WorldWideScience

Sample records for group building activities

  1. Building Bunk Group Buddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Denise Cabrero

    2000-01-01

    Describes how camp counselors can foster camaraderie among campers through participative decision making, name games, listening, adventure courses, storytelling, spending time in nature, decorating cabins, avoiding favoritism, setting rules, admitting faults, setting group goals, and praising sincere efforts. (TD)

  2. “Conviv\\^{e}ncia” Groups: Building Active and Healthy Communities of Older Adults in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia R. Bertoldo Benedetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In old age, social groups can be a crucial component for health and well-being. In 2009-2010, a follow-up survey was carried out in Florianópolis, Brazil to understand the impact of a variety of programs established since 2002 that were designed to enhance social activities among the older adult population. This study employed two surveys within the population of older adults in Florianópolis. The first survey interviewed a total of 875 older adults in 2002, and the second survey involved 1,705 older adults between 2009 and 2010. By 2010, many new programs were offered in the community and the enrollment of older adults in social programs followed similar trends. “Convivência” groups stood out as extremely popular social groups among this population. This paper discusses some of the potential outcomes associated with participation in “convivência” groups.

  3. Analysis of the Relationship Between QC Group Activities and Team Building%试论QC小组活动与班组建设的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱柳

    2013-01-01

      围绕班组建设 QC 小组活动的内涵入手,分析了 QC 小组活动与班组建设的关系,阐述了 QC 小组活动对班组建设的促进作用,明确了 QC 小组活动与班组建设相结合的重要途径,强调了 QC 小组活动是班组建设的重要内容和有效形式,其活动深入持久健康地开展,已经成为推动企业班组建设的巨大动力。%is paper started from the de nition of the team construction of QC group activity, analyzed the relationship between QC group activities and team building and elaborated the QC group activities for team building, it also cleared about the QC group activities and team building with the combination of important ways and emphasized that the QC group activity is an important part of the team building and e ective form, which has become a great force to promote enterprise team construction.

  4. Working group report: Flavor physics and model building

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Parida; Nita Sinha; B Adhikary; B Allanach; A Alok; K S Babu; B Brahmachari; D Choudhury; E J Chun; P K Das; A Ghosal; D Hitlin; W S Hou; S Kumar; H N Li; E Ma; S K Majee; G Majumdar; B Mishra; G Mohanty; S Nandi; H Pas; M K Parida; S D Rindani; J P Saha; N Sahu; Y Sakai; S Sen; C Sharma; C D Sharma; S Shalgar; N N Singh; S Uma Sankar; N Sinha; R Sinha; F Simonetto; R Srikanth; R Vaidya

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of flavor physics and model building working group at WHEPP-9. While activities in flavor physics have been mainly focused on -physics, those in model building have been primarily devoted to neutrino physics. We present summary of working group discussions carried out during the workshop in the above fields, and also briefly review the progress made in some projects subsequently

  5. GPR surveying of transport infrastructures and buildings; underground utility and void sensing - ongoing activities in Working Group 2 of COST Action TU1208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Plati, Christina; Derobert, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the ongoing research activities carried out in Working Group 2 'GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing' of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar' (www.GPRadar.eu). The principal goal of the COST Action TU1208 is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst simultaneously promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe and non-destructive technique in the monitoring of infrastructures and structures. Four Working Groups (WGs) carry out the research activities. WG1 focuses on the development of innovative GPR equipment dedicated for civil engineering applications. WG2 deals with the development of guidelines and protocols for the surveying, through the use of a GPR system, of transport infrastructure and buildings, as well as for the sensing of utilities and voids. WG3 deals with the development of electromagnetic forward and inverse scattering methods, for the characterization of GPR scenarios, as well as with data- processing algorithms for the elaboration of the data collected during GPR surveys. WG4 is concerned with the use of GPR in fields different from the civil engineering, as well as with the integration of GPR with other non-destructive testing techniques. Each WG includes several Projects. WG2 includes five Projects. Project 2.1 focuses on outlining 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of critical transport infrastructures (pavements, bridges and tunnels).' Project 2.2 is concerned with the development of 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR surveying of buildings.' Project 2.3 deals with identifying 'Innovative inspection procedures for effective GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids, with a focus to urban

  6. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  7. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  8. 21 CFR 26.37 - Confidence building activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Confidence building activities. 26.37 Section 26... COMMUNITY Specific Sector Provisions for Medical Devices § 26.37 Confidence building activities. (a) At the beginning of the transitional period, the Joint Sectoral Group will establish a joint confidence building...

  9. Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druskat, Vanessa Urch; Wolff, Steven B.

    2001-01-01

    Research has found that individual emotional intelligence has a group analog and it is critical to groups' effectiveness. Teams can develop greater emotional intelligence and boost their overall performance. (JOW)

  10. Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druskat, Vanessa Urch; Wolff, Steven B.

    2001-01-01

    Research has found that individual emotional intelligence has a group analog and it is critical to groups' effectiveness. Teams can develop greater emotional intelligence and boost their overall performance. (JOW)

  11. Groups of Groups: The Role of Group Learning in Building Social Capital. CRLRA Discussion Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Bell, Rowena; Falk, Ian

    The Centre for Research and Learning in Regional Australia is investigating the elements of social capital and developing a set of indicators that show when social capital is building. The indicators can be used where groups or organizations with a shared purpose engage in productive interactions that benefit not only the individual member groups…

  12. Capacity building in indigenous men's groups and sheds across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, Amie; Cavanagh, Jillian; Bartram, Timothy

    2015-09-01

    This article presents an investigation into capacity building, at the community level, in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Men's Groups and Sheds. As safe men's spaces, Men's Groups and Sheds represent an ever-growing social, and health and well-being community service across Australia. The study is qualitative and employs 'yarning circles' (focus groups), semi-structured interviews and observations to gather data from 15 Groups/Sheds involving 45 men from urban, regional and remote communities. We found that capacity building is primarily about securing relationships between Group Leaders/Shed Co-ordinators and Government services. Capacity building establishes links to services such as Centrelink, Medicare, Department of Housing, Probation and Control, and positive outcomes such as Indigenous men securing housing and Centrelink payments. Capacity building results in better health outcomes and, educates and empowers men to improve their social, cultural, emotional and economic well-being. It helps men to better connect with family and community. The current research paves the way for countries worldwide to explore the conceptual and empirical approach of capacity building applicable to other Indigenous [and non-Indigenous] Men's Groups/Sheds. We recommend feasibilities studies, on approaches to capacity building in Indigenous Groups/Sheds, be carried out within urban, regional and remote regions across the country. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Building Neo-Riemannian Groups of Musical Transformations as Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Popoff, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Chords in musical harmony can be viewed as objects having shapes (major/minor/etc.) grafted on base spaces (pc-sets). The base space and the shape space are usually given the structure of a group, more particularly a cyclic group. In a more general setting, any object could be defined by its position on a base space and by its internal shape or state. The goal of this paper is to determine the structure of simply transitive groups of transformations acting on such sets of objects with internal symmetries. In the main proposition, we state that, under simple assumptions, these groups can be built as group extensions of the group associated to the base space by the group associated to the shape space, or the other way. By doing so, complex groups of transformations are obtained, including the traditional ones such as the dihedral groups. The knowledge of the group structure and product allows to explicitly build group actions on the objects. In particular we differentiate between left and right group actions an...

  14. Building structure-activity insights through patent mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meihua; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Filipski, Kevin J

    2012-11-01

    One gap in current patent-mining practice is the lack of tools to build SAR knowledge. Here, we report a novel technique that enabled us to derive useful SAR information from the exemplified structures of a series of patents. In our approach, exemplified chemical structures were extracted from patent documents. They were grouped into structural series based on similarity and binding mode, after which the R-group table was generated. By analyzing R-group usages over time, we were able to build insights into SAR of a structural series, even though the biological activities were not available.

  15. Local flow control for active building facades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligotla, Srikar; Chen, Wayne; Glauser, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Existing building facade designs are for a passive and an impermeable shell to prevent migration of outdoor air into the building and to control heat transfers between the exterior environment and the building interior. An active facade that can respond in real time to changing environmental conditions like wind speed and direction, pollutant load, temperature, humidity and light can lower energy use and maximize occupant comfort. With an increased awareness of cost and environmental effects of energy use, cross or natural ventilation has become an attractive method to lower energy use. Separated flow regions around such buildings are undesirable due to high concentration of pollutants, especially if the vents or dynamic windows for cross ventilation are situated in these regions. Outside pollutant load redistribution through vents can be regulated via flow separation control to minimize transport of pollutants into the building. Flow separation has been substantially reduced with the application of intelligent flow control tools developed at Syracuse University for flow around "silo" (turret) like structures. Similar flow control models can be introduced into buildings with cross ventilation for local external flow separation control. Initial experiments will be performed for turbulent flow over a rectangular block (scaled to be a mid-rise building) that has been configured with dynamic vents and unsteady suction actuators in a wind tunnel at various wind speeds.

  16. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  17. Active vibration control of nonlinear benchmark buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xing-de; CHEN Dao-zheng

    2007-01-01

    The present nonlinear model reduction methods unfit the nonlinear benchmark buildings as their vibration equations belong to a non-affine system. Meanwhile,the controllers designed directly by the nonlinear control strategy have a high order, and they are difficult to be applied actually. Therefore, a new active vibration control way which fits the nonlinear buildings is proposed. The idea of the proposed way is based on the model identification and structural model linearization, and exerting the control force to the built model according to the force action principle. This proposed way has a better practicability as the built model can be reduced by the balance reduction method based on the empirical Grammian matrix. A three-story benchmark structure is presented and the simulation results illustrate that the proposed method is viable for the civil engineering structures.

  18. Final-part metrology for LIGA springs, Build Group 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.; Mills, Bernice E.

    2004-03-01

    The LIGA spring is a recently designed part for defense program applications. The Sandia California LIGA team has produced an initial group build of these nickel alloy parts. These are distinctive in having a macroscopic lateral size of about 1 cm, while requiring microscopic dimensional precision on the order of a few micrometers. LIGA technology capabilities at Sandia are able to manufacture such precise structures. While certain aspects of the LIGA process and its production capabilities have been dimensionally characterized in the past, [1-6] the present work is exclusive in defining a set of methods and techniques to inspect and measure final LIGA nickel alloy parts in large prototype quantities. One hundred percent inspection, meaning that every single LIGA part produced needs to be measured, ensures quality control and customer satisfaction in this prototype production run. After a general visual inspection of the parts and an x-ray check for voids, high precision dimensional metrology tools are employed. The acquired data is analyzed using both in house and commercially available software. Examples of measurements illustrating these new metrology capabilities are presented throughout the report. These examples furthermore emphasize that thorough inspection of every final part is not only essential to characterize but also improve the LIGA manufacturing process.

  19. Gilt Groupe's CEO on building a team of A players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Ryan believes that a CEO should spend more time on recruiting and managing people than on any other activity, and that the head of HR is one of the most important people in the company. He insists on his freedom to bypass managers and speak with any employee at any time. And he espouses certain talent-management principles, such as that your best people are usually underpaid (reward them with performance pay) and that people leave jobs mainly because they don't like their managers. Recruiting at Gilt Groupe focuses on references more than on résumés and interviews because, Ryan says, resumes only establish basic qualifications for a job, and interviewers can't help being influenced by well-spoken or attractive people. But reference checks need to go beyond the names supplied by a candidate: Employers should dig up people in their networks who are willing to speak candidly.

  20. Expert Groups in the Building of European Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to building European public action, expertise is ubiquitous and polymorphic. This article intends to study the ways expertise is being used in the European Commission and the logics underlying its use. The massive use of expertise also has consequences for the practices and identities of actors with whom European institutions…

  1. Expert Groups in the Building of European Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to building European public action, expertise is ubiquitous and polymorphic. This article intends to study the ways expertise is being used in the European Commission and the logics underlying its use. The massive use of expertise also has consequences for the practices and identities of actors with whom European institutions…

  2. A dynamic policy for grouping maintenance activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Wildeman (Ralph); R. Dekker (Rommert); A.C.J.M. Smit

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA maintenance activity carried out on a technical system often involves a system-dependent set-up cost that is the same for all maintenance activities carried out on that system. Grouping activities thus saves costs since execution of a group of activities requires only one set-up. Many

  3. Study Abroad: The Reality of Building Dynamic Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransbury, Molly K.; Harris, Sandra A.

    1994-01-01

    The collaborative effort of a professor of human development with expertise in group process and a general education professor with expertise in Greek mythology and culture uses a case study format to apply theoretical models of group dynamics to the travel and learning experience of study abroad. Implications for course design and group process…

  4. Thermally activated building systems in context of increasing building energy efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Branislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the possible ways to provide heating to the building is to use thermally activated building systems. This type of heating, besides providing significant increase in building energy efficiency, allows using low-temperature heating sources. In this paper, special attention is given to opaque part of the building façade with integrated thermally activated building systems. Due to fact that this type of system strongly depends on temperature of this construction-thermal element and type and thickness of other materials of the façade, influence of these parameters on energy efficiency was analyzed in this paper. Since the simplest and most promising way of using geothermal energy is to use it directly, for our analysis this source of energy was selected. Building energy needs for heating were obtained for real residential multi-family building in Serbia by using EnergyPlus software. The building with all necessary input for simulation was modeled in Google SketchUp with aid of Open Studio Plug-in. Obtained results were compared with measured heating energy consumption. The results show that thermally activated building systems represent good way to increase building energy efficiency and that applying certain temperatures within this element, low-energy house standard can be achieved.

  5. Reviewing the Role of Stakeholders in Operational Research: Opportunities for Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van

    2013-01-01

    Stakeholders have always received much attention in system dynamics, especially in the group model building tradition, which emphasizes the deep involvement of a client group in building a system dynamics model. In organizations, stakeholders are gaining more and more attention by managers who try t

  6. The Use of Team-Building Activities to Build a Better Resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, James D; Deloney, Linda A; Renfroe, Shyann; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2017-02-16

    We implemented team building activities to build a better resident during our orientation process and we have refined the choice of activities each year since. Resident satisfaction with their team building actives provided feedback to improve the following years' experience. While there is no definite way to demonstrate the effectiveness of our team building initiative, our expectation is it will improve the residency experience and work environment, and ultimately, result in better patient care. We focus on five aspects of team building - personal history sharing, creativity and imagination, common bonds, cooperation, and shared experience. The purpose of this paper is to recommend activities in each of these areas based on our experience. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. How Does Physical Activity Help Build Healthy Bones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications How does physical activity help build healthy bones? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content ​​Bones are living tissue. Weight-bearing physical activity causes ...

  8. Abating Earthquake Effects on Buildings by Active Slip Brace Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekai Akbay

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid control system for reducing building vibration under a spectrum of earthquake load amplitudes is presented. The hybrid control is accomplished by an energy dissipation device called the active slip brace device (ASBD. The hybrid control system uses the ASBD to regulate the energy dissipation characteristics of the building during its response to earthquakes by utilizing active control principles. The ASBD consists of a Coulomb friction interface with a clamping mechanism on the interface. The clamping force on the friction interface is altered at short time intervals during building vibration. Computer simulations of building response with and without ASBD are compared.

  9. "Peer Pressure" and the Group Process: Building Cultures of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Thomas F.; Copas, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    Peer group treatment has been subject to two main lines of criticism. Some suggest any program which aggregates antisocial youth inevitably fosters negative peer influence. Others are concerned that certain peer programs are based on coercive peer confrontation. Positive Peer Culture [PPC] is an antidote to both of these varieties of toxic group…

  10. Thermo Active Building Systems – Using Building Mass To Heat and Cool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2014-01-01

    Using the thermal storage capacity of the concrete slabs between each floor in multistory buildings to heat or cool is a trend that began in the early 1990s in Switzerland.1,2 Pipes carrying water for heating and cooling are embedded in the center of the concrete slab. In central Europe (Germany......, Austria, Netherlands, etc.), this type of system has been installed in a significant number of new office buildings since the late 1990s. The trend is spreading to other parts of the world (the rest of Europe, North America and Asia). Thermo active building systems (TABS) are primarily used for cooling...... multistory buildings. By activating the building mass, there is a direct heating-cooling effect. Also, because of the thermal mass, the peak load will be reduced and some of the cooling load will be transferred beyond the time of occupancy. Because these systems for cooling operate at water temperatures...

  11. Modeling thermally active building components using space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frank; Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    In order to efficiently implement thermally active building components in new buildings, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal interaction between them and other building components. Applying parameter investigation or numerical optimization methods to a differential-algebraic (DAE) model....... This paper describes the principle of the space mapping technique, and introduces a simple space mapping technique. The technique is applied to a lumped parameter model of a thermo active component, which provides a model of the thermal performance of the component as a function of two design parameters...... of a building provides a systematic way of estimating efficient building designs. However, using detailed numerical calculations of the components in the building is a time consuming process, which may become prohibitive if the DAE model is to be used for parameter variation or optimization. Unfortunately...

  12. Developing social-ecological system indicators using group model building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugteveen, P.; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Stouten, H.J.; Katwijk, M.M. van; Hanssen, L.S.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In many coastal regions, activities of multiple users present a growing strain on the ecological state of the area. The necessity of using integrative system approaches to understand and solve coastal problems has become obvious in the last decades. Integrated management strategies for social-ecolog

  13. Mastering group leadership. An active learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, Dawn M

    2002-09-01

    Leading therapeutic groups is an underused but viable treatment role for nurses in all specialty areas. A dynamic psychoeducational group model provides structure as nurses invest and collaboratively participate to actively learn the group leader role. this article highlights the sequencing of instruction of group theory and skills with examples from a baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Samples from student journals reveal their growing assimilation of the group leader role as learners actively participated in groups, collaborated, and reflected on their learning. Examples of creatively adapted group exercises, as well as selected nursing group leader interventions, demonstrate group leadership as a skill that can increase nurses' repertoire of therapeutic responses. Therapeutic groups are both exciting and cost-effective treatment strategies for use with mentally ill clients. The skills of an accomplished group leader are transferable from within the psychiatric population to working with families, bereavement groups, and other client populations, ranging from people with diabetes to survivors of catastrophic crises. Group leadership ability complements the management and negotiation skills needed in professional nursing roles. When students and staff nurses grow in group leadership expertise, clients in various settings will be better served with this currently underused treatment option.

  14. Building Social Capital in Groups: Facilitating Skill Development for Natural Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the experiences of four farmer groups set up to learn how to jointly manage local natural resource issues shows that the groups are going though two simultaneous processes. One builds technical competency in natural resource management and the other is the underpinning social process that allows the groups to make decisions and work…

  15. Small Group Activities for Introductory Business Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundrake, George

    1999-01-01

    Describes numerous small-group activities for the following areas of basic business education: consumer credit, marketing, business organization, entrepreneurship, insurance, risk management, economics, personal finance, business careers, global markets, and government regulation. (SK)

  16. Modeling Group Rapports through Tourist School Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Moldovan; Răzvan Sandu ENOIU; Adriana LEIBOVICI

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was the evaluation of the developing social climate by determining group cohesion and affective and sympathetic inter personal relationships between the components of the experimental group bent to the tourist program done by the researcher and between the ones of the witness group that has done extracurricular tourist activities after the traditional program, in its free time and during holidays.

  17. Modeling Group Rapports through Tourist School Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Moldovan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was the evaluation of the developing social climate by determining group cohesion and affective and sympathetic inter personal relationships between the components of the experimental group bent to the tourist program done by the researcher and between the ones of the witness group that has done extracurricular tourist activities after the traditional program, in its free time and during holidays.

  18. Building the Group: Using Personal Affirming to Create Healthy Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise

    1995-01-01

    Group leaders who offer affirmations to participants in outdoor education encourage healthy relationships and group cohesion and increase individuals' self-esteem. Personal affirming includes actions and statements that make participants feel comfortable in their environment, support capable work, and encourage behavior change in a supportive and…

  19. Sustainable Buildings. Using Active Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, M. Keith [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States); Barnett, Russell [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)

    2015-04-20

    The objective of this project is to promote awareness and knowledge of active solar energy technologies by installing and monitoring the following demonstration systems in Kentucky: 1) Pool heating system, Churchill Park School, 2) Water heating and daylighting systems, Middletown and Aiken Road Elementary Schools, 3) Photovoltaic street light comparison, Louisville Metro, 4) up to 25 domestic water heating systems across Kentucky. These tasks will be supported by outreach activities, including a solar energy installer training workshop and a Kentucky Solar Energy Conference.

  20. Do active design buildings change health behaviour and workplace perceptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, L; Dhillon, H M; Chau, J Y; Hespe, D; Bauman, A E

    2016-07-01

    Occupying new, active design office buildings designed for health promotion and connectivity provides an opportunity to evaluate indoor environment effects on healthy behaviour, sedentariness and workplace perceptions. To determine if moving to a health-promoting building changed workplace physical activity, sedentary behaviour, workplace perceptions and productivity. Participants from four locations at the University of Sydney, Australia, relocated into a new active design building. After consent, participants completed an online questionnaire 2 months before moving and 2 months after. Questions related to health behaviours (physical activity and sitting time), musculoskeletal issues, perceptions of the office environment, productivity and engagement. There were 34 participants (60% aged 25-45, 78% female, 84% employed full-time); 21 participants provided complete data. Results showed that after the move participants spent less work time sitting (83-70%; P workplace were in an open-plan office, compared to 16% before moving. Participants perceived the new work environment as more stimulating, better lit and ventilated, but noisier and providing less storage. No difference was reported in daily physical activity, number of stairs climbed or productivity. Moving to an active design building appeared to have physical health-promoting effects on workers, but workers' perceptions about the new work environment varied. These results will inform future studies in other new buildings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  2. Utilizing Adventure Activities with Intact Groups: A Sociodramatic Systems Approach to Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, H. Lee; Bonney, Warren C.

    1989-01-01

    Describes team-building activities for mental health counselors who function as consultants to staffs, groups, or other intact work systems. Provides rationale for application of strategic systems and sociodrama techniques to an adventure activity that allows a group to metaphorically enact its common issue. Provides example of a consultation…

  3. Experimental study on small group behavior and crowd dynamics in a tall office building evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaping; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Tao

    2017-05-01

    It is well known that a large percentage of occupants in a building are evacuated together with their friends, families, and officemates, especially in China. Small group behaviors are therefore critical for crowd movement. This paper aims to study the crowd dynamic considering different social relations and the impacts of small groups on crowd dynamics in emergency evacuation. Three experiments are conducted in an 11-storey office building. In the first two experiments, all participants are classmates and know each other well. They are evacuated as individuals or pairs. In the third experiment, social relations among the participants are complex. Participants consist of 8 families, 6 lovers and several individuals. Space-time features, speed characteristics and density-speed relations for each experiment are analyzed and compared. Results conclude that small group behaviors can make positive impacts on crowd dynamics when evacuees know each other and are cooperative. This conclusion is also testified by four verified experiments. In the third experiment, speeds of evacuees are lowest. Small groups form automatically with the presence of intimate social relations. Small groups in this experiment slow down the average speed of the crowd and make disturbance on the crowd flow. Small groups in this case make negative impacts on the movement of the crowd. It is because that evacuees do not know each other and they are competitive to each other. Characteristics of different types of small groups are also investigated. Experimental data can provide foundational parameters for evacuation model development and are helpful for building designers.

  4. Building new businesses through corporate venturing at the danish NKT group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skat-Rørdam, Peter

    2005-01-01

    An in depth case study of how the danish NKT group used corporate venturing over a 25 year period to build new businesses. The study provides insights on purposes, drivers and results of corporate venturing and examines factors contributing to venture success and failure....

  5. Developing Reflective Dispositions through Collaborative Knowledge-Building during Small Group Bible Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tze Keong; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling; Chai, Ching Sing

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of a constructivist pedagogical approach to cultivate reflective dispositions during small group Bible study. Conducted in a local church Bible class setting (n = 12), the instructional design emulated the reflective thinking process, while adopting collaborative knowledge-building as its pedagogical framework.…

  6. Does it work everywhere? Group Model Building as participative method in intercultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arensbergen, P. van; Lansu, M.E.M.; Bleijenbergh, I.L.

    2016-01-01

    Group Model Building (GMB) is a type of facilitated modeling, in which the input of the participants to structuring a complex problem is crucial. There is a high level of participant interaction and involvement. The method focuses on open communication between participants to gain insight in complex

  7. Modeling thermally active building components using space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frank; Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    simplified models of the components do not always provide useful solutions, since they are not always able to reproduce the correct thermal behavior. The space mapping technique transforms a simplified, but computationally inexpensive model, in order to align it with a detailed model or measurements....... This paper describes the principle of the space mapping technique, and introduces a simple space mapping technique. The technique is applied to a lumped parameter model of a thermo active component, which provides a model of the thermal performance of the component as a function of two design parameters......In order to efficiently implement thermally active building components in new buildings, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal interaction between them and other building components. Applying parameter investigation or numerical optimization methods to a differential-algebraic (DAE) model...

  8. Community Capacity Building for Physical Activity Promotion among Older Adults-A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubert, Tobias; Forberger, Sarah; Gansefort, Dirk; Zeeb, Hajo; Brand, Tilman

    2017-09-13

    Community-based interventions to promote physical activity (PA) among older adults are of high interest in health promotion since they promise to be effective strategies to reach this population group. Community capacity building, that is, the local promotion of knowledge, skills, commitment, structures, and leadership, is among the recommended core strategies. However, little guidance is provided on how to achieve a high degree of community capacity. This study aims to identify practical strategies to enhance community capacities for PA promotion among older adults (50 years or older) and to evaluate their success. A literature review was conducted using scientific databases (PsycInfo and Web of Sciences) and grey literature (national and international project databases), and 14 studies (16 articles) were identified. Five groups of capacity building strategies emerged from the literature: (1) building community coalitions and networks, (2) training of professionals, (3) training of laypersons, (4) strengthening competence and awareness in the target population, and (5) allocation of financial resources. All studies used more than one strategy. Coalition building and strengthening competence and awareness were most frequently used. Feasibility and acceptability of the capacity building strategies were demonstrated. However, intervention effects on PA behavior and other relevant outcomes were inconsistent. The one study that systematically compared different capacity building approaches did not find any evidence for beneficial effects of intensified capacity building. More rigorous research evaluating the efficacy of specific strategies to enhance community capacities for PA promotion is needed.

  9. Research on Dynamic Model's Building of Active Magnetic Suspension Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian; YAN Guo-zheng; LI Li-chuan; WANG Kun-dong

    2006-01-01

    An experimental method is introduced in this paper to build the dynamics of AMSS (the active magnetic suspension system), which doesn't depend on system's physical parameters. The rotor can be reliably suspended under the unit feedback control system designed with the primary dynamic model obtained. Online identification in frequency domain is processed to give the precise model. Comparisons show that the experimental method is much closer to the precise model than the theoretic method based on magnetic circuit law. So this experimental method is a good choice to build the primary dynamic model of AMSS.

  10. Feedbacks from Focus Group Meeting on Training and Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Lin , Haiyan; Song, Bo; Halverson, Mark A.; Evans, Meredydd; Zhu, Xiaojiao

    2011-01-01

    A focus group meeting is a very effective quality research approach to collect information on a specific project. Through focus group meetings at both Changchun and Ningbo in August 2010, the project team gained a more complete understandings of key stakeholders (such as their education level), their training needs and expectations, key factors influencing their decision making, and incurred implementation difficulties. In addition, the meeting helped the project team (especially PNNL) improve its understanding of the implementation status of building energy codes in other regions (such as small cities and counties neighboring to urban areas, small townships and rural areas distant from urban areas). The collected feedbacks will serve as important input not only for better design of training materials and the development of an on-line training website, but also for development of follow-up projects to promote building energy codes in China.

  11. Multi-axial active isolation for seismic protection of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ming

    Structural control technology has been widely accepted as an effective means for the protection of structures against seismic hazards. Passive base isolation is one of the common structural control techniques used to enhance the performance of structures subjected to severe earthquake excitations. Isolation bearings employed at the base of a structure naturally increase its flexibility, but concurrently result in large base displacements. The combination of base isolation with active control, i.e., active base isolation, creates the possibility of achieving a balanced level of control performance, reducing both floor accelerations as well as base displacements. Many theoretical papers have been written by researchers regarding active base isolation, and a few experiments have been performed to verify these theories; however, challenges in appropriately scaling the structural system and modeling the complex nature of control-structure interaction have limited the applicability of these results. Moreover, most experiments only focus on the implementation of active base isolation under unidirectional excitations. Earthquakes are intrinsically multi-dimensional, resulting in out-of-plane responses, including torsional responses. Therefore, an active isolation system for buildings using multi-axial active control devices against multi-directional excitations must be considered. The focus of this dissertation is the development and experimental verification of active isolation strategies for multi-story buildings subjected to bi-directional earthquake loadings. First, a model building is designed to match the characteristics of a representative full-scale structure. The selected isolation bearings feature low friction and high vertical stiffness, providing stable behavior. In the context of the multi-dimensional response control, three, custom-manufactured actuators are employed to mitigate both in-plane and out-of-plane responses. To obtain a high-fidelity model of the

  12. A survey of ring-building network protocols suitable for command and control group communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeih, Ahmed; Yurcik, William

    2005-05-01

    Multicasting is the enabling technology for group communication. However, network-layer multicasting (e.g., IP multicast) has not been widely adopted more than 10 years of its invention due to the concerns related to deployment, scalability and network management. Application-layer multicast (ALM) has been proposed as an alternative for IP multicast. In ALM, group communications take place on an overlay network in which each edge corresponds to a direct unicast path between two group members. ALM protocols differ in, among other aspects, the topology of the underlying overlay network (e.g., tree, mesh or ring). Ring-based ALM protocols have the advantages of providing a constant node degree, and enabling the implementation of reliable and totally-ordered message delivery through the use of a ring with a token that contains ordering and flow control information. In addition, a ring overlay network topology is inherently reliable to single node failures. In this paper, we provide a survey and a taxonomy of several ring-building group communication protocols. Investigating the major characteristics of ring-building network protocols is an important step towards understanding which of them are suitable for command and control group communications.

  13. Building Bridges for Innovation in Ageing : Synergies between Action Groups of the EIP on AHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Bewick, M; Cano, A; Eklund, P; Fico, G; Goswami, N; Guldemond, N A; Henderson, D; Hinkema, M J; Liotta, G; Mair, A; Molloy, W; Monaco, A; Monsonis-Paya, I; Nizinska, A; Papadopoulos, H; Pavlickova, A; Pecorelli, S; Prados-Torres, A; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E; Somekh, D; Vera-Muñoz, C; Visser, F.; Farrell, J; Malva, J; Andersen Ranberg, K; Camuzat, T; Carriazo, A M; Crooks, G; Gutter, Z; Iaccarino, G; Manuel de Keenoy, E; Moda, G; Rodriguez-Mañas, L; Vontetsianos, T; Abreu, C; Alonso, J; Alonso-Bouzon, C; Ankri, J; Arredondo, M T; Avolio, F; Bedbrook, A; Białoszewski, A Z; Blain, H; Bourret, R; Cabrera-Umpierrez, M F; Catala, A; O'Caoimh, R; Cesari, M; Chavannes, N H; Correia-da-Sousa, J; Dedeu, T; Ferrando, M; Ferri, M; Fokkens, W J; Garcia-Lizana, F; Guérin, O; Hellings, P W; Haahtela, T; Illario, M; Inzerilli, M C; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Kardas, P; Keil, T; Maggio, M; Mendez-Zorrilla, A; Menditto, E; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Murray, R; Nogues, M; O'Byrne-Maguire, I; Pappa, D; Parent, A S; Pastorino, M; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Siciliano, P; Teixeira, A M; Tsartara, S I; Valiulis, A; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M; Wickman, M; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Barbagallo, M; Canonica, G W; Klimek, L; Maggi, S; Aberer, W; Akdis, C; Adcock, I M; Agache, I; Albera, C; Alonso-Trujillo, F; Angel Guarcia, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Apostolo, J; Arshad, S H; Attalin, V; Avignon, A; Bachert, C; Baroni, I; Bel, E; Benson, M; Bescos, C; Blasi, F; Barbara, C; Bergmann, K C; Bernard, P L; Bonini, S; Bousquet, P J; Branchini, B; Brightling, C E; Bruguière, V; Bunu, C; Bush, A; Caimmi, D P; Calderon, M A; Canovas, G; Cardona, V; Carlsen, K H; Cesario, A; Chkhartishvili, E; Chiron, R; Chivato, T; Chung, K F; d'Angelantonio, M; De Carlo, G; Cholley, D; Chorin, F; Combe, B; Compas, B; Costa, D J; Costa, E.; Coste, O; Coupet, A-L; Crepaldi, G; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Du Toit, G; Dubakiene, R; Dupeyron, A; Emuzyte, R; Fiocchi, A; Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fonseca, J; Fougère, B; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, G; Garcia-Aymeric, J; Garcia-Zapirain, B; Gemicioğlu, B; Gouder, C; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Hermosilla-Gimeno, I; Héve, D; Holland, C; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Johnston, S L; Just, J; Jutel, M; Kaidashev, I P; Khaitov, M; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keijser, W; Kerstjens, H; Knezović, J; Kowalski, M; Koppelman, G H; Kotska, T; Kovac, M; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lepore, V; MacNee, W; Maggio, M; Magnan, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; Marcucci, M; Marti, T; Masoli, M; Melen, E; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Millot-Keurinck, J; Mlinarić, H; Momas, I; Montefort, S; Morais-Almeida, M; Moreno-Casbas, T; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nadif, R; Nalin, M; Navarro-Pardo, E; Nekam, K; Ninot, G; Paccard, D; Pais, S; Palummeri, E; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N K; Papanikolaou, C; Passalacqua, G; Pastor, E; Perrot, M; Plavec, D; Popov, T A; Postma, D S; Price, D; Raffort, N; Reuzeau, J C; Robine, J M; Rodenas, F; Robusto, F; Roche, N; Romano, A; Romano, V; Rosado-Pinto, J; Roubille, F; Ruiz, F; Ryan, D.; Salcedo, T; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Scichilone, N; Siciliano, P; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Sourdet, S; Sousa-Costa, E; Spranger, O; Sooronbaev, T; Sruk, V; Sterk, P J; Todo-Bom, A; Touchon, J; Tramontano, D; Triggiani, M; Tsartara, S I; Valero, A L; Valovirta, E; van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; van den Berge, M; Vandenplas, O; Ventura, M T; Vergara, I; Vezzani, G; Vidal, D; Viegi, G; Wagemann, M; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Wilson, N; Yiallouros, P K; Žagar, M; Zaidi, A.; Zidarn, M; Hoogerwerf, E J; Usero, J; Zuffada, R; Senn, A; de Oliveira-Alves, B

    2017-01-01

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have

  14. Building bridges for innovation in ageing: Synergies between Action Groups of the EIP on AHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Bewick, M.; Cano, A.; Keijser, Wouter Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have

  15. Building Bridges for Innovation in Ageing : Synergies between Action Groups of the EIP on AHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Bewick, M.; Cano, A.; Eklund, P.; Fico, G.; Goswami, N.; Guldemond, N. A.; Henderson, D.; Hinkema, M. J.; Liotta, G.; Mair, A.; Molloy, W.; Monaco, A.; Monsonis-Paya, I.; Nizinska, A.; Papadopoulos, H.; Pavlickova, A.; Pecorelli, S.; Prados-Torres, A.; Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.; Somekh, D.; Vera-Munoz, C.; Visser, F.; Farrell, J.; Malva, J.; Ranberg, K. Andersen; Camuzat, T.; Carriazo, A. M.; Crooks, G.; Gutter, Z.; Iaccarino, G.; Manuel De Keenoy, E.; Moda, G.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Vontetsianos, T.; Abreu, C.; Alonso, J.; Alonso-Bouzon, C.; Ankri, J.; Arredondo, M. T.; Avolio, F.; Bedbrook, A.; Bialoszewski, A. Z.; Blain, H.; Bourret, R.; Cabrera-Umpierrez, M. F.; Catala, A.; O'Caoimh, R.; Cesari, M.; Chavannes, N. H.; Correia-Da-Sousa, J.; Dedeu, T.; Ferrando, M.; Ferri, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Garcia-Lizana, F.; Guerin, O.; Hellings, P. W.; Haahtela, T.; Illario, M.; Inzerilli, M. C.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Kardas, P.; Keil, T.; Maggio, M.; Mendez-Zorrilla, A.; Menditto, E.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Murray, R.; Nogues, M.; O'Byrne-Maguire, I.; Pappa, D.; Parent, A. S.; Pastorino, M.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Samolinski, B.; Siciliano, P.; Teixeira, A. M.; Tsartara, S. I.; Valiulis, A.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vellas, B.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.; Wickman, M.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zuberbier, T.; Barbagallo, M.; Canonica, G. W.; Klimek, L.; Maggi, S.; Aberer, W.; Akdis, C.; Adcock, I. M.; Agache, I.; Albera, C.; Alonso-Trujillo, F.; Angel Guarcia, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Apostolo, J.; Arshad, S. H.; Attalin, V.; Avignon, A.; Bachert, C.; Baroni, I.; Bel, E.; Benson, M.; Bescos, C.; Blasi, F.; Barbara, C.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bernard, P. L.; Bonini, S.; Bousquet, P. J.; Branchini, B.; Brightling, C. E.; Bruguiere, V.; Bunu, C.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D. P.; Calderon, M. A.; Canovas, G.; Cardona, V.; Carlsen, K. H.; Cesario, A.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chung, K. F.; D'Angelantonio, M.; De Carlo, G.; Cholley, D.; Chorin, F.; Combe, B.; Compas, B.; Costa, D. J.; Costa, E.; Coste, O.; Coupet, A. -L.; Crepaldi, G.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Du Toit, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Dupeyron, A.; Emuzyte, R.; Fiocchi, A.; Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fonseca, J.; Fougere, B.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Garces, G.; Garcia-Aymeric, J.; Garcia-Zapirain, B.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gouder, C.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Hermosilla-Gimeno, I.; Heve, D.; Holland, C.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Johnston, S. L.; Just, J.; Jutel, M.; Kaidashev, I. P.; Khaitov, M.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keijser, W.; Kerstjens, H.; Knezovic, J.; Kowalski, M.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kotska, T.; Kovac, M.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lepore, V.; Macnee, W.; Maggio, M.; Magnan, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Marcucci, M.; Marti, T.; Masoli, M.; Melen, E.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Mlinaric, H.; Momas, I.; Montefort, S.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Moreno-Casbas, T.; Moesges, R.; Mullol, J.; Nadif, R.; Nalin, M.; Navarro-Pardo, E.; Nekam, K.; Ninot, G.; Paccard, D.; Pais, S.; Palummeri, E.; Panzner, P.; Papadopoulos, N. K.; Papanikolaou, C.; Passalacqua, G.; Pastor, E.; Perrot, M.; Plavec, D.; Popov, T. A.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Raffort, N.; Reuzeau, J. C.; Robine, J. M.; Rodenas, F.; Robusto, F.; Roche, N.; Romano, A.; Romano, V.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Roubille, F.; Ruiz, F.; Ryan, D.; Salcedo, T.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Schulz, H.; Schunemann, H. J.; Serrano, E.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Scichilone, N.; Siciliano, P.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sourdet, S.; Sousa-Costa, E.; Spranger, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Sruk, V.; Sterk, P. J.; Todo-Bom, A.; Touchon, J.; Tramontano, D.; Triggiani, M.; Tsartara, S. I.; Valero, A. L.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Van Hage, M.; Van den Berge, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Ventura, M. T.; Vergara, I.; Vezzani, G.; Vidal, D.; Viegi, G.; Wagemann, M.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Wilson, N.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Zagar, M.; Zaidi, A.; Zidarn, M.; Hoogerwerf, E. J.; Usero, J.; Zuffada, R.; Senn, A.; De Oliveira-Alves, B.

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have

  16. Building Bridges for Innovation in Ageing : Synergies between Action Groups of the EIP on AHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Bewick, M; Cano, A; Eklund, P; Fico, G; Goswami, N; Guldemond, N A; Henderson, D; Hinkema, M J; Liotta, G; Mair, A; Molloy, W; Monaco, A; Monsonis-Paya, I; Nizinska, A; Papadopoulos, H; Pavlickova, A; Pecorelli, S; Prados-Torres, A; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E; Somekh, D; Vera-Muñoz, C; Visser, F; Farrell, J; Malva, J; Andersen Ranberg, K; Camuzat, T; Carriazo, A M; Crooks, G; Gutter, Z; Iaccarino, G; Manuel de Keenoy, E; Moda, G; Rodriguez-Mañas, L; Vontetsianos, T; Abreu, C; Alonso, J; Alonso-Bouzon, C; Ankri, J; Arredondo, M T; Avolio, F; Bedbrook, A; Białoszewski, A Z; Blain, H; Bourret, R; Cabrera-Umpierrez, M F; Catala, A; O'Caoimh, R; Cesari, M; Chavannes, N H; Correia-da-Sousa, J; Dedeu, T; Ferrando, M; Ferri, M; Fokkens, W J; Garcia-Lizana, F; Guérin, O; Hellings, P W; Haahtela, T; Illario, M; Inzerilli, M C; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Kardas, P; Keil, T; Maggio, M; Mendez-Zorrilla, A; Menditto, E; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Murray, R; Nogues, M; O'Byrne-Maguire, I; Pappa, D; Parent, A S; Pastorino, M; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Siciliano, P; Teixeira, A M; Tsartara, S I; Valiulis, A; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M; Wickman, M; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Barbagallo, M; Canonica, G W; Klimek, L; Maggi, S; Aberer, W; Akdis, C; Adcock, I M; Agache, I; Albera, C; Alonso-Trujillo, F; Angel Guarcia, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Apostolo, J; Arshad, S H; Attalin, V; Avignon, A; Bachert, C; Baroni, I; Bel, E; Benson, M; Bescos, C; Blasi, F; Barbara, C; Bergmann, K C; Bernard, P L; Bonini, S; Bousquet, P J; Branchini, B; Brightling, C E; Bruguière, V; Bunu, C; Bush, A; Caimmi, D P; Calderon, M A; Canovas, G; Cardona, V; Carlsen, K H; Cesario, A; Chkhartishvili, E; Chiron, R; Chivato, T; Chung, K F; d'Angelantonio, M; De Carlo, G; Cholley, D; Chorin, F; Combe, B; Compas, B; Costa, D J; Costa, E; Coste, O; Coupet, A-L; Crepaldi, G; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Du Toit, G; Dubakiene, R; Dupeyron, A; Emuzyte, R; Fiocchi, A; Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fonseca, J; Fougère, B; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, G; Garcia-Aymeric, J; Garcia-Zapirain, B; Gemicioğlu, B; Gouder, C; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Hermosilla-Gimeno, I; Héve, D; Holland, C; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Johnston, S L; Just, J; Jutel, M; Kaidashev, I P; Khaitov, M; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keijser, W; Kerstjens, H; Knezović, J; Kowalski, M; Koppelman, G H; Kotska, T; Kovac, M; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lepore, V; MacNee, W; Maggio, M; Magnan, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; Marcucci, M; Marti, T; Masoli, M; Melen, E; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Millot-Keurinck, J; Mlinarić, H; Momas, I; Montefort, S; Morais-Almeida, M; Moreno-Casbas, T; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nadif, R; Nalin, M; Navarro-Pardo, E; Nekam, K; Ninot, G; Paccard, D; Pais, S; Palummeri, E; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N K; Papanikolaou, C; Passalacqua, G; Pastor, E; Perrot, M; Plavec, D; Popov, T A; Postma, D S; Price, D; Raffort, N; Reuzeau, J C; Robine, J M; Rodenas, F; Robusto, F; Roche, N; Romano, A; Romano, V; Rosado-Pinto, J; Roubille, F; Ruiz, F; Ryan, D; Salcedo, T; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Scichilone, N; Siciliano, P; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Sourdet, S; Sousa-Costa, E; Spranger, O; Sooronbaev, T; Sruk, V; Sterk, P J; Todo-Bom, A; Touchon, J; Tramontano, D; Triggiani, M; Tsartara, S I; Valero, A L; Valovirta, E; van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; van den Berge, M; Vandenplas, O; Ventura, M T; Vergara, I; Vezzani, G; Vidal, D; Viegi, G; Wagemann, M; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Wilson, N; Yiallouros, P K; Žagar, M; Zaidi, A; Zidarn, M; Hoogerwerf, E J; Usero, J; Zuffada, R; Senn, A; de Oliveira-Alves, B

    2017-01-01

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have

  17. Evaluation of Active Cooling Systems for Non-Residential Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Othuman Mydin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling systems are an essential element in many facets of modern society including cars, computers and buildings. Cooling systems are usually divided into two types: passive and active. Passive cooling transfers heat without using any additional energy while active cooling is a type of heat transfer that uses powered devices such as fans or pumps. This paper will focus on one particular type of passive cooling: air-conditioning systems. An air-conditioning system is defined as controlled air movement, temperature, humidity and cleanliness of a building area. Air conditioning consists of cooling and heating. Therefore, the air-conditioning system should be able to add and remove heat from the area. An air-conditioning system is defined as a control or treatment of air in a confined space. The process that occurs is the air-conditioning system absorbs heat and dust while, at the same time, cleaning the air breathed into a closed space. The purpose of air-conditioning is to maintain a comfortable atmosphere for human life and to meet user requirements. In this paper, air-conditioning systems for non-residential buildings will be presented and discussed.

  18. Recognition of human activities using depth images of Kinect for biofied building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ami; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    These days, various functions in the living spaces are needed because of an aging society, promotion of energy conservation, and diversification of lifestyles. To meet this requirement, we propose "Biofied Building". The "Biofied Building" is the system learnt from living beings. The various information is accumulated in a database using small sensor agent robots as a key function of this system to control the living spaces. Among the various kinds of information about the living spaces, especially human activities can be triggers for lighting or air conditioning control. By doing so, customized space is possible. Human activities are divided into two groups, the activities consisting of single behavior and the activities consisting of multiple behaviors. For example, "standing up" or "sitting down" consists of a single behavior. These activities are accompanied by large motions. On the other hand "eating" consists of several behaviors, holding the chopsticks, catching the food, putting them in the mouth, and so on. These are continuous motions. Considering the characteristics of two types of human activities, we individually, use two methods, R transformation and variance. In this paper, we focus on the two different types of human activities, and propose the two methods of human activity recognition methods for construction of the database of living space for "Biofied Building". Finally, we compare the results of both methods.

  19. Active leave behavior of members in a fault-tolerant group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yun

    2004-01-01

    Active replication is an effective means to enhance fault tolerant capability in distributed systems. A fault-tolerant group is composed of replicas of key components in a system. This paper analyzes three types of leave semantics of group members, and manifests activities a group member involves. Then it educes requirements for a group member to safely leave. As to quick-leave semantics, this paper proposes a solution and discusses the non-empty protocol and relay protocol in detail. Further, it gives proofs of correctness and termination property of the protocols. The solution is a building block for a practical and operational group membership module.

  20. SEMIAUTOMATIC BUILDING EXTRACTION FROM STEREOIMAGE PAIR BASED ON LINES GROUPING AND LEAST SQUARES MATCHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a general paradigm of semiautomatic building extrac tion from aerial stereo image pair.In the semiautomatic extraction system,the building model is defined by selected roof type through human-machine interface and input the approximation of area where the extracted building exists.Then un der the knowledge of the roof type,low-level and mid-level processing including edge detection,straight line segments extraction and line segments grouping ar e used to establish the initial geometrical model of the roof-top.However,the initial geometrical model is not so accurate in geometry.To attain accurate res ults,a general least squares adjustment integrating the linear templates matchin g model with geometrical constraints in object-space is applied to refine the ini tial geometrical model.The adjustment model integrating the straight edge pat tern and 3D constraints together is a well-studied optimal and ant i-noise method.After gaining proper initial values,this adjustment model can f lexibly process extraction of kinds of roof types by changing or assembling the geometrical constraints in object-space.

  1. Applying Critical Race Theory to Group Model Building Methods to Address Community Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Funchess, Melanie; Burrell, Marcus; Cerulli, Catherine; Bedell, Precious; White, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Group model building (GMB) is an approach to building qualitative and quantitative models with stakeholders to learn about the interrelationships among multilevel factors causing complex public health problems over time. Scant literature exists on adapting this method to address public health issues that involve racial dynamics. This study's objectives are to (1) introduce GMB methods, (2) present a framework for adapting GMB to enhance cultural responsiveness, and (3) describe outcomes of adapting GMB to incorporate differences in racial socialization during a community project seeking to understand key determinants of community violence transmission. An academic-community partnership planned a 1-day session with diverse stakeholders to explore the issue of violence using GMB. We documented key questions inspired by critical race theory (CRT) and adaptations to established GMB "scripts" (i.e., published facilitation instructions). The theory's emphasis on experiential knowledge led to a narrative-based facilitation guide from which participants created causal loop diagrams. These early diagrams depict how violence is transmitted and how communities respond, based on participants' lived experiences and mental models of causation that grew to include factors associated with race. Participants found these methods useful for advancing difficult discussion. The resulting diagrams can be tested and expanded in future research, and will form the foundation for collaborative identification of solutions to build community resilience. GMB is a promising strategy that community partnerships should consider when addressing complex health issues; our experience adapting methods based on CRT is promising in its acceptability and early system insights.

  2. Promoting physical activity in socially vulnerable groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herens, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background:  In the Netherlands, inequalities in physical activity behaviour go hand in hand with socioeconomic inequalities in health. To promote physical activity effectively and equitably, participatory community-based physical activity interventions seem promising and are s

  3. Promoting physical activity in socially vulnerable groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herens, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background:  In the Netherlands, inequalities in physical activity behaviour go hand in hand with socioeconomic inequalities in health. To promote physical activity effectively and equitably, participatory community-based physical activity interventions seem promising and are

  4. Group Work vs. Whole Class Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Asma

    2008-01-01

    Group work has only been recently introduced in the education system of Pakistan but many primary teachers, especially in the public schools, are still not aware of how different kinds of strategies that is group work and whole class teaching facilitate learning among students. This paper aims to provide an overview of teaching strategies to…

  5. Interdisciplinary Service-Learning: Building Student Competencies through the Cross-Cultural Parent Groups Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Belliveau

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Changing demographics and an emphasis on competency-based social work education call for innovative approaches to the delivery of curricular content. In an effort to introduce BSW students to the socio-political issues facing the local Latino immigrant community, a service-learning project was developed in collaboration with the Spanish Language Department and a local middle school. An analysis of outcomes from social work student evaluations showed that students engaged with the community and issues in new and unexpected ways. Through their engagement in a cross-cultural group project, students developed greater cultural competency, honed their group practice skills in an unfamiliar context, provided a needed service to the community, and raised their awareness about the working conditions of new immigrants as part of a developing framework for social action. Details and implications of the project as a means to build student competencies are described.

  6. Building Point Detection from Vehicle-Borne LiDAR Data Based on Voxel Group and Horizontal Hollow Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Information extraction and three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of buildings using the vehicle-borne laser scanning (VLS system is significant for many applications. Extracting LiDAR points, from VLS, belonging to various types of building in large-scale complex urban environments still retains some problems. In this paper, a new technical framework for automatic and efficient building point extraction is proposed, including three main steps: (1 voxel group-based shape recognition; (2 category-oriented merging; and (3 building point identification by horizontal hollow ratio analysis. This article proposes a concept of “voxel group” based on the voxelization of VLS points: each voxel group is composed of several voxels that belong to one single real-world object. Then the shapes of point clouds in each voxel group are recognized and this shape information is utilized to merge voxel group. This article puts forward a characteristic nature of vehicle-borne LiDAR building points, called “horizontal hollow ratio”, for efficient extraction. Experiments are analyzed from two aspects: (1 building-based evaluation for overall experimental area; and (2 point-based evaluation for individual building using the completeness and correctness. The experimental results indicate that the proposed framework is effective for the extraction of LiDAR points belonging to various types of buildings in large-scale complex urban environments.

  7. Novel heating and cooling concept employing rainwater cisterns and thermo-active building systems for a residential building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalz, Doreen E.; Wienold, Jan; Fischer, Martin; Cali, Davide [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    This paper introduces and evaluates a novel heating and cooling concept employing thermo-active building systems and environmental energy, harnessed from two 11-m{sup 3} rainwater cisterns for a 285-m{sup 2} residential building in passive house standard in Germany. The building strives for a significantly reduced primary energy use with carefully coordinated measures, such as high quality building envelope, by means of vacuum insulated panels, supply and exhaust air system with heat recovery, reduced solar heat gains (solar shading), and the integration of thermal solar collectors and photovoltaic in the plant system. On this premise, a comprehensive long-term monitoring in high time-resolution was carried out for the building for two years with an accompanying commissioning of the building performance. Measurements comprise the energy use for heating, cooling, and ventilation, as well as the auxiliary equipment, the performance of the environmental heat source and sink (rainwater cistern), thermal comfort, and local climatic site conditions. The analysis focuses on the performance and the efficiency of rainwater cisterns as natural heat source and sink as well as the heat pump system. The paper discusses the performance of thermo-active building systems, investigates the thermal comfort, determines the efficiency of the heating/cooling system, and evaluates the total end and primary energy use of the building. (author)

  8. Embedding types and canonical affine maps between Bruhat-Tits buildings of classical groups (Thesis)

    CERN Document Server

    Skodlerack, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There are 2 parts. To part one. P. Broussous and S. Stevens studied maps between enlarged Bruhat-Tits buildings to construct types for p-adic unitary groups. They needed maps which respect the Moy-Prasad filtrations. That property is called (CLF), i.e. compatibility with the Lie algebra filtrations. We generalise their results on CLF-maps. Let k_0 be a p-adic field of characteristic not two. We consider G:={\\bf U}(h) defined over k_0 with a signed hermitian form h. Let H be the centraliser of a semisimple k_0-rational Lie algebra element of G. We prove the existence of an affine H(k_0)-equivariant CLF-map j from the enlarged Bruhat-Tits building B^1(H,k_0) to B^1(G,k_0). Every point of B^1(H,k_0) and B^1(G,k_0) has attached a Lie algebra filtration. CLF is precisely that the intersection of the Lie algebra filtration of j(x) down to Lie(H)(k_0) is the filtration of x. We also prove how strong the CLF-property determines j. In the non-quaternion algebra case Broussous und Stevens showed the existence and a fir...

  9. Group Activities in Task-based Communicative Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓一琳; 王宇澄

    2005-01-01

    In a task-based communicative classroom, group activities are effective ways to devdop students' 4 basic language skills. However, not all group activities can reach the expected results. English teachers should pay attention to some aspects in organizing a classroom group activity.

  10. Active Disaster Response System for a Smart Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yen Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Disaster warning and surveillance systems have been widely applied to help the public be aware of an emergency. However, existing warning systems are unable to cooperate with household appliances or embedded controllers; that is, they cannot provide enough time for preparedness and evacuation, especially for disasters like earthquakes. In addition, the existing warning and surveillance systems are not responsible for collecting sufficient information inside a building for relief workers to conduct a proper rescue action after a disaster happens. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a proof of concept prototype, named the active disaster response system (ADRS, which automatically performs emergency tasks when an earthquake happens. ADRS can interpret Common Alerting Protocol (CAP messages, published by an official agency, and actuate embedded controllers to perform emergency tasks to respond to the alerts. Examples of emergency tasks include opening doors and windows and cutting off power lines and gas valves. In addition, ADRS can maintain a temporary network by utilizing the embedded controllers; hence, victims trapped inside a building are still able to post emergency messages if the original network is disconnected. We conducted a field trial to evaluate the effectiveness of ADRS after an earthquake happened. Our results show that compared to manually operating emergency tasks, ADRS can reduce the operation time by up to 15 s, which is long enough for people to get under sturdy furniture, or to evacuate from the third floor to the first floor, or to run more than 100 m.

  11. Environmental and Economic Analysis of Thermal Active Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fabiano Reis Lessa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is regarding one promising technological solution – which is so called Thermal Active Building Systems (TABS –for one of the most critical problems both in environmental and economic aspects, which is the raising energy consumption. Buildings are the principal application target of the solution once that population spends most part of their time inside them. Therefore, more energy is required to supply an increasingly demand in lighting, air conditioning, heating, electronic devices and so on. In this context, TABS emerge like a possible solution. To ensure the system efficiency or, in other words, prove its viability, it will be applied an environmental management tool (SWOT Analysis weighting all the pros and comparing with its drawbacks, based on previous experiences in implantation of such system, available in literature. A basic theoretical background, which is extremely important to a better comprehension of the system, covering both engineering and environmental management areas, is presented on this paper. Results shown that TABS are efficient mechanisms in the reduction of power consumption, committed with sustainable development, and which worth the investments in a Life Cycle Cost evaluation

  12. Examination of the Basement of Historic Buildings in Investment Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulybin Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process and methodology of the survey of basements rarely mentioned in the various construction rules and regulations. Basically describes the procedure of conducting a detailed survey of some of the individual elements. These surveys are fundamental in nature, include a large number of estimates and require significant financial and time costs. Usually the purpose of these surveys is to check the state of the building as a whole, it’s safe operation or before starting of reconstruction. In the process of selecting areas of investment activity such large-scale survey is not possible. Needed a quick and inexpensive method intended for decision about investment in a particular object. At the same time, the survey should cover all the elements of the basement significantly affect the cost of reconstruction of the basement associated with his penetration. The article presents the general conception of conducting a rapid survey. The described methods and technologies applicable to the examination for the purpose of making decisions about investments in reconstruction of a basement level rooms. The composition of the works and their sequence. A comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of different methods. The practical examples. Scheme of conducting a rapid survey of the basement. The article analyzes the materials used in the construction of historic buildings in St. Petersburg.

  13. Building as active elements of energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bulut, Mehmet Börühan

    2016-01-01

    Buildings account for approximately 40% of the energy demand and 33% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union. Accordingly, there are several efforts that target energy efficiency in buildings both at the European and Swedish levels. The role of buildings in climate change mitigation, however, is not limited to energy savings. Buildings are expected to become key elements of the future smart energy systems by supplying and using energy in a more flexible way. Reducing the e...

  14. Energy intelligent buildings based on user activity : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Aiello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Occupant presence and behaviour in buildings has been shown to have large impact on heating, cooling and ventilation demand, energy consumption of lighting and appliances, and building controls. Energy-unaware behaviour can add one-third to a building's designed energy performance. Consequently, use

  15. Energy intelligent buildings based on user activity : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Aiello, Marco

    Occupant presence and behaviour in buildings has been shown to have large impact on heating, cooling and ventilation demand, energy consumption of lighting and appliances, and building controls. Energy-unaware behaviour can add one-third to a building's designed energy performance. Consequently,

  16. Individual and group dynamics in purchasing activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Guo, Jin-Li; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is in constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behavior of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchase orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plots. It’s found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and then lead to an exponential factor for group dynamics. To better describe the mechanism generating the heterogeneity of the purchase order assignment process from the objective company to all its vendors, a model driven by product life cycle is introduced, and then the analytical distribution and the simulation result are obtained, which are in good agreement with the empirical data.

  17. Activity report of ILD-TPC Asia group

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Y; Gros, P; Tian, J; Kawada, S; Fujii, K; Matsuda, T; Sugiyama, A; Nitoh, O; Watanabe, T; Fusayasu, T; Takahashi, T; Kobayashi, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of ILD-TPC Asia group is realization of high precision Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as a central tracker in International Linear Collider (ILC). We have been studying the many R&D items to build the real detector as a member of LCTPC collaboration. This paper describes the our efforts for realization of the ILD-TPC, the result of test beam using large prototype TPC, local field distortion, positive ion effects and gate devices, and cooling electronics which are key items to build ILD-TPC.

  18. Individual and Group Dynamics in Purchasing Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2010-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is of constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behaviors of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchasing orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plot. It's found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and t...

  19. Building Bridges for Innovation in Ageing: Synergies between Action Groups of the EIP on AHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Bewick, M; Cano, A; Eklund, P; Fico, G; Goswami, N; Guldemond, N A; Henderson, D; Hinkema, M J; Liotta, G; Mair, A; Molloy, W; Monaco, A; Monsonis-Paya, I; Nizinska, A; Papadopoulos, H; Pavlickova, A; Pecorelli, S; Prados-Torres, A; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E; Somekh, D; Vera-Muñoz, C; Visser, F; Farrell, J; Malva, J; Andersen Ranberg, K; Camuzat, T; Carriazo, A M; Crooks, G; Gutter, Z; Iaccarino, G; Manuel de Keenoy, E; Moda, G; Rodriguez-Mañas, L; Vontetsianos, T; Abreu, C; Alonso, J; Alonso-Bouzon, C; Ankri, J; Arredondo, M T; Avolio, F; Bedbrook, A; Białoszewski, A Z; Blain, H; Bourret, R; Cabrera-Umpierrez, M F; Catala, A; O'Caoimh, R; Cesari, M; Chavannes, N H; Correia-da-Sousa, J; Dedeu, T; Ferrando, M; Ferri, M; Fokkens, W J; Garcia-Lizana, F; Guérin, O; Hellings, P W; Haahtela, T; Illario, M; Inzerilli, M C; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Kardas, P; Keil, T; Maggio, M; Mendez-Zorrilla, A; Menditto, E; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Murray, R; Nogues, M; O'Byrne-Maguire, I; Pappa, D; Parent, A S; Pastorino, M; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Siciliano, P; Teixeira, A M; Tsartara, S I; Valiulis, A; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M; Wickman, M; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Barbagallo, M; Canonica, G W; Klimek, L; Maggi, S; Aberer, W; Akdis, C; Adcock, I M; Agache, I; Albera, C; Alonso-Trujillo, F; Angel Guarcia, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Apostolo, J; Arshad, S H; Attalin, V; Avignon, A; Bachert, C; Baroni, I; Bel, E; Benson, M; Bescos, C; Blasi, F; Barbara, C; Bergmann, K C; Bernard, P L; Bonini, S; Bousquet, P J; Branchini, B; Brightling, C E; Bruguière, V; Bunu, C; Bush, A; Caimmi, D P; Calderon, M A; Canovas, G; Cardona, V; Carlsen, K H; Cesario, A; Chkhartishvili, E; Chiron, R; Chivato, T; Chung, K F; d'Angelantonio, M; De Carlo, G; Cholley, D; Chorin, F; Combe, B; Compas, B; Costa, D J; Costa, E; Coste, O; Coupet, A-L; Crepaldi, G; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Du Toit, G; Dubakiene, R; Dupeyron, A; Emuzyte, R; Fiocchi, A; Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fonseca, J; Fougère, B; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, G; Garcia-Aymeric, J; Garcia-Zapirain, B; Gemicioğlu, B; Gouder, C; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Hermosilla-Gimeno, I; Héve, D; Holland, C; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Johnston, S L; Just, J; Jutel, M; Kaidashev, I P; Khaitov, M; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keijser, W; Kerstjens, H; Knezović, J; Kowalski, M; Koppelman, G H; Kotska, T; Kovac, M; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lepore, V; MacNee, W; Maggio, M; Magnan, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; Marcucci, M; Marti, T; Masoli, M; Melen, E; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Millot-Keurinck, J; Mlinarić, H; Momas, I; Montefort, S; Morais-Almeida, M; Moreno-Casbas, T; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nadif, R; Nalin, M; Navarro-Pardo, E; Nekam, K; Ninot, G; Paccard, D; Pais, S; Palummeri, E; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N K; Papanikolaou, C; Passalacqua, G; Pastor, E; Perrot, M; Plavec, D; Popov, T A; Postma, D S; Price, D; Raffort, N; Reuzeau, J C; Robine, J M; Rodenas, F; Robusto, F; Roche, N; Romano, A; Romano, V; Rosado-Pinto, J; Roubille, F; Ruiz, F; Ryan, D; Salcedo, T; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Scichilone, N; Siciliano, P; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Sourdet, S; Sousa-Costa, E; Spranger, O; Sooronbaev, T; Sruk, V; Sterk, P J; Todo-Bom, A; Touchon, J; Tramontano, D; Triggiani, M; Tsartara, S I; Valero, A L; Valovirta, E; van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; van den Berge, M; Vandenplas, O; Ventura, M T; Vergara, I; Vezzani, G; Vidal, D; Viegi, G; Wagemann, M; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Wilson, N; Yiallouros, P K; Žagar, M; Zaidi, A; Zidarn, M; Hoogerwerf, E J; Usero, J; Zuffada, R; Senn, A; de Oliveira-Alves, B

    2017-01-01

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have often worked in silos and, consequently, synergies between Action Groups have been proposed to strengthen the triple win of the EIP on AHA. The paper presents the methodology and current status of the Task Force on EIP on AHA synergies. Synergies are in line with the Action Groups' new Renovated Action Plan (2016-2018) to ensure that their future objectives are coherent and fully connected. The outcomes and impact of synergies are using the Monitoring and Assessment Framework for the EIP on AHA (MAFEIP). Eight proposals for synergies have been approved by the Task Force: Five cross-cutting synergies which can be used for all current and future synergies as they consider overarching domains (appropriate polypharmacy, citizen empowerment, teaching and coaching on AHA, deployment of synergies to EU regions, Responsible Research and Innovation), and three cross-cutting synergies focussing on current Action Group activities (falls, frailty, integrated care and chronic respiratory diseases).

  20. Activities of the Boom and Chassis Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    dell, Jason Scott; Meeks, Thomas Bayne; Merkel, Kelly; Nelson, Brent; Winchell, Tom

    Group One of the NASA Lunar Enabler Project has designed the primary chassis and boom structures for the lunar vehicle. Both components also feature V-clamps that were adapted to interface connections within the structure. The chassis features a front end, rear end section, middle cross-section, and face plate. The rear section contains an extra compartment for the engine, hydraulic pump, fuel bottles, and oil reservoir necessary for the wheel drives. Each section consists of tubular aluminum 6061-T6. The boom features four degrees of freedom system, where the minimum factor of safety of any part is 1.5 (but, normally much higher). It consists of a tapered upper boom, lower boom, and three elbows that complement the articulation joints. Each section of the boom has been constructed from aluminum 6061-T6. There are four joints and eight V-clamps in the boom assembly. The V-clamps feature support rings that prevent axial rotation. They provide easy adaptability and assembly.

  1. The Inevitability of Strengthening the Nation-Building Subjectivity of Ethnic and National Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.sc. Harun Hadzic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a very courageous, scientifically founded prediction, concerning the imminent and inevitable process of strengthening  the political and nation-building subjectivity of national minorities and ethnic groups, i.e., minority indigenous people. For, a more lasting peace and stability, for which we want to dominate in Europe and the world, can only be achieved by deflection of the discontent of these nationalities, on one hand, and strengthening of the public recognition of their international legal subjectivity, on the other hand. This implies the exercise of their right to self-determination and the creation of independent autonomies, regions or countries, which also implies reclassification and conversion of the internal, but also of the interstate borders. These new limits must be established precisely in those parts of the world where there is a political struggle, and a long-time demand of these organized groups, which would, in effect, mean that the international community should accept their demand for creation of new states, or, at least, another, lower, level of independence.

  2. Building a stakeholder's vision of an offshore wind-farm project: A group modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Château, Pierre-Alexandre; Chang, Yang-Chi; Chen, Hsin; Ko, Tsung-Ting

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a Group Model Building (GMB) initiative that was designed to discuss the various potential effects that an offshore wind-farm may have on its local ecology and socioeconomic development. The representatives of various organizations in the study area, Lu-Kang, Taiwan, have held several meetings, and structured debates have been organized to promote the emergence of a consensual view on the main issues and their implications. A System Dynamics (SD) model has been built and corrected iteratively with the participants through the GMB process. The diverse interests within the group led the process toward the design of multifunctional wind-farms with different modalities. The scenario analyses, using the SD model under various policies, including no wind-farm policy, objectively articulates the vision of the local stakeholders. The results of the SD simulations show that the multifunctional wind-farms may have superior economic effects and the larger wind-farms with bird corridors could reduce ecological impact. However, the participants of the modeling process did not appreciate any type of offshore wind-farm development when considering all of the identified key factors of social acceptance. The insight gained from the study can provide valuable information to actualize feasible strategies for the green energy technique to meet local expectations.

  3. Effects of resource-building group intervention on career management and mental health in work organizations: randomized controlled field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Jukka; Toppinen-Tanner, Salla; Mutanen, Pertti

    2012-03-01

    A resource-building group intervention was developed to enhance career management, mental health, and job retention in work organizations. The in-company training program provided employees with better preparedness to manage their own careers. The program activities were universally implemented using an organization-level, 2-trainer model with trainers from the human resources management and occupational health services. The study was a within-organizations, randomly assigned field experimental study; it investigated the impacts of the intervention on immediate career management preparedness and later mental health and intentions to retire early. A total of 718 eligible individuals returned a questionnaire in 17 organizations and became voluntary participants. The respondents were randomly assigned to either an intervention (N = 369) or a comparison group (N = 349). Those in the intervention group were invited to group intervention workshops, whereas those in the comparison group received printed information about career and health-related issues. The 7-month follow-up results showed that the program significantly decreased depressive symptoms and intentions to retire early and increased mental resources among the group participants compared to the others. The mediation analyses demonstrated that the increase in career management preparedness as a proximal impact of the intervention mediated the longer term mental health effects. Those who benefited most from the intervention as regards their mental health were employees with elevated levels of depression or exhaustion and younger employees, implying additional benefits of a more targeted use of the intervention. The results demonstrated the benefits of the enhancement of individual-level career management and resilience resources as career and health promotion practice in work organizations.

  4. Case-study of thermo active building systems in Japanese climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Rongling; Yoshidomi, Togo; Ooka, Ryozo

    2015-01-01

    Thermo active building systems (TABS) have been applied in office buildings as a promising energy efficient solution in many European countries. The utilization of building thermal mass helps to provide high quality thermal environments with less energy consumption. However, the concept of TABS...... is entirely new in Japan. This paper introduces and evaluates TABS under Tokyo weather conditions to clarify the potential of use TABS in Japan. Cooling capacity of thermo active building systems used in an office building was evaluated by means of dynamic simulations. Two central rooms of the office were...

  5. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  6. Dynamics of safety performance and culture: a group model building approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yang Miang; Love, Peter E D; Stagbouer, Greg; Annesley, Chris

    2012-09-01

    The management of occupational health and safety (OHS) including safety culture interventions is comprised of complex problems that are often hard to scope and define. Due to the dynamic nature and complexity of OHS management, the concept of system dynamics (SD) is used to analyze accident prevention. In this paper, a system dynamics group model building (GMB) approach is used to create a causal loop diagram of the underlying factors influencing the OHS performance of a major drilling and mining contractor in Australia. While the organization has invested considerable resources into OHS their disabling injury frequency rate (DIFR) has not been decreasing. With this in mind, rich individualistic knowledge about the dynamics influencing the DIFR was acquired from experienced employees with operations, health and safety and training background using a GMB workshop. Findings derived from the workshop were used to develop a series of causal loop diagrams that includes a wide range of dynamics that can assist in better understanding the causal influences OHS performance. The causal loop diagram provides a tool for organizations to hypothesize the dynamics influencing effectiveness of OHS management, particularly the impact on DIFR. In addition the paper demonstrates that the SD GMB approach has significant potential in understanding and improving OHS management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Jihadi Groups and State-Building: The Case of Boko Haram in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ladbury

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The following article considers the extent to which the Nigerian jihadi group, Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati wal-Jihad (JAS, also known as Boko Haram, is transforming its model of governance from domination by violence and force to governance through civil administration and public support. Drawing on over four years of research and programming in north-east Nigeria, the authors consider three aspects of such a transformation: the development of institutions, the propagation of an ideology and programmes to win over the hearts and minds of the wider population, and the role assigned to women and girls. The article finds that JAS has established little in the way of a civilian administration in the areas that have come under its control. Likewise, the movement has apparently made no concerted effort to project a vision of a future society or concrete benefits of the envisaged caliphate that would generate a level of public support. Moreover, the brutal treatment of women and girls belies any attempt by the movement to promote a positive vision of the role of women, even as wives and mothers. In this, JAS is seen to differ from a number of other jihadi movements that have relatively sophisticated approaches to generating popular support and recruiting members. The article goes on to suggest a number of reasons for JAS’s failure to move towards a polity that is more consensual and less dependent on violence, as well as its implications for those who would seek to restrain the expansion and ideological reach of jihadist groups. It concludes by offering suggestions of how the government can seize the opportunity presented by this lack of a state-building strategy, in order to show the people of north-east Nigeria that it can offer a better alternative.

  8. Facilitating Active Engagement of the University Student in a Large-Group Setting Using Group Work Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Gemma K.; Mahon, Catherine; Lillis, Seamus

    2017-01-01

    It is envisaged that small-group exercises as part of a large-group session would facilitate not only group work exercises (a valuable employability skill), but also peer learning. In this article, such a strategy to facilitate the active engagement of the student in a large-group setting was explored. The production of student-led resources was…

  9. The net zero energy building of the Zeller-Group in Herten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeth, Bart van [Daikin Europe NV, Environment Research Center, Anderlecht (Belgium); Zeller, Achim [Athoka GmbH, Herten (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010 a recast of the European Energy performance of buildings directive was published, introducing nearly zero energy building for new constructions by 2019 and 2021. While the different member states are in the process of implementing this directive in the national legislations also manufactures of buildings HVAC equipment are preparing on this new evolution. This presentation will give a manufactures view on the process of defining the boundaries, optimising selections and products. This will be brought from theory to reality with the demonstration of a case study nZEB in Herten (office building for a small to medium enterprise): a high performance building partly due to the contribution of heat pump technology and electricity generation by thin film photovoltaic panels. (orig.)

  10. Field test of a thermal active building system (tabs) in an office building in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondo, Daniela; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Corgnati, Stefano P.

    2013-01-01

    in the indoor environmental assessment of a building. At the same time, also use of low temperature heating and high temperature cooling systems in non-residential buildings has increased, due to the energy efficiency and the economical cooling and heating performance of tins kind of plants. This paper presents...... were carried out monitoring air and operative temperature, relative humidity and CO2 levels in the room where internal heat gains from people where controlled and simulated by heated dummies positioned at the same workstations used by employees during the workdays. Supply and return water temperature...

  11. Active ingredients of substance use-focused self-help groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Rudolf H

    2008-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of some of the probable active ingredients of self-help groups in light of four related theories that identify common social processes that appear to underlie effective psychosocial treatments for and continuing remission from these disorders. Social control theory specifies active ingredients such as bonding, goal direction and structure; social learning theory specifies the importance of norms and role models, behavioral economics and behavioral choice theory emphasizes involvement in rewarding activities other than substance use, and stress and coping theory highlights building self-efficacy and effective coping skills. A review of existing studies suggests that the emphasis on these active ingredients probably underlies some aspects of the effectiveness of self-help groups. Several issues that need to be addressed to enhance understanding of the active ingredients of action of self-help groups are discussed, including consideration of indices of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) affiliation as active ingredients, identification of personal characteristics that may moderate the influence of active ingredients on substance use outcomes, examination of whether active ingredients of self-help groups, can amplify or compensate for treatment, identification of potential detrimental effects of involvement in self-help groups and focusing on the link between active ingredients of self-help groups and other aspects of the overall recovery milieu, such as the family and social networks.

  12. Building an optomechatronics group in a young university in Western Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Cira, Octavian; Demian, Dorin; Mnerie, Corina; Kaposta, Iosif

    2014-07-01

    We present our experience regarding the establishing of an interdisciplinary group with Optics as one of its main topic at the Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad (UAVA) - linked with the improvement through research of our educational activities. The 3OM Group (in Opto-Mechatronics, Optical Metrology, and Optics and Mechanics) is described in its evolution from optomechanics to photonics, the latter with a focus on OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) - with the national and the international collaborations established, with universities from Romania, Europe and USA. While the research directions of the 3OM Group are presented, they are linked with the educational components implemented in the various subjects we teach, for both undergraduate and graduate students, both in Mechanical and in Electrical Engineering. The main effort is to integrate education and research, to move teaching beyond the classical aspects to put the stress on hands-on-experiments, as well as on research-based activities - even with undergraduates. The main goals of this approach are to obtain an early orientation towards innovation and discovery, with a taste for novelties and with a clear focus on international standards. While this account is only one of many, it offers our experience in passing through the difficulties of developing both research and education in Optics in a young university in an emergent economy in Eastern Europe.

  13. Thermo Active Building Systems Using Building Mass To Heat and Cool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    Using the thermal storage capacity of the concrete slabs between each floor in multistory buildings to heat or cool is a trend that began in the early 1990s in Switzerland.1,2 Pipes carrying water for heating and cooling are embedded in the center of the concrete slab. In central Europe (Germany...

  14. Building a peaceful society: origins, prevention, and reconciliation after genocide and other group violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Ervin

    2013-10-01

    The 20th century was a century of genocide and other great violence between groups within societies. Already at the beginning of the 21st century, there have been mass killings, civil wars, violent conflict, and terrorism. This article summarizes influences that tend to lead to intense group violence. It then considers prevention, stressing early prevention--and reconciliation as an aspect of prevention--and focusing on central principles and practices. The principles include developing positive orientations to previously devalued groups; healing from past victimization and promoting altruism born of suffering; moderating respect for authority; creating constructive ideologies; promoting understanding of the origins of violence, its impact, and avenues to prevention; promoting truth, justice, and a shared history; and raising inclusively caring, morally courageous children. Practices related to all of these are also discussed. The article stresses the role of progressive change, that is, of psychological, behavioral, and social evolution, in both extreme violence and positive relations between groups; the role of passive bystanders in the unfolding of violence; and the role of active bystandership in the prevention of violence, in the promotion of reconciliation, and in the development of harmonious societies. It emphasizes psychological processes but notes the importance of creating societal institutions. The author cites findings from both laboratory research and case studies, reviews interventions and their evaluation in Rwanda, and points to the need for further research.

  15. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  16. Teaching Group Interdependence: A Campus Murder Mystery Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minei, Elizabeth M.; Shearer Dunn, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication; small group; interpersonal. Objectives: This single activity demonstrates: (1) how interdependence can lead to better group outcomes than individual outcomes can; (2) how diversity of knowledge from multiple contributors helps group functioning; and (3) how students can be introduced to members of the…

  17. Team-Building Activities in Dance Classes and Discoveries from Reflective Essays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Stephanie J.; Pedro, Rachel A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perceptions of team-building activities within a university Latin dance course. Students (N = 30) completed an evaluation of the team-building activities and wrote reflective essays about their experiences in the course. The course consisted of twenty 90-minute classes. In the third class…

  18. Surface functional groups and redox property of modified activated carbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xianglan; Deng Shengfu; Liu Qiong; Zhang Yan; Cheng Lei

    2011-01-01

    A series of activated carbons (ACs) were prepared using HNO3, H2O2 and steam as activation agents with the aim to introduce functional groups to carbon surface in the ACs preparation process. The effects of concentration of activation agent, activation time on the surface functional groups and redox property of ACs were characterized by Temperature Program Desorption (TPD) and Cyclic Voitammetry (CV). Results showed that lactone groups of ACs activated by HNO3 increase with activation time, and the carboxyl groups increase with the concentration of HNO3. Carbonyl/quinine groups of ACs activated by H2O2 increase with the activation time and the concentration of H2O2, although the acidic groups decrease with the concentration of H2O2. The redox property reflected by CV at 0 and 0.5 V is different with any kinds of oxygen functional groups characterized by TPD, but it is consistent with the SO2 catalytic oxidization/oxidation properties indicated by TPR.

  19. Physician executive promotes process for managing change. Building consensus for group plan is key to successful transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, V M

    2001-01-01

    Thrust into a leadership position after years in solo practice demanded quick thinking for one physician executive. Faced with a need for change, he developed his own process for turning an individual's idea into a plan of action for an entire group. Learn the steps he took to build consensus and ease resistance to change.

  20. SETTING OF TASK OF OPTIMIZATION OF THE ACTIVITY OF A MACHINE-BUILDING CLUSTER COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Romanenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the development of methodological approaches to the management of machine-building enterprise on the basis of cost reduction, optimization of the portfolio of orders and capacity utilization in the process of operational management. Evaluation of economic efficiency of such economic entities of the real sector of the economy is determined, including the timing of orders, which depend on the issues of building a production facility, maintenance of fixed assets and maintain them at a given level. Formulated key components of economic-mathematical model of industrial activity and is defined as the optimization criterion. As proposed formula accumulating profits due to production capacity and technology to produce products current direct variable costs, the amount of property tax and expenses appearing as a result of manifestations of variance when performing replacement of production tasks for a single period of time. The main component of the optimization of the production activity of the enterprise on the basis of this criterion is the vector of direct variable costs. It depends on the number of types of products in the current portfolio of orders, production schedules production, the normative time for the release of a particular product available Fund time efficient production positions, the current valuation for certain groups of technological operations and the current priority of operations for the degree of readiness performed internal orders. Modeling of industrial activity based on the proposed provisions would allow the enterprises of machine-building cluster, active innovation, improve the efficient use of available production resources by optimizing current operations at the high uncertainty of the magnitude of the demand planning and carrying out maintenance and routine repairs.

  1. Deconstructing Williamsburg: Using focus groups to examine residents' perceptions of the building of a walkable community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharratt Michael T

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Components of the built environment are associated with active living behaviors, but research in this area has employed surveys and other quantitative methods almost exclusively. Qualitative approaches can provide additional detail about how neighborhoods influence physical activity, including informing the extent to which such relationships are causal in nature. The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of residents' attitudinal and behavioral responses to living in a neighborhood designed to be walkable. Methods Focus groups were conducted with residents of a planned retail and residential development that was designed to embody many attributes of walkability and was located within a large city in southwestern Ontario. In total, 31 participants provided qualitative data about neighborhood resources and dynamics, use of local services, physical activity behavior, and other related issues. The data were transcribed and coded for themes relevant to the study purpose. Results Salient themes that emerged emphasized the importance of land use diversity, safety, parks and trails, aesthetics, and a sense of community, with the latter theme cutting across all others. The data also revealed mechanisms that explain relationships between the built environment and behavior and how sidewalks in the neighborhood facilitated diverse health behaviors and outcomes. Finally, residents recited several examples of changes in behavior, both positive and negative, since moving to their current neighborhood. Conclusions The results of this study confirmed and expanded upon current knowledge about built and social environment influences on physical activity and health. That many residents reported changes in their behaviors since moving to the neighborhood permitted tentative inferences about the causal impact of built and social environments. Future research should exploit diverse methods to more fully understand how

  2. Deconstructing Williamsburg: Using focus groups to examine residents' perceptions of the building of a walkable community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Sharratt, Michael T

    2010-05-27

    Components of the built environment are associated with active living behaviors, but research in this area has employed surveys and other quantitative methods almost exclusively. Qualitative approaches can provide additional detail about how neighborhoods influence physical activity, including informing the extent to which such relationships are causal in nature. The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of residents' attitudinal and behavioral responses to living in a neighborhood designed to be walkable. Focus groups were conducted with residents of a planned retail and residential development that was designed to embody many attributes of walkability and was located within a large city in southwestern Ontario. In total, 31 participants provided qualitative data about neighborhood resources and dynamics, use of local services, physical activity behavior, and other related issues. The data were transcribed and coded for themes relevant to the study purpose. Salient themes that emerged emphasized the importance of land use diversity, safety, parks and trails, aesthetics, and a sense of community, with the latter theme cutting across all others. The data also revealed mechanisms that explain relationships between the built environment and behavior and how sidewalks in the neighborhood facilitated diverse health behaviors and outcomes. Finally, residents recited several examples of changes in behavior, both positive and negative, since moving to their current neighborhood. The results of this study confirmed and expanded upon current knowledge about built and social environment influences on physical activity and health. That many residents reported changes in their behaviors since moving to the neighborhood permitted tentative inferences about the causal impact of built and social environments. Future research should exploit diverse methods to more fully understand how neighborhood contexts influence active living.

  3. Nonlinear Economic Model Predictive Control Strategy for Active Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Rui Mirra; Zong, Yi; Sousa, Joao M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the development of advanced and innovative intelligent control techniques for energy management in buildings is a key issue within the smart grid topic. A nonlinear economic model predictive control (EMPC) scheme, based on the branch-and-bound tree search used as optimization algorithm...... for solving the nonconvex optimization problem is proposed in this paper. A simulation using the nonlinear model-based controller to control the temperature levels of an intelligent office building (PowerFlexHouse) is addressed. Its performance is compared with a linear model-based controller. The nonlinear...

  4. Active Shapes for Automatic 3D Modeling of Buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological developments help us to acquire high quality 3D measurements of our urban environment. However, these measurements, which come as point clouds or Digital Surface Models (DSM), do not directly give 3D geometrical models of buildings. In addition to that, they are not suitable for

  5. Groups 4 Health: Evidence that a social-identity intervention that builds and strengthens social group membership improves mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Catherine; Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, S Alexander; Dingle, Genevieve; Chang, Melissa Xue-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Social isolation and disconnection have profound negative effects on mental health, but there are few, if any, theoretically-derived interventions that directly target this problem. We evaluate a new intervention, Groups 4 Health (G4H), a manualized 5-module psychological intervention that targets the development and maintenance of social group relationships to treat psychological distress arising from social isolation. G4H was tested using a non-randomized control design. The program was delivered to young adults presenting with social isolation and affective disturbance. Primary outcome measures assessed mental health (depression, general anxiety, social anxiety, and stress), well-being (life satisfaction, self-esteem) and social connectedness (loneliness, social functioning). Our secondary goal was to assess whether mechanisms of social identification were responsible for changes in outcomes. G4H was found to significantly improve mental health, well-being, and social connectedness on all measures, both on program completion and 6-month follow-up. In line with social identity theorizing, analysis also showed that improvements in depression, anxiety, stress, loneliness, and life satisfaction were underpinned by participants' increased identification both with their G4H group and with multiple groups. This study provides preliminary evidence of the potential value of G4H and its underlying mechanisms, but further examination is required in other populations to address issues of generalizability, and in randomized controlled trials to address its wider efficacy. Results of this pilot study confirm that G4H has the potential to reduce the negative health-related consequences of social disconnection. Future research will determine its utility in wider community contexts. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Collaborative Activities on Group Identity in Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungsung; Seo, Sumin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of collaborative activities on group identity in a virtual world such as "Second Life." To achieve this purpose, this study adopted events that promoted participants' interactions using tools inherent in "Second Life." The interactive tools given to the control group in…

  7. Implementing Small-Group Activities in Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kolkhorst, Brittany Boyle

    2007-01-01

    This study examines student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of small-group work in a large lecture class. The article considers and illustrates from students' perspectives the ways in which small-group activities could enhance comprehension of course material, reduce anonymity associated with large lecture classes, and promote student…

  8. External Group Coaching and Mentoring: Building a Research Community of Practice at a University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Jeanette; Visagie, Retha; Johnson, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Globally, a clarion call has been made for higher education institutions to establish creative and effective research capacity-building systems with the purpose of developing a next generation of scholars. The training and skills development of a researcher entail a process of increasing levels of participation in diverse communities of practice.…

  9. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  10. "Group Intelligence": An Active Learning Exploration of Diversity in Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Christopher J.; Salaita, Meisa K.; Hughes, Catherine H.; Lynn, David G.; Fristoe, Adam; Fristoe, Ariel; Grover, Martha A.

    2017-01-01

    "Group Intelligence" is an active learning, inquiry-based activity that introduces prebiotic chemistry, emergent complexity, and diversity's importance to adaptability across scales. Students explore the molecular emergence of order and function through theatrical exercises and games. Through 20 min of audio instruction and a discussion…

  11. Mobilizing and Activating Group Demands: The American Agriculture Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, William P.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the American agriculture movement begun in 1977 provides insight into group behavior, mobilization, and activation. Leaders who had recruited participants and organized local and state activities were interviewed. Problems of organizing, specifically when protest is involved, are also discussed. (KC)

  12. Experimental investigations of heat transfer in thermo active building systems in combination with suspended ceilings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Maria Alonso; Hviid, Christian Anker; Weitzmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Thermo Active Building Systems (TABS), described as radiant heating or cooling systems with pipes embedded in the building structure, represent a sustainable alternative to replace conventional systems by using source temperatures close to room temperatures. The use of suspended ceiling in office...

  13. Thermo Active Building Systems(TABS) - Performance in practice and possibilities for optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub

    The project “Thermo Active Building Systems (TABS) – Performance in practice and possibilities for optimization” was carried out at DTU Byg in the period form 1.9.2012 until 31.12.2014. The aim of the project was to conduct field measurements in modern office buildings equipped with TABS systems...

  14. The Development of Spatial Skills through Interventions Involving Block Building Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Beth M.; Andrews, Nicole; Schindler, Holly; Kersh, Joanne E.; Samper, Alexandra; Copley, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of block-building interventions to develop spatial-reasoning skills in kindergartners. Two intervention conditions and a control condition were included to determine, first, whether the block building activities themselves benefited children's spatial skills, and secondly, whether a story context further improved…

  15. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  16. BPM Organization and Personnel. Part 1: Building a BPM Support Group that creates Value

    OpenAIRE

    Boots, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Mature Business Process Management (BPM) is not achieved overnight. Typically, it takes many years of commitment to build mature BPM capability into an organization’s culture. This paper, which is the first in a series of BPM white papers sponsored by the Innovation Value Institute (IVI), will help organizations understand where they are on the BPM maturity curve, where they are trying to go, and how they can get there. Chevron Corporation, where the author worked for 30 years, serves as a...

  17. Biomass district heating methodology and pilot installations for public buildings groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistougianni, N.; Giagozoglou, E.; Sentzas, K.; Karastergios, E.; Tsiamitros, D.; Stimoniaris, D.; Stomoniaris, A.; Maropoulos, S.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to show how locally available biomass can support a small-scale district heating system of public buildings, especially when taking into account energy audit in-situ measurements and energy efficiency improvement measures. The step-by-step methodology is presented, including the research for local biomass availability, the thermal needs study and the study for the biomass district heating system, with and without energy efficiency improvement measures.

  18. Architectural design and physical activity: an observational study of staircase and elevator use in different buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, David R; Browning, Ray; Conger, Scott A; Wolff, Dana L; Flynn, Jennifer I

    2013-05-01

    The indoor built environment has the potential to influence levels of physical activity. However, the extent to which architectural design in commercial buildings can influence the percentage of people choosing to use the stairs versus elevators is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if buildings with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases result in a greater percentage of people taking the stairs. Direct observations of stair and elevator use were conducted in 3 buildings on a university campus. One of the buildings had a bank of 4 centrally located elevators and a fire escape stairwell behind a steel door. The other 2 buildings had centrally located staircases and out-of-the-way elevators. The percentage of people who ascended the stairs was 8.1% in the elevator-centric building, compared with 72.8% and 81.1% in the 2 stair-centric buildings (P < .001). In addition, the percentage of people who descended the stairs was 10.8% in the first building, compared with 89.5% and 93.7% in the stair-centric buildings (P < .001). The results of the current study suggest that if buildings are constructed with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases, a greater percentage of people will choose to take the stairs.

  19. A Case Study Analysis of a Constructionist Knowledge Building Community with Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chee S.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Wilson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how activity theory can help research a constructionist community. We present a constructionist activity model called CONstructionism Through ACtivity Theory (CONTACT) model and explain how it can be used to analyse the constructionist activity in knowledge building communities. We then illustrate the model through its…

  20. The building of a pluralist expertise group about uranium mines in Limousin (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    Uranium mining and milling industry once played a major strategic and economic role in France. After the definitive cessation of mining and milling activity in 2001, more than 200 sites are currently under closure and post-closure phases. Decisions required in this frame raise particular difficulties because of the sensitivity of some technical issues and the strong scrutiny and requirements of local and national NGOs. This is particular true in Limousin, the region that stands for the cradle and the heart of the national uranium history. In order to deal with this complex and disputed topic, the ministries of environment, health and industry recently decided to set up a pluralist expertise group with the aim to come to analyze and give a critical point of view on the various technical documents prepared by AREVA NC about the surveillance and control of its mining sites in the department of Haute-Vienne in the Limousin region and than provide recommendations to public authorities to improve current situation. (author)

  1. The Surface Groups and Active Site of Fibrous Mineral Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fa-qin; WAN Pu; FENG Qi-ming; SONG Gong-bao; PENG Tong-jiang; LI Ping; LI Guo-wu

    2004-01-01

    The exposed and transformed groups of fibrous brucite,wollastonite,chrysotile asbestos,sepiolite,palygorskite,clinoptilolite,crocidolite and diatomaceous earth mineral materials are analyzed by IR spectra after acid and alikali etching,strong mechanical and polarity molecular interaction.The results show the active sites concentrate on the ends in stick mineral materials and on the defect or hole edge in pipe mineral materials.The inside active site of mineral materials plays a main role in small molecular substance.The shape of minerals influence their distribution and density of active site.The strong mechanical impulsion and weak chemical force change the active site feature of minerals,the powder process enables minerals exposed more surface group and more combined types.The surface processing with the small polarity molecular or the brand of middle molecular may produce ionation and new coordinate bond,and change the active properties and level of original mineral materials.

  2. Building the Emotional Intelligence and Effective Functioning of Student Work Groups: Evaluation of an Instructional Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme

    2012-01-01

    Group-based learning is common practice in university classrooms. Despite the frequent student complaint of social loafing from teammates, methods for teaching students how to address teamwork issues are rarely incorporated into group assignments. Students are instructed on their final product, rather than their group process. In this article, an…

  3. Building a Society of Solidarity through Critical Pedagogy: Group Teaching as a Social and Democratic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaki, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Against the menacing shadow of neoliberalism, which promotes individualism and competition, the author illustrates in this paper the need for group teaching. Group teaching as a method of instruction and learning fosters community bonds, solidarity, and is more effective teaching. Group teaching is a democratic tool necessary for society to…

  4. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  5. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  6. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  7. Infinite-dimensional p-adic groups, semigroups of double cosets, and inner functions on Bruhat-Tits buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neretin, Yu A.

    2015-06-01

    We construct p-adic analogues of operator colligations and their characteristic functions. Consider a p-adic group \\mathbf G={GL}(α+k∞, Q_p), a subgroup L= O(k∞, Z_p) of \\mathbf G and a subgroup \\mathbf K= O(∞, Z_p) which is diagonally embedded in L. We show that the space Γ=\\mathbf K\\setminus\\mathbf G/\\mathbf K of double cosets admits the structure of a semigroup and acts naturally on the space of \\mathbf K-fixed vectors of any unitary representation of \\mathbf G. With each double coset we associate a `characteristic function' that sends a certain Bruhat-Tits building to another building (the buildings are finite-dimensional) in such a way that the image of the distinguished boundary lies in the distinguished boundary. The second building admits the structure of a (Nazarov) semigroup, and the product in Γ corresponds to the pointwise product of characteristic functions.

  8. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  9. Activation of both Group I and Group II metabotropic glutamatergic receptors suppress retinogeniculate transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Y-W; Sherman, S M

    2013-07-09

    Relay cells of dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) receive a Class 1 glutamatergic input from the retina and a Class 2 input from cortical layer 6. Among the properties of Class 2 synapses is the ability to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and mGluR activation is known to affect thalamocortical transmission via regulating retinogeniculate and thalamocortical synapses. Using brain slices, we studied the effects of Group I (dihydroxyphenylglycine) and Group II ((2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine) mGluR agonists on retinogeniculate synapses. We showed that both agonists inhibit retinogeniculate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) through presynaptic mechanisms, and their effects are additive and independent. We also found high-frequency stimulation of the layer 6 corticothalamic input produced a similar suppression of retinogeniculate EPSCs, suggesting layer 6 projection to LGN as a plausible source of activating these presynaptic mGluRs.

  10. Building functional groups of marine benthic macroinvertebrates on the basis of general community assembly mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, Nikolaos; Bacher, Cédric; Desroy, Nicolas; Jean, Fred

    2017-03-01

    The accurate reproduction of the spatial and temporal dynamics of marine benthic biodiversity requires the development of mechanistic models, based on the processes that shape macroinvertebrate communities. The modelled entities should, accordingly, be able to adequately represent the many functional roles that are performed by benthic organisms. With this goal in mind, we applied the emergent group hypothesis (EGH), which assumes functional equivalence within and functional divergence between groups of species. The first step of the grouping involved the selection of 14 biological traits that describe the role of benthic macroinvertebrates in 7 important community assembly mechanisms. A matrix of trait values for the 240 species that occurred in the Rance estuary (Brittany, France) in 1995 formed the basis for a hierarchical classification that generated 20 functional groups, each with its own trait values. The functional groups were first evaluated based on their ability to represent observed patterns of biodiversity. The two main assumptions of the EGH were then tested, by assessing the preservation of niche attributes among the groups and the neutrality of functional differences within them. The generally positive results give us confidence in the ability of the grouping to recreate functional diversity in the Rance estuary. A first look at the emergent groups provides insights into the potential role of community assembly mechanisms in shaping biodiversity patterns. Our next steps include the derivation of general rules of interaction and their incorporation, along with the functional groups, into mechanistic models of benthic biodiversity.

  11. Mould growth on building materials under low water activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Holm, G.; Uttrup, L.P.;

    2004-01-01

    The influence of relative humidity (RH) and temperature on growth and metabolism of eight microfungi on 21 different types of building material was investigated. The fungi were applied as a dry mixture to the materials, which were incubated at 5degreesC, 10degreesC, 20degreesC and 25degrees......C at three humidity levels in the range 69-95% RH over 4-7 months. The lower limit for fungal growth on wood, wood composites and starch-containing materials was 78% RH at 20-25degreesC and increased to 90% RH at 5degreesC. An RH of 86% was necessary for growth on gypsum board. Ceramic materials supported...... growth at RH > 90%, although 95% RH was needed to yield chemically detectable quantities of biomass. Almost exclusively only Penicillium, Aspergillus and Eurotium (contaminant) species grew on the materials. Production of secondary metabolites and mycotoxins decreased with humidity and the quantities...

  12. How Many Focus Groups Are Enough? Building an Evidence Base for Nonprobability Sample Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Greg; Namey, Emily; McKenna, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Few empirical studies exist to guide researchers in determining the number of focus groups necessary for a research study. The analyses described here provide foundational evidence to help researchers in this regard. We conducted a thematic analysis of 40 focus groups on health-seeking behaviors of African American men in Durham, North Carolina.…

  13. Building Relationships and Combating Bullying: Effectiveness of a School-Based Social Skills Group Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosier, Melissa E.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a generic social skills intervention, Social Skills GRoup INtervention (S.S.GRIN), for children experiencing peer dislike, bullying, or social anxiety. Third-grade children were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 187) or no-treatment control (CO; n = 194) groups. Examination of the direction and magnitude of…

  14. Building a Peaceful Society: Origins, Prevention, and Reconciliation after Genocide and Other Group Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    The 20th century was a century of genocide and other great violence between groups within societies. Already at the beginning of the 21st century, there have been mass killings, civil wars, violent conflict, and terrorism. This article summarizes influences that tend to lead to intense group violence. It then considers prevention, stressing early…

  15. Integrating Research, Theory-Building, Training, and Practice in CBT Group Therapy for Children and Adolescents with anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael

    This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents. The res......This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents...... centers (n=40); (c) an open study with both group-based and case-based analyses of case-formulation-focused CBT for non-responding clients and their families (n = 20); (d) an explorative study of the treatment program for children with ADHD and comorbid anxiety disorder (n = 12); and (e) etiological...

  16. Effect of Rigidity of Plinth Beam on Soil Interaction of Modeled Building Frame Supported on Pile Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar Reddy, C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of rigidity of plinth beam on a model building frame supported by pile groups embedded in cohesionless soil (sand through the results of static vertical load tests. The effect of rigidity of plinth beam on displacements and rotation at the column base and also shears and bending moments in the building frame were investigated. In the analytical model, soil nonlinearity in the axial direction is characterized by nonlinear vertical springs along the length of the pile (t-z curves and at the tip of the pile (Q-z curves while in the lateral direction by the p-y curves. Results revealed that, shear force and bending moment values which were back calculated from the experimental results, showed considerable reduction with the reduction of the rigidity of the plinth beam. The response of the frame from the experimental results is in good agreement with that obtained by the nonlinear finite element analysis.

  17. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Erfanianfar, G; Finoguenov, A; Wuyts, S; Wilman, D; Biviano, A; Ziparo, F; Salvato, M; Nandra, K; Lutz, D; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Tanaka, M; Mirkazemi, M; Balogh, M L; Altieri, M B; Aussel, H; Bauer, F; Berta, S; Bielby, R M; Brandt, N; Cappelluti, N; Cimatti, A; Cooper, M; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Magnelli, B; Mulchaey, J S; Nordon, R; Newman, J A; Poglitsch, A; Pozzi, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass and halo occupation distribution in massive halos by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from SED fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high redshift groups (0.5groups at z~0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive halos than in the more common lower mass ...

  18. Forestry Activities. A Guide for Youth Group Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Twenty-six activities related to forestry, conservation, and outdoor education comprise the content of this leader's guide. Designed for use with youth groups, ideas and techniques range from forest conservation mobiles, locating forest fires, and Christmas tree uses to litterbug campaigns, watershed experiments, and crossword puzzles. Activities…

  19. XPS of nitrogen-containing functional groups on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.J.J.; Bekkum, van H.

    1995-01-01

    XPS is used to study the binding energy of the Cls, Nls and Ols photoelectrons of surface groups on several nitrogen-containing activated carbons. Specific binding energies are assigned to amide (399.9 eV). lactam and imidc (399.7 eV). pyridine (398.7 eV), pyrrole (400.7 eV), alkylamine. secondary a

  20. 101 Activities for Building More Effective School-Community Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Dorothy; Mattox, Beverly

    This booklet contains a collection of more than 100 activities designed to promote school-home and school-community relations. Activities are organized into seven categories: (1) communicating word from home to school, (2) people to people, (3) educational events, (4) volunteers--hands on in the classroom, (5) utilizing community resources, (6)…

  1. In-group and out-group membership mediates anterior cingulate activation to social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen Krill

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was employed to examine sensitivity to social exclusion in three conditions: same-race, other-race, and self-resembling faces. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, specifically the dorsal ACC, has been targeted as a key substrate in the physical and social pain matrix and was hypothesized to regulate activation response to various facial conditions. We show that participants demonstrated greatest ACC activation when being excluded by self-resembling and same-race faces, relative to other-race faces. Additionally, participants expressed greater distress and showed increased ACC activation as a result of exclusion in the same-race condition relative to the other-race condition. A positive correlation between implicit racial bias and activation in the amygdala was also evident. Implicit attitude about other-race faces partly explains levels of concern about exclusion by out-group individuals. These findings suggest that individuals are more distressed and their brain (i.e. neural alarm system responds with greater activation when being excluded by individuals whom they are more likely to share group membership with.

  2. Investigation into the surface active groups of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-cai; XUE Han-ling; Deng Jun; Wen Hu; ZHANG Xing-hai

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation heat of coal is the direct reason leading to coal spontaneous combustion.When coal is exposed in oxygen atmosphere, the physical adsorption and chemisorption happened, and then which resulting chemical reaction followed heat between coal and oxygen. Owing to the complexity and uncertain of molecular structure of coal, it was only reduced that bridge bonds, side chains and O2-containing functional groups in coal may be prone to oxidation in last year, but not to deeply investigate into the structures and the type of the active radicals. In this paper, according to the last achievements in coal structure research, the hypomethylether bond,hypoalkyl bond of α-carbon atom with hydroxyl and α-carbon atom with hypomethy side chain and hypomettyl bonds linking up two aromatic hydrocarbon in bridge bonds, and methoxy, aldehyde and alkyls of α-carbon atom with hydroxy in side bonds are inferred to be free radical easily to lead to oxidize coal under the ambient temperature and pressure. The order from strong to week of oxide activation of the seven surface active groups is aldehyde side chains, hypomethylether bonds, hypoalkyl bonds of α-carbon atom with hydroxyl, hypoalkyl bonds of α-carbon atom with hypomethyl, hypomethyl bonds linking up two aromatic hydrocarbon, methoxy, alkyls side chains of α-carbon atom with hydroxyl. Because of the two unsaturated molecular tracks of C2, unpaired eleotron clouds of the part of surface active groups of coal enter molecular tracks of O2 to lead to chemisorb on the conjugate effect and induced effect of surface active groups, and then chemical reaction followed heat happens in them. On the basis of change of bond energy, weighted average method is adopted to count the reactionheat value of each mol CO, CO2 and H2O. The property of coal spontaneous combustion is different for the different number and oxidability of the active structure in the coal resulting in the different oxidation heat.

  3. Sialidase activity of the "Streptococcus milleri group" and other viridans group streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Beighton, D.; Whiley, R A

    1990-01-01

    Viridans group streptococci were examined for the production of sialidase (neuraminidase) activity, using the fluorescent substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid in a simple and rapid (15-min) assay. Sialidase was produced by all strains of Streptococcus oralis and S. intermedius and by a majority of S. mitis strains. S. mutans, S. sobrinus, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, S. vestibularis, S. salivarius, S. anginosus, S. constellatus, "S. parasanguis," and the "tufted fibril g...

  4. Hidden Markov Models for the Activity Profile of Terrorist Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Tartakovsky, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this work is on developing models for the activity profile of a terrorist group, detecting sudden spurts and downfalls in this profile, and in general, tracking it over a period of time. Toward this goal, a d-state hidden Markov model (HMM) that captures the latent states underlying the dynamics of the group and thus its activity profile is developed. The simplest setting of d = 2 corresponds to the case where the dynamics are coarsely quantized as Active and Inactive, respectively. Two strategies for spurt detection and tracking are developed here: a model-independent strategy that uses the exponential weighted moving-average (EWMA) filter to track the strength of the group as measured by the number of attacks perpetrated by it, and a state estimation strategy that exploits the underlying HMM structure. The EWMA strategy is robust to modeling uncertainties and errors, and tracks persistent changes (changes that last for a sufficiently long duration) in the strength of the group. On the othe...

  5. USING MULTICRITERIAL RANKING MODELS IN CASE OF SOLUTIONS REGARDING THE SUPPLY OF THERMAL ENERGY FOR RESIDENTIAL GROUPS OF BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIURCA IOAN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the way of choosing the technical solutions concerning the supply of thermal energyfor residential groups of buildings, using the Multicriterial Ordinal Ranking Model, the Relative Distance Comparisonmodel in relation with the maximum performance and the Relative Distance Comparison model in relation with theaverage performance. The paper ends with the presentation of the numerical results and a few conclusions. Themodels proposed may be used in practice in case of feasibility studies, for master degree theses as well as for Ph.D.theses.

  6. Elementary Bipoles, the Building Blocks of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara F.; Mkhitaryan, M.

    2013-07-01

    New magnetic flux even in very small active regions appears as a succession of tiny bipolar magnetic fields that successively and concurrently appear in tight clusters. These smallest observable bipoles were initially called “elementary bipoles” when first seen in videomagnetograms from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (Martin, S. F. 1990, “Elementary Bipoles of Active Regions and Ephemeral Active Regions” Societa Astronomica Italiana, Memorie 61, 293). The magnetic flux of each pole of elementary bipole is approximately the same and measures 1018 Mx or less depending on both the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the magnetograph with which the measurements are made. The two poles initially occur very close together and rapidly move in opposite directions with a typical speed of 3 km/sec. The elementary bipoles within a cluster tend to emerge with similar orientations. The most common orientation of the elementary bipoles at any given time determines the “orientation” of a whole simple bipolar region. In this paper we illustrate and compare 6 clusters of elementary bipoles during the development of a large active region less than 2 days old when observed in Hα at the Dutch Open Telescope along with HMI/SDO. Each cluster of elementary bipoles behaves like a single simple bipolar active region. However the clusters are so close together that the magnetic flux of each bipolar cluster merges or cancels with adjacent clusters. The study of elementary bipoles provides a means of simplifying our understanding of the development of complex active regions depending on both the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the magnetograph with which the measurements are made.

  7. Building Interdisciplinary Qualitative Research Networks: Reflections on Qualitative Research Group (QRG) at the University of Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kerstin Stieber; Halas, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    As qualitative research methodologies continue to evolve and develop, both students and experienced researchers are showing greater interest in learning about and developing new approaches. To meet this need, faculty at the University of Manitoba created the Qualitative Research Group (QRG), a community of practice that utilizes experiential…

  8. Group Action Planning: An Innovative Manual for Building a Self-Determined Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma Longan; And Others

    This manual is designed to provide adolescents and young adults who have disabilities with a blueprint for setting and achieving goals, making decisions, acquiring needed supports, and achieving a self-determined and sustainable lifestyle. A planning process called Group Action Planning is used as a foundation for self-determination, with…

  9. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  10. Integrating Research, Theory-Building, Training, and Practice in CBT Group Therapy for Children and Adolescents with anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael

    This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents. The res......This presentation will describe how the model developed in Esben Hougaard's Adult CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus University - which integrates research, theory-building, training, and practice - has beenadapted to work with children and adolescents with anxiety disorders and their parents....... The resulting Youth CBT Therapy Program at Aarhus is organized around a short-term, 10-session, evidence-based, manualized, family-based, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group program, called "Cool Kids" for children and "Chilled Adolescents" for adolescents, and derived from Ronald Rapee's work in Australia....... A distinctive aspect of the work of the Youth CBT Therapy Program is their incorporation of a case-study perspective into a series of group designs, including:(a) a randomized treatment vs. waitlist-control efficacy study (n=120); (b) an open, naturalistic effectiveness study of the program in two mental health...

  11. Building A Cloud Based Distributed Active Data Archive Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Baynes, Katie; Murphy, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data System (ESDS) Program facilitates the implementation of NASA's Earth Science strategic plan, which is committed to the full and open sharing of Earth science data obtained from NASA instruments to all users. The Earth Science Data information System (ESDIS) project manages the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Data within EOSDIS are held at Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs). One of the key responsibilities of the ESDS Program is to continuously evolve the entire data and information system to maximize returns on the collected NASA data.

  12. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  13. Integration of active thermography into the assessment of cultural heritage buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Röllig, Mathias; Krankenhagen, Rainer

    2010-10-01

    Applications of infrared thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. Active infrared thermography methods enable structural investigations of building elements with one-sided access up to a depth of about 10 cm. Masonry and especially historical masonry has a very heterogeneous structure containing several different materials (brick, stone, mortar, plaster, wood, metal, etc.) with various thermal properties. As many classes of damage originate from defects that are close to the surface, active thermography is in general very well suited to assessing different test problems in cultural heritage buildings. In this paper, the physical background, equipment, environmental influences and material properties are discussed. Several application results are presented. It is shown how active thermography can be integrated into a holistic approach for the assessment of historical structures.

  14. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very

  15. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  16. Building a cloud based distributed active archive data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Baynes, Katie; Murphy, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data System (ESDS) Program serves as a central cog in facilitating the implementation of NASA's Earth Science strategic plan. Since 1994, the ESDS Program has committed to the full and open sharing of Earth science data obtained from NASA instruments to all users. One of the key responsibilities of the ESDS Program is to continuously evolve the entire data and information system to maximize returns on the collected NASA data. An independent review was conducted in 2015 to holistically review the EOSDIS in order to identify gaps. The review recommendations were to investigate two areas: one, whether commercial cloud providers offer potential for storage, processing, and operational efficiencies, and two, the potential development of new data access and analysis paradigms. In response, ESDS has initiated several prototypes investigating the advantages and risks of leveraging cloud computing. This poster will provide an overview of one such prototyping activity, "Cumulus". Cumulus is being designed and developed as a "native" cloud-based data ingest, archive and management system that can be used for all future NASA Earth science data streams. The long term vision for Cumulus, its requirements, overall architecture, and implementation details, as well as lessons learned from the completion of the first phase of this prototype will be covered. We envision Cumulus will foster design of new analysis/visualization tools to leverage collocated data from all of the distributed DAACs as well as elastic cloud computing resources to open new research opportunities.

  17. The Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience: building communication skills in the clinical reasoning context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopasek, Lyuba; Kelly, Kevin V; Bylund, Carma L; Wenderoth, Suzanne; Storey-Johnson, Carol

    2014-07-01

    Students are rarely taught communication skills in the context of clinical reasoning training. The purpose of this project was to combine the teaching of communication skills using SPs with clinical reasoning exercises in a Group Objective Structured Clinical Experience (GOSCE) to study feasibility of the approach, the effect on learners' self-efficacy and attitude toward learning communication skills, and the effect of providing multiple sources of immediate, collaborative feedback. GOSCE sessions were piloted in Pediatrics and Medicine clerkships with students assessing their own performance and receiving formative feedback on communication skills from peers, standardized patients (SPs), and faculty. The sessions were evaluated using a retrospective pre/post-training questionnaire rating changes in self-efficacy and attitudes, and the value of the feedback. Results indicate a positive impact on attitudes toward learning communication skills and self-efficacy regarding communication in the clinical setting. Also, learners considered feedback by peers, SPs, and faculty valuable in each GOSCE. The GOSCE is an efficient and learner-centered method to attend to multiple goals of teaching communication skills, clinical reasoning, self-assessment, and giving feedback in a formative setting. The GOSCE is a low-resource, feasible strategy for experiential learning in communication skills and clinical reasoning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Building a beverage for recovery from endurance activity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaccarotella, Kim J; Andzel, Walter D

    2011-11-01

    Recovery beverages are commonly used by endurance and team-sport athletes during the time between exercise sessions. Practical recommendations on the optimal nutrient composition of these drinks and timing of their consumption are therefore needed. This article summarizes research to date on the use of recovery beverages after aerobic activities and provides the following recommendations for practitioners on the optimal formula and timing of use for endurance and team-sport athletes. Current evidence suggests that, to maximize glycogen resynthesis, athletes should consume about 1.2 g carbohydrate per kilogram body weight as glucose and sucrose immediately after exercise and each hour thereafter for 4-6 hours postexercise. Alternatively, they may consume 0.8 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) in combination with 0.4 g·kg(-1)·h(-1) amino acids or protein. Liquids provide valuable fluids for rehydration, and an ideal recovery beverage should not only contain carbohydrate and protein but also contain electrolytes, including about 0.3-0.7 g sodium·per liter fluid to help restore sodium lost through sweat. Commercial beverages with this type of nutrient composition are effective, and recent work indicates that chocolate milk may be as effective as or superior to these in promoting recovery. Research regarding the effects of specific types of amino acids and antioxidants on recovery is mixed; thus, further investigation is needed before specific recommendations about these nutrients can be made. Future studies that include women and athletes representing a variety of sports, ages, and training levels and that use consistent methodology will lead to a better understanding of the effects of postexercise intake on recovery.

  19. Inventory of U.S.-led International Activities on Building Energy Efficiency Initial Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2010-04-01

    Several U.S. Government agencies promote energy efficiency in buildings internationally. The types and scope of activities vary by agency. Those with the largest role include the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both USAID and the Department of State have a substantial presence overseas, which may present some complementarities with the Department of Energy’s efforts to reach out to other countries. Generally speaking, USAID focuses on capacity building and policy issues; the Department of State focuses on broad diplomatic efforts and some targeted grants in support of these efforts, and EPA has more targeted roles linked to ENERGY STAR appliances and a few other activities. Several additional agencies are also involved in trade-related efforts to promote energy efficiency in buildings. These include the Department of Commerce, the Export-Import Bank, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Trade and Development Agency (TDA). This initial synthesis report is designed to summarize broad trends and activities relating to international cooperation on energy efficiency in buildings, which can help the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in developing its own strategy in this area. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will develop a more complete synthesis report later in 2010 as it populates a database on international projects on building energy efficiency.

  20. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis.

  1. Improving Reading Achievement of Chapter 1 Pull-Out Students through Self-Esteem Building Classes Involving Buddy Group and Teacher Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfield, Marlene

    A practicum attempted to improve the low reading achievement of Chapter 1 students in a low socioeconomic fifth-grade class by implementing a self-esteem building program. Activities were designed in a workbook format to complement class instruction in self-esteem building exercises. An emphasis on critical thinking skills was incorporated into…

  2. Simulated performance of the Thermo Active Building System (TABS) with respect to the provided thermal comfort and primary energy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Toftum, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    The central module of an office building conditioned by a Thermo Active Building System (TABS) coupled with constant volume ventilation was evaluated by means of dynamic computer simulations. Additionally, the same building model was simulated with a conventional all air VAV ventilation system...

  3. Enhanced biological activity of carotenoids stabilized by phenyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ji Suk; Jeon, Sunhwa; Byun, Youn Jung; Koo, Sangho; Choi, Shin Sik

    2015-06-15

    Carotenoids are lipid soluble food ingredients with multifunction including antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, carotenoids are destructively oxidized upon reaction with radicals resulting in toxic effects on biological systems. Two synthetic carotenoids (BAS and BTS) containing the aromatic phenyl groups with a para-substituent (OMe and Me, respectively) at C-13 and C-13' position were prepared in order to overcome a structural instability of carotenoid. Both BAS and BTS exerted stronger radical scavenging activity than β-carotene in DPPH and ABTS assays. In particular, BTS significantly reduced in vivo ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels and improved body growth and reproduction of Caenorhabditiselegans. BTS has a great potential for the advanced and modified carotenoid material with stability leading to enhanced bioavailability.

  4. Production of building elements based on alkali-activated red clay brick waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Andres Robayo-Salazar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the feasibility of reusing a red clay brick waste (RCBW in order to produce building elements such as blocks, pavers and tiles, by using the technique of alkaline activation. The production of these building elements was based on the design of a hybrid mortar with 48.61 MPa of compressive strength, at 28 curing days at room temperature (25 °C. The hybrid mortar was synthesized by adding 10% by weight of Portland cement (OPC to the RCBW, Red Clay Brick Waste. As alkaline activators were used commercial industrial grade sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. Building elements were physically and mechanically characterized, according to Colombian Technical Standards (NTC. This technology process is presented as an alternative for the reuse of RCBW and its contribution to the environmental sustainability.

  5. Active Build-Model Random Forest Method for Network Traffic Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamza Munther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Network traffic classification continues to be an interesting subject among numerous networking communities. This method introduces multi-beneficial solutions in different avenues, such as network security, network management, anomaly detection, and quality-of-service. In this paper, we propose a supervised machine learning method that efficiently classifies different types of applications using the Active Build-Model Random Forest (ABRF method. This method constructs a new build model for the original Random Forest (RF method to decrease processing time. This build model includes only the active trees (i.e., trees with high accuracy, whereas the passive trees are excluded from the forest. The passive trees were excluded without any negative effect on classification accuracy. Results show that the ABRF method decreases the processing time by up to 37.5% compared with the original RF method. Our model has an overall accuracy of 98.66% based on the benchmark dataset considered in this paper.

  6. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  7. The Energy Audit Activity Focused on the Lighting Systems in Historical Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Salvadori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The energy audit for a building is a procedure designed mainly to obtain adequate knowledge of the energy consumption profile, identify, and quantify opportunities for energy savings by a cost-benefit analysis and report, clearly and comprehensively, about the obtained results. If the audit is referred to a building with a significant historical and artistic value, a compatibility evaluation of the energy saving interventions with the architectural features should also be developed. In this paper, analysing the case study of a historical building used as public offices in Pisa (Italy, the authors describe how it is possible to conduct an energy audit activity (especially dedicated to the lighting system and they show how, for this type of buildings, it is possible to obtain significant energy savings with a refurbishment of the lighting system. A total number of seven interventions on indoor and outdoor lighting sub-systems were analysed in the paper. They are characterised by absolute compatibility with the historical and artistic value of the building and they show short payback times, variable between 4 and 34 months, allowing a reduction of the electrical energy consumption for the artificial indoor and outdoor lighting variable from 1.1 MWh/year to 39.0 MWh/year. The followed methodology and the evaluation results described in the paper, although based on a case study, can be extended to numerous historical buildings used as public offices, a recurring situation in the centres of Italian historical cities.

  8. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  9. Active Houses - development of carbon neutral buildings with healthy indoor comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, Kurt Emil (VKR Holding (Denmark)). e-mail: kee@vkr-holding.com

    2009-07-01

    The European Commission and the European Parliament are calling for national strategies for low to zero carbon housing in their proposal for a revision of the EPBD; the European Commission is also recommending to include application of renewable energy sources, use of passive heating and cooling elements and shading in the design of the building and in the design of the building and to ensure indoor air quality and adequate natural light in buildings. A few Member States have already initiated targets on low energy housing, and there are several demonstration projects showing how future housing could be both zero carbon buildings and have a high indoor comfort level. The European and national strategies for low energy housing must focus on energy efficiency and CO{sub 2} reductions, but as people spend approximately 90% of their life inside buildings, future housing also needs to be developed with a focus on healthy indoor comfort. The different national standards for low energy housing have mainly been focusing on energy savings, but some new standards also focus on energy saving in combination with indoor comfort requirements, like the 'Sustainable Home standard' and BOLIG+. At the same time the German energy legislation and the EU Renewable Energy Directive are setting requirements to integrate a proportion of renewable energy into all new buildings and buildings undergoing major renovation, while others like France and England have targets to move towards energy producing houses. Therefore, a new approach, where energy efficiency, indoor climate and integration of renewable energy are included, is needed. A number of partners from the construction sector have initiated the first thoughts and, as they intend to move from passive systems to active systems, the network is named Active Houses.

  10. Using Theory Elaboration and Activity Theory for Building a Knowledge Management Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Edwin M.; Kazlauskas, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports ongoing developmental research at the Department of Agriculture to build a high-performance knowledge base for four agencies within the Department. Describes data gathering for the information system; planning to support knowledge management practices; theory elaboration through qualitative case analysis; and use of an activity theory…

  11. Climate classification for the simulation of thermally activated building systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Benjamin; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2013-01-01

    Thermally activated building systems (TABS) provide high temperature cooling and low temperature heating which has a better efficiency compared to traditional heating and cooling solutions. Additionally the moderate required temperature levels for heating and cooling create the opportunity to use...... entirely. The proposed climate classification should fill this gap by providing the missing data in a simple manner....

  12. 75 FR 4904 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update... of Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group Activities. SUMMARY: The FRA is updating its announcement of RSAC's Working Group activities to reflect its current status. FOR...

  13. 77 FR 58608 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update... of Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group Activities. SUMMARY: FRA is updating its announcement of the RSAC Working Group activities to reflect its current status. FOR FURTHER...

  14. 75 FR 51525 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update... of Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group Activities. SUMMARY: The FRA is updating its announcement of RSAC's Working Group activities to reflect its current status. FOR...

  15. 75 FR 76070 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update... of Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group Activities. SUMMARY: The FRA is updating its announcement of RSAC's Working Group activities to reflect its current status. FOR...

  16. Environmental distribution, abundance and activity of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Biddle, J.; Teske, A.

    2011-12-01

    Many marine sedimentary microbes have only been identified by 16S rRNA sequences. Consequently, little is known about the types of metabolism, activity levels, or relative abundance of these groups in marine sediments. We found that one of these uncultured groups, called the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG), dominated clone libraries made from reverse transcribed 16S rRNA, and 454 pyrosequenced 16S rRNA genes, in the White Oak River estuary. Primers suitable for quantitative PCR were developed for MCG and used to show that 16S rRNA DNA copy numbers from MCG account for nearly all the archaeal 16S rRNA genes present. RT-qPCR shows much less MCG rRNA than total archaeal rRNA, but comparisons of different primers for each group suggest bias in the RNA-based work relative to the DNA-based work. There is no evidence of a population shift with depth below the sulfate-methane transition zone, suggesting that the metabolism of MCG may not be tied to sulfur or methane cycles. We classified 2,771 new sequences within the SSU Silva 106 database that, along with the classified sequences in the Silva database was used to make an MCG database of 4,646 sequences that allowed us to increase the named subgroups of MCG from 7 to 19. Percent terrestrial sequences in each subgroup is positively correlated with percent of the marine sequences that are nearshore, suggesting that membership in the different subgroups is not random, but dictated by environmental selective pressures. Given their high phylogenetic diversity, ubiquitous distribution in anoxic environments, and high DNA copy number relative to total archaea, members of MCG are most likely anaerobic heterotrophs who are integral to the post-depositional marine carbon cycle.

  17. Building groups and independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Mine; Holm, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    This article, based on an ethnographic study, examines the role of food in the social interaction of 11-to-17-year-old youths in sports centres in Denmark. The sports centres serve as a free space where young people receive no adult supervision. This i s underlined by their understanding and use...

  18. Building groups and independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Mine; Holm, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    This article, based on an ethnographic study, examines the role of food in the social interaction of 11-to-17-year-old youths in sports centres in Denmark. The sports centres serve as a free space where young people receive no adult supervision. This i s underlined by their understanding and use...

  19. Photovoltaic Reliability Group activities in USA and Brazil (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Cruz, Leila R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Recently prices of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been reduced considerably and may continue to be reduced making them attractive. If these systems provide electricity over the stipulated warranty period, it would be possible attain socket parity within the next few years. Current photovoltaic module qualifications tests help in minimizing infant mortality but do not guarantee useful lifetime over the warranty period. The PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) is trying to formulate accelerated tests that will be useful towards achieving the ultimate goal of assuring useful lifetime over the warranty period as well as to assure manufacturing quality. Unfortunately, assuring the manufacturing quality may require 24/7 presence. Alternatively, collecting data on the performance of fielded systems would assist in assuring manufacturing quality. Here PV systems installed by home-owners and small businesses can constitute as an important untapped source of data. The volunteer group, PV - Reliable, Safe and Sustainable Quality! (PVRessQ!) is providing valuable service to small PV system owners. Photovoltaic Reliability Group (PVRG) is initiating activities in USA and Brazil to assist home owners and small businesses in monitoring photovoltaic (PV) module performance and enforcing warranty. It will work in collaboration with small PV system owners, consumer protection agencies. Brazil is endowed with excellent solar irradiance making it attractive for installation of PV systems. Participating owners of small PV systems would instruct inverter manufacturers to copy the daily e-mails to PVRG and as necessary, will authorize the PVRG to carry out review of PV systems. The presentation will consist of overall activities of PVRG in USA and Brazil.

  20. Microbial diversity associated with four functional groups of benthic reef algae and the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, Katie L; Rodriguez-Brito, Beltran; Janouškovec, Jan; Marhaver, Kristen L; Smith, Jennifer E; Keeling, Patrick; Rohwer, Forest L

    2011-05-01

    The coral reef benthos is primarily colonized by corals and algae, which are often in direct competition with one another for space. Numerous studies have shown that coral-associated Bacteria are different from the surrounding seawater and are at least partially species specific (i.e. the same bacterial species on the same coral species). Here we extend these microbial studies to four of the major ecological functional groups of algae found on coral reefs: upright and encrusting calcifying algae, fleshy algae, and turf algae, and compare the results to the communities found on the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis. It was found using 16S rDNA tag pyrosequencing that the different algal genera harbour characteristic bacterial communities, and these communities were generally more diverse than those found on corals. While the majority of coral-associated Bacteria were related to known heterotrophs, primarily consuming carbon-rich coral mucus, algal-associated communities harboured a high percentage of autotrophs. The majority of algal-associated autotrophic Bacteria were Cyanobacteria and may be important for nitrogen cycling on the algae. There was also a rich diversity of photosynthetic eukaryotes associated with the algae, including protists, diatoms, and other groups of microalgae. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that coral reefs are a vast landscape of distinctive microbial communities and extend the holobiont concept to benthic algae.

  1. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very

  2. COST Action TU1208 - Working Group 2 - GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Derobert, Xavier; Fontul, Simona; Govedarica, Miro; Gregoire, Colette; Loizos, Andreas; Perez-Gracia, Vega; Plati, Christina; Ristic, Aleksandar; Tosti, Fabio; Van Geem, Carl

    2017-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the main results achieved by Working Group (WG) 2 "GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing" of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu, www.cost.eu). The principal goal of the Action, started in April 2013 and ending in October 2017, is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe non-destructive technique. The Action involves more than 300 Members from 28 COST Countries, a Cooperating State, 6 Near Neighbour Countries and 6 International Partner Countries. The most interesting achievements of WG2 include: 1. The state of the art on the use of GPR in civil engineering was composed and open issues were identified. The few existing international/national guidelines/protocols for GPR inspection in civil engineering were reviewed and discussed. Academic end-users, private companies and stakeholders presented their point of view and needs. 2. Guidelines for investigating flexible pavement by using GPR were prepared, with particular regard to layer-thickness assessment, moisture-content sensing, pavement-damage detection and classification, and other main GPR-based investigations in pavement engineering. 3. Guidelines for GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids were prepared, with a main focus on urban areas. 4. Guidelines for GPR assessment of concrete structures, with particular regard to inspections in bridges and tunnels, were prepared. 5. A report was composed, including a series of practical suggestions and very useful information to guide GPR users during building inspection. 6. WG2 Members carried out a plethora of case studies where GPR was used to survey roads, highways, airport runways, car

  3. Metabolic activity of moulds as a factor of building materials biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarowska, Beata

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of building materials on the growth and metabolic activity of moulds. In cultures of Aspergillus and Penicillium moulds grown on a model medium with the addition of building materials, the biomass of mycelium, its cellular components--glucan, chitin, ergosterol and the spectrum of enzymes and organic acids produced in the medium were investigated. It was found that on the medium with wallpaper moulds produced more biomass and extracellular enzymes, mainly glycolytic ones. On medium with mortar the growth of mycelium was impeded, production of biomass was 60% smaller, the quantity of chitin, glucan and ergosterol decreased 13-41%, and the activity of most enzymes was reduced; however the moulds intensively produced organic acids: malic, succinic and oxalic acid. The largest acid production activity was found in medium with addition of mortar; moulds produced the greatest variety of acids and in greater quantities than in the control medium. Metabolic activity of the moulds depends on the type of building material, and may lead to biodeterioration of these materials.

  4. The road plan model: Information model for planning road building activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azinhal, Rafaela K.; Moura-Pires, Fernando

    1994-01-01

    The general building contractor is presented with an information model as an approach for deriving a high-level work plan of construction activities applied to road building. Road construction activities are represented in a Road Plan Model (RPM), which is modeled in the ISO standard STEP/EXPRESS and adopts various concepts from the GARM notation. The integration with the preceding road design stage and the succeeding phase of resource scheduling is discussed within the framework of a Road Construction Model. Construction knowledge is applied to the road design and the terrain model of the surrounding road infrastructure for the instantiation of the RPM. Issues regarding the implementation of a road planner application supporting the RPM are discussed.

  5. Innovative two-pipe active chilled beam system for simultaneous heating and cooling of office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Afshari, Alireza; Bergsøe, Niels Christian;

    2014-01-01

    energy between zones with one hydronic circuit, operating with a water temperature between 20°C and 23°C. To calculate the energy performance of the system, simulation-based research was developed. The two-pipe system was modelled by using EnergyPlus, a whole building energy simulation program. Hourly......The aim of this paper was to investigate the energy savings potential of an innovative two-pipe system in an active chilled beam application for heating and cooling of office buildings. The characteristic of the system is its ability to provide simultaneous heating and cooling by transferring...... heating, cooling and ventilation loads were calculated by the program and an annual energy consumption evaluation of the system was made. Simulation results showed that the innovative two-pipe active chilled beam system used approximately 5% less energy than a conventional four-pipe system....

  6. A design build activity for a “design build” course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Simonsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    the requirements the students had set. Next, for implementation, the model house is constructed in the workshop, and the measuring system is tested and installed in the house. Finally, the house will be operated by putting it on the ground in an outdoor test field where it is exposed to the Danish climate for two......This paper deals with the CDIO course “Design Build”, which is taught in the first semester of the Bachelor of Engineering education at the Technical University of Denmark’s Department of Civil Engineering. A specific design build assignment has been developed for the course, and the paper...... describes this course activity. The “Design Build” course revolves around the activity that the students should build a model house of their own during the course. The only demands stipulated are that the house should be made as a scale 1:20 model of a realistic house and that is should be thermally...

  7. A review of vacuum insulation research and development in the Building Materials Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.; Childs, K.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-09-01

    This report is a summary of the development work on flat-vacuum insulation performed by the Building Materials Group (BMG) in the Metals and Ceramics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the last two years. A historical review of the technology of vacuum insulation is presented, and the role that ORNL played in this development is documented. The ORNL work in vacuum insulation has been concentrated in Powder-filled Evacuated Panels (PEPs) that have a thermal resistivity over 2.5 times that of insulating foams and seven times that of many batt-type insulations, such as fiberglass. Experimental results of substituting PEPs for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foal insulation in Igloo Corporation ice coolers are summarized. This work demonstrated that one-dimensional (1D) heat flow models overestimated the increase in thermal insulation of a foam/PEP-composite insulation, but three-dimensional (3D) models provided by a finite-difference, heat-transfer code (HEATING-7) accurately predicted the resistance of the composites. Edges and corners of the ice coolers were shown to cause the errors in the 1D models as well as shunting of the heat through the foam and around the PEPs. The area of coverage of a PEP in a foam/PEP composite is established as an important parameter in maximizing the resistance of such composites. 50 refs., 27 figs,. 22 tabs.

  8. Substructure in the Most Massive GEEC Groups: Field-like Populations in Dynamically Active Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Annie; Wilman, David J; McGee, Sean L; Harris, William E; Connelly, Jennifer L; Balogh, Michael L; Mulchaey, John S; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    The presence of substructure in galaxy groups and clusters is believed to be a sign of recent galaxy accretion and can be used not only to probe the assembly history of these structures, but also the evolution of their member galaxies. Using the Dressler-Shectman (DS) Test, we study substructure in a sample of intermediate redshift (z ~ 0.4) galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) group catalog. We find that 4 of the 15 rich GEEC groups, with an average velocity dispersion of ~525 km s-1, are identified as having significant substructure. The identified regions of localized substructure lie on the group outskirts and in some cases appear to be infalling. In a comparison of galaxy properties for the members of groups with and without substructure, we find that the groups with substructure have a significantly higher fraction of blue and star-forming galaxies and a parent colour distribution that resembles that of the field population rather than the overall group population....

  9. Simulation of thermal behavior of residential buildings using fuzzy active learning method

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Taheri Shahraein; Hamid Taheri Shahraiyni; Melika Sanaeifar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy modeling technique called Modified Active Learning Method (MALM) was introduced and utilized for fuzzy simulation of indoor and inner surface temperatures in residential buildings using meteorological data and its capability for fuzzy simulation was compared with other studies. The case studies for simulations were two residential apartments in the Fakouri and Rezashahr neighborhoods of Mashhad, Iran. The hourly inner surface and indoor temperature data were accumulated...

  10. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicovich, David

    By 2050 an estimated 9 billion people will inhabit planet earth and almost all the growth in the next 40 years will be in urban areas putting tremendous pressure on creating sustainable cities. The rapid increase in population, rise in land value and decrease in plot sizes in cities around the world positions tall or more importantly slender buildings as the best suited building typology to address the increasingly critical demand for space in this pressing urbanization trend. However, the majority of new tall building urban developments have not followed principles of environmental and/or sustainable design and incentives to innovate, both technological and economic, are urgently required. The biggest climatic challenge to the design, construction and performance of tall buildings is wind sensitivity. This challenge is further emphasized seeing two market driven trends: on one hand as urban population grows, land value rises while plot sizes decrease; on the other, more cost effective modular construction techniques are introducing much lighter tall building structures. The combination of the two suggests a potential increase in the slenderness ratio of tall buildings (typically less than 6:1 but stretching to 20:1 in the near future) where not-so-tall but much lighter buildings will be the bulk of new construction in densely populated cities, providing affordable housing in the face of fast urbanization but also introducing wind sensitivity which was previously the problem of a very limited number of super tall buildings to a much larger number of buildings and communities. The proposed research aims to investigate a novel approach to the interaction between tall buildings and their environment. Through this approach the research proposes a new relationship between buildings and the flows around, through and inside them, where buildings could adapt to better control and manage the air flow around them, and consequently produce significant opportunities to reduce

  11. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  12. Developing capacity-building activities for mental health system strengthening in low- and middle-income countries for service users and caregivers, service planners, and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrau, M; Alem, A; Abdulmalik, J; Docrat, S; Evans-Lacko, S; Gureje, O; Kigozi, F; Lempp, H; Lund, C; Petersen, I; Shidhaye, R; Thornicroft, G; Hanlon, C

    2017-10-02

    There is increasing international recognition of the need to build capacity to strengthen mental health systems. This is a fundamental goal of the 'Emerging mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries' (Emerald) programme, which is being implemented in six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda). This paper discusses Emerald's capacity-building approaches and outputs for three target groups in mental health system strengthening: (1) mental health service users and caregivers, (2) service planners and policy-makers, and (3) mental health researchers. When planning the capacity-building activities, the approach taken included a capabilities/skills matrix, needs assessments, a situational analysis, systematic reviews, qualitative interviews and stakeholder meetings, as well as the application of previous theory, evidence and experience. Each of the Emerald LMIC partners was found to have strengths in aspects of mental health system strengthening, which were complementary across the consortium. Furthermore, despite similarities across the countries, capacity-building interventions needed to be tailored to suit the specific needs of individual countries. The capacity-building outputs include three publicly and freely available short courses/workshops in mental health system strengthening for each of the target groups, 27 Masters-level modules (also open access), nine Emerald-linked PhD students, two MSc studentships, mentoring of post-doctoral/mid-level researchers, and ongoing collaboration and dialogue with the three groups. The approach taken by Emerald can provide a potential model for the development of capacity-building activities across the three target groups in LMICs.

  13. Both Sides of the Interface: Building an Education Interface for a Digital Video Archive with an Interprofessional Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ella Belzberg

    2014-01-01

    In 1999, it was necessary to build an interface for the Shoah Foundation's Visual History Archive (the world's largest digital video archive at the time) that constituted over 120,000 hours of video of over 52,000 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors, rescuers and witnesses. In order to build this educational research interface, an…

  14. Evaluation of various activated carbons for air cleaning - Towards design of immune and sustainable buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, Fariborz; Lee, Chang-Seo; Pant, Bhuvan; Bolourani, Golnoush; Lakdawala, Ness; Bastani, Arash

    There are increased demands for security, sustainability and indoor air quality in today's building design, construction, operation and maintenance. Installation of air cleaning systems can improve the indoor air quality by reducing the air pollution levels, and enhance the building security against sudden release of chemical and/or biological agents. At the same time, air cleaning techniques may reduce the building energy consumption by reducing the outdoor air supply rate, hence lowering the needs for conditioning of outdoor air. While the air filtration of particulate matter is well standardized, the standards against which the performance of air cleaning for gaseous contaminants is measured or classified are still under development. This study examined the performance of various granular activated carbons (GACs) for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from mechanically ventilated buildings. Eight different GACs (three virgin and five impregnated) were tested against toluene using a dynamic test system. The virgin GACs showed better performance than impregnated ones, the percentage and the type of impregnation affected the removal efficiencies. Tests were also conducted with selected GACs against toluene, cyclohexane and ethyl acetate at relative humidity (RH) values of 30%, 50% and 70%. The effect of humidity was dependant on the VOC used. Both for toluene and cyclohexane, the removal efficiency decreased as RH increased. However, higher humidity showed a positive impact on the removal of ethyl acetate.

  15. Experimental analysis of simulated reinforcement learning control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 243, Omaha, NE (United States); Henze, G. P. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 203D, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part investigation of a novel approach to optimally control commercial building passive and active thermal storage inventory. The proposed building control approach is based on simulated reinforcement learning, which is a hybrid control scheme that combines features of model-based optimal control and model-free learning control. An experimental study was carried out to analyze the performance of a hybrid controller installed in a full-scale laboratory facility. The first paper introduced the theoretical foundation of this investigation including the fundamental theory of reinforcement learning control. This companion paper presents a discussion and analysis of the experimental results. The results confirm the feasibility of the proposed control approach. Operating cost savings were attained with the proposed control approach compared with conventional building control; however, the savings are lower than for the case of model-based predictive optimal control. As for the case of model-based predictive control, the performance of the hybrid controller is largely affected by the quality of the training model, and extensive real-time learning is required for the learning controller to eliminate any false cues it receives during the initial training period. Nevertheless, compared with standard reinforcement learning, the proposed hybrid controller is much more readily implemented in a commercial building. (author)

  16. The Use of a Group Blog to Actively Support Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of blogs in higher education, there remains a lack of knowledge and consensus about the use and value of blogging in higher education, particularly when used for long periods. This article investigates the use of a group blog to assist traditional teaching activities and foster collaborative learning through the…

  17. Scaffolding of small groups' metacognitive activities with an avatar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Chiu, M.M.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Boxtel, C.A.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Metacognitive scaffolding in a computer-supported learning environment can influence students' metacognitive activities, metacognitive knowledge and domain knowledge. In this study we analyze how metacognitive activities mediate the relationships between different avatar scaffolds on students' learn

  18. Experimental analysis of simulated reinforcement learning control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 243, Omaha, NE (United States); Henze, G. P. [Architectural Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PKI 203D, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part investigation of a novel approach to optimally control commercial building passive and active thermal storage inventory. The proposed building control approach is based on simulated reinforcement learning, which is a hybrid control scheme that combines features of model-based optimal control and model-free learning control. An experimental study was carried out to analyze the performance of a hybrid controller installed in a full-scale laboratory facility. The first part presents an overview of the project with an emphasis on the theoretical foundation. The motivation of the research will be introduced first, followed by a review of past work. A brief introduction of the theory is provided including classic reinforcement learning and its variation, so-called simulated reinforcement learning, which constitutes the basic architecture of the hybrid learning controller. A detailed discussion of the experimental results will be presented in the companion paper. (author)

  19. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  20. Assessment of alpha activity of building materials commonly used in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    This paper, reports for the first time, an extensive study of alpha activity of all widely used building materials (plaster of Paris, stone chips, marble, white cement, mosaic stone, limestone, sand, granite, cement brick, asbestos, red brick, cement tile, ceramic tile and ceramics) in West Bengal, India. The alpha activities have been measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The samples were collected from local markets of Kolkata. The measured average alpha activities ranged from 22.7+/-2.5 to 590.6+/-16.8Bqkg(-1). The alpha activity of ceramic tiles was highest and provides additional data to estimate the effect of environmental radiation exposure on human health.

  1. Earthquake Vulnerability Assessment for Hospital Buildings Using a Gis-Based Group Multi Criteria Decision Making Approach: a Case Study of Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavar, M. R.; Moradi, M.; Moshiri, B.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, urban areas are threatened by a number of natural hazards such as flood, landslide and earthquake. They can cause huge damages to buildings and human beings which necessitates disaster mitigation and preparation. One of the most important steps in disaster management is to understand all impacts and effects of disaster on urban facilities. Given that hospitals take care of vulnerable people reaction of hospital buildings against earthquake is vital. In this research, the vulnerability of hospital buildings against earthquake is analysed. The vulnerability of buildings is related to a number of criteria including age of building, number of floors, the quality of materials and intensity of the earthquake. Therefore, the problem of seismic vulnerability assessment is a multi-criteria assessment problem and multi criteria decision making methods can be used to address the problem. In this paper a group multi criteria decision making model is applied because using only one expert's judgments can cause biased vulnerability maps. Sugeno integral which is able to take into account the interaction among criteria is employed to assess the vulnerability degree of buildings. Fuzzy capacities which are similar to layer weights in weighted linear averaging operator are calculated using particle swarm optimization. Then, calculated fuzzy capacities are included into the model to compute a vulnerability degree for each hospital.

  2. Building Energy Simulation and Analysis for A Building Group in Guangzhou%广州地区某建筑群典型建筑能耗模拟及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江向阳; 张勇华

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the software of eQUEST is used to simulate energy consumption for two typical buildings in building group in Guangzhou, by which two typical buildings energy-saving rates are obtained. Simulation results show that through enhanced natural ventilation, improved thermal performance of envelope and improved EER of air conditioning system, the energy-saving rates of building A1 and building B1 are 69.7% and 64.8% respectively. The building energy efficiency design is superior to《Residential building energy efficiency design standard in hot summer and warm winter zone》 JGJ 75-2003. It plays an exemplary role in progressively implementing the design stan- dard of energy-saving 65% in Guangzhou.%本文运用eQUEST软件对广州地区某建筑群内典型建筑进行能耗模拟计算.计算两栋典型建筑的节能率。计算结果表明,通过强化建筑自然通风降温功能,提高围护结构隔热性能和提高空调设备能效比等节能措施,A1建筑和B1建筑节能率分别为69.7%和64.8%。该建筑群的节能设计优于《夏热冬暖地区建筑节能设计标准》JGJ75—2003提出的建筑节能50%标准,对在广州地区居住建筑中逐步实施节能65%的建筑节能设计标准具有重要的示范作用。

  3. PHYSIC AND CHEMICAL BASIS FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF D-ELEMENTS OF THE FOURTH GROUP (TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, HAFNIUM IN THE SYNTHESIS OF BUILDING AND SILICATE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Bolshakov

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the studies of physico-chemical grounds of involving the fourth group elements (titanium, zirconium, hafnium for syntheses of construction silicate materials are presented. The physico-chemical approach proposed allows involving the great group of technogenic titanium-containing semi-products, concentrates, slags and slimes for production of construction silicate materials and manufacture the products and building structures.

  4. Regulation and control of thermally activated building systems; Regelung und Steuerung von thermoaktiven Bauteilsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toedtli, Juerg [Consulting Juerg Toedtli, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gwerder, Markus; Renggli, Franz; Guentensperger, Werner [Siemens Building Technologies, Zug (Switzerland); Lehmann, Beat; Dorer, Viktor [EMPA, Duebendorf (Switzerland). Abt. Building Technologies; Hildebrand, Kurt [Hochschule Luzern - Technik und Architektur, Horw (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    Thermally activated building systems (TABS) are becoming increasingly important in terms of energy efficient cooling and heating of buildings. In practice, however, regulation and control of such systems often causes problems. Started five years ago with the aim of getting to grips with these problems, the TABS Control research project was completed in early 2009. The project yielded the following results: various models and simulation programs for TABS; performance-bound calculations for regulating zones; a range of zone regulation/control strategies for planners to choose from, including good solutions for automatic switching between heating and cooling, for pulsed operation of the zone pump and for room temperature control; the implementation of a subset of these strategies as standard solutions in a Siemens building automation system; laboratory tests on these strategies; a new procedure for the integrated planning of TABS and their regulation/control (referred to as UBB planning procedure - Unknown But Bounded); an Excel planning tool; guidelines on selecting the hydraulic switching topology; a method for operation optimization; the theoretical basis for the new integrated planning procedure and the new regulation/ control strategies; a patent application.

  5. Impact of climate and weather on the activities of the building and construction industry in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, GDT

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a quantitative survey of the impact of the climate and weather on the activities of the building and construction industry in South Africa. Seasonal productivity problems, the seasonal provision of special facilities...

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Effects of Acoustic Sound Absorbers on the Cooling Performance of Thermally Active Building Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, L. Marcos; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Rage, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Free-hanging horizontal and vertical sound absorbers are commonly used in buildings for room acoustic control; however, when these sound absorbers are used in combination with Thermally Active Building Systems, they will decrease the cooling performance of Thermally Active Building Systems...... plug-in for acoustic elements, which allows modeling free-hanging horizontal sound absorbers that partially cover the ceiling. With horizontal sound absorbers, the cooling performance of the Thermally Active Building System decreased by 11%, 23% and 36% for ceiling coverage ratios of 43%, 60% and 80...... and this will affect the thermal indoor environment in that space. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to quantify and model these effects in the design phase. This study quantifies experimentally the effects of horizontal and vertical free-hanging sound absorbers on the cooling performance of Thermally Active...

  7. Experimental Study of an Integrated System with Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation and Thermally Activated Building Constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per

    The experiments are carried out in a climate chamber located at the Department of Civil Engineering Aalborg University. The objective of the experiments is to evaluate the performance of the system combining diffuse ceiling ventilation and thermally activated building construction (TABS) in terms....... And the thermal comfort is analyzed by draught rate vertical temperature gradient and radiant temperature asymmetry. Finally the effect of plenum and diffuse ceiling is discussed. This report mainly focuses on the experiment results and discussions. Therefore, some details about the measurement are not presented...... in this report but can be found in the experimental plan made before....

  8. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  9. Solar heating and cooling of buildings: activities of the private sector of the building community and its perceived needs relative to increased activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    A description of the state of affairs existing in the private sector of the building community between mid-1974 and mid-1975 with regard to solar heating and cooling of buildings is presentd. Also, information on the needs perceived by the private sector with regard to governmental actions (besides research) required to induce widespread application of solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings is given. The information is based on surveys, data obtained at workshops, sales literature of manufacturers, symposia, and miscellaneous correspondence. Selected interests and projects of individuals and organizations are described. (WHK)

  10. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  11. Building a culture of motor activity in students of secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil’ Sutula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to justify the connection and the sequence of the process of formation of culture of motor activity at pupils of elementary and primary schools and to define the role of means of the main gymnastics. Material and Methods: the analysis and synthesis of scientific and methodical literature on use of the main gym in building a culture of motor activity in primary and secondary schools. Results: showed that the concept of "culture of movement" is used only in primary school; it is the first step in creating the culture of motor activity of schoolchildren. The development of pupils motor activity culture is not provided as the main task of the secondary school. Teaching material for pupils of the fifth-ninth grade is not accompanied by a continuation of the formation of their culture of motor activity. Conclusions: the use of basic exercises in creating a culture of pupils motor activity of the primary school is a continuation of "movement school" formed in elementary school

  12. Using Group Drawings Activities to Facilitate the Understanding of Systemic Aspects of Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arantes do Amaral, João Alberto; Hess, Aurélio; Gonçalves, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    ) Making drawings in groups promotes knowledge sharing among team members; 3) Making drawings in group fosters creativity and communication between students; 4) Drawing in groups reduces the students’ boredom, makes the lecture more dynamic and interesting; 5) Drawing in groups reinforces bonds between...... students. Our systems analysis suggests that group drawing improves student participation in classroom activities, strengthens bonds between students, and enhances learning....

  13. Building Extraction from LIDAR Based Semantic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jie; YANG Haiquan; TAN Ming; ZHANG Guoning

    2006-01-01

    Extraction of buildings from LIDAR data has been an active research field in recent years. A scheme for building detection and reconstruction from LIDAR data is presented with an object-oriented method which is based on the buildings' semantic rules. Two key steps are discussed: how to group the discrete LIDAR points into single objects and how to establish the buildings' semantic rules. In the end, the buildings are reconstructed in 3D form and three common parametric building models (flat, gabled, hipped) are implemented.

  14. Characterization of inhibitory mechanism and antifungal activity between group-1 and group-2 phytocystatins from taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Ming; Kumar, Senthil; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Venkatagiri, Shripathi; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-10-01

    Tarocystatin from Colocasia esculenta, a group-2 phytocystatin, is a defense protein against phytopathogenic nematodes and fungi. It is composed of a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is homological to group-1 cystatin, and a repetitive peptide at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant proteins of tarocystatin, such as full-length (FL), N-terminus (Nt) and C-terminus (Ct) peptides, were produced and their inhibitory activities against papain as well as their antifungal effects were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed that FL peptide exhibited mixed type inhibition (K(ia) = 0.098 microM and K(ib) = 0.252 microM) and Nt peptide showed competitive inhibition (K(i) = 0.057 microM), whereas Ct peptide possessed weak papain activation properties. A shift in the inhibitory pattern from competitive inhibition of Nt peptide alone to mixed type inhibition of FL peptide implied that the Ct peptide has an regulatory effect on the function of FL peptide. Based on the inhibitory kinetics of FL (group-2) and Nt (group-1) peptides on papain activity, an inhibitory mechanism of group-2 phytocystatins and a regulatory mechanism of extended Ct peptide have each been proposed. By contrast, the antifungal activity of Nt peptide appeared to be greater than that of FL peptide, and the Ct peptide showed no effect on antifungal activity, indicating that the antifungal effect is not related to proteinase inhibitory activity. The results are valid for most phytocystatins with respect to the inhibitory mechanism against cysteine proteinase.

  15. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM.

  16. Structure of ganglioside with CAD blood group antigen activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, B.K.; Blanchard, D.; Cartron, J.P.; van Kuik, G.A.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Marcus, D.M.

    1986-05-01

    The novel erythrocyte ganglioside which carries the blood group Cad determinant has been isolated, and its structure has been determined. The ganglioside contained Glu:Gal:GalNAc:GlcNAc in a molar ratio of 1.00:1.94:0.93:0.95. The ganglioside binds Helix pomatia lectin and its chromatographic mobility is similar to G/sub D3/. After treatment with ..beta..-hexosaminidase (human placenta HexA) the product migrated with sialosylparagloboside (SPG), no longer binds Helix lectin, and binds a human anti-SPG antibody. Treatment of this material with neuraminidase (V. cholera) yielded a product with the mobility of paragloboside that bound monoclonal antibody 1B2. NMR analysis revealed that the terminal GalNAc is linked ..beta..1-4 to Gal, and confirms the structure proposed previously: GalNAc..beta..1-4(NeuAc..cap alpha..2-3)Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc..beta..1-3Gal..beta..1-4Glc-Cer. This structure is consistent with the previous demonstration that a compound with the same chromatographic mobility as the Cad ganglioside could be synthesized by enzymatic transfer of GalNAc to sialosylparagloboside.

  17. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3.

  18. Effects of Free-Hanging Horizontal Sound Absorbers on the Cooling Performance of Thermally Activated Building Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacarte, Luis Marcos Domínguez; Rage, Nils; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2017-01-01

    Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) have proven to be an energy-efficient solution to provide buildings with an optimal indoor thermal environment. This solution uses the structure of the building to store heat, reduce the peak loads, and decrease the primary energy demand. TABS require t...... simulations using a new TRNSYS Type, the use of comfort ventilation has a considerable influence on the thermal conditions in the room; if the ventilation is removed, then the operative temperature increases by 1.8 K for a 60%-covered ceiling....

  19. Effect of age, gender, economic group and tenure on thermal comfort: A field study in residential buildings in hot and dry climate with seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indraganti, Madhavi; Rao, Kavita Daryani [Architecture Department, Jawaharlal Nehru Architecture and Fine Arts University, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-03-15

    Energy consumption in Indian residential buildings is one of the highest and is increasing phenomenally. Indian standards specify comfort temperatures between 23 and 26 C for all types of buildings across the nation. However, thermal comfort research in India is very limited. A field study in naturally ventilated apartments was done in 2008, during the summer and monsoon seasons in Hyderabad in composite climate. This survey involved over 100 subjects, giving 3962 datasets. They were analysed under different groups: age, gender, economic group and tenure. Age, gender and tenure correlated weakly with thermal comfort. However, thermal acceptance of women, older subjects and owner-subjects was higher. Economic level of the subjects showed significant effect on the thermal sensation, preference, acceptance and neutrality. The comfort band for lowest economic group was found to be 27.3-33.1 C with the neutral temperature at 30.2 C. This is way above the standard. This finding has far reaching energy implications on building and HVAC systems design and practice. Occupants' responses for other environmental parameters often depended on their thermal sensation, often resulting in a near normal distribution. The subjects displayed acoustic and olfactory obliviousness due to habituation, resulting in higher satisfaction and acceptance. (author)

  20. Defining Building Information Modeling implementation activities based on capability maturity evaluation: a theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Morlhon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modeling (BIM has become a widely accepted tool to overcome the many hurdles that currently face the Architecture, Engineering and Construction industries. However, implementing such a system is always complex and the recent introduction of BIM does not allow organizations to build their experience on acknowledged standards and procedures. Moreover, data on implementation projects is still disseminated and fragmentary. The objective of this study is to develop an assistance model for BIM implementation. Solutions that are proposed will help develop BIM that is better integrated and better used, and take into account the different maturity levels of each organization. Indeed, based on Critical Success Factors, concrete activities that help in implementation are identified and can be undertaken according to the previous maturity evaluation of an organization. The result of this research consists of a structured model linking maturity, success factors and actions, which operates on the following principle: once an organization has assessed its BIM maturity, it can identify various weaknesses and find relevant answers in the success factors and the associated actions.

  1. Surface activity and radiation field measurements of the TMI-2 reactor building gross decontamination experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C V

    1983-10-01

    Surface samples were collected from concrete and metal surfaces within the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building on December 15 and 17, 1981 and again on March 25 and 26, 1982. The Reactor Building was decontaminated by hydrolasing during the period between these dates. The collected samples were analyzed for radionuclide concentration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The sampling equipment and procedures, and the analysis methods and results are discussed. The measured mean surface concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr on the 305-ft elevation floor before decontamination were, respectively, 3.6 +- 0.9 and 0.17 +- 0.04 ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 2/. Their mean concentrations on the 347-ft elevation floor were about the same. On both elevations, walls were found to be considerably less contaminated than floors. The fractions of the core inventories of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 129/I deposited on Reactor Building surfaces prior to decontamination were calculated using their mean concentrations on various types of surfaces. The calculated values for these three nuclides are 3.5 +- 0.4 E-4, 2.4 +- 0.8 E-5, and 5.7 +- 0.5 E-4, respectively. The decontamination operations reduced the /sup 137/Cs surface activity on the 305- and 347-ft elevations by factors of 20 and 13, respectively. The /sup 90/Sr surface activity reduction was the same for both floors, that being a factor of 30. On the whole, decontamination of vertical surfaces was not achieved. Beta and gamma exposure rates that were measured during surface sampling were examined to determine the degree to which they correlated with measured surface activities. The data were fit with power functions of the form y = ax/sup b/. As might be expected, the beta exposure rates showed the best correlation. Of the data sets fit with the power function, the set of December 1981 beta exposure exhibited the least scatter. The coefficient of determination for this set was calculated to be 0.915.

  2. Building Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — Explore real estate information about buildings in the Town of Cary.This file is created by the Town of Cary GIS Group. It contains data from both the Wake, Chatham...

  3. Effect of Different Types of Small-Group Activities on Students' Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Krista K.; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Teaching reform efforts in chemistry education often involve engaging students in small-group activities of different types. This study focused on the analysis of how activity type affected the nature of group conversations. In particular, we analyzed the small-group conversations of students enrolled in a chemistry course for nonscience majors.…

  4. Republic of Kazakhstan: Capacity Building through the Increasing of Space Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, G.

    Currently, a new space policy of the Republic of Kazakhstan is being formulated. Basic directions are: Adherence to principal agreements of the International Space Law. Optimal utilization and modernization of the Baikonur spaceport launch infrastructure. Creation of the national satellite communication system In accordance with the above listed goals and objectives, the following priority actions should be taken in national level: Increasing of the National activities in COPUOS Developing of the National space activities Program and Space activities Act; Funding of a new and upgraded facilities at the Baikonur spaceport; Creating of the educational and training system for national space industry In 2004 Kazakhstan-Russia cooperation in space activities has entered to a new perspectives. Both countries proceeded to develop joint projects in the field of space activities connected to modernization of existing space infrastructure of the Baikonur spaceport for launchers that meet requirements of ecological security. Three relevant bilateral agreements were signed. All signed documents ensure more wide participation of the Republic of Kazakhstan in realization of space programs and projects implemented at the Baikonur spaceport through shared financing and realization jointly with Russia of projects on building of the space missile complex ``Baiterek'' and launching of geostationary communication satellite. It opens great opportunities for Kazakhstan in terms of capacity building. Implementation of the mentioned two projects will allow to use the available scientific, technical and intellectual potential of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the field of space activities, and to utilize effectively the infrastructure of Baikonur complex, to get affordable access to space technologies, to create conditions for development, test and operation of space facilities, new science --capacity technologies that will lead to close integration with Russian space industry and with

  5. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  6. Simulation of thermal behavior of residential buildings using fuzzy active learning method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Taheri Shahraein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fuzzy modeling technique called Modified Active Learning Method (MALM was introduced and utilized for fuzzy simulation of indoor and inner surface temperatures in residential buildings using meteorological data and its capability for fuzzy simulation was compared with other studies. The case studies for simulations were two residential apartments in the Fakouri and Rezashahr neighborhoods of Mashhad, Iran. The hourly inner surface and indoor temperature data were accumulated during measurements taken in 2010 and 2011 in different rooms of the apartments under heating and natural ventilation conditions. Hourly meteorological data (dry bulb temperature, wind speed and direction and solar radiation were measured by a meteorological station and utilized with zero to three hours lags as input variables for the simulation of inner surface and indoor temperatures. The results of simulations demonstrated the capability of MALM to be used for nonlinear fuzzy simulation of inner surface and indoor temperatures in residential apartments.

  7. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  8. Using Phenomenography to Build an Understanding of How University People Conceptualise Their Community-Engaged Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kim; Shephard, Kerry; Warren, David; Hesson, Gala; Fleming, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions are seeking greater community engagement through academic, social and civic activity. In response, researcher attention has turned to impacts on students' education, and benefits to both university and community partners. This phenomenographic study examines how a diverse group of teachers, researchers and…

  9. Using Phenomenography to Build an Understanding of How University People Conceptualise Their Community-Engaged Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kim; Shephard, Kerry; Warren, David; Hesson, Gala; Fleming, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions are seeking greater community engagement through academic, social and civic activity. In response, researcher attention has turned to impacts on students' education, and benefits to both university and community partners. This phenomenographic study examines how a diverse group of teachers, researchers and…

  10. Salivary Alpha Amylase Activity in Human Beings of Different Age Groups Subjected to Psychological Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahu, Gopal K; Upadhyay, Seema; Panna, Shradha M

    2014-01-01

    ... in different age groups is least studied. This article reports the activity of sAA in human subjects of different age groups subjected to psychological stress induced through stressful video clip...

  11. Contested Inclusions: Pitfalls of NGO Peace-Building Activities in Liberia Umstrittene Inklusion: Fallstricke bei peace-building-Aktivitäten von NRO in Liberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Fuest

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In post-war situations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs feature highly in peace-building processes in their (perceived capacities as both representatives of civil society and as grassroots agents to be employed in the reconstruction and transformation of society. As elsewhere, in Liberia, peace-building approaches include, first, international blueprints of representation that intend to empower groups generally perceived to be socially subordinate and, second, supporting traditional institutions considered social capital in reconciliation. Using the example of Liberia, this paper explores how in local conflict arenas, NGO workshops – the most popular mode of participatory intervention – are interpreted and appropriated by local actors; it highlights some fallacies and unintended consequences of inclusive procedures in practice and questions the support furnished to heads of gendered secret societies. Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NRO wird in Nachkriegsphasen hohe Kompetenz in Bezug auf peace-building-Prozesse zugesprochen, denn sie repräsentieren die civil society und stellen gleichzeitig Akteure, die an der Basis zum Wiederaufbau und zur gesellschaftlichen Transformation beitragen können. Auch in Liberia schließen peace-building-Konzepte an erster Stelle international erarbeitete Zielvorgaben zur Repräsentanz ein und sehen erstens eine Beteiligung von Gruppen mit niedrigem sozialen Status vor und zweitens die Unterstützung traditioneller Institutionen, die als soziales Kapital im Aussöhnungsprozess angesehen werden. Die Autorin untersucht am Beispiel Liberia, inwieweit NRO-workshops – die beliebteste Form der partizipativen Intervention – in Konfliktzonen von lokalen Akteuren interpretiert und für eigene Ziele genutzt werden; sie verweist auf irrtümliche Annahmen und unbeabsichtigte Konsequenzen der praktischen Anwendung inklusiver Verfahren und stellt die Unterstützung in Frage, die Oberhäuptern geschlechtsspezifischer

  12. Level of Presence in Team-Building Activities: Gaming Component in Virtual Environments

    CERN Document Server

    De Leo, Gianluca; Radici, Elena; Secrhist, Scott R; Mastaglio, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    Historically the training of teams has been implemented using a face-to-face approach. In the past decade, on-line multiuser virtual environments have offered a solution for training teams whose members are geographically dispersed. In order to develop on effective team training activity, a high sense of presence among the participant needs to be reached. Previous research studies reported being able to reach a high level of presence even when using inexpensive technology such as laptop and headset. This study evaluates the level of presence of ten subjects who have to perform a team-building activity in a multi-user virtual environment using a laptop computer and a headset. The authors are interested in determining which user characterizes, such as gender, age and knowledge of computers, have a strong correlation with the level of sense of presence. The results of this study showed that female participants were more likely to engage in the activity and perceived fewer negative effects. Participants who repor...

  13. Activities of the Federal Government, Laender and municipalities and fields of activity relating to building modernisation; Aktivitaeten des Bundes, der Laender und der Kommunen und Handlungsfelder zur Gebaeudesanierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Thomas; Schuele, Ralf; Pietzner, Katja [Wuppertal Institut fuer Klima, Umwelt, Energie GmbH, Wuppertal (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The present report inquires into how the programmes and activities undertaken by the German Federal Government and the Lnder to increase the potential for building modernisation should be designed so that municipalities, including those with poor financial means, can utilise and create incentives and also take on a role as local multiplicator for building modernisation to improve energy efficiency. The goal is to maximise synergy effects between building modernisation programmes of the Federation and Laender and activities at the municipal level. The second part of the report explains the legal framework for promotion by the Federation and Laender which has been set up on the basis of European and global goals for climate protection and in particular building modernisation. The third part clarifies the importance and significance of building modernisation for climate protection and pinpoints general impediments affecting the area of building modernisation. The last part of the report offers suggestions to municipalities for setting up, designing and supplementing building modernisation programmes dedicated to improving energy efficiency.

  14. Regulation and control of thermally activated building systems (TABS); Regelung und Steuerung von thermoaktiven Bauteilsystemen (TABS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toedtli, Juerg [Consulting Juerg Toedtli, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gwerder, Markus; Renggli, Franz; Guentensperger, Werner [Siemens Building Technologies, Zug (Switzerland); Lehmann, Beat; Dorer, Viktor [Empa, Abt. Building Technologies, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hildebrand, Kurt [Hochschule Luzern - Technik and Architektur, Horw (Switzerland)

    2009-10-15

    Thermally activated building systems (TABS) are becoming increasingly important in terms of energy efficient cooling and heating of buildings. In practice, however, regulation and control of such systems often causes problems. Started five years ago with the aim of getting to grips with these problems, the TABS Control research project was completed in early 2009. The project yielded the following results: various models and simulation programs for TABS; performance-bound calculations for regulating zones; a range of zone regulation/control strategies for planners to choose from, including good solutions for automatic switching between heating and cooling, for pulsed operation of the zone pump and for room temperature control; the implementation of a subset of these strategies as standard solutions in a Siemens building automation system; laboratory tests on these strategies; a new procedure for the integrated planning of TABS and their regulation/control (referred to as UBB planning procedure - Unknown But Bounded); an Excel planning tool; guidelines on selecting the hydraulic switching topology; a method for operation optimization; the theoretical basis for the new integrated planning procedure and the new regulation/ control strategies; a patent application. [German] Thermoaktive Bauteilsysteme (TABS) haben eine zunehmende Bedeutung bei der energieeffizienten Kuehlung und Heizung von Gebaeuden, doch ihre Regelung/Steuerung fuehrt in der Praxis oft zu Problemen. Mit dem Ziel, diese Probleme in den Griff zu bekommen, wurde vor fuenf Jahren das Forschungsprojekt TABS-Control gestartet, das zu Beginnd des Jahres 2009 abgeschlossen wurde. Es wurden folgende wesentliche Resultate erarbeitet: Modelle und Simulationsprogramme fuer TABS; Performance-Bound-Berechnungen fuer die Zonenregelung; eine Auswahl von Regel-/ Steuer-Strategien fuer die Zonenregelung, u. a. mit Loesungen fuer das automatische Umschalten zwischen Heizen und Kuehlen, fuer den Taktbetrieb der

  15. Activity of small businesses in the process of building relationships in the supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Glabiszewski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multilateral cooperation is an inherent part of any business and one of the most important factors in the success of modern enterprise. Therefore, in this paper the author addresses the problem of building relationships with partners in a supply chain and focuses on the development of relational abilities as well as inter-organizational ties, and his exploration and considerations are applied to small businesses. Methods: In the empirical part of the work the author aims to identify the scope and intensity of the involvement of small businesses in taking measures to build relationships with supply chain partners. The basic source of data is the results of empirical research conducted by the author in 2014 by means of mail and personal surveys. A questionnaire specially designed for this purpose was sent out to 500 randomly selected small businesses from the kujawsko-pomorskie region (Poland. Results: The author provides a positive verification of the formulated hypotheses, which imply that small businesses take action to develop both their ability to establish and maintain relationships and the actual relationships with partners in the supply chain. However, they take various activities into account, but not all, and this is mostly done in a manner that is not systematically, particularly in relation to those undertakings which require more sophisticated skills and tools. Conclusions: Propagating the theory of relational abilities among small businesses and the concepts indicating the forms of their development and use appears to be justified, even if these companies seem to be aware of the impact of the quality of relationships with supply chain partners on the effects of cooperation with them.

  16. The importance of group activities for quality of life of women in postmenopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Calazans Negrão

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the quality of life of postmenopausal women who participate in different activities groups for elderly. Methods: We selected 59 women, divided as follows: hydrotherapy group (n = 15, physical activity and bingo group (n = 15, and a control group(n = 29. Data collection was done through a questionnaire evaluating the Quality of Life(WHOQOL-Bref, the Blatt and Kupperman Menopausal Index and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS. The assessments were conducted in two stages with an interval of two monthsbetween each one. Results: There was an improvement in quality of life of women participants in activities groups with respect to the control group, and in all domains of quality of life questionnaire, the control group had lower values. Significant differences occurred in the environment domain, in comparing the hydrotherapy group and physical activity/bingo groups, of which the latter showed better responses. Conclusion: The activities groups were positive for improving quality of life of postmenopausal women, emphasizing the importance of encouraging the practice of not only physical activities, but also those that stimulate the social and psychological profile of these women.

  17. Teacher-Involved Conversations with Young Children during Small Group Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia; Dangel, Julie Rainer

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the conversations of two preschool teachers with two- and three-year-old children during small-group activity settings in two high-quality child development centers. Using interviews, observations and videotaping of small-group activities, the conversations are characterized in terms of the kind and function of…

  18. Canadian-led capacity-building in biostatistics and methodology in cardiovascular and diabetes trials: the CANNeCTIN Biostatistics and Methodological Innovation Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabane, Lehana; Wells, George; Cook, Richard; Platt, Robert; Pogue, Janice; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Matthews, David; McCready, Tara; Devereaux, Philip J; Cairns, John A; Yusuf, Salim

    2011-02-18

    The Biostatistics and Methodological Innovation Working (BMIW) Group is one of several working groups within the CANadian Network and Centre for Trials INternationally (CANNeCTIN). This programme received funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canada Foundation for Innovation beginning in 2008, to enhance the infrastructure and build capacity for large Canadian-led clinical trials in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). The overall aims of the BMIW Group's programme within CANNeCTIN, are to advance biostatistical and methodological research, and to build biostatistical capacity in CVD and DM. Our program of research and training includes: monthly videoconferences on topical biostatistical and methodological issues in CVD/DM clinical studies; providing presentations on methods issues at the annual CANNeCTIN meetings; collaborating with clinician investigators on their studies; training young statisticians in biostatistics and methods in CVD/DM trials and organizing annual symposiums on topical methodological issues. We are focused on the development of new biostatistical methods and the recruitment and training of highly qualified personnel--who will become leaders in the design and analysis of CVD/DM trials. The ultimate goal is to enhance global health by contributing to efforts to reduce the burden of CVD and DM.

  19. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  20. Analiza socjometryczna w ocenie grupy społecznej i budowaniu zespołu sportowego = Sociometry in the assessment of social group and sport team building

    OpenAIRE

    Ussorowska, Anna; Mieszkowska, Monika; Graczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ussorowska Anna, Mieszkowska Monika, Graczyk Marek. Analiza socjometryczna w ocenie grupy społecznej i budowaniu zespołu sportowego = Sociometry in the assessment of social group and sport team building. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(8):719-733. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.62023 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3842       The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Educa...

  1. Using Electronic Communication Tools in Online Group Activities to Develop Collaborative Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Ebner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using synchronous and asynchronous communication tools in online group activities to develop collaborative learning skills. An experimental study was implemented on a sample of faculty of education students in Mansoura University. The sample was divided into two groups, a group studied…

  2. The Exploration of the Relationship between Participation in Organized Activity and Cross-Group Friendships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonseok Suh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-group friendship is an important element in regard to reducing prejudice and increasing positive interracial interactions among young adults. In order to facilitate the formation of cross-group friendships, organized activity participation (e.g., community service and school-based extracurricular activities may provide an environment that supports positive cross-cultural interactions and contacts. The sample used for this study consisted of 601 college students. We tested whether participation in an organized activity contributes to the formation of cross-group friendships. The results of this study indicate that community service and school-based extracurricular activities significantly contribute to the formation of cross-group friendships among young adults. The findings also suggest that a variety of organized activities should be developed and implemented to facilitate cross-group friendships. We also discuss the practical implications of these findings.

  3. Building novel Ag/CeO{sub 2} heterostructure for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Qiang; Yang, Dezhi; Yang, Qi [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu, Chenguo, E-mail: hucg@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Kang, Yue; Wang, Mingjun [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hashim, Muhammad [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Applied Physics Department, Federal Urdu University of Arts Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticle is designed to building Schottky heterojunction on CeO{sub 2} nanocube. • The photocatalytic activity of Ag/CeO{sub 2} heterostructure is much enhanced. • 95.33% of MB can be effectively degraded within half an hour. • Ag as acceptor of photoelectrons blocks the recombination of electron–hole pairs. - Abstract: Stable and recyclable photocatalysts with high efficiency to degrade organic contamination are important and widely demanded under the threat of the environment pollution. Ag/CeO{sub 2} heterostructure is designed as a photocatalyst to degrade organic dye under the simulated sunlight. The catalytic activity of CeO{sub 2} nanocubes (NCs) to degrade methylene blue (MB) is obviously enhanced when Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are deposited on the surface of them. The weight ratio of Ag and CeO{sub 2} in forming high efficiency catalyst, the amount of Ag/CeO{sub 2} catalyst used in degradation process, and the dye concentration and pH value of the initial MB solution are examined systematically. 95.33% of MB can be effectively degraded within half an hour when 50 mg of Ag/CeO{sub 2} catalyst in an optimal weight ratio of 1:3, is added to the 100 mL of MB solution (c{sub 0} = 1 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1}, pH 6.2). The mechanism of the enhanced catalytic activity of Ag/CeO{sub 2} heterostructure is discussed. The photocatalytic degradation rate is found to obey pseudo-first-order kinetics equations according to Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. The intermediate products in different stages during the degradation of MB are analyzed.

  4. Building positive self-image in adolescents in foster care: the use of role models in an interactive group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, A K

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article (Yancey, 1992), the literature on identity development in individuals from socially devalued racial and ethnic groups was summarized. It was postulated that the social maladaptation of adolescents in residential group foster care is reflective of identity disturbances created by the negative images of African-Americans and Latinos perpetuated by the dominant society and unfiltered by optimal parental racial/ethnic socialization. The present article describes the development of a pilot preventive mental health intervention, the PRIDE (Personal and Racial/ethnic Identity Development and Enhancement) program, designed to provide components of parenting that are necessary for promoting positive self-image in ethnically marginalized adolescents and that are typically lacking in the group foster care milieu. PRIDE utilizes successful, ethnically relevant role models in interactive group sessions to create a significant cognitive and emotional experience for teens. While the utility of role modeling for at-risk youth is widely accepted, there is little research on the packaging, delivery, and influence of this intervention modality. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a "hybrid" role-modeling approach (intermediate in intensity of exposure and cost between one-to-one mentoring and career-day programs). Implications for further research on this type of intervention are discussed.

  5. Building the competitive intelligence knowledge: processes and activities in a corporate organisation

    OpenAIRE

    V. sreenivasulu

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of building and developing comprehensive tools, techniques, support systems, and better methods of harnessing the competitive intelligence knowledge processes. The author stresses the need for building sophisticated methodological competitive intelligence knowledge acquisition, systematic collection of competitive intelligence knowledge from various sources for critical analysis, process, organization, synthesis, assessment, screening, filtering and interpreta...

  6. Natural Interactions in Artifical Situations: Focus Groups as an Active Social Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    the interactions going on in the group can be described as natural occurring data (cf. Silverman, 2007). Thus this approach comes to terms with some of the problems addressed within both positivistic as well as constructivist uses of focus group methods. Secondly, framing focus groups as social experiments also......This chapter discuss the question of how the validity of focus group data can be reframed when approaching focus groups as social experiments in a science and technology approach. By using this frame we first of all comes to perceive the focus group discussion as an artificial situation, while...... highlights possibilities of a more active use of groups (by intervention) that resembles the interviewing situations as an active ethnomethodological breaching. It is within this framework of “stimulated or irritated” natural occurring data that focus groups will be discussed....

  7. Language-Building Activities and Interaction Variations with Mixed-Ability ESL University Learners in a Content-Based Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna Dimas, Héctor Manuel; Ruíz Castellanos, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of both language-building activities and a variety of teacher/student interaction patterns increase both oral language participation and content learning in a course of manual therapy with mixed-language ability students. In this article, the researchers describe their collaboration in a content-based course in English with English…

  8. A Hands-On Activity to Build Mastery of Intermolecular Forces and Its Impacts on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The intermolecular forces activity presented in this article is designed to foster concept-building through students' use of concrete, manipulative objects, and it was developed to be pedagogically sound. Data analysis via pre- and posttesting and subsequent exam questions indicated that students who had the opportunity to participate in the…

  9. Forming and activating an internal facilitation group for successful implementation: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Megan B; Gillespie, Chris; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Jones, Ellen A; Park, Angela M; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen; Rose, Adam J

    detailing how internal facilitators learn their skills over time, and how a group of internal facilitators can help each other succeed. These findings can guide those who wish to incorporate internal facilitation teams as an implementation strategy, and demonstrate how sites can build capacity for implementation efforts. This study focuses on an implementation facilitation strategy to improve the delivery of anticoagulation care within pharmacy-run clinics across 8 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Internal facilitators (IFs) guided by and supported by an external facilitators (EF), successfully implemented the clinical innovation. This study examines how the IF group became instrumental in the successful implementation of evidence-based practice change. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Intrinsic Optical Activity and Environmental Perturbations: Solvation Effects in Chiral Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemler, Paul M.; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The non-resonant interaction of electromagnetic radiation with an isotropic ensemble of chiral molecules, which causes the incident state of linear polarization to undergo a signed rotation, long has served as a metric for gauging the enantiomeric purity of asymmetric syntheses. While the underlying phenomenon of circular birefringence (CB) typically is probed in the condensed phase, recent advances in ultrasensitive circular-differential detection schemes, as exemplified by the techniques of Cavity Ring-Down Polarimetry (CRDP), have permitted the first quantitative analyses of such processes to be performed in rarefied media. Efforts to extend vapor-phase investigations of CB to new families of chiral substrates will be discussed, with particular emphasis directed towards the elucidation of intrinsic (e.g., solvent-free) properties and their mediation by environmental perturbations (e.g., solvation). Specific species targeted by this work will include the stereoselective building blocks phenylpropylene oxide and α-methylbenzyl amine, both of which exhibit pronounced solvent-dependent changes in measured optical activity. The nature of chiroptical response in different environments will be highlighted, with quantum-chemical calculations serving to unravel the structural and electronic provenance of observed behavior.

  11. Method of Building a Group of NURBS Models Based on Genetic Algorithm%基于遗传算法的NURBS模型群体生成方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李媛媛; 刘弘

    2011-01-01

    Producing a crowd animation needs a great number of individual models.For how to quickly build multiple models from a single built one and ensure that they are not the same, researched methods of NURBS modeling and presented a method of building a group of NURBS models based on genetic algorithm.This method first extracted structure lines of a given NURBS model, initialized a population according to it, and regarded the given model as the best one.Then it adjusted each structure line of each model by using selection,crossover and mutation operations, and made the population evolve to build a group of models with different appearances and to be used in crowd animation.%制作群体动画需要使用大量的个体模型.针对如何由一个制作好的模型快速生成多个模型,并且保证各模型之间的外观不完全相同,对NURBS建模方法进行研究,提出基于遗传算法的NURBS模型群体生成方法.该方法首先提取给定NURBS模型的结构线,根据给定的NURBS模型初始化一个种群,并将给定的NURBS模型作为最佳模型,然后利用选择、交叉、变异三种基本操作对种群中每个模型的每条结构线进行放大或缩小调整,对种群进行进化,生成形态各异的NURBS模型的群体,用于群体动画的制作.

  12. Chemometric Analysis of Some Biologically Active Groups of Drugs on the Basis Chromatographic and Molecular Modeling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Baczek, Tomasz; Bucinski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different groups of drugs such as 12 analgesic drugs, 11 cardiovascular system drugs and 36 "other" compounds, respectively, were analyzed with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) methods. All chemometric analysis were based on the chromatographic parameters (logk and logk(w)) determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and also by molecular modeling descriptors calculated using various computer programs (HyperChem, Dragon, and the VCCLAB). The clustering of compounds were obtained by CA (using various algorithm as e.g. Ward method or unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages as well as Euclidean or Manhattan distance), and allowed to build dendrograms linked drugs with similar physicochemical and pharmacological properties were discussed. Moreover, the analysis performed for analyzed groups of compounds with the use of FA or PCA methods indicated that almost all information reached in input chromatographic parameters as well as in molecular modeling descriptors can be explained by first two factors. Additionally, all analyzed drugs were clustered according to their chemical structure and pharmacological activity. Summarized, the performed classification analysis of studied drugs was focused on similarities and differences in methods being used for chemometric analysis as well as focused abilities to drugs classification (clustering) according to their molecular structures and pharmacological activity performed on the basis of chromatographic experimental and molecular modeling data. Thus, the most important application of statistically important molecular descriptors taken from QSRR models to classification analysis allow detailed biological (pharmacological) classification of analyzed drugs.

  13. 基于视知觉理论的建筑群体表情初探%Brief Discussion on Building Group Expression Based on Visual Perception Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伟; 张伟

    2012-01-01

      According to disorderly and repetitive City Scape under the context of current urban construction, this paper Consider the thought of ‘building group' as the media of Architectural design and Architectural design.On this basis,it puts forward the concept of ‘building group expression’and make preliminary inquiry to it according to the visual perception gestalt theory, hoping to research the important role of it in shaping city style and feature from a new perspective.%  针对当前城市建设背景下中千城一面、杂乱无章的城市面貌,该文提出以“建筑群体”思想作为连接建筑设计与城市规划的中间层次,在此基础上提出“建筑群体表情”的概念,并根据视知觉完形理论对其进行了初步的探究,希望从新的角度思考其在塑造城市风貌方面的的重要作用。

  14. Post-Occupancy Evaluation of UK Library Building Projects: Some Examples of Current Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Enright

    2002-01-01

    Post-occupancy evaluations of buildings ask questions and provide answers on how buildings actually work in technical, social and management terms for the end-users1. They can have a significant impact on creating change in terms of improving use of any building. Post-occupancy evaluations can show what works, and what does not – yet they are not common and apparently have been seldom done in a systematic way. Fortunately that picture is changing as post-occupancy evaluation becomes more acti...

  15. 226Ra, 232Th and 40K ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS AND RADIOLOGICAL HAZARDS OF BUILDING MATERIALS IN MUGLA, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Eren Belgin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity concentrations of natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in commonly used building materials were measured by using high purity germanium (HPGe detector coupled with a high resolution multichannel analyser. The results associated radiation hazards due to  40K, 226Ra and 232Th have been determined in samples collected randomly from southwest part of Turkey. When the building materials such as clay brick, marble, cement etc. originating from soil and rocks are used in constructions they cause direct ionizing radiation exposure at varying intensities. Different criterion formulas as radium equivalent activity, the external/internal hazard indices, the alpha/gamma indexes and the absorbed dose rate in indoor air were determined to assess the radiation hazards arising due to the use of materials studied for people living in the construction of dwellings made of the these materials. Although indoor absorbed dose rate is relatively higher than the world population-weighted average value and international limit for studied brick and cement samples they could be used safely as building materials because radium equivalent activity, alpha/gamma indices and hazard indices of those materials have been found to be within the recommended limits. All the values for all criterion formulas for marble samples are found to be well below the safety limits recommended by UNSCEAR. It can be concluded that examined materials can be used for construction of buildings for interior and external works.

  16. Role of the phenolic hydroxyl group in the biological activities of simplified analogue of aplysiatoxin with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Ryo C; Kamachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Murakami, Akira; Nakagawa, Yu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nagai, Hiroshi; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2010-10-15

    The 18-deoxy derivative (3) of a simplified analogue (1) of aplysiatoxin with antiproliferative activity was synthesized to examine the role of the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 18 in the biological activities of 1. Compound 3 as well as 1 showed significant affinity for protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), and the antiproliferative activity of 3 was slightly higher than that of 1. However, the anti-tumor-promoting activity of 3 was less than that of 1 in vitro, suggesting that the phenolic hydroxyl group of 1 is necessary for the anti-tumor-promoting activity but not for the binding of PKCδ and antiproliferative activity. Moreover, PKC isozyme selectivity of 3 was similar to that of 1, suggesting non-PKC receptors for these compounds to play some roles in the anti-tumor-promoting activity of 1.

  17. Building social participation with a support group users: challenges of care qualification in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Corrêa Detomini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature points out a lack of studies describing practical experiences approaching the role of social participation, even though, the subject Brazilian Health System (SUS as a principle is valued by theoretical-conceptual works. The lack of studies is especially observed in mental health care services, where the existing studies focus on the users’ management engagement as part of psychosocial rehabilitation. Thus, this article introduces an experience developed in a Center for Psycho-Social Attention (CAPS, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, aiming to address the issue of social participation in care qualification, in accordance to legislation and technical standards. Thisstudy focused on two types of sources. 1 Internship Final Report of a Psycology Student including 54 sessions of a support group, 2 technical and legal documents concerning the SUS and the National Mental Health Policy and Humanization. The service aspects were analyzed through technical and legislative foundations - focusing the needs and claims on group discussions, classified as structure and process, used to assess the health care quality. Most concerns were listed on normative Ordinances and Regulations. Achieving social participation was not an institutional premise and, among the main difficulties was the medical/outpatient centered model and the representation of “crazy”/”CAPS users” as incapable. It requires: i integration of “clinic” and “politics”; ii intensification of interdisciplinary and psychological care; iii respect the citizenship of mental health users, and, finally, iv that the collective participation spaces do not exhaust themselves. Therefore, the collective participation spaces need practical recommendations in order to improve the structures and work processes and meet the users’ needs.

  18. Impact of physical activity in group versus individual physical activity on fatigue in patients with breast cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, Christine; Filion, Myriam; Brien, Marie-Chantale; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Laflamme, Christian; Lemieux, Julie

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity improves the quality of life of cancer survivors, but whether there is a difference between individual vs. group physical activity is unknown. To compare fatigue at 12 weeks in breast cancer survivors after participation in a program of group vs. individual video-assisted physical activity. This was a randomized phase II pilot study carried out in breast cancer survivors at a tertiary breast cancer center. Eligible patients were randomized to individual or group 12-week physical activity program. The primary outcome was fatigue (FACT-F). Aerobic capacity (6-min walk test), muscular strength, and quality-of-life (FACT-G and FACT-B) were assessed. Because of poor accrual, 200 consecutive breast cancer patients were surveyed about their physical activity habits to assess reasons for low recruitment. For all participants (n = 26; n = 12 for group vs. n = 14 for individual), there were some improvement in FACT-F, FACT-G, FACT-B, physical activity level, aerobic capacity, and shoulder strength. Among the 200 patients surveyed, 58% were interested to increase their physical activity level, 15% declared that they were already exercising enough, 9% declared being unable to, 3% declared having no time, and 2% declared having no interest, and other reasons (13%). Among the 200 patients surveyed, 25% preferred in group, 57% preferred alone, and 18% had no preference. Low recruitment precluded conclusions about the efficacy of physical activity practiced in group vs. individually, but both groups derived a benefit. Low willingness to change exercising habits could be the biggest barrier to physical activity in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient use of energy in buildings - Activities and projects in 2002; Rationelle Energienutzung in Gebaeuden. Aktivitaeten und Projekte 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, M.

    2003-07-01

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy reviews the activities and projects of the Swiss Programme on the Efficient Use of Energy in Buildings in 2002. The aims of the programme, which concerns itself with building systems, technical installations and the use of solar energy in buildings, are reviewed. Areas targeted in the period 2002 - 2006 are listed, including high-insulation technologies, so-called 'passive' low-energy consumption housing, environmental technology and sustainable neighbourhood development. Progress made in the environmental technology area is described including eco-assessment methods and the development of alternative insulation materials. The topics of solar sustainable housing, low-energy consumption building standards, aids for the optimisation of solar installations in larger buildings and lighting are covered, as is progress in the development of vacuum insulation and translucent elements with latent energy storage and guidelines for air-tightness and mechanical ventilation in 'passive' housing. In the technical services area, the validation of planning tools and manuals for purchasers and operators of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems are discussed. Co-operation with national and international institutions is discussed. A list of pilot and demonstration projects completes the report.

  20. Modified activated carbons with amino groups and their copper adsorption properties in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Mahaninia; Paria Rahimian; Tahereh Kaghazchi

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by two chemical methods and the adsorption of Cu (II) on activated carbons from aqueous solution containing amino groups was studied. The first method involved the chlorination of activated carbon following by substitution of chloride groups with amino groups, and the second involved the nitrilation of activated carbon with reduction of nitro groups to amino groups. Resultant activated carbons were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, XPS, Boehm titration, and pHzpc. Kinetic and equilibrium tests were performed for copper adsorption in the batch mode. Also, adsorption mechanism and effect of pH on the adsorption of Cu (II) ions were discussed. Adsorption study shows enhanced adsorption for copper on the modified activated carbons, mainly by the presence of amino groups, and the Freundlich model is applicable for the activated carbons. It is suggested that binding of nitrogen atoms with Cu (II) ions is stronger than that with H+ions due to relatively higher divalent charge or stronger electrostatic force.

  1. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  2. A REVIEW OF OXYGEN-CONTAINING SURFACE GROUPS AND SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yongwen; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; XIA Qibin

    2004-01-01

    This review focused on the recent reports related to the function, characterization and modification of oxygen-containing surface groups of activated carbon (AC). The Oxygen-containing surface groups were briefly described, and the most frequently used techniques for characterization of the oxygen-containing surface groups on ACs were also briefly stated. A detailed discussion of the effects of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the adsorptive capacity of AC was given. The recent progresses in modification of the oxygen-containing surface groups of AC were also reviewed.

  3. Carboxylate groups play a major role in antitumor activity of Ganoderma applanatum polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chen; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jinping; Wang, Weijun

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, the structure difference between the polysaccharides isolated from fruit bodies (FGAP) and submerged fermentation system (SGAP) of Ganoderma applanatum was investigated by means of GPC, HPLC and IR, respectively. And their antitumor activities were evaluated against Sarcoma 180 in vivo. The results showed that FGAP and SGAP were typical polysaccharides with different molecular weights, monosaccharide components, and functional groups. Closely related to the distinct structures, FGAP exhibited a better antitumor activity than SGAP. Moreover, since FGAP contained carboxylate groups rather than SGAP, such groups were chemically introduced into SGAP (CSGAP) by carboxymethylation in order to identify their contribution to antitumor activity. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of CSGAP against Sarcoma 180 in vivo was significantly enhanced by comparison to the native SGAP and even higher than that of FGAP, suggesting that the carboxylate groups played a major role in antitumor activity of G. applanatum polysaccharide.

  4. Reversible Redox Activity in Multicomponent Metal-Organic Frameworks Constructed from Trinuclear Copper Pyrazolate Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Binbin; Pang, Qingqing; Xu, Huoshu; Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Yulin; Ma, Zhen; Weng, Linhong; Li, Qiaowei

    2017-06-14

    Inorganic functionalization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), such as incorporation of multiple inorganic building blocks with distinct metals into one structure and further modulation of the metal charges, endows the porous materials with significant properties toward their applications in catalysis. In this work, by an exploration of the role of 4-pyrazolecarboxylic acid (H2PyC) in the formation of trinuclear copper pyrazolate as a metalloligand in situ, four new MOFs with multiple components in order were constructed through one-pot synthesis. This metalloligand strategy provides multicomponent MOFs with new topologies (tub for FDM-4 and tap for FDM-5) and is also compatible with a second organic linker for cooperative construction of complex MOFs (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-6 and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-7). The component multiplicity of these MOFs originates from PyC's ability to separate Cu and Zn on the basis of their differentiated binding affinities toward pyrazolate and carboxylate. These MOFs feature reversible and facile redox transformations between Cu(I)3(PyC)3 and Cu(II)3(μ-OH)(PyC)3(OH)3 without altering the connecting geometries of the units, thus further contributing to the significant catalytic activities in the oxidation of CO and aromatic alcohols and the decomposition of H2O2. This study on programming multiple inorganic components into one framework and modulating their electronic structures is an example of functionalizing the inorganic units of MOFs with a high degree of control.

  5. The thermal stability of the framework, hydroxyl groups, and active sites of faujasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishin, I.V.; Kalinin, V.P.; Nissenbaum, V.D. [Zelinskii Institute of Organic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Beyer, H.K. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Karge, H.G. [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Soceity, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of the framework composition on the crystallinity and {open_quotes}density{close_quotes} of hydroxyl groups and the concentration of active sites is reported for hydrogen forms of Y zeolites preheated at 400 - 1000{degrees}C. The increase in the Si/Al ratios results in improved resistance of the framework atoms and hydroxyl groups to high temperatures and in enhanced thermal stability of the sites that are active in the cracking of isooctane and disproportionation of ethylbenzene.

  6. Transnational Strategies for the Promotion of Physical Activity and Active Aging: The World Health Organization Model of Consensus Building in International Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; Schwingel, Andiara

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we focus our attention on an examination of the four-step process adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its systematic campaign to promote physically active lifestyles by older adults across the 193 WHO member states. The four steps adopted by the WHO include (1) Building Consensus Among Professionals; (2) Educating the…

  7. Practice of Building WEB Group via Cloud Computing%云计算架构下的网站群应用实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛培民

    2012-01-01

    云计算正在由概念逐步走进现实,其广泛的应用前景已初现端倪.以政府机构网站群建设为对象,阐述应用云计算支撑政府机构网站群架构的安全性设计和应用方法.从两个方面构建网站群应用环境.一方面,以IaaS的模式搭建支撑网站群应用的云计算基础平台,以SaaS的模式搭建网站群内容管理云计算应用平台;另一方面,运用公有云和私有云环境,保障网站群系统安全和信息安全.更加方便、灵活地满足互联网信息传播需求,为政府运作及企业发展提供更加完善的信息化支撑服务.%Cloud computing is transforming from concept to reality and its wide application is just around the corner. In mis paper, we will take web group application as the subject and explore ways to apply cloud computing method into supporting government and enterprise's websites, and we seek to build a Web technology-supporting environment in two aspects so as to meet the requirements of web group application. Firstly, we will build a cloud computing platform via the model of PaaS (Platform as a Service). And we will build web content management software via the model of SaaS (Software as a Service). Secondly, we use public and private cloud environments, protect information security of the web group. In this way, it can maximize efficiency, reduce costs, and meet the enterprise network information communication needs more conveniently and with more flexibility.

  8. Need for Cognition and Active Information Search in Small Student Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curseu, Petru Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 213 students organized in 44 groups this study tests the impact of need for cognition on active information search by using a multilevel analysis. The results show that group members with high need for cognition seek more advice in task related issues than those with low need for cognition and this pattern of information exchange is…

  9. Need for Cognition and Active Information Search in Small Student Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curseu, Petru Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 213 students organized in 44 groups this study tests the impact of need for cognition on active information search by using a multilevel analysis. The results show that group members with high need for cognition seek more advice in task related issues than those with low need for cognition and this pattern of information exchange is…

  10. The organizational and economic mechanism of economic safety management for international economic activity of machine-building enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Domashenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizational-economic mechanism of economic safety management for foreign economic activity of machine-building enterprises, which includes management principles and stages of economic safety management for international economic activity of machine-building enterprises, is presented in the paper.The aim of the article. The aim of the article is formation of economic safety management for international economic activity of machine-building enterprises.The results of the analysis. It is noted by authors that management of economic safety of FEA of machine-building enterprise has to include development of principles of management, structure of the organizational and economic mechanism of management, functions, administrative decisions which together lead implementation of basic task maintenance of sufficient level of FEA economic safety.In the research it is noted that combination of principles of economic safety, economic activity in a uniform complex allows to influence the formation of the purposes of the company and to make reasonable administrative decisions. Operation of organizational and economic mechanism of management as economic safety of FEA of machine-building enterprise needs to be considered as the activity directed on achievement of the objectives of management, and to determine by criterion of a condition of such mechanism level of economic safety of FEA. In the paper stages of management are offered by economic safety of FEA and divided into two main components which are the analysis of economic safety of FEA at the enterprise and measures for its increase and supports. Thus, analysis of economic safety of FEA provides collecting and data processing on main aspects of economic safety, its quantitative and qualitative analysis, and actions on increases and maintenance of economic safety of FEA provide a choice and justification of maximum permissible level of economic safety of FEA a choice of instruments of increase and

  11. Facilitators of Attendance and Adherence to Group-Based Physical Activity for Older Adults: A Literature Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacy-Vawdon, Cassandra J; Schwarzman, Joanna; Nolan, Genevieve; de Silva, Renee; Menzies, David; Smith, Ben J

    2017-05-22

    This review examines program features that influence attendance and adherence to group-based physical activity (PA) by older adults. Medline, PubMed, CINAHL plus, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published from 1995-2016. Quantitative and qualitative studies investigating factors related to PA group attendance or adherence by persons aged 55 years and over, were included. Searching yielded eight quantitative and 13 qualitative studies, from 2044 titles. Quantitative findings identified social factors, instructor characteristics, PA types, class duration and frequency, and perceived PA outcomes as important for attendance and adherence, whilst qualitative studies identified settings, leadership, PA types, observable benefits and social support factors. Studies were predominantly low- to moderate-quality. This review identified design and delivery considerations for group-based PA programs to inform best-practice frameworks and industry capacity-building. Future research should use longitudinal and mixed-methods designs to strengthen evidence about facilitators of program reach and engagement.

  12. Post-Occupancy Evaluation of UK Library Building Projects: Some Examples of Current Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Enright

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-occupancy evaluations of buildings ask questions and provide answers on how buildings actually work in technical, social and management terms for the end-users1. They can have a significant impact on creating change in terms of improving use of any building. Post-occupancy evaluations can show what works, and what does not – yet they are not common and apparently have been seldom done in a systematic way. Fortunately that picture is changing as post-occupancy evaluation becomes more action-orientated and more clearly based on addressing clients’ and architects’ needs. In the UK there are two formal schemes underway which have been applied to the Higher Education (HE sector and to academic libraries – an external one led by the construction industry (PROBE or Postoccupancy Review of Buildings and their Engineering – which has undertaken over 100 studies to date and the other, internal to the HE sector itself (led by the Higher Education Design Quality Forum. These are complimented by two 'softer’, qualitative forms of evaluation demonstrated by the efforts of (a the library profession itself, led by SCONUL for academic libraries and by the Library Association for public libraries, and (b the architecture and building related professions.

  13. Upper Elementary Boys' Participation during Group Singing Activities in Single-Sex and Coeducational Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzy, Zadda M.

    2010-01-01

    As boys in the upper elementary grades become increasingly influenced by peer pressure, many are less likely to participate in singing activities because singing is considered a "feminine" activity. The purpose of this research was to explore if there was an effect on upper elementary boys' level of participation during group singing activities…

  14. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  15. Taking It to the Classroom: Number Board Games as a Small Group Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Siegler, Robert S.; Hitti, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether a theoretically based number board game could be translated into a practical classroom activity that improves Head Start children's numerical knowledge. Playing the number board game as a small group learning activity promoted low-income children's number line estimation, magnitude comparison, numeral identification, and…

  16. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  17. Taking It to the Classroom: Number Board Games as a Small Group Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Siegler, Robert S.; Hitti, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether a theoretically based number board game could be translated into a practical classroom activity that improves Head Start children's numerical knowledge. Playing the number board game as a small group learning activity promoted low-income children's number line estimation, magnitude comparison, numeral identification, and…

  18. What Do We Want Small Group Activities For? Voices from EFL Teachers in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental issue of why small group activities are utilized in the language learning classroom. Although these activities have gained popularity in the field of Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), supported by a sound theoretical base, few studies have so far examined the reasons why language teachers are…

  19. Field theoretical Lie symmetry analysis: The Möbius group, exact solutions of conformal autonomous systems, and predictive model-building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, Kyriakos

    2014-07-01

    We study single and coupled first-order differential equations (ODEs) that admit symmetries with tangent vector fields, which satisfy the N-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann equations. In the two-dimensional case, classes of first-order ODEs which are invariant under Möbius transformations are explored. In the N dimensional case we outline a symmetry analysis method for constructing exact solutions for conformal autonomous systems. A very important aspect of this work is that we propose to extend the traditional technical usage of Lie groups to one that could provide testable predictions and guidelines for model-building and model-validation. The Lie symmetries in this paper are constrained and classified by field theoretical considerations and their phenomenological implications. Our results indicate that conformal transformations are appropriate for elucidating a variety of linear and nonlinear systems which could be used for, or inspire, future applications. The presentation is pragmatic and it is addressed to a wide audience.

  20. [Cellulase and xylanase activities of Fusarium Lk:Fr. genus fungi of different trophic groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchenko, I M; Sokolova, O V; Zhdanova, N M; Iarynchyn, A M; Iovenko, O M

    2008-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cellulase and xylanase activities of 26 fungal strains of phytopathogenic, saprophytic and endophytic Fusarium species has been realized using the qualitative reactions. The rare of their linear growth on the media with carboxymethyl cellulose or xylane has been studied. It was shown that the fungi of genus Fusarium belonging to different trophic groups possessed low activities of investigated enzymes as a whole, but in endophytic strains their levels were lower than in phytopathogenic ones. At the same time the distinct strain dependence of cellulase and xylanase activities was fixed in the fungi of different trophic groups. As far as the cellulase and xylanase activities in phytopathogenic isolates varied from complete absence to high levels, and since the activity maximum for each of the investigated strains was observed in different growth terms the conclusion was made that the cellulase and xylanase activities could not be considered as possible markers of the fungal isolate pathogenicity on the strain level.

  1. [Two woman medical doctors of the Meiji era who came from the "Preservative District of Johnai Suwakohji Important Traditional Buildings Group", Kanegasaki Town, Iwate Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Masakazu

    2010-09-01

    There is a historical group of samurai buildings called the "Preservative District of Johnai Suwakohji Important Traditional Buildings Group" in Kanegasaki Town, Iwate Prefecture. Two woman medical doctors (Misaho Aizawa and Mie Shiga, came from this district at the end of the Meiji Era (1910-1911). Misaho Aizawa was born in a minister's family in 1885 and studied at the Women's School of Dohshisha. After graduation she studied abroad at the Women's Medical College of Philadelphia and graduated from the college in 1910. Immediately after graduation she came back to Japan and got a medical license in Japan. She married a minister and was employed by the Red Cross Clinic in Fukuoka Prefecture. Mie Shiga was born in a samurai-family in 1880 and worked her way through various medical schools in Tokyo. After three failures to pass the national medical examination she received a medical license in 1911. In 1913 she opened her clinic of internal medicine & pediatrics in Utsunomiya. She made an effort to diagnose correctly and won patients' confidence. These two women had neither communication nor common points due to the differences of their family environment and their age. However, they were brought up by fathers who were enthusiastic for education and they made an effort to become woman doctors. Although women's social situation and the female compulsory education rate were low, and women's medical education was poor in the Meiji Era, Misaho Aizawa was able to enter the medical route under the influence of Christianity, and Mie Shiga through the assistance of her family and her samurai spirit.

  2. Developing User-Driven Climate Information Services to Build Resilience Amongst Groups at Risk of Drought and Flood in Arid and Semi-Arid Land Counties in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Githungo, W. N.; Shaka, A.; Kniveton, D.; Muithya, L.; Powell, R.; Visman, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arid and Semi-Arid Land (ASAL) counties of Kitui and Makueni in Kenya are experiencing increasing climate variability in seasonal rainfall, including changes in the onset, cessation and distribution of the two principal rains upon which the majority of the population's small-holder farmers and livestock keepers depend. Food insecurity is prevalent with significant numbers also affected by flooding during periods of intense rainfall. As part of a multi-partner Adaptation Consortium, Kenya Meteorological Services (KMS) are developing Climate Information Services (CIS) which can better support decision making amongst the counties' principal livelihoods groups and across County Government ministries. Building on earlier pilots and stakeholder discussion, the system combines the production of climate information tailored for transmission via regional and local radio stations with the establishment of a new SMS service. SMS are provided through a network of CIS intermediaries drawn from across key government ministries, religious networks, non-governmental and community groups, aiming to achieve one SMS recipient per 3-500 people. It also introduces a demand-led, premium-rate SMS weather information service which is designed to be self-financing in the long term. Supporting the ongoing process of devolution, KMS is downscaling national forecasts for each county, and providing seasonal, monthly, weekly and daily forecasts, as well as warnings of weather-related hazards. Through collaboration with relevant ministries, government bodies and research institutions, including livestock, agriculture, drought management and health, technical advisories are developed to provide guidance on application of the climate information. The system seeks to provide timely, relevant information which can enable people to use weather and climate information to support decisions which protect life and property and build resilience to ongoing climate variability and future change.

  3. Variant for estimating the activity of tropical cyclone groups in the world ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshevich, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    It is especially important to know the character and the intensity level of tropical cyclone (TC) activity when the system for estimating the cyclonic danger and risk is formed. During seasons of increased cyclonic activity, when several TCs are simultaneously active, the total energy effect of the cyclone group joint action is not estimated numerically. Cyclonic activity is as a rule characterized by the number of TCs that occur in the considered zone. A variant of the criterion, according to which relative cyclonic activity is estimated, is presented.

  4. Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Shane M

    2014-01-01

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few {\\mu}Eh or less) with M = 128 in both cases, which is in contrast to conventional ab initio density matrix renormalization group.

  5. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  6. Synthesis and Insecticidal Activities of Novel Analogues of Chlorantraniliprole Containing Nitro Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi; WANG Ming-zhong; XIONG Li-xia; LIU Zhi-li; LI Zheng-ming

    2011-01-01

    Twelve novel analogues of chlorantraniliprole containing nitro group were synthesized,and their structures were characterized by 1H NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry(HRMS).Their evaluated insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm(Mythimna separata) indicate that the nitro-containing analogues showed favorable insecticidal activities,while the activity of compounds 5g at 0.25 mg/L was 40%,but still lower than chlorantraniliprole.

  7. Nest building and posture changes and activity budget of gilts housed in pens and crates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Inger Lise; Vasdal, Guro; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2014-01-01

    was born until 8 h after the birth of the first piglet. There was no significant effect of the sows breeding value on any of the sow behaviours. Sows housed in pens spent significantly more time nest building than crated sows from 4 to 12 h prepartum (P ... for the lack of space in the crate compared to the pens. Sows in pens spent more time nest building from 4 to 12 h post partum compared to crated sows, and crated sows showed more behaviours related to frustration and restlessness....

  8. Group cohesion and between session homework activities predict self-reported cognitive-behavioral skill use amongst participants of SMART Recovery groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P; Baker, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    SMART Recovery groups are cognitive-behaviorally oriented mutual support groups for individuals with addictions. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which the quality of group facilitation, group cohesion and the use of between session homework activities contribute to self-rated use of cognitive-behavioral skills amongst group participants. Participants attending SMART Recovery groups in Australia completed a cross sectional survey (N=124). The survey included measures of cognitive and behavioral skill utilization, group cohesion, quality of group facilitation and a rating of how frequently participants leave group meetings with an achievable between session homework plan. On average, participants had been attending SMART Recovery meetings for 9 months. Participants were most likely to attend SMART Recovery for problematic alcohol use. Regression analyses indicated that group cohesion significantly predicted use of cognitive restructuring, but that only provision of homework at the end of each group session predicted self-reported behavioral activation. Both group cohesion and leaving a group with an achievable homework plan predicted participant use of cognitive behavioral skills. The concrete actions associated with homework activities may facilitate behavioral activation. There is a need for longitudinal research to examine the relationship between the utilization of cognitive and behavioral skills and participant outcomes (e.g. substance use, mental health) for people attending SMART Recovery groups.

  9. Catalytical Activities of Reconstructed Hemoglobin with Different Central Ions in Prosthetic Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-yu; SUN Bao-wei; LI Yuan-zong; CHANG Wen-bao

    2003-01-01

    Hemoglobin(Hb) was de-prosthetized, which was then reconstructed with the prosthetic groups with different central metal ions including Fe(Ⅲ), Co(Ⅱ) and Mn(Ⅱ). The spectral properties along with the catalase and peroxidase activities of the reconstructed hemoglobin were compared with those of Hb and prosthetic groups with different ions. When the central ion is iron, the reconstituted Hb(rHb) has the highest catalase and peroxidase activities. Maybe it is the reason that iron is chosen as the central ion in the prosthetic groups of natural hemoproteins. Different from peroxidase activity, the catalase activity of hemin cannot be enhanced by the microenvironment of apoHb. This result shows that the structure of apoHb is more similar to that of apoHRP than that of apocatalase.

  10. Health behaviors and participation in health promotion activities among hospital staff: which occupational group performs better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2014-10-22

    Staff health behaviors affect not only their own health but also their provision of health promotion services to their patients. Although different occupational groups work in hospitals, few studies have compared health behaviors among them. The objectives of this study were to examine health behaviors, including physical activity, eating 5 portions of fruits and vegetables per day (5 a day), and stress adaptation, and participation in hospital-based health promotion activities by occupational groups in hospitals. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among full-time employees in 100 hospitals across Taiwan. This analysis included 4202 physicians, 31639 nurses, 2315 pharmacists, 8161 other health professionals, and 13079 administrative personnel. Administrative personnel attended more health promotion lectures and clubs/groups than other health professionals, pharmacists and physicians, and those workers participated more than nurses. Participation in health promotion activities provided by hospitals was associated with better practice of health behaviors. After adjustment for socio-demographics and participation in health promotion activities, physicians, pharmacists, and other health professionals reported more 5 a day than administrative staff. Other health professionals reported more physical activity than administrative staff, and they reported more than physicians. Nurses reported the lowest level of physical activity, 5 a day, and stress adaptation of all occupational groups. Nurses had worse health behaviors and less participation in health promotion activities than other groups. Workplace health promotion program for health professionals is needed, with special emphasis on nurses. Hospital-based health promotion programs could take the differences of occupational groups into consideration to tailor programs to the needs of different occupational groups.

  11. Grundtvig Partnership Case Study 2009-2011 LifeLong Learning for Active Citizenship and Capacity Building LLLab

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Lifelong Learning (LLL) is the key concept of European Union (EU) and European Commission (EC) recommends Promoting Access and Participation in Lifelong Learning for All starting with 1996 European year of LLL and continuing with Feira (2000) and Lisbon (2000) European Council proceedings. With these principles in mind, the project Lifelong Learning for Active Citizenship and Capacity Building (LLLab) sets out to make the knowledge triangle (education, research and inn...

  12. Living City: community mobilization to build active transport policies and programs in Santiago, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagaris

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the usefulness of walking and cycling to promote health is increasingly recognized, the importance of civil society leadership in developing new policies and activities is often overlooked. This case study, of Living City (Ciudad Viva a community-based organization in Santiago, Chile, examines how several communities used knowledge about transport’s impact on the environment and health, gained through opposition to a major highway project, to build effective sustainable urban transport initiatives.Inspired by urban reforms in Bogot´a, Living City now focuses mainly on “active transport” (formerly nonmotorized, building the policies, attitudes and infrastructure necessary to encourage walking and cycling, and the inclusion of the differently abled. It has won two major awards for innovation and now partners with NGOs in The Netherlands and elsewhere in Chile and Latin America.Moreover, Living City now organizes cycling-inclusive training programs, design charrettes and participatory processes in cooperation with Santiago’s regional and national authorities. Its publication, La Voz de La Chimba, distributed free throughout the city by volunteers, has helped to open people’s eyes to the implications of active transport for social equality and health, and provided support to other citizens’ initiatives, struggling to get off the ground.This experience illustrates how citizens’ and community organizations acquire important knowledge and practical experience in learning by doing situations, and how they can learn to reach out to ordinary people and key policymakers, building bridges across the citizen-policy divide to produce innovative, win-win programs that simultaneously bring change at micro- and macro-levels.Bien que la nécessité de marcher et de faire du vélo pour rester en bonne santé soit de plus en plus reconnue, l’importance du rôle prépondérant de la société civile dans le développement de nouvelles

  13. To the question of formation the quality management system of activity on the example of machine-building enterprises of the Vinnytsia region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Balzan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On the example of machine-building enterprises of Vinnytsia region the character and features of their activities are analyzed, as well as conclusions regarding instability and inefficiency of the work effectiveness. Analysis and grouping of enterprises on selected attributes made possible to clarify the nature of the major economic and business indicators in each group, which facilitated the study of relations between the general management systems and content of quality management systems of activity at enterprises and confirmed the direct interdependence between the content and efficiency of these management systems, the efficiency of the quality management and the state of enterprises. The list of indicators of the quality management system of activity is proposed. For each of them number of quality indicators, which are affected by the form (way quality management of activity, is formed. The relationship of indicators of quality management system with the classification features that allows to create a profile of the quality management system is realized in a table. It is concluded about the possibility of using the proposed classification system as an intellectual component of the program decision making support in the formation of the profile of the quality management system of activity.

  14. Guidelines for Quality Assurance Inspection of Commercial Activities Contracts for Real Property Maintenance Activities. Guide Number 7: Building Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    for leaks ( Johnson 1993). (3) Bolts, pipe hangers, stainers , or drain covers are not damaged or missing. (4) Commodes are firmly fixed and do not rock...Building Services by James H. Johnson Paul C. Bresnahan OTIC .I ••JAN 0 5 1994 A Quality Assurance (QA) Program allows the Army to evaluate and...Guide #7: Building Services AT41 SB-A5 I 6. AUTHOR(S) James H. Johnson and Paul C. Bresnahan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AODRESS(ES) 8

  15. Promoting Physical Activity With Group Pictures. Affiliation-Based Visual Communication for High-Risk Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifegerste, Doreen; Rossmann, Constanze

    2017-02-01

    Past research in social and health psychology has shown that affiliation motivation is associated with health behavior, especially for high-risk populations, suggesting that targeting this motivation could be a promising strategy to promote physical activity. However, the effects that affiliation appeals (e.g., pictures depicting companionship during physical activities) and accompanying slogans have on motivating physical activity have been largely unexplored. Hence, our two studies experimentally tested the effects of exposure to affiliation-based pictures for overweight or less active people, as well as the moderating effect of affiliation motivation. The results of these two studies give some indication that group pictures (with or without an accompanying slogan) can be an effective strategy to improve high-risk populations' attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to engage in physical activity. Affiliation motivation as a personality trait did not interact with these effects, but was positively associated with attitudes, independent of the group picture effect.

  16. Practical routes to (SiH₃)₃P: applications in group IV semiconductor activation and in group III-V molecular synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jesse B; Chizmeshya, A V G; Tolle, J; D' Costa, V R; Menendez, J; Kouvetakis, J

    2010-05-21

    The (SiH₃)₃P hydride is introduced as a practical source for n-doping of group IV semiconductors and as a highly-reactive delivery agent of -(SiH₃)₂P functionalities in exploratory synthesis. In contrast to earlier methods, the compound is produced here in high purity quantitative yields via a new single-step method based on reactions of SiH₃Br and (Me₃Sn)₃P, circumventing the need for toxic and unstable starting materials. As an initial demonstration of its utility we synthesized monosubstituted Me₂M-P(SiH₃)₂ (M = Al, Ga, In) derivatives of Me₃M containing the (SiH₃)₂P ligand for the first time, in analogy to the known Me₂M-P(SiMe₃)₂ counterparts. A dimeric structure of Me₂M-P(SiH₃)₂ is proposed on the basis of spectroscopic characterizations and quantum chemical simulations. Next, in the context of materials synthesis, the (SiH₃)₃P compound was used to dope germanium for the first time by building a prototype p(++)Si(100)/i-Ge/n-Ge photodiode structure. The resultant n-type Ge layers contained active carrier concentrations of 3-4 × 10¹⁹ atoms cm⁻³ as determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and confirmed by SIMS. Strain analysis using high resolution XRD yielded a Si content of 4 × 10²⁰ atoms cm⁻³ in agreement with SIMS and within the range expected for incorporating Si₃P type units into the diamond cubic Ge matrix. Extensive characterizations for structure, morphology and crystallinity indicate that the Si co-dopant plays essentially a passive role and does not compromise the device quality of the host material nor does it fundamentally alter its optical properties.

  17. Personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism associate with ABO blood groups through catecholamine activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2011-08-01

    Personality trait research has shown associations with many genes, prominently those of the catecholamine metabolism such as dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Because DBH gene is in linkage disequilibrium with ABO gene, there is reason to think that other catecholamine genes using the same substrate as DBH may also have associations with ABO blood groups, and this paper demonstrates how this may be so. Reasons include similarities in hapmap population frequency distributions, similarities in illness risks between ABO blood groups and DBH activities as well as between ABO blood groups and COMT activities and between ABO blood groups and MAOA activities. If ABO blood groups can be demonstrated to associate with all these catecholamine genes, then the catecholamine personality trait research can be applied to ABO blood groups and tested for confirmation. ABO blood typing is widely available and affords ability to test this hypothesis and thus confirm the possible joint association of personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism to catecholamine genes and to ABO blood groups. Clinical applications and implications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of Partitions in a Homogeneous Activity Group Using Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People in public areas often appear in groups. People with homogeneous coarse-grained activities may be further divided into subgroups depending on more fine-grained behavioral differences. Automatically identifying these subgroups can benefit a variety of applications for group members. In this work, we focus on identifying such subgroups in a homogeneous activity group (i.e., a group of people who perform the same coarse-grained activity at the same time. We present a generic framework using sensors built in commodity mobile devices. Specifically, we propose a two-stage process, sensing modality selection given a coarse-grained activity, followed by multimodal clustering to identify subgroups. We develop one early fusion and one late fusion multimodal clustering algorithm. We evaluate our approaches using multiple datasets; two of them are with the same activity while the other has a different activity. The evaluation results show that the proposed multimodal-based approaches outperform existing work that uses only one single sensing modality and they also work in scenarios when manually selecting one sensing modality fails.

  19. Leisure-time Physical Activity Among Different Social Groups of Estonia: Results of the National Physical Activity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusmägi Peeter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the Eurobarometer (European Commission, 2010, 39% of the Estonian adult population is not physically active at all. This percentage is relatively high compared to other countries that are culturally close to Estonia; the corresponding figure of close neighbors Finland and Sweden is below 10%. The article aims to present the results of a survey of physical activity (n=1,009 conducted in Estonia in 2013 and analyzes physical activity levels across various social groups. The results of the article show that employment, age, education, and ethnicity are important factors for engaging in leisure-time physical activity in Estonia. Non-ethnic Estonians, the less educated, the elderly, the unemployed, and those on maternity leave are less engaged in regular leisure exercise than people in other social groups. The results of the article were used to develop Estonia’s Sports 2030 strategy.

  20. Team Building for Youth Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Gordon A.; Loughead, Todd M.; Newin, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Participation in youth sport generally begins to decline after the age of 12. Among the reasons for this are personal aspects such as lack of desire, and social aspects including negative experiences with coaches. One way that coaches can improve the sporting environment is through group activities that promote team building. The purpose of this…

  1. Building the Next Generation of Scientific Explorers through Active Engagement with STEM Experts and International Space Station Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Higgins, M.; Stefanov, W. L.; Rampe, E.

    2015-01-01

    Connecting students and teachers in classrooms with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts provides an invaluable opportunity for all. These experts can share the benefits and utilization of resources from the International Space Station (ISS) while sharing and "translating" exciting science being conducted by professional scientists. Active engagement with these STEM experts involves students in the journey of science and exploration in an enthralling and understandable manner. This active engagement, connecting classrooms with scientific experts, helps inspire and build the next generation of scientific explorers in academia, private industry, and government.

  2. The impact of group activities as a strategy for health promotion in the senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléria Bittar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the perception of two groups of elderly about the impact of the participation/ non participation in some activities, had in their health and quality of life. Twenty interviews were conducted with two groups of elderly. In the first group, called Participant Group (PG 10 elderly men and women participated in the third age group, a project called "Healthy Aging", which are held in various physical and socialization activities; and with other 10 subjects the Non-Participant Group (NPG, which did not join the project. We compared the two groups’ answers and concluded that the elderly from PG reported better quality of life, health and willingness to form social bonds. Also according to the elderly of NPG, we seek to know their justifications and reasons for non-adherence to the project. They also reported perceiving significant changes in those who participated, understanding that the group was able to improve self-esteem, health and quality of life. We conclude that the group actions, aiming the principles that guide the assumptions of health promotion can create a space for exchanges and experiences, restoring the necessary conditions so that the elderly may have a fuller life, with quality of life and welfare.

  3. Work group I: Measures of the food and physical activity environment: instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelens, Brian E; Glanz, Karen

    2009-04-01

    A work group was convened to identify the core challenges, content gaps, and corresponding possible solutions for improving food- and physical activity-environment instrumentation. Identified challenges included instrument proliferation, the scaling or grain of instruments and appropriate aggregation to the neighborhood or community level, and unknown sensitivity to change of most instruments. Solutions for addressing these challenges included establishing an interactive and real-time instrument repository, developing and enforcing high standards for instrument reporting, increasing community-researcher collaborations, and implementing surveillance of food and physical activity environment. Solid instrumentation will accelerate a better understanding of food- and physical activity-environment effects on eating and physical activity behaviors.

  4. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to prioritize the children´s perceived barriers. This was verified...... differences in children’s perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment Methods: Data were collected through 17 focus groups consisting of 111 children...... by a thematic analysis of data from the open discussions and go-along interviews. Results: The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys and girls identifying the same...

  5. Building a Privacy, Ethics, and Data Access Framework for Real World Computerised Medical Record System Data: A Delphi Study. Contribution of the Primary Health Care Informatics Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H; Liaw, S-T; Di Iorio, C T; Kuziemsky, C; Schreiber, R; Terry, A L; de Lusignan, S

    2016-11-10

    Privacy, ethics, and data access issues pose significant challenges to the timely delivery of health research. Whilst the fundamental drivers to ensure that data access is ethical and satisfies privacy requirements are similar, they are often dealt with in varying ways by different approval processes. To achieve a consensus across an international panel of health care and informatics professionals on an integrated set of privacy and ethics principles that could accelerate health data access in data-driven health research projects. A three-round consensus development process was used. In round one, we developed a baseline framework for privacy, ethics, and data access based on a review of existing literature in the health, informatics, and policy domains. This was further developed using a two-round Delphi consensus building process involving 20 experts who were members of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and European Federation of Medical Informatics (EFMI) Primary Health Care Informatics Working Groups. To achieve consensus we required an extended Delphi process. The first round involved feedback on and development of the baseline framework. This consisted of four components: (1) ethical principles, (2) ethical guidance questions, (3) privacy and data access principles, and (4) privacy and data access guidance questions. Round two developed consensus in key areas of the revised framework, allowing the building of a newly, more detailed and descriptive framework. In the final round panel experts expressed their opinions, either as agreements or disagreements, on the ethics and privacy statements of the framework finding some of the previous round disagreements to be surprising in view of established ethical principles. This study develops a framework for an integrated approach to ethics and privacy. Privacy breech risk should not be considered in isolation but instead balanced by potential ethical benefit.

  6. Variable Stars in Local Group Galaxies. III. And VII, NGC 147, and NGC 185: Insight into the Building Blocks of the M31 Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monelli, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Bernard, E. J.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Bono, G.; Gallart, C.; Dall'Ora, M.; Stetson, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present the discovery of 1568 RR Lyrae stars in three of the most luminous M31 satellites: And VII (573), NGC 147 (177), and NGC 185 (818). We use their properties to study the formation history of Local Group spiral haloes, and in particular, to infer about the nature of their possible building blocks by comparison with available data for RR Lyrae stars in the halo and in a sample of satellites of M31 and the Milky Way. We find that the brightest satellites and the halos of both galaxies host a number of High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) RR Lyrae variable stars, which are missing in the faintest satellites. HASP variable stars have been shown by Fiorentino et al. to be tracers of a population of stars as metal-rich as [Fe/H] ≃ -1.5 and older than ≃ 10 {Gyr}. This suggests that the metal-rich M31 and MW halo component, which manifests through the HASP phenomenon, comes from massive dwarf galaxy building blocks, as the low-mass dwarfs did not chemically enrich fast enough to produce them. All detected variable stars are new discoveries; in particular, this work presents the first detections of RR Lyrae stars in And VII. Moreover, a number of candidate Anomalous Cepheids, and binary and long-period variable stars have been detected. We provide pulsation properties (period, amplitude, mean magnitude), light curves, and time series photometry for all of the variable stars in the three galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #10430 and #11724.

  7. Building Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Mary J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Defines school-business partnerships and reviews changes in such partnerships over the past 25 years. Provides steps to building effective partnerships for school-to-work activities: review the school's mission; select partners that will bring strength to the relationship; set clearly defined, realistic goals; maintain the partnership; and…

  8. Building Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Mary J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Defines school-business partnerships and reviews changes in such partnerships over the past 25 years. Provides steps to building effective partnerships for school-to-work activities: review the school's mission; select partners that will bring strength to the relationship; set clearly defined, realistic goals; maintain the partnership; and…

  9. Effects of animal activity and air temperature on methane and ammonia emissions from a naturally ventilated building for dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwabie, N. M.; Jeppsson, K.-H.; Gustafsson, G.; Nimmermark, S.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of how different factors affect gas emissions from animal buildings can be useful for emission prediction purposes and for the improvement of emission abatement techniques. In this study, the effects of dairy cow activity and indoor air temperature on gas emissions were examined. The concentrations of CH 4, NH 3, CO 2 and N 2O inside and outside a dairy cow building were measured continuously between February and May together with animal activity and air temperature. The building was naturally ventilated and had a solid concrete floor which sloped towards a central urine gutter. Manure was scraped from the floor once every hour in the daytime and once every second hour at night into a partly covered indoor pit which was emptied daily at 6 a.m. and at 5 p.m. Gas emissions were calculated from the measured gas concentrations and ventilation rates estimated by the CO 2 balance method. The animal activity and emission rates of CH 4 and NH 3 showed significant diurnal variations with two peaks which were probably related to the feeding routine. On an average day, CH 4 emissions ranged from 7 to 15 g LU -1 h -1 and NH 3 emissions ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 g LU -1 h -1 (1 LU = 500 kg animal weight). Mean emissions of CH 4 and NH 3 were 10.8 g LU -1 h -1 and 0.81 g LU -1 h -1, respectively. The NH 3 emissions were comparable to emissions from tied stall buildings and represented a 4% loss in manure nitrogen. At moderate levels, temperature seems to affect the behaviour of dairy cows and in this study where the daily indoor air temperature ranged from about 5 up to about 20 °C, the daily activity of the cows decreased with increasing indoor air temperature ( r = -0.78). Results suggest that enteric fermentation is the main source of CH 4 emissions from systems of the type in this study, while NH 3 is mainly emitted from the manure. Daily CH 4 emissions increased significantly with the activity of the cows ( r = 0.61) while daily NH 3 emissions increased

  10. Using activity-based costing to track resource use in group practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, T L; Siegel, G; Kaciuba, G; Lau, A H

    1999-09-01

    Research shows that understanding how resources are consumed can help group practices control costs. An American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons study used an activity-based costing (ABC) system to measure how resources are consumed in providing medical services. Teams of accounting professors observed 18 diverse orthopedic surgery practices. The researchers identified 17 resource-consuming business processes performed by nonphysician office staff. They measured resource consumption by assigning costs to each process according to how much time is spent on related work activities. When group practices understand how their resources are being consumed, they can reduce costs and optimize revenues by making adjustments in how administrative and clinical staff work.

  11. An overview of worldwide development activity in building-integrated photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, S.J. [Solar Design Associates, Inc., Harvard, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The last two decades have brought significant charges to the design profession. Architects with vision have come to understand it is no longer the goal of good design to simply create a building that is pleasing; buildings of the future must be environmentally responsive as well. Increased levels of thermal insulation, healthier interiors, higher-efficiency lighting, better glazings and HVAC equipment, air to air heat exchangers and heat recovery ventilation systems are important steps in the right direction. However, more needs to be done and the area of photovoltaics is one of the most promising renewable energy technologies. This paper is a country by country description of component and system development along with selected examples of Solar Electric architecture. Countries described include Japan, Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Spain, Sweden, Italy, Canada, Norway.

  12. In-vehicle group activity modeling and simulation in sensor-based virtual environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Telagamsetti, Durga; Poshtyar, Azin; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-05-01

    Human group activity recognition is a very complex and challenging task, especially for Partially Observable Group Activities (POGA) that occur in confined spaces with limited visual observability and often under severe occultation. In this paper, we present IRIS Virtual Environment Simulation Model (VESM) for the modeling and simulation of dynamic POGA. More specifically, we address sensor-based modeling and simulation of a specific category of POGA, called In-Vehicle Group Activities (IVGA). In VESM, human-alike animated characters, called humanoids, are employed to simulate complex in-vehicle group activities within the confined space of a modeled vehicle. Each articulated humanoid is kinematically modeled with comparable physical attributes and appearances that are linkable to its human counterpart. Each humanoid exhibits harmonious full-body motion - simulating human-like gestures and postures, facial impressions, and hands motions for coordinated dexterity. VESM facilitates the creation of interactive scenarios consisting of multiple humanoids with different personalities and intentions, which are capable of performing complicated human activities within the confined space inside a typical vehicle. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of VESM in terms of its capabilities to seamlessly generate time-synchronized, multi-source, and correlated imagery datasets of IVGA, which are useful for the training and testing of multi-source full-motion video processing and annotation. Furthermore, we demonstrate full-motion video processing of such simulated scenarios under different operational contextual constraints.

  13. The inclusion of children with special needs into optional group dance activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kralj, Neva

    2012-01-01

    The thesis explores the effects of dance/movement therapy based on the inclusion of two children with special needs into a dance group activity. The aim of the study was to determine to what extent methods of dance/movement therapy assist the development of social skills and influence interpersonal relations within the group. The study also explores to what extent integrating methods of dance/movement therapy into the group influences children’s feeling of satisfaction and success. The main r...

  14. WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-03-20

    The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the

  15. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption.

  16. Trans activation of plasmid-borne promoters by adenovirus and several herpes group viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Everett, R D; Dunlop, M

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes experiments to test the ability of a number of viruses of the Herpes group, and also Adenovirus-2 and SV40, to activate transcription from the Herpes simplex virus-1 glycoprotein D and the rabbit beta-globin promoters. Plasmids containing these genes were transfected into HeLa cells which were then infected with various viruses. Transcriptional activation in trans of the plasmid-borne promoters was monitored by quantitative S1 nuclease analysis of total cytoplasmic RNA is...

  17. Weapons in disguise--activating mechanisms and protecting group chemistry in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jason C; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-11-22

    Bioactive natural products often possess uniquely functionalized structures with unusual modes of action; however, the natural product itself is not always the active species. We discuss molecules that draw on protecting group chemistry or else require activation to unmask reactive centers, illustrating that nature is not only a source of complex structures but also a guide for elegant chemical transformations which provides ingenious chemical solutions for drug delivery.

  18. Structure-activity relationships in aminosterol antibiotics: the effect of stereochemistry at the 7-OH group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Tsemre-Dingel; Gassler, Frank; Shu, Youheng; Jones, Stephen; Selinsky, Barry S

    2013-06-01

    Squalamine and three aminosterol analogs have been shown to inhibit bacterial cell growth and induce lysis of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. The analogs differ in the identity of the polyamine attached at C3 of the sterol, and the stereochemistry of a hydroxyl substituent at C7. Analogs with a tetraammonium spermine polyamine are somewhat more active than analogs with a shorter trisammonium spermidine polyamine, and analogs with an axial (α) hydroxyl substituent at C7 are more active than analogs with the corresponding equatorial (β) hydroxyl group. There is some variability noted; the 7β-OH spermine analog is the most active compound against Escherichia coli, but the least effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lytic activity correlates well with antimicrobial activity of the compounds, but the lytic activity varies with the phospholipid composition of the vesicles.

  19. A method to quantify movement activity of groups of animals using automated image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianyu; Yu, Haizhen; Liu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Most physiological and environmental changes are capable of inducing variations in animal behavior. The behavioral parameters have the possibility to be measured continuously in-situ by a non-invasive and non-contact approach, and have the potential to be used in the actual productions to predict stress conditions. Most vertebrates tend to live in groups, herds, flocks, shoals, bands, packs of conspecific individuals. Under culture conditions, the livestock or fish are in groups and interact on each other, so the aggregate behavior of the group should be studied rather than that of individuals. This paper presents a method to calculate the movement speed of a group of animal in a enclosure or a tank denoted by body length speed that correspond to group activity using computer vision technique. Frame sequences captured at special time interval were subtracted in pairs after image segmentation and identification. By labeling components caused by object movement in difference frame, the projected area caused by the movement of every object in the capture interval was calculated; this projected area was divided by the projected area of every object in the later frame to get body length moving distance of each object, and further could obtain the relative body length speed. The average speed of all object can well respond to the activity of the group. The group activity of a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) school to high (2.65 mg/L) levels of unionized ammonia (UIA) concentration were quantified based on these methods. High UIA level condition elicited a marked increase in school activity at the first hour (P<0.05) exhibiting an avoidance reaction (trying to flee from high UIA condition), and then decreased gradually.

  20. THE MERGER HISTORY, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS, AND DWARF GALAXIES OF HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 59

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Charlton, J. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Hill, A. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zabludoff, A. I. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maier, M. L. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, Colina el Pino S/N, La Serena (Chile); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Johnson, K. E.; Walker, L. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P. O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); English, J. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN (Canada); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: iraklis@astro.psu.edu [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (Hubble Space Telescope), infrared (Spitzer), and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun }), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other are two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic H II regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at {approx}1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity active galactic nucleus in HCG 59A by its {approx}10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR spectral energy distribution. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  1. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  2. 76 FR 61149 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 4) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960-I-3. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Other Autoimmune Diseases Disability... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 4) Activity Under OMB... collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and...

  3. An Initial Description and Pilot of Group Behavioral Activation Therapy for Anxious and Depressed Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian C.; Colognori, Daniela; Weissman, Adam S.; Bannon, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Transdiagnostic approaches for treating multiple problems within a single protocol are novel but gaining support. This report describes initial efforts to adapt reconceptualized behavioral activation (e.g., Jacobson, Martell, & Dimidjian, 2001) to a group format suitable for young adolescents, plus add a powerful exposure component to accommodate…

  4. Use of a Wiki-Based Software to Manage Research Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Vezenov, Dmitri V.; Simboli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses use of the wiki software Confluence to organize research group activities and lab resources. Confluence can serve as an electronic lab notebook (ELN), as well as an information management and collaboration tool. The article provides a case study in how researchers can use wiki software in "home-grown" fashion to…

  5. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  6. Singing as Language Learning Activity in Multilingual Toddler Groups in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultti, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This research focused on learning conditions in preschool that support multilingual children's linguistic development. The aim of this paper was to study singing activities through the experiences of ten multilingual children in toddler groups (one to three years of age) in eight Swedish preschools. A sociocultural theoretical approach is used to…

  7. 76 FR 16478 - Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 2) Activity: Comment... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960A-2. b. Hypertension Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960A-3. c. Non-ischemic Heart Disease (including Arrhythmias and Surgery) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA...

  8. 76 FR 8846 - Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 1) Activity: Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 1) Activity: Comment.... Titles: a. Hematologic and Lymphatic Conditions, Including Leukemia Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960C-2. c. Peripheral Nerve Conditions (Not Including Diabetic Sensory- Motor...

  9. 76 FR 33417 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 2) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires--Group 2) Activity Under OMB...) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960A-2. b. Hypertension Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA... Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960A-4. d. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral...

  10. A New Monodisperse Reactive Resin with Active Groups on the Particle Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel reactive resin as active support was synthesized by an improved method based on seed swelling and surface coating polymerization. The resin is monosized beads with inner nucleus of cross-linked polymer and surface layer of copolymer containing epoxy groups. The physico-chemical structures of beads were characterized.

  11. Collaborative Activities Enabled by GroupScribbles (GS): An Exploratory Study of Learning Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Ng, Foo-Keong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory cycle of a design-based research project and examines the learning effectiveness of collaborative activities that are supported by the GroupScribbles (GS) software technology in two Singapore primary science classrooms. The students had ten weeks of GS-based lessons in science, which were…

  12. Studies on Syntheses and Biological Activities of Novel Triazole Compounds Containing Phosphorodithioate Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Liang-zhong; ZHANG Shu-sheng; CHEN Xiao; JIAO Kui

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen new triazole organic phosphorus compounds were synthesized. Their structures were confirmed with IR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and MS. The primary biological tests show that the titled compounds have the fungicidal activities, which are influenced by R groups and the substituents attached to the P atom.

  13. Studies on Synthesis and Biological Activities of Novel Triazole compounds Containing Thiophene Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Liang-zhong; ZHANG Shu-sheng; HU Zhi-qiang; JIAO Kui

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen new triazole compounds containing thiophene groups were synthesized and their structures were confirmed by means of 1H NMR, IR, MS spectroscopies and elemental analyses. The preliminary biological tests show that the titled compounds exhibit some activities of fungicides and plant growth regulators.

  14. Activities for Learning about Conservation of Forest Resources: A Guide for Leaders of Youth Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended to support the leader of a youth group in increasing the awareness of members of the need for good forest conservation practices. Sections include: (1) science fundamentals; (2) making informative exhibits; (3) gaining community involvement; (4) Christmas activities; (5) games and crafts; and (6) a list of resources and…

  15. Effects of Cooperative Group Work Activities on Pre-School Children's Pattern Recognition Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarim, Kamuran

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is twofold; to investigate the effects of cooperative group-based work activities on children's pattern recognition skills in pre-school and to examine the teachers' opinions about the implementation process. In line with this objective, for the study, 57 children (25 girls and 32 boys) were chosen from two private schools…

  16. 77 FR 28530 - Special Conditions: Tamarack Aerospace Group, Cirrus Model SR22; Active Technology Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ..., composite airplane. The installation of winglets, as proposed by Tamarack, increases aerodynamic efficiency... Group's modification. The design change will install winglets and an Active Technology Load Alleviation System (ATLAS). The addition of the ATLAS mitigates the negative effects of the winglets by...

  17. 78 FR 10055 - Special Conditions: Tamarack Aerospace Group, Cirrus Model SR22; Active Technology Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... engine, four- passenger, composite airplane. The installation of winglets, as proposed by Tamarack... Aerospace Group's modification. The design change will install winglets and an Active Technology Load Alleviation System (ATLAS). The addition of the ATLAS mitigates the negative effects of the winglets...

  18. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  19. Formylation of N-arylpyrazole containing active amino group using Vilsmeier-Haack reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Luo; Ping Zhong; Xiao Hong Zhang; Qiu Lian Lin; Ye Na Chen

    2008-01-01

    Two species of N-arylpyrazoles containing active amino group were synthesized.And formylations of N-arylpyazoles containing amino in different position of pyrazole rings using Vilsmeier-Haack reaction gave a series of useful pyrazole intermediates.The important features of this protocol were cheap materials,easy process,mild reaction conditions and good yield of products.

  20. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  1. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Shane M; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE(h) or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  2. The Influence of Some Romanian Interest Groups Upon the Activity of Government and Parliament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca COBÂRZAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on two specific interest groups, NGOs and trade unions, and on their influence upon the government and parliament. Our paper is based on an analyze of the activity of several interest groups during the period 2002-2004 and on the results of several researches and reports published on the last years. The analyze identifies petitioning for rule making, public meetings and debates, monitoring the activity of the public institutions and participating in advisory or regulatory committees as being the most common used mechanisms to influence the government and the parliament in Romania. Also, the analyze shows that administrative procedures affect the degree of bureaucratic autonomy. Overall, the results of this brief research show some pluralist forms of the interaction between the interest groups and the public institutions.

  3. Activities of the US-Japan Safety Monitor Joint Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Savercool; Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    This paper documents the activities of the US-Japan exchange in the area of personnel safety at magnetic and laser fusion experiments. A near-miss event with a visiting scientist to the US in 1992 was the impetus for forming the Joint Working Group on Fusion Safety. This exchnge has been under way for over ten years and has provided many safety insights for both US and Japanese facility personnel at national institutes and at universities. The background and activities of the Joint Working Group are described, including the facilities that have been visited for safety walkthroughs, the participants from both countries, and the main safety issues examined during visits. Based on these visits, some operational safety ideas to enhance experiment safety are given. The near-term future plans of the Safety Monitor Joint Working group are also discussed.

  4. [Current state of the scientific activity of the Aachen group concerning number processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs-Domínguez, P

    The research group from Willmes and colleagues is one of the most advanced research groups in cognitive neuroscience. The use and nature of the numeric magnitude representation constitutes one of the study objects of the mentioned research group. This mental representation provokes a great controversy among the members of the scientific community studying number processing and arithmetic. As a consequence, there are several different theoretical models concerning number processing. In this work, we have reviewed some of the scientific studies realized by the Aachen group concerning number processing, with the aim to expound the current state of its activity. In the works from Willmes and colleagues, we can notice a logic sequence, regarding the formulation of work hypothesis. The course of evolution of their activity starts studying number processing and arithmetic on German listener population and continues with a progressive integration of the German deaf population into their work. There is, as well, an emergent trend in this group to research number processing at the classroom. This means to examine the underlying mental representations in the education field. The information included in the studies analyzed here, leads to several scientific questions which need to be researched in future studies, and questions and complements what has been supported by other research groups.

  5. Interrogating Surface Functional Group Heterogeneity of Activated Thermoplastics Using Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, Colleen E; Jackson, Joshua M; Shim, Sang-Hee; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel approach for characterizing surfaces utilizing super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with subdiffraction limit spatial resolution. Thermoplastic surfaces were activated by UV/O3 or O2 plasma treatment under various conditions to generate pendant surface-confined carboxylic acids (-COOH). These surface functional groups were then labeled with a photoswitchable dye and interrogated using single-molecule, localization-based, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the surface heterogeneity of these functional groups across the activated surface. Data indicated nonuniform distributions of these functional groups for both COC and PMMA thermoplastics with the degree of heterogeneity being dose dependent. In addition, COC demonstrated relative higher surface density of functional groups compared to PMMA for both UV/O3 and O2 plasma treatment. The spatial distribution of -COOH groups secured from super-resolution imaging were used to simulate nonuniform patterns of electroosmotic flow in thermoplastic nanochannels. Simulations were compared to single-particle tracking of fluorescent nanoparticles within thermoplastic nanoslits to demonstrate the effects of surface functional group heterogeneity on the electrokinetic transport process.

  6. Pre-Session Satiation as a Treatment for Stereotypy During Group Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Mandy; Camargo, Síglia Hoher; Neely, Leslie; Gerow, Stephanie; Lang, Russell; Goodwyn, Fara; Ninci, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities may engage in automatically reinforced behaviors that may interfere with learning opportunities. Manipulation of motivating operations has been shown to reduce automatically maintained behavior in some individuals. Considering behavioral indicators of satiation may assist in identifying the point at which an abolishing operation has begun to effect behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of pre-session satiation of automatic reinforcement on subsequent levels of stereotypy and activity engagement during group activities for three males ages 5 to 13 years with developmental disabilities. Following functional analyses with analogue conditions, an alternating treatment design compared a pre-session access to stereotypy condition with a no-pre-session access condition prior to group activity sessions. Results indicated that pre-session satiation of the putative reinforcer produced by stereotypy was effective in decreasing stereotypy and increasing activity engagement during subsequent group activities for all participants. These findings add to the literature supporting the effectiveness of abolishing operations to decrease automatically maintained stereotypy.

  7. Energy Cost Expression for a Youth Compendium of Physical Activities: Rationale for Using Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, K A; Watson, K B; McMurray, R G; Bassett, D R; Butte, N F; Crouter, S E; Herrmann, S D; Trost, S G; Ainsworth, B E; Fulton, J E; Berrigan, D

    2017-08-08

    This study compared the accuracy of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) prediction using two methods of accounting for age dependency versus one standard (single) value across all ages. PAEE estimates were derived by pooling data from five studies. Participants, 6-18 years (n=929), engaged in 14 activities while in a room calorimeter or wearing a portable metabolic analyzer. Linear regression was used to estimate the measurement error in PAEE (expressed as METy) associated with using age-groups (6-9, 10-12, 13-15, and 16-18 years) and age-in-years (each year of chronological age (e.g., 12=12.0-12.99 years)) versus the standard (a single value across all ages). Age-groups and age-in-years showed similar error, and both showed less error than the standard method for cycling, skilled and moderate-to-vigorous intensity activities. For sedentary and light activities, the standard had similar error to the other two methods. Mean values for root mean square error ranged from 0.2-1.7 METy across all activities. Error reduction ranged from -0.2-21.7% for age-groups and -0.23-18.2% for age-in-years, compared to the standard. Accounting for age showed lower errors than a standard (single) value; using an age-dependent model in the Youth Compendium is recommended.

  8. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Le Roux

    Full Text Available Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively, the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number, and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species, though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification

  9. Outreach and capacity building activities for engaging youth and public in Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    We report to the COSPAR Panel on Education and relevant community on activities, pilot projects and results relevant for outreach and engagement in exploration. Number of activities were developed in the frame of the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) including the participation of students in lunar symposia, space conferences or ICEUM International Conferences on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon* ILEWG with support from various space agencies, universities and institutions has organized events for young professionals with a wide background (including scientist, engineers, humanistic, law, art students) a Moon academy, lunar and planetary students work-shops, technical training workshops, international observe the Moon sessions. ILEWG has organised or sponsored participants to a series of field training and research campaigns in Utah desert research station, Eifel volcanic park, Iceland, Rio Tinto, La Reunion island. Education and outreach projects used space missions data (SMART-1 views of the Moon, Earth views from space, Mars views, Mars crowdsourcing games, astronomy data analysis) to engage the public in citizen science and exploration. Artistic and sociological projects (e.g. "social lunar telescope, lunar zen garden, Moon academy, MoonLife, MoonLife concept store, Moon republic, artscience projects, space science in the arts, artists in residence, artists in MoonMars base") were also initiated with artists to engage the wide public in exploration. A number of projects have been developed with support from ITACCUS IAF committee. We shall discuss how these pilot projects could be expanded for the benefit of future space projects, young professionals, the space community and the public. Acknowledgements: we thank collaborators from ILEWG community and partner institutes for the different projects mentioned http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/47170-gluc-iceum11-beijing-2010lunar-declaration/ Foing B., Stoker C

  10. Empirical Validation of Heat Transfer Performance Simulation of Graphite/PCM Concrete Materials for Thermally Activated Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the heat capacity in lightweight construction materials, a phase change material (PCM can be introduced to building elements. A thermally activated building system (TABS with graphite/PCM concrete hollow core slab is suggested as an energy-efficient technology to shift and reduce the peak thermal load in buildings. An evaluation of heat storage and dissipation characteristics of TABS in graphite/PCM concrete has been conducted using dynamic simulations, but empirical validation is necessary to acceptably predict the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete. This study aimed to validate the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete through a three-dimensional transient heat transfer simulation. The simulation results were compared to experimental results from previous studies of concrete and graphite/PCM concrete. The overall thermal behavior for both materials was found to be similar to experiment results. Limitations in the simulation modeling, which included determination of the indoor heat transfer coefficient, assumption of constant thermal conductivity with temperature, and assumption of specimen homogeneity, led to slight differences between the measured and simulated results.

  11. The Effects of Group Musical Activity on Psychiatric Patients in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Rumball

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Musical activity, particularly as the application of music therapy, has been found to produce numerous benefits within a psychiatric setting. This study has explored a selection of these benefits in psychiatric patients in a hospital in India, examining these effects within a culture not typically studied in this field. Observations of seven sessions of group musical activity was undertaken and questionnaire and interview data collected from both patients and staff. Questionnaire data demonstrated improvements in mood, energy, and attention levels, both during and following the sessions. The quantitative data was integrated with interview responses and is discussed with reference to previous research. Interviews and observation found improvements in the categories of interaction, learning and confidence. Alongside these variables, specific musical factors were considered which strongly indicate that the application of musical activity as a therapy, as distinct from other group effects, contributed to the benefits found.

  12. Effects of sulfate group in red seaweed polysaccharides on anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wanai; Mao, Xuan; Peng, Xiaohui; Tang, Shunqing

    2014-01-30

    In this paper, the structural effects of two main red seaweed polysaccharides (agarose and carrageenan) and their sulfated derivatives on the anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The substitution position rather than the substitution degree of sulfate groups shows the biggest impact on both the anticoagulant activity and the cell proliferation. Among them, C-2 of 3,6-anhydro-α-d-Galp is the most favorable position for substitution, whereas C-6 of β-d-Galp is the most disadvantageous. Moreover, the secondary structures of glycans also play a key role in biological activities. These demonstrations warrant that the red seaweed polysaccharides should be seriously considered in biomedical applications after carefully tailoring the sulfate groups.

  13. Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead Due to Renovation Repair and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead Due to Renovation Repair and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings: links to documents at www.regulations.gov, links to PDFs related to Approach document

  14. Reports on Activities of the IODE Groups of Experts: IODE Group of Experts on Technical Aspects of Data Exchange (GETADE)

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, G.

    2002-01-01

    The IODE Group of Experts on the Technical Aspects of Data Exchange (GETADE) has the following terms of reference (IODE-XV, 1996): (i) Collaborate with IGOSS-CP, IODE GE-MIM and the data management groups of other international bodies and scientific programmes in the development of technical solutions for the management, exchange and easier integration of oceanographic data and information with data from other disciplines. (ii) Collaborate with IODE GE-MIM in the development of a com...

  15. Enzymatic activity of the intestine in effect of pesticides of pyrethroid group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddas Khamrakulova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of investigation was to study the effect of pesticides from group of pyrethroids (e.g. decis on the enzymatic function in the homogenate of the mucosal membrane of the proximal and distal segments of the small intestine.Determination of the degree of the activity of hydrolytic enzymes in the homogenates of some parts of the intestine allowed to show effect of pesticide decis on the gradient of distribution of enzymatic activity along the intestine. For characteristic of the enzymatic activity of the small intestine there was performed study of the activity of dipeptidase, amylase, invertase and alkaline phosphatase in the homogenate of the mucosal membrane from proximal and distal parts in multiple effects of pesticide decis in toxic dose (1/20 LD50 during 4 months.Changes of the enzymatic activity in acute poisoning were depended on the time of pesticide exposure and site of the bowel. The different digestive enzymes have different response to effect ofpesticidesof pyrethroid group (decis, there are differences in the reactions of proximal and distal part of the small intestine and there is correlation between changes of activity of the majority hydrolases and administered dose of pesticides.

  16. 78 FR 8145 - Sequence 24 Findings of the EISA 436(h) Ad-Hoc Review Group on Green Building Certification Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... completed its most recent evaluation of green building certification systems in May 2012 focusing on... role that green building certification systems currently play within Federal portfolios and in... estate portfolio holders, including GSA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy,...

  17. 群体动力学视角下新生适应性集体活动的组织与实施%Organizing and Conducting Adaptive Group Activities among College Freshmen from the Perspective of Group Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于超美; 叶威惠

    2014-01-01

    文章在对新生群体、新生适应性问题进行分类分析的基础上,从群体动力学的角度对解决新生适应问题进行审视,对针对新生适应性问题开展的集体活动的组织与实施进行探讨,在实证基础上阐述并完善大型集体活动牵引个体心理建设,进一步提升育人效果。%After analyzing the group characteristics of college freshmen and their adaptive problems, this article examines from the perspective of group dynamics how to solve the problems and discusses how to organize and conduct group activities aimed at the problems.It gives an evidence based expla-nation of how well designed large scale group activities can help build individual psychology and en-hance education.

  18. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  19. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Building Relationship Communication Skills for Transformational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Edward O.

    1995-01-01

    The most important skill for the transformational leader is building relationships through positive and effective communication. Provides guidelines for supporting and encouraging group members, setting the tone for the group, modeling communication behaviors, use of voice patterns, active listening, reflective communication (paraphrasing),…

  1. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  2. CHAIN FOOD ACTIVITIES TO IMPROVE COMPETITIVENESS IN FRUIT AND VEGETABLES GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Pawlewicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the important problems of Polish agriculture is insuffi cient state horizontal integration of agricultural producers. Identifi cation of factors that affect the improvement of the competitiveness of producer groups in the food chain can help in the development of such entities. The aim of the publication is to present activities that should improve competitiveness in the food chain which are undertaken by groups of raw materials producers on the example of fruit and vegetable producers groups operating in Kujawsko-Pomorskie region. In studies the method of participant observation interview were used. The measurement was conducted in late April and May 2013 and included 19 leaders of producer groups. According to them the most important factor infl uencing the market position of the groups in the food chain, was the high quality of the manufactured goods in farms affi liated farmers. Few respondents identifi ed marketing as an opportunity to strengthen the competitive advantage of producer groups in the food supply chain. This is due to the fact that farmers are far removed in the supply chain from consumers with whom they have contact only in the form of market random retail.

  3. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  4. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  5. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  6. Antibacterial Activity of New Dibenzoxepinone Oximes with Fluorine and Trifluoromethyl Group Substituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the antimicrobial activity of some newly synthesized dibenz[b,e]oxepin derivatives bearing the oximino moiety, and fluorine (F and trifluoromethyl (CF3 group substituents. The chemical structure and purity of the new compounds were assessed by using elemental analysis, NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The new compounds were screened for their antibacterial activity towards Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, by qualitative and quantitative assays. Our results demonstrated that the CF3 and F disubstituted compounds could be considered for the further development of novel antimicrobial drugs.

  7. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Oxazolidinone Analogs Containing Substituted Thiazole/Fused-Bicyclic Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen novel oxazolidinone analogs containing substituted thiazole/fused-bicyclic(imidazo[1,2-b] pyridazine/imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole) groups were designed and synthesized. A new method for the preparation of the key intermediate compound 11 was proposed. The structures of the target compounds were confirmed by 1H NMR, IR and MS, and their in vitro antibacterial activities against staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. Among them, compound 16a displays a promising antibacterial activity comparable to that of linezolid.

  8. Design, synthesis, and antifungal activities of novel triazole derivatives containing the benzyl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kehan; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Yanwei; Bai, Guojing; Wu, Qiuye; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shichong; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies undertaken by our group, a series of 1-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-substituted-2-propanols (1a-r), which were analogs of fluconazole, was designed and synthesized by click chemistry. In the study reported here, the in vitro antifungal activities of all the target compounds were evaluated against eight human pathogenic fungi. Compounds 1a, 1q, and 1r showed the more antifungal activity than the others.

  9. Historical, theoretical methodological foundations of recreational activity of different population groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Andreeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to justify and develop historical, theoretical and methodological foundations of recreational activity to meet the recreational needs of different population groups. Material and Methods: analysis and systematization of the special scientific and methodological literature and informational Internet resources; comparative method, historical analysis; systemic approach. The study involved school and college students and adults, in total of 1150 persons. Results: historical backgrounds of formation and development of recreation in the world and Ukraine are analyzed. Theoretical generalization of certain concepts of motivation in the area of physical recreation is provided, as well as theoretical and organizational principles of leisure and recreation in foreign countries are discussed. Conclusions: historical backgrounds of development of knowledge about recreation are identified and conceptual approaches to development of the theoretical and methodological foundations of recreational activities of various population groups are determined.

  10. New Horizons in C-F Activation by Main Group Electrophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozerov, Oleg V. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-02-13

    This technical report describes progress on the DOE sponsored project "New Horizons in C-F Activation by Main Group Electrophiles" during the period of 09/15/2010 – 08/31/2015. The main goal of this project was to develop improved catalysts for conversion of carbon-fluorine bonds in potentially harmful compounds. The approach involved combining of a highly reactive positively charged main-group compound with a highly unreactive negatively charged species (anions) as a way to access potent catalysts for carbon-fluorine bond activation. This report details progress made in improving synthetic pathways to a variety of new anions with improved properties and analysis of their potential in catalysis.

  11. Group behavioral activation for patients with severe obesity and binge eating disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsson, Sven; Parling, Thomas; Ghaderi, Ata

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether behavioral activation (BA) is an efficacious treatment for decreasing eating disorder symptoms in patients with obesity and binge eating disorder (BED). Ninety-six patients with severe obesity and BED were randomized to either 10 sessions of group BA or wait-list control. The study was conducted at an obesity clinic in a regular hospital setting. The treatment improved some aspects of disordered eating and had a positive effect on depressive symptoms but there was no significant difference between the groups regarding binge eating and most other symptoms. Improved mood but lack of effect on binge eating suggests that dysfunctional eating (including BED) is maintained by other mechanisms than low activation and negative mood. However, future studies need to investigate whether effects of BA on binge eating might emerge later than at post-assessment, as in interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa.

  12. Engagement in elderly persons with dementia attending animal-assisted group activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christine; Pedersen, Ingeborg; Bergland, Astrid; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Ihlebæk, Camilla

    2016-09-02

    The need for meaningful activities that enhance engagement is very important among persons with dementia (PWDs), both for PWDs still living at home, as well as for PWDs admitted to a nursing home (NH). In this study, we systematically registered behaviours related to engagement in a group animal-assisted activity (AAA) intervention for 21 PWDs in NHs and among 28 home-dwelling PWDs attending a day care centre. The participants interacted with a dog and its handler for 30 minutes, twice a week for 12 weeks. Video-recordings were carried out early (week 2) and late (week 10) during the intervention period and behaviours were categorized by the use of an ethogram. AAA seems to create engagement in PWDs, and might be a suitable and health promoting intervention for both NH residents and participants of a day care centre. Degree of dementia should be considered when planning individual or group based AAA.

  13. Organocatalytic chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes via a cascade reaction: remote activation of hydroxyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Chen; Jiang, Fei; Wang, Shu-Liang; Shi, Feng; Tu, Shu-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    The first organocatalytic oxyarylation of styrenes has been established through a cascade of vinylogous Michael addition/alkoxyl transfer reactions of o- or p-hydroxylstyrenes with quinone imine ketals. The process leads to a highly chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes and provides access to m-alkylated anilines in generally high yields and excellent diastereoselectivity (up to 99% yield, >95:5 dr). An investigation of the reaction pathway revealed that the existence and position of the hydroxyl group of styrene played crucial roles in the cascade reaction, suggesting that the two reactants were simultaneously activated by binaphthyl-derived phosphoric acid via hydrogen bonding interactions and long-distance conjugative effects. In addition, the activating group of the hydroxyl functionality in the products can be easily removed or transformed, demonstrating the applicability and utility of this strategy in styrene oxyarylation and in the synthesis of styrene-based compounds.

  14. Modelling the exposure of wildlife to radiation: key findings and activities of IAEA working groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, Nicholas A. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Center, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LM2E, Cadarache (France); Johansen, Mathew P. [ANSTO Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Menai, NSW (Australia); Goulet, Richard [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Environmental Risk Assessment Division, 280 Slater, Ottawa, K1A0H3 (Canada); Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (United States); Stark, Karolina; Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 (Sweden); Andersson, Pal [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16, Stockholm (Sweden); Copplestone, David [Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Yankovich, Tamara L.; Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, 1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In total, participants from 14 countries, representing 19 organisations, actively participated in the model application/inter-comparison activities of the IAEA's EMRAS II programme Biota Modelling Group. A range of models/approaches were used by participants (e.g. the ERICA Tool, RESRAD-BIOTA, the ICRP Framework). The agreed objectives of the group were: 'To improve Member State's capabilities for protection of the environment by comparing and validating models being used, or developed, for biota dose assessment (that may be used) as part of the regulatory process of licensing and compliance monitoring of authorised releases of radionuclides.' The activities of the group, the findings of which will be described, included: - An assessment of the predicted unweighted absorbed dose rates for 74 radionuclides estimated by 10 approaches for five of the ICRPs Reference Animal and Plant geometries assuming 1 Bq per unit organism or media. - Modelling the effect of heterogeneous distributions of radionuclides in sediment profiles on the estimated exposure of organisms. - Model prediction - field data comparisons for freshwater ecosystems in a uranium mining area and a number of wetland environments. - An evaluation of the application of available models to a scenario considering radioactive waste buried in shallow trenches. - Estimating the contribution of {sup 235}U to dose rates in freshwater environments. - Evaluation of the factors contributing to variation in modelling results. The work of the group continues within the framework of the IAEA's MODARIA programme, which was initiated in 2012. The work plan of the MODARIA working group has largely been defined by the findings of the previous EMRAS programme. On-going activities of the working group, which will be described, include the development of a database of dynamic parameters for wildlife dose assessment and exercises involving modelling the exposure of organisms in the marine coastal

  15. A semi-active H∞ control strategy with application to the vibration suppression of nonlinear high-rise building under earthquake excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Fuquan; Wu, Yingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Different from previous researches which mostly focused on linear response control of seismically excited high-rise buildings, this study aims to control nonlinear seismic response of high-rise buildings. To this end, a semi-active control strategy, in which H∞ control algorithm is used and magneto-rheological dampers are employed for an actuator, is presented to suppress the nonlinear vibration. In this strategy, a modified Kalman-Bucy observer which is suitable for the proposed semi-active strategy is developed to obtain the state vector from the measured semi-active control force and acceleration feedback, taking into account of the effects of nonlinearity, disturbance and uncertainty of controlled system parameters by the observed nonlinear accelerations. Then, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is applied to the ASCE 20-story benchmark building when subjected to earthquake excitation and compared with the other control approaches by some control criteria. It is indicated that the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy provides much better control performances by comparison with the semi-active MPC and Clipped-LQG control approaches, and can reduce nonlinear seismic response and minimize the damage in the buildings. Besides, it enhances the reliability of the control performance when compared with the active control strategy. Thus, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is suitable for suppressing the nonlinear vibration of high-rise buildings.

  16. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  17. Moms in motion: a group-mediated cognitive-behavioral physical activity intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brawley Lawrence R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When examining the prevalence of physical inactivity by gender and age, women over the age of 25 are at an increased risk for sedentary behavior. Childbearing and motherhood have been explored as one possible explanation for this increased risk. Post natal exercise studies to date demonstrate promising physical and psychological outcomes, however few physical activity interventions have been theory-driven and tailored to post natal exercise initiates. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a group-mediated cognitive behavioral intervention based upon social-cognitive theory and group dynamics (GMCB to a standard care postnatal exercise program (SE. Method A randomized, two-arm intervention design was used. Fifty-seven post natal women were randomized to one of two conditions: (1 a standard exercise treatment (SE and (2 a standard exercise treatment plus group-mediated cognitive behavioral intervention (GMCB. Participants in both conditions participated in a four-week intensive phase where participants received standard exercise training. In addition, GMCB participants received self-regulatory behavioral skills training via six group-mediated counseling sessions. Following the intensive phase, participants engaged in a four-week home-based phase of self-structured exercise. Measures of physical activity, barrier efficacy, and proximal outcome expectations were administered and data were analyzed using ANCOVA procedures. Results and discussion ANCOVA of change scores for frequency, minutes, and volume of physical activity revealed significant treatment effects over the intensive and home-based phases (p's Conclusion While both exercise programs resulted in improvements to exercise participation, the GMCB intervention produced greater improvement in overall physical activity, barrier efficacy and proximal outcome expectations.

  18. Active Galactic Nuclei in Groups and Clusters of Galaxies: Detection and Host Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Timothy J; Mulchaey, John S; Berti, Angela; Jeltema, Tesla E

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the field, groups, and clusters can provide new information about how these objects are triggered and fueled, similar to how these environments have been employed to study galaxy evolution. We have obtained new XMM-Newton observations of seven X-ray selected groups and poor clusters with 0.02 10^{41}; M_R2.5}(L_X>10^{41}; M_Rgroups (92% significance), a result consistent with the hypothesis that the change in AGN fraction is directly connected to environment.

  19. Synthesis, insecticidal, and acaricidal activities of novel 2-aryl-pyrrole derivatives containing ester groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Yongqiang; Ou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Pengxiang; Huang, Zhiqiang; Bi, Fuchun; Huang, Runqiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2008-11-12

    A series of novel 2-aryl-pyrrole derivatives containing ester groups were synthesized, and their structures were characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm, mosquito, diamondback moth, green rice leafhopper, and bean aphids and acaricidal activities against spider mite of these new compounds were evaluated. The results of bioassays indicated that some of these title compounds exhibited excellent insecticidal and acaricidal activities. The insecticidal activities against oriental armyworm of compounds IVa, IVd, IVe, IVf, IVg, IVi, IVk, and IVp were equal to commercialized Chlorfenapyr, and the insecticidal activities of most of compounds IVb, IVc, IVd, IVf, IVg, IVj, IVk, IVl, IVs, IVt, IVu, IVw, IVx, IVz, and Chlorfenapyr against mosquito at 0.10 mg kg (-1) were 100%, and the acaricidal activities of compounds IVd, IVe, IVf, IVg, IVh, IVi, and IVk were equal or superior to Chlorfenapyr. Especially, the results indicated that the acaricidal activity of [4-bromo-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-cyano-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrrol-1-yl]methyl 3-methylbutanoate ( IVg) against spider mite was 2.65-fold as high as that of Chlorfenapyr from the value of LC 50.

  20. Applied building physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hens, Hugo S L C

    2012-01-01

    The energy crises of the 1970s, persisting moisture problems, complaints about sick buildings, thermal, visual and olfactory discomfort, and the move towards more sustainability in building construction have pushed Building Physics to the forefront of building innovation. The societal pressure to diminish energy consumption in buildings without impairing usability acted as a trigger to activate the whole notion of performance based design and construction. As with all engineering sciences, Building Physics is oriented towards application, which is why, after a first book on fundamentals this s

  1. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-02-02

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  2. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Siegford

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  3. Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yongjun; Tang, Pei; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hanjun; Yan, Ning; Hu, Gang; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Ding

    2016-02-24

    A heterogeneous, inexpensive and environment-friendly carbon catalytic system was developed for the C-H bond arylation of benzene resulting in the subsequent formation of biaryl compounds. The oxygen-containing groups on these graphene oxide sheets play an essential role in the observed catalytic activity. The catalytic results of model compounds and DFT calculations show that these functional groups promote this reaction by stabilization and activation of K ions at the same time of facilitating the leaving of I. And further mechanisms studies show that it is the charge induced capabilities of oxygen groups connected to specific carbon skeleton together with the giant π-reaction platform provided by the π-domain of graphene that played the vital roles in the observed excellent catalytic activity. D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  4. Analysis of Radioactive Releases During Proposed Demolition Activities for the 224-U and 224-UA Buildings - Addendum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Droppo, James G.; Joyce, Kevin E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2010-12-21

    A post-demolition modeling analysis is conducted that compares during-demolition atmospheric concentration monitoring results with modeling results based on the actual meteorological conditions during the demolition activities. The 224-U and 224-UA Buildings that were located in the U-Plant UO3 complex in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site were demolished during the summer of 2010. These facilities converted uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), a product of Hanford’s Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, into uranium trioxide (UO3). This report is an addendum to a pre-demolition emission analysis and air dispersion modeling effort that was conducted for proposed demolition activities for these structures.

  5. Anticancer and DNA binding activities of platinum (IV) complexes; importance of leaving group departure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryasin, Zahra; Yousefi, Reza; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Hamidizadeh, Peyman; Alavianmehr, Mohammad-Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2014-03-01

    The two six-coordinate Pt(IV) complexes, containing bidentate nitrogen donor/methyl ligands with general formula [Pt(X)2Me2((t)bu2bpy)], where (t)bu2bpy = 4,4'-ditert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine and X = Cl (C1) or Br (C2), serving as the leaving groups were synthesized for evaluation of their anticancer activities and DNA binding properties. To examine anticancer activities of the synthetic complexes, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and ethidium bromide/acridine orange (EB/AO) staining method were performed. The binding properties of these complexes to DNA and purine nucleotides were examined, using different spectroscopic techniques. These complexes demonstrated significant anticancer activities against three cancer cell lines Jurkat, K562, and MCF-7. On the basis of the results of EB/AO staining, C1 and C2 were also capable to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. These complexes comprise halide leaving groups, displaying different departure rates; accordingly, they demonstrated slightly dissimilar anticancer activity and significantly different DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. The results of DNA interaction studies of these complexes suggest a mixed-binding mode, comprising partial intercalation and groove binding. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that the newly synthesized Pt(IV) complexes are promising class of the potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing novel platinum anticancer drugs. This study also highlights the importance of leaving group in anticancer activity and DNA binding properties of Pt(IV) complexes.

  6. Math Strategies You Can Count On: Tools & Activities to Build Math Appreciation, Understanding & Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsten, Char

    2005-01-01

    This book offers classroom-tested activities designed to make even the most reluctant learners crazy about math. Appealing to everyone from sports fans to readers, future fashion designers to budding musicians, the activities presented in this book offer ways to develop a deep-rooted love and appreciation of math in every student. Teachers are…

  7. Synthesis, algal inhibition activities and QSAR studies of novel gramine compounds containing ester functional groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; YU Liangmin; JIANG Xiaohui; XIA Shuwei; ZHAO Haizhou

    2009-01-01

    2,5,6-Tribromo-l-methylgramine (TBG), isolated from bryozoan Zoobotryon pellucidum was shown to be very efficient in preventing recruitment of larval settlement. In order to improve the compatibility of TBG and its analogues with other ingredients in antifouling paints, structural modification of TBG was focused mainly on halogen substitution and N-substitution. Two halogen-substitute gramines and their derivatives which contain ester functional groups at N-position of gramines were synthesized. Algal inhibition activities of the synthesized compounds against algae Nitzschia closterium were evaluated and the Median Effective Concentration (EC50) range was 1.06-6.74 μg ml-1. Compounds that had a long chain ester group exhibited extremely high antifouling activity. Quantitive Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies with multiple linear regression analysis were applied to find correlation between different calculated molecular descriptors and biological activity of the synthesized compounds. The results show that the toxicity (log (1/EC50)) is correlated well with the partition coefficient log P. Thus, these products have potential function as antifouling agents.

  8. Stages of change and physical activity in a group of university students. Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gómez-Ramírez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The stages of change can be defined as changes in the behavior of the conduct of the people, which follows a series of steps. The present study sought to determine the stages of change with regard to the practice of physical activity of a group of college students. Its approach was quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional design. The sample of 193 students of the physiotherapy program from a private university in the city of Cali, selected by simple random sampling, through the OpenEpi statistical software version 3.0.1. A questionnaire of stages of change of physical activity in its short form was used. Analysis was descriptive and correlation with some sociodemographic variables using the Chi-square test. 89.6% of the university students is in the first three stages of change, i.e. are sedentary and a 10.31% was categorized as physically active. The variable associated with the stages of change was the sex with a value p<0.05. The majority of the participants in the study population is young and is at risk of classified as inactive physical. There is potential in this group to promote healthy habits through the practice of physical activity.

  9. Design, synthesis, and antifungal activities of novel triazole derivatives containing the benzyl group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kehan Xu,1,* Lei Huang,1,* Zheng Xu,2 Yanwei Wang,1,3 Guojing Bai,1 Qiuye Wu,1 Xiaoyan Wang,1 Shichong Yu,1 Yuanying Jiang1 1School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 3Number 422 Hospital of PLA, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In previous studies undertaken by our group, a series of 1-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl-3-substituted-2-propanols (1a–r, which were analogs of fluconazole, was designed and synthesized by click chemistry. In the study reported here, the in vitro antifungal activities of all the target compounds were evaluated against eight human pathogenic fungi. Compounds 1a, 1q, and 1r showed the more antifungal activity than the others. Keywords: triazole, synthesis, antifungal activity, CYP51

  10. Mechanical Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei in Galaxies, Groups, and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R

    2012-01-01

    The radiative cooling timescales at the centers of hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters are much shorter than their ages. Therefore, hot atmospheres are expected to cool and to form stars. Cold gas and star formation are observed in central cluster galaxies but at levels below those expected from an unimpeded cooling flow. X-ray observations have shown that wholesale cooling is being offset by mechanical heating from radio active galactic nuclei. Feedback is widely considered to be an important and perhaps unavoidable consequence of the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes. We show that cooling X-ray atmospheres and the ensuing star formation and nuclear activity are probably coupled to a self-regulated feedback loop. While the energetics are now reasonably well understood, other aspects of feedback are not. We highlight the problems of atmospheric heating and transport processes, accretion, and nuclear activity, and we discuss the potential role of black hole sp...

  11. Undecylenic acid: a valuable and physiologically active renewable building block from castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Steen, Marijke; Stevens, Christian V

    2009-01-01

    A lot of attention is currently being paid to the transition to a biobased economy. In this movement, most efforts concentrate on the development of bioenergy applications including bioethanol, biodiesel, thermochemical conversion of biomass, and others. However, in the energy sector other nonbiomass alternatives are known, whereas no valuable alternatives are available when thinking about chemical building blocks. Therefore, it is also essential to develop new routes for the synthesis of bio-based chemicals and materials derived thereof. Such intermediates can originate either from plants or from animals. Castor oil is a non-edible oil extracted from the seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), which grows in tropical and subtropical areas. Globally, around one million tons of castor seeds are produced every year, the leading producing areas being India, PR China, and Brazil.2 10-Undecenoic acid or undecylenic acid is a fatty acid derived from castor oil that, owing to its bifunctional nature, has many possibilities to develop sustainable applications.

  12. Building memories: remembering and forgetting of verbal experiences as predicted by brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A D; Schacter, D L; Rotte, M; Koutstaal, W; Maril, A; Dale, A M; Rosen, B R; Buckner, R L

    1998-08-21

    A fundamental question about human memory is why some experiences are remembered whereas others are forgotten. Brain activation during word encoding was measured using blocked and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how neural activation differs for subsequently remembered and subsequently forgotten experiences. Results revealed that the ability to later remember a verbal experience is predicted by the magnitude of activation in left prefrontal and temporal cortices during that experience. These findings provide direct evidence that left prefrontal and temporal regions jointly promote memory formation for verbalizable events.

  13. Activated carbon fibers with a high content of surface functional groups by phosphoric acid activation of PPTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Muñiz, Alberto; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D

    2011-09-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared by chemical activation of poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) with phosphoric acid, with a particular focus on the effects of impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature on both surface chemistry and porous texture. Thermogravimetric studies of the pyrolysis of PPTA impregnated with different amounts of phosphoric acid indicated that this reagent has a strong influence on the thermal degradation of the polymer, lowering the decomposition temperature and increasing the carbon yield. As concerns surface chemistry, TPD and chemical analysis results indicated that the addition of phosphoric acid increases the concentration of oxygenated surface groups, with a maximum at an impregnation ratio of 100 wt.%. The resulting materials present uncommon properties, namely a large amount of oxygen- and phosphorus-containing surface groups and a high nitrogen content. Porosity development following H(3)PO(4) activation was very significant, with values close to 1700 m(2)/g and 0.80 cm(3)/g being reached for the BET surface area and total pore volume, respectively. The pore size distributions remained confined to the micropore and narrow mesopore (<10 nm) range.

  14. Suppression of mechanical vibrations in a building-like structure using a passive/active autoparametric absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a system consisting of a primary structure coupled with a passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber. The primary structure consists of a building-like mechanical structure, it has three rigid floors connected by flexible columns made from aluminium strips, while the absorber consists of a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled through an acquisition card. The whole system, which is a coupled non-linear oscillator, is subjected to sinusoidal excitation obtained from an electromechanical shaker in the neighborhood of internal resonances. The natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to be one-half of any of the natural frequencies of the main system. With the addition of a PZT actuator, the autoparametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from an accelerometer on the primary structure, an accelerometer on the tip of the beam absorber and a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary system.

  15. Integrating psychological research on girls with feminist activism: a model for building a liberation psychology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathryn E; Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S; Lyons, Aoife L

    2003-03-01

    A liberation psychology is needed to bridge the gap between psychology's focus on individual distress and broad social forces that foster such distress. We offer a model for bridging this gap by focusing on a specific area of psychology (psychological research on girls) and a specific social movement (feminist activism). Psychological research on girls and feminist activism share the common goal of improving the lives of girls and women. However, both have fallen short of this goal. This is due, in part, to the weaknesses associated with each endeavor and to the fact that the complementary strengths of each have remained isolated from the other. In this paper, we propose a common language and shared framework to integrate psychological research with feminist activism. First, we review the basic strengths and weaknesses associated with psychological research and feminist activism, with a particular focus on how they are distinct from one another. Second, we provide a taxonomic framework for integrating these two areas on the basis of the stress paradigm, with specific examples provided from our recent reviews of the literature and our own empirical work with adolescent girls. Finally, we conclude with recommendations for future work needed to integrate psychological research on girls with feminist activism toward the goal of building a liberation psychology in the United States.

  16. Knowledge formalization of intelligent building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This article aim is understanding the basic knowledge about an intelligent building. The notion of the intelligent building can be called any building equipped with computer and communication technology, which can automatically respond to internal or external stimuli. The result of the intelligent building is an automated and foreseeing of activities that enable to reduce operating costs and increase comfort. The best way to use the intelligent building is for a low-energy building, a passive building, or for building with high savings. The output of this article is the formalization of basic knowledge of the intelligent building by RDF graph.

  17. Activities in a social networking-based discussion group by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Na; Wang, Xiangping; Zhang, Rongchun; Liu, Zhiguo; Liang, Shuhui; Yao, Shaowei; Tao, Qin; Jia, Hui; Pan, Yanglin; Guo, Xuegang

    2017-10-01

    Online social networking is increasingly being used among medical practitioners. However, few studies have evaluated its use in therapeutic endoscopy. Here, we aimed to analyze the shared topics and activities of a group of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) doctors in a social networking-based endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography discussion group (EDG). Six ERCP trainers working in Xijing Hospital and 48 graduated endoscopists who had finished ERCP training in the same hospital were invited to join in EDG. All group members were informed not to divulge any private information of patients when using EDG. The activities of group members on EDG were retrospectively extracted. The individual data of the graduated endoscopists were collected by a questionnaire. From June 2014 to May 2015, 6924 messages were posted on EDG, half of which were ERCP related. In total, 214 ERCP-related topics were shared, which could be categorized into three types: sharing experience/cases (52.3%), asking questions (38.3%), and sharing literatures/advances (9.3%). Among the 48 graduated endoscopists, 21 had a low case volume of less than 50 per year and 27 had a high volume case volume of 50 or more. High-volume graduated endoscopists posted more ERCP-related messages (P=0.008) and shared more discussion topics (P=0.003) compared with low-volume graduated endoscopists. A survey showed that EDG was useful for graduated endoscopists in ERCP performance and management of post-ERCP complications, etc. A wide range of ERCP-related topics were shared on the social networking-based EDG. The ERCP-related behaviors on EDG were more active in graduated endoscopists with an ERCP case volume of more than 50 per year.

  18. Building a foundation for systems change: increasing access to physical activity programs for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmayr, Sue; Mackenzie, Geraldine

    2004-10-01

    Although 25% of U.S. adults are physically inactive, this percentage increases dramatically for older adults. Organizational change theory guided a state health department in identifying system gaps and developing strategies to expand programming for seniors. A survey of provider agencies in New Jersey assessed (a) capacity for physical activity programs for older adults, (b) accessibility of programs, and (c) barriers to providing programs. One hundred sixty agencies provided physical activity programs to almost 184,000 individuals annually. Fewer than one half of the agencies provided exercise programs for people with disabilities, and only 44% provided in-home programs. Eighty-two percent of program providers wanted to expand programming but cited lack of trained instructors and peer leaders, inadequate facility space, insufficient funding, and limited transportation resources as barriers. Sustaining older adult behavior change requires infrastructure that will ensure access to diverse physical activities. This article provides strategies to expand access to physical activity programs for older adults.

  19. ACADEMIC LITERACY FOR LANGUAGES GRADUATE COURSE UNDERGRADUATES: BUILDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACTIVE AND TACTICAL ATTITUDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia de Fátima Santos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is a result of an ethnographic-based research carried out in the Applied Linguistics area in order to understand the constitution of Languages Graduate Course undergraduate students as producers of Portuguese–written texts, with a focus on active and tactical attitude. The corpus consists of students’ interviews and writing and rewriting texts activities, which were held throughout two disciplines of the course, taught by the same teacher. Data analysis highlights few times when students performed active and tactical attitude in the writing process activities in both disciplines. This result is among other reasons due to the history of each student as a producer of texts in basic education, and above all the absence of a significant work in producing texts in the Languages Graduate Course.

  20. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...... Belgrade), Leo Pekkala (Finnish Centre for Media Education and Audiovisual Media/MEKU), Julie Uldam (Network on Civic Engagement and Social Innovation) and Gabriella Velics (Community Media Forum Europe)....

  1. Friendship groups and physical activity: qualitative findings on how physical activity is initiated and maintained among 10–11 year old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Angie S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many youth physical activity interventions have minimal effect. To design better interventions we need to understand more about the factors that influence youth activity. Application of self-determination theory to youth physical activity, particularly the relatedness and competence, might suggest that friends and friendship groups influence the initiation and maintenance of youth physical activity. In this study we examined this issue. Methods Seventeen focus groups were conducted with 113, 10–11 year old children, from 11 primary schools in Bristol, UK. Focus groups examined: 1 the nature of children's friendship groups; 2 associations between physical activity and social group status; and 3 how friendship groups affect the initiation and maintenance of physical activity. All focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Participants reported that there were three different types of friendship groups; School friends; Neighborhood friends; and Other Friends who were friends from organized activities or children of their parents' friends. Participants had multiple groups of friends and engaged in different activities with the different groups. Possessing several groups of friends was desirable as it kept the friendships fresh and interesting. Physical activity was perceived as a positive attribute and linked to social status among boys. Among girls the association between physical activity ability and social status was more complex, appearing to differ by the norms of the group to which participants belonged. Some participants reported that low activity ability could be perceived as desirable in some social groups. Participants reported that friends provide support to initiate physical activity via co-participation (i.e. engaging in activity together; modeling of being active; and providing verbal support to engage in activity. Enjoyment was the most important

  2. 75 FR 61501 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Capacity Building Activities Through the World Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... animal antimicrobials to be reviewed by WHO; and FDA's resources could be used in support of AGISAR's.... Promote development of standardized methods for monitoring antimicrobial use and work with member states... Health Organization (WHO) Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance...

  3. Bronchodilator activity of xanthine derivatives substituted with functional groups at the 1- or 7-position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, Y; Kurita, M; Sakai, R; Konno, K; Sanae, F; Ohshima, T; Takagi, K; Hasegawa, T; Iwasaki, N

    1993-05-14

    Xanthine derivatives with several functional groups at the 1- or 7-position were synthesized, and their pharmacological activities in guinea pigs were studied. In general, the in vitro tracheal relaxant action and positive chronotropic action of 3-propylxanthines were increased by substitutions with nonpolar functional groups at the 1-position, but decreased by any substitution at the 7-position. On the other hand, because positive chronotropic actions of substituents with allyl, aminoalkyl, alkoxyalkyl, and normal alkyl groups were much less than tracheal muscle became very high with substitutions of 3'-butenyl, (dimethylamino)ethyl, 2'-ethoxyethyl, 3'-methoxypropyl, and n-propyl groups at the 1-position and of 2'-ethoxyethyl, 2'-oxopropyl, and n-propyl groups at the 7-position, compared with theophylline and the corresponding unsubstituted xanthines, 3-propylxanthine and 1-methyl-3-propylxanthine. When compounds were intraduodenally administered to the guinea pig, 1-(2'-ethoxyethyl)-, 1-(3'-methoxypropyl)-, 1-(3'-butenyl)-, and 1-[(dimethylamino)-ethyl]-3-propylxanthines, 1-methyl-7-(2'-oxopropyl)-3-propylxanthine, and denbufylline (1,3-di-n-butyl-7-(2'-oxopropyl)xanthine) effectively inhibited the acetylcholine-induced bronchospasm without heart stimulation or central nervous system-stimulation at the effective dosage range. Particularly, the bronchodilatory effect of 1-(2'-ethoxyethyl)-3-propylxanthine was much stronger and more continuous than those of theophylline and pentoxifylline. On the other hand, there were certain relationships among the in vitro tracheal relaxant activities of these compounds, their affinities for adenosine (A1) receptors in the brain membrane, and their inhibition of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the tracheal muscle. The affinity for A2 receptors of these compounds was very low or negligible. This suggests that both the action on A1 receptors or interaction with adenosine and the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity contribute

  4. Role of allyl group in the hydroxyl and peroxyl radical scavenging activity of S-allylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Perla D; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl; Aguilar-González, Adriana; Lira-Rocha, Alfonso; Jung-Cook, Helgi; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Galano, Annia

    2011-11-17

    S-Allylcysteine (SAC) is the most abundant compound in aged garlic extracts, and its antioxidant properties have been demonstrated. It is known that SAC is able to scavenge different reactive species including hydroxyl radical (•OH), although its potential ability to scavenge peroxyl radical (ROO•) has not been explored. In this work the ability of SAC to scavenge ROO• was evaluated, as well as the role of the allyl group (-S-CH(2)-CH═CH(2)) in its free radical scavenging activity. Two derived compounds of SAC were prepared: S-benzylcysteine (SBC) and S-propylcysteine (SPC). Their abilities to scavenge •OH and ROO• were measured. A computational analysis was performed to elucidate the mechanism by which these compounds scavenge •OH and ROO•. SAC was able to scavenge •OH and ROO•, in a concentration-dependent way. Such activity was significantly ameliorated when the allyl group was replaced by benzyl or propyl groups. It was shown for the first time that SAC is able to scavenge ROO•.

  5. Building a competency-based workplace curriculum around entrustable professional activities: The case of physician assistant training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Hanneke; Ten Cate, Olle; Daalder, Rieneke; Berkvens, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is increasingly dominating clinical training, but also poses questions as to its practical implementation. There is a need for practical guidelines to translate CBME to the clinical work floor. This article aims to provide a practical model, based on the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) to make this translation, derived from curriculum building for physician assistants (PAs). For the training of PAs at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, a three-step model was developed to guide competency-based curriculum development, teaching and assessment. It includes specific guidelines for the identification, systematic description and planning of EPAs. The EPA concept appeared to be a useful tool to build competency-based clinical workplace curricula. Implementation of the curriculum requires use of trainee portfolios and progress interviews, statements of rewarded responsibility and training of supervisors. The individualised approach and flexibility that true CBME implies is brought into practice with this model. The model may also be transferred to other domains of clinical training, among which postgraduate training for medical specialties.

  6. Building Bridges Between IPY Scientists and the Educational Community: A Spectrum of IPY Education and Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, T. S.; Dahlman, L.; McAuliffe, C.; Domenico, B.; Taber, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    The International Polar Year is an opportunity to simultaneously increase our scientific understanding of the polar regions and to engage the next generation of Earth scientists and socially responsible citizens. However, building the bridge between the scientific community who conduct the research and the education community who convey that information to students requires specific and continuing efforts. The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET, http://serc.carleton.edu/eet) and the accompanying spectrum of activities encompassing development of materials that can provide access and understanding of IPY data and knowledge, and teacher professional development to facilitate the effective use of these materials with students can help build that bridge. The EET is an online resource that provides an easy way for educators to learn how to use Earth science datasets and data analysis tools to convey science concepts. Modules (called chapters) in the EET provide step-by-step instructions for accessing and analyzing these datasets within compelling case studies, and provide pedagogical information to help the educator use the data with their students. New EET chapters, featuring IPY data, can be developed through the use of an EET chapter template that standardizes the content and structure of the chapter. The initiation of new chapters can be facilitated through our Data in Education Workshops (previously DLESE Data Services Workshops, http://swiki.dlese.org/2006- dataservicesworkshop/). During these workshops IPY data providers, analysis tool specialists, IPY scientists, curriculum developers, and educators participate on teams of 5-6 members to create an outline of a new EET chapter featuring the IPY data and analysis tools represented on the team. New chapters will be completed by a curriculum developer following the workshop. Use of the IPY EET chapters will be facilitated by a range of professional development activities ranging from two 2-hour telecon-online workshops

  7. NEWBORNS OF HIGH RISK GROUPS AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CARDIAC ACTIVITY DURING THE PERIOD OF EARLY ADAPTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tumaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study characteristics of electrophysiological cardiac activity in children of risk groups and to assess possibilities of Holter-electrocardiography (H-ECG in revealing of cardiac dysfunction during the period of early adaptation. Patients and methods: 250 newborns were examined. The main group consisted of 200 children with cerebral ischemia (CI. This group was divided into 2 subgroups: 100 full-term and 100 premature (at various gestation age infants. Control group contained 50 children born at 38–40th weeks of gestation with physiological course of pregnancy and delivery, APGAR score of 8–9 points. Complex examination included H-ECG according the standard technic with evaluation of the hearth rate (HR during sleep and wakefulness; HRmin, HRmax; arrhythmias, conductivity disorders, duration of the intervals; rhythm variability. Results: according to the ECG children with CI, especially premature ones, and children delivered via Cesarean section more often had ST-T disturbances, arrhythmias (sinus tachycardia, less often — sinus bradycardia and conductivity disorders, Q-Tc prolongation. H-EGC revealed decrease of sleep HR, HRmin and HRmax in children with CI especially in delivered via Cesarean section. The most common arrhythmia was supraventricular extrasystole.  Pauses in rhythms and variability were the highest in premature children delivered via Cesarean section. Conclusions: hypoxia/ischemia is a trigger for development of cardiovascular dysfuncion in newborns. Premature and children delivered via Cesarean section form a group of high risk. H-ECG widens possibilities of revealing of symptoms of cardiac dysfunction (disturbances at the basal level of functioning, of adaptation resources of the sinus node, electric instability of the myocardium and heart rate variability in children of risk group for development of cardiovascular disorders. 

  8. Cycles of activity, group composition, and diet of Lemur mongoz mongoz Linnaeus 1766 in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, R W; Tattersall, I

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary study of the ecology and behavior of Lemur mongoz mongoz was carried out in the northwest of Madagascar. The animals were observed for approximately 250 h in July till August, 1973, and for 50 h in June, 1974. L.m.mongoz has been reported to be diurnal and to live in groups of 6-8 individuals. However, we found the animals to be nocturnal and that groups contained an adult male, an adult female and their offspring (groups numbering from 2 to 4 individuals). L.m.mongoz is thus the only species of the genus Lemur studied to date that is active exclusively at night and that lives in family groups. L.m.mongoz was also found to have a very specialized diet. During our study, it was observed to feed on only five species of plant and mainly on the nectar-producing parts (flowers and nectaries) of four of these species. It spent most of its feeding time licking nectar from the flowers of the kapok tree, Ceiba pentandra, and is probably a major pollinator of this tree in Madagascar. In Africa and South and Central America, the kapok tree is usually bat-pollinated. A dietary preference for nectar, although common among bats, has not previously been observed in primates.

  9. Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalt, Ann C.; Lufler, Rebecca S.; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

    2010-01-01

    Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its…

  10. Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalt, Ann C.; Lufler, Rebecca S.; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

    2010-01-01

    Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its…

  11. Characterization of environmentally-friendly alkali activated slag cements and ancient building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard

    Alternative cement technologies are an area of increasing interest due to growing environmental concerns and the relatively large carbon footprint of the cement industry. Many new cements have been developed, but one of the most promising is that made from granulated, ground blast furnace slag activated by a high-pH solution. Another is related to the discovery that some of the pyramid limestone blocks may have been cast using a combination of diatomaceous earth activated by lime which provides the high pH needed to dissolve the diatomaceous earth and bind the limestone aggregate together. The emphasis of this thesis is not on the latter---which was explored elsewhere---but on the results supplying further evidence that some of the pyramid blocks were indeed reconstituted limestone. The goal of this work is to chemically and mechanically characterize both alkali-activated slag cements as well as a number of historic materials, which may be ancient analogues to cement. Alkali activated slag cements were produced with a number of additives; concretes were made with the addition of a fine limestone aggregate. These materials were characterized mechanically and by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA. Samples from several Egyptian pyramids, an 'ancient floor' in Colorado, and the 'Bosnian Pyramids' were investigated. In the cements, it has been unequivocally shown that C-S-H, the same binding phase that is produced in ordinary portland cement, has been produced, as well as a variety of mineral side products. Significant recarbonation occurs during the first 20 months, but only for the Na2CO3-activated formulae. Radiocarbon dating proves that the 'Bosnian Pyramids' and 'ancient floors' are not made from any type of recarbonated lime; however, Egyptian pyramid limestones were finite, thus suggesting that they are of a synthetic nature. XRD and FTIR results were inconclusive, while TGA results indicate the limestones are identical to naturally occurring limestones, and SEM

  12. The Study of ABO Groups and Rh Factor in Active and Non-active Carriers of Hepatitis B Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydeh Alaoddolehei et al.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During past eight decades, many studies have been performed to determine relationship between infectious diseases and blood groups. Interaction of microorganisms and RBC membrane is probably because of antigenic similarity, adherence through specific receptors or demodulation of antibody response (1. The first known relationship between blood groups and infectious diseases was seen in Plasmodium vivax. It is believed that sensitivity to HIV infection is related to blood groups and Rh factor (2. Hepatitis is a general word which caused by many factors such as DNA virus named HBV (hepatitis B virus. Several serologic determinants [eg. Glycoprotein surface antigen (HBsAg, viral peptide antigen (HBeAg, antibody against viral nucleoprotein (HBcAb] and PCR lead to recognition of HBV (3. A number of individuals with chronic infection (presence of HBsAg are divided to active and onactive groups. All cases are positive in HBcAb and negative in HBsAb. Active cases are recognized by detection of HBeAg and HBV-DNA, some clinical symptoms and elevated laboratory tests (ALT and AST (4. This study was performed based on presence of ABO and Rh antigens on other cells (5 which could be used as receptors for viruses. All individuals infected with HBV in the past or present time who were referred to a clinic were enrolled to this study. Fifty-five patients (10 female and 45 male were active and 182 (64 female and118 male were non-active out of 237 person with HBsAg. The blood samples were collected and ABO and Rh typing was done by Blood Filtration and Investigation Co (Palayesh and Pajohesh of blood company. Lot. No: MAbA09 antiserum. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using ||2 test. This study showed that active individuals have A (18.2%, B (18.2%, O (58.2%, AB (5.4%, Rh positive (96.4% and Rh negative (3.6% and nonactive individuals have A (26.9%, B (25.3%, O (41.2%, AB (6.6%, Rh positive (98.4% and Rh negative (1.6% (Table 1. These findings revealed that

  13. Building Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Building Materials Sub-council of CCPIT is the other sub-council in construction field. CCPIT Building Materials Sub-council (CCPITBM), as well as CCOIC Build-ing Materials Chamber of Commerce, is au-thorized by CCPIT and state administration of building materials industry in 1992. CCPITBM is a sub-organization of CCPIT and CCOIC.

  14. Coherent states of the Euclidean group and activation regions of primary visual cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Davide; Sanguinetti, Gonzalo; Sarti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainty principle of SE(2) allows to construct a coherent states transform that is strictly related to the Bargmann transform for the second Heisenberg group H2. The corresponding target space is characterized constructively and related to the almost complex structure of SE(2) as a contact manifold. Such a coherent state transform provides a model for neural activity maps in the primary visual cortex, that are then described in terms of minimal uncertainty states. The results of the model are compared with the experimental measurements.

  15. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen;

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti...... with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier...

  16. Dynamic Heat Storage and Cooling Capacity of a Concrete Deck with PCM and Thermally Activated Building System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2012-01-01

    the performance of the new deck with PCM concrete is the thermal properties of such a new material, as the PCM concrete is yet to be well defined. The results presented in the paper include models in which the PCM concrete material properties, such as thermal conductivity, and specific heat capacity were first......This paper presents a heat storage and cooling concept that utilizes a phase change material (PCM) and a thermally activated building system (TABS) implemented in a hollow core concrete deck. Numerical calculations of the dynamic heat storage capacity of the hollow core concrete deck element...... with and without microencapsulated PCM are presented. The new concrete deck with microencapsulated PCM is the standard deck on which an additional layer of the PCM concrete was added and, at the same time, the latent heat storage was introduced to the construction. The challenge of numerically simulating...

  17. Applied nuclear physics group - activities report. 1977-1997; Grupo de fisica nuclear aplicada - relatorio de atividades. 1977-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    1998-06-01

    This report presents the activities conducted by the Applied Nuclear Physics group of the Londrina State University - Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory - Brazil, from the activities beginning (1977) up to the end of the year 1997.

  18. Learning global health: a pilot study of an online collaborative intercultural peer group activity involving medical students in Australia and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Mark; Murray, Linda; Handoyo, Nicholas E; Tunggal, Deif; Cooling, Nick

    2017-01-13

    There is limited research to inform effective pedagogies for teaching global health to undergraduate medical students. Theoretically, using a combination of teaching pedagogies typically used in 'international classrooms' may prove to be an effective way of learning global health. This pilot study aimed to explore the experiences of medical students in Australia and Indonesia who participated in a reciprocal intercultural participatory peer e-learning activity (RIPPLE) in global health. Seventy-one third year medical students (49 from Australia and 22 from Indonesia) from the University of Tasmania (Australia) and the University of Nusa Cendana (Indonesia) participated in the RIPPLE activity. Participants were randomly distributed into 11 intercultural 'virtual' groups. The groups collaborated online over two weeks to study a global health topic of their choice, and each group produced a structured research abstract. Pre- and post-RIPPLE questionnaires were used to capture students' experiences of the activity. Descriptive quantitative data were analysed with Microsoft Excel and qualitative data were thematically analysed. Students' motivation to volunteer for this activity included: curiosity about the innovative approach to learning; wanting to expand knowledge of global health; hoping to build personal and professional relationships; and a desire to be part of an intercultural experience. Afer completing the RIPPLE program, participants reported on global health knowledge acquisition, the development of peer relationships, and insight into another culture. Barriers to achieving the learning outcomes associated with RIPPLE included problems with establishing consistent online communication, and effectively managing time to simultaneously complete RIPPLE and other curricula activities. Medical students from both countries found benefits in working together in small virtual groups to complement existing teaching in global health. However, our pilot study

  19. Epidemiologic assessment of mortality, building collapse pattern, and medical response after the 1992 earthquake in Turkey. Disaster Reanimatology Study Group (DRSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, D C; Pretto, E A; Abrams, J I; Ceciliano, N; Watoh, Y; Kirimli, B; Certug, A; Comfort, L K

    1997-01-01

    Post-earthquake engineering and epidemiologic assessments are important for the development of injury prevention strategies. This paper describes mortality and its relationship to building collapse patterns and initial medical responses following the 1992 earthquake in Erzincan, Turkey. The study consisted of: 1) background data collection and review; 2) design and implementation of a field survey; and 3) site inspection of building collapse patterns. The survey included: 1) national (n = 11) and local (n = 17) officials; 2) medical and search and rescue (SAR) workers (n = 38); and 3) a geographically stratified random sample of lay survivors (n = 105). The survey instruments were designed to gather information regarding location, injuries, initial actions and prior training of survivors and responders, and the location, injuries, and management of dead and dying victims. A case-control design was constructed to assess the relationship between mortality, location, and building collapse pattern. There was extensive structural damage throughout the region, especially in the city where mid-rise, unreinforced masonry buildings (MUMBs) incorporating a "soft" first floor design (large store windows for commercial use) and one story adobe structures were most vulnerable to collapse. Of 526 people who died in the city, 87% (n = 456) were indoors at the time of the earthquake. Of these, 92% (n = 418) died in MUMBs. Of 54 witnessed deaths, 55% (n = 28) of victims died slowly, the majority of whom (n = 26) were pinned or trapped (p building type is inappropriate for areas of seismic risk. The vulnerability of MUMBs appears due to a lack of lateral force resistance as a result of the use of glass store front windows and the absence of shear walls. The prevalence of this building type in earthquake-prone regions needs to be investigated further. A large portion of victims dying in an earthquake die slowly at the scene of injury. Prior public first-aid and rescue training

  20. Cytotoxic Activity of Pyrovalerone Derivatives, an Emerging Group of Psychostimulant Designer Cathinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszak, Jakub; Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Woldan-Tambor, Agata; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2016-08-01

    The growing popularity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) has aroused the concerns of public health specialists. The pyrovalerone derivatives are a branch of synthetic cathinones, a very popular group of psychostimulant NPS. Despite numerous case reports of fatal intoxications, little is known about the cytotoxicity of these substances. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the toxic properties of pyrovalerone, its highly prevalent derivative 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (3,4-MDPV) with its two major metabolites (catechol-MDPV and methylcatechol-MDPV) and the structural isomer 2,3-MDPV, together with newer members of the group, i.e., α-pyrrolidinovalerothiophenone (α-PVT) and α-pyrrolidinooctanophenone (PV9), using model human cell lines for neurons (SH-SY5Y), hepatocytes (Hep G2), and upper airway epithelium (RPMI 2650). We found that the first generation pyrovalerones (pyrovalerone, 3,4-MDPV, and 2,3-MDPV) produced a modest decrease of mitochondrial activity in the three examined cell lines, but were active in lower concentrations than methamphetamine used as a reference psychostimulant compound. Since catechol-MDPV displayed greater toxic potential than the parent compound, we suggest that the toxicity of 3,4-MDPV could be attributed to activity of this metabolite. Strikingly, the two new generation pyrovalerones, α-PVT and PV9, seem to be the most potent cytotoxic compounds: both induced highly pronounced mitochondrial dysfunction; the latter also demonstrated significant damage to cell membranes. The reported in vitro toxic activity of pyrovalerone cathinones against different cell types reinforces existing concerns regarding the health risks associated with the intake of these drugs.

  1. Behavioural activation for depression; an update of meta-analysis of effectiveness and sub group analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ekers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. METHOD: Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. RESULTS: Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD -0.74 CI -0.91 to -0.56, k = 25, N = 1088 and medication (SMD -0.42 CI -0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283. Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base.

  2. Indoor air particles and bioaerosols before and after renovation of moisture-damaged buildings: the effect on biological activity and microbial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Kati; Rintala, Helena; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Hyvärinen, Anne; Meklin, Teija; Toivola, Mika; Nevalainen, Aino

    2008-07-01

    Many building-related health problems coincide with moisture damage and mold growth within a building. Their elimination is assumed to improve indoor air quality. The aim of this study was to follow the success of remediation in two individual buildings by analyzing the microbial flora and immunotoxicological activity of filter samples. We compare results from samples collected from indoor air in the moisture-damaged buildings before and after renovation and results from matched reference buildings and outdoor air. The microbial characteristics of the samples were studied by analyzing ergosterol content and determining the composition of fungal flora with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). In addition, the concentrations of particles were monitored with optical particle counter (OPC). The immunotoxicological activity of collected particle samples was tested by exposing mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) for 24 h to particle suspension extracted from the filters, and measuring the viability of the exposed cells (MTT-test) and production of inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide, IL-6 and TNF*) in cell culture medium by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). The results show that for Location 1 the renovation decreased the immunotoxicological activity of the particles collected from damaged building, whereas no difference was detected in the corresponding samples collected from the reference building. Interestingly, only slight differences were seen in the concentration of fungi. In the Location 2, a decrease was seen in the concentration of fungi after the renovation, whereas no effect on the immunotoxicological responses was detected. In this case, the immunotoxicological responses to the indoor air samples were almost identical to those caused by the samples from outdoor air. This indicates that the effects of remediation on the indoor air quality may not necessarily be readily measurable either with microbial or toxicological parameters. This may be associated

  3. Active games in physical education students of special medical group with limited capacity of cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva M.V.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is considered the directions of the development an effective methods of usage moving elements of sports and games in exercises. The experiment involved students of special medical groups that have various abnormalities of the cardiovascular system. The study was conducted in four stages: a search, the first experimental, the second experimental, final. We used questioning and education registry books of academic work. Found that the use of sports and outdoor games is students' interest, and increasing motivation for physical activity. Justified by the possibility of using games and exercises performed their adaptation by changing the pulse value. The resulting modification of gaming exercises are divided into three groups: the game in the area of heart rate to 110, 110-130 and 130-150 beats per minute. The first version of the experimental procedure at a heart rate of 110 and 110-130 beats per minute was ineffective for the emergence of significant positive changes in the functional state of the cardiovascular system students. Recommended experimental procedure based on the alternation and equivalence ratio of mobile elements and sports games and increases the heart rate to 130-150 beats per minute. Application of the method increases the overall level of physical health, improves the functional state of the cardiovascular system, health, activity and mood of the students.

  4. Nonplanar tertiary amides in rigid chiral tricyclic dilactams. Peptide group distortions and vibrational optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, Václav; Hodačová, Jana; Sebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, Tomáš; Novotná, Pavlína; Urbanová, Marie; Safařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, Vladimír; Maloň, Petr

    2013-08-22

    We investigate amide nonplanarity in vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra of tricyclic spirodilactams 5,8-diazatricyclo[6,3,0,0(1,5)]undecan-4,9-dione (I) and its 6,6',7,7'-tetradeuterio derivative (II). These rigid molecules constrain amide groups to nonplanar geometries with twisted pyramidal arrangements of bonds to amide nitrogen atoms. We have collected a full range vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra including signals of C-H and C-D stretching vibrations. We report normal-mode analysis and a comparison of calculated to experimental VCD and ROA. The data provide band-to-band assignment and offer a possibility to evaluate roles of constrained nonplanar tertiary amide groups and rigid chiral skeletons. Nonplanarity shows as single-signed VCD and ROA amide I signals, prevailing the couplets expected to arise from the amide-amide interaction. Amide-amide coupling dominates amide II (mainly C'-N stretching, modified in tertiary amides by the absence of a N-H bond) transitions (strong couplet in VCD, no significant ROA) probably due to the close proximity of amide nitrogen atoms. At lower wavenumbers, ROA spectra exhibit another likely manifestation of amide nonplanarity, showing signals of amide V (δ(oop)(N-C) at ~570 cm(-1)) and amide VI (δ(oop)(C'═O) at ~700 cm(-1) and ~650 cm(-1)) vibrations.

  5. 5-HT7 receptor modulators: Amino groups attached to biphenyl scaffold determine functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjae; Park, Hyeri; Lee, Jeongeun; Tae, Jinsung; Kim, Hak Joong; Min, Sun-Joon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Hyunah

    2016-11-10

    5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) agonists and antagonists have been reported to be used for treatment of neuropathic pain and depression, respectively. In this study, as a novel scaffold for 5-HT7R modulators, we designed and prepared a series of biphenyl-3-yl-methanamine derivatives with various amino groups. Evaluation of functional activities as well as binding affinities of the title compounds identified partial agonists (EC50 = 0.55-3.2 μM) and full antagonists (IC50 = 5.57-23.1 μM) depending on the amino substituents. Molecular docking study suggested that the ligand-based switch in functional activity from agonist to antagonist results from the size of the amino groups and thereby different binding modes to 5-HT7R. In particular, interaction of the ligand with Arg367 of 5-HT7R is shown to differentiate agonists and antagonists. In the pharmacophore model study, two distinct pharmacophore models can tell whether a ligand is an agonist or an antagonist. Taken together, this study provides valuable information for designing novel compounds with selective agonistic or antagonistic properties against 5-HT7R.

  6. Skin subspace color modeling for daytime and nighttime group activity recognition in confined operational spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Poshtyar, Azin; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-05-01

    In many military and homeland security persistent surveillance applications, accurate detection of different skin colors in varying observability and illumination conditions is a valuable capability for video analytics. One of those applications is In-Vehicle Group Activity (IVGA) recognition, in which significant changes in observability and illumination may occur during the course of a specific human group activity of interest. Most of the existing skin color detection algorithms, however, are unable to perform satisfactorily in confined operational spaces with partial observability and occultation, as well as under diverse and changing levels of illumination intensity, reflection, and diffraction. In this paper, we investigate the salient features of ten popular color spaces for skin subspace color modeling. More specifically, we examine the advantages and disadvantages of each of these color spaces, as well as the stability and suitability of their features in differentiating skin colors under various illumination conditions. The salient features of different color subspaces are methodically discussed and graphically presented. Furthermore, we present robust and adaptive algorithms for skin color detection based on this analysis. Through examples, we demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of these new color skin detection algorithms and discuss their applicability for skin detection in IVGA recognition applications.

  7. Active load management in an intelligent building using model predictive control strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yi; Kullmann, Daniel; Thavlov, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces PowerFlexHouse, a research facility for exploring the technical potential of active load management in a distributed power system (SYSLAB) with a high penetration of renewable energy and presents in detail on how to implement a thermal model predictive controller for load...... shifting in PowerFlexHouse heaters' power consumption scheme. With this demand side control study, it is expected that this method of demand response can dramatically raise energy efficiencies and improve grid reliability, when there is a high penetration of intermittent energy resources in the power...

  8. A New Calibrated Sunspot Group Series Since 1749: Statistics of Active Day Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Usoskin, I G; Lockwood, M; Mursula, K; Owens, M; Solanki, S K

    2015-01-01

    Although the sunspot-number series have existed since the mid-19th century, they are still the subject of intense debate, with the largest uncertainty being related to the "calibration" of the visual acuity of individual observers in the past. Daisy-chain regression methods are applied to inter-calibrate the observers which may lead to significant bias and error accumulation. Here we present a novel method to calibrate the visual acuity of the key observers to the reference data set of Royal Greenwich Observatory sunspot groups for the period 1900-1976, using the statistics of the active-day fraction. For each observer we independently evaluate their observational thresholds [S_S] defined such that the observer is assumed to miss all of the groups with an area smaller than S_S and report all the groups larger than S_S. Next, using a Monte-Carlo method we construct, from the reference data set, a correction matrix for each observer. The correction matrices are significantly non-linear and cannot be approximate...

  9. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  10. Research Report on Feasibility Study of Building a QT Gui Testing Tool, AX Program Code Group Computer Science R&D Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, B T

    2003-05-05

    The main goal of this project was to determine if a tool could be built to test Qt. In determining the feasibility of building a tool the following requirements needed to be researched: (1) Determine if the underlying Qt signal/slot architecture could be leveraged. (2) Research how much impact implementing such a tool would have on existing code, i.e. how much extra code would need to be inserted to use the tool. (3) Determine with the above information if a tool could be built. With the above steps completed, the information needed to make a decision on building a tool could be made. Armed with this information I felt I could make a more educated decision on the possibility of building a tool. This project was divided into two main steps. The first step was to understand the underlying Qt source code much better. The second step was to build a small prototype that I could use to test ideas. The first step was actually much shorter than I had originally anticipated. Understanding the underlying architecture of Qt only took about two weeks. After studying the architecture of qt and working with the support people at Trolltech, the company that develops Qt, I found a way to test Qt. This project was very successful. I accomplished everything I intended to do. I learned and understood the inner workings of the Qt library enough that I could build a simple tool that could leverage some of the information in Qt to test the GUI. I was also able to find a tool that was commercially available to test Qt GUI's. These two things were the main goals of this project. Therefore I consider it a success. In fact I was able to progress farther with my prototype testing then I had originally planned.

  11. Building blocks of the apoptotic pore: how Bax and Bak are activated and oligomerize during apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, D; Kluck, R M; Dewson, G

    2014-01-01

    The central role of the Bcl-2 family in regulating apoptotic cell death was first identified in the 1980s. Since then, significant in-roads have been made in identifying the multiple members of this family, characterizing their form and function and understanding how their interactions determine whether a cell lives or dies. In this review we focus on the recent progress made in characterizing the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, Bax and Bak. This progress has resolved longstanding controversies, but has also challenged established theories in the apoptosis field. We will discuss different models of how these two proteins become activated and different ‘modes' by which they are inhibited by other Bcl-2 family members. We will also discuss novel conformation changes leading to Bak and Bax oligomerization and speculate how these oligomers might permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:24162660

  12. Enaminones as Building Blocks for the Synthesis of Substituted Pyrazoles with Antitumor and Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Riyadh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel N-arylpyrazole-containing enaminones 2a,b were synthesized as key intermediates. Reactions of 2a,b with active methylene compounds in acetic acid in the presence of ammonium acetate afforded substituted pyridine derivatives 5a-d. Enaminones 2a,b also reacted with aliphatic amines such as hydrazine hydrate and hydroxylamine hydrochloride to give bipyrazoles 8a,b and pyrazolylisoxazoles 9a,b, respectively. On the other hand, treatment of 2a,b with a heterocyclic amine and its diazonium salt yielded the respective [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidines 12a,b and pyrazolylcarbonyl[1,2,4]triazolo-[3,4-c][1,2,4]triazines 14a,b. Moreover, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one (17 was prepared via reaction of enaminone 2a with aminothiouracil (15. Cyclocondensation of 17 with the appropriate hydrazonoyl chlorides 18a-c gave the corresponding pyrido[2,3-d][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidin-5-ones 21a-c. The cytotoxic effects of compounds 2b, 14a and 17 against human breast cell line (MCF-7 and liver carcinoma cell line (HEPG2 were screened and in both lines they showed inhibition effects comparable to those of 5-fluorouracil, used as a standard. The antimicrobial activity of some products chosen as representative examples was also evaluated.

  13. Activity budgets in a group of Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys in Shennongjia Nature Reserve, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiming LI

    2009-01-01

    We examined time allocation by Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys Rhinopithecus roxellana in the montane, temperate and highly seasonal forests of the Shennongjia Nature Reserve in China, in order to improve our understanding of the ecological and social influences on monkey behavior. We collected data on activity budgets in relation to food availability in a group of monkeys from July 2003 to September 2004 (except February 2004), using instantaneous scan samples. The monkeys spent 36.21% of daytime moving (n=21, 269 records), 24.39% foraging, 9.33% inactive, 11.7% performing social behaviors, and 18.38% performing other behaviors. There were seasonal and annual variations in the proportions of time devoted to some activities. These variations were largely attributed to seasonal or annual fluctuations in the distribution and quality of food resources. Adult males spent more time moving, searching, and displaying other behaviors, but less time feeding and performing social behaviors than adult females. Adults performed other behaviors more often and moving less often than juveniles. These differences in activity budgets may reflect fundamental differences in reproductive biology, parental investment, and development among the different age/sex classes.

  14. The Revealing Dust: Mid-Infrared Activity in Hickson Compact Group Galaxy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Hornschemeier, A E; Charlton, J C; Hibbard, J E

    2007-01-01

    We present a sample of 46 galaxy nuclei from 12 nearby (z<4500 km/s) Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with a complete suite of 1-24 micron 2MASS+Spitzer nuclear photometry. For all objects in the sample, blue emission from stellar photospheres dominates in the near-IR through the 3.6 micron IRAC band. Twenty-five of 46 (54%) galaxy nuclei show red, mid-IR continua characteristic of hot dust powered by ongoing star formation and/or accretion onto a central black hole. We introduce alpha_{IRAC}, the spectral index of a power-law fit to the 4.5-8.0 micron IRAC data, and demonstrate that it cleanly separates the mid-IR active and non-active HCG nuclei. This parameter is more powerful for identifying low to moderate-luminosity mid-IR activity than other measures which include data at rest-frame lambda<3.6 micron that may be dominated by stellar photospheric emission. While the HCG galaxies clearly have a bimodal distribution in this parameter space, a comparison sample from the Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey (SIN...

  15. Transposon display supports transpositional activity of elements in species of the saltans group of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nathalia De Setta; Ana Paula Pimentel Costa; Fabrício Ramon Lopes; Marie-Anne Van Sluys; Cláudia Márcia Aparecida Carareto

    2007-01-01

    Mobilization of two element subfamilies (canonical and O-type) from Drosophila sturtevanti and D. saltans was evaluated for copy number and transposition activity using the transposon display (TD) technique. Pairwise distances between strains regarding the insertion polymorphism profile were estimated. Amplification of the element based on copy number estimates was highly variable among the strains (D. sturtevanti, canonical 20.11, O-type 9.00; D. saltans, canonical 16.4, O-type 12.60 insertions, on average). The larger values obtained by TD compared to our previous data by Southern blotting support the higher sensitivity of TD over Southern analysis for estimating transposable element copy numbers. The higher numbers of the canonical element and the greater divergence in its distribution within the genome of D. sturtevanti (24.8%) compared to the O-type (16.7%), as well as the greater divergence in the distribution of the canonical P element, between the D. sturtevanti (24.8%) and the D. saltans (18.3%) strains, suggest that the canonical element occupies more sites within the D. sturtevanti genome, most probably due to recent transposition activity. These data corroborate the hypothesis that the O-type is the oldest subfamily of elements in the saltans group and suggest that the canonical element is or has been transpositionally active until more recently in D. sturtevanti.

  16. Towards the Development of a Second-Order Approximation in Activity Coefficient Models Based on Group Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Constantinou, Leonidas; Gani, Rafiqul

    1996-01-01

    A simple modification of group contribution based models for estimation of liquid phase activity coefficients is proposed. The main feature of this modification is that contributions estimated from the present first-order groups in many instances are found insufficient since the first-order groups...

  17. Potential for innovative massive building envelope systems – Scenario development towards integrated active systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Knaack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate possible scenarios about future developments of massive constructions, this paper explains the developmental paths on the basis of individual materials of clay/brick as well as concrete/lightweight concrete/aerated concrete and sand-lime brick. These construction types are organised qua development level on a roadmap, structured by a timeline and the division in massive and skeleton construction. By this development, lines of constructions appear, structured by the order of additional functionalities integrated in each development step. Following this path, possible scenarios for future developments of integrated active systems are sketched, following the line of additional functionalities being integrated in the construction. Drawbacks such as the limitation of recycling of integrated constructions and the conflict of insulation versus load bearing capacities are named. As a result two strategies are expressed: the light massive envelope construction with integral layers and the massive oriented solution with possible exchangeable components are developed and illustrated by five general construction principles.

  18. Potential for innovative massive building envelope systems – Scenario development towards integrated active systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Knaack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate possible scenarios about future developments of massive constructions, this paper explains the developmental paths on the basis of individual materials of clay/brick as well as concrete/lightweight concrete/aerated concrete and sand-lime brick. These construction types are organised qua development level on a roadmap, structured by a timeline and the division in massive and skeleton construction. By this development, lines of constructions appear, structured by the order of additional functionalities integrated in each development step. Following this path, possible scenarios for future developments of integrated active systems are sketched, following the line of additional functionalities being integrated in the construction. Drawbacks such as the limitation of recycling of integrated constructions and the conflict of insulation versus load bearing capacities are named. As a result two strategies are expressed: the light massive envelope construction with integral layers and the massive oriented solution with possible exchangeable components are developed and illustrated by five general construction principles.  

  19. Function Activation on Intelligent Buildings Using Mobile Devices through Voice Commands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumtadi Fatima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of information and communication technologies has allowed the incorporation into different areas of human activity of apps that control electrical and electronic devices through voice commands. With these apps, in telemedicine people affected by some temporary decrease in their physical capacities have improved their level of autonomy; utilities have been added to educational environments to facilitate the use of IT applications to users with physical disability; finally, home automated solutions have made possible to any person with permanent limited mobility to take control over home devices using voice commands. In this article a home automated solution, developed over a client-server principle is presented. As the client device a MIDP 2.0 cell phone with a Java MicroEdition application loaded was used; as server a web server PC was used serving also as gateway towards a Konnex network, added with a speech recognizer engine. Fully functional prototype developed allowed take control over 3 devices with 87% success of the speech recognizer reliability, this percentage improved after the use of a drop-down menu of commands displayed over the monitor.

  20. Reforming pathology teaching in medical college by peer-assisted learning and student-oriented interest building activities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sumit; Sood, Neena; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a teaching-learning method in which students act as peer teachers and help other students to learn while also themselves learning by teaching. PAL through modified interest building activities (MIBAs) is seldom tried in teaching pathology in medical colleges. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of peer teaching using MIBA, obtain feedback from students, and compare different activities with each other and with traditional teaching-learning methods. An interventional pilot study was conducted in 2 months on the 2nd MBBS undergraduates learning pathology at a medical college in North India. Students acted as peer teachers and performed different MIBAs including role plays, demonstration of pathogenesis through props, student-led seminars such as PowerPoint teaching, blackboard teaching, multiple choice question seminars, case-based learning (CBL) exercises, and quizzes before teaching sessions. Feedback was obtained through structured questionnaires on a 5-point Likert scale. Paired t-test was used to compare traditional teaching with MIBAs, and Friedman test was used to compare among different MIBAs. Students found ease of understanding and the interaction and involvement of students as the most important benefits of PAL. MIBAs increased voluntary participation, coordination, teamwork, shared responsibility, and group dynamics among students. Quiz sessions followed by PowerPoint seminars and prop demonstrations received highest mean scores from students on most of the parameters. Quizzes, blackboard teaching, prop activities, and CBL helped students understand topics better and generated interest. Learners advocated for making MIBAs and PAL compulsory for future students. PAL complemented by MIBAs may be adopted to make teaching-learning more interesting and effective through the active involvement and participation of students.

  1. An intervention to promote physical activity in Mexican elementary school students: building public policy to prevent noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo-Oteyza, Ernestina; Ancira-Moreno, Mónica; Rosel-Pech, Cecilia; Sánchez-Mendoza, María Teresa; Salinas-Martínez, Vicente; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is an important component of strategies for health promotion and prevention of noncommunicable diseases. It is also associated with decreased risk for cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese adults and children. This article addresses the initial description of a physical activity intervention for children attending public elementary schools in Mexico. The objective was to develop a replicable model based on a strategic public, private, academic, and social partnership that would have a short-term impact on the metabolic health of children and be useful for building effective public policy. Forty-nine schools (20 000 students) participated, and 5 schools were selected for evaluation. The intervention included a 30-minute supervised middle-effort interchangeable routine, 5 days a week for a complete school year, adapted for different school conditions and students of different ages. Evaluation included anthropometric measurements and biochemical markers. Actual prevalence of combined overweight and obesity in these children was 31.9%. The intervention was successfully implemented in all schools. No change in body mass index, waist circumference, or other anthropometric indicators was found. However, changes in biochemical markers showed a significant decrease in blood glucose, total cholesterol, and cholesterol-low-density lipoproteins, reflecting a positive effect on cardiovascular health indicators.

  2. covR Mediated Antibiofilm Activity of 3-Furancarboxaldehyde Increases the Virulence of Group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Ashwinkumar Subramenium

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes, a multi-virulent, exclusive human pathogen responsible for various invasive and non-invasive diseases possesses biofilm forming phenomenon as one of its pathogenic armaments. Recently, antibiofilm agents have gained prime importance, since inhibiting the biofilm formation is expected to reduce development of antibiotic resistance and increase their susceptibility to the host immune cells.The current study demonstrates the antibiofilm activity of 3Furancarboxaldehyde (3FCA, a floral honey derived compound, against GAS biofilm, which was divulged using crystal violet assay, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The report is extended to study its effect on various aspects of GAS (morphology, virulence, aggregation at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (132μg/ml. 3FCA was found to alter the growth pattern of GAS in solid and liquid medium and increased the rate of auto-aggregation. Electron microscopy unveiled the increase in extra polymeric substances around cell. Gene expression studies showed down-regulation of covR gene, which is speculated to be the prime target for the antibiofilm activity. Increased hyaluronic acid production and down regulation of srtB gene is attributed to the enhanced rate of auto-aggregation. The virulence genes (srv, mga, luxS and hasA were also found to be over expressed, which was manifested with the increased susceptibility of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to 3FCA treated GAS. The toxicity of 3FCA was ruled out with no adverse effect on C. elegans.Though 3FCA possess antibiofilm activity against GAS, it was also found to increase the virulence of GAS. This study demonstrates that, covR mediated antibiofilm activity may increase the virulence of GAS. This also emphasizes the importance to analyse the acclimatization response and virulence of the pathogen in the presence of antibiofilm compounds prior to their clinical trials.

  3. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  4. Local community intervention through depression screening and group activity for elderly suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Ono, Yutaka; Watanabe, Naoki; Tanaka, Eriko; Kudoh, Seijiro; Sakashita, Tomoe; Sakamoto, Shinji; Neichi, Keiko; Satoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Kimio

    2006-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among the elderly (>or=65 years old) using a quasi-experimental design with two neighboring references. During 1999-2004, the program including depression screening and group activity was conducted by the public health nurses in the Minami district (population 1685) of Nagawa town, rural Japan. Pre-post changes in the risk of completing suicide were estimated by the incidence rate ratios (IRR). The risk for Minami's elderly females was reduced by 74% (age-adjusted IRR, 0.26; 90% CI, 0.07-0.98) more than the historical trend, while there was no change in the risk of Minami's males and nor in the male or female references. The local intervention using public health nursing would be effective against suicide for elderly females without diffusing to the surroundings.

  5. Continuous-Flow Monolithic Silica Microreactors with Arenesulphonic Acid Groups: Structure–Catalytic Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Ciemięga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of monolithic silica microreactors activated with sulphonic acid groups and a packed bed reactor with Amberlyst 15 resin were compared in the esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol. The monolithic microreactors were made of single silica rods with complex pore architecture, differing in the size of mesopores, and in particular, flow-through macropores which significantly affected the flow characteristic of the continuous system. The highest ester productivity of 105.2 mol·molH+−1·h−1 was achieved in microreactor M1 with the largest porosity, characterized by a total pore volume of 4 cm3·g−1, mesopores with 20 nm diameter, and large flow-through macropores 30–50 μm in size. The strong impact of the permeability of the monoliths on a reaction kinetics was shown.

  6. Trithorax and Polycomb group-dependent regulation: a tale of opposing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Sarah J; Paro, Renato

    2015-09-01

    Intricate layers of regulation determine the unique gene expression profiles of a given cell and, therefore, underlie the immense phenotypic diversity observed among cell types. Understanding the mechanisms that govern which genes are expressed and which genes are silenced is a fundamental focus in biology. The Polycomb and Trithorax group chromatin proteins play important roles promoting the stable and heritable repression and activation of gene expression, respectively. These proteins, which are conserved across metazoans, modulate post-translational modifications on histone tails and regulate nucleosomal structures. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the mechanisms by which these two classes of proteins act to maintain epigenetic memory and allow dynamic switches in gene expression during development.

  7. PHOTOINDUCED ALIGNMENT OF OPTICALLY ACTIVE POLYMER CONTAINING A TEMPO RADICAL END GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Chen Dong; Yong Zhang; Ze-da Xu; Xing-he Fan; Xiao-fang Chen; Xin-hua Wan; Qi-feng Zhou

    2003-01-01

    A new azobenzene side-chain polymer (TEMPO-PAZ) containing TEMPO (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy) radical end group was synthesized by free radical copolymerization. Photoinduced alignment was studied on the polymer films at room temperature with linearly polarized light of 514.5 nm. The experimental results showed that the magnetic response intensity of the TEMPO-PAZ could be easily controlled by choosing the appropriate polarized light irradiating times, presumably due to the nitroxide radical in the TEMPO-PAZ molecular structure. For the polymer investigated here, the photoinduced alignment technique was introduced to increase the magnetic response intensity of polymer under irradiation, aiming originally at searching for a new photo-active organic magnetic multifunctionai materials.On the other hand, experimental results also showed that the TEMPO-PAZ can be used as a material for optical image storage.

  8. Area and Flux Distributions of Active Regions, Sunspot Groups, and Sunspots: A Multi-Database Study

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Windmueller, John C; Amouzou, Ernest C; Longcope, Dana W; Tlatov, Andrey G; Nagovitsyn, Yury A; Pevtsov, Alexei A; Chapman, Gary A; Cookson, Angela M; Yeates, Anthony R; Watson, Fraser T; Balmaceda, Laura A; DeLuca, Edward E; Martens, Petrus C H

    2014-01-01

    In this work we take advantage of eleven different sunspot group, sunspot, and active region databases to characterize the area and flux distributions of photospheric magnetic structures. We find that, when taken separately, different databases are better fitted by different distributions (as has been reported previously in the literature). However, we find that all our databases can be reconciled by the simple application of a proportionality constant, and that, in reality, different databases are sampling different parts of a composite distribution. This composite distribution is made up by linear combination of Weibull and log-normal distributions -- where a pure Weibull (log-normal) characterizes the distribution of structures with fluxes below (above) $10^{21}$Mx ($10^{22}$Mx). Additionally, we demonstrate that the Weibull distribution shows the expected linear behaviour of a power-law distribution (when extended into smaller fluxes), making our results compatible with the results of Parnell et al.\\ (200...

  9. Finding of No Significant Impact: Repair and Renovate Airborne Warning and Control System Maintenance Group Complex, Building 230 Tinker Air Force Base Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    automatic fire protection sprinkler systems installed, as required by NFPA 13 1-6.1. • The sprinkler alarm valve...replaced with an automatic wet-pipe fire sprinkler system capable of suppressing potential fire spread throughout the building; the new fire suppression... fire suppression system does not meet code. • The wet-pipe fire suppression sprinkler heads installed in the 1950s also no longer meet

  10. Characterization of bacterial functional groups and microbial activity in microcosms with glyphosate application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Sofia; Bonetto, Mariana; Baigorria, Tomas; Pegoraro, Vanesa; Ortiz, Jimena; Faggioli, Valeria; Conde, Belen; Cazorla, Cristian; Boccolini, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is a worldwide used herbicide as c. 90% of transgenic crops are tolerant to it. Microbial degradation of glyphosate molecule in soil is considered the most important process that determines its persistence in the environment. However, the impact of this herbicide on target groups of soil biota remains poorly understood. Our objective was to characterize the abundance of bacterial groups and global microbial activity, under controlled conditions with application of increasing doses of glyphosate. A bioassay was carried out in microcosms using an agricultural soil (Typic Argiudoll) with registered history of glyphosate application from National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA, EEA Marcos Juarez, Argentina). Glyphosate of commercial formulation (74.7%) was used and the following treatments were evaluated: Soil without glyphosate (control), and Soil with doses equivalent to 1.12 and 11.2 kg ai ha-1. Microbiological parameters were estimated at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after herbicide application by counting heterotrophic, cellulolytic, nitrogen fixing (N), and nitrifying bacteria; and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA), microbial respiration (MR) and microbial biomass (C-BM). The N cycle related bacteria showed greater sensitivity to glyphosate with significant increases in abundance. On the other hand the C cycle parameters were strongly conditioned by the time elapsed since the application of the herbicide, as did the MR. The FDA declined with the highest dose, while the C-BM was not affected. Therefore, we conclude that in the studied experimental conditions glyphosate stimulated bacterial growth (i.e. target abundances) representing a source of N, C and nutrients. On the other hand, enzymatic activity (FDA) decreased when glyphosate was applied in the highest dose, whereas, it had no effect on the MR nor C-BM, which could be attributable to the organic matter content of the soil. However, future research in field conditions is necessary, for

  11. Using Small Group Debates to Actively Engage Students in an Introductory Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce A. Shaw

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Debates stimulate critical thinking and can be a highly effective way to actively engage students in the classroom. This paper describes a small group debate format in which groups of four to six students debated preassigned topics in microbiology in front of the rest of the class. Rapid advancements in science, especially in microbiology, provide the scaffolding for students to locate and share evidence-based information from a plethora of complex and often conflicting sources. Student-generated debate presentations can be a welcome respite from the lecture format. Debates were scheduled throughout the course to coincide with topics being covered. Questionnaires distributed immediately after each debate revealed that the debates were well received by students and were effective in changing student attitudes and misconceptions. Debate preparation provided students the opportunity to gain proficiency in accessing information from electronic databases, to use resources from professional organizations, and to synthesize and analyze information. In addition, the debate process gave students experience in developing oral communication skills.

  12. Using small group debates to actively engage students in an introductory microbiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joyce A

    2012-01-01

    Debates stimulate critical thinking and can be a highly effective way to actively engage students in the classroom. This paper describes a small group debate format in which groups of four to six students debated preassigned topics in microbiology in front of the rest of the class. Rapid advancements in science, especially in microbiology, provide the scaffolding for students to locate and share evidence-based information from a plethora of complex and often conflicting sources. Student-generated debate presentations can be a welcome respite from the lecture format. Debates were scheduled throughout the course to coincide with topics being covered. Questionnaires distributed immediately after each debate revealed that the debates were well received by students and were effective in changing student attitudes and misconceptions. Debate preparation provided students the opportunity to gain proficiency in accessing information from electronic databases, to use resources from professional organizations, and to synthesize and analyze information. In addition, the debate process gave students experience in developing oral communication skills.

  13. Unique lead adsorption behavior of activated hydroxyl group in two-dimensional titanium carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiuming; Guo, Jianxin; Zhang, Qingrui; Xiang, Jianyong; Liu, Baozhong; Zhou, Aiguo; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-03-19

    The functional groups and site interactions on the surfaces of two-dimensional (2D) layered titanium carbide can be tailored to attain some extraordinary physical properties. Herein a 2D alk-MXene (Ti3C2(OH/ONa)(x)F(2-x)) material, prepared by chemical exfoliation followed by alkalization intercalation, exhibits preferential Pb(II) sorption behavior when competing cations (Ca(II)/Mg(II)) coexisted at high levels. Kinetic tests show that the sorption equilibrium is achieved in as short a time as 120 s. Attractively, the alk-MXene presents efficient Pb(II) uptake performance with the applied sorption capacities of 4500 kg water per alk-MXene, and the effluent Pb(II) contents are below the drinking water standard recommended by the World Health Organization (10 μg/L). Experimental and computational studies suggest that the sorption behavior is related to the hydroxyl groups in activated Ti sites, where Pb(II) ion exchange is facilitated by the formation of a hexagonal potential trap.

  14. Building the capacity for evidence-based clinical nursing leadership: the role of executive co-coaching and group clinical supervision for quality patient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Jo; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2007-03-01

    The general aims of this article were to facilitate primary care nurses (District Nurse Team Leaders) to link management and leadership theories with clinical practice and to improve the quality of the service provided to their patients. The specific aim was to identify, create and evaluate effective processes for collaborative working so that the nurses' capacity for clinical decision-making could be improved. This article, part of a doctoral study on Clinical Leadership in Nursing, has wider application in the workplace of the future where professional standards based on collaboration will be more critical in a world of work that will be increasingly complex and uncertain. This article heralds the type of research and development activities that the nursing and midwifery professions should give premier attention to, particularly given the recent developments within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. The implications of: Agenda for Change, the Knowledge and Skills Framework, 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say' and the recent proposals from the article 'Modernising Nursing Career', to name but a few, are the key influences impacting on and demanding new ways of clinical supervision for nurses and midwives to improve the quality of patient management and services. The overall approach was based on an action research using a collaborative enquiry within a case study. This was facilitated by a process of executive co-coaching for focused group clinical supervision sessions involving six district nurses as co-researchers and two professional doctoral candidates as the main researchers. The enquiry conducted over a period of two and a half years used evidence-based management and leadership interventions to assist the participants to develop 'actionable knowledge'. Group clinical supervision was not practised in this study as a form of 'therapy' but as a focus for the development of actionable knowledge, knowledge needed for effective clinical management and

  15. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzler, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-01

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW-1 in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  16. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzler, Brian P; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-06

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW(-1) in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  17. FACTORS IN STRENGHTNING OF TERRORIST ACTIVITY OF “ISLAMIC STATE” GROUPING ACROSS EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Aleksandrovich Lobanov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available XXI century was marked by the strengthening of globalization and integration processes in whole world. This led to the fact that the international community, especially European countries, faced the number of new threats to the spread of Islamic terrorism, the most urgent of which is the activity of “Islamic State” grouping. In this context it’s important to determine the reasons of intense activity growth of IS and its influence in Europe. The article analyzes the factors, contributing to the spread of terrorism. Also it gives some recommendations, implementation of which, according to the author, could decrease the level of terrorist threat. The purpose of the research is to determine factors of growing influence of “Islamic State” and increasing number of terrorist attacks in European countries. The author concludes that IS problem is a comprehensive threat, to prevent which a number of efforts – both within the European continent and in Middle East – is required. It also requires a systematic approach and a high level of consolidation and coordination within the international community.

  18. Epigenome changes in active and inactive Polycomb-group-controlled regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiling, Achim; O'Neill, Laura P; D'Eliseo, Donatella; Turner, Bryan M; Orlando, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins conveys epigenetic inheritance of repressed transcriptional states. In Drosophila, the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) maintains the silent state by inhibiting the transcription machinery and chromatin remodelling at core promoters. Using immunoprecipitation of in vivo formaldehyde-fixed chromatin in phenotypically diverse cultured cell lines, we have mapped PRC1 components, the histone methyl transferase (HMT) Enhancer of zeste (E(z)) and histone H3 modifications in active and inactive PcG-controlled regions. We show that PRC1 components are present in both cases, but at different levels. In particular, active target promoters are nearly devoid of E(z) and Polycomb. Moreover, repressed regions are trimethylated at lysines 9 and 27, suggesting that these histone modifications represent a mark for inactive PcG-controlled regions. These PcG-specific repressive marks are maintained by the action of the E(z) HMT, an enzyme that has an important role not only in establishing but also in maintaining PcG repression. PMID:15448640

  19. BUILDING "BRIDGES" WITH QUALITY ASSURANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The papr describes how, rather than building "bridges" across centuries, quality assurance (QA) personnel have the opportunity to build bridges across technical disciplines, between public and private organizations, and between different QA groups. As reviewers and auditors of a...

  20. Building blocks for actively-aligned micro-optical systems in rapid prototyping and small series production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Queisser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been considerable progress in utilizing fully automated machines for the assembly of microoptical systems. Such systems integrate laser sources, optical elements and detectors into tight packages, and efficiently couple light to free space beams, waveguides in optical backplanes, or optical fibers for longer reach transmission. The required electrical-optical and optical components are placed and aligned actively in more than one respect. For one, all active components are actually operated in the alignment process, and, more importantly, the placing of all components is controlled actively by camera systems and power detectors with live feedback for an optimal coupling efficiency. The total number of optical components typically is in the range of 5 to 50, whereas the number of actors with gripping tools for the actual handling and aligning is limited, with little flexibility in the gripping width. The assembly process therefore is strictly sequential and, given that an automated tool changing has not been established in this class of machines yet, there are either limitations in the geometries of components that may be used, or time-consuming interaction by human operators is needed. As a solution we propose and present lasered glass building blocks with standardized gripping geometries that enclose optical elements of various shapes and functionalities. These are cut as free form geometries with green short pulse and CO2 lasers. What seems to add cost at first rather increases freedom of design and adds an economical flexibility to create very hybrid assemblies of various micro-optical assemblies also in small numbers.

  1. Evaluation of Hylife-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566- group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D; Latkowski, J; Sanz, J

    1999-06-18

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and SOMBRERO inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared to each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross section library.

  2. Evaluation of HYLIFE-II and Sombrero using 175- and 566-group neutron transport and activation cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent modifications to the TART Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code allow enable calculation of 566-group neutron spectra. This expanded group structure represents a significant improvement over the 50- and 175-group structures that have been previously available. To support use of this new capability, neutron activation cross-section libraries have been created in the 175- and 566-group structures starting from the FENDL/A-2.0 pointwise data. Neutron spectra have been calculated for the first walls of the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero inertial fusion energy power plant designs and have been used in subsequent neutron activation calculations. The results obtained using the two different group structures are compared with each other as well as to those obtained using a 175-group version of the EAF3.1 activation cross-section library.

  3. Effects of biological oxidants on the catalytic activity and structure of group VIA phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haowei; Bao, Shunzhong; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Turk, John

    2006-05-23

    Group VIA phospholipase A(2) (iPLA(2)beta) is expressed in phagocytes, vascular cells, pancreatic islet beta-cells, neurons, and other cells and plays roles in transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, secretion, and other events. A bromoenol lactone (BEL) suicide substrate used to study iPLA(2)beta functions inactivates iPLA(2)beta by alkylating Cys thiols. Because thiol redox reactions are important in signaling and some cells that express iPLA(2)beta produce biological oxidants, iPLA(2)beta might be subject to redox regulation. We report that biological concentrations of H(2)O(2), NO, and HOCl inactivate iPLA(2)beta, and this can be partially reversed by dithiothreitol (DTT). Oxidant-treated iPLA(2)beta modifications were studied by LC-MS/MS analyses of tryptic digests and included DTT-reversible events, e.g., formation of disulfide bonds and sulfenic acids, and others not so reversed, e.g., formation of sulfonic acids, Trp oxides, and Met sulfoxides. W(460) oxidation could cause irreversible inactivation because it is near the lipase consensus sequence ((463)GTSTG(467)), and site-directed mutagenesis of W(460) yields active mutant enzymes that exhibit no DTT-irreversible oxidative inactivation. Cys651-sulfenic acid formation could be one DTT-reversible inactivation event because Cys651 modification correlates closely with activity loss and its mutagenesis reduces sensitivity to inhibition. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation might also cause reversible inactivation because oxidant-treated iPLA(2)beta contains DTT-reducible oligomers, and oligomerization occurs with time- and temperature-dependent iPLA(2)beta inactivation that is attenuated by DTT or ATP. Subjecting insulinoma cells to oxidative stress induces iPLA(2)beta oligomerization, loss of activity, and subcellular redistribution and reduces the rate of release of arachidonate from phospholipids. These findings raise the possibility that redox reactions affect iPLA(2)beta functions.

  4. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...... project for calculations in the SESAM model....

  5. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...

  6. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Steadman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a debilitating disease and there is little research on support networks for people with MS (PwMS. More specifically, most studies on online support groups focus on those who actively participate in the group, whereas the majority of those who utilise online support groups do so in a passive way.Objectives: This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group.Method: An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted.Results: Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease,informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information and social companionship (place of belonging. Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease, informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group and social companionship (non-active status.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important,the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  7. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Jacqui; Pretorius, Chrisma

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease and there is little research on support networks for people with MS (PwMS). More specifically, most studies on online support groups focus on those who actively participate in the group, whereas the majority of those who utilise online support groups do so in a passive way. This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group. An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted. Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information) and social companionship (place of belonging). Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group) and social companionship (non-active status). These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important, the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  8. Participation of Empresarios Agrupados in engineering of the Tokamak systems and auxiliary buildings; Participacion de Empresarios Agrupados en la Ingenieria de los sistemas de tokamak y edificios auxiliares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez del Palacio, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Architect Engineering works comprise approximately the design of 32 buildings and structures, some of them very simple and others extremely complex. 32 buildings include nuclear buildings, as the Toyama, tritium, or the building of emergency diesel and buildings conventional and the building of the site services. Systems including those related to systems within a building they reach conventional, while interfaces with process systems are countless. Grouped entrepreneurs led the design of the mechanical (PBS65) systems and Electric (PBS43) actively participating in the design of systems of fire proofing of buildings and site. During the development of engineering accident of Fukushima works directly affect in the design of the systems.

  9. Does chess instruction improve mathematical problem-solving ability? Two experimental studies with an active control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Giovanni; Gobet, Fernand

    2017-06-23

    It has been proposed that playing chess enables children to improve their ability in mathematics. These claims have been recently evaluated in a meta-analysis (Sala & Gobet, 2016, Educational Research Review, 18, 46-57), which indicated a significant effect in favor of the groups playing chess. However, the meta-analysis also showed that most of the reviewed studies used a poor experimental design (in particular, they lacked an active control group). We ran two experiments that used a three-group design including both an active and a passive control group, with a focus on mathematical ability. In the first experiment (N = 233), a group of third and fourth graders was taught chess for 25 hours and tested on mathematical problem-solving tasks. Participants also filled in a questionnaire assessing their meta-cognitive ability for mathematics problems. The group playing chess was compared to an active control group (playing checkers) and a passive control group. The three groups showed no statistically significant difference in mathematical problem-solving or metacognitive abilities in the posttest. The second experiment (N = 52) broadly used the same design, but the Oriental game of Go replaced checkers in the active control group. While the chess-treated group and the passive control group slightly outperformed the active control group with mathematical problem solving, the differences were not statistically significant. No differences were found with respect to metacognitive ability. These results suggest that the effects (if any) of chess instruction, when rigorously tested, are modest and that such interventions should not replace the traditional curriculum in mathematics.

  10. Mentors' experiences of using the Active Mentoring model to support older adults with intellectual disability to participate in community groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Bigby, Christine; Stancliffe, Roger J; Balandin, Susan; Craig, Diane; Anderson, Kate

    2013-12-01

    Social inclusion is a widely acknowledged goal; who is best positioned to provide support and how support is delivered are key questions. Using Active Mentoring training, members of community groups mentored a person with intellectual disability and supported their inclusion in that group. Interviews with 14 mentors explored their experiences of supporting a previously unknown person with intellectual disability to participate in their community group. The core theme was No Different From Us. Mentors saw beyond the disability, they valued others, were community leaders, and had intrinsic qualities. With some basic orientation to the task, mentors were able to support the inclusion of their mentee in the group. Community members are willing to support people with intellectual disability to join their community groups. The Active Mentoring training is one way of harnessing the goodwill of community groups and their members to include people with intellectual disability to participate on an individual basis in community groups.

  11. Application of Team Building in QC Activity%团队建设在QC小组活动中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘文辉

    2013-01-01

      团队建设是企业人力资源管理的重要内容。而QC小组活动也在国内企业中成为普及性的活动,QC小组活动能创造出良好工作环境和经济效益。根据当前企业QC小组活动的特点和现状,可将团队建设与QC小组活动相结合,加强团队建设,培养团队精神,提升企业的核心竞争力。%Team building is an important part of the human resource management of corporation. The activities of Quality Control Circle are widespread at many corporations in China, which have created good work circumstances and economic benefits for the corporations. Based on the characteristic and actuality of QC activities in specific corporations, QC activity can be combined with team building. Team building will be strengthened with the QC activity. So team building application will develop strong team spirit and foster core competitiveness.

  12. A common building block for the syntheses of amorfrutin and cajaninstilbene acid libraries toward efficient binding with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidhen, Indrapal S; Mukkamala, Ramesh; Weidner, Christopher; Sauer, Sascha

    2015-01-16

    A common building block for the synthesis of amorfrutin and cajaninstilbene acid derivatives has been developed. The library of synthesized compounds has enabled identification of new nontoxic ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and potential inhibitors of the transcriptional corepressor protein NCoR. The biological data holds promise in identification of new potential leads for the antidiabetic drug discovery process.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of nonisomerizable derivatives of tamoxifen: importance of hydroxyl group and side chain positioning for biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C S; Parker, C J; McCague, R; Jordan, V C

    1991-03-01

    The antiestrogen tamoxifen [(Z)-1(p-beta-dimethylaminoethoxy-phenyl)-1,2-diphenylbut-1-ene] is an effective anticancer agent against estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. The alkylaminoethane side chain is essential for antiestrogenic activity, but the potency of the antiestrogen can be increased by para hydroxylation of the phenyl ring on carbon 1 of but-1-ene. This compound, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, is a metabolite of tamoxifen and has a very high binding affinity for ER [J. Endocrinol. 75:305-316 (1977)] because the hydroxyl is located in the equivalent position as the 3-phenolic hydroxyl of 17 beta-estradiol. In this study, we have examined the relationship between the relative positions of the hydroxyl and the alkyl-aminoethane side chain and the pharmacological activity of the ligand. A fixed seven-membered ring derivative of the triphenylethylene was used to prevent isomerization. All compounds were tested, with and without 17 beta-estradiol, for their effects on the growth of estrogen-responsive T47D and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth of MDA-MB-231 ER-negative breast cancer cells was not affected by any of the compounds tested, at a concentration (1 microM) that had a profound estrogenic or antiestrogenic action in ER-positive cell lines. The relative binding affinity of the compounds was determined using rat uterine ER and was found to be consistent with the observed potencies in vitro. The compounds found to be antiestrogens in vitro were antiestrogenic against estradiol (0.08 micrograms daily) in the 3-day immature rat uterine weight test. All compounds were partial agonists in vivo. In general, the estrogenic and antiestrogenic results obtained in vivo were consistent with the potency estimates obtained with the breast cancer cells in vitro. The results of this extensive structure-activity relationship study demonstrate that the substitution for 4-hydroxytamoxifen appears to be optimal to produce a potent antiestrogen; all

  14. Design and Analysis of Phase Change Material based thermal energy storage for active building cooling: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin .D. Patil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Materials (PCMs are "latent" thermal storage materials. They use chemical bonds to store and release heat. The thermal energy transfer occurs when a material changes from a solid to a liquid orfrom a liquid to a solid form. This is called a change in state or "phase." Initially, these solid-liquid PCMs perform like conventional storage materials; their temperature rises as they absorb solar heat. Unlike conventional heat storage materials, when PCMs reach the temperature at which they change phase (their melting point, they absorb large amounts of heat without getting hotter. When the ambient temperature in the space around the PCM material drops, the Phase Change Material solidifies, releasing its stored latent heat. PCMs absorb and emit heat while maintaining a nearly constant temperature. Within the human comfort and electronic-equipment tolerance range of 20°C to 35°C, latent thermal storage materials are very effective.They can be used for equalization of day & night temperature and for transport of refrigerated products. In the proposed project heat of fusion of Cacl2. 6H2o as PCM is used for cooling water during night and this cooled water is used as circulating medium trough fan coil unit, air trough FCU will get cooled by transferring heat to water and fresh & cool air will be thrown in a room. In the proposed project FREE COOLING & ACTIVE BUILDING COOLING concepts of Thermal Energy Storage are used in combine

  15. Examining the Impact of Novel Pre-activity Tasks on Macroskills: The Case of Group Discussion on Writing Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Khoshsima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main concern of most researchers in the field of second and foreign language teaching is lessening the problems and eliminating the hinders on the way of learning a language. Writing is considered as one of the most challenging and complicated tasks for learners to perform particularly when they have to write in a second or foreign language. Numerous studies were done on the importance of the pre-writing stage and activities which are directly and indirectly related to the theme of the writing. Accordingly, the main aim of this study was to examine the effects of group discussion as a pre- activity task on writing ability. To this aim, 27 Iranian EFL learners, who were at the same level –intermediate- studying at Shokuh and Safir Institutes, Birjand, Iran were chosen randomly. Two groups- one control and one experimental group- were studied. In control group the conventional method was used in teaching writing, while in experimental group, group discussion pre-activity task was administered. After 16 sessions, the obtained data of the pretests and posttests was analyzed by SPSS software. According to the results, researcher strongly concluded that group discussion has no significant effect on writing ability of Iranian intermediate learners. This study can help teachers and syllabus designers in choosing and applying an effective pre-activity task. Keywords: writing ability, pre-activity task, group discussion, EFL learners

  16. Apheresis activity in Spain: a survey of the Spanish Apheresis Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan; Areal, Carlos; Romon, Iñigo; Muncunill, Josep

    2013-12-01

    The Spanish Apheresis Group is a scientific association of physicians and nurses representing most of the medical centers in the country that are involved in apheresis. The group developed a survey in order to get information about the types and number of apheresis procedures performed in Spain. We received responses from 66 centers and we were able to collect data from at least one center of each autonomous region. There were 7 centers (11%) that did not perform any kind of apheresis procedures, 26 (39%) centers performed therapeutic apheresis procedures only, 18 (27%) centers performed apheresis donations only, and 15 (23%) centers performed both types of apheresis procedures. Regarding therapeutic apheresis in adult patients, plasma exchange (34%) and stem cell collections (30%) were the two therapeutic procedures most frequently reported, followed by erythrocytapheresis (13%) and extracorporeal photochemotherapy (11%). Regarding apheresis donation, our survey showed that the most frequent was multicomponent donation (45%) followed by plasmapheresis (28%) and single plateletapheresis (21%). When analyzing the current instrumentation for performing apheresis procedures, centers used the Spectra, Optia, and Trima devices (TerumoBCT) as the most frequent ones, followed by the MCS+(Haemonetics), Amicus (Fenwal), and Fresenius devices. In conclusion, we report here the first nationwide survey performed in Spain in order to get information about apheresis activities in our country. The survey is representative of Spain because we were able to collect data from at least one center from each of the different 17 autonomous regions, and we found a wide variety of therapeutic and donation procedures, as well as instrumentation used.

  17. Chronology of the 2007 eruption of Stromboli and the activity of the Scientific Synthesis Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi, Franco; Civetta, Lucia; Rosi, Mauro; Scandone, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    On 27 February 2007, at 12.49 GMT, a new eruption of Stromboli took place with the effusion of a lava flow from a fracture cutting the flank of the NE cone, which rapidly reached the sea. The eruption had been heralded by an increase in the amplitude of tremor and flank movement since at least the 14th of February. Short-term precursors were an increase in the rate of occurrence of small landslides within the "Sciara del Fuoco" scar on the North-western flank of the volcano. A new effusive vent opened at 18.30 GMT on the Sciara del Fuoco at an height of 400 m asl. The new lava emission caused the sudden termination of the summit flow and initiated a period of non-stationary lava outpouring which ended on 2 April, 2007. The eruption has been characterized by a rapid decrease in the eruption rate after the first days and subsequently by episodic pulse increases. On the 15th of March, the increase in lava outpouring, monitored by a thermal camera, heralded by 9 min the occurrence of a violent paroxysmal explosion with the formation of an impulsive eruption column and the emission of small pumices mingled with black scoriae. The pumice had a bulk composition similar to that of the lava and of the black scoriae, but with a distinct lower content of phenocrysts. A similar feature has been repeatedly observed during the major explosive paroxysms of Stromboli. Short term precursors of the paroxysm were recorded by strainmeter and tiltmeter stations. The volcano monitoring activity has been made by a joint team of researchers from the INGV sections of Catania, Napoli, Palermo and Rome, along with researchers from the Universities of Florence, Pisa, Roma Tre, and Palermo. The scientific activity was coordinated by a Synthesis Group made up by scientists responsible for the different monitoring techniques of INGV and Universities and by the volcanic experts of Commissione Nazionale Grandi Rischi of the Prime Minister Office (Civil Protection Department). The group made a

  18. Natural variation in 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in the urine of Finnish population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muikku, Maarit; Heikkinen, Tarja; Solatie, Dina; Vesterbacka, Pia

    2011-11-01

    A study to determine activity concentrations of (210)Pb and (210)Po in the urine of certain Finnish population groups was conducted, to investigate the variation in natural background level of urinary excretion. The study participants were divided into three groups mainly based on their diet. The first group comprised recreational fishermen and the second group represented people consuming more reindeer meat than an average Finn, while people using drinking water with very high activity concentrations of (210)Po were selected for the third group. The fourth group was a control group. The mean urinary excretion of (210)Po in groups 1 and 2 was 73 and 100 mBq d(-1), respectively. These values were higher than the value of the control group (20 mBq d(-1)) and the mean values reported in the literature. The mean daily urinary excretion of (210)Pb in groups 1 and 2, 70 and 52 mBq d(-1), was also slightly higher than that in the control group (32 mBq d(-1)). In contrast, the excretion rates of both (210)Po and (210)Pb for the members of group 3 were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported in the literature. This was clearly due to the elevated levels of natural radionuclides in their drinking water. The present study demonstrates the importance of possessing good knowledge of the background levels, in order to allow the determination of the additional exposure due, for example, to the malevolent use of radiation.

  19. Transdiagnostic group behavioral activation and exposure therapy for youth anxiety and depression: Initial randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian C; Crocco, Sofia T; Esseling, Petra; Areizaga, Margaret J; Lindner, Alison M; Skriner, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are debilitating and commonly co-occurring in young adolescents, yet few interventions are designed to treat both disorder classes together. Initial efficacy is presented of a school-based transdiagnostic group behavioral activation therapy (GBAT) that emphasizes anti-avoidance in vivo exposure. Youth (N = 35; ages 12-14; 50.9% male) were randomly assigned to either GBAT (n = 21) or WL (n = 14) after completing a double-gated screening process. Multi-reporter, multi-domain outcomes were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and four-month follow-up (FU). GBAT was associated with greater posttreatment remission rates than WL in principal diagnosis (57.1% vs. 28.6%; X1(2) = 2.76, p = .09) and secondary diagnosis (70.6% vs. 10%; X1(2) = 9.26, p = .003), and greater improvement in Clinical Global Impairment - Severity ratings, B = -1.10 (0.42), p = .01. Symptom outcomes were not significantly different at posttreatment. GBAT produced greater posttreatment behavioral activation (large effect size) and fewer negative thoughts (medium effect), two transdiagnostic processes, both at the trend level. Most outcomes showed linear improvement from pretreatment to FU that did not differ depending on initial condition assignment. Sample size was small, but GBAT is a promising transdiagnostic intervention for youth anxiety and unipolar mood disorders that can feasibly and acceptably be applied in school settings.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to participation in physical activity: The experiences of a group of South African adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchar, Lauren; Bantjes, Jason; Swartz, Leslie; Derman, Wayne

    2016-02-01

    Participation in regular physical activity promotes physical health and psychosocial well-being. Interventions are thus needed to promote physical activity, particularly among groups of individuals, such as persons with disability, who are marginalised from physical activity. This study explored the experiences of a group of South African adolescents with cerebral palsy. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 adolescents with cerebral palsy. The results provided insight into a range of factors that promote and hinder participation in physical activity among adolescents with cerebral palsy in resource-scarce environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Power, heat and cooling production for a group of buildings (CHCP); Integrerade loesningar foer produktion av kraft, vaerme och kyla (CHCP) i grupper av byggnader med el-, vaerme- och kylbehov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Corfitz [Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Bjurstroem, Henrik; Cronholm, Lars-Aake; Forsberg, Maya [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Small-scale production and distribution of power, heat and cooling (CHCP) for a group of buildings is described in this report on a general level. Possible system solutions are identified and a summary of the state-of-the-art is provided. Costs have been compared for different system solutions using a fictitious group of buildings in a case study. CHCP (Combined Heat, Cooling and Power) is an acronym used for a compact cogeneration unit (CHP) that also provides cooling, where cooling may be produced using an absorption cooling machine. The advantage of heat-driven cooling process combined with a cogeneration unit offers is an increase of the annual number of hours during which the cogeneration is operated. This should lead to an increased competitiveness for small-scale cogeneration also in Sweden, which should become even better if the price for electricity continues to increase. Systems with cogeneration and cooling are often associated with the concept of 'distributed generation' of electricity and with units in single buildings such as hotels, hospitals, offices, shopping centers etc. They could also be considered for groups of buildings connected to a small distribution network for district heating, and district cooling. Both steam and hot water are possible energy carriers. The focus of the study was small-scale cogeneration units in the range 0,1 to 2 MW{sub e} with natural gas as fuel. For the sake of the analysis of profitability and of investment, a fictitious area has been defined with four buildings: two hotels, an office and a shopping centre. The maximum total heat and cooling loads of this area are 8 MW heat and 3.5 MW cooling. The alternatives to heat-only boilers and electric chillers in each building studied were based on piping networks. The results from the calculations show that local production of electric power, heat and cooling is possible in buildings and areas with large energy consumption. With prices and assumptions as in the

  2. Dextromethorphan Efficiently Increases Bactericidal Activity, Attenuates Inflammatory Responses, and Prevents Group A Streptococcal Sepsis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Han; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Lu, Shiou-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2011-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from mild throat and skin infections to severe invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Dextromethorphan (DM), a dextrorotatory morphinan and a widely used antitussive drug, has recently been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effect of DM in GAS infection using an air pouch infection mouse model. Our results showed that DM treatment increased the survival rate of GAS-infected mice. Bacterial numbers in the air pouch were lower in mice treated with DM than in those infected with GAS alone. The bacterial elimination efficacy was associated with increased cell viability and bactericidal activity of air-pouch-infiltrating cells. Moreover, DM treatment prevented bacterial dissemination in the blood and reduced serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-1β and the chemokines monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), and RANTES. In addition, GAS-induced mouse liver injury was reduced by DM treatment. Taken together, DM can increase bacterial killing and reduce inflammatory responses to prevent sepsis in GAS infection. The consideration of DM as an adjunct treatment in combination with antibiotics against bacterial infection warrants further study. PMID:21199930

  3. Identification of an active ID-like group of SINEs in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, David H; Jamison, Nicole

    2007-09-01

    The mouse genome consists of five known families of SINEs: B1, B2, B4/RSINE, ID, and MIR. Using RT-PCR we identified a germ-line transcript that demonstrates 92.7% sequence identity to ID (excluding primer sequence), yet a BLAST search identified numerous matches of 100% sequence identity. We analyzed four of these elements for their presence in orthologous genes in strains and subspecies of Mus musculus as well as other species of Mus using a PCR-based assay. All four analyzed elements were identified either only in M. musculus or exclusively in both M. musculus and M. domesticus, indicative of recent integrations. In conjunction with the identification of transcripts, we present an active ID-like group of elements that is not derived from the proposed BC1 master gene of ID elements. A BLAST of the rat genome indicated that these elements were not in the rat. Therefore, this family of SINEs has recently evolved, and since it has thus far been observed mainly in M. musculus, we refer to this family as MMIDL.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, investigation of biological activity and theoretical studies of hydrazone compounds containing choloroacetyl group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukurovali, Alaaddin; Yilmaz, Engin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, three new hydrazide-hydrazone derivative compounds which contain choloroacetyl group have been synthesized and characterized. In the characterization, spectral techniques such as IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were used. Antibacterial effects of the synthesized compounds were investigated against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In the theoretical calculations Gaussian 09 software was used with the DFT/6-311+(d,p) basis set. Experimental X-ray analysis of compounds has not been studied. Theoretical bond lengths of synthesized compounds were compared with experimental bond lengths of a similar compound. Theoretical and experimental bond lengths are in good agreement with R2: 0.896, 0.899 and 0.900 for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For antibacterial activity, the most effective one was found to be N‧-(4-bromobenzylidene)-2-chloro-N-(4-(3-methyl-3-phenylcyclobutyl)-thiazol-2-yl) acetohydrazide against P.aeroginaosa ATTC 27853, among the studied compounds.

  5. Representations of happiness and life satisfaction in the group of educated and socially active young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokurina, Irina G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the differences in the social representations of happiness among optimists and pessimists in the group of socially active, educated young members of the international youth organization Association Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences Economiques et Commerciales . To assess the degree of optimism and pessimism we used the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS developed by E. Diener, while social representation, divided into the nucleus and peripheral zones, were examined using Verges’ technique within the framework of the concept of social mindsets offered by S. Moskovichi. It has been shown that, irrespective of the optimism or pessimism of the participants, the nucleus of their representations of happiness contains such a value as love. However, only in optimists’ representations is this value combined in the nucleus with the values of family and friendship. In the pessimists’ nucleus zone of the representation of happiness, love is presented as an independent value, primarily associated with striking emotional experiences, which has aspects of psychological addiction. Considerable differences between optimists and pessimists have also been found in the peripheral zone of the representation of happiness. Only optimists have such associations as “knowledge”, “children”, and “faith” in their peripheral area. In our opinion, the major scale of differences between optimists and pessimists is formed by the factor of sociocentricity and egocentricity.

  6. Synthesis, Structure and Biological Activities of Novel Triazole Compounds Containing Thioamide Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘法谦; 秦永其; 许良忠; 陆路德; 杨绪杰; 汪信

    2005-01-01

    Two compounds 2-benzoyl-N-phenyl-2-( 1,2,4-triazol- 1-yl)thioacetamide (1) and 2-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-N-phenyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)thioacetamide (2) were synthesized from substituted acetophenone, triazole and phenyl isothiocyanate by several step reactions. The structure of compound 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P21/c, a =0.8806(2) nm, b= 1.2097(2) nm, c= 1.4809(3) nm, β=105.88°, Z=4, V=1.5173(6) nm3, Dc= 1.411 Mg/m3, μ=0.22 mm-1, F(000)=672, final R1=0.040 and Rw=0.103. There is obvious potentially weak C—H…N intermolecular interaction in the crystal, which stabilizes the structure. The results of biological test show that the two compounds have antifungal and plant growth regulating activities.

  7. The Austrian Botanic Gardens Work Group, an Example of Active Networking to Promote Small Botanic Gardens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland K. EBERWEIN

    2011-01-01

    The continuously increasing demands on botanic gardens during the last few decades have led to a huge in increase administration and an urgent need for additional specialized personnel, especially botanists, teachers, database specialists and administrative staff. Instead of meeting these requirements, many botanic gardens are faceing a severe decrease in funding and personnel. Larger gardens provide the opportunity to distribute several tasks to different employees, whereas small gardens are short staffed and often nn by a single curator who has to fulfill all functions. In order to meet actual demands more easily, the Austrian botanic gardens are linked nationally via an active workgroup.This network not only allows the distribution of information but also facilitates the sharing of duties. A listserver speeds up the communication and correspondence within the workgroup, collection priorities and projects (e. g., GSPC) are coordinated, seedbanking becomes decentralized, printedmatters are shared and distributed, etc. Small gardens with only few employees can participate in projects by taking on small-ideally using with their special resources-in order not to fall behind. In addition, there is also an urgent need for international networking by means of plant and seed exchange (Index Semihum), BGCI membership, discussion groups, personal contacts and projects. Mission statements,special marketing strategies for public relations, integrating projects of other workgroup members and adapted public awareness programs are important to focus attention to small gardens and to help them keep alive.

  8. Leukotriene C4 Potentiates IL-33-Induced Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Activation and Lung Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Sean J; Portillo, Alex; Cavagnero, Kellen; Baum, Rachel E; Naji, Luay H; Badrani, Jana H; Mehta, Amit; Croft, Michael; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2017-08-01

    Asthma is a complex disease that is promoted by dysregulated immunity and the presence of many cytokine and lipid mediators. Despite this, there is a paucity of data demonstrating the combined effects of multiple mediators in asthma pathogenesis. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have recently been shown to play important roles in the initiation of allergic inflammation; however, it is unclear whether lipid mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs), which are present in asthma, could further amplify the effects of IL-33 on ILC2 activation and lung inflammation. In this article, we show that airway challenges with the parent CysLT, leukotriene C4 (LTC4), given in combination with low-dose IL-33 to naive wild-type mice, led to synergistic increases in airway Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, and peribronchial inflammation compared with IL-33 alone. Further, the numbers of proliferating and cytokine-producing lung ILC2s were increased after challenge with both LTC4 and IL-33. Levels of CysLT1R, CysLT2R, and candidate leukotriene E4 receptor P2Y12 mRNAs were increased in ILC2s. The synergistic effect of LTC4 with IL-33 was completely dependent upon CysLT1R, because CysLT1R(-/-) mice, but not CysLT2R(-/-) mice, had abrogated responses. Further, CysLTs directly potentiated IL-5 and IL-13 production from purified ILC2s stimulated with IL-33 and resulted in NFAT1 nuclear translocation. Finally, CysLT1R(-/-) mice had reduced lung eosinophils and ILC2 responses after exposure to the fungal allergen Alternaria alternata Thus, CysLT1R promotes LTC4- and Alternaria-induced ILC2 activation and lung inflammation. These findings suggest that multiple pathways likely exist in asthma to activate ILC2s and propagate inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. 21st Century jobs initiative - building the foundations for a 21st Century economy. Appendix A, cluster working group initiative business plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The business and community leaders who participated in a four-month long series of working groups developed business plans for initiatives which would lead to further growth and competitiveness of each of the industrial clusters. This appendix contains those business plans as they stood at the end of the working group session mid-September, 1995.

  10. Catalytic enantioselective construction of quaternary stereocenters: assembly of key building blocks for the synthesis of biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyang; Han, Seo-Jung; Liu, Wen-Bo; Stoltz, Brian M

    2015-03-17

    compatible with a wide range of arylboronic acids, β-substituents, and ring sizes. Aside from benzylic quaternary stereocenters, a more challenging motif is a quaternary stereocenter not adjacent to an aromatic group. Such centers represent more general structures in chemical space but are more difficult to form by asymmetric catalysis. To address this greater challenge, and motivated by the greater reward, we entered the field of palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of prochiral enolate nucleophiles about a decade ago. On the basis of Tsuji's work, which solved the issue of positional selectivity for unsymmetrical ketones, we discovered that the phosphinooxazoline ligand effectively rendered this reaction enantioselective. Extensive investigations since then have revealed that the reaction exhibits broad scope and accepts a range of substrate classes, each with its unique advantage in synthetic applications. A diverse array of carbonyl compounds bearing α-quaternary stereocenters are obtained in excellent yields and enantioselectivities, and more possibilities have yet to be explored. As an alternative to palladium catalysis, we also studied iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylations that generate vicinal quaternary and tertiary stereocenters in a single transformation. Overall, these methods provide access to small molecule building blocks with a single quaternary stereocenter, can be applied to various molecular scaffolds, and tolerate a wide range of functional groups. We envision that the chemistry reported in this Account will be increasingly useful in drug discovery and design.

  11. Building Numbers from Primes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  12. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of New MKC-442 Analogues with an Alkynyl-Substituted 6-Benzyl Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, Youssef L.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.; La Colla, Paolo;

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis and antiviral activities are reported of a series of 6-(3-alkynyl benzyl)-substituted analogues of MKC-442 (6-benzyl-1-(ethoxymethyl)-5-isopropyluracil), a highly potent agent against HIV. The 3-alkynyl group is assumed to give a better stacking of the substituted benzyl group to revers...

  13. Sport and Physical Activity in the Lives of Looked-After Children: A "Hidden Group" in Research, Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarmby, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Looked-after children are arguably one of the most disadvantaged groups in society and constitute a "hidden group" in relation to sport and physical activity research, policy and practice. Research on looked-after children has explored the views of caregivers, practitioners and policy-makers who have often been asked to speak for…

  14. Evaluation Tools to Guide Students' Peer-Assessment and Self-Assessment in Group Activities for the Lab and Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation tools are provided that help students' peer-assessment and self-assessment in group activities for the laboratories and classroom. The self- and peer-evaluations have helped teachers provide better feedback to the students and feel more confident in assigning each individual a grade for their contribution to the group laboratory project.

  15. The Effectiveness of Individual/Small Group Singing Activities on Kindergartners' Use of Singing Voice and Developmental Music Aptitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the comparative effectiveness of two teaching strategies, large-group and individual/small group singing activities, on kindergartners' developmental music aptitude. Examines improvements in children's singing and musical aptitude in order to ascertain length of time and types of instruction necessary to affect improvement. (MJP)

  16. Comparing the effects of group and home-based physical activity on mental health in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Salehe Mortazavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study focuses on comparing the effects of home-based (HB and group-based (GB physical activity on mental health in a sample of older adults in Shahr-e-kord. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, a twice-weekly physical activity program for 2 months was provided either individually at home or in a group format for 181 people who were divided into two groups (HB and GB. The outcome, mental health, was measured with the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results: Mental health status improved after participation in the physical activity program. The decrease in GHQ-28 total score in GB group, 3 months after intervention, was 3.61 ΁ 2.28 (P < 0.001. In HB group, this reduction was 1.20 ΁ 2.32 during the same period (P < 0.001. The difference of these "before-after differences" between the two groups in the GHQ-28 and all its subscales was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Also, the effects of GB physical activity on mental health compared with HB physical activity, adjusted for related baseline variables, were significant. Conclusions: These findings reveal the probable effects of GB rather than HB physical activity on mental health among the elderly.

  17. Building web service interfaces to geoscience data sets: EarthCube GeoWS project activities at the IRIS DMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabant, C. M.; Ahern, T. K.; Stults, M.

    2015-12-01

    At the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) we have been developing web service data access interfaces for our, primarily seismological, repositories for five years. These interfaces have become the primary access mechanisms for all data extraction from the DMC. For the last two years the DMC has been a principal participant in the GeoWS project, which aims to develop common web service interfaces for data access across hydrology, geodesy, seismology, marine geophysics, atmospheric and other geoscience disciplines. By extending our approach we have converged, along with other project members, on a web service interface and presentation design appropriate for geoscience and other data. The key principles of the approach include using a simple subset of RESTful concepts, common calling conventions whenever possible, a common tabular text data set convention, human-readable documentation and tools to help scientific end users learn how to use the interfaces. The common tabular text format, called GeoCSV, has been incorporated into the DMC's seismic station and event (earthquake) services. In addition to modifying our existing services, we have developed prototype GeoCSV web services for data sets managed by external (unfunded) collaborators. These prototype services include interfaces for data sets at NGDC/NCEI (water level tides and meteorological satellite measurements), INTERMAGNET repository and UTEP gravity and magnetic measurements. In progress are interfaces for WOVOdat (volcano observatory measurements), NEON (ecological observatory measurements) and more. An important goal of our work is to build interfaces usable by non-technologist end users. We find direct usability by researchers to be a major factor in cross-discipline data use, which itself is a key to solving complex research questions. In addition to data discovery and collection by end users, these interfaces provide a foundation upon which federated data access and brokering systems are already being

  18. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  19. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  20. Energy efficiency buildings program, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A separate abstract was prepared on research progress in each group at LBL in the energy efficient buildings program. Two separate abstracts were prepared for the Windows and Lighting Program. Abstracts prepared on other programs are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program; DOE-21 Building Energy Analysis; and Building Energy Data Compilation, Analysis, and Demonstration. (MCW)