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Sample records for group antigen family

  1. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Histo-blood group ABH (O) antigens are major alloantigens in humans. These antigens are widely distributed in human tissues and undergo changes in expression during cellular differentiation and malignant development. The ABH antigens have been characterized as terminal disaccharide determinants...... healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  2. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...... carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue...

  3. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue......The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...

  4. Dd-antigen-antibody system in five caste groups in north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, V; Kaur, H

    1991-12-01

    Antigen Dd, a polymorphic antigen found in extracts of certain human dandruff specimens, was investigated in five caste groups of north India. The incidence of antigen Dd-positive type varied from 21.21 per cent in Brahmins to 29.08 per cent in the Jat Sikhs of Punjab. However, a high frequency (45%) was observed in the Sunni Muslims of Kashmir, which differed significantly, when compared with different caste groups of Punjab. Family studies on 44 families indicated its inherited nature, the mode of inheritance being autosomal dominant.

  5. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  6. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  7. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  8. Blood group and Rhesus antigens among Blood donors attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood group and Rhesus antigens among Blood donors attending the Central Blood Bank, Sudan. WM Shahata, HB Khalil, A-E Abass, I Adam, SM Hussien. Abstract. Background: It is well known that the Rhesus system remains the second most clinically important blood group system after the ABO. There is no published ...

  9. Cell-wall composition and the grouping antigens of Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLADE, H D; SLAMP, W C

    1962-08-01

    Slade, Hutton D. (Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill.) and William C. Slamp. Cell-wall composition and grouping antigens of streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 84:345-351. 1962.-The carbohydrates present in the cell walls of streptococci belonging to serological groups A-H and K-S, and unclassifiable strains, have been identified. The sugars found were rhamnose, glucose, galactose, arabinose, and mannose. All sugars vary considerably in their distribution among the groups; glucose, galactose, and rhamnose occur most frequently. Strains were found which contained each of the latter sugars singly or in combination with one or both of the other sugars. Variation within a single group occurred in one-half of the groups. A strain containing only glucose and another only galactose were found. Except for groups A and C, in which only rhamnose is present in the great majority of strains, the presence or absence of the sugars does not aid in the identification of the groups. The cell walls of all groups examined also contained alanine, glutamic acid, lysine, glucosamine, galactosamine, and muramic acid. The cell walls of all groups, except D, agglutinated in the presence of specific group antisera, indicating the presence of the group antigen in the cell wall. Strains in groups F, K, and M gave a weak reaction. The structure and chemical composition of the group antigens of the streptococci are discussed.

  10. [Blood groups - minuses and pluses. Do the blood group antigens protect us from infectious diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiński, Marcin

    2015-06-25

    Human blood can be divided into groups, which is a method of blood classification based on the presence or absence of inherited erythrocyte surface antigens that can elicit immune response. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion, there are 341 blood group antigens collected in 35 blood group systems. These antigens can be proteins, glycoproteins or glycosphingolipids, and function as transmembrane transporters, ion channels, adhesion molecules or receptors for other proteins. The majority of blood group antigens is present also on another types of cells. Due to their localization on the surface of cells, blood group antigens can act as receptors for various pathogens or their toxins, such as protozoa (malaria parasites), bacteria (Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae) and viruses (Noroviruses, Parvoviruses, HIV). If the presence of group antigen (or its variant which arised due to mutation) is beneficial for the host (e.g. because pathogens are not able to bind to the cells), the blood group may become a selection trait, leading to its dissemination in the population exposed to that pathogen. There are thirteen blood group systems that can be related to pathogen resistance, and it seems that the particular influence was elicit by malaria parasites. It is generally thought that the high incidence of blood groups such as O in the Amazon region, Fy(a-b-) in Africa and Ge(-) in Papua-New Guinea is the result of selective pressure from malaria parasite. This review summarizes the data about relationship between blood groups and resistance to pathogens.

  11. Prevalence, serologic and genetic studies of high expressers of the blood group A antigen on platelets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna Gomes, B M; Estalote, A C; Palatnik, M; Pimenta, G; Pereira, B de B; do Nascimento, E M

    2010-01-01

    Objective/Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of the platelet blood group A antigenicity in Euro-Brazilians (EUBs) and Afro-Brazilians (AFBs). Background: A small but significant proportion of individuals express high levels of A or B antigen on their platelets corresponding to the erythrocyte ABO group. The mechanism of increased antigen expression has not been elucidated. Material/Methods: A cohort of 241 blood group A donors was analysed by flow cytometry. Although mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) is a typical continuous variable, platelets were screened and divided into two categories: low expressers (LEs) and high expressers (HEs). A three-generation family was investigated looking for an inheritance mechanism. Results: The prevalence of the HE platelet phenotype among group A1 donors was 2%. The mean of MFI on platelets of A1 subgroup of EUBs differs from that of AFBs (P = 0·0115), whereas the frequency of the HE phenotype was similar between them (P = 0·5251). A significant difference was found between sexes (P = 0·0039). Whereas the serum glycosyltransferase from HE family members converted significantly more H antigen on group O erythrocytes into A antigens compared with that in LE serum, their ABO, FUT1 and FUT2 genes were consensus. The theoretically favourable, transcriptionally four-repeat ABO enhancer was not observed. Conclusion: The occurrence of HE in several members suggests familial aggregation. Indeed, in repeated measures, stability of the MFI values is suggesting an inherited condition. Factors outside the ABO locus might be responsible for the HE phenotype. Whether the real mechanism of inheritance is either of a polygenic or of a discrete Mendelian nature remains to be elucidated. PMID:20553427

  12. Differential recognition and hydrolysis of host carbohydrate antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae family 98 glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Melanie A; Whitworth, Garrett E; El Warry, Nahida; Randriantsoa, Mialy; Samain, Eric; Burke, Robert D; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2009-09-18

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-beta-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-beta-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  13. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  14. The distribution of blood group antigens in experimentally produced carcinomas of rat palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibel, J; Philipsen, H P; Fisker, A V

    1986-01-01

    It has been shown previously that rat oral epithelia express antigens cross-reacting with antibodies against human blood group antigen B and its structural precursor, the H antigen (Type 2 chain). In the present study we investigated the expression of these antigens in malignant changes in the rat....... The blood group antigen staining pattern in experimentally produced verrucous carcinomas showed an almost normal blood group antigen expression. This may have diagnostic significance. Localized areas of hyperplastic palatal epithelium with slight dysplasia revealed loss of H antigen and the presence of B...

  15. Distribution of ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens, alleles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens represent a genetically stably determined trait with many-sided biological and clinical significance. The indigenous Ajarian population (105 subjects) was investigated for ABO Rh-Hr red cell blood group antigens. Using immunoserologic methods, seven blood group antigens (A, B, C, c, ...

  16. Abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in uterine endometrial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukazaki, K; Sakayori, M; Arai, H; Yamaoka, K; Kurihara, S; Nozawa, S

    1991-08-01

    The expression of A, B, and H group antigens, Lewis group antigens (Lewis(a), Lewis(b), Lewis(x), and Lewis(y)), and Lc4 and nLc4 antigens, the precursor antigens of both groups, was examined immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies in 9 normal endometria, 6 endometrial hyperplasias, and 31 endometrial cancers. 1) A, B and/or H antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at an incidence of 51.6%, while no distinct localization of these antigens was observed in normal endometria. H antigen, the precursor of A and B antigens, was particularly frequently detected in endometrial cancers. 2) An increased rate of expression of Lewis group antigens, particularly Lewis(b) antigen, was observed in endometrial cancers compared with its expression in normal endometria. 3) Lc4 and nLc4 antigens were detected in endometrial cancers at rates of 41.9% and 38.7%, respectively, these expressions being increased compared with those in normal endometria. 4) These results suggest that a highly abnormal expression of blood group-related antigens in endometrial cancers occurs not only at the level of A, B, and H antigens and Lewis group antigens, but also at the level of their precursor Lc4 and nLc4 antigens. 5) Lewis(a), Lewis(b), and Lc4 antigens, built on the type-1 chain, are more specific to endometrial cancers than their respective positional isomers, Lewis(x), Lewis(y), and nLc4 antigens, built on the type-2 chain.

  17. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  18. Family Therapy in a Women's Group: Integrating Marriage and Family Therapy and Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a family therapy perspective can be integrated into group as a treatment modality. Concepts from family therapy are illustrated through a description of a specific women's group and case study. Techniques from family therapy applied in group are derived from multigenerational, experiential/humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral…

  19. The distribution of blood group antigens in experimentally produced carcinomas of rat palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibel, J; Philipsen, H P; Fisker, A V

    1986-01-01

    palate induced by a chemical carcinogen (4NQO). The H antigen, normally expressed on spinous cells in rats, was absent in malignant epithelium, whereas staining for the B antigen, normally expressed on basal cells, was variable. These changes are equivalent to those seen in human squamous cell carcinomas....... The blood group antigen staining pattern in experimentally produced verrucous carcinomas showed an almost normal blood group antigen expression. This may have diagnostic significance. Localized areas of hyperplastic palatal epithelium with slight dysplasia revealed loss of H antigen and the presence of B...

  20. Prevalence, serologic and genetic studies of high expressers of the blood group A antigen on platelets*

    OpenAIRE

    Sant?Anna Gomes, B M; Estalote, A C; Palatnik, M; Pimenta, G; Pereira, B de B; do Nascimento, E M

    2010-01-01

    Objective/Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of the platelet blood group A antigenicity in Euro-Brazilians (EUBs) and Afro-Brazilians (AFBs). Background: A small but significant proportion of individuals express high levels of A or B antigen on their platelets corresponding to the erythrocyte ABO group. The mechanism of increased antigen expression has not been elucidated. Material/Methods: A cohort of 241 blood group A donors was analysed by flow cytometry. Although m...

  1. Family support group in psychosocial rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuchamy, L.; Mathew, Baijumon K.; Mathew, Sheeba; Udayakumar, G.S.; Kalyanasundaram, S.; Ramprasad, Dharitri

    2005-01-01

    Background: Support groups for families of persons with mental illness are emerging as significant components in psychosocial rehabilitation programmes. Aim: To ascertain the expectations of family members who attend family support group meetings and to find out the efficacy of such programmes. Methods: The data were collected from support group members using a semi-structured interview schedule. The study sample (n=20) was drawn from family members who attended the support group meetings regularly for a minimum period of 6 months. Data analysis was done using percentile. Results: Analysis of the data revealed that members attending the support group meetings expected to get more information about the illness, develop skills to cope with problems at home and learn skills to deal with the ill person. An important finding of the study was that the members developed a ‘feeling of togetherness’ as a result of being a member of a group with common aims. Conclusion: Participation in a support group meeting positively affects key variables in the participant's adaptation to mental illness in a relative. PMID:20814460

  2. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  3. Distribution of ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens, alleles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Ikemoto, 1995) and criminology. As it seems, the composition of the blood group systems' antigens in human populations is a result of a balance ... From the foregoing, we have set an objective to establish the genetic geography of the erythrocytic group antigens in the highland Khulo region of Ajara. The.

  4. [Multi-Family-Groups in Youth Welfare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Matthias; Hermans, Björn Enno; Lingnau-Carduck, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Multi-Family-Groups are an intervention setting, that is mainly applied in the context of systemic therapy and counselling. In this article we introduce some basics of that setting and sketch some specifics and two examples of use for the application in the context of youth welfare.

  5. Family Group Conferencing: A Theoretical Underpinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, R.N.; Abma, T.A.; Kwekkeboom, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards

  6. Group A Streptococcus produce pilus-like structures containing protective antigens and Lancefield T antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Marirosa; Bensi, Giuliano; Capo, Sabrina; Falugi, Fabiana; Zingaretti, Chiara; Manetti, Andrea G O; Maggi, Tiziana; Taddei, Anna Rita; Grandi, Guido; Telford, John L

    2005-10-25

    Although pili have long been recognized in Gram-negative pathogens as important virulence factors involved in adhesion and invasion, very little is known about extended surface organelles in Gram-positive pathogens. Here we report that Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a Gram-positive human-specific pathogen that causes pharyngitis, impetigo, invasive disease, necrotizing fasciitis, and autoimmune sequelae has long, surface-exposed, pilus-like structures composed of members of a family of extracellular matrix-binding proteins. We describe four variant pili and show that each is recognized by a specific serum of the Lancefield T-typing system, which has been used for over five decades to characterize GAS isolates. Furthermore, we show that immunization of mice with a combination of recombinant pilus proteins confers protection against mucosal challenge with virulent GAS bacteria. The data indicate that induction of a protective immune response against these structures may be a useful strategy for development of a vaccine against disease caused by GAS infection.

  7. The effect of HLA mismatches, shared cross-reactive antigen groups, and shared HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Hepkema, BG; Peeters, PMJG; Ten Vergert, EM; De Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van den Berg, AP; Lems, SPM; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-DR mismatching, sharing cross-reactive antigen groups (CREGs), and sharing HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation. Outcome parameters were graft survival, acute rejection,

  8. Granulocytes: New Members of the Antigen-Presenting Cell Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytes, the most abundant types of leukocytes, are the first line of defense against pathogen invasion. However, the plasticity and diversity of granulocytes have been increasingly revealed, especially with regard to their versatile functions in orchestrating adaptive immune responses. A substantial body of recent evidence demonstrates that granulocytes can acquire the function as antigen-presenting cells under pathological or inflammatory conditions. In addition, they can acquire surface expression of MHC class II and costimulatory molecules as well as T cell stimulatory behavior when cultured with selected cytokines. The classic view of granulocytes as terminally differentiated, short-lived phagocytes is therefore changing to phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous cells that are engaged in cross-talk with other leukocyte populations and provide an additional link between innate and adaptive immunity. In this brief review, we summarize the current knowledge on the antigen-presenting capacity of granulocyte subsets (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Underlying mechanisms, relevant physiological significance and potential controversies are also discussed.

  9. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  10. Human blood groups: chemical and biochemical basis of antigen specificity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schenkel-Brunner, Helmut

    2000-01-01

    ... of the monograph on the chemistry and biochemistry of human blood groups is being published to honour the 1Oath anniversary of Dr. Karl Landsteiner's discovery of human blood groups here in Vienna. Five years have passed since publication of the first edition, and in this time research on the biochemistry of human blood groups has reached staggering pr...

  11. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  12. Family group conferences in youth justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Robin; Shemmings, David; Dugmore, Paul; Hyare, Mina

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses part of an evaluation of the 'Family Group Conference (FGC) Project for Young People Who Offend' within a large social services department ('Exshire'). The evaluation covers all 30 family group conferences during a 15-month period from September 2000 to December 2001. This article presents the findings relating to young people along with changes in their psychosocial profile using a modified version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman 1997). The views of all participants were positive, with the majority saying they would recommend FGCs to others. FGC was felt by most participants to have brought about changes in the way young people view the world, partly by helping them to accept the reality of offending in a way that had not previously been possible. It provided victims with a unique opportunity to become involved in the youth justice system, recognising them as key stakeholders as a result of a crime. This process left most victims with a sense of satisfaction and resolution. Average SDQ scores were lower following FGC for the 12 young people who responded to follow-up interviews. Although there are a number of restorative justice projects using FGC in youth justice, we believe this project is among the first in the UK to establish the use of the New Zealand model with its emphasis on 'private family time' as an ongoing established service. Although the data were collected before 2002, the project contains unique features which we believe should be brought to the attention of the wider academic and practice community given that FGC is still a fairly new, unexplored and under-evaluated phenomenon in youth justice. There is currently a need for more research looking at the use of FGC in relation to young offenders.

  13. Association of Alport's syndrome with HLA-DR2 antigen in a group of unrelated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Donadi

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A few family studies have evaluated HLA antigens in Alport's syndrome; however, there are no large population studies. In the present report, we studied 40 unrelated white patients with Alport's syndrome seen at the Unit of Renal Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were typed using a complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity assay. A control white population (N = 403 from the same geographical area was also typed for HLA antigens. Although the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens of patients were not statistically different from controls, the frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen observed in patients (65% was significantly increased in relation to controls (26%; P<0.001. The relative risk and etiologic fraction for HLA-DR2 antigen were 5.2 and 0.525, respectively. Although few immunological abnormalities have been shown in Alport's syndrome, in this report we emphasize the association of HLA molecules and Alport's syndrome. Besides the well-known inherited molecular defects encoded by type IV collagen genes in Alport's syndrome, the major histocompatibility alleles may be in linkage disequilibrium with these defective collagen genes

  14. The SSX Family of Cancer-Testis Antigens as Target Proteins for Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath A. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs represent an expanding class of tumor-associated proteins defined on the basis of their tissue-restricted expression to testis or ovary germline cells and frequent ectopic expression in tumor tissue. The expression of CTA in MHC class I-deficient germline cells makes these proteins particularly attractive as immunotherapeutic targets because they serve as essentially tumor-specific antigens for MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells. Moreover, because CTAs are expressed in many types of cancer, any therapeutic developed to target these antigens might have efficacy for multiple cancer types. Of particular interest among CTAs is the synovial sarcoma X chromosome breakpoint (SSX family of proteins, which includes ten highly homologous family members. Expression of SSX proteins in tumor tissues has been associated with advanced stages of disease and worse patient prognosis. Additionally, both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to SSX proteins have been demonstrated in patients with tumors of varying histological origin, which indicates that natural immune responses can be spontaneously generated to these antigens in cancer patients. The current review will describe the history and identification of this family of proteins, as well as what is known of their function, expression in normal and malignant tissues, and immunogenicity.

  15. Prevalence of Rh, Duffy, Kell, Kidd & MNSs blood group antigens in the Indian blood donor population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroo, R N; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Gupta, Richa; Phillip, Jessy

    2013-03-01

    Little data are available regarding the frequencies of the blood group antigens other than ABO and RhD in the Indian population. Knowledge of the antigen frequencies is important to assess risk of antibody formation and to guide the probability of finding antigen-negative donor blood, which is especially useful when blood is required for a patient who has multiple red cell alloantibodies. This study was carried out to determine the frequencies of the D, C, c, E, e, K, k, Fy(a), Fy(b), Jk(a), Jk(b), M, N, S and s antigens in over 3,000 blood donors. Samples from randomly selected blood donors from Delhi and nearby areas (both voluntary and replacement) were collected for extended antigen typing during the period January 2009 to January 2010. Antigens were typed via automated testing on the Galileo instrument using commercial antisera. A total of 3073 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. The prevalence of these antigens was found to be as follows in %: D: 93.6, C: 87, c: 58, E: 20, e: 98, K: 3.5, k: 99.97, F(a) : 87.4, Fy(b) : 57.6, Jk(a) : 81.5, Jk(b) : 67.4, M: 88.7, N: 65.4, S: 54.8 and s: 88.7. This study found the prevalence of the typed antigens among Indian blood donors to be statistically different to those in the Caucasian, Black and Chinese populations, but more similar to Caucasians than to the other racial groups.

  16. Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves; Davies, Anthony E.; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.; Lawrence, John F.; Lyal, Chris H. C.; Newton, Alfred F.; Reid, Chris A. M.; Schmitt, Michael; Ślipiński, S. Adam; Smith, Andrew B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes

  17. Multiple Family Group Therapy: An Interpersonal/Postmodern Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Kleist, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple Family Group Therapy has been identified as a viable treatment model for a variety of client populations. A combination of family systems theories and therapeutic group factors provide the opportunity to explore multiple levels of intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships between families. This article depicts a Multiple Family Group…

  18. Transmission of hepatitis-B virus through salivary blood group antigens in saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, S.A.; Abdo, A.A.; Baksh, N.D.; Sanie, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine an association between transmission of hepatitis B virus and secretor and non-secretor status of salivary blood group antigens. Study Design: Cross-sectional, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Physiology and Division of Hepatology, College of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2009. Methodology: Eighty eight known patients, who were positive for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen [HBsAg] were recruited. Saliva was collected for investigating the secretor and non-secretor status by using blood typing kit number Kemtec Educational Science USA. Hepatitis B Surface antigen test was performed on Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay technique. Polymerase chain reaction [PCR] on saliva was also carried out in High Performance Thermal Cycler-Palm- Cycler [Corbett Life Science, Sydney, Australia] and enzymatic amplification of extracted viral DNA was performed using primers covering the promoter of the core region of HBV. Results: Out of the 88 subjects, 61 belong to blood group O, 20 to A and 7 subjects to blood group B. Fifty subjects were secretors [salivary blood group antigens positive] and 38 subjects were non-secretors [salivary blood group antigens negative]. Among core gene positive 25 (69.4%) were secretors and 11 (30.6%) were non-secretors. However, in core gene negative 25 (48.1%) were secretors and 27 (51.9%) were non-secretors. Conclusion: The result shows an association [p=0.047] between secretor and non-secretors status of the salivary blood group antigens with core gene positive and core gene negative. (author)

  19. Atomic resolution structural characterization of recognition of histo-blood group antigens by Norwalk virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Mun; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor)

    2008-07-28

    Members of Norovirus, a genus in the family Caliciviridae, are causative agents of epidemic diarrhea in humans. Susceptibility to several noroviruses is linked to human histo-blood type, and its determinant histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are regarded as receptors for these viruses. Specificity for these carbohydrates is strain-dependent. Norwalk virus (NV) is the prototype genogroup I norovirus that specifically recognizes A- and H-type HBGA, in contrast to genogroup II noroviruses that exhibit a more diverse HBGA binding pattern. To understand the structural basis for how HBGAs interact with the NV capsid protein, and how the specificity is achieved, we carried out x-ray crystallographic analysis of the capsid protein domain by itself and in complex with A- and H-type HBGA at a resolution of {approx}1.4 {angstrom}. Despite differences in their carbohydrate sequence and linkage, both HBGAs bind to the same surface-exposed site in the capsid protein and project outward from the capsid surface, substantiating their possible role in initiating cell attachment. Precisely juxtaposed polar side chains that engage the sugar hydroxyls in a cooperative hydrogen bonding and a His/Trp pair involved in a cation-p interaction contribute to selective and specific recognition of A- and H-type HBGAs. This unique binding epitope, confirmed by mutational analysis, is highly conserved, but only in the genogroup I noroviruses, suggesting that a mechanism by which noroviruses infect broader human populations is by evolving different sites with altered HBGA specificities.

  20. THE PROPERTIES OF T ANTIGENS EXTRACTED FROM GROUP A HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancefield, Rebecca C.; Dole, Vincent P.

    1946-01-01

    1. T antigens of group A hemolytic streptococci have been obtained in soluble form by digestion of the bacterial cells with pepsin or trypsin. Large quantities of this antigen were readily extracted from type 1 strains, whereas only small amounts could be obtained from strains of other types. 2. The T antigen, prepared in this way from a type 1 strain, was partially purified by chemical precipitation and further enzymatic digestion. An active fraction, apparently protein in nature, was separated electrophoretically at pH 7.00. The separated material, pooled and analyzed at the same pH, gave only a single peak. The isoelectric point of this substance was about pH 4.50. An elementary analysis was obtained. Although the T antigen was resistant to digestion with proteolytic enzymes and ribonuclease, it was readily inactivated by heat, especially in acid media and in strong salt solutions. The serological activity of this purified T substance was lost after exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 3. Analysis by means of the ultracentrifuge showed that the material was polydisperse and therefore probably impure. 4. The soluble form of the T substance was active in the precipitin reaction, in the fixation of complement, in inhibition of T agglutination, and as an antigen when injected into rabbits. The antibodies produced did not protect mice against infection with virulent strains of hemolytic streptococci containing the same T antigen. 5. The immunological specificity of T antigen in soluble form is the same as that of the T antigen in the intact streptococcus from which it was derived PMID:19871581

  1. Comparative case control study of clinical features and human leukocyte antigen susceptibility between familial and nonfamilial vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misri Rachita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies worldwide suggest that human leukocyte antigen (HLA region may be involved in the genetic susceptibility of vitiligo but little information is available from India. Aim: To find the HLA associated susceptibility to develop vitiligo in Indian patients and to detect role of HLA in familial vitiligo. Methods: This was a case controlled study which included all patients suffering from vitiligo over a period of one and half years. Clinical details were noted and sera collected from these patients were screened for the presence of HLA class I antibodies. The clinical features and HLA antigens were assessed and comparison was made between patients with familial and nonfamilial vitiligo. Results: Out of 114 patients studied, 84 had family history and 30 had no family history. Patients with family history of vitiligo have higher chances of acquiring vitiligo if first degree relatives are affected compared to if second degree relatives are affected. Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the type, stability, and severity of vitiligo in both the groups. HLA results in both the groups revealed increase in HLA A2, A11, A31, A33, B17, B35, B40, and B44 alleles while HLA A9, B13, and B53 alleles were decreased. Family history was associated with HLA A2, A28, A31, and B44 alleles. Early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years was significantly associated with HLA A2, A11, B17, B35, and B44 alleles. The patients with severe affection (> 10% area showed in significant association with HLA A10 and B8. Conclusion: Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo. There is no correlation of family history with the type of vitiligo, stability of lesions, and areas involved. Severity is not associated with family history. Apart from other alleles, alleles A2, and B44 play a significant role in vitiligo in the Indian patients.

  2. Prevalence of Diego blood group antigen and the antibody in three ethnic population groups in Klang valley of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cheong Tar; Al-Hassan, Faisal Muti; Naim, Norris; Knight, Aishah; Joshi, Sanmukh R

    2013-01-01

    Diego blood group antigen, Di(a), is very rare among Caucasians and Blacks, but relatively common among the South American Indians and Asians of Mongolian origin. The antibody to Di(a) is clinically significant to cause hemolytic disease in a new-born or hemolytic transfusion reaction. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of Di(a) antigen among the blood donors from the three major ethnic groups in Klang Valley of Malaysia as well as to find an incidence of an antibody of the Diego antigen, anti-Di(a), in a tertiary care hospital to ascertain the need to include Di(a+) red cells for an antibody screen cell panel. Serological tests were performed by column agglutination technique using commercial reagents and following instruction as per kit insert. Di(a) antigen was found with a frequency of 2.1% among the Malaysians donors in three ethnic groups viz, Malay, Chinese and Indian. It was present among 1.25% of 401 Malay, 4.01% of Chinese and 0.88% of 114 Indian origin donors. None of the 1442 patients, including 703 antenatal outpatients, had anti-Di(a) in serum. The prevalence of Di(a) antigen was found among the donors of all the three ethnic background with varying frequency. Inclusion of Di(a+) red cells in routine antibody screening program would certainly help in detection of this clinically significant antibody and to provide safe blood transfusion in the Klang Valley, though the incidence of antibody appears to be very low in the region.

  3. Expression of blood group antigens A and B in pancreas of vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENKA GEORGIEVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological role of blood group antigens (BGA A and B in tissues of different vertebrates is still controversial. There are few investigations on vertebrate pancreas and no obvious explanation of their tissue expression. The aim of the present study is to follow and compare the pancreatic expression of BGA A and B in representatives of five vertebrate classes. The biotin-streptavidin-proxidase labeling system was used for immunohistochemical detection of BGA by monoclonal antibodies to human A and B antigens. The present study reveals specific immunoreactivity in acinar and epithelial cells of pancreatic efferent ducts in species free-living vertebrates. The immunoperoxidase staining shows antigenic heterogeneity in the cellular localization. The number of positive cells and the intensity of expression vary in different species. Endothelial cells are positive only in the pancreas of Emys orbicularis. The lack of BGA A and B in some species suggests that the expression of these antigens is dependent not only on the evolutionary level of the species, but mainly on some genetic control mechanisms. The production of BGA A and B and the variability in their cellular localization probably reflect the stage of cell differentiation and the mechanisms of pancreatic secretor function. The presence of histo BGA in endodermal acinar pancreatic cells confirms the assumption for the high antigenic stability and conservatism of these molecules in vertebrate histogenesis and evolution.

  4. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and immunochemical characterization of carbohydrate antigens prepared from group A Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, S; Okahashi, N; Yamamoto, T; Morisaki, I; Michalek, S M; McGhee, J R

    1983-11-01

    Group A carbohydrate antigens were prepared from isolated cell walls or whole cells of Streptococcus pyogenes strain Sv (group A, M type 3). Cell walls were lysate by the enzymatic action of M1 endo-N-acetylmuramidase. The cell wall lysate was concentrated and chromatographed on a Sephadex G-100 column. Two fractions reactive with group A antisera were obtained. These were composed of N-acetylglucosamine, rhamnose, and peptidoglycan components such as glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. For comparison, hot TCA extract of the cell walls (TCAgA) or Rantz and Randall extract of the whole cells (RRgA) was purified chromatographically. The latter two also contained rhamnose and glucosamine, and were reactive with group A antisera. The molecular weights of M1gA antigens were larger than those of TCAgA and RRgA. Hapten inhibition study indicated that N-acetylglucosamine was the most potent inhibitor.

  6. Engine Family Groups for Verification of Clean Diesel Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents show engine family boxes that represent groupings of engine families with similar characterists (i.e., the emissions standards that the engines were built to) for current and past model years.

  7. 20 CFR 229.49 - Adjustment of benefits under family maximum for change in family group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustment of benefits under family maximum for change in family group. 229.49 Section 229.49 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD... Overall Minimum Rate § 229.49 Adjustment of benefits under family maximum for change in family group. (a...

  8. The effects of cigarette smoking on prostate-specific antigen in two different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gokhan; Akgul, Korhan; Yilmaz, Yuksel; Dirik, Alper; Un, Sitki

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of cigarette smoking on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) using 2 different age groups. The study was carried out between January 2007 and October 2011 with men; the 2 sets of age groups were: 25 to 35 years and 50 to 70 years old. The participants were divided into 4 groups. Of the 25 to 35 age range, smokers were Group 1, and non-smokers were Group 2; of the 50 to 70 age range, smokers were Group 3 and non-smokers Group 4. In addition, for the 50 to 70 age group, the International Prostate Symptom Score was completed, digital rectal examination was performed, and transabdominal prostate volume was measured. We wanted to see whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels showed a difference between the 2 age groups. There were 114 patients in Group 1, 82 in Group 2, 90 in Group 3, and 102 in Group 4. The mean PSA level was 0.7 ± 0.28 ng/mL for Group 1, and 0.6 ± 0.27 ng/mL for Group 2 (p = 0.27), and there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. The mean PSA was 2.5 ± 1.8 ng/mL for Group 3, and 2.1 ± 2.0 ng/mL (p = 0.59) for Group 4, and there was no statistically significant difference between the these 2 age groups. Cigarette smoking effects various hormone levels. Different from previous studies, the PSA level was higher in smokers compared to nonsmokers, although it was not statistically significant. Our study is limited by the small numbers in our study groups and the lack of PSA velocity data.

  9. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  10. A gene family expressing a host-protective antigen of Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, C; Gauci, C G; Cowman, A F; Lightowlers, M W

    2001-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic hydatidosis in humans. A recombinant antigen vaccine has been developed, for use in the parasite's natural animal intermediate hosts, that may provide a new tool for control of hydatid disease transmission. The antigen, designated EG95, is encoded by a cDNA the features of which indicate it to be an incomplete copy of the associated mRNA. Characterisation of the gene(s) encoding the antigen was undertaken in order to enable subsequent study of genetic variability in the gene and associated protein in different parasite isolates. Southern hybridisation studies of E. granulosus genomic DNA probed with the eg95 cDNA revealed that the gene belonged to a gene family. DNA sequence analysis of cloned genomic fragments indicated that the gene family consists of at least seven members, one of which is a pseudogene. The gene having identity with the eg95 cDNA was cloned and sequenced, and the full length mRNA characterised. Genomic sequence and structure of the eg95 gene family members are highly conserved with respect to the gene encoding EG95. Four eg95-related genes are predicted to express an identical EG95 protein and all four were shown to be expressed in the oncosphere life-cycle stage. The full length EG95 protein has a predicted molecular mass of 16.9 kDa, secretory signal sequence, carboxy-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol hydrophobic anchor motif and a fibronectin type III domain. PCR amplification conditions were established which allow gene-specific characterisation of the eg95 gene in E. granulosus isolates from different host species and geographical locations.

  11. Molecular typing for blood group antigens within 40 minutes by direct PCR from plasma or serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz Friedrich; Flegel, Willy Albert; Bittner, Rita; Döscher, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Determining blood group antigens by serological methods may be unreliable in certain situations, such as in patients after chronic or massive transfusion. Red cell genotyping offers a complementary approach, but current methods may take much longer than conventional serological typing, limiting their utility in urgent situations. To narrow this gap, we devised a rapid method using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification while avoiding the DNA extraction step. DNA was amplified by PCR directly from plasma or serum of blood donors followed by a melting curve analysis in a capillary rapid-cycle PCR assay. We evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying the clinically relevant Fya, Fyb, Jka and Jkb antigens, with our analysis being completed within 40 min of receiving a plasma or serum sample. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value at least 84%. Direct PCR with melting point analysis allowed faster red cell genotyping to predict blood group antigens than any previous molecular method. Our assay may be used as a screening tool with subsequent confirmatory testing, within the limitations of the false-negative rate. With fast turnaround times, the rapid-cycle PCR assay may eventually be developed and applied to red cell genotyping in the hospital setting. PMID:27991657

  12. Biosynthetic basis of incompatible histo-blood group A antigen expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, L; Leitao, D; Sobrinho-Simoes, M

    1993-01-01

    , we have screened 31 cases of gastric tumors of phenotype O for the expression of blood group A gene-defined glycosyltransferase by immunohistology on frozen sections using newly developed monoclonal antibodies to the transferases. Three cases were positive, and transferase expression was confirmed...... by enzyme analysis of extracts from the specimens. Blood group A carbohydrate antigens were also identified immunohistologically in these three cases as well as in five other cases. Thin-layer chromatography immunostaining analysis of glycolipid extracts from the three cases did not confirm the chemical...

  13. Variants of a Leishmania surface antigen derived from a multigenic family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W

    1991-12-25

    The promastigote surface antigen-2 (PSA-2) complex comprises a group of immunogenic surface antigens linked to the surface of the Leishmania major promastigote with glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors. The L. major genome contains at least 14 PSA-2 genes on a 950-kilobase chromosome and comprising approximately 20% of the length of this chromosome. The sequence of three independent, but incomplete, PSA-2 cDNAs and one genomic fragment encoding a complete PSA-2 coding sequence were compared. PSA-2 genes encode polypeptides exhibiting 22-25aa tandem repeat elements, threonine-rich segments which vary between genes, a conserved COOH-terminal cysteine-rich region, and a conserved GPI anchor signal sequence. PSA-2 genes appear to be transcribed in a complex manner with multiple RNAs. The complex genomic organization of PSA-2 genes is present in other members of the genus suggesting that PSA-2 function is important for the biology of Leishmania.

  14. Surface proteome analysis and characterization of surface cell antigen (Sca or autotransporter family of Rickettsia typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandra T Sears

    Full Text Available Surface proteins of the obligate intracellular bacterium Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine or endemic typhus fever, comprise an important interface for host-pathogen interactions including adherence, invasion and survival in the host cytoplasm. In this report, we present analyses of the surface exposed proteins of R. typhi based on a suite of predictive algorithms complemented by experimental surface-labeling with thiol-cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and identification of labeled peptides by LC MS/MS. Further, we focus on proteins belonging to the surface cell antigen (Sca autotransporter (AT family which are known to be involved in rickettsial infection of mammalian cells. Each species of Rickettsia has a different complement of sca genes in various states; R. typhi, has genes sca1 thru sca5. In silico analyses indicate divergence of the Sca paralogs across the four Rickettsia groups and concur with previous evidence of positive selection. Transcripts for each sca were detected during infection of L929 cells and four of the five Sca proteins were detected in the surface proteome analysis. We observed that each R. typhi Sca protein is expressed during in vitro infections and selected Sca proteins were expressed during in vivo infections. Using biotin-affinity pull down assays, negative staining electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the Sca proteins in R. typhi are localized to the surface of the bacteria. All Scas were detected during infection of L929 cells by immunogold electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrate that Scas 1-3 and 5 are expressed in the spleens of infected Sprague-Dawley rats and Scas 3, 4 and 5 are expressed in cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis. Sca proteins may be crucial in the recognition and invasion of different host cell types. In short, continuous expression of all Scas may ensure that rickettsiae are primed i to infect mammalian cells should the flea bite a host, ii to remain

  15. The Paracoccidioides brasiliensis gp70 antigen is encoded by a putative member of the flavoproteins monooxygenase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricato, Juliana T; Batista, Wagner L; Kioshima, Erika S; Feitosa, Luciano S; e Brito, Ronni R Novaes; Goldman, Gustavo H; Mariano, Mário; Puccia, Rosana; Lopes, José D

    2010-02-01

    Glycoprotein gp70 is an important intracellular antigen from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis that elicits both humoral and cellular immune responses. Herein, the PbGP70 gene cloning from isolate Pb18 using internal peptide sequence information is reported. The deduced protein sequence bears two N-glycosylation sites, antigenic sites and two mouse T-cell epitopes. Anti-recombinant gp70 (rPbgp70) polyclonal antibodies reacted with a 70-kDa component in total cell extract of P. brasiliensis, while MAbC5F11 and paracoccidioidomycosis patients' sera recognized rPbgp70. Confocal microscopy with anti-rPbgp70 and MAbC5F11 showed intense staining and cytoplasmatic co-localization. The protein sequence belongs to the flavoprotein monooxygenase family which groups important anti-oxidative bioactive compounds. We found increased PbGP70 transcript accumulation under oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2), during fungal growth and in macrophage phagocyted/bound yeasts. Therefore, gp70 might play a dual role in P. brasiliensis by both eliciting immune cellular and humoral responses in the host and protecting the fungus from oxidative stress generated by phagocytic cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzyme release of antigen from Streptococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes cross-reactive with Lancefield group G typing reagents.

    OpenAIRE

    Hopfer, R L; Pinzon, R; Wenglar, M; Rolston, K V

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme extraction methods are commonly used to release antigen for Lancefield serogrouping of streptococci. Recently, up to 47% of enterococci have been found to possess antigens cross-reactive with both the group D and the group G grouping reagents. We investigated whether the organisms had recently emerged or whether changes in extraction methods (enzyme extraction) have resulted in our awareness of their existence. We found that approximately 20% of our enterococcal isolates released mater...

  17. INRA, a new high-frequency antigen in the INDIAN (IN023) blood group system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sanmukh R; Sheladiya, Ankita; Mendapara-Dobariya, Kinjal V

    2017-01-01

    The INDIAN blood group system comprises 4 antigens sensitive to enzymes and 2-aminoethyl isothiouronium bromide (AET). The patient's antibody was investigated for its specificity to the high-frequency antigens (HFA) of this system. Low ionic strength solution (LISS)-tube/LISS-indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) methods were used. The patient's red blood cells (RBCs) were tested with antisera to HFA. Her antibody was tested with RBCs lacking the HFA. Furthermore, it was tested with RBCs as untreated or treated with enzyme or AET. The genetic sequence was studied for mutation in CD44 gene that encodes INDIAN antigens. The patient was grouped A1B, RhD+, antibody screening test positive, direct antiglobulin test negative. A negative autocontrol test had suggested to the alloantibody being present. Antibody had agglutinated RBCs in LISS-tube at RT and by LISS-IAT at 37°C. The RBCs of the 11-cell panel, those lacking HFA and from 50 random donors, were agglutinated by her antibody indicating its specificity to the HFA, though the RBCs of Lu (a-b-)/In (Lu) type showed a weaker reaction. The patient's RBCs were agglutinated by antisera to a number of the enzyme-sensitive HFA, including those of INDIAN blood groups. The antibody showed reduced reactivity with the RBCs treated with papain, chymotrypsin, and AET but resistant to trypsin and dithiothreitol. The patient's genetic sequence revealed a novel homozygous mutation 449G>A in exon 5 of CD44 . The antibody to enzyme sensitive HFA was tested for serological and molecular genetics studies and found to be directed to the novel HFA, named as INRA of the INDIAN blood group system and was assigned a numerical symbol IN: 005 by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT).

  18. CD1a presentation of endogenous antigens by group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Clare S; Chen, Yi-Ling; Salimi, Maryam; Jarrett, Rachael; Johnson, David; Järvinen, Valtteri J; Owens, Raymond J; Repapi, Emmanouela; Cousins, David J; Barlow, Jillian L; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Ogg, Graham

    2017-12-22

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are effectors of barrier immunity, with roles in infection, wound healing, and allergy. A proportion of ILC2 express MHCII (major histocompatibility complex II) and are capable of presenting peptide antigens to T cells and amplifying the subsequent adaptive immune response. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of CD1a-reactive T cells in allergy and infection, activated by the presentation of endogenous neolipid antigens and bacterial components. Using a human skin challenge model, we unexpectedly show that human skin-derived ILC2 can express CD1a and are capable of presenting endogenous antigens to T cells. CD1a expression is up-regulated by TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin) at levels observed in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis, and the response is dependent on PLA2G4A. Furthermore, this pathway is used to sense Staphylococcus aureus by promoting Toll-like receptor-dependent CD1a-reactive T cell responses to endogenous ligands. These findings define a previously unrecognized role for ILC2 in lipid surveillance and identify shared pathways of CD1a- and PLA2G4A-dependent ILC2 inflammation amenable to therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  19. BLOOD GROUP ANTIGEN-DEPENDENT FEATURES OF POLYCLONAL IgE-RESPONSE IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Telesmanich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory parameters of IgE-mediated immunological reaction (total IgE were studied. Subjects with impaired carbohydrate metabolism and persons with diabetes mellitus were classified for blood groups 0(I, A(II, B(III (n = 93. We determined total IgE, glucose levels and percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c in blood serum; as well ABO blood groups. Comparison of these parameters in patient cohorts with 0(I and A(II, B(III blood groups showed different reactogenicity, depending on the degree of carbohydrate metabolism disturbance and ABO group specificity of antigenic determinants of blood glycoproteins. There was a strong direct correlation (r = 0.8 between blood group 0(I antigens, and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. The highest correlation degree was observed between the blood group A(II and type 1 diabetes onset of (r = 1.0. The smallest percentage of DM and the smallest correlation (r = 0.67 were observed in patients, B(III blood group is located. In cases of sufficiently altered carbohydrate metabolism, the blood group 0(I and A(II carriers had total IgE of 43.61±15.12 kIU/L, and 86.2±42.61 kIU/L, respectively, thus being, on average, 4-times lower than in B(III blood group in whom total IgE in type 2 diabetes was 2-fold higher than normal values, being 209.65±52.5 kIU/L.

  20. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A J; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A F

    1986-10-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous globular domain (NC1) of type IV collagen from normal human GBM, while FNS identified only the 26,000-mol wt monomer. FNS reacted with EBM of 12 controls and nine unaffected male kindred members but not EBM of eight affected males. Five affected females exhibited interrupted reactivity of FNS with EBM. GPS showed variable reactivity with EBM and was not discriminating with respect to Alport-type FN. FNS did not stain renal basement members of five affected males. However, the EBM, tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsules of affected males contained antigens reactive with GPS. These immunochemical studies suggest that the FNS antigen is distinct from Goodpasture antigen(s). The expression of FNS antigen located on the NC1 domain of type IV collagen is altered in basement membranes of patients with Alport-type FN, and the distribution of this antigenic anomaly within kindreds suggests X-linked dominant transmission of a defective gene.

  1. Blood Group Antigens C, Lub and P1 May Have a Role in HIV Infection in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Modisa Sekhamo; Kasvosve, Ishmael; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi Omoniyi

    2016-01-01

    Botswana is among the world's countries with the highest rates of HIV infection. It is not known whether or not this susceptibility to infection is due to genetic factors in the population. Accumulating evidence, however, points to the role of erythrocytes as potential mediators of infection. We therefore sought to establish the role, if any, of some erythrocyte antigens in HIV infection in a cross-section of the population. 348 (346 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive) samples were obtained from the National Blood Transfusion Service as residual samples, while 194 HIV-positive samples were obtained from the Botswana-Harvard HIV Reference Laboratory. Samples were grouped for twenty three antigens. Chi-square or Fischer Exact analyses were used to compare the frequencies of the antigens in the two groups. A stepwise, binary logistic regression was used to study the interaction of the various antigens in the light of HIV-status. The Rh antigens C and E were associated with HIV-negative status, while blood group Jka, P1 and Lub were associated with HIV-positive status. A stepwise binary logistic regression analysis yielded group C as the most significant protective blood group while Lub and P1 were associated with significantly higher odds ratio in favor of HIV-infection. The lower-risk-associated group C was significantly lower in Africans compared to published data for Caucasians and might partially explain the difference in susceptibility to HIV-1. The most influential antigen C, which also appears to be protective, is significantly lower in Africans than published data for Caucasians or Asians. On the other hand, there appear to be multiple antigens associated with increased risk that may override the protective role of C. A study of the distribution of these antigens in other populations may shed light on their roles in the HIV pandemic.

  2. Genomic organization, splice variants and expression of CGM1, a CD66-related member of the carcinoembryonic antigen gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, G.; Grunert, F.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Watt, S. M.; Thompson, J.; Zimmermann, W.

    1993-01-01

    The tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) belongs to a family of proteins which are composed of one immunoglobulin variable domain and a varying number of immunoglobulin constant-like domains. Most of the membrane-bound members, which are anchored either by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol

  3. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia González

    Full Text Available The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs, which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories.We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua. High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment.TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies.Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs.

  4. Evaluation of the Secretor Status of ABO Blood Group Antigens in Saliva among Southern Rajasthan Population Using Absorption Inhibition Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metgud, Rashmi; Khajuria, Nidhi; Mamta; Ramesh, Gayathri

    2016-02-01

    The ABO blood group system was the significant element for forensic serological examination of blood and body fluids in the past before the wide adaptation of DNA typing. A significant proportion of individuals (80%) are secretors, meaning that antigens present in the blood are also found in other body fluids such as saliva. Absorption inhibition is one such method that works by reducing strength of an antiserum based on type and amount of antigen present in the stains. To check the efficacy of identifying the blood group antigens in saliva and to know the secretor status using absorption inhibition method among southern Rajasthan population. Blood and saliva samples were collected from 80 individuals comprising 20 individuals in each blood group. The absorption inhibition method was used to determine the blood group antigens in the saliva and then the results were correlated with the blood group of the collected blood sample. The compiled data was statistically analysed using chi-square test. Blood groups A & O revealed 100% secretor status for both males and females. While blood groups B and AB revealed 95% secretor status. Secretor status evaluation of the ABO blood group antigen in saliva using absorption inhibition method can be a useful tool in forensic examination.

  5. Effect of pronase on high-incidence blood group antigens and the prevalence of antibodies to pronase-treated erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M E; Greeen, C A; Hoffer, J; Øyen, R

    1996-01-01

    Pronase is a useful and relatively nonspecific protease that cleaves many red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins that carry blood group antigens. Unexpected findings in tests using pronase-treated RBCs during the investigation of a patient's blood sample led us to test which high-incidence blood group antigens were sensitive and which were resistant to pronase treatment, and to determine the prevalence of antipronase in the serum of blood donors. Our results show that antigens in the Cromer and Lutheran blood group systems and the JMH antigen were sensitive to pronase treatment of RBCs. Antigens in the Dombrock blood group system and Sc1 were either sensitive to or markedly weakened by pronase treatment of RBCs. The following high-incidence antigens were resistant to treatment of RBCs with pronase: AnWj, Ata, Coa, Co3, Dib, EnaFR, Era, Fy3, Jk3, Jra, k, Kpb, Jsb, K14, Lan, Oka, Rh17, U, Vel, and Wrb. Over half of the serum samples from normal blood donors contained antibodies to pronase-treated RBCs. When testing human serum against pronase-treated RBCs, it is essential either to use an autocontrol or to perform the testing with an eluate.

  6. Microbial F-type lectin domains with affinity for blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Sonal; Khairnar, Aasawari; Bishnoi, Ritika; Ramya, T N C

    2017-09-23

    F-type lectins are fucose binding lectins with characteristic fucose binding and calcium binding motifs. Although they occur with a selective distribution in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, most biochemical studies have focused on vertebrate F-type lectins. Recently, using sensitive bioinformatics search techniques on the non-redundant database, we had identified many microbial F-type lectin domains with diverse domain organizations. We report here the biochemical characterization of F-type lectin domains from Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001, Myxococcus hansupus and Leucothrix mucor. We demonstrate that while all these three microbial F-type lectin domains bind to the blood group H antigen epitope on fucosylated glycans, there are fine differences in their glycan binding specificity. Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001 F-type lectin domain binds exclusively to extended H type-2 motif, Myxococcus hansupus F-type lectin domain binds to B, H type-1 and Lewis b motifs, and Leucothrix mucor F-type lectin domain binds to a wide range of fucosylated glycans, including A, B, H and Lewis antigens. We believe that these microbial lectins will be useful additions to the glycobiologist's toolbox for labeling, isolating and visualizing glycans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variational formulae for Fuchsian groups over families of algebraic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the problem of understanding the uniformizing Fuchsian groups for a family of plane algebraic curves ... For such Xt we determine first variational formula for t 2 Gt where. Xt U=Gt (Gt is the uniformizing ... parabolic-free Fuchsian uniformizing group in the introduction above, the theory of. Teichmüller spaces works ...

  8. Enzyme release of antigen from Streptococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes cross-reactive with Lancefield group G typing reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfer, R L; Pinzon, R; Wenglar, M; Rolston, K V

    1985-10-01

    Enzyme extraction methods are commonly used to release antigen for Lancefield serogrouping of streptococci. Recently, up to 47% of enterococci have been found to possess antigens cross-reactive with both the group D and the group G grouping reagents. We investigated whether the organisms had recently emerged or whether changes in extraction methods (enzyme extraction) have resulted in our awareness of their existence. We found that approximately 20% of our enterococcal isolates released material cross-reactive with the group G reagents. These organisms have been present for at least 6 years, and probably for many more. In addition, we found that most strains of Listeria monocytogenes also released antigen cross-reactive with the group G reagent. The clinical significance of these findings is also discussed.

  9. BGMUT: NCBI dbRBC database of allelic variations of genes encoding antigens of blood group systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to human leukocyte antigens, blood group antigens are surface markers on the erythrocyte cell membrane whose structures differ among individuals and which can be serologically identified. The Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation Database (BGMUT) is an online repository of allelic variations in genes that determine the antigens of various human blood group systems. The database is manually curated with allelic information collated from scientific literature and from direct submissions from research laboratories. Currently, the database documents sequence variations of a total of 1251 alleles of all 40 gene loci that together are known to affect antigens of 30 human blood group systems. When available, information on the geographic or ethnic prevalence of an allele is also provided. The BGMUT website also has general information on the human blood group systems and the genes responsible for them. BGMUT is a part of the dbRBC resource of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA, and is available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gv/rbc/xslcgi.fcgi?cmd=bgmut. The database should be of use to members of the transfusion medicine community, those interested in studies of genetic variation and related topics such as human migrations, and students as well as members of the general public.

  10. Strong Military Families Program: A Multifamily Group Approach to Strengthening Family Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Kate; Muzik, Maria; Waddell, Rachel; Thompson, Stephanie; Rosenberg, Lauren; Masini, Gabriella; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Military families frequently display remarkable resilience in the face of significant challenges, and yet deployment and parental separation are significant stressors for parents, particularly those with infants and young children. The Strong Military Families preventive intervention is a multifamily parenting and self-care skills group that aims…

  11. Protein array profiling of tic patient sera reveals a broad range and enhanced immune response against Group A Streptococcus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Bombaci

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes, GAS is widely recognized as a major cause of common pharyngitis as well as of severe invasive diseases and non-suppurative sequelae associated with the existence of GAS antigens eliciting host autoantibodies. It has been proposed that a subset of paediatric disorders characterized by tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms would exacerbate in association with relapses of GAS-associated pharyngitis. This hypothesis is however still controversial. In the attempt to shed light on the contribution of GAS infections to the onset of neuropsychiatric or behavioral disorders affecting as many as 3% of children and adolescents, we tested the antibody response of tic patient sera to a representative panel of GAS antigens. In particular, 102 recombinant proteins were spotted on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides and probed against 61 sera collected from young patients with typical tic neuropsychiatric symptoms but with no overt GAS infection. Sera from 35 children with neither tic disorder nor overt GAS infection were also analyzed. The protein recognition patterns of these two sera groups were compared with those obtained using 239 sera from children with GAS-associated pharyngitis. This comparative analysis identified 25 antigens recognized by sera of the three patient groups and 21 antigens recognized by tic and pharyngitis sera, but poorly or not recognized by sera from children without tic. Interestingly, these antigens appeared to be, in quantitative terms, more immunogenic in tic than in pharyngitis patients. Additionally, a third group of antigens appeared to be preferentially and specifically recognized by tic sera. These findings provide the first evidence that tic patient sera exhibit immunological profiles typical of individuals who elicited a broad, specific and strong immune response against GAS. This may be relevant in the context of one of the hypothesis proposing that GAS

  12. Renormalisation group improved leptogenesis in family symmetry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Iain K.; King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We study renormalisation group (RG) corrections relevant for leptogenesis in the case of family symmetry models such as the Altarelli-Feruglio A 4 model of tri-bimaximal lepton mixing or its extension to tri-maximal mixing. Such corrections are particularly relevant since in large classes of family symmetry models, to leading order, the CP violating parameters of leptogenesis would be identically zero at the family symmetry breaking scale, due to the form dominance property. We find that RG corrections violate form dominance and enable such models to yield viable leptogenesis at the scale of right-handed neutrino masses. More generally, the results of this paper show that RG corrections to leptogenesis cannot be ignored for any family symmetry model involving sizeable neutrino and τ Yukawa couplings.

  13. Group Intervention for Dementia Family Caregivers: A Longitudinal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.

    1989-01-01

    Conducted longitudinal follow-up to previously published experimental study of effectiveness of group intervention for dementia family caregivers. Found methodological and clinical issues relevant to future studies included issues of differential attrition from treatment, selection of participants,and need for measures appropriate to long-term…

  14. Histo-blood group ABO antigen in oral potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma--genotypic and phenotypic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Bennett, Erik Paul; Reibel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A/B antigens is frequent in oral cancer. It is unclear whether this alteration is due to loss of the chromosomal region encoding the genes. The aim was to investigate genotypic alterations in the ABO locus in oral potentially malignant lesions and carcinomas. Seventy...... and 3/24 cases with mild and moderate dysplasia by genotyping analysis. O allele loss was found in 10 cases involving all four groups. In patients with heterozygous genotypes, A/B allelic loss by genotyping analysis was always followed by loss of A/B antigen expression by IHC staining. Loss of A...

  15. Biosynthetic basis of incompatible histo-blood group A antigen expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, L; Leitao, D; Sobrinho-Simoes, M

    1993-01-01

    presence of A antigen. The ABO genotype of all patients was found to be OO, showing that all carried O alleles with a structural defect at nucleotide position 261 leading to a shift in the reading frame. The data suggest that incompatible A antigen expression is a result of transferase expression derived...

  16. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinira Magali Fortuna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. METHOD: groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". CONCLUSIONS: continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  17. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2013-01-01

    to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  18. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite : differential evolution by positive selection and recombination - art. no. 292

    OpenAIRE

    Devault, A.; Banuls, Anne-Laure

    2008-01-01

    Background: PSA (promastigote surface antigen) is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results: From the newly available complete genome sequences of L...

  19. Lev Vygotsky’s ideas in family group logopsychotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova, N.L.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available According to Lev Vygotsky’s theory, every bodily deficiency not only changes a person’s attitude to the world but also entails social consequences, which makes its social and psychological rehabilitation so important. The way in which problems of deformity compensation and supercompensation are solved, is largely determined by a patient`s motivation. The paper deals with stuttering (logoneurosis as an extreme form of broken communication; it analyses the peculiarities of stutteres and their families, and the specific features of treating this defect; it also dwells on issues involving family co-participation in social rehabilitation. The multilayered system of family group logo psychotherapy - treatment of stuttering children, teenagers and adults - is based on Yu.B. Nekrasova’s method of group logopsychotherapy. It also employs non-traditional techniques: Nekrasova’s dynamic psycho-therapeutic diagnostics and biblio-, kinesi-, symbol-, video- and cinema therapies. This system may serve as a model for forming motivational involvement and intragenic activity by patients and their relatives in social rehabilitation processes. The paper describes the levels and psychological structure of motivational involvement and mechanisms of its formation in logopsychotherapeutic processes. Motivational involvement is understood as a source of a subject’s intragenic (inner activity, the paper maps out strategies to form intragenic activity. The family group logopsychotherapeutic techniques may also help optimize communication between parent and child, doctor and patient, teacher and pupil, professor and student.

  20. Circulation of HIV antigen in blood according to stage of infection, risk group, age and geographic origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Paul, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus antigen (HIV-ag) was determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in HIV-antibody (anti-HIV) positive as well as pre-anti-HIV seroconversion sera and the results analysed according to stage of infection, risk group, age and geographic origin. Eleven (19%) of 58 homosexual men

  1. Histo-blood group ABO antigen in oral potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma--genotypic and phenotypic characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Bennett, Erik Paul; Reibel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Loss of histo-blood group A/B antigens is frequent in oral cancer. It is unclear whether this alteration is due to loss of the chromosomal region encoding the genes. The aim was to investigate genotypic alterations in the ABO locus in oral potentially malignant lesions and carcinomas. Seventy...... to establish the ABO genotype. Total and patchy loss of A/B antigen expression was found in 24/32 carcinomas, 6/7 leukoplakias with severe dysplasia, 12/17 leukoplakias with mild and moderate dysplasia, and 6/17 leukoplakias without dysplasia. Specific A/B allele loss was found in 8/24 cases with carcinoma...

  2. A simple and rapid micromethod for genomic DNA extraction from jugal epithelial cells. Application to human lymphocyte antigen typing in one large family of atopic/asthmatic probands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Y; Swierczewski, E; Lockhart, A

    1994-10-01

    We describe a rapid and reliable micromethod for DNA isolation from buccal epithelial cells from the interior mouth mucosa. This convenient, noninvasive method could be applied to genetic typing in a small number of cells (about 2000 cells per cheek). We have shown that DNA released by this method is suitable for further amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using this protocol, coupled with the PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) method, we analyzed the allelic sequence diversity of the human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes in an extended family of 33 persons containing 14 asthmatic or atopic members. Six of eight DQA1 alleles, and 11 DQB1, 20 DPB1, and 10 DR haplotypes could be identified in a single DNA sample. Our results suggest that the DR53 group haplotype is frequently associated with allergic asthma and atopy. The micromethod described here may be useful in genetic epidemiology, especially in family studies involving small children.

  3. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and elution experiments showed that it was impossible to separate antibodies against blood group factor M' from antibodies against bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA) A16 in an antiserum showing haemolytic activity against M' as well as lymphocytotoxic activity against BoLA-A16....... To elucidate the structural relationship between BoLA-A16 and blood group antigen M', immunoprecipitation experiments on red and white cell lysates isolated from M'-A16 positive and negative cattle were carried out. These results showed that M(r) 44,000 and M(r) 12000 polypeptides can be precipitated from both...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  4. A small-group approach to teaching family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, L; Devieux, J; Huff, F; Barker, P; Arradondo, J E; Devieux, R

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a method for teaching preclinical medical students some important family medicine concepts utilizing a seminar format which allows for improved student-teacher interaction and individualization of material. These seminars, on family health behavior, compliance, behavioral interventions for life-style change, and managing stress, were designed to encourage freshman medical students to understand and apply concepts concerning health behavior and attitudes, both personally and professionally. The format of these sessions included the use of self-assessment instruments, discussion, role play, and case studies. Results of student evaluations indicate they perceived the seminars positively. Specific areas of positive value included the content and small-group related processes. The seminars also provided data useful for developing programs for students.

  5. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sabbi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: helicobacter pylori (hp infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World health organization. the exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. Methods: We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8% children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. Results: stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent’s occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (egdS that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. Conclusions: the results of this study suggest that risk factors for hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  6. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding

    KAUST Repository

    Di Palma, Francesco

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody–antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation.

  7. Antibody to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or O donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Hansen, J E; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    for virus neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) AH16 directed against the blood group A epitope. MAb AH16 was previously shown to inhibit cell-free virus infection using HTLV-IIIB propagated in H9 cells. AH16 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the HTLV-IIIB/lyA isolate but did...... not inhibit the HTLV-IIIB/lyB or the HTLV-IIIB/lyO isolate. Specificity of the MAb-mediated inhibition was shown using A-antigen (tetrasaccharide). Thus, HIV infection of PBMC from donors with blood type A appears to induce expression of host-cell-encoded carbohydrate blood group A epitope on HIV which can......Three virus isolates HTLV-IIIB/lyA, HTLV-IIIB/lyB and HTLV-IIIB/lyO, obtained by passaging and propagating the HTLV-IIIB/H9 isolate in three separate cultures of mixed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from donors of blood type A, B or O, respectively, were tested for susceptibility...

  8. [Development of nursing pratice in family medecine groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; Goudreau, Johanne; Hudon, Eveline; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Lamothe, Lise; Jobin, Guy; Gilbert, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the development of nursing practice in family medicine groups (FMGs). The two-year case study consisted of 73 semi-directed interviews ofnurses, physicians and managers in five FMGs. The findings led to three main observations: nursing practice varies considerably from one FMG to another, the development of nurses' practice seems to be associated with the development of a collaborative relationship, and the satisfaction of the professionals in the FMG, nurses in particular, depends on the type of practice. It is important to implement measures to encourage the optimal use ofnurses' skills in a FMG.

  9. Rapid genotyping of blood group antigens by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and DNA microarray hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beiboer, Sigrid H. W.; Wieringa-Jelsma, Tinka; Maaskant-van Wijk, Petra A.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Zwieten, Rob; Roos, Dirk; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Haas, Masja

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, 500,000 blood donors are active. Blood of all donors is currently typed serologically for ABO, the Rh phenotype, and K. Only a subset of donors is typed twice for a larger set of red cell (RBC) and/or platelet (PLT) antigens. To increase the direct availability of

  10. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A J; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A F

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous ...

  11. The Shc Family Protein Adaptor, Rai, Negatively Regulates T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling by Inhibiting ZAP-70 Recruitment and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neuro...

  12. Genetic distribution of noncapsular meningococcal group B vaccine antigens in Neisseria lactamica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidarme, Jay; Gilchrist, Stefanie; Newbold, Lynne S; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Richardson, Lynne; Bennett, Julia S; Maiden, Martin C J; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray

    2013-09-01

    The poor immunogenicity of the meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) capsule has led to the development of vaccines targeting subcapsular antigens, in particular the immunodominant and diverse outer membrane porin, PorA. These vaccines are largely strain specific; however, they offer limited protection against the diverse MenB-associated diseases observed in many industrialized nations. To broaden the scope of its protection, the multicomponent vaccine (4CMenB) incorporates a PorA-containing outer membrane vesicle (OMV) alongside relatively conserved recombinant protein components, including factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), and neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA). The expression of PorA is unique to meningococci (Neisseria meningitidis); however, many subcapsular antigens are shared with nonpathogenic members of the genus Neisseria that also inhabit the nasopharynx. These organisms may elicit cross-protective immunity against meningococci and/or occupy a niche that might otherwise accommodate pathogens. The potential for 4CMenB responses to impact such species (and vice versa) was investigated by determining the genetic distribution of the primary 4CMenB antigens among diverse members of the common childhood commensal, Neisseria lactamica. All the isolates possessed nhba but were devoid of fhbp and nadA. The nhba alleles were mainly distinct from but closely related to those observed among a representative panel of invasive MenB isolates from the same broad geographic region. We made similar findings for the immunogenic typing antigen, FetA, which constitutes a major part of the 4CMenB OMV. Thus, 4CMenB vaccine responses may impact or be impacted by nasopharyngeal carriage of commensal neisseriae. This highlights an area for further research and surveillance should the vaccine be routinely implemented.

  13. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as

  14. Incorporation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels into the prognostic grouping system of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Heita; Kotake, Kenjiro; Hosaka, Miki; Hirata, Akira; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Fujita, Shin; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the significance of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on disease-free survival (DFS) in colon cancer and propose a new prognostic grouping system. A multiinstitutional retrospective cohort of 7296 colon cancer patients who underwent R0 surgery between 1997 and 2006 was analyzed. We stratified preoperative serum CEA values into three categories (C-stages): C0 (normal CEA), C1A (up to double the cutoff value), and C1B (more than double the cutoff value) and stratified each TNM stage by C-stage. Multivariate analyses using Cox regression models were used to analyze the significance of C-stage on 5-year DFS. CEA level was an independent factor affecting DFS; the 5-year DFS of patients with C0 and C1, as well as those with C1A and C1B, differed significantly (C0 84.6%, C1 69.8%, C1A 72.7%, and C1B 66.4%, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the DFS of pStages IIC and C1B was significantly lower than of pStages IIIA and C0 (65.8 vs. 87.7%, respectively; hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.97-5.88, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the 5-year DFS of pStages IIIA and C0 or C1A did not differ significantly from pStages I and C1A (87.7 vs. 87.7%, P = 0.90 and 86.4 vs. 87.7%, P = 0.78, respectively). pStage IIC and C1B disease should be considered candidates for intensive adjuvant chemotherapy. Conversely, pStages IIIA and C0 or C1A could be exempted from adjuvant chemotherapy. Incorporating C-stage into the current TNM staging system may facilitate decision making regarding the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients.

  15. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    ), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  16. Multi-Family Group Intervention for OEF/OIF Traumatic Brain Injury Survivors and their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    conjunction with 4th Pacific Rim Meeting of the Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) in Auckland , New Zealand. Brain...couples and child coping skills and support networks, the intervention aims to reduce the risk for child behavior problems and distress that limit growth ... economics and family issues, incarceration and substance abuse of Veterans and/or spouses makes it inevitable that some Veterans will like the group

  17. The Echinococcus granulosus antigen B gene family comprises at least 10 unique genes in five subclasses which are differentially expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbao; Li, Jun; Jones, Malcolm K; Zhang, Zhuangzhi; Zhao, Li; Blair, David; McManus, Donald Peter

    2010-08-10

    Antigen B (EgAgB) is a major protein produced by the metacestode cyst of Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. This protein has been shown to play an important role in modulating host immune responses, although its precise biological function still remains unknown. It is generally accepted that EgAgB is comprised of a gene family of five subfamilies which are highly polymorphic, but the actual number of genes present is unknown. Based on published sequences for the family, we designed specific primers for each subfamily and used PCR to amplify them from genomic DNA isolated from individual mature adult worms (MAW) taken from an experimentally infected dog in China and individual larval protoscoleces (PSC) excised from a single hydatid cyst taken from an Australian kangaroo. We then used real-time PCR to measure expression of each of the genes comprising the five EgAgB subfamilies in all life-cycle stages including the oncosphere (ONC). Based on sequence alignment analysis, we found that the EgAgB gene family comprises at least ten unique genes. Each of the genes was identical in both larval and adult E. granulosus isolates collected from two geographical areas (different continents). DNA alignment comparisons with EgAgB sequences deposited in GenBank databases showed that each gene in the gene family is highly conserved within E. granulosus, which contradicts previous studies claiming significant variation and polymorphism in EgAgB. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the genes were differentially expressed in different life-cycle stages of E. granulosus with EgAgB3 expressed predominantly in all stages. These findings are fundamental for determining the expression and the biological function of antigen B.

  18. Prevalence of Principal Rh Blood Group Antigens in Blood Donors at the Blood Bank of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundrajukuppam, Deepthi Krishna; Vijaya, Sreedhar Babu Kinnera; Rajendran, Arun; Sarella, Jothibai Dorairaj

    2016-05-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigen was discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner and Wiener. Due to its immunogenicity along with A, B antigens, Rh D antigen testing was made mandatory in pre-transfusion testing. Presently there are more than 50 antigens in Rh blood group system but major ones are D, C, E, c, and e. Very few reports are available regarding their prevalence in India and no reports are available from Andhra Pradesh. To study the prevalence of principal Rh blood group antigens like D, C, E, c & e in the voluntary blood donors attending our blood bank. A prospective cross-sectional non interventional study was carried out on 1000 healthy blood donors from August 2013 to July 2014 at our blood bank. Donors were grouped and typed for ABO and Rh major antigens using monoclonal blood grouping reagents as per the manufacturer's instructions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. Comparison of categorical data between antigen positive and negative individuals was done using Chi-square test. Descriptive statistics for the categorical variables were performed by computing the frequencies (percentages) in each category. Incidence was given in proportion with 95% confidence interval. A total of 1000 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. Among Rh antigens, e was the most common antigen (98.4%), followed by D-94.1%, C-88%, c-54.9% and E-18.8% with DCe/DCe (R1R1) (43.4%) being the most common phenotype and the least common phenotype is r'r' (0.1%). Database for antigen frequency to at least Rh blood group system in local donors helps to provide antigen negative blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies, minimize alloimmunization rate, and thereby improve blood safety.

  19. Molecular typing for blood group antigens within 40 min by direct polymerase chain reaction from plasma or serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F; Flegel, Willy A; Bittner, Rita; Döscher, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Determining blood group antigens by serological methods may be unreliable in certain situations, such as in patients after chronic or massive transfusion. Red cell genotyping offers a complementary approach, but current methods may take much longer than conventional serological typing, limiting their utility in urgent situations. To narrow this gap, we devised a rapid method using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification while avoiding the DNA extraction step. DNA was amplified by PCR directly from plasma or serum of blood donors followed by a melting curve analysis in a capillary rapid-cycle PCR assay. We evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying the clinically relevant Fy a , Fy b , Jk a and Jk b antigens, with our analysis being completed within 40 min of receiving a plasma or serum sample. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value at least 84%. Direct PCR with melting point analysis allowed faster red cell genotyping to predict blood group antigens than any previous molecular method. Our assay may be used as a screening tool with subsequent confirmatory testing, within the limitations of the false-negative rate. With fast turnaround times, the rapid-cycle PCR assay may eventually be developed and applied to red cell genotyping in the hospital setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Antibiotic treatment attenuates behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by exposure of rats to group a streptococcal antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Lotan

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal A (GAS sequelae including movement and neuropsychiatric disorders have been associated with improvement in response to antibiotic therapy. Besides eradication of infection, the underlying basis of attenuation of neuropsychiatric symptoms following antibiotic treatment is not known. The aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in a rat model of GAS-related neuropsychiatric disorders. In the model, rats were not infected but were exposed to GAS-antigen or to adjuvants only (Control rats and treated continuously with the antibiotic ampicillin in their drinking water from the first day of GAS-antigen exposure. Two additional groups of rats (GAS and Control did not receive ampicillin in their drinking water. Behavior of the four groups was assessed in the forced swim, marble burying and food manipulation assays. We assessed levels of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase in the prefrontal cortex and striatum, and IgG deposition in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and thalamus. Ampicillin treatment prevented emergence of the motor and some of the behavioral alterations induced by GAS-antigen exposure, reduced IgG deposition in the thalamus of GAS-exposed rats, and tended to attenuate the increase in the level of TH and D1 and D2 receptors in their striatum, without concomitantly reducing the level of sera anti-GAS antibodies. Our results reinforce the link between exposure to GAS antigen, dysfunction of central dopaminergic pathways and motor and behavioral alterations. Our data further show that some of these deleterious effects can be attenuated by antibiotic treatment, and supports the latter's possible efficacy as a prophylactic treatment in GAS-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Limitations of the Echinococcus granulosus genome sequence assemblies for analysis of the gene family encoding the EG95 vaccine antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles G; Alvarez Rojas, Cristian A; Chow, Conan; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2017-11-27

    Echinococcus granulosus is an important zoonotic parasite that is distributed worldwide. The EG95 vaccine was developed to assist with control of E. granulosus transmission through the parasite's livestock intermediate hosts. The vaccine is based on a recombinant antigen encoded by a gene which is a member of a multi-gene family. With the recent availability of two E. granulosus draft genomes, we sought to map the eg95 gene family to the genomes. We were unable to map unequivocally any of the eg95 gene family members which had previously been characterized by cloning and sequencing both strands of genomic DNA fragments. Our inability to map EG95-related genes to the genomes has revealed limitations in the assembled sequence data when utilized for gene family analyses. This study contrasts with the expectations expressed in often high-profile publications describing draft genomes of parasitic organisms, highlighting deficiencies in currently available genomic resources for E. granulosus and provides a cautionary note for research which seeks to utilize these genome datasets.

  2. The type-specific polysaccharide and the R protein antigens of the L-phase from a group B, type III Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A E; Ferrieri, P

    1985-04-01

    The type-specific polysaccharide and the R protein antigens from filtered culture supernatants of the bacterial phase and L-phase of the group B, type III streptococcal strain 76-043 were studied by several immunological methods. In the L-phase of growth, the two antigens were separate and distinct molecules which were found principally in the culture supernatant even on the 254th serial subculture in the cell-wall-defective state. Only trace amounts of these antigens were detected in extracts of L-phase cells. The type III polysaccharide antigens in the supernatant of cultures of the parent bacterium and the L-phase gave reactions of identity in immunodiffusion. Precipitin bands obtained by immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) revealed that the type-specific antigen of the bacterial phase of growth migrated toward the anode, whereas that of the L-phase remained near the antigen well. The R protein antigen in the L-phase supernatant was immunologically identical to the R protein of the supernatant and 1% trypsin-extracted antigens from whole cells of the parent bacterial strain, and other groups A, B and C streptococcal strains sharing a common R antigen. Immunologically, the R antigen appeared to be the species R4. The R protein of the L-phase and bacterial phase cultures was resistant to 5% trypsin but sensitive to 0.5% pepsin at 37 degrees C/2hr. Antiserum prepared in rabbits against L-phase cells contained an antibody reactive with the R protein antigens of the bacterial and L-phase cultures. The soluble, naturally released type III and R protein streptococcal antigens of the L-phase of growth permitted immunological confirmation of its bacterial origin.

  3. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote an Early Antibody Response to a Respiratory Antigen in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Bartemes, Kathleen; Kita, Hirohito

    2016-08-15

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new family of immune cells that play important roles in innate immunity in mucosal tissues, and in the maintenance of tissue and metabolic homeostasis. Recently, group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) were found to promote the development and effector functions of Th2-type CD4(+) T cells by interacting directly with T cells or by activating dendritic cells, suggesting a role for ILC2s in regulating adaptive immunity. However, our current knowledge on the role of ILCs in humoral immunity is limited. In this study, we found that ILC2s isolated from the lungs of naive BALB/c mice enhanced the proliferation of B1- as well as B2-type B cells and promoted the production of IgM, IgG1, IgA, and IgE by these cells in vitro. Soluble factors secreted by ILC2s were sufficient to enhance B cell Ig production. By using blocking Abs and ILC2s isolated from IL-5-deficient mice, we found that ILC2-derived IL-5 is critically involved in the enhanced production of IgM. Furthermore, when adoptively transferred to Il7r(-/-) mice, which lack ILC2s and mature T cells, lung ILC2s promoted the production of IgM Abs to a polysaccharide Ag, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl Ficoll, within 7 d of airway exposure in vivo. These findings add to the growing body of literature regarding the regulatory functions of ILCs in adaptive immunity, and suggest that lung ILC2s promote B cell production of early Abs to a respiratory Ag even in the absence of T cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Antigenicity and protective efficacy of a Leishmania amastigote-specific protein, member of the super-oxygenase family, against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian T Martins

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate a hypothetical Leishmania amastigote-specific protein (LiHyp1, previously identified by an immunoproteomic approach performed in Leishmania infantum, which showed homology to the super-oxygenase gene family, attempting to select a new candidate antigen for specific serodiagnosis, as well as to compose a vaccine against VL.The LiHyp1 DNA sequence was cloned; the recombinant protein (rLiHyp1 was purified and evaluated for its antigenicity and immunogenicity. The rLiHyp1 protein was recognized by antibodies from sera of asymptomatic and symptomatic animals with canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL, but presented no cross-reactivity with sera of dogs vaccinated with Leish-Tec, a Brazilian commercial vaccine; with Chagas' disease or healthy animals. In addition, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rLiHyp1 plus saponin was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged subcutaneously with virulent L. infantum promastigotes. rLiHyp1 plus saponin vaccinated mice showed a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with the recombinant protein. Immunized and infected mice, as compared to the control groups (saline and saponin, showed significant reductions in the number of parasites found in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and in the paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, produced mainly by CD4 T cells. In these mice, a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 response could also be observed.The present study showed that this Leishmania oxygenase amastigote-specific protein can be used for a more sensitive and specific serodiagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic CVL and, when combined with a Th1-type adjuvant, can also be employ as a candidate antigen to develop vaccines against VL.

  5. Using a genomic assay for the detection of SNPs of Knops blood group antigens leads to the identification of two caucasians homozygous for the SNP associated with the knops SL3 antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. A.; Sprogoe, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Case Studies: The antigens of the Knops (Kn) blood group system are associated with SNPs located on exon 29 and (to lesser extent) on exon 26 of the complement receptor 1 (CR1) gene. Because of a lack of proper typing antibodies, serologic detection of Kn antigens is not feasible. We...... previously described to be Sl3- (personal communication from the International Blood Group Reference Laboratory in Bristol). * Number indicates the nucleotide position of the CR1 gene. Conclusion: In this study, we have set up a genomic assay for identifying the antigens in the Knops system. We found...... designed a genomic assay based on sequencing targeting the SNPs underlying the antigens of the Knops system. Study Design/Methods: Samples from a total of 105 blood donors and 2 patients were examined for polymorphisms in CR1 exon 29 by using PCR and subsequent Sanger sequencing. Results...

  6. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti......-cancer therapy and specific antisense oligonucleotides or small molecule inhibitors have shown broad anti-cancer activities in pre-clinical models and are currently tested in clinical trials. In addition, immune-mediated tumor destruction is emerging as an interesting modality to treat cancer patients. Notably......, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti...

  7. The extended family of CD1d-restricted T cells: sifting through a mixed bag of TCRs, antigens and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie eMacho-Fernandez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR usage and antigen-specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, antitumor immunity, and autoimmunity.

  8. The Extended Family of CD1d-Restricted NKT Cells: Sifting through a Mixed Bag of TCRs, Antigens, and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Fernandez, Elodie; Brigl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR) usage and antigen specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, anti-tumor immunity, and autoimmunity.

  9. Radioimmunoassay of capsular polysaccaride antigens of groups A and C meningococci and Haemophilus influenza type b in cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeyhty, H.; Maekelae, P.H.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1977-01-01

    Sensitive radioimmunoassays capable of measuring 0.5 ng/ml of the Haemophilus influenza type b polysaccharide and 2 ng/ml of the groups A and C meningococcal polysaccharides were developed and used to detect these substances in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Polysaccharide of the causative agent was detected in the CSF of 14 out of 15 patients with Haemophilus influenza type b meningitis, in 18 out of 23 patients with group A, and in two out of four patients with group C meningococcal meningitis. In some cases the antigen could be detected even after three days of antibacterial treatment. No false positive reactions were seen. The assay procedure could be shortened to approximately three hours. These assays could be useful in routine diagnostic work and epidemiological investigations. (author)

  10. Experiences from a support group for families of preschool children in the expressive AAC user group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadskleiv, Kristine

    2017-03-01

    Children using aided language need communication partners who are competent in modeling language, but most parents of children who use AAC will not have extensive experience with aided communication and will therefore need support to become competent language models. In this participatory observational study the experiences of a support group for parents of young children with age-expected language comprehension who use aided communication expressively are outlined. The group was established in 2012 at a habilitation unit in a hospital, and involved five families of children who use AAC. Field notes were taken during each group meeting and related activities. Parents and professionals agreed on the following topics for discussion: child development, aided communication, communication devices, and policy affecting AAC implementation. The group developed and implemented a range of innovative interventions: (a) a Children's Day at the hospital, (b) a communication plan template, (c) a school preparation workshop, (d) a network for teachers, (e) education of hospital staff, (f) dissemination of knowledge about AAC, and (g) making aided resources available for the ISAAC-Norway website. The aim of increasing the parents' confidence and competence was achieved through a combination of discussions and teaching. The children benefitted not only from the parents' new knowledge, but also from the interventions implemented.

  11. Consolidation of glycosyl hydrolase family 30 : a dual domain 4/7 hydrolase family consisting of two structurally distinct groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz J. St John; Javier M. Gonzalez; Edwin Pozharski

    2010-01-01

    In this work glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 30 (GH30) is analyzed and shown to consist of its currently classified member sequences as well as several homologous sequence groups currently assigned within family GH5. A large scale amino acid sequence alignment and a phylogenetic tree were generated and GH30 groups and subgroups were designated. A partial rearrangement...

  12. Intergenerational family solidarity: value differences between immigrant groups and generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Eva-Maria; Ozeke-Kocabas, Ezgi; Oort, Frans J; Schuengel, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Although immigrants may be more dependent on their immediate family for support, they may also experience a wider generation-gap in values regarding intergenerational solidarity, because of processes of acculturation. Based on large scale survey data (N = 2,028), differences between first and second generation immigrants in values regarding intergenerational solidarity were examined among family members in the Netherlands with an immigration background from Turkey, Morocco, Suriname, and The Dutch Antilles. Using a multilevel analytic approach, effects of family and individual characteristics on values regarding intergenerational solidarity were tested, considering the perspectives of two generations. It was found that immigrants with Moroccan and Turkish backgrounds scored higher on values with respect to intergenerational family solidarity than immigrants stemming from Suriname and The Antilles. First generation immigrants placed higher values on family solidarity compared to second generation immigrants. Additionally, religious denomination was a significant predictor of higher values with respect to intergenerational family solidarity. Immigration and acculturation may create great strains in migrant families. Policies to support the fabric of intergenerational solidarity should consider ethnic and religious background and immigration history. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. The Multiple Family Group as a Small Society: Fitting Theory and Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, David; And Others

    This is a comprehensive report of a study of the mechanisms by which the family regulates its interaction with the immediate social environment. Subjects were four multiple family groups, each composed of six or more families, meeting in both hospital and home settings. In each family, at least one member was either an alcoholic or an adolescent…

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen family receptor recognition by gonococcal Opa proteins requires distinct combinations of hypervariable Opa protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Martine P; Kao, David; Hogan, Daniel M; Grant, Christopher C R; Belland, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    Neisserial Opa proteins function as a family of adhesins that bind heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) or carcinoembryonic antigen family (CEACAM) receptors on human host cells. In order to define the CEACAM binding domain on Opa proteins, we tested the binding properties of a series of gonococcal (strain MS11) recombinants producing mutant and chimeric Opa proteins with alterations in one or more of the four surface-exposed loops. Mutagenesis demonstrated that the semivariable domain, present in the first loop, was completely dispensable for CEACAM binding. In contrast, the two hypervariable (HV) regions present in the second and third loops were essential for binding; deletion of either domain resulted in loss of receptor recognition. Deletion of the fourth loop resulted in a severe decrease in Opa expression at the cell surface and could therefore not be tested for CEACAM binding. Chimeric Opa variants, containing combinations of HV regions derived from different CEACAM binding Opa proteins, lost most of their receptor binding activity. Some chimeric variants gained HSPG binding activity. Together, our results indicate that full recognition of CEACAM receptors by Opa proteins requires a highly coordinate interplay between both HV regions. Furthermore, shuffling of HV regions may result in novel HSPG receptor binding activity.

  15. Association of HLA antigens with the clinical course of sarcoidosis and familial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardag, Halil; Tetikkurt, Cuneyt; Bilir, Muammer; Yılmaz, Erkan

    2017-09-27

    Patients with sarcoidosis usually have a benign course and a favourable prognosis. Although spontaneous remission is common, a progressive disease with a severe prognosis occurs in a small but significant number of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential significance of HLA antigens as a clinical marker on the outcome of sarcoidosis patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for HLA class I and II allels in 74 sarcoidosis patients and 72 healthy transplant donors. Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies were performed in each patient. Two or more positive bronchial biopsy samples revealing granulomatous inflammation was defined as diffuse while one positive biopsy sample was considered as limited endobronchial disease. Three or more extrapulmonary organ involvement was denoted as severe extrapulmonary disease. The patients were followed-up at least for eight years.  Incidence of progressive disease was significantly high in patients with positive HLA-DRB1*07, DRB1*14 (pHLA-DRB1*14 and DRB1*15 were associated with severe extrapulmonary organ involvement (pHLA-DRB1 *14 (pdisease was 14.8% with a 6.7% identical HLA typing. Presence of HLA class I and II allels may influence the severity and prognosis of sarcoidosis significantly. Apart from defining genetic susceptibility, HLA class I and class II allels appear to be relevant and crucial markers for the to predict the clinical outcome of sarcoidosis. Distinct heterogenity of sarcoidosis may arise from the particular presence of different allels in invidual patients.

  16. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  17. Predictors of Family Participation in a Multiple Family Group Intervention for Aggressive Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, William H.; Hall, Dan B.; Smith, Emilie P.; Rabiner, David

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine predictors of family participation in the G.R.E.A.T. Families Program of the Multisite Violence Prevention Project (MVPP), a four-site collaboration examining student, teacher, and family interventions for middle school students. Teachers recruited two cohorts of sixth grade students, recognized as being aggressive and…

  18. Human platelet antigen polymorphisms (HPA-1, -2, -3, -4, -5 and -15) in major ethnic groups of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, F A; Uddin, M; Ahmed, A; Bugert, P

    2010-04-01

    Gene frequencies of human platelet antigens (HPA) determine the magnitude of platelet immunological disorders like neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, platelet refractoriness and ease of availability of particular HPA-typed platelet donors in a given community. However, the pattern of HPA in Pakistani population is not known. The aim of present study was to determine the gene frequencies of HPA (HPA-1 to -5 and -15) in individuals belonging to major ethnic groups and castes of Pakistani population. HPA genotyping was done in 593 individuals belonging to all ethnic groups of Pakistan, by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers with detection on polyacrylamide electrophoresis. The gene frequencies of the 'a' and 'b' alleles of HPA-1 to -5 and -15 in Pakistanis were as follows: HPA-1a/b, 0.885/0.115; HPA-2a/b, 0.92/0.08; HPA-3a/b, 0.69/0.31; HPA-4a/b, 1/0; HPA-5a/b, 0.9/0.1; HPA-15a/b, 0.59/0.41. Except for significant difference regarding gene frequency of HPA-3 between Pathans and Sindhis, there was no significant difference of HPA-1 to -5 and -15 between major ethnic groups of Pakistan. The estimated mismatch probability regarding platelet antigens 1-5 and 15 in Pakistanis, after transfusion of random donor platelets, is from 14 to 37%. The expected incidence of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HPA-1a in Pakistani pregnant females is a need to establish donor registries typed for HPA in the transfusion centres of the country.

  19. Family group conferencing in youth care : characteristics of the decision making model, implementation and effectiveness of the Family Group (FG) plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, Jessica J.; Dijkstra, Sharon; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Dekovic, Maja; Creemers, Hanneke E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The model of Family group-conferencing (FG-c) for decision making in child welfare has rapidly spread over the world during the past decades. Its popularity is likely to be caused by its philosophy, emphasizing participation and autonomy of families, rather than based on positive

  20. ABO blood group antigen mismatch has an impact on outcome after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Matthias; Wolff, Daniel; Ahrens, Norbert; Herzberg, Philipp Y; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    ABO blood group antigen incompatibility (ABO mismatch) is not an obstacle to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the impact on clinical outcome after allo-SCT remains controversial. We analyzed 512 patients after allogeneic peripheral blood SCT (allo-PBSCT) for an association of ABO mismatch with transfusion requirements, myeloid and platelet engraftment, the incidence of GvHD, relapse, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall survival (OS). A total of 260 patients underwent ABO-mismatched transplantation and the control group consisted of 252 patients with ABO-matched allo-PBSCT. We found a significant association between major-0 ABO mismatch (group 0 recipient/group A, B, or AB donor) and increased red blood cell (RBC) and platelet transfusion requirements (both Pmismatch was significantly associated with an increased TRM after allo-PBSCT (P=.001 and P=.02). In multivariate analysis performed using Cox regression, minor ABO mismatch appeared as independent risk factor for TRM after allo-PBSCT. No association was found for ABO mismatch with the incidence of GvHD, relapse, and OS. Our results suggest that ABO blood group mismatch has a significant impact on the outcome and that minor-A and minor-AB ABO mismatch represents a risk factor for increased TRM after allo-PBSCT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Intergenerational family solidarity: value differences between immigrant groups and generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, Eva-Maria; Ozeke-Kocabas, Ezgi; Oort, Frans J.; Schuengel, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Although immigrants may be more dependent on their immediate family for support, they may also experience a wider generation-gap in values regarding intergenerational solidarity, because of processes of acculturation. Based on large scale survey data (N = 2,028), differences between first and second

  2. Intergenerational family solidarity: value differences between immigrant groups and generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.-M.; Özeke Kocabas, E.; Oort, F.J.; Schuengel, C.

    2009-01-01

    Although immigrants may be more dependent on their immediate family for support, they may also experience a wider generation-gap in values regarding intergenerational solidarity, because of processes of acculturation. Based on large scale survey data (N 2,028), differences between first and second

  3. Histo-blood group antigens in human fetal thymus and in thymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, P; Dabelsteen, Erik; Francis, D

    1996-01-01

    -y, Le-x and sialyl-Le-x) of the ABO-histo-blood group system was investigated in 19 normal fetal thymuses (gestational age 16 to 39 weeks) and in 19 thymomas in order to study possible tumor-associated changes in the glycosylation pattern. The material was investigated by immunochemical stainings...

  4. Kell blood group antigen in Port Harcourt, Nigeria-a pilot study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The Kell blood group system is important and should be considered in blood transfusion practice in this environment. The data emanating from this study could be utilized in the planning and running of an efficient blood transfusion service and better management of our maternal and child unit. Keywords: Kell ...

  5. INRA, a new high-frequency antigen in the INDIAN (IN023 blood group system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmukh R Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The antibody to enzyme sensitive HFA was tested for serological and molecular genetics studies and found to be directed to the novel HFA, named as INRA of the INDIAN blood group system and was assigned a numerical symbol IN: 005 by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT.

  6. A unique variant of streptococcal group O-antigen (C-polysaccharide) that lacks phosphocholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, N; Jansson, P.-E.; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis strain SK598, which represents a subgroup of biovar 1, possesses a unique variant of the C-polysaccharide found in the cell wall of all strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and in some strains of S. mitis. This new variant lacks the choline methyl groups in contrast...

  7. [The role of miR-492 in the regulation of OK blood group antigen expression on red blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Luyi; Wang, Chen; Yang, Qixiu; Zhu, Ziyan

    2017-10-10

    To investigate whether miR-492 is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of OK blood group antigen expression on red blood cells. Two 3'-UTR fragments of the BSG gene were synthesized with a chemical method, which respectively encompassed the BSG rs8259 TT or BSG rs8259 AA sites. The fragments were added with Xho I and Not I restriction enzyme cutting sites at both ends and cloned into a pUC57 vector, which in turn was constructed into a psiCHECK-2 vector and verified by sequencing. K562 cells were transfected with various combinations of miR-492 mimic and constructed psiCHECK2-BSG-T or psiCHECK2-BSG-A recombinant plasmid. A blank control group was set up. Each transfection experiment was repeated three times. The activity of Renilla reniformis luciferase was determined and normalized with that of firefly luciferase, and detected with a dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The data were subjected to statistical analysis. The sequencing results confirmed that the recombinant psiCHECK2 plasmids containing the BSG rs8259 TT or rs8259 AA sites were constructed successfully. The results of dual-luciferase report gene detection showed that the miR-492 mimic could significantly inhibit psiCHECK2-BSG-T at a concentration over 100 nmol/L. However, it could not inhibit psiCHECK-BSG-A. miR-492 may be involved in the regulation of OK antigen expression on red blood cells with the BSG rs8259 TT genotype.

  8. Support Groups for Family Caregivers of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasow, Mona

    1986-01-01

    Discusses some assumptions, dilemmas, and questions in (1) facilitating support groups for caregivers whose relatives have Alzheimer's disease, (2) talking with other such facilitators around the country, (3) reviewing the literature, and (4) talking with group members themselves. Suggestions are made for a wider variety of support-group models.…

  9. Premalignant and malignant oral lesions are associated with changes in the glycosylation pattern of carbohydrates related to ABH blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Clausen, H; Holmstrup, P

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of carbohydrate structures related to the ABO(H) blood group antigen system was studied in biopsies from eight squamous cell carcinomas, and eight erythroplakias with epithelial dysplasia. Twenty oral lesions without histological evidence of malignancy (13 lichen planus lesions...... and 7 homogeneous leukoplakias) were also examined. The distribution of Lex, Ley, H type 2 chain, and N-acetyllactosamine, all type 2 chain carbohydrate structures, was investigated by immunohistological staining using monoclonal antibodies with selected specificity. The histological pattern...... of expression of these antigens in the benign lesions was similar to that of normal oral mucosa, i.e. expression of: N-acetyllactosamine on basal cells, H antigen on parabasal cells, and Lex and Ley on spinous cells. However, lesions with epithelial dysplasia showed H antigen on all spinous cells, and often...

  10. Transitioning Together: A Multi-Family Group Psychoeducation Program for Adolescents with ASD and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaWalt, Leann Smith; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2018-01-01

    Currently there are few evidence-based programs available for families of individuals with ASD during the transition to adulthood. The present study provided a preliminary evaluation of a multi-family group psychoeducation intervention using a randomized waitlist control design (n = 41). Families in the intervention condition participated in…

  11. Histo-blood group antigens in human fetal thymus and in thymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, P; Dabelsteen, Erik; Francis, D

    1996-01-01

    -y, Le-x and sialyl-Le-x) of the ABO-histo-blood group system was investigated in 19 normal fetal thymuses (gestational age 16 to 39 weeks) and in 19 thymomas in order to study possible tumor-associated changes in the glycosylation pattern. The material was investigated by immunochemical stainings...... of formalin-fixed paraffin-imbedded tissue using monoclonal antibodies with defined specificity. In fetal thymus the epithelial cells of the medulla and the Hassal's bodies strongly expressed elongated carbohydrate structures (Le-y, Le-x and sialyl-Le-x). In a few cases the cortical epithelial cells weakly...... expressed Le-x and sialyl-Le-x. Compared with fetal thymus 16 of the thymomas showed a total loss, or a very much reduced expression of elongated carbohydrate structures. Three thymomas, which histologically had been reclassified according to Kirchner & Müller-Hermelink (14) as high grade thymic carcinomas...

  12. The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is distinct from the N-CAM related group of surface antigens BSP-2 and D2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faissner, A; Kruse, J; Goridis, C

    1984-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and the group of N-CAM related molecules, BSP-2 and D2 antigen, are immunochemically distinct molecular species. The two groups of surface molecules are also functionally distinct entities, since inhibition of Ca2+-independent adhesion among early post-natal m...

  13. Development and Validation of Monoclonal Antibody-Based Antigen Capture ELISA for Detection of Group A Porcine Rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Atta Muhammad; Bhuyan, Anjuman Ara; Chen, Fangzhou; Guo, Xiaozhen; Menghwar, Harish; Zhu, Yinxing; Ku, Xugang; Chen, Shuhua; Li, Zhonghua; He, Qigai

    2017-05-01

    Porcine rotavirus-A (PoRVA) is one of the common causes of mild to severe dehydrating diarrhea, leading to losses in weaning and postweaning piglets. A rapid, highly specific, and sensitive antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) was developed for detection of PoRVA, by using VP6 (a highly conserved and antigenic protein of group-A rotavirus)-directed rabbit polyclonal antibodies (capture antibody) and murine monoclonal antibodies (detector antibody). The detection limit of AC-ELISA was found to be equal to that of conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; about 10 2.5 TCID 50 /mL). For validation of the in-house AC-ELISA, 295 porcine fecal/diarrhea samples, collected from different provinces of China, were evaluated and compared with conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR). The sensitivity and specificity of this in-house AC-ELISA relative to RT-qPCR were found to be 91.67% and 100%, respectively, with the strong agreement (kappa = 0.972) between these two techniques. Total detection rate with AC-ELISA, conventional RT-PCR, and RT-qPCR were found to be 11.2%, 11.5%, and 12.2%, respectively, without any statistical significant difference. Moreover, AC-ELISA failed to detect any cross-reactivity with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, transmissible gastroenteritis virus, pseudorabies virus, and porcine circovirus-2. These results suggested that our developed method was rapid, highly specific, and sensitive, which may help in large-scale surveillance, timely detection, and preventive control of rotavirus infection in porcine farms.

  14. The Effectiveness of Role Theory Based Group Counseling on Family Function of Families With Slow-Learning Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    فرناز حوله کیان

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group counseling based on the role theory on function of families with slow-learningchildren. The present study is a Quasi - experimental research with pre-test and post - test, and with experimental and control groups. Statistical population in cludes all mothers of slow - learning children in thecity of Hamadan. A sample of 30 subjects selected through available sampling method from high schools with equal numbers of both genders. Based on cloning features were allocated in experimental and control groups. The experimental group received 10 group counseling and control group was placed in the waiting list. Data collection instrument is family function questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, covariance analysis and t-test were applied to analyze data. It was found that there is a significant difference between post-test of experimental and control group (p<0/001. t-test showed significant difference in effectiveness of role theory group counseling for mothers with slow-learning girl and boy (p<0/001. So we can conclude that group counseling based on the role theory is effective on improving the function of families with slow-learning children. In addition, this effectivenessis different for families of slow-learning children based on the gender of child.

  15. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, Rikke L. V.; Oettinger, Thomas; Rosenkrands, Ida

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P, B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  16. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate....... The molecules were characterized, mapped in a two-dimensional electrophoresis reference map of short-term culture filtrate, and compared with another recently identified low-mass protein, CFP10 (F. X. Berthet, P. B. Rasmussen, I. Rosenkrands, P. Andersen, and B. Gicquel. Microbiology 144:3195-3203, 1998......), and the well-described ESAT-6 antigen. Genetic analyses demonstrated that TB10.4 as well as CFP10 belongs to the ESAT-6 family of low-mass proteins, whereas TB7.3 is a low-molecular-mass protein outside this family. The proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their immunogenicity was tested...

  17. A Community-Based Family/Patient Group Program for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Miriam K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a support program for community-based Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers. In addition to joint activities, the family group focuses on the family organization, support networks, feelings, new activities, and making decisions. The patient group provides social and awareness activities. (JAC)

  18. Mourning the Death of a Child: The Family and Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soricelli, Barbara A.; Utech, Carolyn Lorenz

    1985-01-01

    Describes how social workers intervene with families during bereavement, integration, renewed bereavement, and post-death mourning of the death of a child. This article also describes bereavement groups and stresses the importance of connecting families to self-help and mutual-aid groups. (Author/BL)

  19. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Bañuls Anne-Laure; Devault Alain

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen) is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequenc...

  20. A Novel Family of Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Receptors May Have Its Origin in Archaic Human Species*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin; Neumann, Jürgen; Wohlfromm, Sebastian; König, Angelika; Temme, Nadine; Springer, Sebastian; Trowsdale, John; Koch, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    HLA class II α and β chains form receptors for antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. Numerous pairings of class II α and β subunits from the wide range of haplotypes and isotypes may form, but most of these combinations, in particular those produced by isotype mixing, yielded mismatched dimers. It is unclear how selection of functional receptors is achieved. At the atomic level, it is not known which interactions of class II residues regulate selection of matched αβ heterodimers and the evolutionary origin of matched isotype mixed dimer formation. In this study we investigated assembly of isotype-mixed HLA class II α and β heterodimers. Assembly and carbohydrate maturation of various HLA-class II isotype-mixed α and β subunits was dependent on the groove binding section of the invariant chain (Ii). By mutation of polymorphic DPβ sequences, we identified two motifs, Lys-69 and GGPM-(84–87), that are engaged in Ii-dependent assembly of DPβ with DRα. We identified five members of a family of DPβ chains containing Lys-69 and GGPM 84–87, which assemble with DRα. The Lys/GGPM motif is present in the DPβ sequence of the Neanderthal genome, and this ancient sequence is related to the human allele DPB1*0401. By site-directed mutagenesis, we inspected Neanderthal amino acid residues that differ from the DPB1*0401 allele and aimed to determine whether matched heterodimers are formed by assembly of DPβ mutants with DRα. Because the *0401 allele is rare in the sub-Saharan population but frequent in the European population, it may have arisen in modern humans by admixture with Neanderthals in Europe. PMID:24214983

  1. A novel family of human leukocyte antigen class II receptors may have its origin in archaic human species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin; Neumann, Jürgen; Wohlfromm, Sebastian; König, Angelika; Temme, Nadine; Springer, Sebastian; Trowsdale, John; Koch, Norbert

    2014-01-10

    HLA class II α and β chains form receptors for antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells. Numerous pairings of class II α and β subunits from the wide range of haplotypes and isotypes may form, but most of these combinations, in particular those produced by isotype mixing, yielded mismatched dimers. It is unclear how selection of functional receptors is achieved. At the atomic level, it is not known which interactions of class II residues regulate selection of matched αβ heterodimers and the evolutionary origin of matched isotype mixed dimer formation. In this study we investigated assembly of isotype-mixed HLA class II α and β heterodimers. Assembly and carbohydrate maturation of various HLA-class II isotype-mixed α and β subunits was dependent on the groove binding section of the invariant chain (Ii). By mutation of polymorphic DPβ sequences, we identified two motifs, Lys-69 and GGPM-(84-87), that are engaged in Ii-dependent assembly of DPβ with DRα. We identified five members of a family of DPβ chains containing Lys-69 and GGPM 84-87, which assemble with DRα. The Lys/GGPM motif is present in the DPβ sequence of the Neanderthal genome, and this ancient sequence is related to the human allele DPB1*0401. By site-directed mutagenesis, we inspected Neanderthal amino acid residues that differ from the DPB1*0401 allele and aimed to determine whether matched heterodimers are formed by assembly of DPβ mutants with DRα. Because the *0401 allele is rare in the sub-Saharan population but frequent in the European population, it may have arisen in modern humans by admixture with Neanderthals in Europe.

  2. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Ferro

    Full Text Available Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  3. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol) or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction) prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  4. The Shc Family Protein Adaptor, Rai, Negatively Regulates T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling by Inhibiting ZAP-70 Recruitment and Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps –recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol) or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction) prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade. PMID:22242145

  5. Milleri group streptococcus--a stepchild in the viridans family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegman-Igra, Y; Azmon, Y; Schwartz, D

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to provide a comprehensive review of the pathogenic role and spectrum of disease of milleri group streptococci, with special attention to bloodstream invasion and to possible differential roles among the three species. All consecutive isolates of milleri group streptococci from any anatomic source, during a 37-month period, in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Tel-Aviv, Israel, were thoroughly investigated. Identification to the species level was performed by an automated system.Streptococcus anginosus constituted 82% of the 245 patient-unique isolates from hospitalized patients. All nonurinary isolates were involved in pyogenic infections mostly originating from the gastrointestinal tract, with bacteremia in 28 cases. The 71 urinary isolates represented either urinary tract infection or nonsignificant bacteriuria. No specific association could be detected between species and the infection site, except for a higher relative representation of Streptococcus constellatus in bacteremia. Milleri group streptococci are common in clinical practice and play a different pathogenic role to other viridans streptococci. Due to their invariable association with pyogenic processes, their presence in blood warrants immediate focus identification. In addition, they have a previously unappreciated clinical niche concerning urinary tract infection. The identification of viridans streptococci to the species level is of paramount clinical significance.

  6. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devault, Alain; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2008-10-24

    PSA (promastigote surface antigen) is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance) subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs. Seven of these are evolving relatively slowly and could

  7. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bañuls Anne-Laure

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. Conclusion PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs

  8. Variational formulae for Fuchsian groups over families of algebraic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the polynomial equation Ptًx; yق ¼ 0 where Ptًx; yق ¼. PP ai jًtقxiyj such that ai jًtق are holomorphic functions of t (t in a small disk around the origin) with additional restriction that ai jً0ق ¼ ai j. For such Xt we determine first variational formula for t 2 Gt where. Xt U=Gt (Gt is the uniformizing Fuchsian group corresponding to Xt).

  9. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.; Liu, J.-H.; Bergelson, J. M.; Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Holmes, K. V.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, binding of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.

  10. Comparison of familial and psychological factors in groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çengel-Kültür, S Ebru; Akdemir, Devrim; Saltık-Temizel, İnci N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the differences between groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation. The Symptom Checklist- 90-Revised, the COPE Questionnaire, the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the McMaster Family Assessment Device and the Parenting Style Scale were used to evaluate, respectively, maternal psychiatric symptoms, coping abilities, attachment style, family functioning and children's perceptions of parenting behaviors. Psychiatric diagnoses were evaluated using the K-SADS. A higher level of maternal psychiatric symptoms, impaired role and affective involvement functioning of the family and less psychological autonomy were observed in the group of encopresis patients with constipation than in the group of encopresis patients without constipation. No significant differences were found between the groups in psychiatric comorbidities, maternal coping abilities and attachment style. The two groups had a similar pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders and maternal psychological factors, although some familial factors-related mainly to parental authority-were differentiated in the encopresis with constipation group.

  11. Organizational complexity in family practice: a sociological model of a family practice group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, J M

    1978-02-01

    The growth of a family practice goup is presented as a case study. Enlarging size and increasing functions require organizational change--from solo to collegial to bureaucratic to political systems. Organizational theory distinguishes between the characteristics and functions of individual, collegial, bureaucratic, and political organizations. Different styles and strategies are appropriate at different stages.

  12. A member of the HSP90 family from ovine Babesia in China: molecular characterization, phylogenetic analysis and antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Aihong; Li, Youquan; Niu, Qingli; Gao, Jinliang; Luo, Jianxun; Chauvin, Alain; Yin, Hong; Moreau, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a key component of the molecular chaperone complex essential for activating many signalling proteins involved in the development and progression of pathogenic cellular transformation. A Hsp90 gene (BQHsp90) was cloned and characterized from Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan), an ovine Babesia isolate belonging to Babesia motasi-like group, by screening a cDNA expression library and performing rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of BQHsp90 is 2399 bp with an open reading frame of 2154 bp encoding a predicted 83 kDa polypeptide with 717 amino acid residues. It shows significant homology and similar structural characteristics to Hsp90 of other apicomplex organisms. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the HSP90 amino acid sequences, showed that the Babesia genus is clearly separated from other apicomplexa genera. Five Chinese ovine Babesia isolates were divided into 2 phylogenetic clusters, namely Babesia sp. Xinjiang (previously designated a new species) cluster and B. motasi-like cluster which could be further divided into 2 subclusters (Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan)/Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. BQ1 (Ningxian)/Babesia sp. Hebei). Finally, the antigenicity of rBQHSP90 protein from prokaryotic expression was also evaluated using western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  13. Identification of a family of group II introns encoding LAGLIDADG ORFs typical of group I introns.

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, Navtej; Zimmerly, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Group I and group II introns are unrelated classes of introns that each encode proteins that facilitate intron splicing and intron mobility. Here we describe a new subfamily of nine introns in fungi that are group II introns but encode LAGLIDADG ORFs typical of group I introns. The introns have fairly standard group IIB1 RNA structures and are inserted into three different sites in SSU and LSU rRNA genes. Therefore, introns should not be assumed to be group I introns based solely on the prese...

  14. Premalignant and malignant oral lesions are associated with changes in the glycosylation pattern of carbohydrates related to ABH blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Clausen, H; Holmstrup, P

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of carbohydrate structures related to the ABO(H) blood group antigen system was studied in biopsies from eight squamous cell carcinomas, and eight erythroplakias with epithelial dysplasia. Twenty oral lesions without histological evidence of malignancy (13 lichen planus lesions...

  15. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  16. Experiences of family physicians who practise primary care obstetrics in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B; Jordan, John M

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of family physicians in primary care obstetrical groups. Using a qualitative approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 Edmonton family physicians who participated in primary care obstetrical groups. Experiences with respect to several aspects of group obstetrical practice were examined including advantages and challenges of primary care obstetrical groups, provision of patient care by a group, fit with other work commitments, and sustainability of the groups. Study data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was iterative and interpretive. Primary care obstetrical groups were found to preserve a family physician's enjoyment of obstetrics and allowed for continuity of care. They afforded work-life balance, allowed for collaboration, and provided support and a social network for group members. Such groups were found to facilitate short-term family physician absences, although long-term absences (such as maternity leaves) were considered challenging. Participants described conflict within primary care obstetrical groups and considered sustainability to be a challenge. Family physicians' continued involvement in obstetrics could be facilitated by their participation in primary care obstetrical groups.

  17. The influence of family control on decisions regarding the specialization and diversification of business groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Hernández-Trasobares

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the impact of family control on decisions regarding the specialization and diversification of large business groups whose parent companies are listed on Spanish stock exchanges. Using a sample of ninety-nine companies, having identified the companies that constitute the business group, and using both binary logistic models and the Heckman two-step method to eliminate selection bias, the results show how the familial nature of the parent company favours specialization and reduces the level of the business group's diversification. In addition, we see that there are differences among family groups with respect to the concentration of their holdings in that a higher level of concentration increases the level of diversification in the family business group.

  18. Integration Processes of a Romanian Group in a Huelva Village through Family Life Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reales, Antonia-María; Aguaded-Gómez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of Romanian immigrants in Lucena del Puerto (Huelva, Spain) through the life stories of two families of Romanian origin. The experiences of the groups presented in this study were analyzed. Both families were in the town for work, to grow and harvest strawberries. We observed a contrast between idealistic views…

  19. Focus Group Evaluation of Customized Family Health History Education Materials in a North Carolina Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Karen; Edelson, Vaughn; O'Leary, James; Christianson, Carol; Henrich, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The "Does It Run In The Family?" booklets provide educational materials about family health history (FHH) and basic genetics to readers of all levels and are customizable for local communities. Purpose: The booklets were customized and provided to focus groups to evaluate their usefulness in conveying health information at a low reading…

  20. Family Trauma and Dysfunction in Sexually Abused Female Adolescent Psychiatric Control Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Differences in family trauma, stressors, and dysfunction among adolescent psychiatric inpatients grouped by sexual abuse self-reports were investigated. Family trauma/dysfunction was determined from a composite score derived from the Traumatic Antecedents Scale. The results indicated that sexually abused adolescents reported more family…

  1. Perceived Benefits Experienced in Support Groups for Chinese Families of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Lusa

    2010-01-01

    Parent support groups have been considered an important channel for families of children with disabilities who seek support and resources. Given the view of family privacy in many diverse cultures, it is unknown whether or not parents from diverse backgrounds can receive the same benefits as parents from the dominant culture. The purpose of this…

  2. Family Check-Up Effects Across Diverse Ethnic Groups: Reducing Early-Adolescence Antisocial Behavior by Reducing Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D.; Knoble, Naomi B.; Zerr, Argero A.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Multicultural responsiveness and adaptation have been a recent area of emphasis in prevention and intervention science. The changing demographics of the United States demand the development of intervention strategies that are acceptable and effective for diverse cultural and ethnic groups. The Family Check-Up (FCU) was developed to be an intervention framework that is flexible and adaptive to diverse cultural groups (Dishion & Stormshak, 2007). We empirically evaluated the extent to which the intervention is effective for improving youth adjustment and parent–child interactions for diverse cultural groups. Method A sample of 1,193 families was drawn from 2 large-scale randomized prevention trials conducted in diverse urban middle schools. We formulated 3 groups on the basis of youth self-identification of ethnicity (European American, African American, Hispanic) and examined group differences in the hypothesized mediating effect of family conflict (FC) on later antisocial behavior (ASB). Results Path analysis revealed that youths in the intervention condition reported significantly less ASB over a 2-year period (Grades 6 through 8). Moreover, youth-reported reductions in FC at 12 months were an intervening effect. Ethnicity did not moderate this relationship. Conclusions Consistent with one of the primary tenets of coercion theory, participation in the FCU acts on ASB through FC across diverse ethnic groups, lending support to the multicultural competence of the model. Limitations of this study are discussed, along with areas for future research. PMID:24731120

  3. Family check-up effects across diverse ethnic groups: reducing early-adolescence antisocial behavior by reducing family conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D; Knoble, Naomi B; Zerr, Argero A; Dishion, Thomas J; Stormshak, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural responsiveness and adaptation have been a recent area of emphasis in prevention and intervention science. The changing demographics of the United States demand the development of intervention strategies that are acceptable and effective for diverse cultural and ethnic groups. The Family Check-Up (FCU) was developed to be an intervention framework that is flexible and adaptive to diverse cultural groups (Dishion & Stormshak, 2007 ). We empirically evaluated the extent to which the intervention is effective for improving youth adjustment and parent-child interactions for diverse cultural groups. A sample of 1,193 families was drawn from 2 large-scale randomized prevention trials conducted in diverse urban middle schools. We formulated 3 groups on the basis of youth self-identification of ethnicity (European American, African American, Hispanic) and examined group differences in the hypothesized mediating effect of family conflict (FC) on later antisocial behavior (ASB). Path analysis revealed that youths in the intervention condition reported significantly less ASB over a 2-year period (Grades 6-8). Moreover, youth-reported reductions in FC at 12 months were an intervening effect. Ethnicity did not moderate this relationship. Consistent with one of the primary tenets of coercion theory, participation in the FCU acts on ASB through FC across diverse ethnic groups, lending support to the multicultural competence of the model. Limitations of this study are discussed, along with areas for future research.

  4. Family Group Conferencing in public mental health and social capital theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, G.; Schout, G.; Pennell, J.; Abma, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Clients in public mental health care have limited social capital; they lack trusting and mutually supportive relations within bonded groups and do not have access to supportive external groups. Family Group Conferencing (FGC) is a promising decision-making model to restore social ties and

  5. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  6. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  7. An overview of the GAGE cancer/testis antigen family with the inclusion of newly identified members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2008-01-01

    GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer. This rev......GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer...

  8. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  9. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  10. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations

  11. THE TECHNICAL AND ETHNICAL DIVISION OF WORK, THE INDIGEOUS GROUPS AND THE FAMILY BUSINESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria A. Miranda-Zambrano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The work exposes some forms of indigenous groups participation on entrepreneurial family businesses, mainly in the region of Laja - Bajío where the family plays an important role in these organizations. The work point out the approach on technical ethnic division of labour to locate such actors in labour circuits, in economic activities or guilds that have been built in various social processes. To analyze the ways in which they operate, the role of the family, their knowledge (cultural capital, its forms of linkage with the community of origin and with the Group (social capital, as well as the existence of certain differences with business in common. This research is part of a larger work on family businesses.

  12. Inactivation of the alpha C protein antigen gene, bca, by a novel shuttle/suicide vector results in attenuation of virulence and immunity in group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Kasper, D L; Ausubel, F M; Rosner, B; Michel, J L

    1997-11-25

    The alpha C protein of group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major surface-associated antigen. Although its role in the biology and virulence of GBS has not been defined, it is opsonic and capable of eliciting protective immunity. The alpha C protein is widely distributed among clinical isolates and is a potential protein carrier and antigen in conjugate vaccines to prevent GBS infections. The structural gene for the alpha C protein, bca, has been cloned and sequenced. The protein encoded by bca is related to a class of surface-associated proteins of gram-positive cocci involved in virulence and immunity. To investigate the potential roles of the alpha C protein, bca null mutants were generated in which the bca gene was replaced with a kanamycin resistance cassette via homologous recombination using a novel shuttle/suicide vector. Studies of lethality in neonatal mice showed that the virulence of the bca null mutants was attenuated 5- to 7-fold when compared with the isogenic wild-type strain A909. Significant differences in mortality occurred in the first 24 h, suggesting that the role of the alpha antigen is important in the initial stages of the infection. In contrast to A909, bca mutants were no longer killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the presence of alpha-specific antibodies in an in vitro opsonophagocytic assay. In contrast to previous studies, alpha antigen expression does not appear to play a role in resistance to opsonophagocytosis in the absence of alpha-specific antibodies. In addition, antibodies to the alpha C protein did not passively protect neonatal mice from lethal challenge with bca mutants, suggesting that these epitopes are uniquely present within the alpha antigen as expressed from the bca gene. Therefore, the alpha C protein is important in the pathogenesis of GBS infection and is a target for protective immunity in the development of GBS vaccines.

  13. Participation in a support group from the perspective of family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Adriana; Tokovská, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    The aim: The aim of the study was to identify, describe and analyze approaches positively affecting care provided by family caregivers to the patients with Alzheimer’s disease with focus on caregivers’ perceptions and experience regarding personal participation in the support group. Methods: The qualitative cross-sectional descriptive study design was adopted. To gather empirical data semi-structured interviews with family caregivers was used. Twenty caregivers were recruited between January ...

  14. A Multi-Family Group Intervention for Adolescent Depression: The BEST MOOD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lucinda A; Lewis, Andrew J; Toumbourou, John W; Knight, Tess; Bertino, Melanie D; Pryor, Reima

    2017-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder for young people, and it is associated with educational underachievement, self-harm, and suicidality. Current psychological therapies for adolescent depression are usually focused only on individual-level change and often neglect family or contextual influences. The efficacy of interventions may be enhanced with a broader therapeutic focus on family factors such as communication, conflict, support, and cohesion. This article describes a structured multi-family group approach to the treatment of adolescent depression: Behaviour Exchange Systems Therapy for adolescent depression (BEST MOOD). BEST MOOD is a manualized intervention that is designed to address both individual and family factors in the treatment of adolescent depression. BEST MOOD adopts a family systems approach that also incorporates psychoeducation and elements of attachment theories. The program consists of eight multifamily group therapy sessions delivered over 2 hours per week, where parents attend the first four sessions and young people and siblings join from week 5. The program design is specifically aimed to engage youth who are initially resistant to treatment and to optimize youth and family mental health outcomes. This article presents an overview of the theoretical model, session content, and evaluations to date, and provides a case study to illustrate the approach. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  15. Identification of novel rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus B-cell epitopes and their interaction with host histo-blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanhua; Wang, Fang; Fan, Zhiyu; Hu, Bo; Liu, Xing; Wei, Houjun; Xue, Jiabin; Xu, Weizhong; Qiu, Rulong

    2016-02-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease, caused by rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), results in the death of millions of adult rabbits worldwide, with a mortality rate that exceeds 90%. The sole capsid protein, VP60, is divided into shell (S) and protruding (P) domains, and the more exposed P domain likely contains determinants for cell attachment and antigenic diversity. Nine mAbs against VP60 were screened and identified. To map antigenic epitopes, a set of partially overlapping and consecutive truncated proteins spanning VP60 were expressed. The minimal determinants of the linear B-cell epitopes of VP60 in the P domain, N(326)PISQV(331), D(338)MSFV(342) and K(562)STLVFNL(569), were recognized by one (5H3), four (1B8, 3D11, 4C2 and 4G2) and four mAbs (1D4, 3F7, 5G2 and 6B2), respectively. Sequence alignment showed epitope D(338)MSFV(342) was conserved among all RHDV isolates. Epitopes N(326)PISQV(331) and K(562)STLVFNL(569) were highly conserved among RHDV G1-G6 and variable in RHDV2 strains. Previous studies demonstrated that native viral particles and virus-like particles (VLPs) of RHDV specifically bound to synthetic blood group H type 2 oligosaccharides. We established an oligosaccharide-based assay to analyse the binding of VP60 and epitopes to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Results showed VP60 and its epitopes (aa 326-331 and 338-342) in the P2 subdomain could significantly bind to blood group H type 2. Furthermore, mAbs 1B8 and 5H3 could block RHDV VLP binding to synthetic H type 2. Collectively, these two epitopes might play a key role in the antigenic structure of VP60 and interaction of RHDV and HBGA.

  16. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya ? a blood group study in chikungunya affected families

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarsanareddy, Lokireddy; Sarojamma, Vemula; Ramakrishna, Vadde

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antig...

  17. Family group conferencing in youth care: characteristics of the decision making model, implementation and effectiveness of the Family Group (FG) plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asscher, Jessica J; Dijkstra, Sharon; Stams, Geert Jan J M; Deković, Maja; Creemers, Hanneke E

    2014-02-11

    The model of Family group-conferencing (FG-c) for decision making in child welfare has rapidly spread over the world during the past decades. Its popularity is likely to be caused by its philosophy, emphasizing participation and autonomy of families, rather than based on positive research outcomes. Conclusive evidence regarding the (cost) effectiveness of FG-c is not yet available. The aim of this protocol is to describe the design of a study to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of FG-c as compared to Treatment as Usual. The effectiveness of FG-c will be examined by means of a Randomized Controlled Trial. A multi-informant approach will be used to assess child safety as the primary outcome, and commitment of the social network, perceived control/ empowerment; family functioning and use of professional care as secondary outcomes. Implementation of FG-c, characteristics of family manager and family will be examined as moderators of effectiveness. Studying the effectiveness of Fg-c is crucial now the method is being implemented all over the world as a decision making model in child and youth care. Policy makers should be informed whether the ideals of participation in society and the right for self-determination indeed result in more effective care plans, and the money spent on FG-c is warranted. Dutch Trial Register number NTR4320. The design of this study is approved by the independent Ethical Committee of the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences of The University of Amsterdam (approval number: 2013-POWL-3308). This study is financially supported by a grant from ZonMw, The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, grant number: 70-72900-98-13158.

  18. Approaching confidentiality at a familial level in genomic medicine: a focus group study with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-02-03

    Clinical genetics guidelines from 2011 conceptualise genetic information as confidential to families, not individuals. The normative consequence of this is that the family's interest is the primary consideration and genetic information is shared unless there are good reasons not to do so. We investigated healthcare professionals' (HCPs') views about, and reasoning around, individual and familial approaches to confidentiality and how such views influenced their practice. 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs working in/with clinical genetics services were analysed, drawing on grounded theory. Participants raised seven problems with, and arguments against, going beyond the individual approach to confidentiality. These problems fell into two overlapping categories: 'relationships' and 'structures'. Most participants had never considered ways to-or thought it was impossible to-treat familial genetic information and personal information differently. They worried that putting the familial approach into practice could disrupt family dynamics and erode patient trust in the health service. They also thought they had insufficient resources to share information and feared that sharing might change the standard of care and make them more vulnerable to liability. A familial approach to confidentiality has not been accepted or adopted as a standard, but wider research suggests that some of the problems HCPs perceived are surmountable and sharing in the interest of the family can be achieved. However, further research is needed to explore how personal and familial genetic information can be separated in practice. Our findings are relevant to HCPs across health services who are starting to use genome tests as part of their routine investigations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Framework and catalogue of tools for Participatory monitoring for Farmer Family Learning Groups and Marketing Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette; Nalunga, Jane; Tibasiima, Thaddeo

    2016-01-01

    external facilitators of FFLGs, four FFLG officers from the four organisations in ECOSAF, 21 Marketing Association officers, and staff members and volunteers from NOGAMU, SATNET and Organic Denmark. In the process we have worked together from each our context, and exchanged ideas on farmer group...... of this project (2013-2015) was Farmer Family Learning Groups (FFLG) as a method for developing long-term food security through social capital building. Furthermore, another project based on the FFLG approach but focusing on the formation of Marketing Associations (MAs) contributed to this booklet. This project...... development, participation and monitoring. Participatory monitoring in Farmer Family Learning Groups and Marketing Associations is for the people and the groups who have set goals for themselves and need to monitor themselves whether they are getting closer to the goals which they have set. These groups...

  20. Group attachment-based intervention: trauma-informed care for families with adverse childhood experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anne; Steele, Howard; Bate, Jordan; Nikitiades, Adella; Allman, Brooke; Bonuck, Karen; Meissner, Paul; Steele, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the main premises of an innovative trauma-informed intervention, group attachment-based intervention, specifically developed to target vulnerable families with infants and toddlers, living in one of the poorest urban counties in the nation. It also reports on the trauma-relevant characteristics of 60 families entering a clinical trial to study the effectiveness of Group Attachment-Based Intervention. Initial survey results revealed high levels of neglect, abuse, and household dysfunction in mothers' histories (77% reported ≥4 adverse childhood experiences, with more than 90% reporting 2 or more current toxic stressors, including poverty, obesity, domestic and community violence, and homelessness).

  1. Funções biológicas dos antígenos eritrocitários Biological functions of blood group antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia L. Bonifácio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os antígenos de grupos sanguíneos eritrocitários são estruturas macromoleculares localizadas na superfície extracelular da membrana eritrocitária. Com o desenvolvimento de estudos moleculares, mais de 250 antígenos são conhecidos e estão organizados em 29 sistemas de grupos sanguíneos reconhecidos pela Sociedade Internacional de Transfusão Sanguínea (ISBT. Estudos têm revelado que os antígenos de grupo sanguíneo estão expressos na membrana eritrocitária com ampla diversidade estrutural, incluindo epítopos de carboidratos em glicoproteínas e/ou glicolipídios e em proteínas inseridas na membrana via um domínio, via domínios de multipassagem ou ligados a glicosilfosfatidinositol. Além das diversidades estruturais, muitas funções importantes têm sido associadas aos antígenos eritrocitários recentemente identificadas, podendo ser esquematicamente divididas em: estruturais, transportadores, receptores e moléculas de adesão, enzimas, proteínas controladoras do complemento e outras. Esta revisão tem como foco as funções potenciais das moléculas que expressam os antígenos eritrocitários.Erythrocyte blood group antigens are macromolecules structures located on the extracellular surface of the red blood cell membrane. The development of molecular studies allowed the recognition of more than 250 antigens by the International Society for Blood Transfusion (ISBT. These studies have also shown that blood group antigens are carried on red blood cell membrane of wide structural diversity, including carbohydrate epitopes on glycoproteins and/or glycolipids and on proteins inserted within the membrane via single or multi-pass transmembrane domains, or via glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkages. In addition, to their structural diversity, many important functions associated with blood group antigens have been recently identified and can be didactically divided into: structural proteins, transporters, receptors and adhesion

  2. The Behavioral Ecology of Family Planning : Two Ethnic Groups in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, Donna L; Nath, Dilip C; Hemam, Natabar S

    2007-09-01

    Family planning is the usual modern route to producing a small family. Can human behavioral ecology provide a framework for understanding family planning behavior? Hillard S. Kaplan (Yearb. Phys. Anthropol. 39:91-135) has proposed a general theory of human parental investment based on the importance of skills development in children. As modern, skills-based, competitive market economies are established, parental investment strategies would be predicted to become oriented toward producing increasingly competitive offspring in a pattern of coordinated investment in their embodied capital-in other words, skills training along with good health to ensure their long-term productivity. Parental embodied capital and resources are also expected to be associated with motivation to produce competitive offspring. The basic parental investment trade-off between quality and quantity should predict greater investment in fewer children and the adoption of family planning behavior. Data on family planning in two ethnic groups in Northeast India (Khasi and Bengali) currently experiencing early-phase transition into modern market economies from very different social and ecological baselines are examined within this analytical framework. The results show a mixture of strategies in conjunction with family planning that involve decreased as well as increased investment in the embodied capital of children among Bengali and a divergence of investments in education and health among Khasi. These mixtures of strategies provide some insight into the motivations to use family planning in the face of economic transition, given differing local cultural and ecological conditions and the opportunity structures they provide.

  3. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  4. Using metaphorical techniques in focus groups to uncover mothers' feelings about family meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Leslie; Cotugna, Nancy; Snider, Sue; Peterson, P Michael

    2009-01-01

    Traditional nutrition education has not been shown to consistently produce behavior change. While it has been suggested that using emotion-based messages may be a better way to influence nutrition behavior change, this has not been well tested. Producing emotion-based messages is a multi-step process that begins with exploring subconscious barriers to behavior change rather than the more obvious and typically reported barriers. The purpose of this research was to uncover the emotional reasons, sometimes referred to as emotional pulse points, for mothers' choosing or not choosing to have more family meals. This would then serve as the first step to developing emotion-based messages promoting the benefits of family meals. Five focus group interviews were conducted with 51 low-income Black (n=28) and white (n=23) mothers. Metaphorical techniques were used to determine underlying feelings toward family and family meals. Discussions were video-taped, transcribed, and manually analyzed using a content-driven, immersion/crystallization approach to qualitative data analysis. Four themes emerged around the definition of family: acceptance, sharing, chaos, and protective/loyal. Some mothers felt mealtime was merely obligatory, and described it as stressful. Some reported a preference for attending to their own needs instead of sitting down with their children, while others felt that mealtime should be used to interact with and educate children and felt guilty when they were not able to provide family meals. Three themes emerged around feelings towards having or not having family meals: unimportant, important, and guilty. When explored further, mothers indicated that using the feeling of guilt to encourage family meals might be effective. Data obtained are being used to develop innovative, emotion-based messages that will be tested for effectiveness in promoting family meals.

  5. Anticipatory grief and chronicity: Elders and families in racial/ethnic minority groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Irene Daniels; McBride, Melen

    2004-01-01

    This article provides some brief demographic data on aging, describes anticipatory grief, and presents two cases of anticipatory grief involving elders in racial/ethnic minority groups with some analysis including cultural values and beliefs and some practical guidelines.Melen McBride and Mycel JacobIrene Daniels and Lillian DavisIrene and Don Lewis The discussion ends with a useful process model for improving communications with elders in racial/ethnic groups and their families.

  6. Impact of an Educational Support Group on Family Participants Who Take Care of Their Schizophrenic Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, Ira A.; Coursey, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Compared participants (N=24) in six-session educational support group offering family caregivers information about schizophrenia, training in problem-solving skills for managing patient behavior, and greater access to social support and community resources with matched controls (N=24). Participant caregivers reported significantly reduced anxiety…

  7. Family Experiences, the Motivation for Science Learning and Science Achievement of Different Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Salomé; Lemmer, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    Science education is particularly important for both developed and developing countries to promote technological development, global economic competition and economic growth. This study explored the relationship between family experiences, the motivation for science learning, and the science achievement of a group of Grade Nine learners in South…

  8. Hitting Closer to Home: A Multiple Family Prevention Group for Adolescent Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Colleen E.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an innovative multiple family psychoeducational group for the prevention of disordered eating among adolescent females. An overview of the concerns facing adolescents today is presented, including sociocultural norms, body dissatisfaction associated with pubertal changes, teasing regarding weight and shape, and family…

  9. Are multi family groups appropriate for patients with first episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Johannessen, J O; Klungsoyr, O

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare outcome over 5 years for patients who participated in multi family groups (MFGs) to those who refused or were not offered participation. METHOD: Of 301 first episode psychotic patients aged 15-65 years, 147 participated in MFGs. Outcome was measured by drop-out rates, positive...

  10. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor); (LBNL)

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Coping with asthma in immigrant Hispanic families: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosnaim, Giselle; Kohrman, Claire; Sharp, Lisa K; Wolf, Marion E; Sadowski, Laura S; Ramos, Lori; Grammer, Leslie C

    2006-10-01

    Little is known about how childhood asthma affects immigrant Hispanic families in the United States. Qualitative research is effective for understanding the social, cultural, functional, and structural aspects of asthma in the family context. Furthermore, such knowledge is necessary to develop culturally appropriate interventions for these families. To describe participants' perceptions of their roles in caring for an asthmatic child, to compare family patterns of caring for an asthmatic child by parents' country of origin, to identify barriers to caring for an asthmatic child, and to evaluate specific coping needs of low-income immigrant Hispanic families caring for an asthmatic child. Five focus groups were conducted with low-income, immigrant, Spanish-speaking Hispanic adults caring for an asthmatic child, including community health workers, mothers, fathers, and grandparents, along with women with asthma. Audiotaped focus groups were transcribed verbatim in Spanish, forward translated into English, and back translated into Spanish. Data analysis was performed using qualitative analytic methods. Forty-one participants represented a range of countries of origin. Different themes emerged for community health workers vs parents and grandparents and for women vs men caring for a child with asthma. All the participants reported strong beliefs in using folk medicines. Barriers identified included language, culture, poverty, lack of health insurance, and poor living conditions. Results highlight the lack of asthma self-management skills, diagnostic uncertainty, and the use of folk medicine as factors that should be taken into consideration when tailoring interventions to improve asthma outcomes in this vulnerable population.

  12. Gene Environment Interactions and Predictors of Colorectal Cancer in Family-Based, Multi-Ethnic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pamela K. Shiao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the personalization of polygenic/omics-based health care, the purpose of this study was to examine the gene–environment interactions and predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC by including five key genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathways. In this proof-of-concept study, we included a total of 54 families and 108 participants, 54 CRC cases and 54 matched family friends representing four major racial ethnic groups in southern California (White, Asian, Hispanics, and Black. We used three phases of data analytics, including exploratory, family-based analyses adjusting for the dependence within the family for sharing genetic heritage, the ensemble method, and generalized regression models for predictive modeling with a machine learning validation procedure to validate the results for enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results revealed that despite the family members sharing genetic heritage, the CRC group had greater combined gene polymorphism rates than the family controls (p < 0.05, on MTHFR C677T, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G, and DHFR 19 bp except MTHFR A1298C. Four racial groups presented different polymorphism rates for four genes (all p < 0.05 except MTHFR A1298C. Following the ensemble method, the most influential factors were identified, and the best predictive models were generated by using the generalized regression models, with Akaike’s information criterion and leave-one-out cross validation methods. Body mass index (BMI and gender were consistent predictors of CRC for both models when individual genes versus total polymorphism counts were used, and alcohol use was interactive with BMI status. Body mass index status was also interactive with both gender and MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism, and the exposure to environmental pollutants was an additional predictor. These results point to the important roles of environmental and modifiable factors in relation to gene–environment interactions in the prevention of CRC.

  13. Performance characteristics of a combined hepatitis C virus core antigen and anti–hepatitis C virus antibody test in different patient groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Fu Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the performance of a hepatitis C virus (HCV antigen/antibody combination test [Murex HCV Antigen/Antibody Combination Test (Murex Ag/Ab test] by comparing it with the current third-generation HCV antibody enzyme immunoassay (anti-HCV. A total of 403 serum samples were consecutively collected from four patient groups: healthy controls (n=100; HCV-infected patients (HCV group, n=102; Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HCV-infected patients (HIV/HCV group, n=100; and patients with uremia (uremia group, n=101. Performances were evaluated for the Murex Ag/Ab, anti-HCV, and HCV RNA in the HIV/HCV and uremia patient groups. In the HCV group, all 102 samples showed concordant positive and negative results for anti-HCV, Murex Ag/Ab, and HCV RNA tests. In the HIV/HCV group, all 100 samples were positive for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab tests, whereas 88 patients (88% were HCV RNA positive. In the uremia group, 14 (69.0% of the 23 anti-HCV-positive patients were HCV RNA positive, whereas 14 (77.8% of the 18 Murex Ag/Ab–positive patients were HCV RNA positive. None of anti-HCV-negative or Murex Ag/Ab–negative patients were HCV RNA positive. Based on the HCV RNA assay, the sensitivities for both anti-HCV and Murex Ag/Ab assays were 100%, whereas the specificities of these two assays were 89.7% and 95.4%, respectively. With good sensitivity and specificity, the Murex Ag/Ab assay could be a useful alternative diagnostic tool, especially in immunocompromised populations, such as patients with uremia or those infected with HIV.

  14. In silico Analysis of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT Gene: Identification of a Distant Homolog of Melanoma Antigen Family Gene (MAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma antigen family (MAGE genes are widely expressed in various tumor types but silent in normal cells except germ-line cells lacking human leukocyte antigen (HLA expression. Over 25 MAGE genes have been identified in different tissues, mostly located in Xq28 of human chromosome and some of them in chromosome 3 and 15, containing either single or multiple-exons. This in silico study predicted the genes on hTERT location and identified a distant relative of MAGE gene located on chromosome 5. The study identified a single exon coding ∼850 residues polypeptide sharing ∼30% homology with Macfa-MAGE E1 and hMAGE-E1. dbEST search of the predicted transcript matches 5' and 3' flanking ESTs. The predicted protein showed sequence homology within the MAGE homology domain 2 (MHD2. UCSC genome annotation of CpG Island around the coding region reveals that this gene could be silent by methylation. Affymetrix all-exon track indicates the gene could be expressed in different tissues particularly in cancer cells as they widely undergo a genome wide demethylation process.

  15. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Among children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare investigation, few who manifest emotional and behavioral difficulties actually engage in mental health treatment. The Multiple Family Group service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders (MFG) has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregiver perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Twenty-five predominantly Black and Hispanic adult (ages 26-57) female caregivers with child welfare services involvement participated in individual, in-depth interviews about their experience with MFGs. Transcribed interview data were thematically coded guided by grounded theory methodology. Emergent themes were subsequently organized into a conceptual framework. Within the overarching influence of child welfare services involvement, specific components of MFGs influencing retention included the quality of interaction among group members, group facilitators' attentive approach with caregivers, supports designed to overcome logistical barriers (i.e., child care, transportation expenses, meals), and perceptions of MFG content and activities as fun and helpful. Caregiver factors, including their mental health and personal characteristics, as well as children's behavior, (i.e., observed changes in behavioral difficulties) were also associated with retention. High acceptability suggest utility for implementing MFGs within settings serving child welfare involved families, with additional modifications to tailor to setting and client features.

  16. Ladies in waiting: a group intervention for families coping with deployed soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, Vivian

    2011-07-01

    It is widely recognized that military service during wartime can take a toll on a soldier's psychological health. Recent work has revealed effects on the families left behind as well, as reflected, for example, in an increase in child abuse and neglect in these families. My interest in studying the transgenerational transmission of trauma led me to offer the National Guard a pro bono group therapy for women whose husbands had been deployed overseas. A slightly unorthodox approach paved the way not only to group treatment but, ultimately, individual treatment for these women and their children. My hope is that this work can serve as a model for other therapists who share my interest in treating the intergenerational transmission of trauma by implementing group and mother-child psychotherapy.

  17. Balint groups in family medicine residency programs: a follow-up study from 1990--2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Vanessa A; Chessman, Alexander; Johnson, Alan H; Brock, Clive D; Gavin, Jennifer K

    2015-05-01

    Balint groups have been part of residency education for decades. This study updates our understanding of the organization, purpose, and leadership of Balint groups within US family medicine residency programs. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved family medicine residency training programs (n=453) were contacted to complete a questionnaire, similar to ones performed in 1990 and 2000. This survey included questions regarding Balint groups, including their composition, management, and goals. More than half (54%) of respondent programs (n=159) have at least one Balint group, compared to 19% in 1990 and 60% in 2000. Of programs without Balint, 24% would like to have a Balint group, and 6% plan to initiate one within the following year. The proportion of groups meeting weekly decreased over time (80.9% in 1990 versus 40.4% in 2000 versus 11.7% in 2010). The proportion of peer only groups decreased (45.2% versus 53.6% versus 35.1%) while the proportion of groups with > 11 members increased (11.1% versus 15.8% versus 27.2%). Less than half of Balint group leaders reported going to formal training at the American Balint Society Leader's Intensive Workshop (41%). "Understanding the patient as a person" was seen as the main objective of Balint groups. Balint groups are still commonly occurring, but their implementation is changing. Groups are meeting less frequently and are more likely to be larger and heterogeneous. This trend and lack of formally trained/certified leaders may be decreasing the benefit to residents involved in Balint groups.

  18. Effects of Participation in Support Groups on Alzheimer’s Family Caregivers’ Strain and Spiritual Wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohammadi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Since support for family caregivers is crucial in providing care for elderly, this study was conducted to examine the effects of participation in support groups on Alzheimer’s family caregivers’ strain and spiritual wellbeing. Materials and Methods & Materials: In this semi-experimental study, 32 accessible family caregivers of elderly patients with Alzheimer who had at least one year of experience participated. The intervention consisted of a 4-month active participation in educational and emotional supportive sessions related to patient and caregivers care management. At the end of the intervention, the leadership of the groups was transferred to members of the groups. These sessions were conducted in 3 public centers in the community. Caregivers were assessed by caregiving strain and spiritual wellbeing questionnaires at the beginning, at the end of the intervention and 2 months later. Data was analyzed by ANOVA with repeated measurement. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In general, 32 accessible family caregivers of elderly Alzheimer patients with at least one year of experience participated in this study. The mean of spiritual wellbeing through three mentioned measurements showed an improvement (26.029, 34.029, 34.471, whereas the care giving strain showed a decreasing trend (40.118, 32.706, 31.265. Findings based on ANOVA-repeated measurement revealed a significantly decrease in care giving strain (P=0.001 and an improvement in spiritual wellbeing (P=0.005. Conclusion: Participation in the support groups as a manifest of empowering helps family caregivers to deal effectively with care giving difficulties. Psychoeducational programs lead to a decreased care giving strain and improve the spiritual wellbeing of the caregivers. Hence, supportive interventions should be considered by policy makers and professional health care providers for elderly people.

  19. Both group 4 capsule and lipopolysaccharide O-antigen contribute to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli resistance to human α-defensin 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny-Lee Thomassin

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC are food-borne pathogens that colonize the small intestine and colon, respectively. To cause disease, these pathogens must overcome the action of different host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs secreted into these distinct niches. We have shown previously that EHEC expresses high levels of the OmpT protease to inactivate the human cathelicidin LL-37, an AMP present in the colon. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms used by EPEC to resist human α-defensin 5 (HD-5, the most abundant AMP in the small intestine. Quantitative PCR was used to measure transcript levels of various EPEC surface structures. High transcript levels of gfcA, a gene required for group 4 capsule (G4C production, were observed in EPEC, but not in EHEC. The unencapsulated EPEC ∆gfcA and EHEC wild-type strains were more susceptible to HD-5 than EPEC wild-type. Since the G4C is composed of the same sugar repeats as the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, an -antigen ligase (waaL deletion mutant was generated in EPEC to assess its role in HD-5 resistance. The ∆waaL EPEC strain was more susceptible to HD-5 than both the wild-type and ∆gfcA strains. The ∆gfcA∆waaL EPEC strain was not significantly more susceptible to HD-5 than the ∆waaL strain, suggesting that the absence of -antigen influences G4C formation. To determine whether the G4C and -antigen interact with HD-5, total polysaccharide was purified from wild-type EPEC and added to the ∆gfcA∆waaL strain in the presence of HD-5. The addition of exogenous polysaccharide protected the susceptible strain against HD-5 killing in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that HD-5 binds to the polysaccharides present on the surface of EPEC. Altogether, these findings indicate that EPEC relies on both the G4C and the -antigen to resist the bactericidal activity of HD-5.

  20. A quick needs assessment of key stakeholder groups on the role of family medicine in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Zambia is a nation of nine million people, and has too few physicians to meet the country’s health needs. Following the strategy of other sub-Saharan countries, Zambia has developed a training programme in family medicine to help improve the medical competencies of its physician workforce. A needs assessment was undertaken to better understand the landscape into which Zambian family medicine is being placed. Methods. In 2014, a nine-question survey in Likert-scale format was developed, validated, and then delivered to four stakeholder groups: (i practicing clinical physicians, (ii the general public, (iii the University of Zambia’s School of Medicine’s academic faculty and (iv medical students. The needs assessment was delivered through several different mechanisms: via web-based service, to respondents’ email addresses; in paper form, to population samples of convenience; and verbally, through face-to-face encounters. Results. The number of stakeholders from each group who responded to the needs assessment were: clinical physicians, 27; general public, 15; academic faculty, 14; and medical students, 31. Five of the nine survey statements achieved super-majority consensus, with >66% of stakeholders in each group agreeing. Two additional statements achieved a simple-majority consensus with >50% agreement within each stakeholder group. Conclusion. This survey suggests that there is a broad-based a priori understanding of family medicine in Zambia, and general agreement that its presence would be valuable to Zambia’s healthcare system.

  1. Multi-family group therapy for adolescent Internet addiction: exploring the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin-Xue; Fang, Xiao-Yi; Yan, Ni; Zhou, Zong-Kui; Yuan, Xiao-Jiao; Lan, Jing; Liu, Chao-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Internet addiction is one of the most common problems among adolescents and effective treatment is needed. This research aims to test the effectiveness and underlying mechanism of multi-family group therapy (MFGT) to reduce Internet addiction among adolescents. A total of 92 participants consisting of 46 adolescents with Internet addiction, aged 12-18years, and 46 their parents, aged 35-46years, were assigned to the experimental group (six-session MFGT intervention) or a waiting-list control. Structured questionnaires were administered at pre-intervention (T1), post-intervention (T2) and a three-month follow-up (T3). There was a significant difference in the decline both in the average score and proportion of adolescents with Internet addiction in MFGT group at post-intervention (MT1=3.40, MT2=2.46, pInternet use was partially explained by the satisfaction of their psychological needs and improved parent-adolescent communication and closeness. The six-session multi-family group therapy was effective in reducing Internet addiction behaviors among adolescents and could be implemented as part of routine primary care clinic services in similar populations. As family support system is critical in maintaining the intervention effect, fostering positive parent-adolescent interaction and addressing adolescents' psychological needs should be included in preventive programs for Internet addiction in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-Family Pediatric Pain Group Therapy: Capturing Acceptance and Cultivating Change

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    Samantha E. Huestis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral health interventions for pediatric chronic pain include cognitive-behavioral (CBT, acceptance and commitment (ACT, and family-based therapies, though literature regarding multi-family therapy (MFT is sparse. This investigation examined the utility and outcomes of the Courage to Act with Pain: Teens Identifying Values, Acceptance, and Treatment Effects (CAPTIVATE program, which included all three modalities (CBT, ACT, MFT for youth with chronic pain and their parents. Program utility, engagement, and satisfaction were evaluated via quantitative and qualitative feedback. Pain-specific psychological, behavioral, and interpersonal processes were examined along with outcomes related to disability, quality of life, pain interference, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Participants indicated that CAPTIVATE was constructive, engaging, and helpful for social and family systems. Clinical and statistical improvements with large effect sizes were captured for pain catastrophizing, acceptance, and protective parenting but not family functioning. Similar effects were found for functional disability, pain interference, fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Given the importance of targeting multiple systems in the management of pediatric chronic pain, preliminary findings suggest a potential new group-based treatment option for youth and families. Next steps involve evaluating the differential effect of the program over treatment as usual, as well as specific CBT, ACT, and MFT components and processes that may affect outcomes.

  3. Cross-family correlates of blood pressure in the Western Collaborative Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelli, D; Swan, G E; Rosenman, R H

    1986-08-01

    The present study examined the association between one spouse's characteristics and his/her partner's blood pressure (BP) and the combined effect of parental characteristics on the BP levels of offspring in a subgroup of families recruited from the Western Collaborative Group Study (WCGS). Among the individual personality characteristics examined were pace of activity, reflectiveness, dominance, and emotional stability as assessed by the Thurstone Temperament Schedule (TTS). The confounding effects of age, weight, and father's disease status were controlled for by multiple-regression techniques. The results indicate a differential pattern of cross-spouse and cross-family associations for parents and offspring in these families. Higher scores on the TTS activity scale were associated with increased levels of BP in males and decreased levels of BP in females. The observed associations were of the same magnitude as those of more traditional correlates such as age and weight. The findings from the cross-family association analyses are contrasted with the separate patterns of familial correlation of BP and personality characteristics.

  4. Nonredundant roles of Src-family kinases and Syk in the initiation of B-cell antigen receptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Drobek, Aleš; Hořejší, Václav; Brdička, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 4 (2013), s. 1807-1818 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR GAP302/12/1712 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : BCR signaling * Src family kinases * Syk Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.362, year: 2013

  5. Mapping the Balint groups to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education family medicine competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Albert; Antoun, Jumana; Rule, Chris; Knowlton, Katherine; Sternlieb, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Balint group discussions provide learning opportunities for many of the competencies and milestones put forward by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The current literature is mixed concerning the effect of Balint groups on communication skills and professionalism. Aim To map the content of the Balint discussion to the competencies and milestones put forward by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A group who were both experts in Balint and members of the clinical competency committee of residency programs rated narratives that summarized Balint group discussions. Credentialed Leaders of the American Balint Society were invited via email to submit narratives (250 words) about Balint groups that they have led, or were leading, with residents. Results Only four narratives were submitted. Additional cases were recruited through literature review of published Balint discussion cases. A total of 25 cases were rated by the committee. There was agreement between three out of four raters on at least one core milestone in every case. The most frequent milestones were C1 (develops meaningful therapeutic relationships with patients and families), C2 (communicated effectively with patients, families, and public), Prof1 (completes a process of professionalization), and Prof3 (demonstrates humanism and cultural proficiency). Balint groups provided a learning opportunity for a subset of milestones in at least 36% of the cases. Conclusion This pilot research suggests that Balint groups and the discussions of complex and challenging cases provide learning opportunities for multiple family medicine milestones, mainly communication skills and professionalism. Further research is needed to refine the methodology and the rating system.

  6. ROLES OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY: CONTROL AND COORDINATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROUPS

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    Aylin Ataay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maman (1999 proposed that, in countries in which business groups are dominant forms for organizing economic activities, the interlocking directorate is a managerial tool that can be prioritized to control and coordinate activities of their affiliated firms within the same groups and align their business objectives. This organizational connection appears to be an intentional strategy on the part of the groups‟ headquarters. In order to study the interlocking ties in Turkish family business groups (FBG, this study focused on interlocking directorates among listed firms in Turkey. The findings of preliminary study reveal that almost all of the interlocking ties were within the business groups (BG in our sample. This is the result of assignment of familyaffiliated and/or professional inside directors to the various boards of companies in the BG. We also found that compare to vertical ties; business groups are using more horizontal interlocking connections to bond their affiliated companies together.

  7. EFFECT OF PLANT LECTINS ON HUMAN BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS WITH SPECIAL FOCUS ON PLANT FOODS AND JUICES

    OpenAIRE

    B. Venkata Raman; B. Sravani; P. Phani Rekha; K.V.N. Lalitha; B. Narasimha Rao

    2012-01-01

    Different plant lectins have been studied for lectin binding activity on ABO blood group system individually to study their suitability for consumption. 45% of plants were found to show blood group agglutination activity against A, B, AB and O groups. These results showed more suitability for consumption of investigated plants and their products to entire human population. Data also alarming human to be more careful about the plant lectins reacting with blood groups as the similar reactions ...

  8. Study on occupational therapy groups for caregivers of families with schizophrenia patients

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    Angélica da Silva Araujo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the main aspects featuring the experience of caring for a family member who is schizophrenic and discuss the possible therapeutic benefits which arise from the participation of caregivers in occupational therapy groups. Methodological procedures: Qualitative-descriptive study, performed in a mental health ambulatory at a general hospital in the state of São Paulo. Data was collected through audio-recording in occupational therapy groups which counted on the participation of 10 family-caregivers of schizophrenic patients with follow-up treatment at this ambulatory. The data were analyzed through the thematic content analysis of Lawrence Bardin. Results: Caregivers of schizophrenic patients face daily difficulties arising from living together with their beloved ones and coping with their behaviors. These caregivers stress the importance of groups as a possible opportunity to have contact with other experiences of people under similar conditions, which not only enables them to clear doubts concerning the illness and the provided care, but also to reflect on the importance of taking care of themselves. Conclusions: There is great need for new studies that address this issue and develop continuous therapeutic interventions that offer caregivers the possibility to be heard about their experiences and to share information, aiming to prepare them to offer a more effective care for the schizophrenic family member and others with mental disorders. The importance of evaluating such interventions is therefore highlighted.

  9. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  10. No evidence for a direct effect of von Willebrand factor's ABH blood group antigens on von Willebrand factor clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, D J; van Bekkum, T; Cheung, K L; Dirven, R J; Castaman, G; Reitsma, P H; van Vlijmen, B; Eikenboom, J

    BACKGROUND: One of the major determinants of von Willebrand factor (VWF) plasma levels is ABO blood group status, and individuals with blood group O have ~ 25% lower plasma levels. The exact mechanism behind this relationship remains unknown, although effects on clearance have been postulated.

  11. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  12. Parafunctional oral habits and its relationship with family structure in a mexican preschoolers group, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Murrieta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Habit is any act acquired through experience and performed regularly and unconsciously. Parafunctional habits are resulting from the perversion of a normal function, acquired by repeated practice of an act that is not functional or necessary, may be signs of adjustment problems or inappropriate emotional expression. Its importance lies in the fact that they can interfere with the development of dental occlusion. Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of parafunctional oral habits and their possible association with the type of family, in a group of preschool children from eastern Mexico City. Methodology. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carrying on. Preschool children group and their parents were surveyed before an examiner calibration (k =0.87, p=0.001. The detection of different parafunctional habits was conducted in two stages: 1 application of a parent questionnaire and 2 clinical assessment of the child. Results and discussion. 57.7% of the studied population had at least one parafunctional oral habit. Onycophagia habit was the most prevalent. The relationship between prevalence of parafunctional habits with family type was significant (X2=87.439, p=0.0001. Conclusions. The prevalence of parafunctional habits was high which was associated with family type also the most frequent parafunctional habit onycophagia.

  13. No association between histo-blood group antigens and susceptibility to clinical infections with genogroup II norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Tamar; Vennema, Harry; Koopmans, Marion; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Kayouf, Raid; Sela, Tamar; Ambar, Ruhama; Klement, Eyal

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans. In the present study, the association between NoV susceptibility and the ABO histo-blood group was studied during 2 outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in military units in Israel caused by genogroup II (GII) NoVs. The findings demonstrate that, unlike for genogroup I of NoV, there is no association between the ABO histo-blood group and clinical infection with GII NoVs. This is the largest study to test the association between NoVs, proven clinical infection with GII, and the ABO histo-blood group.

  14. Split-Session Focus Group Interviews in the Naturalistic Setting of Family Medicine Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, Michael D; Guetterman, Timothy C; Power, Debra; Nease, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    When recruiting health care professionals to focus group interviews, investigators encounter challenges such as busy clinic schedules, recruitment, and a desire to get candid responses from diverse participants. We sought to overcome these challenges using an innovative, office-based, split-session focus group procedure in a project that elicited feedback from family medicine practices regarding a new preventive services model. This procedure entails allocating a portion of time to the entire group and the remaining time to individual subgroups. We discuss the methodologic procedure and the implications of using this approach for data collection. We conducted split-session focus groups with physicians and staff in 4 primary care practices. The procedure entailed 3 sessions, each lasting 30 minutes: the moderator interviewed physicians and staff together, physicians alone, and staff alone. As part of the focus group interview, we elicited and analyzed participant comments about the split-session format and collected observational field notes. The split-session focus group interviews leveraged the naturalistic setting of the office for context-relevant discussion. We tested alternate formats that began in the morning and at lunchtime, to parallel each practice's workflow. The split-session approach facilitated discussion of topics primarily relevant to staff among staff, topics primarily relevant to physicians among physicians, and topics common to all among all. Qualitative feedback on this approach was uniformly positive. A split-session focus group interview provides an efficient, effective way to elicit candid qualitative information from all members of a primary care practice in the naturalistic setting where they work. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  15. Prevention of involuntary admission through Family Group Conferencing: a qualitative case study in community mental health nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, G.; Schout, G.; Abma, T.

    2014-01-01

    To understand whether and how Family Group Conferencing might contribute to the social embedding of clients with mental illness. Background: Ensuring the social integration of psychiatric clients is a key aspect of community mental health nursing. Family Group Conferencing has potency to create

  16. Immigrant families' perceptions on walking to school and school breakfast: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busby Katie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigrant children face an increased risk of being overweight. Little is known about how immigrant families perceive school programs that may help prevent obesity, such as walking to school and school breakfast. Methods Six focus groups (n = 53 were conducted with immigrant parents of school-aged children, two each in three languages: Vietnamese, Spanish, and Somali. A facilitator and translator conducted the focus groups using a script and question guide. Written notes and audio transcripts were recorded in each group. Transcripts were coded for themes by two researchers and findings classified according to an ecological model. Results Participants in each ethnic group held positive beliefs about the benefits of walking and eating breakfast. Barriers to walking to school included fear of children's safety due to stranger abductions, distrust of neighbors, and traffic, and feasibility barriers due to distance to schools, parent work constraints, and large families with multiple children. Barriers to school breakfast participation included concerns children would not eat due to lack of appealing/appropriate foods and missing breakfast due to late bus arrival or lack of reminders. Although some parents acknowledged concerns about child and adult obesity overall, obesity concerns did not seem personally relevant. Conclusion Immigrant parents supported the ideals of walking to school and eating breakfast, but identified barriers to participation in school programs across domains of the ecological model, including community, institution, and built environment factors. Schools and communities serving immigrant families may need to address these barriers in order to engage parents and children in walking and breakfast programs.

  17. ABO blood group is a cardiovascular risk factor in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Martine; Dufour, Robert; Baass, Alexis

    2017-12-14

    The ABO blood group has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in observational studies. However, the effect of ABO blood group has never been studied in subjects affected by familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a severe monogenic disease characterized by accelerated atherosclerotic plaque development. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the ABO blood group on CVD risk in FH patients. A total of 668 adult subjects with a heterozygous FH-causing mutation in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene were included in the present study. ABO blood group was determined using 2 functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene (rs8176719 and rs8176746). Total cholesterol was significantly higher in non-O subjects compared to carriers of the O group (9.48 vs 9.14 mmol/L, P = .02). We observed a greater proportion of subjects carrying the non-O groups (73.4%) in patients with CVD compared to subjects without CVD (63.3%). In a regression model corrected for cardiovascular risk factors, the non-O group was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of CVD (odds ratio = 2.14, 95% confidence interval = 1.25-3.65, P = .005). In average, patients in the non-O blood group experienced more CVD events (0.88 per individual) than those in the O group (0.60 per individual), P = .008. Carrying a non-O blood group is associated with an independent twofold increased risk of CVD in FH patients. The ABO blood group represents a novel CVD risk factor in FH subjects that is often known by the patient and could be used to further stratify CVD risk in this population of patients. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of multiple-group measurement invariance in family psychology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Justin L; McBride, Brent A; Laxman, Daniel J; Dyer, W Justin; Santos, Rosa M; Jeans, Laurie M

    2016-04-01

    Measurement invariance (MI) is a property of measurement that is often implicitly assumed, but in many cases, not tested. When the assumption of MI is tested, it generally involves determining if the measurement holds longitudinally or cross-culturally. A growing literature shows that other groupings can, and should, be considered as well. Additionally, it is noted that the standard techniques for investigating MI have been focused almost exclusively on the case of 2 groups, with very little work on the case of more than 2 groups, even though the need for such techniques is apparent in many fields of research. This paper introduces and illustrates a model building technique to investigating MI for more than 2 groups. This technique is an extension of the already-existing hierarchy for testing MI introduced by Meredith (1993). An example using data on father involvement in 5 different groups of families of children with and without developmental disabilities from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort dataset will be given. We show that without considering the possible differential functioning of the measurements on multiple developmental groups, the differences present between the groups in terms of the measurements may be obscured. This could lead to incorrect conclusions. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration at a Family Medicine Residency Program: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Hager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to transforming healthcare and pursuit of the Triple Aim, many health systems have added team members to expand the capabilities and effectiveness of the team to facilitate these aims. The objective of this study was to explore knowledge and perceptions of pharmacist-physician collaboration among family medicine residents (FMR, family medicine faculty (FMF, and pharmacist faculty and residents in a practice where clinical pharmacy services were relatively new. Understanding the nuances of pharmacist-physician interactions will provide insight into how to improve FMR education to prepare learners for patient-centered, team-based practice. Methods: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study design was used to articulate perceptions of professional roles and team-based care in an interprofessional family medicine community-based clinical practice. Five, 60-minute focus groups were conducted in a clinical training setting that focuses on preparing family medicine physicians for collaborative rural primary care practice. Results: Twenty-one FMRs, eight FMF, and six clinical pharmacists participated. Three themes emerged from the focus groups and were consistent across the groups: 1 roles of pharmacists recognized by physicians in different settings, 2 benefits to collaboration, and 3 keys to successful pharmacist-physician collaboration which include a developing the relationship, b optimizing communication, c creating beneficial clinical workflow, d clarifying roles and responsibilities, and e increasing opportunities for meaningful interactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that by co-locating physicians and pharmacists in the same environment, and providing a basic structure for collaboration, a collaborative working relationship can be initiated. Practices looking to have more effective collaborative working relationships should strive to increase the frequency of interactions of the professions, help the

  20. Significance of isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen in Dutch national vaccination campaign of behavioural high-risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, R. P. M.; Gotz, H. M.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.; Heijnen, M. L. A.; van Steenbergen, J. A.; Kroes, A. C. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the Dutch national vaccination campaign for behavioural risk groups, anti-HBcore is used as the primary HBV screening test. Samples with positive results undergo testing for active infection (HBsAg) but are otherwise accepted as indicating past infection, thereby assuming immunity. This study

  1. Four families of Weyl group orbit functions of B3 and C3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háková, Lenka; Hrivnák, Jiří; Patera, Jiří

    2013-08-01

    The properties of the four families of special functions of three real variables, called here C-, S-, Ss-, and Sl-functions, are studied. The Ss- and Sl-functions are considered in all details required for their exploitation in Fourier expansions of digital data, sampled on finite fragment of lattices of any density and of the 3D symmetry imposed by the weight lattices of B3 and C3 simple Lie algebras/groups. The continuous interpolations, which are induced by the discrete expansions, are exemplified and compared for some model functions.

  2. Virulence Role of the GlcNAc Side Chain of the Lancefield Cell Wall Carbohydrate Antigen in Non-M1-Serotype Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Henningham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of streptococci is based upon expression of unique cell wall carbohydrate antigens. All serotypes of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes, a leading cause of infection-related mortality worldwide, express the group A carbohydrate (GAC. GAC, the classical Lancefield antigen, is comprised of a polyrhamnose backbone with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc side chains. The immunodominant GlcNAc epitope of GAC is the basis of all rapid diagnostic testing for GAS infection. We previously identified the 12-gene GAC biosynthesis gene cluster and determined that the glycosyltransferase GacI was required for addition of the GlcNAc side chain to the polyrhamnose core. Loss of the GAC GlcNAc epitope in serotype M1 GAS resulted in attenuated virulence in two animal infection models and increased GAS sensitivity to killing by whole human blood, serum, neutrophils, and antimicrobial peptides. Here, we report that the GAC biosynthesis gene cluster is ubiquitous among 520 GAS isolates from global sources, representing 105 GAS emm serotypes. Isogenic ΔgacI mutants were constructed in M2, M3, M4, M28, and M89 backgrounds and displayed an array of phenotypes in susceptibility to killing by whole human blood, baby rabbit serum, human platelet releasate, human neutrophils, and antimicrobial peptide LL-37. The contribution of the GlcNAc side chain to GAS survival in vivo also varied by strain, demonstrating that it is not a prerequisite for virulence in the murine infection model. Thus, the relative contribution of GAC to virulence in non-M1 serotypes appears to depend on the quorum of other virulence factors that each strain possesses.

  3. Fat, sugar and water intakes among families from the IDEFICS intervention and control groups: first observations from I.Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, L; Bogl, L-H; Eiben, G; Hebestreit, A; Nagy, P; Tornaritis, M; Moreno, L A; Siani, A; Veidebaum, T; De Henauw, S; Lissner, L

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate differences in diets of families in intervention versus control communities 5 years after the Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants intervention ended. Altogether, 4,691 families from the I.Family study with at least one participating parent and one child are included in this analysis. Diet quality indicators, defined as propensities to consume fat, sugar, water and fruit and vegetables, are calculated from a 59-item food frequency questionnaire. Multilevel linear models with random intercepts for study centre are used to determine whether mean diet indicators, calculated at the family level, differed as a function of previous exposure to the intervention. Families in the intervention communities reported a significantly lower sugar propensity (19.8% vs. 20.7% of total food items, p beverages, p sustainability of some aspects of the diet intervention. © 2015 World Obesity.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of family-based group treatment for child and parental obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H; Paluch, Rocco A; Wrotniak, Brian H; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Kilanowski, Colleen; Wilfley, Denise; Finkelstein, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Obesity runs in families, and family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) is associated with weight loss in overweight/obese children and their overweight/obese parents. This study was designed to estimate the costs and cost-effectiveness of FBT compared to separate group treatments of the overweight/obese parent and child (PC). Fifty overweight/obese 8- to 12-year-old children with overweight/obese parents were randomly assigned to 12 months of either FBT or PC treatment program. Assessment of societal costs (payer plus opportunity costs) were completed based on two assumptions: (1) programs for parent and child were available on separate days (PC-1) or (2) interventions for parent and child were available in the same location at sequential times on the same day (PC-2). Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on societal cost per unit of change using percent overBMI for children and weight for parents. The average societal cost per family was $1,448 for FBT and $2,260 for PC-1 (p Child cost-effectiveness for FBT was $209.17/percent overBMI, compared to $1,036.50/percent overBMI for PC-1 and $973.98/percent overBMI for PC-2. Parent cost-effectiveness was $132.97/pound (lb) for FBT and $373.53/lb (PC-1) or $351.00/lb (PC-2). For families with overweight/obese children and parents, FBT presents a lower cost per unit of weight loss for parents and children than treating the parent and child separately. Given the high rates of pediatric and adult obesity, FBT may provide a unique cost-effective platform for obesity intervention that alters weight in overweight/obese parents and their overweight/obese children.

  5. Promoting and recovering health: meanings produced in community groups within the family health program context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiane Camargo-Borges

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Public Healthcare in Brazil has tended to reflect major changes in the healthcare model. New tendencies point to the importance of actions being built up from their context and focused on specific communities. The objective of this study is to describe the meanings of health / illness as produced by community groups within the context of a Family Healthcare Program. Five groups had their single-session discussions taped and recorded, under the coordination of the first author. This material was transcribed and, coupled with field notes, formed the database for this study. The analysis described the meanings of the ideas on which new healthcare proposals are being based, providing visibility for the multiplicity of meanings and denaturalizing fixed lines of discourse on healthcare / illness. The final thoughts, developed from the point of view of social constructionism, indicate that healthcare practices based on the process of constant conversation and negotiation between all the social actors involved is a fertile ground.

  6. Subjective quality of life of outpatients with diabetes: comparison with family caregivers' impressions and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Tawfiq, Adel M; Al-Awadi, Shafika A

    2006-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies on comparison of quality of life (QOL) of type-1 and type-2 diabetes patients, and the impact of family caregivers' impressions on the QOL of patients. To assess the subjective QOL of Sudanese diabetics using the WHOQOL-Bref, compared with a general population sample; examine caregiver-patient concordance; and assess the variables that impact on QOL. The responses of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 136 with type-2 diabetes were compared with their family caregivers' impressions and 139 general population subjects. Patients were predominantly dissatisfied with their life circumstances. Type-1 diabetics had significantly lowest QOL scores, while the control group had highest scores. Having additional medical problems; having diminished sexual desire; and being young, unemployed and single were associated with poor QOL, but illness duration was not. Type-2 diabetics had lesser concordance with caregivers. The only predictor of patients' QOL was the caregivers' impression of patients' QOL. Caregivers' impression of patients' QOL impacted on outcome. Caregiver education is, therefore, important. The factors associated with QOL indicate a group that needs focused attention. The good QOL for type-2 and nonsignificance of illness duration encourage therapeutic optimism.

  7. Association of Group Prenatal Care in US Family Medicine Residencies With Maternity Care Practice: A CERA Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Wendy B; Tong, Sebastian T; LeFevre, Nicholas M

    2017-03-01

    Group prenatal care has been shown to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes. With increasing adaption of group prenatal care by family medicine residencies, this model may serve as a potential method to increase exposure to and interest in maternity care among trainees. This study aims to describe the penetration, regional and program variations, and potential impacts on future maternity care practice of group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies. The CAFM Educational Research Alliance (CERA) conducted a survey of all US family medicine residency program directors in 2013 containing questions about maternity care training. A secondary data analysis was completed to examine relevant data on group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies and maternity care practice patterns. 23.1% of family medicine residency programs report provision of group prenatal care. Programs with group prenatal care reported increased number of vaginal deliveries per resident. Controlling for average number of vaginal deliveries per resident, programs with group prenatal care had a 2.35 higher odds of having more than 10% of graduates practice obstetrics and a 2.93 higher odds of having at least one graduate in the past 5 years enter an obstetrics fellowship. Residency programs with group prenatal care models report more graduates entering OB fellowships and practicing maternity care. Implementing group prenatal care in residency training can be one method in a multifaceted approach to increasing maternity care practice among US family physicians.

  8. Structures of two cell wall-associated polysaccharides of a Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strain. A unique teichoic acid-like polysaccharide and the group O antigen which is a C-polysaccharide in common with pneumococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, N; Jansson, P.-E.; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    -polysaccharide constitutes the Lancefield group O antigen. Studies using mAbs directed against the backbone and against the phosphocholine moiety of the C-polysaccharide revealed several different patterns of these epitopes among 95 S. mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains tested and the exclusive presence of the group O...

  9. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using 2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%. In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9, vs. 88.86 (7.5. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness.

  10. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N Ramsook

    Full Text Available Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors.

  11. The use of music in group educational activities in Family Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Líliam Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes; Santos, Graziela da Costa; Fernandes, Maria Teresinha de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    describe how music is used in the development of group educational activity in Family Health. a qualitative, descriptive and exploratory study, developed with 10 group coordinators, distributed in five basic care units in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Data were collected from March to July, 2009, with non participant observation in the group itself, and semi-structured interviews with the coordinators. Information was organized and categorized according to thematic analysis. To interpret the data, the Snyderian concepts in addition to theoretical references about music, communication and health education were used. three thematic nuclei were found: the affective dimension of music; recreative dimension of music and the reflexive dimension of music. an attempt by the coordinators was observed, to overcome the pathological barriers with the use of music, considering the group as a whole. As advancement for the production of knowledge, this study shows the need for qualification of these coordinators, by means of workshops and constant follow-up of their musical practices.

  12. Unmet need for family planning among married women of reproductive age group in urban Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini M Bhattathiry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Unmet need for family planning (FP, which refers to the condition in which there is the desire to avoid or post-pone child bearing, without the use of any means of contraception, has been a core concept in the field of international population for more than three decades. Objectives: The very objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of "unmet need for FP" and its socio-demographic determinants among married reproductive age group women in Chidambaram. Materials and Methods: The study was a community-based cross-sectional study of married women of the reproductive age group, between 15 and 49 years. The sample size required was 700. The cluster sampling method was adopted. Unmarried, separated, divorced and widows were excluded. Results: The prevalence of unmet need for FP was 39%, with spacing as 12% and limiting as 27%. The major reason for unmet need for FP among the married group was 18%, for low perceived risk of pregnancy, 9%, feared the side effects of contraception 5% lacked information on contraceptives, 4% had husbands who opposed it and 3% gave medical reasons. Higher education, late marriage, more than the desired family size, poor knowledge of FP, poor informed choice in FP and poor male participation were found to be associated with high unmet need for FP. Conclusion: Unmet need for younger women was spacing of births, whereas for older women, it was a limitation of births. Efforts should be made to identify the issues in a case by case approach. Male participation in reproductive issues should be addressed.

  13. Family witnessed resuscitation: Focus group inquiry into UK student nurse experiences of simulated resuscitation scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Pontin, D.; Kenny, G.; Bray, I.; Albarran, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims:\\ud To describe the impact of family member presence on student nurse performance in a witnessed resuscitation scenario.\\ud To explore student nurses’ attitudes to simulated family witnessed resuscitation and their views about its place in clinical practice.\\ud Background: Family witnessed resuscitation remains controversial worldwide. Hospital implementation remains inconsistent despite professional organisation support. Systematic reviews of international literature indicate family mem...

  14. The Cochrane Fertility Regulation Group: synthesizing the best evidence about family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmerhorst, Frans M; Belfield, Toni; Kulier, Regina; Maitra, Nandita; O'Brien, Paul; Grimes, David A

    2006-10-01

    The Fertility Regulation Group of the Cochrane Collaboration has been assessing the best available evidence on fertility regulation, family size and birth spacing. By the end of 2005, this group had published 32 systematic reviews and 12 protocols; most reviews were on contraception. Because of suboptimal trial quality, firm conclusions could be made in only five reviews. Threats to internal validity in published trials include the absence of description of allocation concealment, intentional exclusion of participants after randomization, failure to use intention-to-treat analyses and lack of treatment blinding. The precision of results has been limited by small sample sizes. The finding that most trials of oral contraceptives were conducted by pharmaceutical companies raises concerns about potential commercial bias. Of necessity, most information about fertility regulation effectiveness and adverse effects comes from observational studies, which vary widely in quality. Systematic reviews of evidence, with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials when available, will continue to improve fertility regulation in the years ahead.

  15. Program experiences of adults with autism, their families, and providers: Findings from a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffer Miller, Kaitlin H; Mathew, Mary; Nonnemacher, Stacy L; Shea, Lindsay L

    2017-02-01

    A growing number of individuals with autism spectrum disorder are aging into adulthood. In the United States, Medicaid is the primary payer for services for adults with autism spectrum disorder, yet there are few funded programs that provide dedicated supports to this population. This study examined the experiences of adults with autism spectrum disorder in two Medicaid-funded programs in Pennsylvania through focus groups. Researchers conducted 20 focus groups with a total of 36 adults with autism spectrum disorder, 32 family members, 32 direct care staff, and 20 program administrators. Using thematic analysis, we identified three themes: training needs, community engagement and socialization, and employment. There was a need for additional training to meet the varying needs of program participants including co-occurring diagnoses, sexuality, and long-term planning. Adults with autism spectrum disorder prioritized more individualized community activities based on their interests. Finally, barriers to and strategies for successful employment were discussed. It will be crucial for policy makers to utilize the findings to inform program improvement and development based on the experiences of individuals impacted by these services and systems directly. Additionally, researchers should use the findings from this study to design interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorder as it includes their voices.

  16. The role of Balint group training in the professional and personal development of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, Marty; Freedy, John R; Diaz, Vanessa; Brock, Clive; Chessman, Alexander; Thiedke, Carolyn; Johnson, Alan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a study based on the participation of PGY2 and PGY3 family medicine residents in Balint seminars that occurred twice monthly for 24 months. Balint groups were cofacilitated by leader pairs experienced with the Balint method. Prior to residency graduation, 18 of 19 eligible resident physicians (94.5%) completed 30- to 60-min semistructured interviews conducted by a research assistant. Resident physicians were told that these individual interviews concerned "…how we teach communication in residency." The deidentified transcripts from these interviews formed the raw data that were coded for positive (n = 9) and negative (n = 3) valence themes by four faculty coders utilizing an iterative process based on grounded theory. The consensus positive themes included several elements that have previously been discussed in published literature concerning the nature of Balint groups (e.g., being the doctor that the patient needs, reflection, empathy, blind spots, bonding, venting, acceptance, perspective taking, and developing appreciation for individual experiences). The negative themes pointed to ways of possibly improving future Balint offerings in the residency setting ( repetitive, uneasiness, uncertain impact). These findings appear to have consistency with seminal writings of both Michael and Enid Balint regarding the complex nature of intrapsychic and interpersonal skills required to effectively manage troubling doctor-patient relationships. The implications of findings for medical education (curriculum) development as well as future research efforts are discussed.

  17. Comparison Groups in Autism Family Research: Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Krauss, Marty Wyngaarden; Greenberg, Jan; Swe, April

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines methodological challenges inherent in conducting research on families of children with autism and in comparing these families with others who are coping with different types of disabilities or who have nondisabled children. Although most comparative research has contrasted families whose child has autism with those whose child…

  18. Noninvasive determination of fetal rh blood group, D antigen status by cell-free DNA analysis in maternal plasma: experience in a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Paulo Alexandre; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Martinhago, Ciro Dresch; Camano, Luiz; Daher, Silvia; Pares, David Baptista da Silva; Minett, Thais; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2010-11-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of Rh blood group, D antigen (RHD) fetal genotyping, using real-time polymerase chain reaction in maternal blood samples, in a racially mixed population. We performed a prospective study conducted between January 2006 and December 2007, analyzing fetal RHD genotype in the plasma of 102 D- pregnant women by real-time polymerase chain reaction, targeting exons 7 and 10 of the RHD gene. Genotype results were compared with cord blood phenotype obtained after delivery or before the first intrauterine transfusion when necessary. Most of the participants (75.5%) were under 28 weeks of pregnancy, and 87.5% had at least one relative of black ancestry. By combining amplification of two exons, the accuracy of genotyping was 98%, sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 92%. The positive likelihood ratio was 12.5, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0. The two false-positive cases were confirmed to be pseudogene RHD by real-time polymerase chain reaction. There were no differences between the patients with positive or negative Coombs test ( P = 0.479). Determination of fetal RHD status in maternal peripheral blood was highly sensitive in this racially mixed population and was not influenced by the presence of antierythrocyte antibodies. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  19. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori blood-group antigen-binding adhesion 2 and sialic acid binding adhesion genes among dyspeptic patients in Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Yousefi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this research was to analyze blood-group antigen-binding adhesion (babA2 and sialic acid binding adhesion (sabA genotypes status in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori isolates and their relationship with clinical outcomes. Methods: Gastric biopsy specimens were homogenized and placed in Brucella agar medium supplemented with 5% sheep blood and 3 antibiotics and were cultured at 37 °C under microaerophilic conditions and incubated for 4-7 days. H. pylori was identified by typical morphology, gram-staining and urease tests, and babA2 and sabA genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: From a total of 100 H. pylori isolates; babA2 and sabA genes were detected in 23.0 and 26.4%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between these genes and clinical outcomes (P < 0.050. Conclusion: We found that the babA2 status was not related to clinical outcomes in Tabriz, Iran. However, sabA was a promoting determinant for disease, and multivariate analysis disclosed sabA to be an independent marker of non-ulcer diseases in our subjects.

  20. Distinct groups of repetitive families preserved in mammals correspond to different periods of regulatory innovations in vertebrates

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    Jurka Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian genomes are repositories of repetitive DNA sequences derived from transposable elements (TEs. Typically, TEs generate multiple, mostly inactive copies of themselves, commonly known as repetitive families or families of repeats. Recently, we proposed that families of TEs originate in small populations by genetic drift and that the origin of small subpopulations from larger populations can be fueled by biological innovations. Results We report three distinct groups of repetitive families preserved in the human genome that expanded and declined during the three previously described periods of regulatory innovations in vertebrate genomes. The first group originated prior to the evolutionary separation of the mammalian and bird lineages and the second one during subsequent diversification of the mammalian lineages prior to the origin of eutherian lineages. The third group of families is primate-specific. Conclusions The observed correlation implies a relationship between regulatory innovations and the origin of repetitive families. Consistent with our previous hypothesis, it is proposed that regulatory innovations fueled the origin of new subpopulations in which new repetitive families became fixed by genetic drift. Reviewers Eugene Koonin, I. King Jordan, Jürgen Brosius.

  1. Fecal androgen levels in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus males living in captive family groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro D.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In captive common marmoset groups, the reproductive inhibition observed in subordinate female seems to be a result of olfactory, visual and behavioral cues from the dominant female. However, few studies have examined the relationship among adult males living in the same social group. These studies have shown that reproductive failure among peer males seems to be based on hormonal and behavioral mechanisms. New insights on sexual strategies in primates have been shown using fecal steroids, but so far no information is available for common marmoset males. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of light-dark cycle, age and reproductive condition on the profile of fecal androgens in males living in the same family group. Feces were collected from six fathers and six sons for androgen determination during the light phase of the 24-h cycle for eight days randomly distributed over a 4-week period. Androgen levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay technique. Adult sons showed higher androgen levels (166.97 ± 22.95 ng/g than fathers (80.69 ± 44.38 ng/g and juveniles (49.06 ± 23.15 ng/g; P 0.05 in fecal androgen profile was observed in adults or juveniles. No indication of androgen-mediated social competition between fathers and adult sons was demonstrable. These results provide basic information on fecal androgen profile useful to investigate the socioendocrinology of free-ranging common marmoset males and verify that, in contrast to daughters, the reproductive suppression of sons is not based on physiological inhibition of their gonads.

  2. The internationalisation of Spanish family firms through business groups: Factors affecting the profitability, and the moderating effect of the family nature of the Spanish business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Pérez-López

    2018-01-01

    The results of this study could help to clarify an issue of some significance in professional and academic circles. Both owners and managers of family businesses can use these research findings to better understand how certain characteristics of business group management could affect their performance and the success of the internationalisation process.

  3. Quality of care for anxiety and depression in different ethnic groups by family practitioners in urban areas in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassaert, T.; Nielen, M.; Verheij, R.; Verhoeff, A.; Dekker, J.; Beekman, A.; Wit, M. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is widespread concern about access to good quality health care for ethnic minority groups. This study investigates differences between ethnic groups regarding prevalence of anxiety and depression, and adherence to treatment guidelines by family practitioners in urban areas in the

  4. Quality of care for anxiety and depression in different ethnic groups by family practitioners in urban areas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassaert, T.; Nielen, M.M.A.; Verheij, R.; Verhoeff, A.; Dekker, J.; Beekman, A.T.F.; de Wit, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is widespread concern about access to good quality health care for ethnic minority groups. This study investigates differences between ethnic groups regarding prevalence of anxiety and depression, and adherence to treatment guidelines by family practitioners in urban areas in the

  5. Should Family and Friends Be Involved in Group-Based Rehabilitation Programs for Adults with Low Vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, G.; Saw, C.; Larizza, M.; Lamoureux, E.; Keeffe, J.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the views of clients with low vision and vision rehabilitation professionals on the involvement of family and friends in group-based rehabilitation programs. Both groups outlined advantages and disadvantages to involving significant others, and it is essential that clients are given the choice. Future work is…

  6. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    A limited intralysosomal proteolytic degradation is probably a key event in the accessory cell processing of large protein antigens before their presentation to T cells. With the aid of highly specific inhibitors of proteinases, we have examined the role of proteolysis in the presentation...... of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...... inhibitor. Another inhibitor, pepstatin A, which selectively blocks aspartic proteinases, did not block the presentation of dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. The results identify cysteine proteinases, probably lysosomal, as one of the groups of enzymes involved in antigen processing....

  7. Knowledge and Beliefs about Chronic Non Cancer Pain Management for Family Medicine Group Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Dave A; Bourgault, Patricia; Gallagher, Frances

    2015-12-01

    To provide effective care for chronic pain sufferers, nurses must have a knowledge of chronic pain management. In Quebec, nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs) could play a major role in helping patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP); however, the extent of their knowledge about CNCP management is unknown. The primary goal of this study was to explore the knowledge and beliefs of FMG nurses about CNCP management. The secondary goal was to explore the obstacles seen by these nurses as preventing them from performing CNCP management. We used a mixed-methods design with quantitative preponderance. Fifty-three FMG nurses answered a self-administered mail-in questionnaire. A rigorous data collection method was used. FMG nurses have suboptimal knowledge about CNCP management. They identify their lack of training and lack of knowledge as major obstacles to conducting pain management interventions. There is a need for pain management training specifically designed around the realities of FMG nursing. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An initial evaluation of a family-based approach to weight management in adolescents attending a community weight management group

    OpenAIRE

    Avery, A; Pallister, C; Allan, J; Stubbs, J; Lavin, J

    2012-01-01

    Background Family-based approaches are recommended for the prevention and management of childhood obesity. Given the large numbers of obese children, scalable practical solutions are required. The present study evaluated a family-based national programme that aimed to empower adolescents to adopt healthier lifestyles. Methods Group facilitators supporting more than six young members (11–15 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire was designed to determine the characteristics of the a...

  9. Familial aggregation of suicide explained by cluster B traits: a three-group family study of suicide controlling for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Alexander; Alda, Martin; Séguin, Monique; Cabot, Sophie; Lesage, Alain; Turecki, Gustavo

    2009-10-01

    There is substantial evidence suggesting that suicide aggregates in families. However, the extent of overlap between the liability to suicide and psychiatric disorders, particularly major depressive disorder, remains an important issue. Similarly, factors that account for the familial transmission of suicidal behavior remain unclear. Thus, through direct and blind assessment of first-degree relatives, the authors conducted a family study of suicide by examining three proband groups: probands who committed suicide in the context of major depressive disorder, living depressed probands with no history of suicidal behavior, and psychiatrically normal community comparison probands. Participants were 718 first-degree relatives from 120 families: 296 relatives of 51 depressed probands who committed suicide, 185 relatives of 34 nonsuicidal depressed probands, and 237 relatives of 35 community comparison subjects. Psychopathology, suicidal behavior, and behavioral measures were assessed via interviews. The relatives of probands who committed suicide had higher levels of suicidal behavior (10.8%) than the relatives of nonsuicidal depressed probands (6.5%) and community comparison probands (3.4%). Testing cluster B traits as intermediate phenotypes of suicide showed that the relatives of depressed probands who committed suicide had elevated levels of cluster B traits; familial predisposition to suicide was associated with increased levels of cluster B traits; cluster B traits demonstrated familial aggregation and were associated with suicide attempts among relatives; and cluster B traits mediated, at least in part, the relationship between familial predisposition and suicide attempts among relatives. Analyses were repeated for severity of attempts, where cluster B traits also met criteria for endophenotypes of suicide. Familial transmission of suicide and major depression, while partially overlapping, are distinct. Cluster B traits and impulsive-aggressive behavior represent

  10. Registered Nurses' Perceptions about the Situation of Family Caregivers to Patients with Heart Failure - A Focus Group Interview Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelie K Gusdal

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a growing public health problem associated with poor quality of life and significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of heart failure care is provided by family caregivers, and is associated with caregiver burden and reduced quality of life. Research emphasizes that future nursing interventions should recognize the importance of involving family caregivers to achieve optimal outcomes.The aims of this study are to explore registered nurses' perceptions about the situation of family caregivers to patients with heart failure, and registered nurses' interventions, in order to improve family caregivers' situation.The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Six focus group interviews were held with 23 registered nurses in three hospitals and three primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.Two content areas were identified by the a priori study aims. Four categories and nine sub-categories emerged in the analysis process. The content area "Family caregivers' situation" includes two categories: "To be unburdened" and "To comprehend the heart failure condition and its consequences". The content area "Interventions to improve family caregivers' situation" includes two categories: "Individualized support and information" and "Bridging contact".Registered nurses perceive family caregivers' situation as burdensome, characterized by worry and uncertainty. In the PHCCs, the continuity and security of an RN as a permanent health care contact was considered an important and sustainable intervention to better care for family caregivers' worry and uncertainty. In the nurse-led heart failure clinics in hospitals, registered nurses can provide family caregivers with the opportunity of involvement in their relative's health care and address congruence and relationship quality within the family through the use of "Shared care" and or Family-centred care. Registered nurses consider it

  11. Multiple Family Groups to reduce child disruptive behavior difficulties: moderating effects of child welfare status on child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Small, Latoya; Fuss, Ashley; Bowman, Melissa; Jackson, Jerrold; Marcus, Sue; Chacko, Anil

    2015-08-01

    Children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare (CW) involvement (e.g., investigation, out-of-home placement) manifest high rates of behavioral difficulties, which is a risk factor for further maltreatment and out-of-home placement if not treated effectively. A recently tested Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery model to treat youth Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs) has demonstrated effectiveness in improving child behavior difficulties among hard-to-engage, socioeconomically disadvantaged families by addressing parenting skills, parent-child relationships, family communication and organization, social support, and stress. This exploratory study examines whether child behavioral outcomes for MFG differ for families with self-reported lifetime involvement in CW services compared to other families, as families with CW involvement struggle with additional stressors that can diminish treatment success. Youth (aged 7-11) and their families were assigned to MFG or services as usual (SAU) using a block comparison design. Caregivers reported on child behavior, social skills, and functional impairment. Mixed effects regression modeled multilevel outcomes across 4 assessment points (i.e., baseline, mid-test, post-test, 6-month follow-up). Among CW-involved families, MFG participants reported significantly reduced child oppositional defiant disorder symptoms at 6-month follow-up compared with SAU participants. No other differences were found in the effect of MFG treatment between CW and non-CW involved families. Findings suggest that MFG may be as effective in reducing child behavior difficulties for both CW and non-CW involved families. As a short-term, engaging, and efficient intervention, MFG may be a particularly salient service offering for families involved in the CW system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Conference of the Family Group (KGR as a Method of the Working with the Families in Danger of Social Exclusion (results of the work District Centre of the Family Help in Bytów

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIESŁAW LESNER

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conference of the family group (KGR is a method of the work with the family leading families in functioning to positive changes, giving the possibility of constructive and effective solving her problems. The specificity of this method causes employing the wide circle of members of a family, as well as other persons important for the child: of acquaintances, of neighbors, of friends; on the established forum discussion is being entered into with the possibility of using the participation of professionals, granting technical consultation; plans concerning solving difficult situations of the child and the family are being formulated. The KGR method is applied in final years in, bringing unprecedented beneficial results. Thanks to conducting fifteen conferences of the family group in the district of Bytów over twenty children missed to institutions social and behavioral, and it stayed in related and unrelated foster families and around their families. Moreover the families received the psychological support, possibility to use the services of the assistant of the family and the assistant of the person with disabilities. Drawing fifteen social contracts up was a final result of held conferences. All members of a family are becoming involved in the problem solving, behind taken decisions lives concerning them have a sense of responsibility, they are establishing positive reports with employees of the system of the welfare. Apart from that a number of children is reducing at institutions social and behavioral, a time of staying foster children in substitute forms of the care is undergoing shortening, also a number of institutional intervention is reducing in families

  13. group

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane T. B, Nlandu M, Matondo M, Evelyn G. L.. Factors Influencing the Use of Traditional versus. Modern Family Planning Methods in Bas Zaire. Studies in Family Planning, November/December. 1885;16(6):332-34l. Peter W. H. A natural method of child spacing. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology,. December ...

  14. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH); (NIID-Japan)

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  15. H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen, mediates monocyte recruitment in vitro and in vivo via IL-8/CXCL8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabquer BJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J Rabquer,1,2 Yong Hou,1 Jeffrey H Ruth,1 Wei Luo,1 Daniel T Eitzman,1 Alisa E Koch,3,1 Mohammad A Amin11University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Albion College, Biology Department, Albion, MI, USA; 3VA Medical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI, USAObjective: Monocyte (MN recruitment is an essential inflammatory component of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In this study we investigated the ability of 2-fucosyllactose (H-2g, a glucose analog of blood group H antigen to induce MN migration in vivo and determined if H-2g-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8 plays a role in MN ingress in RA.Methods: Sponge granuloma and intravital microscopy assays were performed to examine H-2g-induced in vivo MN migration and rolling, respectively. MNs were stimulated with H-2g, and the production of IL-8/CXCL8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lastly, in vitro MN migration assays and an in vivo RA synovial tissue severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model were used to determine the role of IL-8/CXCL8 in H-2g-induced MN migration.Results: In vivo, H-2g induced significantly greater MN migration compared to phosphate buffered saline. Intravital microscopy revealed that H-2g mediates MN migration in vivo by inducing MN rolling. In addition, H-2g induced MN production of IL-8/CXCL8, a process that was dependent on Src kinase. Moreover, we found that H-2g mediated MN migration in vitro, and in vivo migration was inhibited by a neutralizing anti-IL-8/CXCL8 antibody.Conclusion: These findings suggest that H-2g mediates MN recruitment in vitro and in vivo (in part via IL-8/CXCL8.Keywords: inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, chemokine, migration

  16. Epitope mapping of histo blood group antigens bound to norovirus VLPs using STD NMR experiments reveals fine details of molecular recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Brigitte; Leuthold, Mila; Parra, Francisco; Dalton, Kevin P; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Peters, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Attachment of human noroviruses to histo blood group antigens (HBGAs) is thought to be critical for the infection process. Therefore, we have determined binding epitopes of synthetic type 1 to 6 blood group A- and B-tetrasaccharides binding to GII.4 human Norovirus virus like particles (VLPs) using STD NMR experiments. So far, little information is available from crystal structure analysis studies on the interactions of the reducing-end sugars with the protruding domain (P-domain) of the viral coat protein VP1. Here, we show that the reducing-end sugars make notable contacts with the protein surface. The type of glycosidic linkage, and the identity of the sugar at the reducing end modulate HBGA recognition. Most strikingly, type 2 structures yield only very poor saturation transfer indicating impeded binding. This observation is in accordance with previous mass spectrometry based affinity measurements, and can be understood based on recent crystal structure data of a complex of highly homologous GII.4 P-dimers with H-type 2 trisaccharide where the N-acetyl group of the reducing N-acetyl glucosamine residue points towards a loop comprising amino acids Q390 to H395. We suggest that in our case, binding of type 2 A- and B-tetrasaccharides leads to steric conflicts with this loop. In order to identify factors determining L-Fuc recognition, we also synthesized GII.4 VLPs with point mutations D391A and H395A. Prior studies had suggested that these residues, located in a second shell around the L-Fuc binding site, assist L-Fuc binding. STD NMR experiments with L-Fuc and B-trisaccharide in the presence of wild type and mutant VLPs yield virtually identical binding epitopes suggesting that these two mutations do not significantly alter HBGA recognition. Our study emphasizes that recognition of α-(1→2)-linked L-Fuc residues is a conserved feature of GII.4 noroviruses. However, structural variation of the HBGA core structures clearly modulates molecular recognition

  17. The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidian Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC, in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n = 50 and mood disorders (n = 50 were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

  18. Exploring Family Factors and Sexual Behaviors in a Group of Black and Hispanic Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucibwa, Naphtal Kaberege; Modeste, Naomi; Montgomery, Susan; Fox, Curtis A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined family factors influencing sexual behavior among black and Hispanic adolescent males from San Bernardino County, California's 1996 Youth Survey. Family structure, parent sexual behaviors, and peer sexual norms closely associated with adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors. Having a sibling who was a teen parent significantly associated…

  19. The Relation of Family and School Attachment to Adolescent Deviance in Diverse Groups and Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Sanford M.; Erickson, Kristan Glasgow; Laird, Jennifer; Wong, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether attachments to family and school reduced five forms of adolescent deviance (smoking, drinking, marijuana use, delinquency, and violent behavior). Found that adolescent attachments to family and school reduced overall frequency, prevalence, and intensity of deviant involvement, regardless of community context, gender, or ethnic…

  20. Individual, demographic, and family correlates of romantic attachments in a group of American young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Thomas W; Holman, Thomas B; Grandy, Shannon R; Blake, Whitney W

    2008-12-01

    Relationship avoidance and anxiety scores were obtained for 590 American young adults (M age = 23.1 yr.). Canonical correlation yielded two orthogonal patterns between the avoidance and anxiety scores with individual, demographic, and family variables. Relationship avoidance was most parsimoniously related to unresolved issues with one's family of origin, having been sexually abused, and being male (canonical correlation = .33). Relationship anxiety was most parsimoniously related to unresolved issues with one's family of origin, lack of personal income, having a strong libido, being young, and being female (canonical correlation = .25). Relationship avoidance was also correlated with not having affectionate and available parents, not having a secure and loving family, high parental conflict, low parental education and income, not having grown up with both parents, family violence, and low libido. Relationship anxiety was also correlated with low personal education. Marital status, ethnicity, and religious denomination were unrelated to either construct.

  1. The Subjective Experiences of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder of Chinese Families in Hong Kong: Co-Construction of Meanings in Multiple Family Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Erica S F; Ma, Joyce L C; Lai, Kelly Y C; Lo, Julia W K

    2016-08-01

    The subjective experiences of Chinese children in Hong Kong with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are underexplored. This article reports the results of a qualitative study that aims to understand the subjective experiences of children with ADHD in Hong Kong, taken from among a clinical sample of Chinese families with children struggling with ADHD who have participated in cross-disciplinary research of multiple family groups (MFG). The participating children revealed the subjective experiences of their struggle with the disorder in response to their parents' concern at a "press conference," one of the MFG activities, which underscored the importance of developing a new social work model to meet the multiple psychosocial service needs of these families. The article concludes with the discussion of the implications for the new model. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Group Hope Therapy on Quality of Life of Family Members of Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    مهدی دهستانی

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The literature suggests that family caregivers of schizophrenic patients report poor quality of life. Lack of knowledge about how to face patients’ condition and insufficient problem solving skills for solving problems that are caused by patients’ condition are related to lower quality of life among family caregivers. The current study aimed to increase family caregivers’ coping and problem solving skills and motivate caregivers to solve their problems by means of hope therapy. Thirty family caregivers of schizophrenic patients participated in the study. Fifteen caregivers were assigned to hope therapy group and 15 caregivers were assigned to control group. The hope therapy consisted of 8 sessions (4 weeks. Each session took two hours. Participants in hope therapy group were asked to complete measures of quality of life and hope beforefirst session and again after completion of the program. In addition, control participants completed the same measures twice with the same interval time sequence. It was found that participants in both groups did not significantly differin quality of life and hope at baseline. Analyses of covariance showed that participants in hope therapy group reported higher score compared to control participants in vitality (p=.001, general health perception (p=.001, social role functioning (p=.006 and mental health (p=.001 at post intervention measurement. Other findings were not significant. The findings indicated that hope therapy is an effective treatment for increasing caregivers’ quality of life mainly in psychological aspects.

  3. Sensitivity to reinforcement and family factors as predictors of psychological health problems in different age groups of children and teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kuznetsova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The follow-up study was designed to assess and to compare the effects of sensitivity to reward, sensitivity to punishment and family environment on internalizing and externalizing problems in a community sample of 477 children and adolescents aged 3-18 (50% female. The level of problem behavior at Time 1 in all age groups was the best predictor of corresponding type of problem level at Time 2; the residual variance in problem behavior was also predicted by sensitivity to reinforcement. Family factors contributed for change in externalizing problems and hyperactivity in preschool and middle childhood children; living in the urban environment was significant factor for peer problem. The study showed that individual differences interact with the family factors in the process of development, and family environment could strengthen or mitigate the influence of biological factors on children and adolescents’ adjustment.

  4. Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse within the Family System: Guidelines for an Educational Social Group Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilo, Daniel Tuelo

    2018-02-28

    Children have the right to be brought up in safe environments. However, this right is often infringed by people who are supposed to provide love, care, and protection to children. These people can include biological fathers, step-fathers, brothers, cousins, aunts, mothers, and uncles. Violation of children takes place in a variety of ways, however, for the purpose of this paper, the focus is on child sexual abuse within the family system. A literature review is adopted as the methodology for the discussions in this paper. The purpose of this paper is firstly to demonstrate that child sexual abuse happens within the family system in South Africa, and secondly, to argue that the prevention of child sexual abuse should start within the family system and this can be achieved by conducting educational social group work sessions on child sexual abuse with the family members.

  5. Multiple Family Group Service Model for Children With Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Child Outcomes at Post-Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Anil; Gopalan, Geetha; Franco, Lydia; Dean-Assael, Kara; Jackson, Jerrold; Marcus, Sue; Hoagwood, Kimberly; McKay, Mary

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits of a multiple family group (MFG) service delivery model compared with services as usual (SAU) in improving the functioning of youth with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder in families residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. Participants included 320 youth aged 7 to 11 and their families who were referred to participating outpatient clinics. Participants were assigned to the MFG or the SAU condition, with parent report of child oppositional behavior, social competence, and level of youth impairment as primary outcomes at post-treatment. Family engagement to MFG was measured by attendance to each group session. Caregivers of youth in the MFG service delivery model condition reported significant improvement in youth oppositional behavior and social competence compared with youth in the SAU condition. Impairment improved over time for both groups with no difference between treatment conditions. The MFG led to greater percentage of youth with clinically significant improvements in oppositional behavior. Attendance to the MFG was high, given the high-risk nature of the study population. The MFG service delivery model offers an efficient and engaging format to implement evidence-based approaches to improving functioning of youth with oppositional defiant and/or conduct disorder in families from socioeconomically disadvantaged communities.

  6. Prevalence and sequence variations of the genes encoding the five antigens included in the novel 5CVMB vaccine covering group B meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Hedberg, Sara Thulin; Mölling, Paula; Unemo, Magnus; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Olcén, Per

    2009-03-04

    During the recent years, projects are in progress for designing broad-range non-capsular-based meningococcal vaccines, covering also serogroup B isolates. We have examined three genes encoding antigens (NadA, GNA1030 and GNA2091) included in a novel vaccine, i.e. the 5 Component Vaccine against Meningococcus B (5CVMB), in terms of gene prevalence and sequence variations. These data were combined with the results from a similar study, examining the two additional antigens included in the 5CVMB (fHbp and GNA2132). nadA and fHbp v. 1 were present in 38% (n=36), respectively 71% (n=67) of the isolates, whereas gna2132, gna1030 and gna2091 were present in all the Neisseria meningitidis isolates tested (n=95). The level of amino acid conservation was relatively high in GNA1030 (93%), GNA2091 (92%), and within the main variants of NadA and fHbp. GNA2132 (54% of the amino acids conserved) appeared to be the most diversified antigen. Consequently, the theoretical coverage of the 5CVMB antigens and the feasibility to use these in a broad-range meningococcal vaccine is appealing.

  7. From the body to the soul: the affective sensitization in a short-term group of adoptive families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cattafi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward a critical reflection on traditional training courses for prospective adoptive parents, usually focused on providing information but who neglect the complex emotional meanings that characterize the experience of adoption. It is proposed therefore a model of experiential training group to promote the mental well-being of families and to prevent adoptive failures. Keywords:  Adoption; Experiential training group; Parental well-being

  8. Perceptions of stakeholder groups about the participation of African American family forest landowners in federal landowner assistance programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puneet Dwivedi; Arundhati Jagadish; John Schelhas

    2016-01-01

    This study examines perceptions of three stakeholder groups (African American Family Forest Landowner, Government Agency, and Nonprofit) regarding federal landowner assistance programs in the southern United States by combining a SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat) analysis with the AHP (analytical hierarchy process). Factors with the highest priority...

  9. Friends and Family: A Literature Review on How High School Social Groups Influence Advanced Math and Science Coursetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael; Owens, Ann; Williams, Darryl; Kim, Hui Yon; Musto, Michela

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the literature on how informal contexts, namely friends and family social groups, shape high school students' likelihood of pursuing advanced math and science coursework. Extending scholarly understandings of STEM education, we turned to the body of literature with three guiding questions: (1) What influence do…

  10. Parent Training with High-Risk Immigrant Chinese Families: A Pilot Group Randomized Trial Yielding Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Fung, Joey J.; Ho, Lorinda Y.; Liu, Lisa L.; Gudino, Omar G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and implementation outcomes of a culturally responsive parent training (PT) program. Fifty-four Chinese American parents participated in a wait-list controlled group randomized trial (32 immediate treatment, 22 delayed treatment) of a 14-week intervention designed to address the needs of high-risk immigrant families.…

  11. Perceptions of Parents of Students with Autism towards the IEP Meeting: A Case Study of One Family Support Group Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Wade W.

    2006-01-01

    This case study investigated parental perceptions of students with autism towards the IEP meeting from one family support group chapter in the north Texas area. Participants were asked to share their experiences of previous IEP meetings and to provide input regarding not only measures that school districts may take towards improving IEP meetings,…

  12. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloet, M.; Meulepas, M.A.; Cals, J.W.J.; Eimers, M.; Hoek, L.S. van der; Dijk, L. van

    2016-01-01

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster

  13. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I

    2000-01-01

    Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtra...

  14. Disability and family in the People's Republic of China: implementation, benefits, and comparison of two mutual support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-03-01

    The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the parents' perspectives. Qualitative interviews and questionnaires were completed by members of the groups, across the first 16 months. Facilitator monthly reports were also analysed. Members of both groups found the groups provided a feeling of belonging and a place to interact with similar people. Differences existed relating to perspectives on the purpose of the groups and how families benefited, as well as in participation rates. Suggestions were provided by members. Implications of the differences in participation and desires of the parents are considered, including the understanding and perceptions of various disabilities in China.

  15. group

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and promote family planning and child health services to ensure a healthier life for isolated communities during their integration ... traditional methods are still used as the main method of fertility regulation in African societies. The social, cultural and traditional beliefs and practices that are .... An elderly man said, "We space.

  16. [Family-oriented group therapy in the treatment of female patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa--a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Korte, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Family therapy has proven effective in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in adolescence. While cognitive-behavioural treatment has been shown to be effective in adult patients suffering from BN, there have been few studies on the effectiveness of psychotherapy in the treatment of adolescents. Since in the majority of AN patients their illness starts in mid-adolescence, and in late adolescence in BN patients, it is crucial to develop and evaluate treatment programmes for these disorders and age groups. In view of these arguments, a programme of group psychotherapy was set up for eating-disordered patients and their parents, combining disorder-specific psychoeducational components with a family group psychotherapy approach that is more open with regard to individual treatment goals. Patients participated together with their parents in the same group. The treatment programme was evaluated within the framework of a naturalistic single-group study design. Pre-post changes were assessed. 32 female patients (29 with AN, 3 with BN) and their parents took part in the treatment programme. All of the families completed the programme, which was interpreted as a high rate of acceptance. Pre-post analysis revealed a decrease in the degree of eating-disorder symptoms. The advantages and disadvantages of this treatment programme, as well as the limitations of the pilot study are critically discussed.

  17. Molecular basis of two novel and related high-prevalence antigens in the Kell blood group system, KUCI and KANT, and their serologic and spatial association with K11 and KETI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliquette, Randall W; Hue-Roye, Kim; Lomas-Francis, Christine; Gillen, Barbara; Schierts, Jennifer; Gentzkow, Kristie; Peyrard, Thierry; von Zabern, Inge; Flegel, Willy A; Rodberg, Karen; Debnath, Asim K; Lee, Soohee; Reid, Marion E

    2013-11-01

    The numerous antigens in the Kell blood group system result from missense nucleotide changes in KEL. Antibodies to antigens in this system can be clinically important. We describe six probands whose plasma contained antibodies to high-prevalence Kell antigens and discuss their relationship. Polymerase chain reaction amplification, direct sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, hemagglutination, flow cytometry, and protein modeling were performed by standard methods. Proband 1 (KUCI) and her serologically compatible sister were heterozygous for a nucleotide change in Exon 11 (KEL*1271C/T; Ala424Val). Proband 2 (KANT) was heterozygous for KEL*1283G/T (Arg428Leu) and KEL*1216C/T (Arg406Stop) in Exon 11. Red blood cells (RBCs) from Proband 1 and her sister were not agglutinated by plasma from Proband 2; however, RBCs from Proband 2 were agglutinated by plasma from Proband 1. Probands 3, 4, 5, and 6 had the KEL*1391C>T change associated with the previously reported KETI- phenotype. Proband 5 was also homozygous for KEL*905T>C encoding the K11-K17+ phenotype. Hemagglutination studies revealed an association between KUCI, KANT, KETI, and K11. Protein modeling indicated that whereas Ala424 and Arg428 are clustered, Val302 and Thr464 are not. Ala424 in the Kell glycoprotein is associated with the high-prevalence Kell antigen, KUCI (ISBT 006032), which is detected by the antibody of Proband 1. Arg428 is associated with the high-prevalence Kell antigen, KANT (ISBT 006033). The association between KUCI, KANT, KETI, and K11 and the results of protein modeling are discussed. © 2013 New York Blood Center. Transfusion © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Predicting Age of Sexual Initiation: Family-Level Antecedents in Three Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Kristin L.; Leary, Janie M.; Watson, S. Michelle; Ottley, Jason

    2018-01-01

    We investigated how family characteristics and experiences during early adolescence predicted timing of sexual initiation. In addition, we investigated adolescent sex and race/ethnicity as potential moderating factors. As part of the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (CNLSY-79), 799 adolescents aged 12 to 15 years provided…

  19. [Family typology and deterioration related to opioids use, in a methadone treatment patients group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Fernández, M; Torrado Val, E; Marcos Sierra, J A

    2010-01-01

    In this article the familiar functioning of subjects addict to opioids included in a maintenance programme with methadone will be analyzed, trying to identify whether belonging to one type of family (family typology) or another, according to Olson's Familiar Functioning Model, is related to the level of deterioration or severity of addiction of the different areas associated to consumption . The sample is composed by 69 subjects (N=69) users of the Servicio de Atención a las Drogodependencias (SAD) in Centro de Servicios Sociales Comunitarios del Ayuntamiento de Alcalá de Guadaíra (Seville). In order to evaluate the functioning and the family typology of these subjects the Escala de Cohesión y Adaptación Familiar--CAF-1--Spanish version of FACES III was used. In order to evaluate the level of deterioration, the Spanish version of the 5th edition of the personal, clinical semistructured interview Addiction Severity Index--ASI4--was applied. The results indicate that the subjects included in balanced families present more addiction severity in two dimensions of the ASI: Alcohol and Employment/Support and are, moreover, the ones that take greater doses of methadone.

  20. Value of Family and Group Counseling Models where Grandparents Function as Parents to Their Grandchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Ray, Shannon L.

    2010-01-01

    Those involved in circumstances in which children are raised by their grandparents often encounter serious problems that require assistance from counselors. Research suggests that grandparents and parents in these families typically experience heightened stress and psychosocial distress. Additionally, the children often encounter behavioral,…

  1. Quality in Family Child Care: A Focus Group Study with Canadian Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of American, Canadian and English preschoolers regularly participate in family child care making its quality of vital importance for the children concerned, their parents, the school system and the society in which they live. This article discusses the seven key caregiver behaviors and physical space characteristics…

  2. A new group of glycoside hydrolase family 13 α-amylases with an aberrant catalytic triad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarian, Fean D; Janeček, Štefan; Pijning, Tjaard; Ihsanawati,; Nurachman, Zeily; Radjasa, Ocky K; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Natalia, Dessy; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2017-01-01

    α-Amylases are glycoside hydrolase enzymes that act on the α(1→4) glycosidic linkages in glycogen, starch, and related α-glucans, and are ubiquitously present in Nature. Most α-amylases have been classified in glycoside hydrolase family 13 with a typical (β/α)8-barrel containing two aspartic acid

  3. An attempt to assess the accepted model of family in a group of Polish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The authors in their subsequent study on the causes of the fall in the birth rate, based on data obtained by means of questionnaires attempt to verify their next hypotheses, concerning low fertility, observed in most European countries. Material and methods. Data were collected by means of a set of open questions concerning the preferred model of family, and then the characteristic types of responses were identified. Also short complementary questionnaires were used by means of which we tried to assess the pessimistic attitude, low resourcefulness and lack of energy and engagement as well as the intensity of the so-called type D personality pattern. Results. The results led the authors to conclude that young people in Poland are not convinced of the benefits from any specific pattern of the family. The various possible arguments against having children or against having two children discourage easily young couples. Conclusions. The authors think that today there is no “source” of message convincing young people of the proper model of the family in Poland. Theoretically, desirable model of the family (parents + 2 children is not convincingly promoted by any sources such as parents, school, neighbours or media.

  4. Important components of a short-term family group programme. From the Danish National Multicenter Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buksti, Ann Staerk; Munkner, Runa; Gade, Inger Lise

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians from three psychiatric departments have established family groups as a specific intervention for the relatives of patients with first-episode psychosis. The intervention manual is combining the psychoeducational model with psychodynamic understanding and principles. The aim of this study...... was to identify the special elements of the programme that were the most important to the relatives. A questionnaire was developed for the participants of the groups in order to establish their satisfaction concerning 1) The actual knowledge received; 2) improvement in ability to cooperate with the therapeutic...... with similar problems and 2) the group leaders' attitude towards patients and relatives....

  5. The effect of peer support groups on family adaptation from the perspective of wives of war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl; Gholami, Mojtaba; Hajihoseini, Morteza; Esmaeili, Aliakbar

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of peer group support on family adaptation of wives of war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this randomized controlled trial, 80 wives of war veterans with PTSD were incorporated, and selected participants were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups (n = 40 per group). The intervention group was divided into four subgroups, with each participating in eight weekly based 1.5-hr peer support group sessions and the control group received no intervention. Demographics form and Family Adaptation Scale (FAS) developed by Antonovsky and Sourani (1988) were applied. The total mean scores of family adaptation increased significantly more in the intervention group than in the control group (p = .033). Furthermore, the time × group interaction effects were significant for internal family fit (p = .013) and a combination of both family fit and family community fit (p = .020) dimensions. Nonetheless family fit dimensions mean scores had no significant increase in the intervention group than the control group over time (p = .948). Peer support group can be a useful tool for health care professionals to enhance family adaptation in spouses of war veterans with PTSD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  7. Enhancing Father Involvement in Low-Income Families: A Couples Group Approach to Preventive Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Marsha Kline; Pruett, Kyle; Cowan, Carolyn Pape; Cowan, Philip A

    2017-03-01

    To address the problem of fathers' absence from children's lives and the difficulty of paternal engagement, especially among lower income families, government agencies have given increasing attention to funding father involvement interventions. Few of these interventions have yielded promising results. Father involvement research that focuses on the couple/coparenting relationship offers a pathway to support fathers' involvement while strengthening family relationships. Relevant research is reviewed and an exemplar is provided in the Supporting Father Involvement intervention and its positive effects on parental and parent-child relationships and children's outcomes. The article concludes with policy implications of this choice of target populations and the need to develop new strategies to involve fathers in the lives of their children. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  8. Core elements to understand and improve coping with Parkinson's disease in patients and family carers: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarta-Sánchez, M Victoria; Caparrós, Neus; Riverol Fernández, Mario; Díaz De Cerio Ayesa, Sara; Ursúa Sesma, M Eugenia; Portillo, Mari Carmen

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study were: (1) To explore the meaning that coping with Parkinson's disease has for patients and family carers; (2) To suggest the components of an intervention focused on enhancing their coping with the disease. Adapting to Parkinson's disease involves going through many difficult changes; however, it may improve quality of life in patients and family carers. One of the key aspects for facilitating the psychosocial adjustment to Parkinson's disease is the strengthening of coping skills. A sequential explanatory mixed methods study was carried out. Findings from the qualitative phase are presented. Data were collected in May 2014 through three focus groups: one of people with Parkinson's disease (n = 9), one of family carers (n = 7) and one of healthcare professionals (n = 5). All focus groups were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim and content analysis was independently carried out by two researchers. The participants coincided in highlighting that coping with Parkinson's disease helped the patient and the family carer in their search for balance; and it implied a transformation in their lives. To aid the process of coping with Parkinson's disease, a multifaceted intervention is proposed. Coping with Parkinson's disease is a complex process for both patients and family carers and it should therefore be considered a standard service in healthcare policies aimed at this group. The proposed intervention constitutes a nursing tool which has great potential to improve the quality of life in Parkinson's disease and in other long-term conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Are children subject to family reunification in Denmark a risk group requiring special attention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurell, M; Hansen, B

    2001-12-31

    The aim was to evaluate the actual health conditions of children subject to family reunification at the time of their introductory examination at their Danish school and to estimate whether these children represent any health risk to others at the school. The focus was the children's somatic disease pattern and not the behavioural and psychopathological aspects. A prospective analysis was carried out of children subject to family reunification who started school in Copenhagen in the school year, 1999/2000. This analysis is based on a family interview with the aid of a translator and an objective medical examination. In the school year 1999/2000, 148 children were examined. They were aged between 5 and 18 years. The children had emigrated from 25 different countries. Fifty-five children live with only one biological parent. Eighteen point five per cent of the children have earlier had one or more diseases. Most of them (91.2%) were assessed as having good general health and sensomotoric development according to their age. Among the 148 children examined, 48% have had one or more diagnoses made. On the basis of the experience obtained in this study, more resources must be allocated for better examination. In the light of the pattern of disease, it cannot be concluded that the children constitute a risk of infection for other children and adults at school. The results of this study call attention to a need for prospective studies on the health conditions of the children subject to family reunification on their arrival in Denmark.

  10. Diet, Lifestyles, Family History, and Prostate Cancer Incidence in an East Algerian Patient Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassed, Somia; Deus, Cláudia M.; Lourenço, Nuno; Dahdouh, Abderrezak

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cancer in men and the sixth leading cause of death in Algeria. To examine the relationship between lifestyle factors, including diet, and family history and PC risk, a case-control study was performed in an eastern Algerian population, comprising 90 patients with histologically confirmed PC and 190 controls. Data collection was carried out through a structured questionnaire and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the different variables. The data showed that consumption of lamb and beef meat and high intake of animal fat and dairy products increased PC risk. Seven to thirteen vegetables servings per week and fourteen or more servings decreased PC risk by 62% and 96%, respectively. Seven to fourteen fruit servings per week decrease PC risk by 98%. Green tea consumption reduced the risk of PC but the results were statistically borderline. Increased risk was observed for individuals with family history of PC in first and in second degree. A positive strong association was also found for alcohol and smoking intake and a dose-response relationship existed for quantity and history of smoking. This study suggests that dietary habits, lifestyle factors, and family history have influence on the development of PC in Algerian population. PMID:27975054

  11. Group for family/caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer’s: experience of teachers based on the complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silomar Ilha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the relationships experienced by a group of health care teachers directed to family members/caregivers of older people with Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: qualitative research, conducted with five teachers participating in a support group developed in a university. Data collected by the technique of focus group submitted to Focal Strategic Analysis. Results: six categories were identified: Difficulty in raising awareness of the participants about Alzheimer’s disease; The interdisciplinary in the guidelines; Exchange of knowledge; Acquire/search for more knowledge; Expansion/socialization of knowledge about Alzheimer’s disease: an even existing challenge; Absence attendance: a threat to the existence of the group. Conclusion: the disorder is a reality experienced by teachers in the group, which is (reorganize constantly seeking the best way to guide and foster care.

  12. Perceived Family Climate and Self-Esteem in Adolescents With ADHD: A Study With a Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Halit Necmi; Eray, Şafak; Vural, Ayşe Pınar; Kocael, Ömer

    2017-04-01

    In this study, our objective is to assess the perception of family environments by adolescents with ADHD based on perceived expressed emotion (EE) and the self-esteem of the adolescents. Uludag University Medical Faculty Hospital completed this study with 41 adolescents with ADHD and 35 control group participants who were matched based on age and gender. The total scores of perceived EE, described as a lack of emotional support, irritability, and intrusiveness, were significantly higher in ADHD group than in the control group. The group with ADHD also showed significantly lower self-esteem. There was a negative correlation between self-esteem scores and total perceived EE scores in the ADHD group and the control group. This study showed that the adolescents with ADHD perceive less emotional support and higher levels of intrusiveness, with patients also describing their families as more irritating. Other results in this study show that adolescents with less emotional support possess lower self-esteem, as do adolescents with more irritable parents.

  13. Introduction of five potentially metabolizable linking groups between [sup 111]In-cyclohexyl EDTA derivatives and F(ab')[sub 2] fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody: Pt. 1; A new reproducible synthetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestin, J.F.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Sai-Maurel, C.; Thedrez, P.; Slinkin, M.; Chatal, J.F. (INSERM, 44 - Nantes (France)); Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize new bifunctional linker-chelating agents for the modification of the in vivo distribution of [sup 111]In-labeled antibodies. A general simple synthetic method of preparing cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) derivatives containing a linker/spacer group is described. Linkers prepared included a diester, a six carbon aliphatic chain, two thioethers and a disulfide group. The CDTA-linker compounds were coupled to F(Ab')[sub 2] fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody and labeled with [sup 111]In with good retention of immunoreactivity. (author).

  14. Introduction of five potentially metabolizable linking groups between 111In-cyclohexyl EDTA derivatives and F(ab')2 fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody--I. A new reproducible synthetic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestin, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Mease, R C; Sai-Maurel, C; Thédrez, P; Slinkin, M; Meinken, G E; Srivastava, S C; Chatal, J F

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize new bifunctional linker-chelating agents for the modification of the in vivo distribution of 111In-labeled antibodies. A general simple synthetic method of preparing cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) derivatives containing a linker/spacer group is described. Linkers prepared included a diester, a six carbon aliphatic chain, two thioethers and a disulfide group. The CDTA-linker compounds were coupled to F(Ab')2 fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody and labeled with 111In with good retention of immunoreactivity.

  15. Community-based educational intervention on necklace method as a natural family planning amongst reproductive age group women in India

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Ramesh; Ramesh Chandrababu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a community-based educational intervention on necklace method as a natural family planning amongst reproductive age group women. This approach helps women decide on their reproductive health choices and avoid ill health, impact and long-term consequences of unwanted pregnancy that lead to unsafe abortion. Methods: A total of 120 women were selected using non-probability purposive sampling technique. The knowledge and practice of participants were a...

  16. Child and Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Pilot Study of Group Treatment Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy E.; Jacobs, Rachel H.; Westerholm, Robert; Lee, Adabel; Carbray, Julie; Heidenreich, Jodi; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This study is a preliminary report of a group adaptation of child- and family-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CFF-CBT) for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Methods: CFF-CBT group treatment was provided to twenty six families who had children with a diagnosis of PBD ranging between six- and twelve-years-old. Results: Results indicated that CFF-CBT was feasible and acceptable to families. CFF-CBT resulted in significant improvement in manic, but not depressive, symptoms and in children’s psychosocial functioning post-treatment. In addition, although not statistically significant, parents reported an increased ability to cope with their child’s illness. Results of this study suggest that group psychosocial treatment provided alongside pharmacotherapy may help attain remission of symptoms, as well as increase overall psychosocial coping and well-being in both children and parents. Conclusion: Future work must include a more rigorous test of CFF-CBT in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:19718425

  17. [Investigation of family pedigree rare blood group of JK(a-b-) phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tian-Xiang; Hong, Ying; Zhou, Chan-Ghua

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the rare individual JK(a-b-) phenotype of proband family and explore its molecular mechanism and the genetic background, in order to provide base for searching compatible donor to blood transfusion of the individuals with rare JK(a-b-) phenotype. Urea lysis test was used to screen the JK(a-b-) phenotype and results were confirmed with serological method. The genotypes were detected with PCR-SSP. The 4-11 exons and their flanking intron regions of JK gene were amplified and sequenced. The results showed that her elder brother has a same phenotype JK(a-b-) and genotypes JK(a)/JK(b) with proband. The phenotype and genotypes of their parent is JK (a+b-) and JK(a)/JK(b), respectively; and the younger sister's is JK (a+b-) and JK(a)/JK(a). Acceptor site of intron 5 3' g > a mutation was detected in proband and her elder brother, which may cause the JK(a-b-) phenotype of proband and her elder brother. There is g/a and a at this site in their parent and younger sister, respectively. Additionally, the SNP (ncbi:rs8090908) a > g at nt-99 in intron 3 was found in proband and her elder brother, it needs to be explored whether the SNP is related to JK(a-b-) phenotype. This SNP was not found in their parent and younger sister. This JK(a-b-) phenotype abides by the rule of dominant inheritance in the family, suggesting that there is higher probability to find homology phenotype and genotype by investigating in their family, especially in their siblings.

  18. Efficiency measures for a non-homogeneous group of family farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Gonçalves Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DEA models assume the homogeneity of the units under evaluation (DMUs. However,in some cases, the DMUs use different production technologies. In such cases, they should be evaluated separately. In this paper we evaluate the efficiency of family farmers from the Brazilian Eastern Amazon, who use different agricultural production systems. We propose an alternative algorithm to assess the global efficiency, taking into account the non-homogeneity. The results show that the farmers that use the classical technology are more efficient than those considered "environmental friendly", as we took into account only the economic point of view.

  19. A DBT Skills Training Group for Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossel, Claudia; Fisher, Jane E.; Mercer, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills training manual (DBT Skills) was adapted for use with caregivers of individuals with dementia. Implementation occurred in a community clinic with a heterogeneous caregiver group at risk for elder abuse. Sixteen caregivers completed the 9-week group. The results point to improved psychosocial adjustment,…

  20. [Evaluation of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention for family caregivers of persons with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilz, Gabriele; Kalytta, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    International studies have revealed that dementia caregivers' health deteriorates as a result of intensive at-home care. A cognitive-behavioral group intervention concept was therefore tailored to the needs of dementia caregivers and aimed at an increase in psychological well-being and the prevention of adverse effects on psychological health. The group concept was evaluated with an intervention-control group design (N=86 IG; N=92 CG) in a prospective longitudinal study. Outcome variables, assessed at 3 point of measurement, were depressive symptoms, symptoms of anxiety, health-related quality of life, and physical health. Compared to caregivers in the control group, caregivers in the intervention group showed significantly lower symptoms of depression and anxiety at follow-up, which was consistent with the hypotheses. Furthermore, nursing home placement was delayed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Characteristics of Children in Foster Care, Family-Style Group Care, and Residential Care: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloux-Opmeer, Harmke; Kuiper, Chris; Swaab, Hanna; Scholte, Evert

    When risky child and family circumstances cannot be resolved at home, (temporary) 24-h out-of-home placement of the child may be an alternative strategy. To identify specific placement risks and needs, care professionals must have information about the child and his or her family, care history, and social-cultural characteristics at admission to out-of-home care. However, to date information on case characteristics and particular their similarities and differences across the three main types of out-of-home settings (namely foster care, family-style group care, and residential care) is largely lacking. This review compiles and compares characteristics of school-aged children of average intelligence and their families at the time of each child's admission to one of the three care modalities. A scoping review technique that provides a broad search strategy and ensures sufficient coverage of the available literature is used. Based on the 36 studies included, there is consensus that the majority of normally intelligent children in care demonstrate severe developmental and behavioral problems. However, the severeness as well as the kinds of defining characteristics present differ among the children in foster care, family-style group care, and residential care. The review also identifies several existing knowledge gaps regarding relevant risk factors. Future research is recommended to fill these gaps and determine the developmental pathway in relation to children's risks and needs at admission. This will contribute to the development of an evidence-based risks and needs assessment tool that will enable care professionals to make informed referrals to a specific type of out-of-home care when such a placement is required.

  2. The role of community, family, peer, and school factors in group bullying: implications for school-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Smith, Megan L

    2015-07-01

    Although an ecological perspective suggests the importance of multiple levels of intervention, most bullying research has emphasized individual- and school-focused strategies. This study investigated community and family factors that influence school efforts to reduce odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. We used multilevel logistic regression to analyze data from the 2009 Youth in Iceland population school survey (N = 7084, response rate: 83.5%, 50.8% girls). Parental support and time spent with parents were protective against group bullying behavior while worsening relationships with teachers and disliking school increased the likelihood of such behavior. Knowing kids in the area increased the likelihood of group bullying while intergenerational closure was a protective factor. Normlessness was consistently positively related to group bullying. We found no indication of higher-level relationships across the bullying models. Parental support was protective against victimization. Disliking school, intergenerational closure, and anomie/normlessness were strongly and negatively related to victimization. We found some indication of multilevel relationships for victimization. Findings support efforts to increase family and community connection, closure, and support as a part of school-based intervention. These factors become more important as young people participate in or experience greater odds of group bullying behavior and victimization. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  3. Support groups for dementia caregivers - Predictors for utilisation and expected quality from a family caregiver's point of view: A questionnaire survey PART I*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luttenberger Katharina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support groups have proved to be effective in reducing the burden on family caregivers of dementia patients. Nevertheless, little is known about the factors that influence utilisation or quality expectations of family caregivers. These questions are addressed in the following paper. Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out as an anonymous written survey of family caregivers of dementia patients in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative data from 404 caregivers were analysed using content analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results The only significant predictor for utilisation is assessing how helpful support groups are for the individual care situation. Family caregivers all agree that psycho-educative orientation is a priority requirement. Conclusions In order to increase the rate of utilisation, family caregivers must be convinced of the relevant advantages of using support groups. Support groups which offer an exchange of experiences, open discussion, information and advice meet the requirements of family caregivers.

  4. Music listening in families and peer groups: benefits for young people's social cohesion and emotional well-being across four cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Diana; Abubakar, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Families are central to the social and emotional development of youth, and most families engage in musical activities together, such as listening to music or talking about their favorite songs. However, empirical evidence of the positive effects of musical family rituals on social cohesion and emotional well-being is scarce. Furthermore, the role of culture in the shaping of musical family rituals and their psychological benefits has been neglected entirely. This paper investigates musical rituals in families and in peer groups (as an important secondary socialization context) in two traditional/collectivistic and two secular/individualistic cultures, and across two developmental stages (adolescence vs. young adulthood). Based on cross-sectional data from 760 young people in Kenya, the Philippines, New Zealand, and Germany, our study revealed that across cultures music listening in families and in peer groups contributes to family and peer cohesion, respectively. Furthermore, the direct contribution of music in peer groups on well-being appears across cultural contexts, whereas musical family rituals affect emotional well-being in more traditional/collectivistic contexts. Developmental analyses show that musical family rituals are consistently and strongly related to family cohesion across developmental stages, whereas musical rituals in peer groups appear more dependent on the developmental stage (in interaction with culture). Contributing to developmental as well as cross-cultural psychology, this research elucidated musical rituals and their positive effects on the emotional and social development of young people across cultures. The implications for future research and family interventions are discussed. PMID:24847296

  5. Comparison of counter-current immunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination, and radioimmunoassay in detection of soluble capsular polysaccharide antigens of Haemohpilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis of groups A or C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinonen, M.; Kaeythy, H.

    1978-01-01

    Three serological methods, radioimmunoassay (RIA), latex agglutination (LX), and counter-current immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP), for sensitivity in the detection of the capsular polysaccharide antigen of Haemophilus influenzae type b or Neisseria meningitidis groups A and C were compared. RIA was consistently the most sensitive, LX the next, and CIEP the least sensitive. When RIA and LX were used to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with meningitis, they gave very similar results. In only two out of 47 samples, in which RIA detected one of the three antigens, was the amount of the specific polysaccharide too low to be detected by LX. By the serological methods evidence of specific pathogen could be detected in 49 samples, including nine from patients who had received intensive antimicrobial treatment for up to three days and from whom specimens yielded no bacteria on culture. The reactions were specific in all cases except two out of 47 tests positive to LX. From these two CSF samples N. meningitidis group B could be cultivated, whereas the LX was recorded positive for N. meningitidis of group A in one case, and of group C in the other. The nonspecific reactions could be due to antibodies to bacterial components other than the capsular polysaccharide. (author)

  6. Deficiency of RgpG Causes Major Defects in Cell Division and Biofilm Formation, and Deficiency of LytR-CpsA-Psr Family Proteins Leads to Accumulation of Cell Wall Antigens in Culture Medium by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Arpan; Liao, Sumei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Roth, Randy; Beatty, Wandy L; Wu, Hui; Wen, Zezhang T

    2017-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is known to possess rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP), a major cell wall antigen. S. mutans strains deficient in rgpG , encoding the first enzyme of the RGP biosynthesis pathway, were constructed by allelic exchange. The rgpG deficiency had no effect on growth rate but caused major defects in cell division and altered cell morphology. Unlike the coccoid wild type, the rgpG mutant existed primarily in chains of swollen, "squarish" dividing cells. Deficiency of rgpG also causes significant reduction in biofilm formation ( P mutans plays a critical role in cell division and biofilm formation and that BrpA and Psr may be responsible for attachment of cell wall antigens to the cell envelope. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans , a major etiological agent of human dental caries, produces rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP) as the major cell wall antigen. This study provides direct evidence that deficiency of RgpG, the first enzyme of the RGP biosynthesis pathway, caused major defects in cell division and morphology and reduced biofilm formation by S. mutans , indicative of a significant role of RGP in cell division and biofilm formation in S. mutans These results are novel not only in S. mutans , but also other streptococci that produce RGP. This study also shows that the LytR-CpsA-Psr family proteins BrpA and Psr in S. mutans are involved in attachment of RGP and probably other cell wall glycopolymers to the peptidoglycan. In addition, the results also suggest that BrpA and Psr may play a direct role in cell division and biofilm formation in S. mutans This study reveals new potential targets to develop anticaries therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Preferences for end-of-life care: A nominal group study of people with dementia and their family carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Louise; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Background: The wishes and preferences of people with dementia should inform decisions on future care. However, such decisions are often left to family carers and may not reflect those the person with dementia would have made for themselves. We know little about what influences agreement between people with dementia and their carers. Aim: To explore whether people with dementia and their carers were able to generate and prioritise preferences for end-of-life care. We examined whether carers influenced the choices made by the persons with dementia. Design: Nominal group technique. Setting/participants: People with dementia (n = 6), carers (n = 5) and dyads of people with dementia and carers (n = 6) attending memory assessment services. Methods: Three modified nominal group technique groups were conducted in five stages: (1) silent generation of ideas, (2) discussion, (3) further generation of ideas, (4) discussion and themeing and (5) ranking. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and analysed for thematic content using NVIVO8. Results: Quality of care, family contact, dignity and respect were ranked as significant themes by all groups. The analysis of transcripts revealed three main themes: quality of care, independence and control and carer burden. People with dementia had difficulty considering their future selves. Carers wanted much control at the end of life, raising issues of assisted dying and euthanasia. Conclusions: Wishes and preferences of people with dementia and their family carers may differ. To ensure the wishes of people with dementia are respected, their views should be ascertained early in the disease before their ability to consider the future is compromised. PMID:23128905

  8. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  9. Characterization of WbiQ: An α1,2-fucosyltransferase from Escherichia coli O127:K63(B8), and synthesis of H-type 3 blood group antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, Nicholas; Styslinger, Thomas; Mei, Zhen; Han, Weiqing; Zhao, Guohui; Wang, Peng George

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → WbiQ is an α1,2-fucosyltransferase from Escherichia coli O127. → WbiQ demonstrates strict substrate specificity for the Gal-β1,3-GalNAc acceptor. → WbiQ was used to synthesize milligram scale of the H-type 3 blood group antigen. -- Abstract: Escherichia coli O127:K63(B8) possesses high human blood group H (O) activity due to its O-antigen repeating unit structure. In this work, the wbiQ gene from E. coli O127:K63(B8) was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified as a fusion protein containing an N-terminal GST affinity tag. Using the GST-WbiQ fusion protein, the wbiQ gene was identified to encode an α1,2-fucosyltransferase using a radioactivity based assay, thin-layer chromatography assay, as well confirming product formation by using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The fused enzyme (GST-WbiQ) has an optimal pH range from 6.5 to 7.5 and does not require the presence of a divalent metal to be enzymatically active. WbiQ displays strict substrate specificity, displaying activity only towards acceptors that contain Gal-β1,3-GalNAc-α-OR linkages; indicating that both the Gal and GalNAc residues are vital for enzymatic activity. In addition, WbiQ was used to prepare the H-type 3 blood group antigen, Fuc-α1,2-Gal-β1,3-GalNAc-α-OMe, on a milligram scale.

  10. Fasciola spp: Mapping of the MF6 epitope and antigenic analysis of the MF6p/HDM family of heme-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Martínez-Sernández

    Full Text Available MF6p/FhHDM-1 is a small cationic heme-binding protein which is recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb MF6, and abundantly present in parenchymal cells and secreted antigens of Fasciola hepatica. Orthologs of this protein (MF6p/HDMs also exist in other causal agents of important foodborne trematodiasis, such as Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and Paragonimus westermani. Considering that MF6p/FhHDM-1 is relevant for heme homeostasis in Fasciola and was reported to have immunomodulatory properties, this protein is expected to be a useful target for vaccination. Thus, in this study we mapped the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 and evaluated its antigenicity in sheep. The sequence of the MF6p/FhHDM-1 ortholog from F. gigantica (MF6p/FgHDM-1 was also reported. By means of ELISA inhibitions with overlapping synthetic peptides, we determined that the epitope recognized by mAb MF6 is located within the C-terminal moiety of MF6p/FhHDM-1, which is the most conserved region of MF6p/HDMs. By immunoblotting analysis of parasite extracts and ELISA inhibitions with synthetic peptides we also determined that mAb MF6 reacted with the same intensity with F. hepatica and F. gigantica, and in decreasing order of intensity with C. sinensis, O.viverrini and P. westermani orthologs. On the contrary, mAb MF6 showed no reactivity against Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Schistosoma mansoni. The study of the recognition of peptides covering different regions of MF6p/FhHDM-1 by sera from immunized sheep revealed that the C-terminal moiety is the most antigenic, thus being of potential interest for vaccination. We also demonstrated that the production of antibodies to MF6p/FhHDM-1 in sheep infected by F. hepatica occurs relatively early and follows the same pattern as those produced against L-cathepsins.

  11. Using Group Work to Rebuild Family and Community Ties among Displaced African Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.

    2012-01-01

    The number of refugees and asylum seekers admitted to the United States has grown, with significant numbers arriving from sub-Saharan Africa. Given this reality, it is important that mental health professionals are equipped to provide culturally relevant services. This article describes the development and implementation of a group treatment model…

  12. Reflective Practice: Using Focus Groups to Determine Family Priorities and Guide Social Pragmatic Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theadore, Geraldine; Laurent, Amy; Kovarsky, Dana; Weiss, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective practice requires that professionals carefully examine and integrate multiple sources of information when designing intervention and evaluating its effectiveness. This article describes the use of focus group discussion as a form of qualitative research for understanding parents' perspectives of a university-based intervention program…

  13. Development of a group and family-based cognitive behavioral therapy program for youth at risk for psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Yulia; Mueser, Kim T.; Wyka, Katarzyna E.; Shreck, Erica; Jespersen, Rachel; Jacobs, Michael A.; Griffin, Kenneth W.; van der Gaag, Mark; Reyna, Valerie F.; Beck, Aaron T.; Silbersweig, David A.; Walkup, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The onset of psychosis typically occurs during adolescence or early adulthood and can have a detrimental impact on social and cognitive development. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) shows promise in reducing the risk of psychosis. Teaching families to apply CBT with their offspring may bolster therapeutic gains made in time-limited treatment. We developed a comprehensive group-and-family-based CBT (GFCBT) program that aims to facilitate psychosocial recovery, decrease symptoms and prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk. GF-CBT is grounded in ecological systems and cognitive theories, resilience models and research on information processing in delusions. The theoretical rationale and description of GF-CBT are presented together with a pilot study that evaluated the program’s feasibility and explored participants’ outcomes. Methods Youth ages 16–21 at risk for psychosis and their families participated in an open trial with pre, post and 3-month follow-up assessments conducted by an independent evaluator. The Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States was the primary clinical outcome measure. Results All enrolled participants (n = 6) completed GF-CBT and all remitted from at-risk mental state (ARMS). As a group participants showed statistically significant decreases in attenuated psychotic symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, cognitive biases and improvements in functioning. Family members showed significant improvements in use of CBT skills, enhanced communication with their offspring, and greater confidence in their ability to help. Gains were maintained at follow-up. Conclusions GF-CBT may delay or prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk, and potentially facilitate recovery from ARMS. More rigorous, controlled research is needed to further evaluate this program. PMID:25585830

  14. Development of a group and family-based cognitive behavioural therapy program for youth at risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Yulia; Mueser, Kim T; Wyka, Katarzyna E; Shreck, Erica; Jespersen, Rachel; Jacobs, Michael A; Griffin, Kenneth W; van der Gaag, Mark; Reyna, Valerie F; Beck, Aaron T; Silbersweig, David A; Walkup, John T

    2016-12-01

    The onset of psychosis typically occurs during adolescence or early adulthood and can have a detrimental impact on social and cognitive development. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) shows promise in reducing the risk of psychosis. Teaching families to apply CBT with their offspring may bolster therapeutic gains made in time-limited treatment. We developed a comprehensive group-and-family-based CBT (GF-CBT) program that aims to facilitate psychosocial recovery, decrease symptoms and prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk. GF-CBT is grounded in ecological systems and cognitive theories, resilience models and research on information processing in delusions. The theoretical rationale and description of GF-CBT are presented together with a pilot study that evaluated the program's feasibility and explored participants' outcomes. Youth ages 16-21 at risk for psychosis and their families participated in an open trial with pre, post and 3-month follow-up assessments conducted by an independent evaluator. The Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States was the primary clinical outcome measure. All enrolled participants (n = 6) completed GF-CBT and all remitted from at-risk mental state (ARMS). As a group participants showed statistically significant decreases in attenuated psychotic symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, cognitive biases and improvements in functioning. Family members showed significant improvements in use of CBT skills, enhanced communication with their offspring, and greater confidence in their ability to help. Gains were maintained at follow-up. GF-CBT may delay or prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk, and potentially facilitate recovery from ARMS. More rigorous, controlled research is needed to further evaluate this program. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. [Influence of family environment and social group on smoking among Brazilian youth aged 15 to 24 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2011-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of smoking among Brazilian youth, examining individual, family, and social group factors associated with this habit. Data from youth aged 15 to 24 years living in 17 Brazilian state capitals and the Federal District, obtained from the Household Survey on Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases and Reported Morbidity carried out in 2002 and 2003 by the National Cancer Institute was analyzed. Individual variables (sex, age, schooling, alcohol consumption, self-rated health, physical activity, current school attendance), family variables (age and education of head of household and father, mother, or sibling smoking), and social group variables (best friend smoking, most friends smoking, boyfriend/girlfriend smoking) were analyzed. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach to evaluate the factors associated with smoking were used. Considering the effect of the sampling design, smoking prevalence was 12.8%, ranging from 6.8% in Aracaju to 24.1% in Porto Alegre. The following factors were predictors of smoking: male sex, older age, less schooling, not attending school at the time of the survey, poorer health perception, and alcohol consumption. Peer smoking (friends or boyfriend/girlfriend) and smoking among family members (father/mother or sibling) were associated with smoking. There was an effect of parental birth cohort on smoking, with a higher prevalence of smoking among youth whose parents were born in the 1930s. Individual characteristics and the influence of peers and family were relevant for smoking by the youth. Increasing the dialogue among teenagers, school, schoolmates, friends, and parents could lead to a reduction of substance use among youth.

  16. Familial Risk of IBD is more pronounced in the younger age groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Jess, Tine; Andersen, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohns Disease (CD) are caused by complex gene-environment interactions and the risk is increased in family members. We investigated whether the risk of IBD in relatives to IBD patients changes by age of the relatives....... Results The age stratified rates of IBD in 1st degree relatives to an IBD affected case, after controlling for the overall effect of age, appear from Table 1. The rate ratio of CD in individuals with two or more 1st degree relatives with IBD is 1-2 fold increased in relatives aged 60+ years, whereas...... it is 67-fold increased risk in relatives aged 0-10 years and 34-fold increased in relatives aged 10-19 years. The same pattern is seen in 1st degree relatives who have one relative with IBD, where the risk of CD is markedly higher in younger relatives, this risk pattern for CD is seen both if the IBD...

  17. The Effect of Participation in Support Groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Family Caregivers of People with Alzheimers: Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Taati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the effect of participation in support groups on the depression, anxiety and stress level of caregivers of patients with Alzheimer. This study was a single blind randomized clinical controlled trial (RCT with 80 family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s (per group=40. The intervention group participated in eight sessions 1.5- 2 hours in support groups. The tool used in this study was the DASS-21 questionnaire for measuring depression, anxiety and stress level of the caregivers, analysis of parametric data, using SPSS version 21. Findings showed, participation in support groups showed no significant difference on depression, anxiety and stress in family caregivers of Alzheimer patients in the control group and the intervention group. Given that caring for these patients by their family members are very sensitive and costly issues for policy makers and health service providers, community and families of these patients.

  18. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  19. An experimental study on the effectiveness of a mutual support group for family caregivers of a relative with dementia in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Qun; Chien, Wai-Tong; Lee, Isabella Y M

    2012-02-01

    When caring for an older relative with dementia, family members experience considerable distress and burden. Literature reviews show that supportive group interventions for these caregivers have significant positive effects on improving their distress and quality of life, but not consistent and conclusive. Limited research is found in Asian populations. This study tested the effectiveness of a 12-session bi-weekly mutual support group program for Chinese family caregivers of a relative with dementia in Hong Kong, when compared with standard family support service. An experimental study with pre- and post-test, parallel groups design was conducted. A randomized sample of 78 family caregivers, 39 in each of the experimental and control groups, from one regional dementia care center participated in the study. A protocol was specifically designed by an advanced practice nurse to guide the mutual support group process and the facilitator and peer leader training, based on evidence from the literature on family support group intervention in Western countries. The results of ANOVA tests indicated that the mutual support group participants had significantly greater improvements in distress levels and quality of life than the control group. There were only mild changes in the demands for mental health services in both groups at post-test. These findings support the effectiveness of mutual support groups to offer psychosocial support to Chinese family caregivers in dementia care beyond routine community mental health care.

  20. Booming Development of Group IV-VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-12-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth-abundant, low-cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review.

  1. Blood stage Plasmodium falciparum antigens induce T cell independent immunoglobulin production via B cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsiri, Ratchanok; Potup, Pachuen; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Petmitr, Songsak; Kalambaheti, Thareerat; Maneerat, Yaowapa

    2010-12-01

    T independent (TI) antigens (Ags) activate monocytes to produce a cytokine, termed B cell activation factor (BAFF), involved in immunoglobulin (Ig) production. This study aimed to investigate whether the soluble schizont fraction of Plasmodium falciparum antigen (sPfAg) and hemozoin (HZ) could act as TI Ag to induce P. falciparum (Pf) specific Ig production via BAFF pathway. Co-cultures of monocytes and naïve B cells from 6 healthy donors were stimulated with sPfAg (10mg/ml) or HZ (10μM). At interval times, the expressions of BAFF on activated monocytes, BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) and proliferation nuclear Ag in activated B cells were determined by flow cytometry. The soluble BAFF (sBAFF), total and specific IgG levels in the supernatants were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The finding revealed both sPfAg and HZ could activate monocytes to express BAFF on surface and release sBAFF in the supernatant within 72h of stimulation. The B cells responded to specific activation, indicated by BAFF-R expression on the surface within 72h, marked proliferation on day 7, and final production of total and specific IgG during days 7-12. Comparing to sPfAg, HZ stimulated monocyte and B cell co-culture to express higher levels of BAFF and sBAFF during 24-48h, more BAFF-R on HZ activated B cells within 24h and induced marked proliferation of B cells with higher Pf specific IgG level. However, stimulation with sPfAg showed a more significant correlation between BAFF expression on the activated monocytes at 72h and the Pf specific IgG level on day 12 (r=0.961, p=0.039, Pearson Correlation). In conclusion, it is possible that both sPfAg and HZ stimulated B cells to produce specific IgG with BAFF involvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Important components of a short-term family group programme. From the Danish National Multicenter Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buksti, Ann Staerk; Munkner, Runa; Gade, Inger Lise

    2006-01-01

    was to identify the special elements of the programme that were the most important to the relatives. A questionnaire was developed for the participants of the groups in order to establish their satisfaction concerning 1) The actual knowledge received; 2) improvement in ability to cooperate with the therapeutic......Clinicians from three psychiatric departments have established family groups as a specific intervention for the relatives of patients with first-episode psychosis. The intervention manual is combining the psychoeducational model with psychodynamic understanding and principles. The aim of this study...... system and other public institutions; 3) the possibility of sharing thoughts, feelings and problems; and 4) dealing with feelings of guilt and shame and the possibility of altering the relationship with the mentally ill relative. Thirty-five relatives of 26 patients filled in the questionnaire consisting...

  3. The living with dysarthria group: implementation and feasibility of a group intervention for people with dysarthria following stroke and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session weekly group intervention programme, Living with Dysarthria, designed for people with chronic dysarthria following stroke and their main communication partners. The target participation was for programme completion by two groups of eight people with dysarthria (PWD) and available family members (FMs) or carers. An active recruitment strategy was undertaken from the speech and language therapy case records for the previous 6 years in two hospitals with combined annual stroke admissions of over 500 people. Twelve PWD and seven FMs were recruited (group 1: seven PWD and four FMs; group 2: five PWD and three FMs). Speech intelligibility, communication effectiveness, general well-being, quality of communication life, and knowledge of stroke and dysarthria were assessed pre- and post-programme. Each PWD and FM also set an individual goal and rated their achievement of this on a 0-10 scale. Recruitment to the programme was lower than anticipated and below target. The 12 PWD were recruited from 62 initial contacts, which was the total number who according to available information met the criteria. The programme was viable: it ran to plan, with only minor content alterations, in community accommodation, and with good participant engagement. Group median score changes were in a positive direction for all measures and effect sizes ranged from 0.17 (quality of communication life) to 0.46 (intelligibility). Significant post-programme changes were present for intelligibility and knowledge of stroke and dysarthria (p= 0.05). Participants' ratings of goal achievements ranged from 6 (some change) to 10 (a lot of change). The recruitment experience revealed

  4. Multiparameter grouping delineates heterogeneous populations of human IL-17 and/or IL-22 T-cell producers that share antigen specificities with other T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Martin; Arnaud, Laurent; Hié, Miguel; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Shoukry, Mohamed; Kemula, Mathilde; Barete, Stéphane; Derai, David; Sauce, Delphine; Amoura, Zahir; Pène, Jérôme; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-09-01

    The ontogenic relationship between pro-inflammatory populations of interleukin-17 (IL-17A)- and/or IL-22-producing T cells and other T-cell subsets is currently unclear in humans. To appreciate T helper cell-lineage commitment, we combined cytokine production profiles of in vitro expanded T-cell clones with T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypic signatures. Moreover, ex vivo cytokine production profiles at the single-cell level were analyzed using an original approach based on the hierarchical cluster analysis of multiparametric flow cytometry data. These combined approaches enabled the delineation of distinct functional T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Tr1, Th17 cells and a highly polyfunctional IL-22-producing T-cell population. Cluster analysis highlighted that the IL-22-producing T-cell population should be considered independently from the Th17 and Th1 subsets, although it was more closely related to the former. In parallel, we observed extensive TCRαβ sharing across all five subsets defined. The strategy described here allows the objective definition of cellular subsets and an unbiased insight into their similarities. Together, our results underscore the ontogenic plasticity of CD4(+) T-cell progenitors, which can adopt a differentiation profile irrespective of antigen specificity. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Familial and cultural perceptions and beliefs of oral hygiene and dietary practices among ethnically and socio-economicall diverse groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Pauline M; Pine, Cynthia M; Burnside, Girvan; Nicoll, Alison D; Gillett, Angela; Anwar, Shahid; Broukal, Zdenek; Chestnutt, Ivor G; Declerck, Dominique; Ping, Feng Xi; Ferro, Roberto; Freeman, Ruth; Grant-Mills, Donna; Gugushe, Tshepo; Hunsrisakhun, Jaranya; Irigoyen-Camacho, Maria; Lo, Edward C M; Moola, Mohamed Hanif; Naidoo, Sudeshni; Nyandindi, Ursuline; Poulsen, Vibeke Juul; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Razanamihaja, Noëline; Shahid, Swarngit; Skeie, Marit Slåttelid; Skur, O Patricia; Splieth, Christian; Soo, Teo Choo; Whelton, Helen; Young, David W

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE; The aim of this international study was to develop a valid and reliable psychometric measure to examine the extent to which parents' attitudes about engaging in twice-daily tooth brushing and controlling sugar snacking predict these respective behaviours in their children. A supplementary objective was to assess whether ethnic group, culture, level of deprivation or children's caries experience impact upon the relationships between oral health related behaviours, attitudes to these respective behaviours and to dental caries. Nurseries, health centres and dental clinics in 17 countries. 2822 children aged 3 to 4 years and their parents. Dental examination of children and questionnaire to parents. Factor analysis identified 8 coherent attitudes towards toothbrushing, sugar snacking and childhood caries. Attitudes were significantly different in families from deprived and non-deprived backgrounds and in families of children with and without caries. Parents perception of their ability to control their children's toothbrushing and sugar snacking habits were the most significant predictor of whether or not favourable habits were reported. Some differences were found by site and ethnic group. This study supports the hypothesis that parental attitudes significantly impact on the establishment of habits favourable to oral health. An appreciation of the impact of cultural and ethnic diversity is important in understanding how parental attitudes to oral health vary. Further research should examine in a prospective intervention whether enhancing parenting skills is an effective route to preventing childhood caries.

  6. Booming Development of Group IV–VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth‐abundant, low‐cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review. PMID:27981008

  7. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  8. Ubiquitination of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM by different membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) protein family E3 ligases targets different endocytic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P

    2012-03-02

    HLA-DM plays an essential role in the peptide loading of classical class II molecules and is present both at the cell surface and in late endosomal peptide-loading compartments. Trafficking of DM within antigen-presenting cells is complex and is, in part, controlled by a tyrosine-based targeting signal present in the cytoplasmic tail of DMβ. Here, we show that DM also undergoes post-translational modification through ubiquitination of a single lysine residue present in the cytoplasmic tail of the α chain, DMα. Ubiquitination of DM by MARCH1 and MARCH9 induced loss of DM molecules from the cell surface by a mechanism that cumulatively involved both direct attachment of ubiquitin chains to DMα and a functional tyrosine-based signal on DMβ. In contrast, MARCH8-induced loss of surface DM was entirely dependent upon the tyrosine signal on DMβ. In the absence of this tyrosine residue, levels of DM remained unchanged irrespective of whether DMα was ubiquitinated by MARCH8. The influence of MARCH8 was indirect and may have resulted from modification of components of the endocytic machinery by ubiquitination.

  9. Ubiquitination of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DM by Different Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) Protein Family E3 Ligases Targets Different Endocytic Pathways*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DM plays an essential role in the peptide loading of classical class II molecules and is present both at the cell surface and in late endosomal peptide-loading compartments. Trafficking of DM within antigen-presenting cells is complex and is, in part, controlled by a tyrosine-based targeting signal present in the cytoplasmic tail of DMβ. Here, we show that DM also undergoes post-translational modification through ubiquitination of a single lysine residue present in the cytoplasmic tail of the α chain, DMα. Ubiquitination of DM by MARCH1 and MARCH9 induced loss of DM molecules from the cell surface by a mechanism that cumulatively involved both direct attachment of ubiquitin chains to DMα and a functional tyrosine-based signal on DMβ. In contrast, MARCH8-induced loss of surface DM was entirely dependent upon the tyrosine signal on DMβ. In the absence of this tyrosine residue, levels of DM remained unchanged irrespective of whether DMα was ubiquitinated by MARCH8. The influence of MARCH8 was indirect and may have resulted from modification of components of the endocytic machinery by ubiquitination. PMID:22247549

  10. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  11. Survival improvement in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma who undergo pretargeted anti-carcinoembryonic-antigen radioimmunotherapy: a collaborative study with the French Endocrine Tumor Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, Jean-François; Campion, Loïc; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bardet, Stephane; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Charbonnel, Bernard; Rohmer, Vincent; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M; Barbet, Jacques

    2006-04-10

    No effective therapy is currently available for the management of patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The efficacy of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) with bispecific monoclonal antibody (BsMAb) and a iodine-131 (131I) -labeled bivalent hapten is evaluated. Twenty-nine patients with advanced, progressive MTC, as documented by short serum calcitonin doubling times (Ct DTs), received an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)/anti-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) -indium BsMAb, followed 4 days later by a 131I-labeled bivalent hapten. Overall survival (OS) was compared with 39 contemporaneous untreated MTC patients with comparable prognostic indicators. OS was significantly longer in high-risk, treated patients (Ct DT < 2 years) than in high-risk, untreated patients (median OS, 110 v 61 months; P < .030). Forty-seven percent of patients, defined as biologic responders by a more than 100% increase in CtDT, experienced significantly longer survival than nonresponders (median OS, 159 v 109 months; P < .035) and untreated patients (median OS, 159 v 61 months; P < .010). Treated patients with bone/bone-marrow disease had a longer survival than patients without such involvement (10-year OS, 83% v 14%; P < .023). Toxicity was mainly hematologic and related to bone/bone-marrow tumor spread. pRAIT against CEA induced long-term disease stabilization and a significantly longer survival in high-risk patients with Ct DTs less than 2 years, compared with similarly high-risk, untreated patients. Ct DT and bone-marrow involvement appear to be prognostic indicators in MTC patients who undergo pRAIT.

  12. REMCARE: reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family caregivers - effectiveness and cost-effectiveness pragmatic multicentre randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R T; Bruce, E; Edwards, R T; Elvish, R; Hoare, Z; Hounsome, B; Keady, J; Moniz-Cook, E D; Orgeta, V; Orrell, M; Rees, J; Russell, I T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the REMiniscence groups for people with dementia and their family CAREgivers (REMCARE) study was to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family caregivers as compared with usual care. A multicentre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms - an intervention group and a usual-care control group - was carried out. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used with an overall allocation ratio of 1 : 1, restricted to ensure intervention groups of a viable size. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, 3 months and 10 months (primary end point). Most participants were recruited through NHS Memory Clinics and Community Mental Health Teams for older people. Assessments were usually carried out in the person's home, and treatment groups were held in a variety of community settings. A total of 488 individuals (mean age 77.5 years) with mild to moderate dementia (meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition criteria), who were initially living in the community, and who had a relative or other caregiver maintaining regular contact, who could act as an informant and was willing and able to participate in the intervention, were recruited to the study. Most carers were spouses (71%). A total of 350 dyads completed the study. The intervention consisted of joint reminiscence groups held weekly for 12 consecutive weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions for a further 7 months. The sessions followed a treatment manual, and were led by two trained facilitators in each centre, supported by a number of volunteers. Up to 12 dyads were invited to attend each group. The primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia and psychological distress for the carer [General Health Questionnaire-28 item version (GHQ-28)]. Secondary outcome measures included autobiographical

  13. Reducing episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis within a youth population: a focus group study with patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Roger; Albrechtsons, Daniel; Hagerty, Donna; Newhook, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality for youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This article reports qualitative data from focus groups with youth and parents of youth with T1DM on the barriers that they identify to DKA prevention and resources that may aid youth better manage their diabetes. Four focus groups were held in three communities, two rural and one urban, in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) with adolescents and parents of youth with diabetes. Open-ended questions focused on knowledge of DKA, diabetes education, personal experiences with DKA, barriers to diabetes self-management, situations which put them at risk for DKA and resources that could be developed to aid youth in preventing DKA. There were 19 participants (14 parents and 5 youth). Participants identified factors which increased their risk of DKA as difficulty in distinguishing cases of DKA from other illnesses; variations in diabetes education received; information overload about their condition; the long period from initial diagnosis, when most education about the condition was received; and stress regarding situations where youth are not in the direct care of their parents. Participants from rural areas reported geographical isolation and lack of regular access to specialist health care personnel as additional barriers to better diabetes management. The project identified barriers to DKA prevention for youth which were not previously identified in the medical literature, e.g., the stress associated with temporary guardians, risk of information overload at initial diagnosis and the long period from initial diagnosis when most diabetes education is received. Families from rural areas do report additional burdens, but in some cases these families have developed community supports to help offset some of these problems. Mobile and online resources, educational refreshers about DKA, concise resources for teachers and other

  14. Family Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and grandparents raise grandchildren. Some children live in foster families, adoptive families, or in stepfamilies. Families are much more than groups of people who share the same genes or the ...

  15. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  16. Nutrition and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Four Age Groups of Female Individuals: The PEP Family Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of nutritional habits and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors in four age groups of women partici-pating in the Prevention Education Program, Family Heart Study.Methods: Anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin were measured in 141 children, 211 adolescents, 151 women 3 times more common in adolescents. Thirty six percent of junior women were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m² and 21% had central adiposity obese. Sixty eight year-old women had a far more adverse risk profile than 35 year-old women. In terms of energy consumption, 14 year-old women had the lowest fat intake and the highest consumption of carbohydrates whereas intake of protein was lowest in 10 year-old girls. Intake of unsaturated fat was lower in youths than in adults amounting to 37 g unsaturated fat respectively 53.4% of total fat consumption. The asso-ciation between energy consumption and overweight was significant and calorie intake was associated with clustering of ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors (OR :4.72; 95% CI 1.22-18.33.Conclusions: The prevalence of CVD risk factors increased continuously from girls and adolescents to junior and senior women. However, dietary intake was different in the four age groups. Caloric intake was associated with overweight and clustering of risk factors in adult women.

  17. THE KNOWLEDGE LEVEL OF A GROUP OF STUDENTS IN CELAL BAYAR UNIVERSITY ABOUT FAMILY PLANNING AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar ERBAY DUNDAR

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Young adulthood is a period when concepts like family planning (FP and sexually transmitted diseases (STD?s become important. This cross-sectional study was performed to measure the knowledge level of Biology and Turkish Language / Literature students of Manisa Celal Bayar University about FP and STD?s. The questionnaire measures knowledge level of FP-STD?s and sociodemographic variables was performed to 299 students (73 % of the population undar observation. The data is evaluated by chi square test and Student?s t test in SPSS 10.0 statistics program. The mean age of the study group is 21.3±1.9, 31.8% get informed about FP by friends, 95.4% of girls know about oral contraseptives (oc?s and 88.3% of girls know about IUD?s; 96.1% of boys know about oc?s and 79.4% of them know about condom. The mean knowledge point of FP is 11.2±3.7 of girls, 9.0±3.9 of boys (p0.05. The effective variables of STD?s knowledge is age group.Medico-social section of universities is a very important places for consulting FP and STD?s to the students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 66-78

  18. Internet-based chat support groups for parents in family-based treatment for adolescent eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binford Hopf, Roslyn B; Le Grange, Daniel; Moessner, Markus; Bauer, Stephanie

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to examine the feasibility and acceptability of an Internet-based chat support group for parents implementing family-based treatment (FBT). Participants (N = 13) were parents of adolescents with eating disorder who participated in 15 weekly online therapist-guided chat sessions. Sessions focused on encouraging and supporting parental efforts to help their child overcome an eating disorder. Chat programme satisfaction ratings were high (91.7%). Participants reported looking forward to chat sessions and would recommend the chat to others. The vast majority reported that the chat helped them cope with their child's eating disorder and to implement FBT. Participants reported feeling that they could talk openly and honestly in sessions and had a sense of belonging to the group. Relatively few technical problems were reported, and the chat was rated as accessible, convenient and easy to use. Findings provide preliminary support for the utility of an online parent chat as an adjunct to FBT. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Methods and design of a 10-week multi-component family meals intervention: a two group quasi-experimental effectiveness trial

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    Catherine Rogers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the ongoing childhood obesity public health crisis and potential protective effect of family meals, there is need for additional family meals research, specifically experimental studies with expanded health outcomes that focus on the at-risk populations in highest need of intervention. Future research, specifically intervention work, would also benefit from an expansion of the target age range to include younger children, who are laying the foundation of their eating patterns and capable of participating in family meal preparations. The purpose of this paper is to address this research gap by presenting the objectives and research methods of a 10-week multi-component family meals intervention study aimed at eliciting positive changes in child diet and weight status. Methods This will be a group quasi-experimental trial with staggered cohort design. Data will be collected via direct measure and questionnaires at baseline, intervention completion (or waiting period for controls, and 10-weeks post-intervention. Setting will be faith-based community center. Participants will be 60 underserved families with at least 1, 4–10 year old child will be recruited and enrolled in the intervention (n = 30 or waitlist control group (n = 30. The intervention (Simple Suppers is a 10-week family meals program designed for underserved families from racial/ethnic diverse backgrounds. The 10, 90-min program lessons will be delivered weekly over the dinner hour. Session components include: a interactive group discussion of strategies to overcome family meal barriers, plus weekly goal setting for caregivers; b engagement in age-appropriate food preparation activities for children; and c group family meal for caregivers and children. Main outcome measures are change in: child diet quality; child standardized body mass index; and frequency of family meals. Regression models will be used to compare response variables results of

  20. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the superoxide dismutase gene family in Musa acuminata cv. Tianbaojiao (AAA group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Lai, Zhongxiong; Lin, Yuling; Lai, Gongti; Lian, Conglong

    2015-10-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an essential enzyme of the plant antioxidant system that responds to oxidative stresses caused by adverse conditions. Banana is an important staple and economic crop in tropical and subtropical regions. However, its growth and yield are constantly affected by various abiotic stresses. To analyze the roles of distinct SOD genes under various stresses, a detailed characterization and analysis of the SOD gene family in Cavendish banana is indispensable. The presence and structure of the SOD family genes were experimentally verified using 5'/3' RACE-PCR, reverse transcription PCR and PCR. Then, their syntenic relationships, conserved motifs and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using software. Cis-elements present in the promoters were predicted via PlantCARE. And the expression levels under abiotic and hormonal stresses were determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In total, 25 'Tianbaojiao' SOD cDNAs (MaSODs), which encoded six Cu/ZnSODs, four MnSODs and two FeSODs, were cloned. The 12 MaSOD genes were divided into four groups based on their conserved motifs, which corroborated their classifications based on gene-structure patterns and subcellular localizations. Eleven MaSOD promoters were isolated and found to contain many cis-acting elements involved in stress responses. Gene expression analysis showed that 11 out of the 12 MaSODs were expressed in all tested tissues (leaf, pseudostem and root), whereas MaCSD2B was expressed only in leaves and roots. Specific MaSOD members exhibited different expression patterns under abiotic and hormonal treatments. Among the 12 MaSOD genes, MaCSD1D was the only one that responded to all eight treatments, suggesting that this gene plays a predominant role in reactive oxygen species scavenging caused by various stresses in banana. A genome-wide analysis showed that the 'Tianbaojiao' banana harbored an expanded SOD gene family. Whole genome duplication, segmental

  1. Characteristics of the Family Caregivers Who Did Not Benefit From a Successful Psychoeducational Group Intervention During Palliative Cancer Care: A Prospective Correlational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Maja; Årestedt, Kristofer; Carlander, Ida; Wengström, Yvonne; Öhlen, Joakim; Alvariza, Anette

    Although there has been a steady increase in intervention studies aimed toward supporting family caregivers in palliative cancer care, they often report modest effect sizes and there is a lack of knowledge about possible barriers to intervention effectiveness. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of family caregivers who did not benefit from a successful psychoeducational group intervention compared with the characteristics of those who did. A psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers was delivered at 10 palliative settings in Sweden. Questionnaires were used to collect data at baseline and following the intervention. The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale was the main outcome for the study and was used to decide whether or not the family caregiver had benefited from the intervention (Preparedness for Caregiving Scale difference score ≤ 0 vs ≥ 1). A total of 82 family caregivers completed the intervention and follow-up. Caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention had significantly higher ratings of their preparedness and competence for caregiving and their health at baseline compared with the group who benefited. They also experienced lower levels of environmental burden and a trend toward fewer symptoms of depression. Family caregivers who did not benefit from the intervention tended to be less vulnerable at baseline. Hence, the potential to improve their ratings was smaller than for the group who did benefit. Determining family caregivers in cancer and palliative care who are more likely to benefit from an intervention needs to be explored further in research.

  2. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Steffensen, Rudi; Nielsen, Henriette S

    2010-01-01

    A 14-base pair (bp) long insertion (ins)/deletion (del) polymorphism in exon 8 in the 3'-untranslated region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene is suggested to affect transcription of the gene. Carriage of the G14bp ins is associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and increases the risk...... of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Due to existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the HLA region, the primary susceptibility genes for RM in the HLA-G region have not yet been identified. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -G14bp polymorphisms were investigated in 29 Caucasian families with two or more siblings...... suffering unexplained RM. Strong positive LD was detected between the G14bp ins and HLA-A*01, -A*11, -A*31, -B*08, and DRB1*03, whereas strong negative LD was found between G14bp ins and HLA-A*02, -A*03, and -A*24. The frequency of haplotypes with HLA-G14bp ins inherited from the mother was significantly...

  3. HLA II class antigens and susceptibility to coeliac disease

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    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a systemic autoimmune, complex and multifactorial disorder, which is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The only established genetic risk factors so far are the human leucocyte antigens. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of II class human leukocyte antigens (HLA in patients with coeliac disease and to investigate the susceptibility to coeliac disease in family members. We typed HLA DR and DQ antigens in 37 patients from Vojvodina with coeliac disease, 23 first-degree relatives, and 210 controls, serologically using standard lymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA DQ5(1, DQ6(1, DR11(5, DQ7(3, DQ2 and DR15(2 were the most common antigens in the control group. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 was higher in CD patients than in the control group. The relative risks for HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 were 4.846, 6.986 and 2.106, respectively, while positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3 and CD. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR16(2 was higher in first-degree relatives than in the control group while a positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3. A negative association was found between HLA DQ5(1 and DQ6(1 in coeliac patients from Vojvodina and their relatives, in addition to HLA DR11(5 in the group of relatives (RR=0.363,PF=0.232. These findings indicate the impact of the HLA testing for CD in clinical practice in order to rule out the possibility to CD in doubtful cases or in at-risk subjects.

  4. The Integration of Family and Group Therapy as an Alternative to Juvenile Incarceration: A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Using Parenting with Love and Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Eli A; Sterrett, Emma M; Kiaer, Lynn

    2017-06-01

    The current study employed a quasi-experimental design using both intent-to-treat and protocol adherence analysis of 155 moderate- to high-risk juvenile offenders to evaluate the effectiveness of Parenting with Love and Limits® (PLL), an integrative group and family therapy approach. Youth completing PLL had significantly lower rates of recidivism than the comparison group. Parents also reported statistically significant improvements in youth behavior. Lengths of service were also significantly shorter for the treatment sample than the matched comparison group by an average of 4 months. This study contributes to the literature by suggesting that intensive community-based combined family and group treatment is effective in curbing recidivism among high-risk juveniles. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  5. Novel alleles at the JK blood group locus explain the absence of the erythrocyte urea transporter in European families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshaid, Nidal M; Eicher, Nicole I; Hustinx, Hein; Poole, Joyce; Olsson, Martin L

    2002-02-01

    The Kidd (JK) blood group system is of importance in transfusion medicine. The Jk(null) phenotype is associated with absence of the urea transporter in erythrocytes and moderately reduced ability to concentrate urine. We and others recently reported different molecular alterations in the silenced Jkb-like alleles of Polynesians and Finns, populations with higher Jk(null) frequencies. Here we report novel molecular bases of this phenotype in Caucasians. Blood samples from a Swiss and an English family were investigated by serological methods, urea haemolysis test and JK genotyping. Genomic DNA and JK mRNA were sequenced. Genotyping showed homozygosity for Jka-like alleles. The Swiss Jk(null) alleles deviated from wild-type Jka sequence by a nonsense mutation in exon 7 causing an immediate stop codon (Tyr194stop). The English Jk(null) alleles revealed a genomic 1.6 kilobase pair deletion including exons 4 and 5, the former of which includes the translation start codon. Multiple mRNA splicing variants were detected in reticulocytes but exons 3-5 were absent in all transcripts analysed. Screening for these alleles was negative in random donors. Two novel molecular alterations at the JK locus were defined and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for detection of the five known silent Jk alleles was developed to complement JK genotyping in clinical transfusion medicine.

  6. Genetic insights into family group co-occurrence in Cryptocercus punctulatus, a sub-social woodroach from the southern Appalachian Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus Scudder (Blattodea: Cryptocercidae is an important member of the dead wood (saproxylic community in montane forests of the southeastern United States. However, its population biology remains poorly understood. Here, aspects of family group co-occurrence were characterized to provide basic information that can be extended by studies on the evolution and maintenance of sub-sociality. Broad sampling across the species’ range was coupled with molecular data (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences. The primary questions were: (1 what proportion of rotting logs contain two or more different mtDNA haplotypes and how often can this be attributed to multiple families inhabiting the same log, (2 are multi-family logs spatially clustered, and (3 what levels of genetic differentiation among haplotypes exist within a log, and how genetically similar are matrilines of co-occurring family groups? Multi-family logs were identified on the premise that three different mtDNA haplotypes, or two different haplotypes among adult females, is inconsistent with a single family group founded by one male–female pair. Results showed that of the 88 rotting logs from which multiple adult C. punctulatus were sampled, 41 logs (47% contained two or more mtDNA haplotypes, and at least 19 of these logs (22% overall were inferred to be inhabited by multiple families. There was no strong evidence for spatial clustering of the latter class of logs. The frequency distribution of nucleotide differences between co-occurring haplotypes was strongly right-skewed, such that most haplotypes were only one or two mutations apart, but more substantial divergences (up to 18 mutations, or 1.6% uncorrected sequence divergence do occasionally occur within logs. This work represents the first explicit investigation of family group co-occurrence in C. punctulatus, providing a valuable baseline for follow-up studies.

  7. An Adjunctive Multi-family Group Intervention with or without Patient Participation during an Inpatient Treatment for Adolescents with an Eating Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depestele, Lies; Claes, Laurence; Dierckx, Eva; Colman, Roos; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Lemmens, Gilbert M D

    2017-11-01

    This study reports on a pilot study of a family group intervention with or without patient participation adjunctive to a specialized inpatient treatment for eating disorders (EDs). Participants were 112 female adolescent ED inpatients and one or both of their parents. The parents were invited to participate in an adjunctive multi-family group with patient (MFT) or in a similar multi-parent group without patient participation (MPT). Questionnaires assessing ED symptoms, family functioning and caregiving experiences were administered before and after intervention. Post-intervention results obtained from both patient and parent(s) indicated that improvement in ED symptoms and parental burden occurred after both types of interventions. Family functioning improved differently according to the informant: fathers reported an improvement of general family functioning, patients reported an improvement of problem solving and mothers reported a decrease in problem solving across both formats. This study emphasized the importance of including a multi-informant approach in family interventions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  8. Men and Their Families: Contributions of Caribbean Men to Family Life. A Discussion Guide for Use by Groups in Church, School, Community and Other Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janet, Comp.; And Others

    The Carribean Child Development Centre conducted a 2-year research project to provide a socio-historical perspective on roles of Caribbean men within the family, and to survey and describe attitudes and behaviors of a cross-section of men in Jamaica. An 8-week series of discussions, designed for a maximum of 15 men and 15 women, was organized to…

  9. Perceived Parent-Child Adjustment in the Family Reunification among a Group of Runaway Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. Suk-Ching

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative research explores, from the perspectives of runaway adolescents, what kind of family responses facilitate and attract a runaway adolescent to return home and what kind of parental characteristics facilitate the adolescents' adjustment to family reunification. The study carried out in-depth interviews with 16 adolescent boys…

  10. The Relationship between Family Experiences and Motivation to Learn Science for Different Groups of Grade 9 Students in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Salomé; Lemmer, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide science education is a national priority due to the role played by science performance in economic growth and the supply and quality of the human capital pool in scientific fields. One factor that may impact on the motivation to learn science is family experiences. This study therefore explored the relationship between family experiences…

  11. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    A limited intralysosomal proteolytic degradation is probably a key event in the accessory cell processing of large protein antigens before their presentation to T cells. With the aid of highly specific inhibitors of proteinases, we have examined the role of proteolysis in the presentation...... of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...... of antigen-presenting cells causes a profound inhibition of both the proteolytic degradation and the presentation of the synthetic antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. In contrast, the presentation of another synthetic antigen, the copolymer of L-glutamic acid and L-alanine, was enhanced by the same...

  12. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  13. Low carbohydrate diets in family practice: what can we learn from an internet-based support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Mary C

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Active Low-Carber Forums (ALCF is an on-line support group started in 2000 which currently has more than 86,000 members. Data collected from posts to the forum and from an on-line survey were used to determine the behavior and attitudes of people on low carbohydrate diets. Members were asked to complete a voluntary 27-item questionnaire over the internet. Our major findings are as follows: survey respondents, like the membership at large, were mostly women and mostly significantly overweight, a significant number intending to and, in many cases, succeeding at losing more than 100 lbs. The great majority of members of ALCF identify themselves as following the Atkins diet or some variation of it. Although individual posts on the forum and in the narrative part of our survey are critical of professional help, we found that more than half of respondents saw a physician before or during dieting and, of those who did, about half received support from the physician. Another 28 % found the physician initially neutral but supportive after positive results were produced. Using the same criteria as the National Weight Registry (without follow-up – 30 lbs or more lost and maintained for more than one year – it was found that more than 1400 people had successfully used low carb methods. In terms of food consumed, the perception of more than half of respondents were that they ate less than before the diet and whereas high protein, high fat sources replaced carbohydrate to some extent, the major change indicated by survey-takers is a large increase in green vegetables and a large decrease in fruit intake. Government or health agencies were not sources of information for dieters in this group and a collection of narrative comments indicates a high level of satisfaction, indeed enthusiasm for low carbohydrate dieting. The results provide both a tabulation of the perceived behavior of a significant number of dieters using low carbohydrate

  14. Process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality in a family medicine residency program- A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric P; McClaflin, Richard; Zonca, Rachel; Mikuni, Karen; Chung, Willard; Etnyre, Ethan; Faucette, Lindsey; Oates, David; Merrill, Chuck

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives This pilot study provides a description and evaluation of process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality for family medicine residents. The main purpose of using this modality was to teach family medicine residents a variety of psychological clinical skills. A secondary benefit of this modality was to provide in-house, primary care treatment to depressed patients, although the efficacy of this was not evaluated in the present study. Methods A 10-item, self-report, Likert-type questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of family medicine residents who had participated in the program. Results Completed questionnaires were received from 100% of the family medicine resident participants. Responses to the questionnaires indicate that the residents felt they acquired a variety of clinical skills from the training modality, to include developing active listening and interviewing skills; methods to improve the doctor-patient relationship; increased skills in empathy, intuitive processes, and emotional support; a depth understanding of how intra-psychic conflicts and interpersonal problems contribute to depression; how to give effective feedback that promotes behavioral change; and how to place interventions at the appropriate level of change. Eighty-eight percent of residents indicated they would recommend this learning modality to a family medicine physician colleague. Conclusions The family medicine residents' responses to the questionnaires indicate that they perceived process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a constructive and beneficial modality for both patient care and learning a variety of clinical skills.

  15. Functional feeding groups of aquatic insect families in Latin America: a critical analysis and review of existing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Alonso; Gutiérrez-Fonseca, Pablo E

    2014-04-01

    Aquatic macroinvertebrates are involved in numerous processes within aquatic ecosystems. They often have important effects on ecosystem processes such as primary production (via grazing), detritus breakdown, and nutrient mineralization and downstream spiraling. The functional feeding groups (FFG) classification was developed as a tool to facilitate the incorporation of macroinvertebrates in studies of aquatic ecosystems. This classification has the advantage of combining morphological characteristics (e.g., mouth part specialization) and behavioral mechanisms (e.g., way of feeding) used by macroinvertebrates when consuming resources. Although recent efforts have greatly advanced our ability to identify aquatic macroinvertebrates, there is limited information on FFG assignment. Furthermore, there has been some variation in the use of the FFG classification, in part due to an emphasis on using gut content analysis to assign FFG, which is more appropriate for assigning trophic guilds. Thus, the main goals of this study are to (1) provide an overview of the value of using the FFG classification, (2) make an initial attempt to summarize available information on FFG for aquatic insects in Latin America, and (3) provide general guidelines on how to assign organisms to their FFGs. FFGs are intended to reflect the potential effects of organisms in their ecosystems and the way they consume resources. Groups include scrapers that consume resources that grow attached to the substrate by removing them with their mouth parts; shredders that cut or chew pieces of living or dead plant material, including all plant parts like leaves and wood; collectors-gatherers that use modified mouth parts to sieve or collect small particles (< 1 mm) accumulated on the stream bottom; filterers that have special adaptations to remove particles directly from the water column; and predators that consume other organisms using different strategies to capture them. In addition, we provide details on

  16. Functional feeding groups of aquatic insect families in Latin America: a critical analysis and review of existing literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ramírez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic macroinvertebrates are involved in numerous processes within aquatic ecosystems. They often have important effects on ecosystem processes such as primary production (via grazing, detritus breakdown, and nutrient mineralization and downstream spiraling. The functional feeding groups (FFG classification was developed as a tool to facilitate the incorporation of macroinvertebrates in studies of aquatic ecosystems. This classification has the advantage of combining morphological characteristics (e.g., mouth part specialization and behavioral mechanisms (e.g., way of feeding used by macroinvertebrates when consuming resources. Although recent efforts have greatly advanced our ability to identify aquatic macroinvertebrates, there is limited information on FFG assignment. Furthermore, there has been some variation in the use of the FFG classification, in part due to an emphasis on using gut content analysis to assign FFG, which is more appropriate for assigning trophic guilds. Thus, the main goals of this study are to (1 provide an overview of the value of using the FFG classification, (2 make an initial attempt to summarize available information on FFG for aquatic insects in Latin America, and (3 provide general guidelines on how to assign organisms to their FFGs. FFGs are intended to reflect the potential effects of organisms in their ecosystems and the way they consume resources. Groups include scrapers that consume resources that grow attached to the substrate by removing them with their mouth parts; shredders that cut or chew pieces of living or dead plant material, including all plant parts like leaves and wood; collectors-gatherers that use modified mouth parts to sieve or collect small particles (<1mm accumulated on the stream bottom; filterers that have special adaptations to remove particles directly from the water column; and predators that consume other organisms using different strategies to capture them. In addition, we provide

  17. HLA antigens in three populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Wentzel, J; Shah, K C; Roberts, D F

    1989-01-01

    In blood samples from a Hindu population of Uttar Pradesh (North India) and from two Muslim groups, one from Andhra Pradesh (South India) and the other from Gujurat (West India), frequencies of 38 HLA-A, -B and -C antigens were investigated. Eight antigens - A23, A25, A29, A32, Bw45, B21, Bw22 and Bw53 - were absent in the Hindu population, four different antigens - A29, Bw52, B14 and Bw42 - were absent in Hyderabad Muslims, two antigens - A31 and Bw45 - were lacking in Surat Muslims. The three populations showed considerable genetic heterogeneity. The genetic difference between the two Muslim groups was small, but the Hindu population showed pronounced differences from each of the Muslim groups.

  18. Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sarah J; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Tanya; Le Dorze, Guylaine; Cruice, Madeline; Isaksen, Jytte; Kong, Anthony Pak Hin; Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Scarinci, Nerina; Gauvreau, Christine Alary

    2017-07-01

    To identify important treatment outcomes from the perspective of people with aphasia and their families using the ICF as a frame of reference. The nominal group technique was used with people with aphasia and their family members in seven countries to identify and rank important treatment outcomes from aphasia rehabilitation. People with aphasia identified outcomes for themselves; and family members identified outcomes for themselves and for the person with aphasia. Outcomes were analysed using qualitative content analysis and ICF linking. A total of 39 people with aphasia and 29 family members participated in one of 16 nominal groups. Inductive qualitative content analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) Improved communication; (2) Increased life participation; (3) Changed attitudes through increased awareness and education about aphasia; (4) Recovered normality; (5) Improved physical and emotional well-being; and (6) Improved health (and support) services. Prioritized outcomes for both participant groups linked to all ICF components; primary activity/participation (39%) and body functions (36%) for people with aphasia, and activity/participation (49%) and environmental factors (28%) for family members. Outcomes prioritized by family members relating to the person with aphasia, primarily linked to body functions (60%). People with aphasia and their families identified treatment outcomes which span all components of the ICF. This has implications for research outcome measurement and clinical service provision which currently focuses on the measurement of body function outcomes. The wide range of desired outcomes generated by both people with aphasia and their family members, highlights the importance of collaborative goal setting within a family-centred approach to rehabilitation. These results will be combined with other stakeholder perspectives to establish a core outcome set for aphasia treatment research. Implications for Rehabilitation Important

  19. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  20. Community-based educational intervention on necklace method as a natural family planning amongst reproductive age group women in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Nurses play a vital role in educating women and creating awareness regarding modern and safe family planning methods. These methods are effective and essential to avoid unwanted pregnancy and thus greatly impact the health of women.

  1. Antigenic and genetic variability of human metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herfst (Sander); L. Sprong; P.A. Cane; E. Forleo-Neto; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.L. de Swart (Rik); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a member of the subfamily Pneumovirinae within the family Paramyxo- viridae. Other members of this subfamily, respiratory syncytial virus and avian pneumovirus, can be divided into subgroups on the basis of genetic or antigenic differences or both. For

  2. INTERACCIONES ENTRE FAMILIAS Y GRUPOS ARMADOS ILEGALES EN LAS zONAS RURALES DE ANTIOQUIA -- INTERACTIONS AMONG FAMILIES AND ILLEGAL ARMED GROUPS IN COUNTRY AREAS FROM ANTIOQUIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME ALBERTO CARMONA PARRA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore the point of view of 21 girls disentailed from the guerrilla and paramilitar groups from Antioquia, in relation to the interactions they perceived between their families and these groups, as well as the performed role by these interactions in their decision to bind to them. The theoretical focus used is the symbolic interactionism, according to which, family, seen as version of the generalized “other”, becomes an interactional escenary, basic to the subjective constitution and referent in a definition of the world. Based on this family role, it is identified on the girls, and the people in general, the ability to interpret the contexts and situations, which, at the same time, condition their reactions and decisions.

  3. What are the health needs, familial and social problems of Thai migrants in a local community in Australia? A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatcharavongvan, Pasitpon; Hepworth, Julie; Lim, Joanne; Marley, John

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the health needs, familial and social problems of Thai migrants in a local community in Brisbane, Australia. Five focus groups with Thai migrants were conducted. The qualitative data were examined using thematic content analysis that is specifically designed for focus group analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) positive experiences in Australia, (2) physical health problems, (3) mental health problems, and (4) familial and social health problems. This study revealed key health needs related to chronic disease and mental health, major barriers to health service use, such as language skills, and facilitating factors, such as the Thai Temple. We concluded that because the health needs, familial and social problems of Thai migrants were complex and culture bound, the development of health and community services for Thai migrants needs to take account of the ways in which Thai culture both negatively impacts health and offer positive solutions to problems.

  4. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients: Consensus Recommendations from a Children’s Oncology Group Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P.; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M.; Bondurant, Patricia G.; Cohn, Susan L.; Dobrozsi, Sarah K.; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C.; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R.; Rodgers, Cheryl C.; Ruccione, Kathleen S.; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children’s Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology. PMID:27385664

  5. Benefits of psychodynamic group therapy on depression, burden and quality of life of family caregivers to Alzheimer’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorli Kamkhagi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family members providing continuous care to demented patients suffer from severe burden that impairs quality of life and often evolves to depression. Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of psychodynamic group psychotherapy (PGT compared to body awareness therapy (BAT on caregiver burden, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among family caregivers to Alzheimer disease (AD patients. Methods Thirty-seven healthy family caregivers were randomly allocated to receive PGT (n = 20 or BAT (n = 17. Interventions were administered in the format of 14 weekly group sessions. Outcome measures were: modification of scores on Zarit Burden Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and WHO-QoL Scale. Results Participants in the PGT group displayed significant reduction on burden (p = 0.01 and depression scores (p = 0.005, and improved quality of life (p = 0.002, whereas those in the BAT group showed improvements in burden of care (p = 0.001 and quality of life (p = 0.01, but not on depressive symptoms (p = 0.13. Discussion Psychodynamic psychotherapy was associated with amelioration of depressive symptoms, but overall benefits on burden of care and quality of life were similar irrespective of the type of intervention, i.e., psychologically-oriented or not. We hypothesize that these interventions can be complementary to improve depression and burden of care among family caregivers of AD patients.

  6. 'You don't show everyone your weakness': Older adults' views on using Family Group Conferencing to regain control and autonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, R.N.; Kwekkeboom, R.H.; Abma, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Family Group Conferencing (FGC), a model in which a person and his or her social network make their own 'care' plan, is used in youth care and might also be useful in elderly care to support older persons living at home. In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, FGC was implemented for older adults but

  7. MINIMAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS, CLASSIFICATION, AND EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF CHILDHOOD ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA (ALL) IN THE BFM FAMILY COOPERATIVE GROUP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERDOESVANDENBERG, A; BARTRAM, CR; BASSO, G; BENOIT, YCM; BIONDI, A; DEBATIN, KM; HAAS, OA; HARBOTT, J; KAMPS, WA; KOLLER, U; LAMPERT, F; LUDWIG, WD; NIEMEYER, CM; VANWERING, ER

    1992-01-01

    Minimal requirements and their rationale for the diagnosis and the response to treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were defined in the recently instituted "BFM-Family"-Group, in which the German, Austrian, Dutch, Italian, Belgian, French and Hungarian childhood leukemia study

  8. Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1 (DEA 1): Mode of Inheritance and Initial Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Klaudia; Acierno, Michelle; Raj, Karthik; Mizukami, Keijiro; Siegel, Don L.; Giger, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background The Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1 blood group system remains poorly defined. Objectives The purpose of the study was to determine the DEA 1 mode of inheritance and to characterize the DEA 1 antigen and alloantibodies. Animals Canine research colony families, clinic canine patients, and DEA 1.2+ blood bank dogs were studied. Methods Canine blood was typed by flow cytometry and immunochromatographic strips using anti-DEA 1 monoclonal antibodies. Gel column experiments with polyclonal and immunoblotting with monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibodies were performed to analyze select samples. Cross-reactivity of human typing reagents against canine RBCs and one monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody against human RBC panels was assessed. Results Typing of 12 families comprising 144 dogs indicated an autosomal dominant inheritance with ≥4 alleles: DEA 1− (0) and DEA 1+ weak (1+), intermediate (2+) and strong (3+ and 4+). Samples from 6 dogs previously typed as DEA 1.2+ were typed as DEA 1+ or DEA 1− using monoclonal antibodies. Human typing reagents produced varied reactions in tube agglutination experiments against DEA 1+ and DEA 1− RBCs. Polypeptide bands were not detected on immunoblots using a monoclonal anti-DEA 1 antibody, therefore the anti-DEA 1 antibody may be specific for conformational epitopes lost during denaturation. Conclusions The autosomal dominant inheritance of DEA 1 with ≥4 alleles indicates a complex blood group system; the antigenicity of each DEA 1+ type will need to be determined. The biochemical nature of the DEA 1 antigen(s) appears different from human blood group systems tested. PMID:26291052

  9. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  10. The Arabidopsis Family GT43 Glycosyltransferases Form Two Functionally Nonredundant Groups Essential for the Elongation of Glucuronoxylan Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    There exist four members of family GT43 glycosyltransferases in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, and mutations of two of them, IRX9 and IRX14, have previously been shown to cause a defect in glucuronoxylan (GX) biosynthesis. However, it is currently unknown whether ...

  11. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  12. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group: Implementation and Feasibility of a Group Intervention for People with Dysarthria Following Stroke and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. Aims: To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session…

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF ACROSOME AS THE MAIN ANTIGEN OF THE SPERM CELLS PROVOKING AUTOANTIBODIES IN VASECTOMIZED IRANIAN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Nowroozi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nVasectomy is one of the extensively used methods of contraception in family planning programs. Antisperm antibodies (ASA develop after vasectomy which can result in auto-immune male infertility. The precise sperm antigens involved in the autoimmune response are still poorly defined, therefore we determined the circulating ASA and identified relevant sperm antigens based on localization of binding sites of ASA to sperm cell antigens, using a rapid, inexpensive and clinically relevant assay in vasectomized men. Results showed that 2.5% of men had ASA at the time of vasectomy, whereas 53.5% of the study population subsequently developed ASA. The numbers of men with circulating ASA increased significantly for the first three months after vasectomy. These antibodies were distinguishable into three groups based on their bindings to different sites of sperm cell antigens including against acrosome and tail in 67.56% and 10.8%, respectively; 21.6% of subjects had antibody to the other parts of the sperm cell antigens. The results of this study are discussed in terms of an autoimmune response against sperm antigens and development of ASA.

  14. Self-management by family caregivers to manage changes in the behavior and mood of their relative with dementia: an online focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis In Het Veld, Judith; Verkaik, Renate; van Meijel, Berno; Verkade, Paul-Jeroen; Werkman, Wendy; Hertogh, Cees; Francke, Anneke

    2016-05-03

    Self-management is important for family caregivers of people with dementia, especially when they face changes in their relative's behavior and mood, such as depression, apathy, anxiety, agitation and aggression. The aim of this study is to give insight into why these changes in behavior and mood are stressful for family caregivers, what self-management strategies family caregivers use when managing these changes and the stress they experience. A qualitative study was conducted using four online focus groups with 32 family caregivers of people with dementia living in the Netherlands. Transcripts of the focus group discussions were analyzed using principles of thematic analysis. Managing changes in the behavior and mood of their relative with dementia is stressful for family caregivers because of constantly having to switch, continuously having to keep the person with dementia occupied and distracted, the fact that others see a different side to the relative, and the fact that caregivers know what to do, but are often not able to put this into practice. Caregivers use calming down and stimulation as self-management strategies for influencing the changes in the behavior and mood of their relative. Furthermore, caregivers describe three self-management strategies that let them manage their own stress and keep up the care for their loved ones: looking for distractions, getting rest, and discussing their feelings and experiences. Behavior and mood changes of a person with dementia are stressful for family caregivers. They use several self-management strategies to positively affect the mood and behavior changes, and also to manage their own stress.

  15. Family forest landowners' interest in forest carbon offset programs: Focus group findings from the Lake States, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristell A. Miller; Stephanie A. Snyder; Mike A. Kilgore; Mae A. Davenport

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, focus groups were organized with individuals owning 20+ acres in the Lake States region of the United States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) to discuss various issues related to forest carbon offsetting. Focus group participants consisted of landowners who had responded to an earlier mail-back survey (2010) on forest carbon offsets. Two focus groups were...

  16. Disability and Family in the People's Republic of China: Implementation, Benefits, and Comparison of Two Mutual Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the…

  17. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  18. What Is the Organizational Culture Regarding Use of Family Nurse Practitioners as Perceived by Selected Objective Medical Group Executives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    are only slightly more visible within the military health care journals (Jennings, 1993a; Miser, 1992; Reinhart, Anderson, Clay, Patrician...G., & Clancy, C. (1994). Practice-based research: Laboratories for health care reform. The Journal of Family Practice. 38(4). 428-430. American...turmoil of turf: Interprofessional collaboration in the war zone. In J.R. Snyder (Ed.), Interdisciplinary health care teams: Proceedings of the

  19. SegWeigh: a mixed-method approach to segmenting potential contraceptive user groups and meeting Family Planning 2020 goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichwein, Barbara; Wolmarans, Liezel; Nantayi, Lois; Nassali, Faith; Kakinda, Allan; Musumba, Duncan; Nguyen, Thang H; Baatsen, Pam

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate a low-cost mixed-method research tool (SegWeigh) that informs awareness raising and family planning interventions for potential contraceptive users. A pilot study of SegWeigh was conducted in Uganda and Vietnam between September 3, 2012, and February 21, 2013. User archetypes were produced in four steps by triangulating Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data; a secondary literature review; family planning service provision data; and primary qualitative investigation. Triangulation of DHS analysis, secondary literature and service data revealed three potential user profiles: Ugandan women wanting to space pregnancies; Ugandan men wanting to limit pregnancies; and unmarried Vietnamese women having infrequent sex. Archetypes were subsequently created of "Kibuuka," a 52-year-old semi-literate subsistence farmer in rural Uganda, and "Anh," a 20-year-old student in Hanoi, Vietnam. SegWeigh rapidly produced data-rich "real life" user profiles that might help to tailor family planning interventions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. INTEDISCIPLINARITY IN SUPPORT GROUPS TO THE FAMILY AND TO THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR TAKING CARE OF THE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE CARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Miranda Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a reflexive study about the intedisciplinarity in support groups to the family and to the person responsible for taking care of the Alzheimer’s Disease carrier. As health professionals, researchers and social subjects who transform the reality by scientific investigations we have responsibilities and try to make thoughtful studies which benefit society and nursering. Those studies have as main focus the care ruled on prevention, promotion e recovery of the population’s health.

  1. Assessment of Caregiving Constructs: Toward a Personal, Familial, Group, and Cultural Construction of Dementia Care through the Eyes of Personal Construct Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Eradah O; AlHadi, Ahmad N; Lee, Christopher J; Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Johnson, Andrew M

    2017-12-01

    Conditions that cause cognitive impairment and behavioural and personality changes, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementia, have global impact across cultures. However, the experience of dementia care can vary between individuals, families, formal caregivers, and social groups from various cultures. Self-reported measures, caregiving stress models, and conceptual theories have been developed to address the physical, financial, psychological, and social factors associated with the experience of dementia care. Given the cross-cultural variability in the experience of dementia care, it is important for such methodologies to take individual and cultural construct systems into account. We contend that personal and group constructs associated with dementia care should be explored in both the formal and informal caregiving contexts. Therefore, in this paper we introduce the theory of Personal Construct Psychology (PCP) with its explicit philosophy, well-elaborated theory, and derived assessment methods as a potential constructivist research approach to examine the personal, familial, group, and cultural construct systems that determine the experience of dementia caregiving. These concepts and assessment procedures are illustrated in this paper through case study examples and scenarios from the context of dementia care with a focus on family home caregivers. This paper elaborates the assessment and therapeutic approaches of personal construct theory (PCT) to further expand alternatives for support services and program interventions and to amplify policies for dementia care within and across cultures.

  2. Procedural Justice in Family Conflict Resolution and Deviant Peer Group Involvement among Adolescents: The Mediating Influence of Peer Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jennifer; Fondacaro, Mark; Miller, Scott A.; Brown, Veda; Brank, Eve M.

    2008-01-01

    The involvement of adolescents with deviant peer groups is one of the strongest proximal correlates to juvenile delinquency and stems from a variety of causes. Past research has linked ineffective parenting with peer variables, including deviant peer group involvement and peer conflict during adolescence. In this study, adolescents' appraisals of…

  3. Attitudes and perceptions of three groups of family farmers in Brazil on problems they perceive in raising broilers and alternative feeding strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Almeida, Gustavo Fonseca; Horsted, Klaus; Figueiredo, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    With the purpose to identify alternatives to the use of oil seed crops and cereals in broiler feeding, we interviewed 21 family farmers raising broilers in alternative systems located in three relevant sites for the poultry industry in Brazil. Two groups in the south (Parana and Rio Grande do Sul......) were organized in cooperatives raising slow-growing broilers in free-range systems. The third group was linked to a broiler company in the state of Sao Paulo producing antibiotic-free (AF) broilers in intensive systems. Individual assessments were performed through surveys with semi...

  4. Mite fauna and mite antigen detection in house dust found in residential areas in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanghal, Ronan Aldous M; Paller, Vachel Gay V

    2012-09-01

    Dust mites are a medically important group of animals commonly found in carpets and mattresses in houses. Antigens in their feces cause allergic reactions such as asthma and contact dermatitis. Dust samples were vacuum-collected in a special collecting bag from a one square meter area of living room floors of 100 randomly sampled houses in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines for one minute. Chromato-immunoassay ELISA (Mitey Checker) was used to detect mite antigenicity. Twenty-three species of mites were identified belonging to 7 families. Of these, Blomia tropicalis (265 mites/g of dust in 87% of households) of Family Glycyphagidae and Dermatophagoides farinae (71 mites/g of dust in 58% of households) of Family Pyroglyphidae were the most prevalent and abundant species. Forty-eight percent of households were detected to have low levels of antigen (mite intensity and antigen level (r = 0.129). Mean Dermatophagoides intensity and antigen levels were also found to have a weak linear relationship. More mites were found in carpeted living rooms (822 mites/g) when compared to non-carpeted living rooms (645 mites/g). Different floor types did not show any difference in mean mite intensity. Likewise, mite intensity did not show correlation with household size.

  5. HLA determinants in familial multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, M G; Cutrupi, F; Bernardi, S; Trabace, S; Pozzilli, C; Cappellacci, S; Fieschi, C

    1992-01-01

    HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, -DQ antigens were studied in 11 multiplex MS families, 11 single-case MS families and 100 healthy subjects. The HLA DR4 was the most frequent antigen in all MS patients (p = 0.015). When the antigenic frequency in index familial cases was compared with that in single cases, the DR4 antigen was found to be more frequent (p = 0.01) in familial cases only. Furthermore, when the DR4 antigen was excluded from the analysis, we observed an increase in DR2 (p = 0.11) only in the familial MS cases. These results can be compatible with a multifactorial hypothesis according to which the HLA genes have an important role in MS susceptibility in familial cases.

  6. Aryldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Ardec): a new family of amine protecting groups removable under mild reducing conditions and their applications to peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyre, Milaine; Leprince, Jérôme; Massonneau, Marc; Oulyadi, Hassan; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony; Turcatti, Gerardo; Vaudry, Hubert

    2006-04-24

    The development of phenyldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Phdec) and 2-pyridyldithioethyloxycarbonyl (Pydec) protecting groups, which are thiol-labile urethanes, is described. These new disulfide-based protecting groups were introduced onto the epsilon-amino group of L-lysine; the resulting amino acid derivatives were easily converted into N alpha-Fmoc building blocks suitable for both solid- and solution-phase peptide synthesis. Model dipeptide(Ardec)s were prepared by using classical peptide couplings followed by standard deprotection protocols. They were used to optimize the conditions for complete thiolytic removal of the Ardec groups both in aqueous and organic media. Phdec and Pydec were found to be cleaved within 15 to 30 min under mild reducing conditions: i) by treatment with dithiothreitol or beta-mercaptoethanol in Tris.HCl buffer (pH 8.5-9.0) for deprotection in water and ii) by treatment with beta-mercaptoethanol and 1,8-diazobicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) in N-methylpyrrolidinone for deprotection in an organic medium. Successful solid-phase synthesis of hexapeptides Ac-Lys-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-Lys(Ardec)-NH2 has clearly demonstrated the full orthogonality of these new amino protecting groups with Fmoc and Boc protections. The utility of the Ardec orthogonal deprotection strategy for site-specific chemical modification of peptides bearing several amino groups was illustrated firstly by the preparation of a fluorogenic substrate for caspase-3 protease containing the cyanine dyes Cy 3.0 and Cy 5.0 as FRET donor/acceptor pair, and by solid-phase synthesis of an hexapeptide bearing a single biotin reporter group.

  7. Breast cancer screening in women at increased risk according to different family histories: an update of the Modena Study Group experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortesi Laura

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC detection in women with a genetic susceptibility or strong family history is considered mandatory compared with BC screening in the general population. However, screening modalities depend on the level of risk. Here we present an update of our screening programs based on risk classification. Methods We defined different risk categories and surveillance strategies to identify early BC in 1325 healthy women recruited by the Modena Study Group for familial breast and ovarian cancer. Four BC risk categories included BRCA1/2 carriers, increased, intermediate, and slightly increased risk. Women who developed BC from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2005 (N = 44 were compared with the number of expected cases matched for age and period. BRCA1/2 carriers were identified by mutational analysis. Other risk groups were defined by different levels of family history for breast or ovarian cancer (OC. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR was used to evaluate the observed and expected ratio among groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results After a median follow-up of 55 months, there was a statistically significant difference between observed and expected incidence [SIR = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.6 to 7.6; p P P P = 0.0018 was higher than expected, while the difference between observed and expected among women at slightly increased risk was not statistically significant (SIR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9 to 8.3; P = .74. Conclusion The rate of cancers detected in women at high risk according to BRCA status or strong family history, as defined according to our operational criteria, was significantly higher than expected in an age-matched general population. However, we failed to identify a greater incidence of BC in the slightly increased risk group. These results support the effectiveness of the proposed program to identify and monitor individuals at high risk, whereas prospective trials are needed for

  8. Reducing antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections in family practice: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating a multifaceted peer-group-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervloet, Marcia; Meulepas, Marianne A; Cals, Jochen W L; Eimers, Mariëtta; van der Hoek, Lucas S; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-02-04

    Irrational antibiotic use for respiratory tract infections (RTI) is a major driver of bacterial resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted peer-group based intervention aiming to reduce RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions in family practice. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial with pre- and follow-up measurement. The intervention was implemented through PharmacoTherapy Audit Meetings (PTAM) in which family physicians (FPs) and pharmacists collaborate. Four PTAM groups received the intervention consisting of: (1) FP communication skills training, including communication about delayed prescribing; (2) implementation of antibiotic prescribing agreements in FPs' Electronic Prescribing Systems; (3) quarterly feedback figures for FPs. Four other PTAM groups were matched controls. Primary outcome measure was the number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions after the intervention, assessed with multilevel linear regression analyses. Total number and number of prescriptions stratified by age (under/over 12 years) were analysed. At baseline, the average total number of RTI-related antibiotic prescriptions per 1,000 patients was 207.9 and 176.7 in the intervention and control PTAM groups, respectively. At follow-up, FPs in both the intervention and control groups prescribed significantly less antibiotics. For adolescents and adults, the drop in number of antibiotic prescription was significantly larger in the intervention groups (-27.8 per 1,000 patients) than the control groups (-7.2 per 1,000 patients; Pantibiotic prescriptions for adolescents and adults. To affect antibiotic prescribing in children other methods are needed.

  9. Functional feeding groups of aquatic insect families in Latin America: a critical analysis and review of existing literature

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Ramírez; Pablo E Gutiérrez-Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic macroinvertebrates are involved in numerous processes within aquatic ecosystems. They often have important effects on ecosystem processes such as primary production (via grazing), detritus breakdown, and nutrient mineralization and downstream spiraling. The functional feeding groups (FFG) classification was developed as a tool to facilitate the incorporation of macroinvertebrates in studies of aquatic ecosystems. This classification has the advantage of combining morphological charact...

  10. Family Forest Landowners' Interest in Forest Carbon Offset Programs: Focus Group Findings from the Lake States, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristell A.; Snyder, Stephanie A.; Kilgore, Mike A.; Davenport, Mae A.

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, focus groups were organized with individuals owning 20+ acres in the Lake States region of the United States (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) to discuss various issues related to forest carbon offsetting. Focus group participants consisted of landowners who had responded to an earlier mail-back survey (2010) on forest carbon offsets. Two focus groups were held per state with an average of eight participants each (49 total). While landowner participant types varied, overall convergence was reached on several key issues. In general, discussion results found that the current payment amounts offered for carbon credits are not likely, on their own, to encourage participation in carbon markets. Landowners are most interested in other benefits they can attain through carbon management (e.g., improved stand species mix, wildlife, and trails). Interestingly, landowner perceptions about the condition of their own forest land were most indicative of prospective interest in carbon management. Landowners who felt that their forest was currently in poor condition, or did not meet their forest ownership objectives, were most interested in participating. While the initial survey sought landowner opinions about carbon markets, a majority of focus group participants expressed interest in general carbon management as a means to achieve reduced property taxes.

  11. Nutrition and cardiovascular risk factors in four age groups of female individuals: The pep family heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of CVD risk factors increased con-tinuously from girls and adolescents to junior and senior women. However, dietary intake was different in the four age groups. Ca-loric intake was associated with overweight and clustering of risk factors in adult women.

  12. Peer support for family carers of people with dementia, alone or in combination with group reminiscence in a factorial design: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenborn Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peer support interventions can improve carer wellbeing and interventions that engage both the carer and person with dementia can have significant mutual benefits. Existing research has been criticised for inadequate rigour of design or reporting. This paper describes the protocol for a complex trial that evaluates one-to-one peer support and a group reminiscence programme, both separately and together, in a factorial design. Design A 2 × 2 factorial multi-site randomised controlled trial of individual peer support and group reminiscence interventions for family carers and people with dementia in community settings in England, addressing both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The methods described in this protocol have implications for research into psychosocial interventions, particularly complex interventions seeking to test both individual and group approaches. Trial Registration ISRCTN37956201

  13. Studies of palatine rugae and interferon regulatory factor 6 variations in a group of families with sporadic hypodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Alys M; Patir, Asli; Seymen, Figen; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2009-12-01

    Irf6 (interferon regulatory factor 6) is expressed in tooth buds and palatine rugae during development in the mouse. Here we report the first study to investigate whether IRF6 variation is associated with palatine rugae patterns in a population with sporadic tooth agenesis. Fifty-two individuals with sporadic tooth agenesis and their parents were studied. Palatine rugae were scored from casts available for a subset of 38 families. DNA samples were obtained from whole blood or saliva samples. Genotyping was performed using TaqMan assays. Linkage disequilibrium and transmission distortion analyses of the marker alleles were performed. Borderline results were obtained for IRF6 genetic variation and having primary rugae larger on the right side than on the left (rs20131633, P = 0.07; rs642961, P = 0.06) and having fewer than eight primary palatine rugae (rs20131623, P = 0.07). However, no specific pattern of tooth agenesis was associated with the palatine rugae patterns studied. Our data suggest that IRF6 may contribute to specific palatine rugae patterns in humans.

  14. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  15. Cloning, expression and characterization of mugwort pollen allergen Art v 2, a pathogenesis-related protein from family group 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arilla, M C; Ibarrola, I; Puente, Y; Daza, J C; Martínez, A; Asturias, J A

    2007-07-01

    Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) belongs to the Compositae family, and is one of the main causes of allergy in late summer and autumn. The aim of the study was to characterize the allergen Art v 2 from mugwort pollen. Skin prick tests, performed in 19 patients allergic to mugwort and 10 control patients, showed an Art v 2 sensitization prevalence of 58%, whereas none false-positives were detected among control patients. Art v 2 was purified by standard chromatography and binding to Concanavalin A column and had an apparent molecular mass of 33 and 20 kDa, calculated by gel permeation and SDS-PAGE under denaturing conditions, respectively, showing that the allergen is composed of two identical subunits. Art v 2-encoding cDNA was amplified by PCR using degenerate primers based on reported partial amino acid sequences. Cloned cDNA encoding Art v 2 contains 140 bp that codify for a polypeptide of 15.8 kDa, with a predicted pI value of 5.2, and one potential N-glycosylation site. Protein homology search demonstrated that Art v 2 share 55-42% identical residues with pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 of tomato, potato, rape, wheat and rice. Homology was also found to Ves v 5 (41% identical residues). Bacterial-expressed recombinant Art v 2 was recognized only by 21% of mugwort-allergic patients. In conclusion, Art v 2 from mugwort is the first weed pollen allergen that belongs to the pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 and its recombinant form could help molecular diagnosis of mugwort associated allergy.

  16. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Will K; Szymczak, Mitchell Scott; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Miller, Myrna M

    2015-12-01

    Sandfly fever group viruses in the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) are widely distributed across the globe and are a cause of disease in military troops and indigenous peoples. We assessed the laboratory sensitivity and specificity of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay, a rapid dipstick assay designed to detect sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) and Toscana virus (TOSV) against a panel of phleboviruses. The assay detected SFNV and TOSV, as well as other phleboviruses including Aguacate, Anahanga, Arumowot, Chagres, and Punta Toro viruses. It did not detect sandfly fever Sicilian, Heartland, Rio Grande, or Rift Valley fever viruses. It did not produce false positive results in the presence of uninfected sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid field-deployable assay to detect sand flies infected with TOSV and SFNV, as well as an assortment of other phleboviruses.

  17. Evaluation of an Ecologically Valid Group Intervention to Address Sleep Health in Families of Children With Allergic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Booster, Genery D.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep issues in children with allergic diseases may be a result of illness related factors (e.g., itching, wheezing) and/or poor sleep habits due to disrupted routines and parental permissiveness. However, the ability of parents to attend a multi-session sleep intervention may be limited. Thus we examined the validity of a one-time sleep health group intervention for parents of children with allergic diseases. Ninety-three parents of children who were admitted to a two-week int...

  18. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  19. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  1. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  2. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  3. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  4. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  5. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  6. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  7. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  8. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  9. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  10. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  11. Shaping an Effective Health Information Website on Rare Diseases Using a Group Decision-Making Tool: Inclusion of the Perspectives of Patients, Their Family Members, and Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babac, Ana; Litzkendorf, Svenja; Schmidt, Katharina; Pauer, Frédéric; Damm, Kathrin; Frank, Martin; Graf von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2017-11-20

    Despite diverging definitions on rare conditions, people suffering from rare diseases share similar difficulties. A lack of experience by health professionals, a long wait from first symptoms to diagnosis, scarce medical and scientific knowledge, and unsatisfactory treatment options all trigger the search for health information by patients, family members, and physicians. Examining and systematically integrating stakeholder needs can help design information platforms that effectively support this search. The aim of this study was to innovate on the group decision-making process involving patients, family members, and physicians for the establishment of a national rare disease Internet platform. We determined differences in the relevance of health information-especially examining quantifiable preference weights-between these subgroups and elucidated the structure and distribution of these differences in people suffering from rare diseases, their family members, and physicians, thus providing information crucial to their collaboration. The included items were identified using a systematic Internet research and verified through a qualitative interview study. The identified major information needs included medical issues, research, social help offers, and current events. These categories further comprised sublevels of diagnosis, therapy, general disease pattern, current studies, study results, registers, psychosocial counseling, self-help, and sociolegal advice. The analytic hierarchy process was selected as the group decision-making tool. A sensitivity analysis was used to determine the stability and distribution of results. t tests were utilized to examine the results' significance. A total of 176 questionnaires were collected; we excluded some questionnaires in line with our chosen consistency level of 0.2. Ultimately, 120 patients, 24 family members, and 32 physicians participated in the study (48 men and 128 women, mean age=48 years, age range=17-87 years

  12. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Strategies for Coping With Stress of Family Caregivers of Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Mahmoodi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, the group cognitive-behavioral therapy can increase the use of compatible strategies for coping with stress and decrease the use of incompatible strategies. This issue is related to factors such as complete understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and its effects, creating an atmosphere for presentation and an opportunity for social interaction, understanding the importance of sport and allocating time for recreational activities, learning body relaxation in stressful situations, understanding life problems, solving problem techniques, feeling of control, and time management. Thus, we recommend using group cognitivebehavioral therapy as a low-cost treatment for family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s and patients with chronic diseases.

  13. A NEW SYNTHETIC FUNCTIONALIZED ANTIGEN CARRIER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W

    A new synthetic functionalized antigen carrier is described. It consists of a core of seven branched lysine residues, of which each of the four N-terminal lysine residues contains two N-(S-acetylmercaptoacetyl)-glutamyl residues. After removal of the protecting S-acetyl groups affording eight thiol

  14. Differential associations between Social Anxiety Disorder, family cohesion, and suicidality across racial/ethnic groups: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent (NCS-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Amy M; Lau, Anna; Chavira, Denise A

    2017-05-01

    The proposed research seeks to introduce a novel model relating Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and suicide outcomes (i.e., passive suicidal ideation, active suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts) in diverse adolescents. This model posits that family cohesion is one pathway by which suicide risk is increased for socially anxious youth, and predicts that the relationships between these variables may be of different strength in Latino and White subgroups and across gender. Data from a sample of Latino (n=1922) and non-Hispanic White (hereafter referred to as White throughout) (n=5648) male and female adolescents who participated in the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent were used for this study. Analyses were conducted using generalized structural equation modeling. Results showed that the mediation model held for White females. Further examination of direct pathways highlighted SAD as a risk factor unique to Latinos for active suicidal ideation and suicide attempt, over and above comorbid depression and other relevant contextual factors. Additionally, family cohesion showed a strong association with suicide outcomes across groups, with some inconsistent findings for White males. Overall, it appears that the mechanism by which SAD increases risk for suicidality is different across groups, indicating further need to identify relevant mediators, especially for racial/ethnic minority youth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrell Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing number of people with dementia, and the increasing cost of care, provides a major incentive to develop and test methods of supporting them in the community for longer. Most attention has been given to pharmacological interventions, but there is increasing recognition that psychosocial interventions may be equally effective, even preferable where medication has negative side-effects. Reminiscence groups, run by professionals and volunteers, which use photographs, recordings and other objects to trigger personal memories are probably the most popular therapeutic approach to working with people with dementia, but there is little evidence for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The recent inclusion of family carers in groups with people with dementia, notably in our own pilot studies, has generated informal evidence that this joint approach improves relationships between people with dementia and their carers, and benefits both. Design and methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family care-givers has two parallel arms – an intervention group and a control group who receive care as usual. The intervention consists of joint reminiscence groups held weekly for twelve consecutive weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions for a further seven months. The primary outcome measures are the quality of life of people with dementia, as assessed by QoL-AD, and their care-givers' mental health as assessed by the GHQ-28. Secondary outcomes include: the autobiographical memories of people with dementia; the quality of the relationship between them and their care-givers; and the levels of depression and anxiety felt by them and their care-giver. Using a 5% significance level, comparison of 200 pairs attending joint reminiscence groups with 200 pairs receiving usual treatment

  16. Solitary expression of CD7 among T-cell antigens in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of a group of patients with similar T-cell receptor beta and delta rearrangements and course of disease suggestive of poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A W; Hokland, M; Jørgensen, H

    1991-01-01

    to the French-American-British type M4, and four were under the age of 40. Despite intensive chemotherapy, four never obtained a complete remission and the fifth died of relapse after an allogenic bone marrow transplantation. While 12 randomly selected T-cell antigen negative AML patients showed only few...... rearrangements in Ig- or T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, such genetic alterations were demonstrated in four of five patients for the TCR delta gene and in all patients for the TCR beta gene. Interestingly, DNA fragments of similar size were demonstrated in three of five patients for both the beta and delta genes...

  17. Effectiveness of an intervention in groups of family caregivers of dependent patients for their application in primary health centers. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Arechaederra Diana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Primary Health Care (PHC Teams are used to deal with prevention and treatment of sanitary problems in adults with chronic diseases, they usually have a lack of experience in development of psychotherapeutic interventions. However, these interventions are the ones that achieve better results to reduce symptomatology and improve emotional state of caregivers. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention of psychotherapy in improving the mental health and Quality of life of caregivers. This intervention is based on theoretical approaches to care adjusted to cognitive theory, in order to be applied in primary health care centres. Methods/Design This is multicentre clinical trials study, randomized in two parallel groups, carry out in two PHC, Study population: 150 caregivers will be included by consecutive sampling and they will be randomized the half to experimental group and the other half to control group. They provide mostly all the assistance to care-dependent familiars receiving attention in PHC Centers. Measurements: Each caregiver will be evaluated on a personal interview. The caregivers' assessment protocol: 1 Assessment of different socio-demographic related to care, and caregiver's personal situation. 2Care-dependent individuals will also be assessed by Barthel Index and Pfeiffer Questionnaire (SPMSQ. 3Change in caregivers will be the principal measure: family function (Family APGAR Questionnaire, burden short questionnaire (Short Zarit Burden Interview, quality of life (Ruiz & Baca: 1993 Questionnaire, the Duke-UNK Functional Social Support Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and changes in Dysfunctional Thoughts about caring. 4 Intervention implementation measures will also be assessed. Intervention: A psychotherapeutic intervention will be 8 sessions of 90 minutes in groups. This intervention has been initially developed for family caregivers of patients with dementia

  18. HLA antigens, epilepsy and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, P; Morellini, M; Raucci, U; Cappellacci, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one epileptic patients, selected from among 900 children with previous febrile convulsions and subsequent epilepsy, were typed for HLA antigens. In 16 of the 31 patients CMV was isolated from the urine shortly after the appearance of spontaneous fits; in the remaining 15 patients the virus was never detected. All the examined children were typed for 14 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B, 7 HLA-C and 9 HLA-DR specificities, and compared with a group of healthy subjects. The HLA-A11 antigen was present in 25% of the children with chronic CMV infection and epilepsy, and absent in patients with epilepsy but without CMV infection (p less than 0.02). The possibility that the A11 antigen is a marker of the predisposing genes for CMV infection in children with epilepsy following FC is proposed.

  19. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2018-01-30

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. Amino Groups of Chitosan Are Crucial for Binding to a Family 32 Carbohydrate Binding Module of a Chitosanase from Paenibacillus elgii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subha Narayan; Wagenknecht, Martin; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bhuvanachandra, Bhoopal; Niddana, Ramana; Balamurugan, Rengarajan; Swamy, Musti J.; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2016-01-01

    We report here the role and mechanism of specificity of a family 32 carbohydrate binding module (CBM32) of a glycoside hydrolase family 8 chitosanase from Paenibacillus elgii (PeCsn). Both the activity and mode of action of PeCsn toward soluble chitosan polymers were not different with/without the CBM32 domain of P. elgii (PeCBM32). The decreased activity of PeCsn without PeCBM32 on chitosan powder suggested that PeCBM32 increases the relative concentration of enzyme on the substrate and thereby enhanced enzymatic activity. PeCBM32 specifically bound to polymeric and oligomeric chitosan and showed very weak binding to chitin and cellulose. In isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding stoichiometry of 2 and 1 for glucosamine monosaccharide (GlcN) and disaccharide (GlcN)2, respectively, was indicative of two binding sites in PeCBM32. A three-dimensional model-guided site-directed mutagenesis and the use of defined disaccharides varying in the pattern of acetylation suggested that the amino groups of chitosan and the polar residues Glu-16 and Glu-38 of PeCBM32 play a crucial role for the observed binding. The specificity of CBM32 has been further elucidated by a generated fusion protein PeCBM32-eGFP that binds to the chitosan exposing endophytic infection structures of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBM32s appended to chitosanases are highly conserved across different chitosanase families suggesting their role in chitosan recognition and degradation. We have identified and characterized a chitosan-specific CBM32 useful for in situ staining of chitosans in the fungal cell wall during plant-fungus interaction. PMID:27405759

  2. A pilot study of maudsley family therapy with group dialectical behavior therapy skills training in an intensive outpatient program for adolescent eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jennifer A Y; O'Gara, Jesine S X; Koman, Stuart L; Baker, Christina Wood; Anderson, Drew A

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to provide pilot clinical data on the effectiveness of an intensive outpatient treatment model for adolescent eating disorders that combines Maudsley-based family therapy and group dialectical behavior therapy skills training. Measures of physical and psychological status were gathered upon admission, discharge, and at 3 follow-up intervals. Adolescents who completed the program gained a significant amount of weight and experienced a significant decrease in eating disorder psychopathology. At the 1-year follow-up, 64% of adolescents were weight restored and menstruating normally. Measures of eating disorder psychopathology continued to improve up to a year after treatment. This pilot, multimodal program warrants further investigation and may be an effective intermediate level of care treatment option for adolescent eating disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Association of Pneumococcal Protein Antigen Serology With Age and Antigenic Profile of Colonizing Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Grant, Lindsay R; Georgieva, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Reid, Raymond; Bentley, Stephen D; Goldblatt, David; Santosham, Mathuran; Weatherholtz, Robert; Burbidge, Paula; Goklish, Novalene; Thompson, Claudette M; Hanage, William P; O'Brien, Kate L; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Several Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins play a role in pathogenesis and are being investigated as vaccine targets. It is largely unknown whether naturally acquired antibodies reduce the risk of colonization with strains expressing a particular antigenic variant. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers to 28 pneumococcal protein antigens were measured among 242 individuals aged - 30 days after serum collection, and the antigen variant in each pneumococcal isolate was determined using genomic data. We assessed the association between preexisting variant-specific antibody titers and subsequent carriage of pneumococcus expressing a particular antigen variant. Antibody titers often increased across pediatric groups before decreasing among adults. Individuals with low titers against group 3 pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) variants were more likely to be colonized with pneumococci expressing those variants. For other antigens, variant-specific IgG titers do not predict colonization. We observed an inverse association between variant-specific antibody concentration and homologous pneumococcal colonization for only 1 protein. Further assessment of antibody repertoires may elucidate the nature of antipneumococcal antibody-mediated mucosal immunity while informing vaccine development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissel, M.; Hoefer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of determining the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a specific tumor marker in thyroid cancer, CEA serum levels were measured (enzymeimmunoassay, Abbott-Kit) repeatedly at the routine followup checks performed at various intervals after total thyroidectomy, in 65 patients with papillary, 82 with follicular, 25 with mixed type (papillary/follicular), 8 with anaplastic, and in 18 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. The postoperative observation period of these patients ranged from 2 to 36 months. Calcitonin serum levels were additionally determined in patients with medullary carcinoma (radioimmunoassay kit of Immuno-Nuclear Corp.). In the family of one patient with medullary carcinoma we also had an opportunity to investigate, within the framework of family screening (pentagastrin tests, etc.), the value of preoperative CEA determination. In the patients with ''non-medullary'' histological types of thyroid cancer, the maximum CEA serum concentration was 9.8 ng/ml. 6% of the patients with papillary, 9% of the patients with follicular, and 8% of those with mixed type thyroid cancer had serum levels above the upper limit of our normal range (5 ng/ml). All patients with anaplastic carcinoma had values below 3 ng/ml. The values quoted represent maximal values and were confirmed at various follow-up checks. However, 1 year after thyroidectomy, a female patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma developed an adenocarcinoma of the rectum: The CEA levels measured in this patient were: 4.2 ng/ml 3 weeks after thyroidectomy, 8.4 ng/ml 6 months later, and 37 ng/ml 1 week before operation on the rectum. In none of the other patients with elevated CEA levels were metastases of thyroid cancer, or any other malignancy, detected. (orig.) [de

  6. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  7. REMCARE: Pragmatic Multi-Centre Randomised Trial of Reminiscence Groups for People with Dementia and their Family Carers: Effectiveness and Economic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Woods

    Full Text Available Joint reminiscence groups, involving people with dementia and family carers together, are popular, but the evidence-base is limited. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups as compared to usual care.This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial had two parallel arms: intervention group and usual-care control group. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used, with an overall allocation ratio of 1:1, restricted to ensure viable sized intervention groups. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, three months and ten months (primary end-point, usually in the person's home. Participants were recruited in eight centres, mainly through NHS Memory Clinics and NHS community mental health teams. Included participants were community resident people with mild to moderate dementia (DSM-IV, who had a relative or other care-giver in regular contact, to act as informant and willing and able to participate in intervention. 71% carers were spouses. 488 people with dementia (mean age 77.5were randomised: 268 intervention, 220 control; 350 dyads completed the study (206 intervention, 144 control. The intervention evaluated was joint reminiscence groups (with up to 12 dyads weekly for twelve weeks; monthly maintenance sessions for further seven months. Sessions followed a published treatment manual and were held in a variety of community settings. Two trained facilitators in each centre were supported by volunteers. Primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia (QoL-AD, psychological distress for the carer (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-28. Secondary outcome measures included: autobiographical memory and activities of daily living for the person with dementia; carer stress for the carer; mood, relationship quality and service use and costs for both.The intention to treat analysis (ANCOVA identified no

  8. Disparities in drinking patterns and risks among ethnic majority and minority groups in China: The roles of acculturation, religion, family and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianhui; Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Cai, Le; McNeil, Edward

    2016-02-01

    Studies investigating alcohol consumption related factors have rarely focused on the relationship between acculturation, religion and drinking patterns. The objective of this study is to explore the predictors of drinking patterns and their mutual relationships, especially acculturation, ethnicity and religion. A cross-sectional household survey using a multistage systematic sampling technique was conducted in Yunnan Province of China. A revised Vancouver Index of Acculturation (VIA) and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) Chinese version were used to measure acculturation and drinking patterns. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the structures of how predictors affect drinking patterns. A total of 977 subjects aged 12-35 years were surveyed. A higher percentage of binge drinking was found among Lisu people. However, the proportion of drinking until intoxication was highest among Han. Gender and enculturation had both direct (standardized β=-0.193, -0.079) and indirect effects (standardized β=-0.126, 0.033) on risky drinking pattern; perceived risk of alcohol consumption (-0.065), family drinking environment (0.061), and friend drinking environment (0.352) affected risky drinking pattern directly, while education level (0.066), ethnicity (-0.038), acculturation (0.012), religious belief (-0.038), and age group (0.088) had indirect effects. Risky drinking pattern was associated with gender and aboriginal culture enculturation both directly and indirectly, and related to mainstream culture acculturation and religious belief indirectly. Other demographic (such as education level) and social family factors (friend drinking environment for example) also had effects on risky drinking pattern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of the Incredible Years group parent program with families in Head Start who self-reported a history of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, Michael S; Nguyen, Katherine; Reid, Jamila; Webster-Stratton, Carolyn; Zhang, Jinjin

    2013-08-01

    A prevention form of the Incredible Years (IY) parenting program was offered to parents who had children enrolled in Head Start, regardless of whether they reported having a history of child maltreatment. This study compared whether parenting practices and child behavioral outcomes differed in families who self reported a history of child maltreatment relative to families who did not. A site-randomized controlled trial of the IY parenting program was conducted in 64 classrooms in seven Head Start centers in Seattle, Washington. Families of 481 children took part in the study, with 335 in the IY condition and 146 in the control condition. Parenting practices and child behavior were measured by blinded raters through in-home observations and self-report questionnaires prior to the start of the IY program, in the spring after the IY program had concluded, and 12-18 months after study enrollment when children were in kindergarten. Analyses examine the impact of the IY program on parenting practices and children's behavior, exploring whether the program had differential impacts for parents with and without a self-reported history of child maltreatment. The IY program resulted in improvements along many parenting dimensions and on characteristics of observed child behavior. Program impacts were similar for parents who did and did not report a history of child maltreatment. However, parents with a reported history of prior maltreatment had greater initial room for improvement in areas such as harsh/critical parenting, nurturing/supportive parenting, and discipline competence than parents without such a history. The IY parenting program has positive impacts for parents who self-reported a history of child maltreatment. While similar benefits were observed for both groups of parents in this study, results support delivering evidence-based parenting programs of longer duration and higher intensity than often used by agencies serving parents in contact with child welfare

  10. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen among Women of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study documents the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag) among women of childbearing age attending various family clinics in Lagos, Nigeria. A total of 501 women were screened with Wellcozyme ELISA technique, of which 45(8.9%) were seropositive. Women in occupations related to needle work ...

  11. The effects of a partitioned var gene repertoire of Plasmodium falciparum on antigenic diversity and the acquisition of clinical immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinaminpathy Nimalan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exploits antigenic diversity and within-host antigenic variation to evade the host's immune system. Of particular importance are the highly polymorphic var genes that encode the family of cell surface antigens PfEMP1 (Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1. It has recently been shown that in spite of their extreme diversity, however, these genes fall into distinct groups according to chromosomal location or sequence similarity, and that recombination may be confined within these groups. Methods This study presents a mathematical analysis of how recombination hierarchies affect diversity, and, by using simple stochastic simulations, investigates how intra- and inter-genic diversity influence the rate at which individuals acquire clinical immunity. Results The analysis demonstrates that the partitioning of the var gene repertoire has a limiting effect on the total diversity attainable through recombination and that the limiting effect is strongly influenced by the respective sizes of each of the partitions. Furthermore, by associating expression of one of the groups with severe malaria it is demonstrated how a small number of infections can be sufficient to protect against disease despite a seemingly limitless number of possible non-identical repertoires. Conclusion Recombination hierarchies within the var gene repertoire of P. falciparum have a severe effect on strain diversity and the process of acquiring immunity against clinical malaria. Future studies will show how the existence of these recombining groups can offer an evolutionary advantage in spite of their restriction on diversity.

  12. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However......, the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  13. BQP35 is a novel member of the intrinsically unstructured protein (IUP) family which is a potential antigen for the sero-diagnosis of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guiquan; Moreau, Emmanuelle; Liu, Junlong; Ma, Miling; Rogniaux, Hélène; Liu, Aihong; Niu, Qingli; Li, Youquan; Ren, Qiaoyun; Luo, Jianxun; Chauvin, Alain; Yin, Hong

    2012-07-06

    A new gene of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (BQP35) was cloned by screening a merozoite cDNA expression library with infected sheep serum and using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was 1140bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 936bp encoding a 35-kDa predicted polypeptide with 311 amino acid residues. Comparison of BQP35 cDNA and genomic DNA sequences showed that BQP35 does not possess an intron. Recombinant BQP35 (rBQP35), expressed in a prokaryotic expression system, showed abnormally slow migration on SDS-PAGE. Gel shifting, amino acid sequence and in silico disorder region prediction indicated that BQP35 protein has characteristics of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs). This is the first description of such proteins in the Babesia genus. BQP35 induced antibodies production as early as one week after Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) infection in sheep. No cross-reaction was observed with sera from sheep infected with other ovine piroplasms dominant in China, except with Babesia sp. Tianzhu. The interest of BQP35 as a diagnostic antigen is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethnic differences in HLA antigens in Chilean donors and recipients: data from the National Renal Transplantation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, M A; Beltran, R; Ardiles, R; Raddatz, N; Labraña, C; Arenas, A; Flores, J; Alruiz, P; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-11-01

    To describe HLA antigen distribution, looking for possible markers of renal disease in Mapuche and non-Mapuche people in the renal transplantation program, we reviewed data from 1297 histocompatibility studies of the Chilean national renal transplantation program (421 donors and 876 recipients), performed between 2000 and 2005. Mapuche people were classified according to their family surnames. The most frequent antigens found among the total Chilean population were A2 (48%), A19 (33%), B16 (33%), B35 (26%), DR4 (38%), and DR6 (28%), without significant differences between donors and recipients. Among the 114 individuals (9%) classified as Mapuche, the most frequent antigens were A28 (49%), A2 (44%), B16 (63%), B35 (24%), DR4 (48%), and DR8 (30%), with A28/B16/DR4 as the most common haplotype. In contrast, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8 were significantly more frequent in Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche people. B8 was significantly more frequent in Mapuche recipients than in non-Mapuche recipients and Mapuche donors. The higher frequency of some HLA antigens in Mapuche people was confirmed, possibly corresponding to ethnic markers. The special concentration of B8 among Mapuche recipients might represent a genetic factor predisposing to chronic renal disease in this human group.

  15. Sera of Chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane K Graça-de Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These fagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identifed, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identifed proteins were classifed into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  16. Sera of chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça-de Souza, Viviane K; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Manque, Patrício; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Corrêa, Paulo R C; Buck, Gregory A; Ávila, Andréa R; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2010-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These flagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identified, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identified proteins were classified into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies.

  17. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  18. Prostate-specific antigen lowering effect of metabolic syndrome is influenced by prostate volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Heo, Nam Ju; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen levels by considering prostate volume and plasma volume. We retrospectively analyzed 4111 men who underwent routine check-ups including prostate-specific antigen and transrectal ultrasonography. The definition of metabolic syndrome was based on the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Prostate-specific antigen mass density (prostate-specific antigen × plasma volume / prostate volume) was calculated for adjusting plasma volume and prostate volume. We compared prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen mass density levels of participants with metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome group, n = 1242) and without metabolic syndrome (non-prostate-specific antigen metabolic syndrome group, n = 2869). To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen, linear regression analysis for the natural logarithm of prostate-specific antigen was used. Patients in the metabolic syndrome group had significantly older age (P metabolic syndrome group vs metabolic syndrome group; 1.22 ± 0.91 vs 1.15 ± 0.76 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Prostate-specific antigen mass density in the metabolic syndrome group was still significantly lower than that in the metabolic syndrome group (0.124 ± 0.084 vs 0.115 ± 0.071 μg/mL, P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, prostate volume and plasma volume using linear regression model, the presence of metabolic syndrome was a significant independent factor for lower prostate-specific antigen (prostate-specific antigen decrease by 4.1%, P = 0.046). Prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with metabolic syndrome seem to be lower, and this finding might be affected by the prostate volume. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  20. 'You don't show everyone your weakness': Older adults' views on using Family Group Conferencing to regain control and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metze, Rosalie N; Kwekkeboom, Rick H; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-08-01

    Family Group Conferencing (FGC), a model in which a person and his or her social network make their own 'care' plan, is used in youth care and might also be useful in elderly care to support older persons living at home. In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, FGC was implemented for older adults but they showed resistance. Reasons for this resistance have been researched and are described in this article. We examine existing views and attitudes of older adults concerning the use of FGC, and report on how older adults see the possibility to regain control over their lives using FGC. To do this, focus group sessions, duo interviews and individual interviews were held with older adults with varying characteristics: living at home, in sheltered housing, or in a home for the elderly; and living in urban, suburban or rural areas. Themes were: views on and contentment with the control and autonomy that they experience in their lives, and the willingness to use FGC to improve this. The main reasons for our respondents to resist FGC were: expecting people to be there for them without a FGC, not feeling ready yet for a FGC, feeling embarrassed when asking for help, being reluctant to open up about their problems, and having the fear of losing control when organizing a FGC. We conclude that, for this generation of older adults, FGC means losing control and autonomy rather than gaining it. To be appealing to older adults, a relational empowerment strengthening model should most likely be focused on reciprocity, peer-to-peer support, and solutions instead of problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does enrollment in multidisciplinary team-based primary care practice improve adherence to guideline-recommended processes of care? Quebec's Family Medicine Groups, 2002-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mamadou; Fiset-Laniel, Julie; Provost, Sylvie; Tousignant, Pierre; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Ouimet, Marie-Jo; Latimer, Eric; Strumpf, Erin

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether multidisciplinary team-based primary care practice improves adherence to process of care guidelines, in the absence of financial incentives related to pay-for-performance. We conducted a natural experiment including 135,119 patients, enrolled with a general practitioner (GP) in a multidisciplinary team Family Medicine Group (FMG) or non-FMG practice, using longitudinal data from Quebec's universal insurer over the relevant time period (2000-2010). All study subjects had diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or heart failure and were followed over a 7-year period, 2 years prior to enrollment and 5 years after. We constructed indicators on adherence to disease-specific guidelines and composite indicators across conditions. We evaluated the effect of FMGs using propensity score methods and Difference-in-Differences (DD) models. Rates of adherence to chronic disease guidelines increased for both FMG and non-FMG patients after enrollment, but not differentially so. Adherence to prescription-related guidelines improved less for FMG patients (DD [95% CI]=-2.83% [-4.08%, -1.58%]). We found no evidence of an FMG effect on adherence to consultation-related guidelines, (DD [95% CI]=-0.24% [-2.24%; 1.75%]). We found no evidence that FMGs increased adherence to the guidelines we evaluated. Future research is needed to assess why this reform did not improve performance on these quality-of-care indicators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  3. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  4. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  5. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. PMID:26085552

  6. Blood Groups in Infection and Host Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Blood group antigens represent polymorphic traits inherited among individuals and populations. At present, there are 34 recognized human blood groups and hundreds of individual blood group antigens and alleles. Differences in blood group antigen expression can increase or decrease host susceptibility to many infections. Blood groups can play a direct role in infection by serving as receptors and/or coreceptors for microorganisms, parasites, and viruses. In addition, many blood group antigens facilitate intracellular uptake, signal transduction, or adhesion through the organization of membrane microdomains. Several blood groups can modify the innate immune response to infection. Several distinct phenotypes associated with increased host resistance to malaria are overrepresented in populations living in areas where malaria is endemic, as a result of evolutionary pressures. Microorganisms can also stimulate antibodies against blood group antigens, including ABO, T, and Kell. Finally, there is a symbiotic relationship between blood group expression and maturation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Activity budget patterns in family-group and solitary territorial male guanacos Patrones de presupuesto de actividad de guanacos machos territoriales en grupos familiares y solitarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIE K. YOUNG

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We observed behavioral patterns of territorial male guanacos (Lama guanicoe in Torres del Paine National Park, Chile. Both solo territorial males and family-group territorial males were observed to compare the activity time budgets of males (n = 23 in different social groups and habitats. We found no difference in the activity time budgets of males based on social group type, total number of females or all guanacos present, or age of territorial males. Males, in all categories, spent most of their time foraging (65 % of overall time budget. There was a significant difference in time spent in aggressive and in miscellaneous (defecation, alertness to observer, scratching activities based on habitat type; most aggressive encounters and miscellaneous activity occurred on hilltops of areas dominated by mata barrosa shrubs (Mulinum spinosum. It is likely that territorial male guanaco behaviors are related to the resources defended rather than to any direct ability to attract potential mates.Observamos patrones de comportamiento de guanacos machos territoriales (Lama guanicoe en el Parque Nacional Torres del Paine, Chile. Comparamos el presupuesto de actividad de machos solos y en grupos familiares (n = 23 en diferentes hábitat. No encontramos diferencias en los presupuestos de actividad de machos basados en el tipo de grupo social, número total de hembras o número total de guanacos presentes, o la edad de los machos territoriales. Guanacos macho en todas las categorías asignaron alrededor de 65 % de su actividad a forrajeo. Por otra parte, detectamos una influencia del tipo de hábitat sobre el tiempo asignado a interacciones agresivas y misceláneas (defecación, vigilancia al observador, rasguñando; las interacciones agresivas y conductas misceláneas fueron más frecuentes en cimas de colinas de áreas dominadas por el arbusto mata barrosa (Mulinum spinosum. Es probable que el comportamiento de los machos territoriales del guanaco est

  8. Do general treatment guidelines for Asian American families have applications to specific ethnic groups? The case of culturally-competent therapy with Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Elena Young-Kyong; Bean, Roy A; Harper, James M

    2004-07-01

    To serve Korean American families effectively, marriage and family therapists need to develop a level of cultural competence. This content analysis of the relevant treatment literature was conducted to discover the most common expert recommendations for family therapy with Asian Americans and to examine their application to Korean Americans. Eleven specific guidelines were generated: Assess support systems, assess immigration history establish professional credibility, provide role induction, facilitate "saving face," accept somatic complaints, be present/problem focused, be directive, respect family structure, be nonconfrontational, and provide positive reframes. Empirical support (clinical and nonclinical research) and conceptual support for each guideline are discussed, and conclusions are reached regarding culturally competent therapy with Korean American families.

  9. Modulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen-C by Human Cytomegalovirus Stimulates KIR2DS1 Recognition by Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, Kattria; Chang, Chiwen; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Moffett, Ashley; Wills, Mark R.; Trowsdale, John

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules has been characterized in detail. By contrast, activating members of the KIR family, although closely related to inhibitory KIRs, appear to interact weakly, if at all, with HLA class I. KIR2DS1 is the best studied activating KIR and it interacts with C2 group HLA-C (C2-HLA-C) in some assays, but not as strongly as KIR2DL1. We used a mouse 2B4 cell reporter system, which carr...

  10. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  11. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor 8 regulates pathways for antigen presentation in myeloid cells and during tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Marquis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8 plays an important role in defenses against intracellular pathogens, including several aspects of myeloid cells function. It is required for ontogeny and maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells, for activation of anti-microbial defenses, and for production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12 in response to interferon gamma (IFNγ and protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcriptional programs and cellular pathways that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ and that are important for defenses against M. tuberculosis are poorly understood. These were investigated by transcript profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip. Studies in primary macrophages identified 368 genes that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ/CpG and that behave as stably segregating expression signatures (eQTLs in F2 mice fixed for a wild-type or mutant allele at IRF8. A total of 319 IRF8 binding sites were identified on promoters genome-wide (ChIP-chip in macrophages treated with IFNγ/CpG, defining a functional G/AGAAnTGAAA motif. An analysis of the genes bearing a functional IRF8 binding site, and showing regulation by IFNγ/CpG in macrophages and/or in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs, revealed a striking enrichment for the pathways of antigen processing and presentation, including multiple structural and enzymatic components of the Class I and Class II MHC (major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation machinery. Also significantly enriched as IRF8 targets are the group of endomembrane- and phagosome-associated small GTPases of the IRG (immunity-related GTPases and GBP (guanylate binding proteins families. These results identify IRF8 as a key regulator of early response pathways in myeloid cells, including phagosome maturation, antigen processing, and antigen presentation by myeloid cells.

  13. Post-conflict opponent affiliation reduces victim re-aggression in a family group of captive arctic wolves (Canis lupus arctos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lazzaroni

    Full Text Available Post-conflict affiliative interactions have been widely investigated in primates but not extensively in other species. Using the Post Conflict-Matched Control (PC-MC comparison method, this study investigated the patterns of post-conflict opponent affiliation (POA of a captive family group of 19 arctic wolves (Canis lupus arctos, investigating the correlation with various factors. We found that POAs occurred mainly in the non-feeding context and more often when the victim was dominant and the aggressor subordinate. Furthermore, POAs were more likely to have been initiated by the victim than the aggressor. Victims' stress related behaviours occurred more in PC than MC periods, and more after high vs. low intensity aggressions but they were not more likely to occur after conflicts between wolves with a stronger social bond and POAs did not reduce their rate of occurrence. Our results showed that re-aggression was twice less frequent when a friendly interaction occurred between the aggressor and the victim, and consistent with this, victims engaged in POAs more often than the aggressor. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that POAs in wolves may have been selected for as a mechanism to avoid conflict escalation, which could lead to social disruption and hence jeopardize cooperative activities. The high relatedness among individuals in the pack and the greater dependence of all members on cooperation in breeding and hunting may reduce the importance of 'relationship quality' as a mediating factor of POAs, although dominance relationships, which are directly linked to the risks of further conflicts, do play an important role.

  14. Post-conflict opponent affiliation reduces victim re-aggression in a family group of captive arctic wolves (Canis lupus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaroni, Martina; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Cafazzo, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Post-conflict affiliative interactions have been widely investigated in primates but not extensively in other species. Using the Post Conflict-Matched Control (PC-MC) comparison method, this study investigated the patterns of post-conflict opponent affiliation (POA) of a captive family group of 19 arctic wolves (Canis lupus arctos), investigating the correlation with various factors. We found that POAs occurred mainly in the non-feeding context and more often when the victim was dominant and the aggressor subordinate. Furthermore, POAs were more likely to have been initiated by the victim than the aggressor. Victims' stress related behaviours occurred more in PC than MC periods, and more after high vs. low intensity aggressions but they were not more likely to occur after conflicts between wolves with a stronger social bond and POAs did not reduce their rate of occurrence. Our results showed that re-aggression was twice less frequent when a friendly interaction occurred between the aggressor and the victim, and consistent with this, victims engaged in POAs more often than the aggressor. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that POAs in wolves may have been selected for as a mechanism to avoid conflict escalation, which could lead to social disruption and hence jeopardize cooperative activities. The high relatedness among individuals in the pack and the greater dependence of all members on cooperation in breeding and hunting may reduce the importance of 'relationship quality' as a mediating factor of POAs, although dominance relationships, which are directly linked to the risks of further conflicts, do play an important role.

  15. The effect of phosphorylation on the salt-tolerance-related functions of the soybean protein PM18, a member of the group-3 LEA protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Meiyan; Cheng, Hua; Sun, Nan; Liu, Simu; Li, Shuiming; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Yizhi; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatically driven post-translated modifications (PTMs) usually happen within the intrinsically disordered regions of a target protein and can modulate variety of protein functions. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a family of the plant intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Despite their important roles in plant stress response, there is currently limited knowledge on the presence and functional and structural effects of phosphorylation on LEA proteins. In this study, we identified three phosphorylation sites (Ser 90 , Tyr 136 , and Thr 266 ) in the soybean PM18 protein that belongs to the group-3 LEA proteins. In yeast expression system, PM18 protein increased the salt tolerance of yeast, and the phosphorylation of this protein further enhanced its protective function. Further analysis revealed that Ser 90 and Tyr 136 are more important than Thr 266 , and these two sites might work cooperatively in regulating the salt resistance function of PM18. The circular dichroism analysis showed that PM18 protein was disordered in aqueous media, and phosphorylation did not affect the disordered status of this protein. However, phosphorylation promoted formation of more helical structure in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, in dedicated in vitro experiments, phosphorylated PM18 protein was able to better protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the inactivation induced by the freeze-thaw cycles than its un- or dephosphorylated forms. All these data indicate that phosphorylation may have regulatory effects on the stress-tolerance-related function of LEA proteins. Therefore, further studies are needed to shed more light on functional and structural roles of phosphorylation in LEA proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic Comparison of Two Family-Level Groups of the Uncultivated NAG1 Archaeal Lineage from Chemically and Geographically Disparate Hot Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Becraft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress based on single-cell genomics and metagenomic investigations of archaea in a variety of extreme environments has led to significant advances in our understanding of the diversity, evolution, and metabolic potential of archaea, yet the vast majority of archaeal diversity remains undersampled. In this work, we coordinated single-cell genomics with metagenomics in order to construct a near-complete genome from a deeply branching uncultivated archaeal lineage sampled from Great Boiling Spring (GBS in the U.S. Great Basin, Nevada. This taxon is distantly related (distinct families to an archaeal genome, designated “Novel Archaeal Group 1” (NAG1, which was extracted from a metagenome recovered from an acidic iron spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. We compared the metabolic predictions of the NAG1 lineage to better understand how these archaea could inhabit such chemically distinct environments. Similar to the NAG1 population previously studied in YNP, the NAG1 population from GBS is predicted to utilize proteins as a primary carbon source, ferment simple carbon sources, and use oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor under oxic conditions. However, GBS NAG1 populations contained distinct genes involved in central carbon metabolism and electron transfer, including nitrite reductase, which could confer the ability to reduce nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Despite inhabiting chemically distinct environments with large variations in pH, GBS NAG1 populations shared many core genomic and metabolic features with the archaeon identified from YNP, yet were able to carve out a distinct niche at GBS.

  17. Families in Transition .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  18. A Survey of ABO, Rhesus (D) Antigen and Haemoglobin Genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    while 5.5% were Rh(D) negative respectively based on the detection (Positive) or absence (Negative) of Rh(D) antigen. 22.8% of the subjects had ABO blood group A, 26.4% were group B, 4.1% were group AB while 46.7% were group O. Further analysis revealed that 695 (21.4%) of the group A were Apositive while 44 ...

  19. Exploring the need for a new UK occupational therapy intervention for people with dementia and family carers: Community Occupational Therapy in Dementia (COTiD). A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Sinéad M; Field, Becky; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Swinson, Thomas; Wenborn, Jennifer; di Bona, Laura; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Poland, Fiona; Orrell, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the Netherlands, Graff et al. found Community Occupational Therapy in Dementia (COTiD) demonstrated benefits to people with dementia and family carers. In this study, focus groups took place with people with dementia and family carers to explore how to make COTiD relevant to the UK context. Six focus groups (three with people living with dementia (n = 18) and three with family carers (n = 21)) took place. Participants were asked for their impressions of the intervention, the extent to which it could meet their needs, and what modifications were needed. Audio-recordings of the groups were transcribed and analysed. Three key themes emerged covering 'loss and living with dementia', 'what helped us', and 'consistency and continuity'. People with dementia and family carers spoke about the impact of their diagnosis on them and their family and what strategies helped. Issues such as timing, follow-up, and the importance of an early intervention in preventing crises were highlighted. There was some concern over the length of the intervention and the disruption it might cause to current schedules. Overall, participants were optimistic about COTiD being used in the United Kingdom if it was to be introduced in a flexible and timely manner, incorporating the needs and existing strategies of the person with dementia. These outcomes have led to changes, such as incorporating more flexibility into COTiD, being made to the intervention prior to its implementation in the United Kingdom.

  20. Prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen in men with Parkinson's disease are not different compared to age-matched control group: A prospective, case-controlled multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Seob Shin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Our data show that a neurologic lesion causing PD does not affect PV and PSA. As both groups have a similar PC occurrence rate, it is clear that prostate evaluation is necessary for PD as well as non-PD patients.

  1. Performance evaluation of the Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Christopher; McLaughlin, Lisa; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Ferrera, Carol; Liska, Sally; Myers, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Swenson, Paul; Gadelle, Stephane; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    A multi-center study was conducted to evaluate the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV-1/HIV-2 assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma in adult and pediatric populations. The objectives of the study were to assess assay performance for the detection of acute HIV infections; sensitivity in known HIV positive samples; percent agreement with HIV status; specificity in low and high risk individuals of unknown HIV status; and to compare assay performance to a 3rd generation HIV assay. The evaluation included testing 9150 samples at four U.S. clinical trial sites, using three kit lots. Unlinked samples were from routine testing, repositories or purchased from vendors. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA detection in samples from individuals in two separate populations with acute HIV infection was 95.2% (20/21) and 86.4% (38/44). Sensitivity was 100% (1603/1603) in known antibody positive [HIV-1 Groups M and O, and HIV-2] samples. HIV p24 antigen detection was 100% (53/53) in HIV-1 culture supernatants. HIV-1 seroconversion panel detection improved by a range of 0-20 days compared to a 3rd generation HIV test. Specificity was 99.9% (5989/5996) in low risk, 99.9% (959/960) in high risk and 100% (100/100) in pediatric populations. The GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA significantly reduced the diagnostic window when compared to the 3rd generation screening assay, enabling earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. The performance parameters of the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA are well suited for use in HIV diagnostic settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Familial Kleine-Levin Syndrome: A Specific Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang Tuan Remy; Groos, Elisabeth; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Monaca-Charley, Christelle; Rico, Tom; Farber, Neal; Mignot, Emmanuel; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare, mostly sporadic disorder, characterized by intermittent episodes of hypersomnia plus cognitive and behavior disorders. Although its cause is unknown, multiplex families have been described. We contrasted the clinical and biological features of familial versus sporadic KLS. Two samples of patients with KLS from the United States and France (n = 260) were studied using clinical interviews and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping. A multiplex family contained two or more first- or second-degree affected relatives (familial cases). Twenty-one patients from 10 multiplex families (siblings: n = 12, including two pairs of monozygotic twins; parent-child: n = 4; cousins: n = 2; uncle-nephews: n = 3) and 239 patients with sporadic KLS were identified, yielding to 4% multiplex families and 8% familial cases. The simplex and multiplex families did not differ for autoimmune, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Age, sex ratio, ethnicity, HLA typing, karyotyping, disease course, frequency, and duration of KLS episodes did not differ between groups. Episodes were less frequent in familial versus sporadic KLS (2.3 ± 1.8/y versus 3.8 ± 3.7/y, P = 0.004). Menses triggered more frequently KLS onset in the nine girls with familial KLS (relative risk, RR = 4.12, P = 0.03), but not subsequent episodes. Familial cases had less disinhibited speech (RR = 3.44, P = 0.049), less combined hypophagia/hyperphagia (RR = 4.38, P = 0.006), more abrupt termination of episodes (RR = 1.45, P = 0.04) and less postepisode insomnia (RR = 2.16, P = 0.008). There was similar HLA DQB1 distribution in familial versus sporadic cases and no abnormal karyotypes. Familial KLS is mostly present in the same generation, and is clinically similar to but slightly less severe than sporadic KLS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  4. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  5. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  6. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Soto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A binding proteins (LiPABPs.Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid.The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis.

  7. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  8. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  9. Expression of Lewisa, Sialyl Lewisa, Lewisx, Sialyl Lewisx, Antigens as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagoe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered expression of blood group-related carbohydrate antigens such as sialyl Lewis (Lex antigen in tumours is associated with tumour progression behaviour and subsequent prognosis. However, the prognostic value of the expression of Le-related antigens in colorectal tumours remains unclear.

  10. Prevalence of Weak D Antigen In Western Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Sadaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discovery of Rh antigens in 1939 by Landsteiner and Weiner was the revolutionary stage in blood banking. Of these antigens, D, which decides Rh positivity or negativity, is the most antigenic. A problem is encountered when an individual has a weakened expression of D (Du, i.e., fewer numbers of D antigens on red cell membrane. Aims and Objectives: To know the prevalence of weak D in Indian population because incidence varies in different population. To determine the risk of alloimmunization among Rh D negative patients who receives the blood of weak D positive donors. Material and Methods: Rh grouping of 38,962 donors who came to The Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from 1st January 2013 to 30th September 2014 was done using the DIAGAST (Automated Grouping. The samples that tested negative for D antigen were further analysed for weak D (Du by indirect antiglobulin test using blend of Ig G and Ig M Anti D. This was done using Column agglutination method in ID card (gel card. Results: The total number of donors studied was 38,962. Out of these 3360(8.6% were tested Rh D negative. All Rh D negative donors were tested for weak D (Du. 22 (0.056% of total donors and 0.65% of Rh negative donors turned out to be weak D (Du positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of weak D (Du in Western Indian population is 0.056 %, So the risk of alloimmunization in our setting due to weak D (Du antigen is marginal. But, testing of weak D antigen is necessary in blood bank because weak D antigen is immunogenic and can produce alloimmunization if transfused to Rh D negative subjects.

  11. Multiracial Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Kelley

    The multiracial population is one of the fastest growing segments of the U. S. population. In discussing the multiracial population it is first important to identify and define the groups that are under the heading of multiracial. The literature has included interracial couples, multiracial individuals, and families in which a cross-racial or…

  12. Helicobacter Pylori Stool Antigen Assay in Hyperemesis Gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, S; Khanam, R A; Basher, M S; Azam, M S; Hossain, M A; Mirza, T T; Banu, K A; Karmoker, R K

    2017-04-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is the most severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy that seriously affects the pregnancy outcome. It is a disease with unknown etiology and varieties of contributing factors like hormonal changes, psychological and immunological factors. A significantly high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori among pregnant women with Hyperemesis gravidarum has been revealed recently. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out at antenatal ward, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh for a period of twenty-one months among purposively selected thirty-six patients with Hyperemesis gravidarum with a view to assess the involvement of H. pylori in Hyperemesis gravidarum. Data were collected through interview, physical examinations and laboratory investigations by using case record form. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20.0 for Windows. Highest number 16(44.44%) of respondents were in age group 20 to 24 years with a mean of 23.81 years and a standard deviation (SD) of 4.55 years. Majority 29(80.56%) of the women had education less than 12 years, as many as 28(77.78%) women were housewives, and at least 14(38.89%) women had unplanned pregnancies. An overwhelming majority 29(80.56%) of women had their pregnancy duration between 8 to 12 weeks with a mean duration of 10.64 weeks and a standard deviation of 2.35 weeks. Majority 20(55.56%) of women were pregnant for first time, as many as 19(52.78%) women had duration of illness for 5 to 9 weeks. Of 16 multi-gravid women, 7(43.75%) had history of similar condition in their previous pregnancies. As many as 9 (25.00%) women had family history of similar condition in their mothers and sisters. First trimester was time of manifestation of the condition.At least 11 (30.56%) stool samples were positive for H. pylori stool antigen. Family history of Hyperemesis gravidarum and presence of H. pylori stool antigen are statistically

  13. Children’s sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.J. Kruitwagen - van de Gaar (Vivian); A. van Grieken (Amy); W. Jansen (Wilma); H. Raat (Hein)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children’s SSB consumption. We explored associations within

  14. Effects of family group conferences among high-risk patients of chronic disability and their significant others : study protocol for a multicentre controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebregt, Chantal F; Scholten, Eline W M; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Post, Marcel W M; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients and family members experience a large gap between the protected environment during inpatient medical rehabilitation and life in the community after discharge. They feel insufficiently prepared to cope with the consequences of their disability in daily life. This study

  15. Reappraisal of visiting policies and procedures of patient's family information in 188 French ICUs: a report of the Outcomerea Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Vinatier, Isabelle; Tabah, Alexis; Misset, Benoit; Timsit, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    The relatives of intensive care unit (ICU) patients must cope with both the severity of illness of their loved one and the unfamiliar and stressful ICU environment. This hardship may lead to post-intensive care syndrome. French guidelines provide recommendations on welcoming and informing families of ICU patients. We questioned whether and how they are applied 5 years after their publication. We conducted a large survey among French ICUs to evaluate their visiting policies and how information was provided to patient's family. A questionnaire was built up by intensivists and nurses. French ICUs were solicited, and the questionnaire was sent to all participating ICUs, for being filled in by the unit medical and/or nursing head. Data regarding the hospital and ICU characteristics, the visiting policy and procedures, and the management of family information were collected. Among the 289 French ICUs, 188 (65 %) participated. Most ICUs have a waiting room 118/188 (62.8 %) and a dedicated room for meeting the family 152/188 (80.8 %). Of the 188 ICUs, 45 (23.9 %) were opened on a 24-h-a-day basis. In the remaining ICUs, the time period allowed for visits was 4.75 ± 1.83 h (median 5 h). In ICUs where visiting restrictions were reported, open visiting was allowed for end-of-life situations in 107/143 (74.8 %). Children are allowed to visit a patient in 164/188 (87.2 %) regardless of their age in 97/164 (59.1 %) of ICUs. Families received an information leaflet in 168/188 (89.3 %). Information was provided to families through structured meetings in 149/188 (79.2 %) of ICUs at patient admission with participation of nurses and nursing assistants in 133/188 (70.4 %) and 55/188 (29.2 %), respectively. Information delivered to the family was reported in the patient chart by only 111/188 ICUs (59 %). Participation in care was infrequent. Although French ICUs do not follow the consensus recommendations, slow progress exists compared to previous reports

  16. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  17. Children’s sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. van de Gaar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children’s SSB consumption. We explored associations within ethnic background of the child. Methods Cross-sectional data from the population-based ‘Water Campaign’ study were used. Parents (n = 644 of primary school children (6-13 years completed a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, family and home-related factors and child’s SSB intake. The family and home-related factors under study were: cognitive variables (e.g. parental attitude, subjective norm, environmental variables (e.g. availability of SSB, parenting practices, and habitual variables (e.g. habit strength, taste preference. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between family and home-related factors and child’s SSB intake (p < 0.05. Results Mean age of the children was 9.4 years (SD: 1.8 and 54.1% were girls. The child’s average SSB intake was 0.9 litres (SD: 0.6 per day. Child’s age, parents’ subjective norm, parenting practices, and parental modelling were positively associated with the child’s SSB intake. The availability of SSB at home and school and parental attitude were negatively associated with the child’s SSB intake. The associations under study differed according to the child’s ethnic background, with the explained variance of the full models ranging from 8.7% for children from Moroccan or Turkish ethnic background to 44.4% for children with Dutch ethnic background. Conclusions Our results provide support for interventions targeting children’s SSB intake focussing on the identified family and home-related factors, with active participation of parents. Also, the relationships between these factors and the child’s SSB intake differed for children with distinct ethnic backgrounds

  18. [An avian strain of Escherichia coli with antigens common to the genus Salmonella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzolo, H R; Zoratti de Verona, A; d'Empaire, M; Furowicz, A J

    1977-01-01

    On a commercial poultry farm, a large percentage (9%) of clinically healthy fowls had positive reaction to the plate test, with commercial polyvalent pullorum antigens. We could not isolate Salmonella from the positive birds. An strain, of Escherichia coli Balcarce (E. coli B) was isolated from the feces of one of the birds. The isolate was identified biochemically and the antigenic study showed correlation with E. coli 044 and the somatic fraction 1, 2, 8, 14 and 23 of the Salmonella genus. The common antigens were studied by agglutination, absorption and crossed immunodiffusion tests, comparing the isolated strain and the different Salmonella serotypes. Four pullorum polyvalent commercial antigens reacted with sera containing somatic agglutinins 1, and with the E. coli B antiserum. These observations confirm the high antigenic correlation between the genus of the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is indicated that for the diagnosis of avian salmonelosis rather than using a single serological tests, the isolation and identification of the etiological agent is required.

  19. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  20. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Populus GT43 family members group into distinct sets required for primary and secondary wall xylan biosynthesis and include useful promoters for wood modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratke, Christine; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Balasubramanian, Vimal K; Naumann, Marcel; Duncranz, Mathilda Lönnäs; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Gorzsás, András; Endo, Satoshi; Ezcurra, Ines; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-01-01

    The plant GT43 protein family includes xylosyltransferases that are known to be required for xylan backbone biosynthesis, but have incompletely understood specificities. RT-qPCR and histochemical (GUS) analyses of expression patterns of GT43 members in hybrid aspen, reported here, revealed that three clades of the family have markedly differing specificity towards secondary wall-forming cells (wood and extraxylary fibres). Intriguingly, GT43A and B genes (corresponding to the Arabidopsis IRX9 clade) showed higher specificity for secondary-walled cells than GT43C and D genes (IRX14 clade), although both IRX9 and IRX14 are required for xylosyltransferase activity. The remaining genes, GT43E, F and G (IRX9-L clade), showed broad expression patterns. Transient transactivation analyses of GT43A and B reporters demonstrated that they are activated by PtxtMYB021 and PNAC085 (master secondary wall switches), mediated in PtxtMYB021 activation by an AC element. The high observed secondary cell wall specificity of GT43B expression prompted tests of the efficiency of its promoter (pGT43B), relative to the CaMV 35S (35S) promoter, for overexpressing a xylan acetyl esterase (CE5) or downregulating REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION (RWA) family genes and thus engineering wood acetylation. CE5 expression was weaker when driven by pGT43B, but it reduced wood acetyl content substantially more efficiently than the 35S promoter. RNAi silencing of the RWA family, which was ineffective using 35S, was achieved when using GT43B promoter. These results show the utility of the GT43B promoter for genetically engineering properties of wood and fibres. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Impact of Pathologist Involvement in Sarcoma and Rare Tumor Patient Support Groups on Facebook: A Survey of 542 Patients and Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jasmine; David, Marjorie Parker; Lee, Nathan E; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2018-01-29

    - Patients with rare tumors have difficulty finding reliable information about their disease. Facebook patient support groups allow patients to educate one another. - To investigate how these patients perceive the value of pathologists, both in Facebook groups and real-world patient care. - Survey links were posted in 12 Facebook patient groups: 6 with an active pathologist member (angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, epithelioid sarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans [×2], and desmoid fibromatosis), and 6 without "active" pathologist involvement (aggressive angiomyxoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and osteosarcoma). - A total of 542 people responded (403 were patients): 264 from groups with a pathologist, and 278 from groups without active pathologist involvement. Of groups with an active pathologist, respondents agreed the pathologist's posts helped them better understand their disease (107 of 119; 90%) and relieved some of their disease-related anxiety (92 of 119; 77%). And for these groups 98% (117 of 119) of respondents agreed that having a pathologist in their group was a good thing; 83% (192 of 232) wanted more pathologists involved. More respondents from groups with an active pathologist (219 of 236; 93%) than without one (215 of 252; 85%) agreed: "pathologists are an important part of the patient care team for patients with cancer and other rare tumors" ( P = .008). - This study is the first to evaluate the impact of pathologist interaction with Facebook patient support groups and to assess perceptions about the specialty of pathology from a large group of patients with rare tumors. Pathologist involvement in Facebook patient groups appears to positively influence patient perception of the importance of pathologists. We hope these data will encourage more pathologists to participate in Facebook patient support groups.

  3. Application of recombinant antigen 5 allergens from seven allergy-relevant Hymenoptera species in diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiener, M; Eberlein, Bernadette; Moreno-Aguilar, C

    2017-01-01

    species can be a diagnostic challenge. To address immunological IgE cross-reactivity on molecular level, seven recombinant antigens 5 of the most important Vespoidea groups were assessed by different diagnostic setups. METHODS: The antigens 5 of yellow jackets, hornets, European and American paper wasps......-reactivity in various diagnostic settings, antigens 5 are inappropriate markers for differential sIgE diagnostics in vespid venom allergy. However, the newly available antigens 5 from further vespid species and the combination of recombinant allergen-based sIgE measurements with BAT represents a practicable way...

  4. Detection of antigens of allergic diseases in children by radioallergosorbent test (RAST), 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Junko

    1977-01-01

    Detection of antigens mainly by RAST, measurement of immunoglobulin, and investigation of clinical history were performed on children with intractable bronchial asthma. The results were compared with those in cases of mild or moderate degree, and they were discussed. The obtained results were as follows: 1) Cases, of which the occurrence age of disease was under 2 years old, hold a majority in intractable cases, and the ratio was twice that of the control group. 2) A result of skin test was generally lower positive rate in the intractable group as compared to the control group. However, a result of prick test for buckwheat antigen in the intractable group showed higher positive rate than that in the control group. The intractable group tended to be separated into two extreme groups, one which showed positive to most of inhaled antigens in skin test, and another which showed negative to all antigens. 3) As a result of RAST, 13% of the intractable group showed positive to egg white out of food antigens, and it was three times the ratio of positive in the control group. One case showed strong positive to rice. 4) Two thirds of cases which showed positive in RAST for food antigens showed negative in prick test. 5) Total IgE in the serum of the intractable group was clearly lower in values than that of the control group. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of partially purified antigens in adult Paragonimus iloktsuenensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pyung-Rim

    2001-01-01

    An immunoelectron microscopy employing immunogold labeling method was performed to detect tissue origin of D1 fraction (D1A) among 5 antigenic protein fractions partially purified by DEAE-anion exchange chromatography from water-soluble crude antigen (PIWA) of adult Paragonimus iloktsuenensis. Immune reactions of adult worm tissues with rabbit serum immunoglobulin immunized with crude antigen (PI-Ig) and D1 antigen (D1-Ig), as well as rat serum immunoglobulin infected with P. iloktsuenensis were observed. D1A showed strong antigenicity in the intestinal epithelium of the worms during the early infection period of 2-4 weeks after infection. The vitellaria also showed stronger antigenicity than the other tissue sites in immune reaction of tissues against all immunoglobulins from 4 to 33 weeks after vitelline development. Therefore, it is suggested that D1A was mainly originated from the intestinal epithelial tissues before the development of vitelline gland of the parasites. Immuno-reactivity of two immunoglobulins (PI-Ig, D1-Ig) was significantly different in intestinal epithelial cytoplasmic protrusions (CP) and intestinal epithelial secretory granules (SG). In the experimental group with D1-Ig, gold particles were labeled significantly in CP than in SG when compared to the PI-Ig group. Thus, the major antigenic materials in D1 antigen having a strong antigenicity in the early infection period was considered to be originated from the intestinal epithelial tissue. PMID:11441499

  6. The Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigen in salivary gland carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Christensen, M

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type T (Thomsen-Friedenreich) antigen is a marker of carcinomas, and has been related to aggressiveness of malignant tumours. We studied the expression of T, sialosyl-T, A and H blood group antigens in salivary gland carcinomas. The aim was to study whether the tumours, based on ...

  7. First steps: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of the Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) program compared to routine care in improving outcomes for high-risk mothers and their children and preventing abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jacqueline; Aistrop, Dipti; Allen, Elizabeth; Barlow, Jane; Elbourne, Diana; Macdonald, Geraldine; Melhuish, Edward; Petrou, Stavros; Pink, Joshua; Snowdon, Claire; Spiby, Helen; Stuart, Jane; Sturgess, Joanna

    2013-09-08

    Evidence from the USA suggests that the home-based Family Nurse Partnership program (FNP), extending from early pregnancy until infants are 24 months, can reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect throughout childhood. FNP is now widely available in the UK. A new variant, Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) offers similar content but in a group context and for a shorter time, until infants are 12 months old. Each group comprises 8 to 12 women with similar expected delivery dates and their partners. Its implementation has been established but there is no evidence of its effectiveness. The study comprises a multi-site randomized controlled trial designed to identify the benefits of gFNP compared to standard care. Participants (not eligible for FNP) must be either aged FNP and, in either age group, severe psychotic mental illness or not able to communicate in English. Consenting women are randomly allocated (minimized by site and maternal age group) when between 10 and 16 weeks pregnant to either to the 44 session gFNP program or to standard care after the collection of baseline information. Researchers are blind to group assignment.The primary outcomes at 12 months are child abuse potential based on the revised Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory and parent/infant interaction coded using the CARE Index based on a video-taped interaction. Secondary outcomes are maternal depression, parenting stress, health related quality of life, social support, and use of services. This is the first study of the effectiveness of gFNP in the UK. Results should inform decision-making about its delivery alongside universal services, potentially enabling a wider range of families to benefit from the FNP curriculum and approach to supporting parenting. ISRCTN78814904.

  8. The frequency and spectrum of congenital anomalies in natural family planning users in South America: no increase in a case-control study. NFP-ECLAMC Group. Natural Family Planning. Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, E E; Lopez-Camelo, J S; da Graça Dutra, M; Queenan, J T; Simpson, J L

    1997-12-01

    Users of natural family planning (NFP) practice periodic abstinence, leading many to reason that such couples should show increased anomalies in offspring as a result of fertilization involving aging gametes. In an effort to complement our NFP cohort study, we currently conducted a case-control study in the same region (South America) in which the largest number of cases have been recruited for our cohort NFP study. During 1992-94, 5324 case-control pairs of mothers were interviewed during the immediate postpartum period in 18 maternity hospitals participating in the Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations: ECLAMC (Spanish acronym for Latin-American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations). Natural family planning (NFP) usage was recorded in 6% of mothers in the ECLAMC sample studied (n = 10,648). Overall, no significant differences in frequency of NFP usage were observed between malformed cases (349/5324 = 6.6%) and normal controls (303/5324 = 5.7%) (chi 2 = 3.3; df = 1; p > 0.05). No significant differences in sex ratios were observed between children of NFP user and non-user mothers. Of special interest is the lack of association between NFP and Down syndrome, the sentinel phenotype for the hypothesis of delayed fertilization (aging gametes).

  9. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  10. Immune Efficacy of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Abdulrahman Yousif

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Salmonella ohio Somatic antigen on humoral and cellular immunity in mice. Two groups of mice (thirty in each were used, first group was immunized twice at two weeks’ intervals subcutaneously (S/C with 0.5 ml of somatic antigen (prepared by heat inactivation of S. ohio containing 1×108C.F. U (protein content 200 µg; second group was injected S/C with phosphate buffer saline(PBS. Blood samples were collected at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post booster dose. Humoral immunity was detected by ELISA test, while cellular immunity detected by E. rosette and delayed type hypersensitivity test (DTH. The immunized and control mice groups were challenged with 5LD50 of virulent Salmonella ohio six weeks post booster dose. IgG was increased significantly (P<0.05 at 2, 4, and 6 weeks in the immunized group, and the maximum increase of antibody titers was determined at fourth week (651.7 ± 21.3 in comparison with the control group which remained within the normal value in all times of the experiment. E. rosette test showed a significantly increase in the mean of the activated lymphocyte of the immunized group at fourth week of immunization while control group gave normal range of active lymphocyte. In DTH test, immunized group showed a significant increase in footpad thickness after 24 hours post inoculation with soluble antigen in comparison with control group. Immunized mice were resist the challenge dose 5LD50 {5x (1.5x107} of virulent Salmonella ohio and all mice of control group died within (3- 4 days. In conclusion, immunization of mice with somatic S. ohio antigen was induced humoral and cellular immune response against Salmonellosis.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen HLADRB1 determinants susceptibility to gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Mutar MAHDI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is characterized by diverse symptoms. There is an evidence for a genetic component to GERD as supported by familial aggregation of this disease. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether certain human leucocyte antigen genes HLA-DRB1 are associated with GERD. METHODS Patients and controls were prospectively recruited from GIT center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq between January 2014 and July 2016. Sixty Iraqi Arab Muslims patients with a history of heartburn and dyspepsia compared with 100 Iraqi Arab Muslims controls. All study patients and control groups underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations and their serums were analyzed for CagA antibodies Immunoglobulin G (IgG for H. pylori. HLA-DRB1 genotyping were done to both groups. RESULTS A total of 60 patients with erosive gastritis; GERD (Grade II and III were evaluated, together with 100 controls. There is a significant increase of H. pylori infection (P=0.0001 in GERD patients than control group. HLA-DRB1* 15:01 was significantly increased in GERD patients in comparison with control group and an increased frequency of HLADRB1*11:01 in control group compared with patients group. CONCLUSION There is an association between HLA-DRB1 *15:01 in GERD patients with H. pylori positive patients.

  12. Hacia una nueva conceptualización de la salud del grupo familiar y sus factores condicionantes Towards a new conceptualization of family group health and its conditioning factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Louro Bernal

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiencias profesionales en el campo de la docencia y la investigación evidenciaron la necesidad de esclarecer y delimitar el concepto de salud de la familia. Existen diferentes acepciones del concepto que no hacen referencia al grupo familiar como unidad de atención médica, psicológica y social en la comunidad. El trabajo propone una nueva concepción teórica de salud del grupo familiar y sus aspectos condicionantes, útil para la labor asistencial, investigativa, docente y administrativa de los profesionales de la salud. Se exponen los fundamentos teóricos que distinguen el enfoque psicosocial que sustenta la propuesta. Tal propuesta constituye el componente teórico de un modelo de evaluación diseñado para proveer información para el diagnóstico de la salud de las familias en la APS. El trabajo tuvo como base la búsqueda bibliográfica, el debate con expertos y los resultados de investigaciones con familias cubanas.Professional experiences in the field of teaching and research evidenced the need of clearing up and delimitating the concept of family health. There are different meanings of the concept that do not refer to the family group as a unit of medical, psychological and social attention in the community. This paper recommends a new theoretical conception of the family group health and its conditioning factors that is useful for the assistance, investigative, teaching and administrative work of health professionals. The theroretical foundations distinguishing the psychosocial approach supporting the proposal are exposed. Such a suggestion is the theoretical component of an evaluation model designed to provide information for diagnosing family health at the primary health care level. This paper was based on bibliografic search, discussions with experts and on the results of the research carried out among Cuban families.

  13. Evaluating the use of dedicated swab for rapid antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most common and fearful bacterial cause in pediatric acute pharyngitis due to its serious complications. Several generations of rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) have been developed to facilitate rapid detection of GAS pharyngitis. We assessed the value of using a ...

  14. The Prognostic, Diagnostic, and Therapeutic Potential of Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn

    Tumor antigens are a group of proteins recognized by the cells of immune system. Specifically, they are recognized in tumor cells where they are present in larger than usual amounts, or are physiochemically altered to a degree at which they no longer resemble native human proteins. Their presence...

  15. Human leukocyte antigen-A genotype as a predictor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim of the study: To screen for CMV infection among solid organ transplantation patients using monitoring of CMV phosphoprotein 65 (CMVpp65) antigenemia and to detect if CMV infection and disease were associated with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A locus genotypes among the studied group. Subjects and ...

  16. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  17. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    consisting of undefined antigens with possible cross reactions toward other environmental bacteria. The objective of the study was to optimize the IFN-γ test using different types of novel antigens for stimulation. Fourteen novel antigen candidates were selected for testing, including 4 peptides of the ESAT...... on the same 30 heifers from a known MAP infected herd. Determination of cut-off for each antigen was based on samples from a non-infected herd, including 60 heifers. Based on PPDj stimulations, more than 50% of the heifers tested MAP positive at the first two samplings, whereas only 20% tested positive...... at third sampling. The resulted showed that PPDj detect a high percentage as MAP positive animals, as this crude antigen mixture is expected to induce non-specific IFN-γ production. However, the tested latency antigens, some secreted proteins and some peptides of the ESAT-6 family detected a comparable...

  18. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  19. Blood group genotyping: from patient to high-throughput donor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuisen, B.; van der Schoot, C. E.; de Haas, M.

    2009-01-01

    Blood group antigens, present on the cell membrane of red blood cells and platelets, can be defined either serologically or predicted based on the genotypes of genes encoding for blood group antigens. At present, the molecular basis of many antigens of the 30 blood group systems and 17 human

  20. The "Learning Through Play" project. Importance of interdisciplinary work among children born prematurely and their family groups in an area of high socio-environmental risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Flor L; Lencina, Manuel J

    2017-12-01

    Several socio-environmental risk factors causea large number of children born prematurely, and without neurological disorders, to have low scores in their development, particularly in the cognitive and socio-emotional skills areas, thus evidencing a potential future risk. Strengthening bonds with the family and caregivers is critical for their adequate development. This article reports on the experience of an interdisciplinary team from Hospital Eva Perón de Tucumán, who designed a program called "Learning Through Play"for the promotion of child development and aimed at parents of preterm infants seen at the Follow-up Outpatient Clinic and the Department of Social Services, with the collaboration of the Department of Nutrition. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.