a limited number of sites, African lions are predicted to exhibit a strict within-pride mating system. Extra-group paternity has not been previously reported in African lions; however, observations of extra-group associations among lions inhabiting Etosha National Park in Namibia suggest deviation from the predicted within-pride mating pattern. We analysed variation in 14 microsatellite loci in a population of 164 African lions in Etosha National Park. Genetic analysis was coupled with demographic and observational data to examine pride structure, relatedness and extra-group paternity (EGP). EGP was found to occur in 57% of prides where paternity was analysed (n = 7), and the overall rate of EGP in this population was 41% (n = 34). Group sex ratio had a significant effect on the occurrence of EGP (P African lion mating systems and provide evidence that social structure may not reflect breeding structure in some social mammals. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Interfacial self-organization of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups: relationships between the molecular structures and their self-organized morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Liu, Guanqing; Xu, Rui; Yin, Shouchun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2008-04-15

    This article discusses the relationship between the molecular structure of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups and their interfacial self-organized morphology. On the basis of the molecular structures of bolaamphiphiles, we designed and synthesized a series of molecules with different hydrophobic alkyl chain lengths, hydrophilic headgroups, mesogenic groups, and connectors between the alkyl chains and the mesogenic group. Through investigating their interfacial self-organization behavior, some experiential rules are summarized: (1) An appropriate alkyl chain length is necessary to form stable surface micelles; (2) different categories of headgroups have a great effect on the interfacial self-organized morphology; (3) different types of mesogenic groups have little effect on the structure of the interfacial assembly when it is changed from biphenyl to azobenzene or stilbene; (4) the orientation of the ester linker between the mesogenic group and alkyl chain can greatly influence the interfacial self-organization behavior. It is anticipated that this line of research may be helpful for the molecular engineering of bolaamphiphiles to form tailor-made morphologies.

  9. The quantum group structure of 2D gravity and minimal models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    On the unit circle, an infinite family of chiral operators is constructed, whose exchange algebra is given by the universal R-matrix of the quantum group SL(2) q . This establishes the precise connection between the chiral algebra of two dimensional gravity or minimal models and this quantum group. The method is to relate the monodromy properties of the operator differential equations satisfied by the generalized vertex operators with the exchange algebra of SL(2) q . The formulae so derived, which generalize an earlier particular case worked out by Babelon, are remarkably compact and may be entirely written in terms of 'q-deformed' factorials and binomial coefficients. (orig.)

  10. The DIALOGUE project. Report of the Gaming group on the structure and content of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Hallencreutz, M.; Andersson, Kjell; Wene, C.O.; Westerlund, S.

    1993-11-01

    The DIALOGUE project has been conducted by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) since 1990. The aim of the project was to stimulate a dialogue between different interest groups within Sweden. The purpose of this dialogue was to establish a licensing process, prior to a future licensing of a repository for spent nuclear waste, in which several of the parties involved are reasonably confident. The DIALOGUE project was carried out with the participation of other government agencies, municipalities and environmental groups and was headed by the former chairman of the National Licensing Board for Environmental Protection

  11. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  12. Miniworkshop on Methods of Electronic Structure Calculations and Working Group on Disordered Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, O K; Mookerjee, A

    1994-01-01

    Developments in the density functional theory and the methods of electronic structure calculations have made it possible to carry out ab-initio studies of a variety of materials efficiently and at a predictable level. This book covers many of those state-of-the-art developments and their applications to ordered and disordered materials, surfaces and interfaces and clusters, etc.

  13. Factor Structure of the 10 WISC-V Primary Subtests across Four Standardization Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Canivez, Gary L.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2018-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V; Wechsler 2014a) "Technical and Interpretation Manual" (Wechsler 2014b) dedicated only a single page to discussing the 10-subtest WISC-V primary battery across the entire 6 to 16 age range. Users are left to extrapolate the structure of the 10-subtest battery from the…

  14. Structuring Collaboration Scripts: Optimizing online group work on classroom dilemmas in teacher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Geerts, Walter; Slootmaker, Aad; Kuipers, Derek; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The optimal structure in collaboration scripts for serious games has appeared to be a key success factor. In this study we compare a ‘high- structured’ and ‘low-structured’ version of a mastership game where teachers-in-training discuss solutions on classroom dilemmas. We collected data on the

  15. Structural and Optical Properties of Group III Doped Hydrothermal ZnO Thin Films

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad J.; Carberry, Benjamin; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    . The hydrothermal layer is doped with Al, Ga, and In through the addition of their respective nitrate salts. We evaluated the effect that varying the concentrations of these dopants has on both the structural and optical properties of these films. It was found

  16. Dancing multiplicity states supported by a carboxylated group in dicopper structures bonded to O2

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    (μ-oxo) species is also on discussion. Despite the relative stabilities of all these either structural or electronic isomeric species are supposed to depend on the computational method, which is a difficulty to reach a definite conclusion about the nature

  17. Effects of density on foraging success and aggression in age-structured groups of brown trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersson, Rasmus; Höjesjö, Johan; Pedersen, Stig

    2010-01-01

    , as a consequence of, for example, age and/or body size. We used two age classes (i.e. size groups) of stream-living brown trout, Salmo trutta, to investigate this issue. While old (and large) trout are assumed to be superior during interference competition, younger individuals may be both numerically dominant...

  18. Chemical groups and structural characterization of lignin via thiol-mediated demethylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihong Hu; Hui Pan; Yonghong Zhou; Chung-Yun Hse; Chengguo Liu; Baofang Zhang; Bin Xu

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to increase the reactivity of lignin by thiol-mediated demethylation was investigated in this study. Demethylated lignin was characterized by the changes in its hydroxyl and methoxyl groups, molecular weight, and other properties using titration and spectroscopy methods including FT-IR, 1H NMR, UV,and GPC. The total...

  19. Papiliochrome II pigment reduces the angle dependency of structural wing colouration in nireus group papilionids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Vukusic, Peter; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    The wings of four papilionid butterfly species of the nireus group, Papilio bromius, P. epiphorbas, P. nireus and P. oribazus, are marked by blue-green coloured bands surrounded by black margins. The cover scales in the coloured bands contain a violet-absorbing, blue-fluorescing pigment. The

  20. Reducing Dropouts in Online Education-Group Tutoring in Virtual Seminars and Support Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Robert; Johansson, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a development project aimed at reducing the large number of dropouts in online degree project courses. The idea was that the introduction of group tutorials in virtual seminars, combined with extensive support materials, would reduce dropout rates. Among the students who participated, the dropout rate was reduced by 50%…

  1. Structure-Activity Relationship of Curcumin: Role of the Methoxy Group in Anti-inflammatory and Anticolitis Effects of Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haixia; Du, Zheyuan; Wang, Weicang; Song, Mingyue; Sanidad, Katherine; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Zheng, Jennifer; Tian, Li; Xiao, Hang; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Guodong

    2017-06-07

    Curcumin, a dietary compound from turmeric, has beneficial effects on inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. Most previous studies have focused on the structure-activity relationship of the thiol-reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups of curcumin, so little is known about the roles of methoxy groups in biological activities of curcumin. Here we synthesized a series of curcumin analogues with different substitution groups (R = H-, Br-, Cl-, F-, NO 2 -, CH 3 -, and OH-) to replace the methoxy group and evaluated their biological effects in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin, Cur-OH, and Cur-Br (25 μM) suppressed 74.91 ± 0.88, 77.75 ± 0.89, and 71.75 ± 0.90% of LPS-induced NO production, respectively (P 0.05). In the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model, the Cur-Br analogue also showed a beneficial effect the same as curcumin (P 0.05). Together, the analogues have dramatically different effects on inflammation, supporting that the substitution group on the methoxy position plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin. The methoxy group is a potential structural candidate for modification to design curcumin-based drugs for inflammatory diseases.

  2. Time-dependent spectral analysis of interactions within groups of walking pedestrians and vertical structural motion using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, M.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.; Racic, V.; Hester, D.; Quattrone, A.; Gilbert, L.; Beasley, R.

    2018-05-01

    A multi-scale and multi-object interaction phenomena can arise when a group of walking pedestrians crosses a structure capable of exhibiting dynamic response. This is because each pedestrian is an autonomous dynamic system capable of displaying intricate behaviour affected by social, psychological, biomechanical and environmental factors, including adaptations to the structural motion. Despite a wealth of mathematical models attempting to describe and simulate coupled crowd-structure system, their applicability can generally be considered uncertain. This can be assigned to a number of assumptions made in their development and the scarcity or unavailability of data suitable for their validation, in particular those associated with pedestrian-pedestrian and pedestrian-structure interaction. To alleviate this problem, data on behaviour of individual pedestrians within groups of six walkers with different spatial arrangements are gathered simultaneously with data on dynamic structural response of a footbridge, from a series of measurements utilising wireless motion monitors. Unlike in previous studies on coordination of pedestrian behaviour, the collected data can serve as a proxy for pedestrian vertical force, which is of critical importance from the point of view of structural stability. A bivariate analysis framework is proposed and applied to these data, encompassing wavelet transform, synchronisation measures based on Shannon entropy and circular statistics. A topological pedestrian map is contrived showing the strength and directionality of between-subjects interactions. It is found that the coordination in pedestrians' vertical force depends on the spatial collocation within a group, but it is generally weak. The relationship between the bridge and pedestrian behaviour is also analysed, revealing stronger propensity for pedestrians to coordinate their force with the structural motion rather than with each other.

  3. Social structure of a semi-free ranging group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx: a social network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Bret

    Full Text Available The difficulty involved in following mandrills in the wild means that very little is known about social structure in this species. Most studies initially considered mandrill groups to be an aggregation of one-male/multifemale units, with males occupying central positions in a structure similar to those observed in the majority of baboon species. However, a recent study hypothesized that mandrills form stable groups with only two or three permanent males, and that females occupy more central positions than males within these groups. We used social network analysis methods to examine how a semi-free ranging group of 19 mandrills is structured. We recorded all dyads of individuals that were in contact as a measure of association. The betweenness and the eigenvector centrality for each individual were calculated and correlated to kinship, age and dominance. Finally, we performed a resilience analysis by simulating the removal of individuals displaying the highest betweenness and eigenvector centrality values. We found that related dyads were more frequently associated than unrelated dyads. Moreover, our results showed that the cumulative distribution of individual betweenness and eigenvector centrality followed a power function, which is characteristic of scale-free networks. This property showed that some group members, mostly females, occupied a highly central position. Finally, the resilience analysis showed that the removal of the two most central females split the network into small subgroups and increased the network diameter. Critically, this study confirms that females appear to occupy more central positions than males in mandrill groups. Consequently, these females appear to be crucial for group cohesion and probably play a pivotal role in this species.

  4. Social structure of a semi-free ranging group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Céline; Sueur, Cédric; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Verrier, Delphine; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty involved in following mandrills in the wild means that very little is known about social structure in this species. Most studies initially considered mandrill groups to be an aggregation of one-male/multifemale units, with males occupying central positions in a structure similar to those observed in the majority of baboon species. However, a recent study hypothesized that mandrills form stable groups with only two or three permanent males, and that females occupy more central positions than males within these groups. We used social network analysis methods to examine how a semi-free ranging group of 19 mandrills is structured. We recorded all dyads of individuals that were in contact as a measure of association. The betweenness and the eigenvector centrality for each individual were calculated and correlated to kinship, age and dominance. Finally, we performed a resilience analysis by simulating the removal of individuals displaying the highest betweenness and eigenvector centrality values. We found that related dyads were more frequently associated than unrelated dyads. Moreover, our results showed that the cumulative distribution of individual betweenness and eigenvector centrality followed a power function, which is characteristic of scale-free networks. This property showed that some group members, mostly females, occupied a highly central position. Finally, the resilience analysis showed that the removal of the two most central females split the network into small subgroups and increased the network diameter. Critically, this study confirms that females appear to occupy more central positions than males in mandrill groups. Consequently, these females appear to be crucial for group cohesion and probably play a pivotal role in this species.

  5. New Concept of the Biosynthesis of 4-Alkyl-L-proline Precursors of Lincomycin, Hormaomycin and Pyrrolobenzodiazepines: Could a γ-Glutamyltransferase Cleave the C-C Bond?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eJiraskova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Structurally different and functionally diverse natural compounds – antitumour agents pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines, bacterial hormone hormaomycin and lincosamide antibiotic lincomycin – share a common building unit, 4-alkyl-L-proline derivative (APD. APDs arise from L-tyrosine through a special biosynthetic pathway. Its generally accepted scheme, however, did not comply with current state of knowledge. Based on gene inactivation experiments and in vitro functional tests with recombinant enzymes, we designed a new APD biosynthetic scheme for the model of lincomycin biosynthesis. In the new scheme at least one characteristic in each of five final biosynthetic steps has been changed: the order of reactions, assignment of enzymes and/or reaction mechanisms. First, we demonstrate that LmbW methylates a different substrate than previously assumed. Second, we propose a unique reaction mechanism for the next step, in which a putative γ-glutamyltransferase LmbA indirectly cleaves off the oxalyl residue by transient attachment of glutamate to LmbW product. This unprecedented mechanism would represent the first example of the C-C bond cleavage catalyzed by a γ-glutamyltransferase, i.e., an enzyme that appears unsuitable for such activity. Finally, the inactivation experiments show that LmbX is an isomerase indicating that it transforms its substrate into a compound suitable for reduction by LmbY, thereby facilitating its subsequent complete conversion to APD 4-propyl-L-proline. Elucidation of the APD biosynthesis has long time resisted mainly due to the apparent absence of relevant C-C bond cleaving enzymatic activity. Our proposal aims to unblock this situation not only for lincomycin biosynthesis, but generally for all above mentioned groups of bioactive natural products with biotechnological potential.

  6. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... the strain is closely related to Frankia sp. strain CcI3. ... [Oshone R, Mansour SR and Tisa LS 2013 Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6. .... This work was supported in part by US-Egypt Joint Research.

  7. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  8. Fiscal 1997 survey report / R and D of important region technology. R and D of technologies giving multi-functional characteristics to C/C composites (development of high-grade surface processing technology for engine members for methane fueled air craft. 1. control technology of micro structures of ultra-high temperature members); 1997 nendo seika hokokusho juyo chiiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu. Fukugo kino buzai kozo seigyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (methane nenryo kokukiyo engine buzai no kodo hyomen kako gijutsu kaihatsu). 1. chokoon buzai micro kozo seigyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    For the purpose of developing members most suitable for aircraft use engines with methane as fuel, the R and D were conducted of technology to reform surfaces and interfaces of materials. In the R and D, the paper took up carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite materials (C/C composites). In the surface control and reformation technology using the ion engineering method, etc., in the sealing processing of C/C composites, tried was the formation of a C/SiC/Si3N4 composite layer which was formed by Si3N4 much smaller in thermal expansion coefficient than SiC. Further, technologies on ion injection, thin film formation, giving of oxidation resistance/corrosion resistance, improving/giving of thermal shock resistance, etc. In the multi-functional coating formation technology such as high liability and corrosion resistance, the study was carried out of the dense composite functionally-gradient layer as thermal stress relaxation layer and the fiber reinforced layer by carbon fiber using pores. Besides, studies were made of technologies of the micro structure control combination, evaluation of ultra-high temperature resistant environmental characteristics, etc. 61 refs., 198 figs., 44 tabs.

  9. Group constant preparation for the estimate of neutron induced damage in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron heating (kerma), displacement per atom cross sections (DPA), gas and γ-ray production are important parameters for the estimate of the damage produced by neutron induced nuclear reactions in the structural materials. The NJOY System for Nuclear Data Processing has been extensively used in order to compute the above quantities; here the theory, the algorithms and the connected problems are described. (author). 6 refs, 3 tabs

  10. The microscopic structure and group theory of the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The chains of groups used in calssifying states of the IBM are compared with the chains used in a composite model with j = 3/2 fermion pairs. Many similarities are found, along with differences due to Pauli principle effects in continuum fermion pairs. The classifications are shown to be characterized by several different seniority numbers, which are physically similar but formally different in the two cases because fermion pair and boson pair states used to define seniority in each model correspond to single bosons and four-fermion clusters, respectively, in the other model. The SO(6) and SO(5) groups which define boson pair seniorities in the boson sextet model are isomorphic, respectively, to SU(4) and Sp(4) which have simple physical interpretations in fermion quartet models. (orig.)

  11. The luminescence properties of the octahedral uranate group in oxides with perovskite structure, ch. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair, J.Th.W. de

    1976-01-01

    This chapter describes how the luminescence properties of the octahedral uranate group are influenced by the chemical constitution of its environment. Especially the quenching temperature of the emission is very sensitive. It is stronger influenced by the nature of the neighbouring B cations in the [100] direction than by the A cations in the [111] direction. This variation of the quenching temperature as a function of the chemical constitution of the host lattice is discussed in terms of a configurational coordinate model. The luminescence properties of uranium-activated oxides A 2+ La 3+ B + B'O 6 are also discussed. Remarkably enough in SrLaNaWO 6 -U the luminescence originates from UO 2 2+ groups. (Auth.)

  12. Growth, morphology, and structural properties of group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, E.; Ristic, J.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Grandal, J.; Cerutti, L.; Trampert, A.; Jahn, U.; Sanchez, G.; Griol, A.; Sanchez, B.

    2007-01-01

    The growth conditions to achieve group-III-nitride nanocolumns and nanocolumnar heterostructures by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The evolution of the nanocolumnar morphology with the growth conditions is determined for (Ga,Al)N and (In,Ga)N nanocolumns. The mechanisms behind the nanocolumnar growth under high N-rich conditions are clarified in the sense that no seeding or catalysts are required, as it is the case in the vapour-liquid-solid model that applies to most nanocolumns grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition, either with group-III nitrides, II-VI or III-V compounds. Some examples of nanocolumnar heterostructures are given, like quantum disks and cylindrical nanocavities. Preliminary results on the growth of arrays of ordered GaN nanocolumns are reported. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. [Professionalization of Legal Dental Experts in Germany: Results of Studies on Structured Focus Groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, H U; Walther, W; Dick, M

    2018-04-01

    Legal expert opinions are a crucial instrument of professional self-control in medicine. To give impulses for further development, focus groups were initiated to reflect upon the perspective of legal dental experts. 5 focus group discussions on the topic "Professionalization of legal dental experts" were conducted. A total of 32 experienced legal dental experts participated in the discussions. The results were evaluated by qualitative content analysis. A catalogue of 68 ideas was generated for improvement and divided into 15 categories. Among these were periodic quality circles, interprofessional exchange, supervision of novices and periodic feedback for legal dental experts and dentists. Self-reflection can be included as an instrument for quality improvement of legal dental expert opinions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Population structure and group composition of western lowland gorillas in north-western Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliocca, F; Querouil, S; Gautier-Hion, A

    1999-01-01

    Population studies are an essential part of conservation actions. Under exceptional observation conditions we studied a western lowland gorilla population visiting the Maya salt-clearing (north of the Parc national d'Odzala, P.N.O., Congo) over an 8 month period; 36 groups and 18 solitary individuals (a total of 420 individuals) have been identified visiting the clearing, which suggests a high gorilla density in the region. Ninety-six percent of the gorillas entered the clearing in groups. One-male groups had a mean size of 11.2. Ninety percent of solitary individuals were silver-back males. Compared with other populations of both lowland gorillas and mountain gorillas, the Maya population had the highest immature rate and the highest number of infants per female. Ecological correlates that could explain the attractiveness of the Maya clearing are discussed. The present status and the renewal rate of the Maya population indicate the need for further studies and confirm the importance of developing eco-tourism in this region as part of the sustainable park management activities developed by the ECOFAC programme (European Union). The results also provide arguments to support the proposal for extending the P.N.O. to include this region, which is rich in salt-clearings and attracts many other key-species of mammal such as forest elephants.

  15. Polarizable Embedded RI-CC2 Method for Two-Photon Absorption Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hršak, Dalibor; Khah, Alireza Marefat; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel polarizable embedded resolution-of-identity coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (PERI-CC2) method for calculation of two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra of large molecular systems. The method was benchmarked for three types of systems: a water-solvated molecule...... of formamide, a uracil molecule in aqueous solution, and a set of mutants of the channelrhodopsin (ChR) protein. The first test case shows that the PERI-CC2 method is in excellent agreement with the PE-CC2 method and in good agreement with the PE-CCSD method. The uracil test case indicates that the effects...... of hydrogen bonding on the TPA of a chromophore with the nearest environment is well-described with the PERI-CC2 method. Finally, the ChR calculation shows that the PERI-CC2 method is well-suited and efficient for calculations on proteins with medium-sized chromophores....

  16. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  17. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department

  18. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of spore coat proteins in two Bacillus species groups are linked to a difference in cellular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Bacillus subtilis-group and the Bacillus cereus-group are two well-studied groups of species in the genus Bacillus. Bacteria in this genus can produce a highly resistant cell type, the spore, which is encased in a complex protective protein shell called the coat. Spores in the B. cereus-group contain an additional outer layer, the exosporium, which encircles the coat. The coat in B. subtilis spores possesses inner and outer layers. The aim of this study is to investigate whether differences in the spore structures influenced the divergence of the coat protein genes during the evolution of these two Bacillus species groups. Results We designed and implemented a computational framework to compare the evolutionary histories of coat proteins. We curated a list of B. subtilis coat proteins and identified their orthologs in 11 Bacillus species based on phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic profiles of these coat proteins show that they can be divided into conserved and labile ones. Coat proteins comprising the B. subtilis inner coat are significantly more conserved than those comprising the outer coat. We then performed genome-wide comparisons of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratio, dN/dS, and found contrasting patterns: Coat proteins have significantly higher dN/dS in the B. subtilis-group genomes, but not in the B. cereus-group genomes. We further corroborated this contrast by examining changes of dN/dS within gene trees, and found that some coat protein gene trees have significantly different dN/dS between the B subtilis-clade and the B. cereus-clade. Conclusions Coat proteins in the B. subtilis- and B. cereus-group species are under contrasting selective pressures. We speculate that the absence of the exosporium in the B. subtilis spore coat effectively lifted a structural constraint that has led to relaxed negative selection pressure on the outer coat. PMID:24283940

  19. Effects of differently hardened brass foil laminate on the electromechanical property of externally laminated CC tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista, Zhierwinjay; Shin, Hyung Seop [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Mean, Byoung Jean; Lee, Jae Hun [SuNAM Co Ltd., Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The mechanical properties of REBCO coated conductor (CC) wires under uniaxial tension are largely determined by the thick component layers in the architecture, namely, the substrate and the stabilizer or even the reinforcement layer. Depending on device applications of the CC tapes, it is necessary to reinforce thin metallic foils externally to one-side or both sides of the CC tapes. Due to the external reinforcement of brass foils, it was found that this could increase the reversible strain limit from the Cu-stabilized CC tapes. In this study, the effects of differently hardened brass foil laminate on the electromechanical property of CC tapes were investigated under uniaxial tension loading. The tensile strain dependence of the critical current (I{sub c}) was measured at 77 K and self-field. Depending on whether the I{sub c} of CC tapes were measured during loading or after unloading, a reversible strain (or stress) limit could be determined, respectively. The both-sides of the Cu-stabilized CC tapes were laminated with brass foils with different hardness, namely 1/4H, 1H and EH. From the obtained results, it showed that the yield strength of the brass laminated CC tapes with EH brass foil laminate was comparable to the one of the Cu-stabilized CC tape due to its large yield strength even though its large volume fraction. It was found that the brass foil with different hardness was mainly sensitive on the stress dependence of I{sub c}, but not on the strain sensitivity due to the residual strain induced in the laminated CC tapes during unloading.

  20. The Use of Structures in Communication Networks to Track Membership in Terrorist Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A Eiselt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper investigates possibilities to detect terrorist cells based on communications between individuals without the need for wiretapping. The advantages of such procedure are apparent: fewer (if any legal requirements, and, most importantly, the possibility to automate the surveillance. After a brief review of the pertinent literature, we offer three approaches that are designed to aid in the detection of not only terrorist cells, but also the command structures within the cells. The techniques are demonstrated by using a small illustration. The paper concludes by outlining limitations of the procedures described here.

  1. Branched multifunctional polyether polyketals: variation of ketal group structure enables unprecedented control over polymer degradation in solution and within cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Rajesh A; Narayanannair, Jayaprakash K; Hamilton, Jasmine L; Lai, Benjamin F L; Horte, Sonja; Kainthan, Rajesh K; Varghese, Jos P; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-09-12

    Multifunctional biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials incorporating specific degradable linkages that respond to various stimuli and with defined degradation profiles are critical to the advancement of targeted nanomedicine. Herein we report, for the first time, a new class of multifunctional dendritic polyether polyketals containing different ketal linkages in their backbone that exhibit unprecedented control over degradation in solution and within the cells. High-molecular-weight and highly compact poly(ketal hydroxyethers) (PKHEs) were synthesized from newly designed α-epoxy-ω-hydroxyl-functionalized AB(2)-type ketal monomers carrying structurally different ketal groups (both cyclic and acyclic) with good control over polymer properties by anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization. Polymer functionalization with multiple azide and amine groups was achieved without degradation of the ketal group. The polymer degradation was controlled primarily by the differences in the structure and torsional strain of the substituted ketal groups in the main chain, while for polymers with linear (acyclic) ketal groups, the hydrophobicity of the polymer may play an additional role. This was supported by the log P values of the monomers and the hydrophobicity of the polymers determined by fluorescence spectroscopy using pyrene as the probe. A range of hydrolysis half-lives of the polymers at mild acidic pH values was achieved, from a few minutes to a few hundred days, directly correlating with the differences in ketal group structures. Confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated similar degradation profiles for PKHEs within live cells, as seen in solution and the delivery of fluorescent marker to the cytosol. The cell viability measured by MTS assay and blood compatibility determined by complement activation, platelet activation, and coagulation assays demonstrate that PKHEs and their degradation products are highly biocompatible. Taken together, these data

  2. Metal-organic cooperative catalysis in C-H and C-C bond activation and its concurrent recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jun; Park, Jung-Woo; Jun, Chul-Ho

    2008-02-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic activation (cleavage) system for C-H and C-C bonds is an important challenge in organic synthesis, because these bonds comprise a variety of organic molecules such as natural products, petroleum oils, and polymers on the earth. Among many elegant approaches utilizing transition metals to activate C-H and C-C bonds facilely, chelation-assisted protocols based on the coordinating ability of an organic moiety have attracted great attention, though they have often suffered from the need for an intact coordinating group in a substrate. In this Account, we describe our entire efforts to activate C-H or C-C bonds adjacent to carbonyl groups by employing a new concept of metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC), which enables the temporal installation of a 2-aminopyridyl group into common aldehydes or ketones in a catalytic way. Consequently, a series of new catalytic reactions such as alcohol hydroacylation, oxo-ester synthesis, C-C triple bond cleavage, hydrative dimerization of alkynes, and skeletal rearrangements of cyclic ketones was realized through MOCC. In particular, in the quest for an optimized MOCC system composed of a Wilkinson's catalyst (Ph 3P) 3RhCl and an organic catalyst (2-amino-3-picoline), surprising efficiency enhancements could be achieved when benzoic acid and aniline were introduced as promoters for the aldimine formation process. Furthermore, a notable accomplishment of C-C bond activation has been made using 2-amino-3-picoline as a temporary chelating auxiliary in the reactions of unstrained ketones with various terminal olefins and Wilkinson's catalyst. In the case of seven-membered cyclic ketones, an interesting ring contraction to five- or six-membered ones takes place through skeletal rearrangements initiated by the C-C bond activation of MOCC. On the other hand, the fundamental advances of these catalytic systems into recyclable processes could be achieved by immobilizing both metal and organic

  3. Structure of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase B: Electron Transfer between Two Flavin Groups Bridged by an Iron-Sulphur Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowland, Poul; Nørager, Sofie; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The fourth step and only redox reaction in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by the flavoprotein dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD). Based on their sequences, DHODs are grouped into two major families. Lactococcus lactis is one of the few organisms with two DHODs, A and B....... RESULTS: Crystal structures have been determined for DHODB and its product complex. The DHODB heterotetramer is composed of two closely interacting PyrDB-PyrK dimers with the [2Fe-2S] cluster in their interface centered between the FMN and FAD groups. Conformational changes are observed between...

  4. EFFICACY OF A STRUCTURED GROUP PROGRAM IN COPYING STRATEGIES FOR POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS IN DISPLACEMENT SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA CLARA RODRÍGUEZ DÍAZ

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis is made on the efficacy of a structured group program in emotional, cognitiveand social coping skills for the treatment of a sample of adults and adolescents that developedposttraumatic stress disorder after a forced displacement situation. The participants completed a 10-session intervention including pre and post assessments about the severity level of the symptoms usingthe PSD scale (Foa, 1995 and an additional measure one month after. The results showed significantimprovements in symptoms in both groups and in each one of the possible comparisons. Recoveryshows that the decrease in the severity level of symptoms affects the functioning level positively.

  5. Abstract structure of partial function $*$-algebras over semi-direct product of locally compact groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Ghaani Farashahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a unified approach to the abstract notions of partial convolution and involution in $L^p$-function spaces over semi-direct product of locally compact groups. Let $H$ and $K$ be locally compact groups and $tau:Hto Aut(K$ be a continuous homomorphism.  Let $G_tau=Hltimes_tau K$ be the semi-direct product of $H$ and $K$ with respect to $tau$. We define left and right $tau$-convolution on $L^1(G_tau$ and we show that, with respect to each of them, the function space $L^1(G_tau$ is a Banach algebra. We define $tau$-convolution as a linear combination of the left and right $tau$-convolution and we show that the $tau$-convolution is commutative if and only if $K$ is abelian. We prove that there is a $tau$-involution on $L^1(G_tau$ such that with respect to the $tau$-involution and $tau$-convolution, $L^1(G_tau$ is a non-associative Banach $*$-algebra. It is also shown that when $K$ is abelian, the $tau$-involution and $tau$-convolution make $L^1(G_tau$ into a Jordan Banach $*$-algebra. Finally, we also present the generalized notation of $tau$-convolution for other $L^p$-spaces with $p>1$.

  6. Parafunctional oral habits and its relationship with family structure in a mexican preschoolers group, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Murrieta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Habit is any act acquired through experience and performed regularly and unconsciously. Parafunctional habits are resulting from the perversion of a normal function, acquired by repeated practice of an act that is not functional or necessary, may be signs of adjustment problems or inappropriate emotional expression. Its importance lies in the fact that they can interfere with the development of dental occlusion. Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of parafunctional oral habits and their possible association with the type of family, in a group of preschool children from eastern Mexico City. Methodology. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carrying on. Preschool children group and their parents were surveyed before an examiner calibration (k =0.87, p=0.001. The detection of different parafunctional habits was conducted in two stages: 1 application of a parent questionnaire and 2 clinical assessment of the child. Results and discussion. 57.7% of the studied population had at least one parafunctional oral habit. Onycophagia habit was the most prevalent. The relationship between prevalence of parafunctional habits with family type was significant (X2=87.439, p=0.0001. Conclusions. The prevalence of parafunctional habits was high which was associated with family type also the most frequent parafunctional habit onycophagia.

  7. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.c.677 C>T and c.c.1298 A>C polymorphisms in reproductive failures: Experience from an RSA and RIF study on a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Izabela; Bylińska, Aleksandra; Wilczyńska, Karolina; Wiśniewski, Andrzej; Malinowski, Andrzej; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Radwan, Paweł; Radwan, Michał; Barcz, Ewa; Płoski, Rafał; Motak-Pochrzęst, Hanna; Banasik, Małgorzata; Sobczyński, Maciej; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Almost 1600 individuals from the Polish population were recruited to this study. Among them 319 were fertile couples, 289 were recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) couples, and 131 were in the group of recurrent implantation failure (RIF) following in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MTHFR c.c.677 C>T and c.c.1298 A>C polymorphisms' association with RSA and RIF. We used PCR-RFLP with HinfI (677 C>T) and MboII (1298 A>C) digestion. We observed a protective effect of the female AC genotype (OR = 0.64, p = 0.01) and the C allele (AC+CC genotypes; OR = 0.65, p = 0.009) against RSA. Moreover, 1298 AA/677 CT women were more frequent in RSA (31.14%) and RIF (25.20%) groups in comparison to fertile women (22.88%), although this difference was significant only in the case of RSA (p = 0.022, OR = 1.52). Male combined genotype analysis revealed no association with reproductive failure of their partners. Nevertheless, the female/male combination AA/AC of the 1298 polymorphism was more frequent in RSA couples (p = 0.049, OR = 1.49). However, the significant results became insignificant after Bonferroni correction. In addition, analysis of haplotypes showed significantly higher frequency of the C/C haplotype (1298 C/677 C) in the female control group than in the female RSA group (p = 0.03, OR = 0.77). Moreover, the association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level in plasma of RSA and RIF women and MTHFR polymorphisms was investigated but did not reveal significant differences. In conclusion, for clinical practice, it is better to check the homocysteine level in plasma and, if the Hcy level is increased, to recommend patients to take folic acid supplements rather than undergo screening of MTHFR for 1298 A>C and 677 C>T polymorphisms.

  8. Line grouping using perceptual saliency and structure prediction for car detection in traffic scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denasi, Sandra; Quaglia, Giorgio

    1993-08-01

    Autonomous and guide assisted vehicles make a heavy use of computer vision techniques to perceive the environment where they move. In this context, the European PROMETHEUS program is carrying on activities in order to develop autonomous vehicle monitoring that assists people to achieve safer driving. Car detection is one of the topics that are faced by the program. Our contribution proposes the development of this task in two stages: the localization of areas of interest and the formulation of object hypotheses. In particular, the present paper proposes a new approach that builds structural descriptions of objects from edge segmentations by using geometrical organization. This approach has been applied to the detection of cars in traffic scenes. We have analyzed images taken from a moving vehicle in order to formulate obstacle hypotheses: preliminary results confirm the efficiency of the method.

  9. Structural Group-based Auditing of Missing Hierarchical Relationships in UMLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Gu, Huanying(Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James

    2009-01-01

    The Metathesaurus of the UMLS was created by integrating various source terminologies. The inter-concept relationships were either integrated into the UMLS from the source terminologies or specially generated. Due to the extensive size and inherent complexity of the Metathesaurus, the accidental omission of some hierarchical relationships was inevitable. We present a recursive procedure which allows a human expert, with the support of an algorithm, to locate missing hierarchical relationships. The procedure starts with a group of concepts with exactly the same (correct) semantic type assignments. It then partitions the concepts, based on child-of hierarchical relationships, into smaller, singly rooted, hierarchically connected subgroups. The auditor only needs to focus on the subgroups with very few concepts and their concepts with semantic type reassignments. The procedure was evaluated by comparing it with a comprehensive manual audit and it exhibits a perfect error recall. PMID:18824248

  10. Group sessions with Paro in a nursing home: Structure, observations and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hayley; Broadbent, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that a companion robot reduced residents' loneliness in a randomised controlled trial at an aged-care facility. This report aims to provide additional, previously unpublished data about how the sessions were run, residents' interactions with the robot and staff perspectives. Observations were conducted focusing on engagement, how residents treated the robot and if the robot acted as a social catalyst. In addition, 16 residents and 21 staff were asked open-ended questions at the end of the study about the sessions and the robot. Observations indicated that some residents engaged on an emotional level with Paro, and Paro was treated as both an agent and an artificial object. Interviews revealed that residents enjoyed sharing, interacting with and talking about Paro. This study supports other research showing Paro has psychosocial benefits and provides a guide for those wishing to use Paro in a group setting in aged care. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  11. Mergers in galaxy groups. I. Structure and properties of elliptical remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Dubinski, John; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present collisionless simulations of dry mergers in groups of 3 to 25 galaxies to test the hypothesis that elliptical galaxies form at the centers of such groups. Mock observations of the central remnants confirm their similarity to ellipticals, despite having no dissipational component. We vary the profile of the original spiral's bulge and find that ellipticals formed from spirals with exponential bulges have too low Sersic indices. Mergers of spirals with de Vaucouleurs (classical) bulges produce remnants with larger Sersic indices correlated with luminosity, as with Sloan Digital Sky Survey ellipticals. Exponential bulge mergers are better fits to faint ellipticals, whereas classical bulge mergers better match luminous ellipticals. Similarly, luminous ellipticals are better reproduced by remnants undergoing many (>5) mergers, and fainter ellipticals by those with fewer mergers. The remnants follow tight size-luminosity and velocity dispersion-luminosity (Faber-Jackson) relations (<0.12 dex scatter), demonstrating that stochastic merging can produce tight scaling relations if the merging galaxies also follow tight scaling relations. The slopes of the size-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations are close to observations but slightly shallower in the former case. Both relations' intercepts are offset—remnants are too large but have too low dispersions at fixed luminosity. Some remnants show substantial (v/σ > 0.1) rotational support, although most are slow rotators and few are very fast rotators (v/σ > 0.5). These findings contrast with previous studies concluding that dissipation is necessary to produce ellipticals from binary mergers of spirals. Multiple, mostly minor and dry mergers can produce bright ellipticals, whereas significant dissipation could be required to produce faint, rapidly rotating ellipticals.

  12. THE GENETIC STRUCTURE OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS OF SILVER (HYPOPHTHALMICHTHYS MOLITRIX) AND BIGHEAD (ARISTICHTHYS NOBILIS) CARPS FROM FISH FARM LIMANSKE

    OpenAIRE

    Т. Nagorniuk; I. Hrytsyniak; N. Borysenko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Studying the peculiarities of the genetic structure of different age groups of silver and bighead carps from fish farm Limanske with the use of genetic-biochemical markers. Methodology. The methods of vertical polyacrylamide and horizontal starch electrophoresis with our own modifications have been used for the study. Sampling of the biological material and histochemical staining of gel plates were carried out using the generally accepted methods. Statistical analysis of the obta...

  13. A Tentative Research on the Education of Teacher by "Adlerian Psychology" (II) : Using Structured Group Encounter Method

    OpenAIRE

    柴山, 謙二; シバヤマ, ケンジ; Shibayama, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This is a tentative research on the education of teacher explored in Adlerian Psychology that used the structured group encounter method. The purpose of teacher education by Adlerian Psychology is to develop and deepen social interests of teachers, and to learn this theory and psychological techniques at school. The process of short-time workshop for teachers who were specialized in guidance for pupils was designed and documented for the education of teacher, and the author participated in th...

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, and thermal stability studies of heteroleptic cadmium(II) dithiocarbamate with different pyridyl groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Hosten, Eric C.

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of three chloroform solvated adducts of cadmium with mixed ligands of N-alkyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate and pyridine, 2,2-bipyridine and 1, 10 phenanthroline represented as [CdL1L2 (py)2]·CHCl3(1), [CdL1L2bpy]•CHCl3(2), and [CdL1L2phen]•CHCl3(3) (LI = N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, L2 = N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate, py = pyridine, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) respectively are reported. Complex 1, which crystallized in the monoclinic space group P-1, is a centrosymmetric dimeric structure where each Cd center is bonded to two monodentate pyridine, a bidentate terminal dithiocarbamate, and another bidentate bridging dithiocarbamate to form a four-membered ring. Complex 2 crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with four discrete monomeric molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure presents a cadmium atom coordinated by two sulphur atoms of a dithiocarbamate ligand and two nitrogen atoms of the 2,2‧-bipyridine to form a CdS4N2 fragment, thus giving the structure around the Cd atom a distorted trigonal prism geometry. Complex 3 contains two discrete monomeric molecules of (phenanthroline) (N, N-methyl phenyl-N, N-ethyl phenyl dithiocarbamato)cadmium (II) per unit cell, and the complex crystallized in the triclinic space group P-1. The structure showed that the Cd atom is bonded to two bidentate dithiocarbamate ligands and to one bidentate phenanthroline ligand in a distorted trigonal prism geometry. All the compounds resulted in CdS as residue upon thermal decomposition process conducted under inert atmosphere.

  15. Functional Group and Structural Characterization of Unmodified and Functionalized Lignin by Titration, Elemental Analysis, 1H NMR and FTIR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Bairami Habashi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is the second most abundant polymer in the world after cellulose. Therefore, characterization of the structure and functional groups of lignin in order to assess its potential applications in various technical fields has become a necessity. One of the major problems related to the characterization of lignin is the lack of well-defined protocols and standards. In this paper, systematic studies have been done to characterize the structure and functional groups of lignin quantitatively using different techniques such as elemental analysis, titration and 1H NMR and FTIR techniques. Lignin as a black liquor was obtained from Choka Paper Factory and it was purified before any test. The lignin was reacted with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide to calculate the number of hydroxyl and methoxyl moles. Using 1H NMR spectroscopic method on α-bromoisobutyrylated lignin (BiBL in the presence of a given amount of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF as an internal standard, the number of moles of hydroxyl and methoxyl groups per gram of lignin was found to be 6.44 mmol/g and 6.64 mmol/g, respectively. Using aqueous titration, the number of moles of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of the lignin were calculated as 3.13 mmol/g and 2.84 mmol/g, respectively. The findings obtained by 1H NMR and elemental analysis indicated to phenyl propane unit of the lignin with C9 structural formula as C9 HAl 3.84HAr2.19S0.2O0.8(OH1.38(OCH31.42. Due to poor solubility of the lignin in tetrahydrofuran (THF, acetylated lignin was used in the GPC analysis, by which number-average molecular weight  of the lignin was calculated as 992 g/mol.

  16. Role of the H-containing groups on the structural dynamics of Ti3C2Tx MXene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Xitian; Gao, Hong

    2018-05-01

    It is a confused problem in the literature that the c-axis value of Ti3C2 MXene changes with the synthesis procedure, but the part of the surface structures that plays the role of pillar to support the Ti3C2 layers and their variation rules remain controversial. In this work, we develop the structure models and formation mechanisms of Ti3C2Tx based on the density functional theory calculations and experimental results. While the c-axis values of the samples vary from about 1.9 to 2.9 nm, the corresponding pillars are determined by different distributions and proportions of the H-containing groups. The proportions of the H-containing groups that determine the c-axis value are formulated as the functions of the interlayer space, which can be used to quantitatively clarify the changes of the surface functional groups after the samples experiencing different treatments. The results can facilitate the in situ detections of the surface structures of MXenes during different treatments or electrochemical processes.

  17. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  18. IMPACT OF TRIBE TRITICEAE VARIETIES ON STRUCTURE AND COMPETITIVENESS OF SEGETAL GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z. Moskalets

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the influence of varieties of tribe Triticeae (Soft Wheat, Winter Rye and Winter Triticale on the structure and competitiveness of segetal vegetation. It is shown that in the conditions of Polissya, Forest-Steppe Polissya, and Forest-Steppe ecotopes the coenotic composition of plant communities was represented mostly by annual plants and at some extent by hemycryptophytes, cryptophytes, and geophytes. The dominant weed associations of Polissya are: Erodium-Neslia; Chenopodiu-Sonchus; Galium-Setaria; Elytrigia-Convolvulus; Apera-Polygonum and Apera-Convolvulus; Polissia-steppe: Viola-Capsella; Matricaria-Galium; Elytrigia-Galeopsis; Chenopodiu-Sonchus; Thlaspi-Euphorbia; Forest-Steppe: Elytrigia-Viola; Matricaria-Taraxacum; Consolida-Convolvulus; Cirsium-Taraxacum; Galium-Stellaria; Thlaspi-Plantago, Linaria-Conyza. In terms of the Central Forest-Steppe and Eastern Polisya the medium-grown and medium ripe Wheat (Yuvivata 60 and Poliska 90, Rye (Borotba, Triticale (Slavetne, Slavetne Polipshene. and AD 256 is the most competitive towards segetal vegetation than other medium-grown and semi-dwarf varieties of such cultures. The introduction of Triticale and Rye in the structure of sown areas are an effective biological control towards segetal vegetation, particularly perennial weeds. We revealed that increasing doses of fertilizers on crops of the tribe Triticeae stimulates the growth of weeds, but the specific weight per unit area does not always correlate with density concerning cultural species. We registered the dominant competitive weeds associations in winter crops, regardless of grade, but their differentiation by population strategy and specific weight per unit area depends on the type and conditions of the specific ecotypes. We selected some six associations for the Polissya: Erodium-Neslia; Chenopodiu-Sonchus; Galium-Setaria; Elytrigia-Convolvulus; Apera-Polygonum and Apera-Convolvulus; five for Polissya Steppe

  19. Influence of α-methyl group on molecular aggregation structure and surface physicochemical properties of fluoroalkyl side chain polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, K; Yamaguchi, H; Takahara, A; Sakata, O; Sasaki, S; Takata, M; Morita, M

    2009-01-01

    Influence of α-methyl group on molecular aggregation states and surface physicochemical properties of poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate)s [PFA-C y , where y is fluoromethylene number in R f group] and poly(fluoroalkykl methacrylate)s [PFMA-C y ] thin films were systematically investigated. Spin-coated PFA-C y and PFMA-C y thin films were characterized by dynamic contact angle measurements and grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray diffraction (GIWAXD) measurements. GIWAXD data revealed that fluoroalkyl side chains of PFA-C y and PFMA-C y with y≥8 formed regular structures in the surface region as well as bulk one. However, the degree of orientation and ordering of the R f groups of PFMA-C 8 thin films was low. Also, the receding contact angle (θ r ) of PFMA-C 8 thin films was lower than that of PFA-C 8 ones. By annealing treatment, the θ r of PFMA-C 8 was increased. These results suggest that the R f groups of PFMA-C 8 were disordered due to presence of the α-methyl group. The R f groups became ordered to pack closely each other by annealing treatment, so that the water repellency was increased.

  20. Genetic structure of the Mon-Khmer speaking groups and their affinity to the neighbouring Tai populations in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanan, Wibhu; Kampuansai, Jatupol; Fuselli, Silvia; Nakbunlung, Supaporn; Seielstad, Mark; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Kangwanpong, Daoroong

    2011-06-15

    The Mon-Khmer speaking peoples inhabited northern Thailand before the arrival of the Tai speaking people from southern China in the thirteenth century A.D. Historical and anthropological evidence suggests a close relationship between the Mon-Khmer groups and the present day majority northern Thai groups. In this study, mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms in more than 800 volunteers from eight Mon-Khmer and ten Tai speaking populations were investigated to estimate the degree of genetic divergence between these major linguistic groups and their internal structure. A large fraction of genetic variation is observed within populations (about 80% and 90% for mtDNA and the Y-chromosome, respectively). The genetic divergence between populations is much higher in Mon-Khmer than in Tai speaking groups, especially at the paternally inherited markers. The two major linguistic groups are genetically distinct, but only for a marginal fraction (1 to 2%) of the total genetic variation. Genetic distances between populations correlate with their linguistic differences, whereas the geographic distance does not explain the genetic divergence pattern. The Mon-Khmer speaking populations in northern Thailand exhibited the genetic divergence among each other and also when compared to Tai speaking peoples. The different drift effects and the post-marital residence patterns between the two linguistic groups are the explanation for a small but significant fraction of the genetic variation pattern within and between them. © 2011 Kutanan et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. [Structure of the gene pool of ethnic groups from the Altai-Sayan region from data on mitochondrial polymorphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenko, M V; Denisova, G A; Maliarchuk, B A; Dambueva, I K; Luzina, F A; Lotosh, E A; Dorzhu, Ch M; Karamchakova, O N; Solovenchuk, L L; Zakharov, I A

    2001-10-01

    Using the data on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism, genetic structures of the four Turkic-speaking ethnic groups of Altai-Sayan highlands, Southern Altaians (Altai-Kizhi), Khakassians, Shorians, and Sojots, were described. Mitochondrial gene pools of the populations examined were characterized by different ratios between Mongoloid (M*, C, D, E, G, A, B, and F) and Caucasoid (H, U, T, J, and K) mtDNA lineages. All the populations studied had a strongly pronounced Mongoloid component, the frequency of which was 88.2% in Sojots, 75.9% in Khakassians, 67.4% in Altaians, and 64.3% in Shorians. Maximum frequency of the Caucasoid component (35.7%) was observed in Shorians. Phylogenetic and statistical analyses of the mtDNA group frequency distribution patterns in the gene pools of the ethnic populations of Altai-Sayan highlands and the adjacent territories showed that the populations of the region fell into three groups. The first group included Khakassians, Tuvinians and Altaians, the second group consisted of Sojots, Buryats, and Mongols, while the third group was composed of Uigurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyzes. The isolated position of Shorians among the populations examined can be explained by their different anthropological composition and their presumptive relatedness to Finno-Ugric populations of Siberia.

  2. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  3. Influences of extraframework cations on features of natrolite group zeolites. The crystal structure of partly dehydrated K-containing paranatrolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryotkin, Yurii [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy; Novosibirsk State Univ., Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bakakin, Vladimir [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry

    2015-05-01

    The partly dehydrated paranatrolite from the Khibiny massif, Russia, Na{sub 1.88}K{sub 0.22}Ca{sub 0.06}[Al{sub 2.24}Si{sub 2.76}O{sub 10}].2.5H{sub 2}O, has a space group F1d1 and the unit cell parameters a = 18.6586(5), b = 18.6536(5), c = 6.64119(13) Aa, β = 90.199(2) {sup circle}, and Z = 8. The dominant Na{sup +} cations are located nearby the sodium positions in the natrolite structure. The potassium cations occupy two individual positions. Their different occupancies define the retention of the monoclinic distortion of the structure. H{sub 2}O molecules statistically occupy eight positions, six being generated with a triple splitting of two positions. Three kinds of main local cation-water assemblages were distinguished, two being similar to the assemblages in the initial high-water paranatrolite. The comparison with the gonnardite and paranatrolite structures determined previously was carried out. Common structural characteristics of natrolite group minerals are suggested from the local water-cation assemblages.

  4. Durability Indicators Comparison for SCC and CC in Tropical Coastal Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Carlos; Camões, Aires; Monteiro, Eliana; Helene, Paulo; Barkokébas, Béda

    2015-03-27

    Self-compacting concrete (SCC) demands more studies of durability at higher temperatures when subjected to more aggressive environments in comparison to the conventional vibrated concrete (CC). This work aims at presenting results of durability indicators of SCC and CC, having the same water/binder relations and constituents. The applied methodologies were electrical resistivity, diffusion of chloride ions and accelerated carbonation experiments, among others, such as microstructure study, scanning electron microscope and microtomography experiments. The tests were performed in a research laboratory and at a construction site of the Pernambuco Arena. The obtained results shows that the SCC presents an average electrical resistivity 11.4% higher than CC; the average chloride ions diffusion was 63.3% of the CC; the average accelerated carbonation penetration was 45.8% of the CC; and the average open porosity was 55.6% of the CC. As the results demonstrated, the SCC can be more durable than CC, which contributes to elucidate the aspects related to its durability and consequent prolonged life cycle.

  5. Durability Indicators Comparison for SCC and CC in Tropical Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Calado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC demands more studies of durability at higher temperatures when subjected to more aggressive environments in comparison to the conventional vibrated concrete (CC. This work aims at presenting results of durability indicators of SCC and CC, having the same water/binder relations and constituents. The applied methodologies were electrical resistivity, diffusion of chloride ions and accelerated carbonation experiments, among others, such as microstructure study, scanning electron microscope and microtomography experiments. The tests were performed in a research laboratory and at a construction site of the Pernambuco Arena. The obtained results shows that the SCC presents an average electrical resistivity 11.4% higher than CC; the average chloride ions diffusion was 63.3% of the CC; the average accelerated carbonation penetration was 45.8% of the CC; and the average open porosity was 55.6% of the CC. As the results demonstrated, the SCC can be more durable than CC, which contributes to elucidate the aspects related to its durability and consequent prolonged life cycle.

  6. RB1CC1 Protein Suppresses Type II Collagen Synthesis in Chondrocytes and Causes Dwarfism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Kita, Hiroko; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) functions in various processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy. The conditional transgenic mice with cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess that were used in the present study were made for the first time by the Cre-loxP system. Cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess caused dwarfism in mice without causing obvious abnormalities in endochondral ossification and subsequent skeletal development from embryo to adult. In vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that the dwarf phenotype in cartilaginous RB1CC1 excess was induced by reductions in the total amount of cartilage and the number of cartilaginous cells, following suppressions of type II collagen synthesis and Erk1/2 signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that two kinds of SNPs (T-547C and C-468T) in the human RB1CC1 promoter have significant influence on the self-transcriptional level. Accordingly, human genotypic variants of RB1CC1 that either stimulate or inhibit RB1CC1 transcription in vivo may cause body size variations. PMID:22049074

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Laille

    Full Text Available CC-486 (oral azacitidine is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML or acute myeloid leukemia (AML from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05 reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle, with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983.

  8. The differential item functioning and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test for five language groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Schaap

    2011-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the differential item functioning (DIF and structural equivalence of a nonverbal cognitive ability test (the PiB/SpEEx Observance test [401] for five South African language groups. Motivation for study: Cultural and language group sensitive tests can lead to unfair discrimination and is a contentious workplace issue in South Africa today. Misconceptions about psychometric testing in industry can cause tests to lose credibility if industries do not use a scientifically sound test-by-test evaluation approach. Research design, approach and method: The researcher used a quasi-experimental design and factor analytic and logistic regression techniques to meet the research aims. The study used a convenience sample drawn from industry and an educational institution. Main findings: The main findings of the study show structural equivalence of the test at a holistic level and nonsignificant DIF effect sizes for most of the comparisons that the researcher made. Practical/managerial implications: This research shows that the PIB/SpEEx Observance Test (401 is not completely language insensitive. One should see it rather as a language-reduced test when people from different language groups need testing. Contribution/value-add: The findings provide supporting evidence that nonverbal cognitive tests are plausible alternatives to verbal tests when one compares people from different language groups.

  9. ETHNOPSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL PECULIARITIES IN SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING(a case study of ethnic groups of the Saratov Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E E Bocharova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data of the empirical study of the structural organization of ethnic groups subjective well-being on the territory of the Saratov Volga region conducted on proportionally selected samples ( N = 280, whose representatives identify themselves as Russians ( n = 70; city of Saratov, Armenians ( n = 70; city of Saratov, Kazakhs ( n = 70; village Alexandrov Ghay in the Saratov Region that borders on the West Kazakhstan Region of Kazakhstan with the ethnical composition represented primarily by Kazakhs, Tatars ( n = 70; village Yakovlevka in Bazarno-Karabulakskiy district of the Saratov Region with the Tatar dominant ethnical group, whose average age is 25.6 years old; SD = 9.7; sex ratio is female (52% and male (48%; respondents’ employment - 87%. It has been found that in contrast to the Russians, the sphere of social and socio-economic relations is the least “happy” area in the representatives of the Armenian, Kazakh, Tatar ethnic groups. The “happiest” is the sphere of family relations in the samples of Armenian, Kazakh and Tatar youth. The significant differences have been revealed in the structure of the subjective well-being both on the emotional and cognitive levels. A downward trend of the index of the subjective well-being of the ethnic groups from the remote areas of the region has been registered. The applied aspect of the research problem can be implemented in the development of ethno-national policy programmes of the Saratov region.

  10. Structural and Optical Properties of Group III Doped Hydrothermal ZnO Thin Films

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad J.

    2017-01-11

    In this work, we employ a simple two-step growth technique to deposit impurity doped heteroepitaxial thin films of (0001) ZnO onto (111) MgAl2O4 spinel substrates through a combination of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and hydrothermal growth. The hydrothermal layer is doped with Al, Ga, and In through the addition of their respective nitrate salts. We evaluated the effect that varying the concentrations of these dopants has on both the structural and optical properties of these films. It was found that the epitaxial ALD layer created a ⟨111⟩MgAl2O4∥⟨0001⟩ZnO out-of-plane orientation and a ⟨1¯1¯2⟩MgAl2O4∥∥⟨011¯0⟩ZnO in-plane orientation between the film and substrate. The rocking curve line widths ranged between 0.75° and 1.80° depending on dopant concentration. The optical bandgap determined through the Tauc method was between 3.28 eV and 3.39 eV and showed a Burstein-Moss shift with increasing dopant concentration.

  11. SiP monolayers: New 2D structures of group IV-V compounds for visible-light photohydrolytic catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhinan; Zhuang, Jibin; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Because of graphene and phosphorene, two-dimensional (2D) layered materials of group IV and group V elements arouse great interest. However, group IV-V monolayers have not received due attention. In this work, three types of SiP monolayers were computationally designed to explore their electronic structure and optical properties. Computations confirm the stability of these monolayers, which are all indirect-bandgap semiconductors with bandgaps in the range 1.38-2.21 eV. The bandgaps straddle the redox potentials of water at pH = 0, indicating the potential of the monolayers for use as watersplitting photocatalysts. The computed optical properties demonstrate that certain monolayers of SiP 2D materials are absorbers of visible light and would serve as good candidates for optoelectronic devices.

  12. Cu-catalyzed esterification reaction via aerobic oxygenation and C-C bond cleavage: an approach to α-ketoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Feng, Peng; Jiao, Ning

    2013-10-09

    The Cu-catalyzed novel aerobic oxidative esterification reaction of 1,3-diones for the synthesis of α-ketoesters has been developed. This method combines C-C σ-bond cleavage, dioxygen activation and oxidative C-H bond functionalization, as well as provides a practical, neutral, and mild synthetic approach to α-ketoesters which are important units in many biologically active compounds and useful precursors in a variety of functional group transformations. A plausible radical process is proposed on the basis of mechanistic studies.

  13. Age-related variability of some characters of karyotype instability in the mouse line CC57W/Mv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazko, T.T.; Safonova, N.A.; Kovaleva, O.A.; Stolina, M.P.; Solomko, A.P.; Malyuta, S.S.; Glazko, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1995-01-01

    The investigations of relations between cytogenetical variability in cells of bone marrow of the mouse line CC57W/Mv and factors of age and radioactivity pollution (the specific vivarium in the 30-km Chernobyl zone) were carried out. The karyotype instability on some characters were similarly between young mice in the Chernobyl zone and old mice under control conditions. The old Chernobyl mice differentiated from old control ones by a low frequency of some cytogenetic anomalies and higher values of the mitotic index. The contribution of the intensity of cell division into observed variabilities of cytogenetic character between different mouse groups was discussed

  14. Structural, absorption, and molecular properties of o,o'-dihydroxyazo resorcinol dyes bearing an acryloyloxy group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkınalı, Sevil; Çavuş, M. Serdar; Ceylan, Abdullah; Gür, Mahmut

    2017-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the synthesis and characterization of o,o‧-dihydroxyazo dyes bearing an acryloyl group. The o,o‧-dihydroxyazo dyes were synthesized through coupling of resorcinol with the diazonium salts of 2-amino-4-methylphenol, 2-aminophenol, 2-amino-4-chlorophenol, and 2-amino-4-nitrophenol. Their acryloyl derivatives were synthesized using metallic sodium and acryloyl chloride under an inert atmosphere. Characterization of the compounds was conducted using infrared (IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) spectroscopic methods. The tautomerism of the synthesized compounds' was also evaluated. The results were compared with theoretical results obtained by density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations were performed to obtain ground-state optimized geometries and calculate the relevant electronic and chemical reactivity parameters. Furthermore, possible tautomers deduced from the UV-vis spectra were investigated using theoretical calculations. Both the IR and NMR spectral data showed that azo tautomers predominate in the solid state and DMSO solvent. The effects of pH, solvent, and substituent on the predominant tautomers were further investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy. The results indicate that hydrazone tautomers were dominant at pH 12 in dimethylformamide (DMF), whereas azo tautomers were dominant at pH 2 in EtOH or CHCl3.

  15. Effects of Cationic Pendant Groups on Ionic Conductivity for Anion Exchange Membranes: Structure Conductivity Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sojeong; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Won Bo

    Anion exchange membranes(AEMs) have been widely studied due to their various applications, especially for Fuel cells. Previous proton exchange membranes(PEMs), such as Nafions® have better conductivity than AEMs so far. However, technical limitations such as slow electrode kinetics, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning of metal catalysts, high methanol crossover and high cost of Pt-based catalyst detered further usages. AEMs have advantages to supplement its drawbacks. AEMs are environmentally friendly and cost-efficient. Based on the well-defined block copolymer, self-assembled morphology is expected to have some relationship with its ionic conductivity. Recently AEMs based on various cations, including ammonium, phosphonium, guanidinium, imidazolium, metal cation, and benzimidazolium cations have been developed and extensively studied with the aim to prepare high- performance AEMs. But more fundamental approach, such as relationships between nanostructure and conductivity is needed. We use well-defined block copolymer Poly(styrene-block-isoprene) as a backbone which is synthesized by anionic polymerization. Then we graft various cationic functional groups and analysis the relation between morphology and conductivity. Theoretical and computational soft matter lab.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of single siloxane dendrimers: Molecular structure and intramolecular mobility of terminal groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. O.; Balabaev, N. K.; Mazo, M. A.; Kramarenko, E. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of two types of isolated siloxane dendrimers of various generations (from the 2nd to the 8th) have been performed for temperatures ranging from 150 K to 600 K. The first type of dendrimer molecules has short spacers consisting of a single oxygen atom. In the dendrimers of the second type, spacers are longer and comprised of two oxygen atoms separated by a single silicon atom. A comparative analysis of molecular macroscopic parameters such as the gyration radius and the shape factor as well as atom distributions within dendrimer interior has been performed for varying generation number, temperature, and spacer length. It has been found that the short-spacer dendrimers of the 7th and 8th generations have a stressed central part with elongated bonds and deformed valence angles. Investigation of the time evolution of radial displacements of the terminal Si atoms has shown that a fraction of the Si groups have a reduced mobility. Therefore, rather long time trajectories (of the order of tens of nanoseconds) are required to study dendrimer intramolecular dynamics.

  17. Flocculent and grand design spiral galaxies in groups: time scales for the persistence of grand design spiral structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmegreen, B.G.; Elmegreen, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Spiral arm classifications were made for 261 low-inclination galaxies in groups listed by Huchra and Geller. The fractional occurrence of grand design spiral structure in nonbarred galaxies was found to increase from approx.0.1 to approx.0.6 and then level off as the group crossing rate or galaxy collision rate in a group increases. A simple model is discussed where the random encounters between galaxies of any type and flocculent galaxies induce transient grand design spirals in the flocculent galaxies. If this grand-design stimulation occurs for binary collisions with impact parameters less than αR 25 , were R 25 is the galactic radius at 25 mag arcsec - 2 , and if the induced grand design spirals persist for an average time equal to #betta# galactic rotations, then the quantity α 2 #betta# equals approximately 3 x 10 4 . If binary collisions are responsible for grand design spirals, then this result implies either that the induced spirals last for many galactic rotations (#betta#>15), or that they can be stimulated by very remote encounters (α>45.) Alternatively, grand design spirals may be stimulated by multiple galaxy encounters, which would be the case for such large α, or by interactions with the potential well of the associated group, rather than by simple binary encounters. Weak correlations between the grand design fraction and the galaxy size, or between this fraction and the total number of galaxies in a group, were also found. Spiral structures of barred galaxies show no correlations with group environment

  18. Identification and expression analysis of a CC chemokine from cobia (Rachycentron canadum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Sun, Xiuxiu; Wang, Yunxin

    2013-06-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations and regulate the immune response mechanisms. The cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a marine finfish species, has a great potential for net cage aquaculture in the South China Sea. We isolated and characterized a CC chemokine cDNA from cobia-designated RcCC2. Its cDNA is 783 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 110 amino acids. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the RcCC2 gene, which contains four conserved cysteine residues, shares a high degree of similarity with other known CC chemokine sequences and is closest to the CCL19/21 clade. The mRNA of RcCC2 is expressed constitutively in all tested tissues, including gill, liver, muscle, spleen, kidney, head kidney, skin, brain, stomach, intestine and heart, but not blood, with the highest level of expression in gill and liver. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of the RcCC2 gene in immune-related tissues, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) and phosphate-buffered saline as a control. RcCC2 gene expression was up-regulated differentially in head kidney, spleen and liver during 12 h after challenge. These results indicate that the RcCC2 gene is inducible and is involved in immune responses, suggesting RcCC2 has an important role in the early stage of viral and bacterial infections.

  19. [Genetic structure in five Phlebotominae (Lutzomyia spp.), townsendi series, verrucarum group, in Colombia (Diptera: Prychodidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Claribel; Ruiz-García, Manuel; Munstermann, Leonard; Ferro, Cristina

    2008-12-01

    Sixteen isoenzyme patterns were analyzed for five Colombian Lutzomyia species. The average unbiased expected heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.098 (Lu. youngi) to 0.215 (Lu. torrvida). The five species samples, taken all the isoenzymes employed, were significantly deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by homozygous excess with classical as well as Markov chain exact tests. Possible causes: (1) Wahlund effect within populations due to subdivision and/or sampling. Endogamy could be discarded because these loci were affected by highly different levels of homozygous excess. (2) Null alleles could be not discarded, at least for some isoenzymes. The hierarchical Wright's F analysis showed high and significant values for each parameter. The average F(IT) value was 0.655 with a conspicous homozygous excess at a global level (all species taken together); the average F(IS) value was significantly positive (0.515) as well, with homozygous excess within each species. The genetic heterogeneity between the fives species was noteworthy (F(ST) 0.288), indicating clear genetic differentiation. The more related species pairs were Lu. longiflocosa-Lu. torvida (0.959) and Lu torvida-Lu. spinicrassa (0.960); while Lu. torvida-Lu. youngi (0.805) and Lu. quasitownsendi-Lu. youngi (0.796) were the most divergent (Nei's genetic identity matrix). UPGMA and Wagner algorithms showed that the most divergent species was Lu. youngi, whereas the most related were Lu. longiflocosa-Lu. torvida and Lu torvida-Lu. spinicrassa. A spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran's I index) revealed a very weak, or inexistent spatial structure, which means that the speciation events between these species were independent from the geographic distances from where they currently live.

  20. Immunological evaluation of lipopeptide group A streptococcus (GAS vaccine: structure-activity relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehfuz Zaman

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide variety of diseases. To date, GAS vaccine development has focused primarily on the M-protein. The M-protein is highly variable at the amino (N-terminus (determining serotype but is conserved at the carboxyl (C-terminus. Previously a 29 amino acid peptide (named J14 from the conserved region of the M-protein was identified as a potential vaccine candidate. J14 was capable of eliciting protective antibodies that recognized many GAS serotypes when co-administered with immuno-stimulants. This minimal epitope however showed no immunogenicity when administered alone. In an attempt overcome this immunological non-responsiveness, we developed a self-adjuvanting vaccine candidate composed of three components: the B-cell epitope (J14, a universal helper T-cell epitope (P25 and a lipid moiety consisting of lipoamino acids (Laas which target Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Immunological evaluation in B10.BR (H-2k mice demonstrated that the epitope attachment to the point of lipid moiety, and the length of the Laa alkyl chain have a profound effect on vaccine immunogenicity after intranasal administration. It was demonstrated that a vaccine featuring C-terminal lipid moiety containing alkyl chains of 16 carbons, with P25 located at the N-terminus, and J14 attached to the side chain of a central lysine residue was capable of inducing optimal antibody response. These findings have considerable relevance to the development of a broad spectrum J14-based GAS vaccine and in particular provided a rational basis for peptide vaccine design based on this self-adjuvanting lipopeptide technology.

  1. Tidal stripping and the structure of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Oman, Kyle A.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu

    2018-05-01

    The shallow faint-end slope of the galaxy mass function is usually reproduced in Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) galaxy formation models by assuming that the fraction of baryons that turn into stars drops steeply with decreasing halo mass and essentially vanishes in haloes with maximum circular velocities Vmax value, unless they are small enough to probe only the rising part of the halo circular velocity curve (i.e. half-mass radii, r1/2 ≪ 1 kpc). Many dwarfs have properties in disagreement with this prediction: they are large enough to probe their halo Vmax but their characteristic velocities are well below 20 km s-1. These `cold faint giants' (an extreme example is the recently discovered Crater 2 Milky Way satellite) can only be reconciled with our ΛCDM models if they are the remnants of once massive objects heavily affected by tidal stripping. We examine this possibility using the APOSTLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the Local Group. Assuming that low-velocity-dispersion satellites have been affected by stripping, we infer their progenitor masses, radii, and velocity dispersions, and find them in remarkable agreement with those of isolated dwarfs. Tidal stripping also explains the large scatter in the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation in the dwarf galaxy regime: tides remove preferentially dark matter from satellite galaxies, lowering their accelerations below the amin ˜ 10-11 m s-2 minimum expected for isolated dwarfs. In many cases, the resulting velocity dispersions are inconsistent with the predictions from Modified Newtonian Dynamics, a result that poses a possibly insurmountable challenge to that scenario.

  2. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) Fiscal Year 1999 annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-10-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1999 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  3. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, Fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1987 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department

  4. Development of high conductive C/C composite tiles for plasma facing armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, K.; Namiki, K.; Tsujimura, S.; Toyoda, M.; Seki, M.; Takatsu, H.

    1991-01-01

    C/C composites with high thermal conductivity were developed in unidirectional, two-dimensional and felt types, and were fabricated as full-scale armor tile. Their thermal conductivity in the direction perpendicular to the plasma-side surface is 250∝550 W/mdeg C, that is comparable to that of pyrolytic graphite. It was shown by heat load tests that the C/C composites have low surface erosion characteristics and high thermal shock resistance. Various kinds of C/C composites were successfully bonded to metal substrate, and their mechanical strength and thermal shock resistance were tested. (orig.)

  5. Modified CC-LR algorithm with three diverse feature sets for motor imagery tasks classification in EEG based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuly; Li, Yan; Paul Wen, Peng

    2014-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) tasks classification provides an important basis for designing brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. If the MI tasks are reliably distinguished through identifying typical patterns in electroencephalography (EEG) data, a motor disabled people could communicate with a device by composing sequences of these mental states. In our earlier study, we developed a cross-correlation based logistic regression (CC-LR) algorithm for the classification of MI tasks for BCI applications, but its performance was not satisfactory. This study develops a modified version of the CC-LR algorithm exploring a suitable feature set that can improve the performance. The modified CC-LR algorithm uses the C3 electrode channel (in the international 10-20 system) as a reference channel for the cross-correlation (CC) technique and applies three diverse feature sets separately, as the input to the logistic regression (LR) classifier. The present algorithm investigates which feature set is the best to characterize the distribution of MI tasks based EEG data. This study also provides an insight into how to select a reference channel for the CC technique with EEG signals considering the anatomical structure of the human brain. The proposed algorithm is compared with eight of the most recently reported well-known methods including the BCI III Winner algorithm. The findings of this study indicate that the modified CC-LR algorithm has potential to improve the identification performance of MI tasks in BCI systems. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique provides a classification improvement over the existing methods tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The synthesis, spectroscopy and X-ray single crystal structure of catena-[(μ-anacardato)-copper(II)bipyridine][Cu2{(μ-O2CC6H3(o-OH)(o-C15H31)}4(NC5H5)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad Azad; O'Brien, Paul; Tuna, Floriana; Pritchard, Robin; Buchweishaija, Joseph; Kimambo, Elianaso; Mubofu, Egid B

    2013-10-28

    Hydrogenation of crude anacardic acid gave a transparent crystalline product on recrystallization. When reacted with copper nitrate in the presence of pyridine it produced green crystals of a pyridine adduct of a dimeric copper(II) anacardate with the copper acetate structure. The X-ray single crystal structures of both anacardic acid and the copper complex were determined. Magnetic studies have confirmed strong antiferromagnetic coupling between copper(II) centre in the dimer. The exchange coupling constant was determined to be J = -324 cm(-1). The EPR spectra of the polycrystalline product are consistent with spin S = 1. The zero-field splitting parameter and g tensor values are |D| = 0.36 cm(-1), g(||) = 2.36 and g(⊥) = 2.06.

  7. Concholepas concholepas Ferritin H-like subunit (CcFer): Molecular characterization and single nucleotide polymorphism associated to innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Maldonado-Aguayo, Waleska; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2013-09-01

    Ferritin has been identified as the principal protein of iron storage and iron detoxification, playing a pivotal role for the cellular homeostasis in living organisms. However, recent studies in marine invertebrates have suggested its association with innate immune system. In the present study, one Ferritin subunit was identified from the gastropod Concholepas concholepas (CcFer), which was fully characterized by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends technique. Simultaneously, a challenge test was performed to evaluate the immune response against Vibrio anguillarum. The full length of cDNA Ccfer was 1030 bp, containing 513 bp of open reading frame that encodes to 170 amino acid peptide, which was similar to the Ferritin H subunit described in vertebrates. Untranslated Regions (UTRs) were identified with a 5'UTR of 244 bp that contains iron responsive element (IRE), and a 3'UTR of 273 bp. The predicted molecular mass of deduced amino acid of CcFer was 19.66 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.92. Gene transcription analysis revealed that CcFer increases against infections with V. anguillarum, showing a peak expression at 6 h post-infection. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism was detected at -64 downstream 5'UTR sequence (SNP-64). Quantitative real time analysis showed that homozygous mutant allele (TT) was significantly associated with higher expression levels of the challenged group compared to wild (CC) and heterozygous (CT) variants. Our findings suggest that CcFer is associated to innate immune response in C. concholepas and that the presence of SNPs may involve differential transcriptional expression of CcFer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex Population Structure of Lyme Borreliosis Group Spirochete Borrelia garinii in Subarctic Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstedt, Pär; Asokliene, Loreta; Eliasson, Ingvar; Olsen, Björn; Wallensten, Anders; Bunikis, Jonas; Bergström, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia garinii, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia, is naturally maintained in marine and terrestrial enzootic cycles, which primarily involve birds, including seabirds and migratory passerines. These bird groups associate with, correspondingly, Ixodes uriae and Ixodes ricinus ticks, of which the latter species may bite and transmit the infection to humans. Studies of the overlap between these two natural cycles of B. garinii have been limited, in part due to the absence of representative collections of this spirochete's samples, as well as of the lack of reliable measure of the genetic heterogeneity of its strains. As a prerequisite for understanding the epidemiological correlates of the complex maintenance of B. garinii, the present study sought to assess the diversity and phylogenetic relationships of this species' strains from its natural hosts and patients with Lyme borreliosis from subarctic Eurasia. We used sequence typing of the partial rrs-rrl intergenic spacer (IGS) of archived and prospective samples of B. garinii from I. uriae ticks collected predominantly on Commander Islands in North Pacific, as well as on the islands in northern Sweden and arctic Norway. We also typed B. garinii samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis and I. ricinus ticks infesting migratory birds in southern Sweden, or found questing in selected sites on the islands in the Baltic Sea and Lithuania. Fifty-two (68%) of 77 B. garinii samples representing wide geographical range and associated with I. ricinus and infection of humans contributed 12 (60%) of total 20 identified IGS variants. In contrast, the remaining 25 (32%) samples recovered from I. uriae ticks from a few islands accounted for as many as 10 (50%) IGS types, suggesting greater local diversity of B. garinii maintained by seabirds and their ticks. Two IGS variants of the spirochete in common for both tick species were found in I. ricinus larvae from migratory birds, an indication that B

  9. Modified DFA and DCCA approach for quantifying the multiscale correlation structure of financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi; Shang, Pengjian

    2013-12-01

    We use multiscale detrended fluctuation analysis (MSDFA) and multiscale detrended cross-correlation analysis (MSDCCA) to investigate auto-correlation (AC) and cross-correlation (CC) in the US and Chinese stock markets during 1997-2012. The results show that US and Chinese stock indices differ in terms of their multiscale AC structures. Stock indices in the same region also differ with regard to their multiscale AC structures. We analyze AC and CC behaviors among indices for the same region to determine similarity among six stock indices and divide them into four groups accordingly. We choose S&P500, NQCI, HSI, and the Shanghai Composite Index as representative samples for simplicity. MSDFA and MSDCCA results and average MSDFA spectra for local scaling exponents (LSEs) for individual series are presented. We find that the MSDCCA spectrum for LSE CC between two time series generally tends to be greater than the average MSDFA LSE spectrum for individual series. We obtain detailed multiscale structures and relations for CC between the four representatives. MSDFA and MSDCCA with secant rolling windows of different sizes are then applied to reanalyze the AC and CC. Vertical and horizontal comparisons of different window sizes are made. The MSDFA and MSDCCA results for the original window size are confirmed and some new interesting characteristics and conclusions regarding multiscale correlation structures are obtained.

  10. The impact of covariance misspecification in group-based trajectory models for longitudinal data with non-stationary covariance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher E; Glonek, Gary Fv; Giles, Lynne C

    2017-08-01

    One purpose of a longitudinal study is to gain a better understanding of how an outcome of interest changes among a given population over time. In what follows, a trajectory will be taken to mean the series of measurements of the outcome variable for an individual. Group-based trajectory modelling methods seek to identify subgroups of trajectories within a population, such that trajectories that are grouped together are more similar to each other than to trajectories in distinct groups. Group-based trajectory models generally assume a certain structure in the covariances between measurements, for example conditional independence, homogeneous variance between groups or stationary variance over time. Violations of these assumptions could be expected to result in poor model performance. We used simulation to investigate the effect of covariance misspecification on misclassification of trajectories in commonly used models under a range of scenarios. To do this we defined a measure of performance relative to the ideal Bayesian correct classification rate. We found that the more complex models generally performed better over a range of scenarios. In particular, incorrectly specified covariance matrices could significantly bias the results but using models with a correct but more complicated than necessary covariance matrix incurred little cost.

  11. Population structure and morphometric variance of the Apis mellifera scutellata group of honeybees in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Radloff

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The honeybee populations of Africa classified as Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier were analysed morphometrically using multivariate statistical techniques. The collection consisted of nearly 15,000 worker honeybees from 825 individual colonies at 193 localities in east Africa, extending from South Africa to Ethiopia. Factor analysis established one primary cluster, designated as A. m. scutellata. Morphocluster formation and inclusivity (correct classification are highly sensitive to sampling distance intervals. Within the A. m. scutellata region are larger bees associated with high altitudes of mountain systems which are traditionally classified as A. m. monticola Smith, but it is evident that these bees do not form a uniform group. Variance characteristics of the morphometric measurements show domains of significantly different local populations. These high variance populations mostly occur at transitional edges of major climatic and vegetational zones, and sometimes with more localised discontinuities in temperature. It is also now evident that those A. m. scutellata introduced nearly fifty years ago into the Neotropics were a particularly homogenous sample, which exhibited all the traits expected in a founder effect or bottleneck population.Populações africanas de abelhas comuns classificadas como Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier foram analisadas morfometricamente usando-se técnicas estatísticas multivariadas. A população consistia de aproximadamente 15.000 abelhas operárias provenientes de 825 colônias individuais de 193 localidades do leste da África, estendendo-se da África do Sul até a Etiópia. A análise de fatores estabeleceu um agrupamento primário designado A. m. scutellata. A formação de agrupamento morfológico e a inclusividade (classificação correta são altamente sensíveis aos intervalos de distância da amostragem. Dentro da região de A. m. scutellata há abelhas maiores associadas às altas altitudes

  12. FLORISTIC-STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION AND SUCCESSIONAL GROUP OF TREE SPECIES IN THE CERRADO BIOME OF TOCANTINS STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDER PEREIRA MIGUEL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the floristic composition, vegetation structure and ecological group of tree species in a cerradão forest (Cerrado biome of Palmas, Tocantins State, Brazil. A forest inventory was performed in an area of 10.15 hectares, using systematic sampling with plots of 400 m², in which all standing trees, alive and dead, that had diameter at breast height (DBH ≥ 5 cm were sampled and identified. A linear plateau regression model (LPR was used for sample sufficiency analysis. The Shannon index (H’ was used for assess the floristic diversity, and the Importance Value Index (IVI for assess the horizontal structure. The forest was classified in three strata according to vertical structure analysis. The LPR showed that the sampling size was adequate. The predominate species in the area were Myrcia splendens, Emmotum nitens and Qualea parviflora, and species from the families Fabaceae and Chrysobalanaceae. The pioneer (613 individuals ha-1 and climax (530 individuals ha-1 species were the predominating groups. Regarding the richness index, the number of climax (57 species and pioneer (25 species species stood out. The alpha floristic diversity was 3.35 nats individuals-1 and the Pielou equability value J = 0.76. The diametric distribution showed a negative and balanced exponential pattern. Regarding the vertical stratification, the smallest amount of individuals was in the upper stratum (13% and the highest in the mid stratum (63% and in the lower stratum (24%. The use of floristic composition tools with horizontal and vertical structure analysis was effective for understand the tree community, which may be considered structured and diverse, thus able to restructure possible disturbances when preserved.

  13. Functional bacterial and archaeal community structures of major trophic groups in a full-scale anaerobic sludge digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariesyady, Herto Dwi; Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    Functional Bacteria and Archaea community structures of a full-scale anaerobic sludge digester were investigated by using a full-cycle 16S rRNA approach followed by microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique and micromanipulation. FISH analysis with a comprehensive set of 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes based on 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed that the Gram-positive bacteria represented by probe HGC69A-hybridized Actinobacteria (8.5+/-1.4% of total 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells) and probe LGC354-hybridized Firmicutes (3.8+/-0.8%) were the major phylogenetic bacterial phyla, followed by Bacteroidetes (4.0+/-1.2%) and Chloroflexi (3.7+/-0.8%). The probe MX825-hybridized Methanosaeta (7.6+/-0.8%) was the most abundant archaeal group, followed by Methanomicrobiales (2.8+/-0.6%) and Methanobacteriaceae (2.7+/-0.4%). The functional community structures (diversity and relative abundance) of major trophic groups were quantitatively analyzed by MAR-FISH. The results revealed that glucose-degrading microbial community had higher abundance (ca. 10.6+/-4.9% of total DAPI-stained cells) and diversity (at least seven phylogenetic groups) as compared with fatty acid-utilizing microbial communities, which were more specialized to a few phylogenetic groups. Despite the dominance of Betaproteobacteria, members of Chloroflexi, Smithella, Syntrophomonas and Methanosaeta groups dominated the [(14)C]glucose-, [(14)C]propionate-, [(14)C]butyrate- and [(14)C]acetate-utilizing microorganism community, and accounted for 27.7+/-4.3%, 29.6+/-7.0%, 34.5+/-7.6% and 18.2+/-9.5%, respectively. In spite of low abundance (ca. 1%), the hitherto unknown metabolic functions of Spirochaeta and candidate phylum of TM7 as well as Synergistes were found to be glucose and acetate utilization, respectively.

  14. Cost effectiveness of group follow-up after structured education for type 1 diabetes: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examines the cost effectiveness of group follow-up after participation in the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) structured education programme for type 1 diabetes. Methods Economic evaluation conducted alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 437 adults with type 1 diabetes in Ireland. Group follow-up involved two group education ‘booster’ sessions post-DAFNE. Individual follow-up involved two standard one-to-one hospital clinic visits. Incremental costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained and cost effectiveness were estimated at 18 months. Uncertainty was explored using sensitivity analysis and by estimating cost effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Group follow-up was associated with a mean reduction in QALYs gained of 0.04 per patient (P value, 0.052; 95% CI, −0.08 to 0.01, intra-class correlation (ICC), 0.033) and a mean reduction in total healthcare costs of €772 (P value, 0.020; 95% CI, −1,415 to −128: ICC, 0.016) per patient. At alternative threshold values of €5,000, €15,000, €25,000, €35,000, and €45,000, the probability of group follow-up being cost effective was estimated to be 1.000, 0.762, 0.204, 0.078, and 0.033 respectively. Conclusions The results do not support implementation of group follow-up as the sole means of follow-up post-DAFNE. Given the reported cost savings, future studies should explore the cost effectiveness of alternative models of group care for diabetes. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN79759174 (assigned: 9 February 2007). PMID:24927851

  15. Structure-transfection activity relationships in a series of novel cationic lipids with heterocyclic head-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Maslov, Mikhail A; Kabilova, Tatyana O; Puchkov, Pavel A; Alekseeva, Anna S; Boldyrev, Ivan A; Vlassov, Valentin V; Serebrennikova, Galina A; Morozova, Nina G; Zenkova, Marina A

    2013-11-07

    Cationic liposomes are promising candidates for the delivery of various therapeutic nucleic acids. Here, we report a convenient synthesis of carbamate-type cationic lipids with various hydrophobic domains (tetradecanol, dialkylglycerol, cholesterol) and positively charged head-groups (pyridinium, N-methylimidazolium, N-methylmorpholinium) and data on the structure-transfection activity relationships. It was found that single-chain lipids possess high surface activity, which correlates with high cytotoxicity due to their ability to disrupt the cellular membrane by combined hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Liposomes containing these lipids also display high cytotoxicity with respect to all cell lines. Irrespective of chemical structures, all cationic lipids form liposomes with similar sizes and surface potentials. The characteristics of complexes composed of cationic liposomes and nucleic acids depend mostly on the type of nucleic acid and P/N ratios. In the case of oligodeoxyribonucleotide delivery, the transfection activity depends on the type of cationic head-group regardless of the type of hydrophobic domain: all types of cationic liposomes mediate efficient oligonucleotide transfer into 80-90% of the eukaryotic cells, and liposomes based on lipids with N-methylmorpholinium cationic head-group display the highest transfection activity. In the case of plasmid DNA and siRNA, the type of hydrophobic domain determines the transfection activity: liposomes composed of cholesterol-based lipids were the most efficient in DNA transfer, while liposomes containing glycerol-based lipids exhibited reasonable activity in siRNA delivery under serum-free conditions.

  16. Clonal spread of MRSA CC398 sublineages within and between Danish pig farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Jesper; Moodley, Arshnee

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CC398 is non-typeable by standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) due to methylation of the SmaI site. This makes it difficult to study the epidemiology of this livestock-associated MRSA clone. In this study, we employed...... a recently developed PFGE protocol using Cfr9I, a neoschizomer of SmaI, to investigate the diversity of MRSA CC398 in Danish pig farms. The PFGE profiles displayed by isolates from pigs, environmental samples and farm workers were compared in order to understand whether farms are contaminated with multiple...... MRSA CC398 sublineages and whether specific sublineages may occur on different farms. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed in five Danish pig farms where farm workers had been shown to carry MRSA CC398 in the previous year. A total of 75 environmental and 308 animal samples were collected...

  17. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-10-18

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed.

  18. The Ciliopathy Protein CC2D2A Associates with NINL and Functions in RAB8-MICAL3-Regulated Vesicle Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Bachmann-Gagescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are a group of human disorders caused by dysfunction of primary cilia, ubiquitous microtubule-based organelles involved in transduction of extra-cellular signals to the cell. This function requires the concentration of receptors and channels in the ciliary membrane, which is achieved by complex trafficking mechanisms, in part controlled by the small GTPase RAB8, and by sorting at the transition zone located at the entrance of the ciliary compartment. Mutations in the transition zone gene CC2D2A cause the related Joubert and Meckel syndromes, two typical ciliopathies characterized by central nervous system malformations, and result in loss of ciliary localization of multiple proteins in various models. The precise mechanisms by which CC2D2A and other transition zone proteins control protein entrance into the cilium and how they are linked to vesicular trafficking of incoming cargo remain largely unknown. In this work, we identify the centrosomal protein NINL as a physical interaction partner of CC2D2A. NINL partially co-localizes with CC2D2A at the base of cilia and ninl knockdown in zebrafish leads to photoreceptor outer segment loss, mislocalization of opsins and vesicle accumulation, similar to cc2d2a-/- phenotypes. Moreover, partial ninl knockdown in cc2d2a-/- embryos enhances the retinal phenotype of the mutants, indicating a genetic interaction in vivo, for which an illustration is found in patients from a Joubert Syndrome cohort. Similar to zebrafish cc2d2a mutants, ninl morphants display altered Rab8a localization. Further exploration of the NINL-associated interactome identifies MICAL3, a protein known to interact with Rab8 and to play an important role in vesicle docking and fusion. Together, these data support a model where CC2D2A associates with NINL to provide a docking point for cilia-directed cargo vesicles, suggesting a mechanism by which transition zone proteins can control the protein content of the ciliary

  19. C=C bond cleavage on neutral VO3(V2O5)n clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Heinbuch, Scott; Xie, Yan; Bernstein, Elliot R; Rocca, Jorge J; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2009-01-28

    The reactions of neutral vanadium oxide clusters with alkenes (ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, and 1,3-butadiene) are investigated by experiments and density function theory (DFT) calculations. Single photon ionization through extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV, 46.9 nm, 26.5 eV) is used to detect neutral cluster distributions and reaction products. In the experiments, we observe products (V(2)O(5))(n)VO(2)CH(2), (V(2)O(5))(n)VO(2)C(2)H(4), (V(2)O(5))(n)VO(2)C(3)H(4), and (V(2)O(5))(n)VO(2)C(3)H(6), for neural V(m)O(n) clusters in reactions with C(2)H(4), C(3)H(6), C(4)H(6), and C(4)H(8), respectively. The observation of these products indicates that the C=C bonds of alkenes can be broken on neutral oxygen rich vanadium oxide clusters with the general structure VO(3)(V(2)O(5))(n=0,1,2...). DFT calculations demonstrate that the reaction VO(3) + C(3)H(6) --> VO(2)C(2)H(4) + H(2)CO is thermodynamically favorable and overall barrierless at room temperature. They also provide a mechanistic explanation for the general reaction in which the C=C double bond of alkenes is broken on VO(3)(V(2)O(5))(n=0,1,2...) clusters. A catalytic cycle for alkene oxidation on vanadium oxide is suggested based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The reactions of V(m)O(n) with C(6)H(6) and C(2)F(4) are also investigated by experiments. The products VO(2)(V(2)O(5))(n)C(6)H(4) are observed for dehydration reactions between V(m)O(n) clusters and C(6)H(6). No product is detected for V(m)O(n) clusters reacting with C(2)F(4). The mechanisms of the reactions between VO(3) and C(2)F(4)/C(6)H(6) are also investigated by calculations at the B3LYP/TZVP level.

  20. Narrowing the broader autism phenotype: A study using the Communication Checklist - Adult Version (CC-A)

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehouse, AJ; Coon, H; Miller, J; Salisbury, B; Bishop, DV

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether the Communication Checklist – Adult (CC-A) could identify subtypes of social and communication dysfunction in autism probands and their parents. The CC-A is divided into subscales measuring linguistic ability as well as two aspects of social communication: the Pragmatic Skills subscale assesses the level of pragmatic oddities (e.g., excessive talking), while the Social Engagement subscale picks up on those behaviours that reflect a more passive communication st...

  1. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations.

  2. Structural dynamics and interactions of Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA98-210) with damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sushmita; Mattaparthi, Venkata Satish Kumar

    2017-10-25

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) in higher organisms repair massive DNA abrasions caused by ultraviolet rays, and various mutagens, where Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein is known to be involved in damage recognition step. Any mutations in XPA cause classical Xeroderma pigmentosum disease. The extent to which XPA is required in the NER is still unclear. Here, we present the comparative study on the structural and conformational changes in globular DNA binding domain of XPA 98-210 in DNA bound and DNA free state. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation was carried out for both XPA 98-210 systems using AMBER force fields. We observed that XPA 98-210 in presence of damaged DNA exhibited more structural changes compared to XPA 98-210 in its free form. When XPA is in contact with DNA, we found marked stability of the complex due to the formation of characteristic longer antiparallel β-sheets consisting mainly lysine residues.

  3. Cyclen-based double-tailed lipids for DNA delivery: Synthesis and the effect of linking group structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Mei; Chang, De-Chun; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-09-01

    The gene transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic lipids is largely influenced by the lipid structure. Six novel 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen)-based cationic lipids L1-L6, which contain double oleyl as hydrophobic tails, were designed and synthesized. The difference between these lipids is their diverse backbone. Liposomes prepared by the lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation could be achieved at N/P of 4 to form lipoplexes with proper size and zeta-potentials for gene transfection. Structure-activity relationship of these lipids as non-viral gene delivery vectors was investigated. It was found that minor backbone structural variations, including linking group and the structural symmetry would affect the TE. The diethylenetriamine derived lipid L4 containing amide linking bonds gave the best TE, which was several times higher than commercially available transfection reagent lipofectamine 2000. Besides, these lipids exhibited low cytotoxicity, suggesting their good biocompatibility. Results reveal that such type of cationic lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, and also afford us clues for the design of novel vectors with higher TE and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Group theoretical and Hamiltonian structures of integrable evolution equations in 1x1 and 2x1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopel'chenko, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    New results in investigation of the group-theoretical and hamiltonian structure of the integrable evolution equations in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions are briefly reviewed. Main general results, such as the form of integrable equations, Baecklund transfomations, symmetry groups, are turned out to have the same form for different spectral problems. The used generalized AKNS-method (the Ablowitz Kaup, Newell and Segur method) permits to prove that all nonlinear evolution equations considered are hamiltonians. The general condition of effective application of the ACNS mehtod to the concrete spectral problem is the possibility to calculate a recursion operator explicitly. The embedded representation is shown to be a fundamental object connected with different aspects of the inverse scattering problem

  5. Structured approaches to large-scale systems: Variational integrators for interconnected Lagrange-Dirac systems and structured model reduction on Lie groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Helen Frances

    to extend POD to structured settings. In particular, we consider systems evolving on Lie groups and make use of canonical coordinates in the reduction process. We see considerable improvement in the accuracy of the reduced model over the usual structure-agnostic POD approach.

  6. Migrating C/C++ Software to Mobile Platforms in the ADM Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Martinez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Software technology is constantly evolving and therefore the development of applications requires adapting software components and applications in order to be aligned to new paradigms such as Pervasive Computing, Cloud Computing and Internet of Things. In particular, many desktop software components need to be migrated to mobile technologies. This migration faces many challenges due to the proliferation of different mobile platforms. Developers usually make applications tailored for each type of device expending time and effort. As a result, new programming languages are emerging to integrate the native behaviors of the different platforms targeted in development projects. In this direction, the Haxe language allows writing mobile applications that target all major mobile platforms. Novel technical frameworks for information integration and tool interoperability such as Architecture-Driven Modernization (ADM proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG can help to manage a huge diversity of mobile technologies. The Architecture-Driven Modernization Task Force (ADMTF was formed to create specifications and promote industry consensus on the modernization of existing applications. In this work, we propose a migration process from C/C++ software to different mobile platforms that integrates ADM standards with Haxe. We exemplify the different steps of the process with a simple case study, the migration of “the Set of Mandelbrot” C++ application. The proposal was validated in Eclipse Modeling Framework considering that some of its tools and run-time environments are aligned with ADM standards.

  7. The Cc1 Project – System For Private Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Chwastowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of the Cloud Computing system developed at IFJ PAN are described. The project is financed from the structural resources provided by the European Commission and the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (Innovative Economy, National Cohesion Strategy. The system delivers a solution for carrying out computer calculations on a Private Cloud computing infrastructure. It consists of an intuitive Web based user interface, a module for the users and resources administration and the standard EC2 interface implementation. Thanks to the distributed character of the system it allows for the integration of a geographically distant federation of computer clusters within a uniform user environment.

  8. Structure-activity relationships of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tyrosine and its derivatives on the inhibition of an identifiable giant neurone of an African giant snail (Achatina fulica Férussac).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, Y.; Takeuchi, H.

    1982-01-01

    1 Inhibitory effects of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tyrosine, N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tryptophan and their derivatives on an identifiable giant neurone, TAN (tonically autoactive neurone) of an African giant snail (Achatina fulica Férussac) were examined in an attempt to elucidate which structural features are necessary to produce the effect. 2 Of the compounds examined, N-beta-cyclohexylpropionyl-L-tyrosine showed the strongest effect. Its critical concentration (c.c.) was 3 X 10(-8)-10(-7)M, about ten times lower than that of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tyrosine (c.c., 3 X 10(-7)-10(-6)M). N-beta-cyclohexylpropionyl-L-tryptophan (c.c., 10(-6)M) had an effect almost similar to that of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tryptophan (c.c., 10(-6)M). 3 N-beta-Phenylpropionyl-N-methyl-L-tyrosine had no effect at a high concentration. 4 Effects of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tyrosine amide (c.c., 3 X 10(-7)-10(-6)M) and N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tryptophan amide (c.c., 10(-6)M) were very similar to those of N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tyrosine and N-beta-phenylpropionyl-L-tryptophan respectively. 5 N-beta-Phenylpropionyl-p-amino-L-phenylalanine (c.c., 3 X 10(-5)-10(-4)M) and N-beta-phenylpropionyl-p-chloro-L-phenylalanine (c.c., 10(-4)M) had only a weak effect. 6 It is proposed that the structural features producing the effect are as follows: the active compound has a phenyl or a cyclohexyl group (hydrophobic binding group), after a suitable distance a peptide bond (proton donor and proton acceptor), adjacently a carbonyl group (proton acceptor), and a phenolic hydroxyl or an indolyl imino group (proton donor) in the molecule. PMID:7150871

  9. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging in breast carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike; Lengana, Thabo; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-04-15

    To report on imaging findings using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET in a series of 19 breast carcinoma patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging results obtained were compared to routinely performed staging examinations and analyzed as to lesion location and progesterone receptor status. Out of 81 tumor lesions identified, 84% were identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC SUVmean values of distant metastases proved significantly higher (mean, 6.86, SD, 5.68) when compared to those of primary or local recurrences (mean, 2.45, SD, 2.55, p = 0.04) or involved lymph nodes (mean, 3.18, SD, 1.79, p = 0.011). SUVmean values of progesterone receptor-positive lesions proved not significantly different from progesterone receptor-negative lesions. SUV values derived from FDG PET/CT, available in seven patients, and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging proved weakly correlated (r = 0.407, p = 0.015). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging in breast carcinoma confirms the reported considerable variation of PSMA expression on human solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. (orig.)

  10. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Cloud Cleared Radiances RiCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Rosenberg, Robert I.; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    ECMWF, NCEP, and GMAO routinely assimilate radiosonde and other in-situ observations along with satellite IR and MW Sounder radiance observations. NCEP and GMAO use the NCEP GSI Data Assimilation System (DAS).GSI DAS assimilates AIRS, CrIS, IASI channel radiances Ri on a channel-by-channel, case-by-case basis, only for those channels i thought to be unaffected by cloud cover. This test excludes Ri for most tropospheric sounding channels under partial cloud cover conditions. AIRS Version-6 RiCC is a derived quantity representative of what AIRS channel i would have seen if the AIRS FOR were cloud free. All values of RiCC have case-by-case error estimates RiCC associated with them. Our experiments present to the GSI QCd values of AIRS RiCC in place of AIRS Ri observations. GSI DAS assimilates only those values of RiCC it thinks are cloud free. This potentially allows for better coverage of assimilated QCd values of RiCC as compared to Ri.

  11. Autosomal InDel polymorphisms for population genetic structure and differentiation analysis of Chinese Kazak ethnic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Tingting; Chen, Yahao; Guo, Yuxin; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xiaoye; Xie, Tong; Mu, Yuling; Dong, Qian; Wen, Shaoqing; Zhou, Boyan; Zhang, Li; Shen, Chunmei; Zhu, Bofeng

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the genetic diversities of the Chinese Kazak ethnic group on the basis of 30 well-chosen autosomal insertion and deletion loci and explored the genetic relationships between Kazak and 23 reference groups. We detected the level of the expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.3605 at HLD39 locus to 0.5000 at HLD136 locus and the observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.3548 at HLD39 locus to 0.5283 at HLD136 locus. The combined power of discrimination and the combined power of exclusion for all 30 loci in the studied Kazak group were 0.999999999999128 and 0.9945, respectively. The dataset generated in this study indicated the panel of 30 InDels was highly efficient in forensic individual identifcation but may not have enough power in paternity cases. The results of the interpopulation differentiations, PCA plots, phylogenetic trees and STRUCTURE analyses showed a close genetic affiliation between the Kazak and Uigur group. PMID:28915619

  12. New WIMS library generation from ENDF/B6 and effect of resonance group structure on cell parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Tabesh, Alireza

    2002-01-01

    Due to inaccessibility to NJOY, steps were taken to create WIMS library, which can be extracted from ENDF/B6 without using NJOY. In addition to using preprocessing codes few programs were written to calculate integral resonance, slowing down power per unit lethargy, potential scattering, and differential scattering cross section, scattering matrices. For neutrons with energy above 4 eV, isotropic elastic scattering was assumed. For neutrons below 4 eV the free gas model was used, except for light elements, which tabulated values of S(α,β) in ENDF/B6 used. The Goldstein-Cohen factors are taken from WIMKAL88.Lib. The integral resonance with self absorption per unit lethargy was obtained from GROUPIE output. The P 1 scattering matrices are calculated only for four elements, namely H, D, C and O at 300 K. In order to examine the created libraries, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR are calculated using new WIMS library, WIMKAL88.Lib and NEA329.Lib. The results showed general agreement. The controversial issue of WIMS library group structure, particularly in resonance region has raised the question of whether the number of resonance group i.e., 13 is optimized. We generated different WIMS libraries consisting of 5, 8, 13, 18 and 23 resonance groups. The main aim was to examine the effect to resonance group structure on calculated core parameters, mainly, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR. These parameters are also calculated and compared with those obtained using WIMKAL88, and NEA329 libraries. (author)

  13. Structural implications of underground coal mining in the Mesaverde Group in the Somerset Coal Field, Delta and Gunnison Counties, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher J. Carroll; Eric Robeck; Greg Hunt; Wendell Koontz [Colorado Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Paleogene and Neogene faults and fractures on the eastern edge of the Colorado Plateau are present in Mesaverde Group coal and sandstone beds. Recent observations of coal cleat orientation in relation to faults in coal mines have significant impacts for mine planning in the area. Faults, coal cleats, and natural fractures are interpreted to show a structural evolution of the Mesaverde Group through time. This field trip included a visit to two active underground coal mines, the Bowie Resources' Bowie No. 2 Mine, and Mountain Coal's West Elk Mine. Mine geologists discussed structural styles including fault orientations and timing, cleat development, and rotation. Geologic encounters ranging from fault flooding, subsidence, mine fires, methane gas problems, and land use restrictions were also discussed. Coal cleat development and open-mode fractures in adjacent sandstones were observed on outcrops and compared to underground measurements in coal mines in the Somerset Coal Field, Colorado's most productive. Coal cleat orientations along a reverse fault in one mine showed rotation in relation to possible Neogene age displacement.

  14. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-08

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  15. Effects of structured group psychosocial support sessions on psychosocial wellbeing of children and their caregivers: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeid, Jasem

    2018-02-21

    Children aged 7-12 years and their caregivers participated in a series of group psychosocial support sessions, using standard manuals specifically developed for facilitating such sessions such as Children Affected by Armed Conflict and Joint Sessions. The sessions used various activities, including drawing, storytelling, folk games, and other activities, to provide participants with opportunities to express their feelings, learn and practice new coping skills, and interact with others. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of structured psychosocial support sessions on the psychosocial wellbeing of children and their caregivers in the Gaza Strip. This descriptive study involved children and female caregivers selected from six locations using a stratified sampling technique. External numerators collected data before and after the group sessions. Two interview questionnaires with questions about psychological and social status were used, one for children and one for caregivers. The caregivers' questionnaire also assessed their psychosocial knowledge. Adult participants and caregivers of participating children provided verbal consent. Data were analysed with SPSS, and a p value less than 0·05 indicated significance. 155 children (77 [50%] boys and 78 [50%] girls) and 155 female caregivers were enrolled from a population of 1720 children (50% boys and 50% girls) and 1720 female caregivers. The sessions improved psychosocial wellbeing in participants, with the average psychosocial wellbeing score increasing from 58% to 87% in children and from 69% to 84% in caregivers. Caregivers' knowledge increased from 70% to 82%. Improvement was found in the various aspects of psychosocial wellbeing. No differences were found with respect to location, sex, and age. Structured group sessions improved psychosocial wellbeing in children and caregivers and improved caregivers' knowledge. Given the design of this study, it is difficult to fully attribute these results to the

  16. New insights into the spatial variability of biofilm communities and potentially negative bacterial groups in hydraulic concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Niu, Lihua; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Meng, Fangang

    2017-10-15

    The composition and distribution characteristics of bacterial communities in biofilms attached to hydraulic concrete structure (HCS) surfaces were investigated for the first time in four reservoirs in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River Basin using 16S rRNA Miseq sequencing. High microbial diversity was found in HCS biofilms, and notable differences were observed in different types of HCS. Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi were the predominant phyla, with respective relative abundances of 35.3%, 25.4% and 13.0%. The three most abundant genera were Leptolyngbya, Anaerolineaceae and Polynucleobacter. The phyla Beta-proteobacteria and Firmicutes and genus Lyngbya were predominant in CGP, whereas the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi and genera Leptolyngbya, Anaerolinea and Polynucleobacter survived better in land walls and bank slopes. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia nitrogen and temperature were characterized as the main factors driving the bacterial community composition. The most abundant groups of metabolic functions were also identified as ammonia oxidizers, sulphate reducers, and dehalogenators. Additionally, functional groups related to biocorrosion were found to account for the largest proportion (14.0% of total sequences) in gate piers, followed by those in land walls (11.5%) and bank slopes (10.2%). Concrete gate piers were at the greatest risk of biocorrosion with the most abundant negative bacterial groups, especially for sulphate reducers. Thus, it should be paid high attention to the biocorrosion prevention of concrete gate piers. Overall, this study contributed to the optimization of microbial control and the improvement of the safety management for water conservation structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and Kinetic Evidence for an Extended Hydrogen-Bonding Network in Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doukov, T.; Hemmi, H.; Drennan, C.; Ragsdale, S.

    2007-01-01

    The methyltetrahydrofolate (CH 3 -H 4 folate) corrinoid-ironsulfur protein (CFeSP) methyltransferase (MeTr) catalyzes transfer of the methyl group of CH3-H4folate to cob(I)amide. This key step in anaerobic CO and CO 2 fixation is similar to the first half-reaction in the mechanisms of other cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases. Methyl transfer requires electrophilic activation of the methyl group of CH 3 -H 4 folate, which includes proton transfer to the N5 group of the pterin ring and poises the methyl group for reaction with the Co(I) nucleophile. The structure of the binary CH 3 -H 4 folate/MeTr complex (revealed here) lacks any obvious proton donor near the N5 group. Instead, an Asn residue and water molecules are found within H-bonding distance of N5. Structural and kinetic experiments described here are consistent with the involvement of an extended H-bonding network in proton transfer to N5 of the folate that includes an Asn (Asn-199 in MeTr), a conserved Asp (Asp-160), and a water molecule. This situation is reminiscent of purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which involves protonation of the purine N7 in the transition state and is accomplished by an extended H-bond network that includes water molecules, a Glu residue, and an Asn residue (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Shi, W., Fedorov, A., Lewandowicz, A., Cahill, S. M., Almo, S. C., and Schramm, V. L. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 14489-14498). In MeTr, the Asn residue swings from a distant position to within H-bonding distance of the N5 atom upon CH 3 -H 4 folate binding. An N199A variant exhibits only ∼20-fold weakened affinity for CH 3 -H 4 folate but a much more marked 20,000-40,000-fold effect on catalysis, suggesting that Asn-199 plays an important role in stabilizing a transition state or high energy intermediate for methyl transfer

  18. Control-group feature normalization for multivariate pattern analysis of structural MRI data using the support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Kristin A; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Doshi, Jimit; Davatzikos, Christos; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-15

    Normalization of feature vector values is a common practice in machine learning. Generally, each feature value is standardized to the unit hypercube or by normalizing to zero mean and unit variance. Classification decisions based on support vector machines (SVMs) or by other methods are sensitive to the specific normalization used on the features. In the context of multivariate pattern analysis using neuroimaging data, standardization effectively up- and down-weights features based on their individual variability. Since the standard approach uses the entire data set to guide the normalization, it utilizes the total variability of these features. This total variation is inevitably dependent on the amount of marginal separation between groups. Thus, such a normalization may attenuate the separability of the data in high dimensional space. In this work we propose an alternate approach that uses an estimate of the control-group standard deviation to normalize features before training. We study our proposed approach in the context of group classification using structural MRI data. We show that control-based normalization leads to better reproducibility of estimated multivariate disease patterns and improves the classifier performance in many cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of Children’s Urinary CC16 Levels with Arsenic Concentrations in Multiple Environmental Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma I. Beamer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure has been associated with decreased club cell secretory protein (CC16 levels in adults. Further, both arsenic exposure and decreased levels of CC16 in childhood have been associated with decreased adult lung function. Our objective was to determine if urinary CC16 levels in children are associated with arsenic concentrations in environmental media collected from their homes. Yard soil, house dust, and tap water were taken from 34 homes. Urine and toenail samples were collected from 68 children. All concentrations were natural log-transformed prior to data analysis. There were associations between urinary CC16 and arsenic concentration in soil (b = −0.43, p = 0.001, R2 = 0.08, water (b = −0.22, p = 0.07, R2 = 0.03, house dust (b = −0.37, p = 0.07, R2 = 0.04, and dust loading (b = −0.21, p = 0.04, R2 = 0.04. In multiple analyses, only the concentration of arsenic in soil was associated with urinary CC16 levels (b = −0.42, p = 0.02, R2 = 0.14 (full model after accounting for other factors. The association between urinary CC16 and soil arsenic may suggest that localized arsenic exposure in the lungs could damage the airway epithelium and predispose children for diminished lung function. Future work to assess this possible mechanism should examine potential associations between airborne arsenic exposures, CC16 levels, lung function, and other possible confounders in children in arsenic-impacted communities.

  20. Development of C/C composite for the core component of the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. H

    2005-01-15

    This report reviewed a state of the art on development of C/C composite for the core components for VHTR and described the followings items. The fabrication methods of C/C composites. Summary on the JAERI report (JAERI-Res 2002-026) on the process screening test for the selection of a proper C/C composite material. Review of the proceedings presented at the GEN-IV VHTR material PMB meeting. A status of the domestic commercial C/C composite. The published property data and the characteristics of the commercial C/C composite.

  1. Development of C/C composite for the core component of the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    This report reviewed a state of the art on development of C/C composite for the core components for VHTR and described the followings items. The fabrication methods of C/C composites. Summary on the JAERI report (JAERI-Res 2002-026) on the process screening test for the selection of a proper C/C composite material. Review of the proceedings presented at the GEN-IV VHTR material PMB meeting. A status of the domestic commercial C/C composite. The published property data and the characteristics of the commercial C/C composite

  2. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of the crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokam, Alain-Pierre K.; Tabod, Charles T.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Julià, Jordi; Wiens, Douglas A.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2010-11-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) consists of a linear chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline, volcanoes that do not exhibit an age progression. Here we study crustal structure beneath the CVL and adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broad-band seismic stations deployed between 2005 January and 2007 February. We find that (1) crustal thickness (35-39km) and velocity structure is similar beneath the CVL and the Pan African Oubanguides Belt to the south of the CVL, (2) crust is thicker (43-48km) under the northern margin of the Congo Craton and is characterized by shear wave velocities >=4.0kms-1 in its lower part and (3) crust is thinner (26-31km) under the Garoua rift and the coastal plain. In addition, a fast velocity layer (Vs of 3.6-3.8kms-1) in the upper crust is found beneath many of the seismic stations. Crustal structure beneath the CVL and the Oubanguides Belt is very similar to Pan African crustal structure in the Mozambique Belt, and therefore it appears not to have been modified significantly by the magmatic activity associated with the CVL. The crust beneath the coastal plain was probably thinned during the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean, while the crust beneath the Garoua rift was likely thinned during the formation of the Benue Trough in the early Cretaceous. We suggest that the thickened crust and the thick mafic lower crustal layer beneath the northern margin of the Congo Craton may be relict features from a continent-continent collision along this margin during the formation of Gondwana.

  4. Creating space for citizenship: The impact of group structure on validating the voices of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Elaine C; O'Connor, Deborah L; Loiselle, Lisa; Hickman, Kathy; Heibein, Bill; Hounam, Brenda; Mann, Jim

    2016-05-01

    Recently, there has been increasing attention given to finding ways to help people diagnosed with dementia 'live well' with their condition. Frequently however, the attention has been placed on the family care partner as the foundation for creating a context that supports the person with dementia to live well. A recent participatory action research (PAR) study highlighted the importance of beginning to challenge some of the assumptions around how best to include family, especially within a context of supporting citizenship. Three advisory groups consisting of 20 people with dementia, 13 care partners, and three service providers, were set up in three locations across Canada to help develop a self-management program for people with dementia. The hubs met monthly for up to two years. One of the topics that emerged as extremely important to consider in the structuring of the program revolved around whether or not these groups should be segregated to include only people with dementia. A thematic analysis of these ongoing discussions coalesced around four inter-related themes: creating safe spaces; maintaining voice and being heard; managing the balancing act; and the importance of solidarity Underpinning these discussions was the fifth theme, recognition that 'one size doesn't fit all'. Overall an important finding was that the presence of family care-partners could have unintended consequences in relation to creating the space for active citizenship to occur in small groups of people with dementia although it could also offer some opportunities. The involvement of care partners in groups with people with dementia is clearly one that is complex without an obvious answer and dependent on a variety of factors to inform a solution, which can and should be questioned and revisited. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Structural analysis of group II chitinase (ChtII) catalysis completes the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qu, Mingbo; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Qing

    2018-02-23

    Chitin is a linear homopolymer of N -acetyl-β-d-glucosamines and a major structural component of insect cuticles. Chitin hydrolysis involves glycoside hydrolase family 18 (GH18) chitinases. In insects, chitin hydrolysis is essential for periodic shedding of the old cuticle ecdysis and proceeds via a pathway different from that in the well studied bacterial chitinolytic system. Group II chitinase (ChtII) is a widespread chitinolytic enzyme in insects and contains the greatest number of catalytic domains and chitin-binding domains among chitinases. In Lepidopterans, ChtII and two other chitinases, ChtI and Chi-h, are essential for chitin hydrolysis. Although ChtI and Chi-h have been well studied, the role of ChtII remains elusive. Here, we investigated the structure and enzymology of Of ChtII, a ChtII derived from the insect pest Ostrinia furnacalis We present the crystal structures of two catalytically active domains of Of ChtII, Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2, both in unliganded form and complexed with chitooligosaccharide substrates. We found that Of ChtII-C1 and Of ChtII-C2 both possess long, deep substrate-binding clefts with endochitinase activities. Of ChtII exhibited structural characteristics within the substrate-binding cleft similar to those in Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. However, Of ChtII lacked structural elements favoring substrate binding beyond the active sites, including an extra wall structure present in Of Chi-h. Nevertheless, the numerous domains in Of ChtII may compensate for this difference; a truncation containing one catalytic domain and three chitin-binding modules ( Of ChtII-B4C1) displayed activity toward insoluble polymeric substrates that was higher than those of Of Chi-h and Of ChtI. Our observations provide the last piece of the puzzle of chitin hydrolysis in insects. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Structural requirements of cholesterol for binding to Vibrio cholerae hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Shimamura, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the conversion of Vibrio cholerae hemolysin (VCH) monomers into oligomers in liposome membranes. Using different sterols, we determined the stereochemical structures of the VCH-binding active groups present in cholesterol. The VCH monomers are bound to cholesterol, diosgenin, campesterol, and ergosterol, which have a hydroxyl group at position C-3 (3betaOH) in the A ring and a C-C double bond between positions C-5 and C-6 (C-C Delta(5)) in the B ring. They are not bound to epicholesterol and dihydrocholesterol, which form a covalent link with a 3alphaOH group and a C-C single bond between positions C-5 and C-6, respectively. This result suggests that the 3betaOH group and the C-CDelta(5) bond in cholesterol are required for VCH monomer binding. We further examined VCH oligomer binding to cholesterol. However, this oligomer did not bind to cholesterol, suggesting that the disappearance of the cholesterol-binding potential of the VCH oligomer might be a result of the conformational change caused by the conversion of the monomer into the oligomer. VCH oligomer formation was observed in liposomes containing sterols with the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond, and it correlated with the binding affinity of the monomer to each sterol. Therefore, it seems likely that monomer binding to membrane sterol leads to the assembly of the monomer. However, since oligomer formation was induced by liposomes containing either epicholesterol or dihydrocholesterol, the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond were not essential for conversion into the oligomer.

  7. Rise of CC398 Lineage of Staphylococcus aureus among Infective Endocarditis Isolates Revealed by Two Consecutive Population-Based Studies in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristan, Anne; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Ruizendaal, Esmée; Laurent, Frédéric; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Hélène; Lina, Gérard; Etienne, Jerome; Celard, Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Monecke, Stefan; Le Moing, Vincent; Vandenesch, François

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two prospective studies on infective endocarditis (IE) conducted in 1999 and 2008 and isolated from non-IE bacteremia collected in 2006 were spa-typed and their virulence factors were analyzed with a microarray. Both populations were genetically diverse, with no virulence factors or genotypes significantly more associated with the IE isolates compared with the non-IE isolates. The population structure of the IE isolates did not change much between 1999 and 2008, with the exception of the appearance of CC398 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates responsible for 5.6% of all cases in 2008. In 1999, this lineage was responsible for no cases. The increasing prevalence of S. aureus in IE is apparently not the result of a major change in staphylococcal population structure over time, with the exception of the emerging CC398 MSSA lineage. PMID:23272091

  8. Lithospheric structure of the Arabian Shield and Platform from complete regional waveform modelling and surface wave group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Arthur J.; Walter, William R.; Mellors, Robert J.; Al-Amri, Abdullah M. S.; Zhang, Yu-Shen

    1999-09-01

    Regional seismic waveforms reveal significant differences in the structure of the Arabian Shield and the Arabian Platform. We estimate lithospheric velocity structure by modelling regional waveforms recorded by the 1995-1997 Saudi Arabian Temporary Broadband Deployment using a grid search scheme. We employ a new method whereby we narrow the waveform modelling grid search by first fitting the fundamental mode Love and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The group velocities constrain the average crustal thickness and velocities as well as the crustal velocity gradients. Because the group velocity fitting is computationally much faster than the synthetic seismogram calculation this method allows us to determine good average starting models quickly. Waveform fits of the Pn and Sn body wave arrivals constrain the mantle velocities. The resulting lithospheric structures indicate that the Arabian Platform has an average crustal thickness of 40 km, with relatively low crustal velocities (average crustal P- and S-wave velocities of 6.07 and 3.50 km s^-1 , respectively) without a strong velocity gradient. The Moho is shallower (36 km) and crustal velocities are 6 per cent higher (with a velocity increase with depth) for the Arabian Shield. Fast crustal velocities of the Arabian Shield result from a predominantly mafic composition in the lower crust. Lower velocities in the Arabian Platform crust indicate a bulk felsic composition, consistent with orogenesis of this former active margin. P- and S-wave velocities immediately below the Moho are slower in the Arabian Shield than in the Arabian Platform (7.9 and 4.30 km s^-1 , and 8.10 and 4.55 km s^-1 , respectively). This indicates that the Poisson's ratios for the uppermost mantle of the Arabian Shield and Platform are 0.29 and 0.27, respectively. The lower mantle velocities and higher Poisson's ratio beneath the Arabian Shield probably arise from a partially molten mantle associated with Red Sea spreading and continental

  9. Implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Community Component (IMCI-CC in Oman: A Situation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fannah Abdullah Alfannah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the baseline data for selected key family practices for implementing the Community Component of IMCI in the Muscat Governorate, Sultanate of Oman. For this purpose, we conducted a situation analysis to assess the adherence to the key family practices. Methods: A pre-tested structured qualitative questionnaire was developed. Data were collected from the participants (mothers with an Anti Natal Card Number (ANC living in the Muscat Governorate. The data collection started from January 2014 and concluded in December 2014. The 12 key family practices were adopted from World Health Organization (WHO and modified according to the Omani context. Capacity building to perform the field survey followed this. The capacity building was based on identifying the regional focal points along with the task force that consisted of head of Health Education in each district (Wilayat and identifying the Community Support Groups (CSGs. The task force was trained to reach out to the participants and get the responses on a voluntary basis. Results: Only 9% of the participants were exclusively breast-feeding their infants, 26% reduced feeding when their children had diarrhea while 6% stopped feeding their child completely, 19.1% did not know how to prepare Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS, 61% took their child to a medical facility immediately when there was cough or cold, 22% started complimentary feeding before the age of 6 months, 12.7% did not know about the WHO recommended total calorie intake for their child, 15.5% did not have any idea about the dietary requirements for their children, 39% stated that if their child had diarrhea, they would not change the diet, 12% stated that they had no idea about the general danger signs, 55.8% stated that cough and cold was a direct consequence of exposing the child to cold weather, 23% stated that in a situation where their child was not improving, they would immediately change the doctor. Conclusion

  10. Overexpression of the CC-type glutaredoxin, OsGRX6 affects hormone and nitrogen status in rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf eEl-Kereamy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (GRXs are small glutathione dependent oxidoreductases that belong to the Thioredoxin (TRX superfamily and catalyze the reduction of disulfide bonds of their substrate proteins. Plant GRXs include three different groups based on the motif sequence, namely CPYC, CGFS and CC-type proteins. The rice CC-type proteins, OsGRX6 was identified during the screening for genes whose expression changes depending on the level of available nitrate. Overexpression of OsGRX6 in rice displayed a semi-dwarf phenotype. The OsGRX6 overexpressors contain a higher nitrogen content than the wild type, indicating that OsGRX6 plays a role in homeostatic regulation of nitrogen use. Consistent with this, OsGRX6 overexpressors displayed delayed chlorophyll degradation and senescence compared to the wild type plants. To examine if the growth defect of these transgenic lines attribute to disturbed plant hormone actions, plant hormone levels were measured. The levels of two cytokinins (CKs, 2-isopentenyladenine and trans-zeatin, and gibberellin A1 (GA1 were increased in these lines. We also found that these transgenic lines were less sensitive to exogenously applied GA, suggesting that the increase in GA1 is a result of the feedback regulation. These data suggest that OsGRX6 affects hormone signaling and nitrogen status in rice plants.

  11. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of CcPILS gene of Hickory (Carya cathayensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Yuan, Huwei; Gao, Liuxiao; Guo, Haipeng; Qiu, Lingling; Xu, Dongbin; Yan, Daoliang; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-04-01

    PILS is a key auxin efflux carrier protein in the auxin signal transduction. A CcPILS gene related to hickory (Carya carthayensis) grafting process was obtained by RACE techniques. The full length of CcPILS gene was1541bp contained a 1263bp length open reading flame (ORF). The CcPILS encoded 294 amino acids with molecular weight of 46 kDa, PI 5.38 and localized at endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The gene contained a central hydrophilic loop separating two hydrophobic domains of about five transmembrane regions each. The gene of CcPILS belonged to Clade III sub-family of PILS and its sequence had high homology with Arabidopsis. Real Time RT-PCR analysis showed that the gene expressions were weakly induced in bud, inflorescence, fruit, leaf and stem, while strongly in root. The expression levels were strongly induced and reached a peak at the third day of grafting in scion and rootstock of hickory, which were 1.45 and 3.45 times higher, respectively, compared to that of control. The results indicated that CcPILS may be involved in regulating the expression of genes related to auxin signal transduction during hickory graft process.

  12. Irradiation effects on C/C composite materials for high temperature nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, M.; Ugachi, H.; Baba, S.I.; Ishiyama, S.; Ishihara, M.; Hayashi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Excellent characteristics such as high strength and high thermal shock resistance of C/C composite materials have led us to try to apply them to the high temperature components in nuclear facilities. Such components include the armour tile of the first wall and divertor of fusion reactor and the elements of control rod for the use in HTGR. One of the most important aspects to be clarified about C/C composites for nuclear applications is the effect of neutron irradiation on their properties. At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), research on the irradiation effects on various properties of C/C composite materials has been carried out using fission reactors (JRR-3, JMTR), accelerators (TANDEM, TIARA) and the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS). Additionally, strength tests of some neutron-irradiated elements for the control rod were carried out to investigate the feasibility of C/C composites. The paper summarises the R and D activities on the irradiation effects on C/C composites. (authors)

  13. Rapid Differentiation between Livestock-Associated and Livestock-Independent Staphylococcus aureus CC398 Clades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jesper; Soldanova, Katerina; Aziz, Maliha; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Petersen, Andreas; Vandendriessche, Stien; Jiménez, Judy N.; Mammina, Caterina; van Belkum, Alex; Salmenlinna, Saara; Laurent, Frederic; Skov, Robert L.; Larsen, Anders R.; Andersen, Paal S.; Price, Lance B.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) isolates cluster into two distinct phylogenetic clades based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealing a basal human clade and a more derived livestock clade. The scn and tet(M) genes are strongly associated with the human and the livestock clade, respectively, due to loss and acquisition of mobile genetic elements. We present canonical single-nucleotide polymorphism (canSNP) assays that differentiate the two major host-associated S. aureus CC398 clades and a duplex PCR assay for detection of scn and tet(M). The canSNP assays correctly placed 88 S. aureus CC398 isolates from a reference collection into the human and livestock clades and the duplex PCR assay correctly identified scn and tet(M). The assays were successfully applied to a geographically diverse collection of 272 human S. aureus CC398 isolates. The simple assays described here generate signals comparable to a whole-genome phylogeny for major clade assignment and are easily integrated into S. aureus CC398 surveillance programs and epidemiological studies. PMID:24244535

  14. Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition in a Group of Children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair; Watson, Shaun D

    2016-01-01

    This study used confirmatory factor analysis to examine the factor structure for the 10 core WISC-IV subtests in a group of children (N = 812) with ADHD. The study examined oblique four- and five-factor models, higher order models with one general secondary factor and four and five primary factors, and a bifactor model with a general factor and four specific factors. The findings supported all models tested, with the bifactor model being the optimum model. For this model, only the general factor had high explained common variance and omega hierarchical value, and it predicted reading and arithmetic abilities. The findings favor the use of the FSIQ scores of the WISC-IV, but not the subscale index scores.

  15. Does Core Length Taken per cc of Prostate Volume in Prostate Biopsy Affect the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliktas, Hasan; Sahin, Hayrettin; Cetinkaya, Mehmet; Dere, Yelda; Erdogan, Omer; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimal core length to be taken per cc of prostate volume for an effective prostate biopsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 379 patients who underwent a first prostate biopsy with 12 to 16 cores under transrectal ultrasound guidance between September 2012 and April 2015. For each patient, the core length per cc of the prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were calculated, and these values were compared between the patients with and without prostate cancer. A total of 348 patients were included in the study. Cancer was determined in 26.4% of patients. The mean core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were determined to be 3.40 ± 0.15 mm/cc (0.26%; range, 0.08-0.63 cc) in patients with cancer and 2.75 ± 0.08 mm/cc (0.20%; range, 0.04-0.66 cc) in patients without cancer (P = .000 and P = .000), respectively. Core length taken per cc of prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc was found to be related to an increase in the rates of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-4.78). The rate of cancer determination for core length taken per cc of prostate of  3.31 mm/cc, 41.1%. Core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume are important morphometric parameters in the determination of prostate cancer. The results of study suggest a core length per cc of the prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc as a cutoff value for quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Six weeks of structured exercise training and hypocaloric diet increases the probability of ovulation after clomiphene citrate in overweight and obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, S; Falbo, A; Giallauria, F; Russo, T; Rocca, M; Tolino, A; Zullo, F; Orio, F

    2010-11-01

    Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first-line therapy for the induction of ovulation in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but ∼20% of patients are unresponsive. The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that a 6-week intervention that consisted of structured exercise training (SET) and hypocaloric diet increases the probability of ovulation after CC in overweight and obese CC-resistant PCOS patients. A cohort of 96 overweight and obese CC-resistant PCOS patients was enrolled consecutively in a three-arm randomized, parallel, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial. The three interventions were: SET plus hypocaloric diet for 6 weeks (Group A); 2 weeks of observation followed by one cycle of CC therapy (Group B); and SET plus hypocaloric diet for 6 weeks, with one cycle of CC after the first 2 weeks (Group C). The primary end-point was the ovulation rate. Other reproductive data, as well as anthropometric, hormonal and metabolic data, were also collected and considered as secondary end points. After 6 weeks of SET plus hypocaloric diet, the ovulation rate was significantly (P =0.008) higher in Group C [12/32 (37.5%)] than in Groups A [4/32 (12.5%)] and B [3/32 (9.4%)] with relative risks of 3.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-8.3; P = 0.035] and 4.0 (95% CI 1.2-12.8; P = 0.020) compared with Groups A and B, respectively. Compared with baseline, in Groups A and C, a significant improvement in clinical and biochemical androgen and insulin sensitivity indexes was observed. In the same two groups, the insulin sensitivity index was significantly (P hypocaloric diet was effective in increasing the probability of ovulation under CC treatment. The study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov:NCT0100468.

  17. Meeting the expectations of chronic tinnitus patients: comparison of a structured group therapy program for tinnitus management with a problem-solving group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, K; Rief, W; Goebel, G

    1998-06-01

    Two different group treatments were evaluated in 144 in-patients suffering from impairment due to chronic tinnitus. A tinnitus management therapy (TMT) was developed using principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy and compared with problem solving group therapy. Self-ratings were used to evaluate the help patients found in dealing with life problems and tinnitus as well as the degree to which they felt they were being properly treated and taken seriously. Patients showed significantly more satisfaction with the TMT group and evaluated the help they found in coping with tinnitus and life problems significantly higher. Thus, in the light of unsatisfactory medical solutions and the poor acceptance of some psychological treatments for tinnitus, TMT appears to be an acceptable and helpful treatment program.

  18. The CC2D1A, a member of a new gene family with C2 domains, is involved in autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Attia, R; Yahav, M; Ferland, R J; Anteki, L; Walsh, C A; Olender, T; Straussberg, R; Magal, N; Taub, E; Drasinover, V; Alkelai, A; Bercovich, D; Rechavi, G; Simon, A J; Shohat, M

    2006-03-01

    The molecular basis of autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation (NSMR) is poorly understood, mostly owing to heterogeneity and absence of clinical criteria for grouping families for linkage analysis. Only two autosomal genes, the PRSS12 gene on chromosome 4q26 and the CRBN on chromosome 3p26, have been shown to cause autosomal recessive NSMR, each gene in only one family. To identify the gene causing autosomal recessive NSMR on chromosome 19p13.12. The candidate region established by homozygosity mapping was narrowed down from 2.4 Mb to 0.9 Mb on chromosome 19p13.12. A protein truncating mutation was identified in the gene CC2D1A in nine consanguineous families with severe autosomal recessive NSMR. The absence of the wild type protein in the lymphoblastoid cells of the patients was confirmed. CC2D1A is a member of a previously uncharacterised gene family that carries two conserved motifs, a C2 domain and a DM14 domain. The C2 domain is found in proteins which function in calcium dependent phospholipid binding; the DM14 domain is unique to the CC2D1A protein family and its role is unknown. CC2D1A is a putative signal transducer participating in positive regulation of I-kappaB kinase/NFkappaB cascade. Expression of CC2D1A mRNA was shown in the embryonic ventricular zone and developing cortical plate in staged mouse embryos, persisting into adulthood, with highest expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. A previously unknown signal transduction pathway is important in human cognitive development.

  19. The CC2D1A, a member of a new gene family with C2 domains, is involved in autosomal recessive non‐syndromic mental retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel‐Vanagaite, L; Attia, R; Yahav, M; Ferland, R J; Anteki, L; Walsh, C A; Olender, T; Straussberg, R; Magal, N; Taub, E; Drasinover, V; Alkelai, A; Bercovich, D; Rechavi, G; Simon, A J; Shohat, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The molecular basis of autosomal recessive non‐syndromic mental retardation (NSMR) is poorly understood, mostly owing to heterogeneity and absence of clinical criteria for grouping families for linkage analysis. Only two autosomal genes, the PRSS12 gene on chromosome 4q26 and the CRBN on chromosome 3p26, have been shown to cause autosomal recessive NSMR, each gene in only one family. Objective To identify the gene causing autosomal recessive NSMR on chromosome 19p13.12. Results The candidate region established by homozygosity mapping was narrowed down from 2.4 Mb to 0.9 Mb on chromosome 19p13.12. A protein truncating mutation was identified in the gene CC2D1A in nine consanguineous families with severe autosomal recessive NSMR. The absence of the wild type protein in the lymphoblastoid cells of the patients was confirmed. CC2D1A is a member of a previously uncharacterised gene family that carries two conserved motifs, a C2 domain and a DM14 domain. The C2 domain is found in proteins which function in calcium dependent phospholipid binding; the DM14 domain is unique to the CC2D1A protein family and its role is unknown. CC2D1A is a putative signal transducer participating in positive regulation of I‐κB kinase/NFκB cascade. Expression of CC2D1A mRNA was shown in the embryonic ventricular zone and developing cortical plate in staged mouse embryos, persisting into adulthood, with highest expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Conclusions A previously unknown signal transduction pathway is important in human cognitive development. PMID:16033914

  20. IFN-Alpha receptor-1 upregulation in PBMC from HCV naïve patients carrying cc genotype. possible role of IFN-lambda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Lalle

    Full Text Available IL-28B gene polymorphisms predict better therapeutic response and spontaneous clearance of HCV. Moreover, higher expression of IFN-lambda has been reported in patients with the rs12979860 CC favourable genotype. The study aim was to establish possible relationships between IL-28B rs12979860 genotypes and expression of IFN-alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR-1 in naïve HCV patients, and to explore the possible role of IFN-lambda.IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were measured in PBMC from naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C with different IL-28 genotypes. The ability of IFN-lambda to up-regulate the expression of IFNAR-1 was established in PBMC from healthy donors carrying different IL-28B genotypes.Lower IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in PBMC from HCV-infected naïve patients as compared to healthy donors. In healthy donors, IFNAR-1 mRNA levels were independent from IL-28B genotype, while in HCV patients, an increasing gradient was observed in TT vs CT vs CC carriers. In the latter group, a direct correlation between IFNAR-1 and endogenous IL-28B expression was observed. Moreover, IFN-lambda up-regulated IFNAR-1 expression in normal PBMC in a time-and dose-dependent manner, with a more effective response in CC vs TT carriers.Endogenous levels of IFN-lambda may be responsible for partial restoration of IFNAR-1 expression in HCV patients with favourable IL-28 genotype. This, in turn, may confer to CC carriers a response advantage to either endogenous or exogenous IFN-alpha, representing the biological basis for the observed association between CC genotype and favourable outcome of either natural infection (clearance vs chronicization or IFN therapy.

  1. Group 13 ligand supported heavy-metal complexes: first structural evidence for gallium-lead and gallium-mercury bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabusankar, Ganesan; Gemel, Christian; Winter, Manuela; Seidel, Rüdiger W; Fischer, Roland A

    2010-05-25

    Heavy-metal complexes of lead and mercury stabilized by Group 13 ligands were derived from the oxidative addition of Ga(ddp) (ddp=HC(CMeNC(6)H(3)-2,6-iPr(2))(2), 2-diisopropylphenylamino-4-diisopropyl phenylimino-2-pentene) with corresponding metal precursors. The reaction of Me(3)PbCl and Ga(ddp) afforded compound [{(ddp)Ga(Cl)}PbMe(3)] (1) composed of Ga-Pb(IV) bonds. In addition, the monomeric plumbylene-type compound [{(ddp)Ga(OSO(2)CF(3))}(2)Pb(thf)] (2a) with an unsupported Ga-Pb(II)-Ga linkage was obtained by the reaction of [Pb(OSO(2)CF(3))(3)] with Ga(ddp) (2 equiv). Compound 2a falls under the rare example of a discrete plumbylene-type compound supported by a nonclassical ligand. Interesting structural changes were observed when [Pb(OSO(2)CF(3))(3)]2.H(2)O was treated with Ga(ddp) in a 1:2 ratio to yield [{(ddp)Ga(mu-OSO(2)CF(3))}(2)(OH(2))Pb] (2b) at below -10 degrees C. Compound 2b consists of a bent Ga-Pb-Ga backbone with a bridging triflate group between the Ga-Pb bond and a weakly interacting water molecule at the gallium center. Similarly, the reaction of mercury thiolate Hg(SC(6)F(5)) with Ga(ddp) (2 equiv) produced the bimetallic homoleptic compounds anti-[{(ddp)Ga(SC(6)F(5))}(2)Hg] (3a) and gauche-[{(ddp)Ga(SC(6)F(5))}(2)Hg] (3b), respectively, with a linear Ga-Hg-Ga linkage. Compounds 1-3 were structurally characterized and these are the first examples of compounds comprised of Ga-Pb(II), Ga-Pb(IV), and Ga-Hg bonds.

  2. Associations of Bcl-2 rs956572 genotype groups in the structural covariance network in early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Huang, Shu-Hua; Lee, Chen-Chang; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lien, Chia-Yi

    2018-02-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease, and genetic differences may mediate neuronal degeneration. In humans, a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) gene, rs956572, has been found to significantly modulate Bcl-2 protein expression in the brain. The Bcl-2 AA genotype has been associated with reduced Bcl-2 levels and lower gray matter volume in healthy populations. We hypothesized that different Bcl-2 genotype groups may modulate large-scale brain networks that determine neurobehavioral test scores. Gray matter structural covariance networks (SCNs) were constructed in 104 patients with AD using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with seed-based correlation analysis. The patients were stratified into two genotype groups on the basis of Bcl-2 expression (G carriers, n = 76; A homozygotes, n = 28). Four SCNs characteristic of AD were constructed from seeds in the default mode network, salience network, and executive control network, and cognitive test scores served as the major outcome factor. For the G carriers, influences of the SCNs were observed mostly in the default mode network, of which the peak clusters anchored by the posterior cingulate cortex seed determined the cognitive test scores. In contrast, genetic influences in the A homozygotes were found mainly in the executive control network, and both the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex seed and the interconnected peak clusters were correlated with the clinical scores. Despite a small number of cases, the A homozygotes showed greater covariance strength than the G carriers among all four SCNs. Our results suggest that the Bcl-2 rs956572 polymorphism is associated with different strengths of structural covariance in AD that determine clinical outcomes. The greater covariance strength in the four SCNs shown in the A homozygotes suggests that different Bcl-2 polymorphisms play different modulatory roles.

  3. Rayleigh wave group velocity and shear wave velocity structure in the San Francisco Bay region from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Thurber, Clifford

    2018-06-01

    We derive new Rayleigh wave group velocity models and a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the upper crust in the San Francisco Bay region using an adaptive grid ambient noise tomography algorithm and 6 months of continuous seismic data from 174 seismic stations from multiple networks. The resolution of the group velocity models is 0.1°-0.2° for short periods (˜3 s) and 0.3°-0.4° for long periods (˜10 s). The new shear wave velocity model of the upper crust reveals a number of important structures. We find distinct velocity contrasts at the Golden Gate segment of the San Andreas Fault, the West Napa Fault, central part of the Hayward Fault and southern part of the Calaveras Fault. Low shear wave velocities are mainly located in Tertiary and Quaternary basins, for instance, La Honda Basin, Livermore Valley and the western and eastern edges of Santa Clara Valley. Low shear wave velocities are also observed at the Sonoma volcanic field. Areas of high shear wave velocity include the Santa Lucia Range, the Gabilan Range and Ben Lomond Plutons, and the Diablo Range, where Franciscan Complex or Silinian rocks are exposed.

  4. Pattern of structural brain changes in social anxiety disorder after cognitive behavioral group therapy: a longitudinal multimodal MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, V R; Brühl, A B; Weidt, S; Delsignore, A; Rufer, M; Jäncke, L; Herwig, U; Hänggi, J

    2017-08-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by fears of social and performance situations. Cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) has in general positive effects on symptoms, distress and avoidance in SAD. Prior studies found increased cortical volumes and decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in SAD compared with healthy controls (HCs). Thirty-three participants diagnosed with SAD attended in a 10-week CBGT and were scanned before and after therapy. We applied three neuroimaging methods-surface-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging and network-based statistics-each with specific longitudinal processing protocols, to investigate CBGT-induced structural brain alterations of the gray and white matter (WM). Surface-based morphometry revealed a significant cortical volume reduction (pre- to post-treatment) in the left inferior parietal cortex, as well as a positive partial correlation between treatment success (indexed by reductions in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale) and reductions in cortical volume in bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging analysis revealed a significant increase in FA in bilateral uncinate fasciculus and right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Network-based statistics revealed a significant increase of structural connectivity in a frontolimbic network. No partial correlations with treatment success have been found in WM analyses. For, we believe, the first time, we present a distinctive pattern of longitudinal structural brain changes after CBGT measured with three established magnetic resonance imaging analyzing techniques. Our findings are in line with previous cross-sectional, unimodal SAD studies and extent them by highlighting anatomical brain alterations that point toward the level of HCs in parallel with a reduction in SAD symptomatology.

  5. Crust and uppermost-mantle structure of Greenland and the Northwest Atlantic from Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, Fiona A.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Larsen, Tine B.; Voss, Peter H.; Joyal, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    The Greenland landmass preserves ˜4 billion years of tectonic history, but much of the continent is inaccessible to geological study due to the extensive inland ice cap. We map out, for the first time, the 3-D crustal structure of Greenland and the NW Atlantic ocean, using Rayleigh wave anisotropic group velocity tomography, in the period range 10-80 s, from regional earthquakes and the ongoing GLATIS/GLISN seismograph networks. 1-D inversion gives a pseudo-3-D model of shear wave velocity structure to depths of ˜100 km with a horizontal resolution of ˜200 km. Crustal thickness across mainland Greenland ranges from ˜25 km to over 50 km, and the velocity structure shows considerable heterogeneity. The large sedimentary basins on the continental shelf are clearly visible as low velocities in the upper ˜5-15 km. Within the upper continental basement, velocities are systematically lower in northern Greenland than in the south, and exhibit a broadly NW-SE trend. The thinning of the crust at the continental margins is also clearly imaged. Upper-mantle velocities show a clear distinction between typical fast cratonic lithosphere (Vs ≥4.6 km s-1) beneath Greenland and its NE margin and anomalously slow oceanic mantle (Vs ˜4.3-4.4 km s-1) beneath the NW Atlantic. We do not observe any sign of pervasive lithospheric modification across Greenland in the regions associated with the presumed Iceland hotspot track, though the average crustal velocity in this region is higher than that of areas to the north and south. Crustal anisotropy beneath Greenland is strong and complex, likely reflecting numerous episodes of tectonic deformation. Beneath the North Atlantic and Baffin Bay, the dominant anisotropy directions are perpendicular to the active and extinct spreading centres. Anisotropy in the subcontinental lithosphere is weaker than that of the crust, but still significant, consistent with cratonic lithosphere worldwide.

  6. The associations between regional gray matter structural changes and changes of cognitive performance in control groups of intervention studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru eTakeuchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In intervention studies of cognitive training, the challenging cognitive tests, which were used as outcome measures, are generally completed in more than a few hours. Here, utilizing the control groups’ data from three 1-week intervention studies in which young healthy adult subjects underwent a wide range of cognitive tests and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI before and after the intervention period, we investigated how regional gray matter (GM density (rGMD of the subjects changed through voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Statistically significant increases in rGMD were observed in the anatomical cluster that mainly spread around the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC and the right superior frontal gyrus (rSFG. Moreover, mean rGMD within this cluster changes were significantly and positively correlated with performance changes in the Stroop task, and tended to positively correlate with performance changes in a divergent thinking task. Affected regions are considered to be associated with performance monitoring (dACC and manipulation of the maintained information including generating associations (rSFG, and both are relevant to the cognitive functions measured in the cognitive tests. Thus, the results suggest that even in the groups of the typical control group in intervention studies including those of the passive one, experimental or non-experimental factors can result in an increase in the regional GM structure and form the association between such neural changes and improvements related to these cognitive tests. These results suggest caution toward the experimental study designs without control groups.

  7. Tailoring surface properties and structure of layered double hydroxides using silanes with different number of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Qi; He, Hongping; Li, Tian; Frost, Ray L.; Zhang, Dan; He, Zisen

    2014-01-01

    Four silanes, trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS), dimethyldiethoxylsilane (DMDES), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), were adopted to graft layered double hydroxides (LDH) via an induced hydrolysis silylation method (IHS). Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and 29 Si MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ( 29 Si MAS NMR) indicated that APTES and TEOS can be grafted onto LDH surfaces via condensation with hydroxyl groups of LDH, while TMCS and DMDES could only be adsorbed on the LDH surface with a small quantity. A combination of X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and 29 Si MAS NMR spectra showed that silanes were exclusively present in the external surface and had little influence on the long range order of LDH. The surfactant intercalation experiment indicated that the adsorbed and/or grafted silane could not fix the interlamellar spacing of the LDH. However, they will form crosslink between the particles and affect the further surfactant intercalation in the silylated samples. The replacement of water by ethanol in the tactoids and/or aggregations and the polysiloxane oligomers formed during silylation procedure can dramatically increase the value of BET surface area (S BET ) and total pore volumes (V p ) of the products. - Graphical abstract: The replacement of water by ethanol in the tactoids and aggregations of LDHs, and the polysiloxane oligomers formed during silylation process can dramatically increase the BET surface area (S BET ) and the total pore volume (V p ) of the silylated products. - Highlights: • Silanes with multifunctional groups were grafted onto LDH surface in C 2 H 5 OH medium. • The number of hydrolysable groups in silanes affects the structure of grafted LDH. • Replacement of H 2 O by C 2 H 5 OH in aggregations increases S BET and V p of grafted LDH. • Polysiloxane oligomers contribute to the increase of S BET and V p of grafted LDH

  8. Coefficient αcc in design value of concrete compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goleš Danica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coefficient αcc introduces the effects of rate and duration of loading on compressive strength of concrete. These effects may be partially or completely compensated by the increase in concrete strength over time. Selection of the value of this coefficient, in recommended range between 0.8 and 1.0, is carried out through the National Annexes to Eurocode 2. This paper presents some considerations related to the introduction of this coefficient and its value adopted in some European countries. The article considers the effect of the adoption of conservative value αcc=0.85 on design value of compressive and flexural resistance of rectangular cross-section made of normal and high strength concrete. It analyzes the influence of different values of coefficient αcc on the area of reinforcement required to achieve the desired resistance of cross-section.

  9. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1993 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The program descriptions consist of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research, and detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments. The FY 1993 budget summary table for DOE Materials Activities in each of the programs is presented.

  10. Direct approaches to nitriles via highly efficient nitrogenation strategy through C-H or C-C bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Jiao, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Because of the importance of nitrogen-containing compounds in chemistry and biology, organic chemists have long focused on the development of novel methodologies for their synthesis. For example, nitrogen-containing compounds show up within functional materials, as top-selling drugs, and as bioactive molecules. To synthesize these compounds in a green and sustainable way, researchers have focused on the direct functionalization of hydrocarbons via C-H or C-C bond cleavage. Although researchers have made significant progress in the direct functionalization of simple hydrocarbons, direct C-N bond formation via C-H or C-C bond cleavage remains challenging, in part because of the unstable character of some N-nucleophiles under oxidative conditions. The nitriles are versatile building blocks and precursors in organic synthesis. Recently, chemists have achieved the direct C-H cyanation with toxic cyanide salts in the presence of stoichiometric metal oxidants. In this Account, we describe recent progress made by our group in nitrile synthesis. C-H or C-C bond cleavage is a key process in our strategy, and azides or DMF serve as the nitrogen source. In these reactions, we successfully realized direct nitrile synthesis using a variety of hydrocarbon groups as nitrile precursors, including methyl, alkenyl, and alkynyl groups. We could carry out C(sp(3))-H functionalization on benzylic, allylic, and propargylic C-H bonds to produce diverse valuable synthetic nitriles. Mild oxidation of C═C double-bonds and C≡C triple-bonds also produced nitriles. The incorporation of nitrogen within the carbon skeleton typically involved the participation of azide reagents. Although some mechanistic details remain unclear, studies of these nitrogenation reactions implicate the involvement of a cation or radical intermediate, and an oxidative rearrangement of azide intermediate produced the nitrile. We also explored environmentally friendly oxidants, such as molecular oxygen, to make our

  11. Longitudinal study on transmission of MRSA CC398 within pig herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broens Els M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the detection of MRSA CC398 in pigs in 2004, it has emerged in livestock worldwide. MRSA CC398 has been found in people in contact with livestock and thus has become a public health issue. Data from a large-scale longitudinal study in two Danish and four Dutch pig herds were used to quantify MRSA CC398 transmission rates within pig herds and to identify factors affecting transmission between pigs. Results Sows and their offspring were sampled at varying intervals during a production cycle. Overall MRSA prevalence of sows increased from 33% before farrowing to 77% before weaning. Overall MRSA prevalence of piglets was > 60% during the entire study period. The recurrent finding of MRSA in the majority of individuals indicates true colonization or might be the result of contamination. Transmission rates were estimated using a Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS-model, which resulted in values of the reproduction ratio (R0 varying from 0.24 to 8.08. Transmission rates were higher in pigs treated with tetracyclins and β-lactams compared to untreated pigs implying a selective advantage of MRSA CC398 when these antimicrobials are used. Furthermore, transmission rates were higher in pre-weaning pigs compared to post-weaning pigs which might be explained by an age-related susceptibility or the presence of the sow as a primary source of MRSA CC398. Finally, transmission rates increased with the relative increase of the infection pressure within the pen compared to the total infection pressure, implying that within-pen transmission is a more important route compared to between-pen transmission and transmission through environmental exposure. Conclusion Our results indicate that MRSA CC398 is able to spread and persist in pig herds, resulting in an endemic situation. Transmission rates are affected by the use of selective antimicrobials and by the age of pigs.

  12. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-08-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic coordinates of all non-H atoms is established to be 0.2 Å. For 98.5% of 200 molecular crystal structures published with missed symmetry, the correct space group is identified; there are no false positives. Very small, very symmetrical molecules can end up in artificially high space groups upon energy minimization, although this is easily detected through visual inspection. If the space group of a crystal structure determined from powder diffraction data is ambiguous, energy minimization with DFT-D provides a fast and reliable method to select the correct space group.

  13. Efficient detection of dangling pointer error for C/C++ programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenzhe

    2017-08-01

    Dangling pointer error is pervasive in C/C++ programs and it is very hard to detect. This paper introduces an efficient detector to detect dangling pointer error in C/C++ programs. By selectively leave some memory accesses unmonitored, our method could reduce the memory monitoring overhead and thus achieves better performance over previous methods. Experiments show that our method could achieve an average speed up of 9% over previous compiler instrumentation based method and more than 50% over previous page protection based method.

  14. First measurement of the lifetime of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Aidala, Christine Angela; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albicocco, Pietro; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Arzymatov, Kenenbek; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Audurier, Benjamin; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; B