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Sample records for group analysis showed

  1. First multigene analysis of Archamoebae (Amoebozoa: Conosa) robustly reveals its phylogeny and shows that Entamoebidae represents a deep lineage of the group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánek, Tomáš; Zadrobílková, Eliška; Walker, Giselle; Brown, Matthew W; Gentekaki, Eleni; Hroudová, Miluše; Kang, Seungho; Roger, Andrew J; Tice, Alexander K; Vlček, Čestmír; Čepička, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Archamoebae is an understudied group of anaerobic free-living or endobiotic protists that constitutes the major anaerobic lineage of the supergroup Amoebozoa. Hitherto, the phylogeny of Archamoebae was based solely on SSU rRNA and actin genes, which did not resolve relationships among the main lineages of the group. Because of this uncertainty, several different scenarios had been proposed for the phylogeny of the Archamoebae. In this study, we present the first multigene phylogenetic analysis that includes members of Pelomyxidae, and Rhizomastixidae. The analysis clearly shows that Mastigamoebidae, Pelomyxidae and Rhizomastixidae form a clade of mostly free-living, amoeboid flagellates, here called Pelobiontida. The predominantly endobiotic and aflagellated Entamoebidae represents a separate, deep-branching lineage, Entamoebida. Therefore, two unique evolutionary events, horizontal transfer of the nitrogen fixation system from bacteria and transfer of the sulfate activation pathway to mitochondrial derivatives, predate the radiation of recent lineages of Archamoebae. The endobiotic lifestyle has arisen at least three times independently during the evolution of the group. We also present new ultrastructural data that clarifies the primary divergence among the family Mastigamoebidae which had previously been inferred from phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rDNA.

  2. Fourier Analysis on Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rudin, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1950s, many of the more refined aspects of Fourier analysis were transferred from their original settings (the unit circle, the integers, the real line) to arbitrary locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. Rudin's book, published in 1962, was the first to give a systematic account of these developments and has come to be regarded as a classic in the field. The basic facts concerning Fourier analysis and the structure of LCA groups are proved in the opening chapters, in order to make the treatment relatively self-contained.

  3. The People's Show: A Critical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Francis

    1996-01-01

    The 1990s heralded a new form of museum exhibition: "The People's Show." A light-hearted celebration of popular culture, the concept has had phenomenal success throughout the United Kingdom. Beneath the humour, however, are more complex and radical agendas relating to cultural rights. The paper explores the issues associated with the rise and possible wane of this museum-based popular cultural phenomenon.

  4. Fingerprinting using extrolite profiles and physiological data shows sub-specific groupings of Penicillium crustosum strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, Silva; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    by previous amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) study. We thus demonstrate here for the first time that combined qualitative and quantitative extrolite profiles can be used as a tool for phenotypic fingerprinting, to complement, or replace, molecular fingerprinting techniques....... water activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using micromorphological data, temperature- and water-dependent growth rates, and extrolite profiles obtained by HPLC analysis. The micromorphological data were less informative, while the growth-rate data were informative only...... if the strains investigated already showed slight adaptations to the selected external parameter. In contrast, PCA analyses of the extrolite data showed groupings of the strains according to their origins and known physiological differences. These groupings are in full agreement with the clustering obtained...

  5. Harmonic Analysis and Group Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Figa-Talamanca, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: Lectures - A. Auslander, R. Tolimeri - Nilpotent groups and abelian varieties, M Cowling - Unitary and uniformly bounded representations of some simple Lie groups, M. Duflo - Construction de representations unitaires d'un groupe de Lie, R. Howe - On a notion of rank for unitary representations of the classical groups, V.S. Varadarajan - Eigenfunction expansions of semisimple Lie groups, and R. Zimmer - Ergodic theory, group representations and rigidity; and, Seminars - A. Koranyi - Some applications of Gelfand pairs in classical analysis.

  6. Group analysis of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1982-01-01

    Group Analysis of Differential Equations provides a systematic exposition of the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras and its application to creating algorithms for solving the problems of the group analysis of differential equations.This text is organized into eight chapters. Chapters I to III describe the one-parameter group with its tangential field of vectors. The nonstandard treatment of the Banach Lie groups is reviewed in Chapter IV, including a discussion of the complete theory of Lie group transformations. Chapters V and VI cover the construction of partial solution classes for the g

  7. [Group cohesion: a concept analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jung; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2007-10-01

    Group cohesion is considered an essential condition for achieving a successful treatment team. High cohesion groups more readily reach their goals, with group members also feeling more secure about their functions and contributions. In clinical practice, nurses use group teaching and group therapy to help patient and family members gain knowledge and skills related to illness treatment and recuperation. Effective group leadership helps minimize non-productive time and manpower and enhance interpersonal interaction. A further advantage of group cohesion is that the more effective administration of nursing programs that results can raise the profession level of staffs and reduce turnover. Walker and Avant (1995) employ concept analysis to use defining attributes in order to apply the same definition and communication to the same profession. The purpose of this paper was to apply this methodology to an analysis of group cohesion. Steps used include a review of the literature on conceptual definitions of group cohesion, a determination of defining attributes, model construction, identification of borderline, contrary, and related cases, and identification of antecedents and consequences and empirical tools. It is hoped that this analysis can help nursing staff to gain a better understanding of the concept of group cohesion and to apply such to clinical practice and nursing administration.

  8. Common marmosets show social plasticity and group-level similarity in personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Sonja E; Burkart, Judith M

    2015-03-06

    The social environment influences animal personality on evolutionary and immediate time scales. However, studies of animal personality rarely assess the effects of the social environment, particularly in species that live in stable groups with individualized relationships. We assessed personality experimentally in 17 individuals of the common marmoset, living in four groups. We found their personality to be considerably modified by the social environment. Marmosets exhibited relatively high plasticity in their behaviour, and showed 'group-personality', i.e. group-level similarity in the personality traits. In exploratory behaviour this was maintained only in the social environment but not when individuals were tested alone, suggesting that exploration tendency is subjected to social facilitation. Boldness, in contrast, showed higher consistency across the social and solitary conditions, and the group-level similarity in trait scores was sustained also outside of the immediate social environment. The 'group-personality' was not due to genetic relatedness, supporting that it was produced by social effects. We hypothesize that 'group-personality' may be adaptive for highly cooperative animals through facilitating cooperation among individuals with similar behavioural tendency.

  9. Snacking on Television: A Content Analysis of Adolescents’ Favorite Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicole I.; Gollust, Sarah E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Snacking is a complex behavior that may be influenced by entertainment media. Research suggests that snacking and unhealthy foods are commonly shown in programming that targets young audiences, but shows selected for study have been limited. We conducted a content analysis on shows that were named as favorites by adolescents to characterize portrayals of snacking on popular television. Methods A diverse sample of 2,130 adolescents (mean age, 14.3 y) listed 3 favorite television shows in a 2010 school-based survey. Three episodes each of the 25 most popular shows were coded for food-related content, including healthfulness, portion size, screen time use, setting, and social context. We also analyzed the characteristics of characters involved in eating incidents, the show type, and the show rating. We used χ2 tests, binomial tests, and multilevel regression models to compare incidence of snacks versus meals, the characteristics of those involved, and snacking across show characteristics. Results Almost half of food incidents on television shows were snacks. Snacks were significantly more likely than meals to be “mostly unhealthy” (69.3% vs 22.6%, P Sitcoms and shows rated for a youth audience were significantly more likely to portray snacking than were shows for adult audiences. Conclusion Media awareness and literacy programs should include foods and snacking behaviors among the issues they address. More healthful portrayals of food and dietary intake in entertainment shows’ content would create a healthier media environment for youth. PMID:27197079

  10. Group adaptation, formal darwinism and contextual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, S; Paternotte, C

    2012-06-01

    We consider the question: under what circumstances can the concept of adaptation be applied to groups, rather than individuals? Gardner and Grafen (2009, J. Evol. Biol.22: 659-671) develop a novel approach to this question, building on Grafen's 'formal Darwinism' project, which defines adaptation in terms of links between evolutionary dynamics and optimization. They conclude that only clonal groups, and to a lesser extent groups in which reproductive competition is repressed, can be considered as adaptive units. We re-examine the conditions under which the selection-optimization links hold at the group level. We focus on an important distinction between two ways of understanding the links, which have different implications regarding group adaptationism. We show how the formal Darwinism approach can be reconciled with G.C. Williams' famous analysis of group adaptation, and we consider the relationships between group adaptation, the Price equation approach to multi-level selection, and the alternative approach based on contextual analysis.

  11. Polymorphism of CRISPR shows separated natural groupings of Shigella subtypes and evidence of horizontal transfer of CRISPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojie; Li, Peng; Su, Wenli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Guang; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Wang, Jian; Cui, Xianyan; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Jia, Leili; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) act as an adaptive RNA-mediated immune mechanism in bacteria. They can also be used for identification and evolutionary studies based on polymorphisms within the CRISPR locus. We amplified and analyzed 6 CRISPR loci from 237 Shigella strains belonging to the 4 species groups, as well as 13 Escherichia coli strains. The CRISPR-associated (cas) gene sequence arrays of these strains were screened and compared. The CRISPR sequences from Shigella were conserved among subtypes, suggesting that CRISPR may represent a new identification tool for the detection and discrimination of Shigella species. Secondary structure analysis showed a different stem-loop structure at the terminal repeat, suggesting a distinct recognition mechanism in the formation of crRNA. In addition, the presence of "self-target" spacers and polymorphisms within CRISPR in Shigella indicated a selective pressure for inhibition of this system, which has the potential to damage "self DNA." Homology analysis of spacers showed that CRISPR might be involved in the regulation of virulence transmission. Phylogenetic analysis based on CRISPR sequences from Shigella and E. coli indicated that although phenotypic properties maintain convergent evolution, the 4 Shigella species do not represent natural groupings. Surprisingly, comparative analysis of Shigella repeats with other species provided new evidence for CRISPR horizontal transfer. Our results suggested that CRISPR analysis is applicable for the detection of Shigella species and for investigation of evolutionary relationships.

  12. Polymorphism of CRISPR shows separated natural groupings of Shigella subtypes and evidence of horizontal transfer of CRISPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojie; Li, Peng; Su, Wenli; Li, Hao; Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Guang; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Wang, Jian; Cui, Xianyan; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Jia, Leili; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) act as an adaptive RNA-mediated immune mechanism in bacteria. They can also be used for identification and evolutionary studies based on polymorphisms within the CRISPR locus. We amplified and analyzed 6 CRISPR loci from 237 Shigella strains belonging to the 4 species groups, as well as 13 Escherichia coli strains. The CRISPR-associated (cas) gene sequence arrays of these strains were screened and compared. The CRISPR sequences from Shigella were conserved among subtypes, suggesting that CRISPR may represent a new identification tool for the detection and discrimination of Shigella species. Secondary structure analysis showed a different stem-loop structure at the terminal repeat, suggesting a distinct recognition mechanism in the formation of crRNA. In addition, the presence of “self-target” spacers and polymorphisms within CRISPR in Shigella indicated a selective pressure for inhibition of this system, which has the potential to damage “self DNA.” Homology analysis of spacers showed that CRISPR might be involved in the regulation of virulence transmission. Phylogenetic analysis based on CRISPR sequences from Shigella and E. coli indicated that although phenotypic properties maintain convergent evolution, the 4 Shigella species do not represent natural groupings. Surprisingly, comparative analysis of Shigella repeats with other species provided new evidence for CRISPR horizontal transfer. Our results suggested that CRISPR analysis is applicable for the detection of Shigella species and for investigation of evolutionary relationships. PMID:26327282

  13. Control groups in paediatric epilepsy research: do first-degree cousins show familial effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Melissa; Morrison, Blaise; Jones, Jana E; Jackson, Daren C; Almane, Dace; Seidenberg, Michael; Zhao, Qianqian; Rathouz, Paul J; Hermann, Bruce P

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether first-degree cousins of children with idiopathic focal and genetic generalized epilepsies show any association across measures of cognition, behaviour, and brain structure. The presence/absence of associations addresses the question of whether and to what extent first-degree cousins may serve as unbiased controls in research addressing the cognitive, psychiatric, and neuroimaging features of paediatric epilepsies. Participants were children (aged 8-18) with epilepsy who had at least one first-degree cousin control enrolled in the study (n=37) and all enrolled cousin controls (n=100). Participants underwent neuropsychological assessment and brain imaging (cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar volumes), and parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Data (based on 42 outcome measures) from cousin controls were regressed on the corresponding epilepsy cognitive, behavioural, and imaging measures in a linear mixed model and case/control correlations were examined. Of the 42 uncorrected correlations involving cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging measures, only two were significant (p0.25). Similar results held for the cognition/behaviour and brain imaging measures separately. Given the lack of association between cases and first-degree cousin performances on measures of cognition, behaviour, and neuroimaging, the results suggest a non-significant genetic influence on control group performance. First-degree cousins appear to be unbiased controls for cognitive, behavioural, and neuroimaging research in paediatric epilepsy.

  14. Scalable group level probabilistic sparse factor analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrich, Jesper Løve; Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Riis, Nicolai Andre Brogaard

    2017-01-01

    Many data-driven approaches exist to extract neural representations of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, but most of them lack a proper probabilistic formulation. We propose a scalable group level probabilistic sparse factor analysis (psFA) allowing spatially sparse maps, component...... pruning using automatic relevance determination (ARD) and subject specific heteroscedastic spatial noise modeling. For task-based and resting state fMRI, we show that the sparsity constraint gives rise to components similar to those obtained by group independent component analysis. The noise modeling...... shows that noise is reduced in areas typically associated with activation by the experimental design. The psFA model identifies sparse components and the probabilistic setting provides a natural way to handle parameter uncertainties. The variational Bayesian framework easily extends to more complex...

  15. Advertising Discourse Analysis of FES stores: Killing Love, Cowards Show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Venegas Ahumada

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to analyze the structural and photographic discourse of the Autumn-Winter campaign 2008 of FES stores for young people. This was done by a semiotic theory and a critical-structural methodology of discourse. An analysis of 4 advertising photographs was done, and at once an analysis of the discourse “FES says no to violence against Women”, which explains the campaign’s target. The result is: The discourse was subjected to production condition (society of control and makes advertising a way to homogenize subjectivity of masses to consume. Recognition conditions demonstrate that this advertising discourse of symbolic violence means a type of violation of Men and Women Rights. An action like this requires commitment of Psychology in order to promote the social humanizing change, by means of university teaching and professional tasks.

  16. Authenticity and TV Shows: A Multidimensional Analysis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Surmi, Mansoor

    2012-01-01

    Television shows, especially soap operas and sitcoms, are usually considered by English as a second language practitioners as a source of authentic spoken conversational materials presumably because they reflect the linguistic features of natural conversation. However, practitioners are faced with the dilemma of how to assess whether such…

  17. Disturbance gradient shows logging affects plant functional groups more than fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, David P; McBurney, Lachlan M; Blanchard, Wade; Banks, Sam C; Lindenmayer, David B

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the impacts of natural and human disturbances on forest biota is critical for improving forest management. Many studies have examined the separate impacts on fauna and flora of wildfire, conventional logging, and salvage logging, but empirical comparisons across a broad gradient of simultaneous disturbances are lacking. We quantified species richness and frequency of occurrence of vascular plants, and functional group responses, across a gradient of disturbances that occurred concurrently in 2009 in the mountain ash forests of southeastern Australia. Our study encompassed replicated sites in undisturbed forest (~70 yr post fire), forest burned at low severity, forest burned at high severity, unburned forest that was clearcut logged, and forest burned at high severity that was clearcut salvage logged post-fire. All sites were sampled 2 and 3 yr post fire. Mean species richness decreased across the disturbance gradient from 30.1 species/site on low-severity burned sites and 28.9 species/site on high-severity burned sites, to 25.1 species/site on clearcut sites and 21.7 species/site on salvage logged sites. Low-severity burned sites were significantly more species-rich than clearcut sites and salvage logged sites; high-severity burned sites supported greater species richness than salvage logged sites. Specific traits influenced species' sensitivity to disturbance. Resprouting species dominated undisturbed mountain ash forests, but declined significantly across the gradient. Fern and midstory trees decreased significantly in frequency of occurrence across the gradient. Ferns (excluding bracken) decreased from 34% of plants in undisturbed forest to 3% on salvage logged sites. High-severity burned sites supported a greater frequency of occurrence and species richness of midstory trees compared to clearcut and salvage logged sites. Salvage logging supported fewer midstory trees than any other disturbance category, and were distinctly different from

  18. Renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leslie M.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to understand and extend a recent theory of turbulence based on dynamic renormalization group (RNG) techniques. The application of RNG methods to hydrodynamic turbulence was explored most extensively by Yakhot and Orszag (1986). An eddy viscosity was calculated which was consistent with the Kolmogorov inertial range by systematic elimination of the small scales in the flow. Further, assumed smallness of the nonlinear terms in the redefined equations for the large scales results in predictions for important flow constants such as the Kolmogorov constant. It is emphasized that no adjustable parameters are needed. The parameterization of the small scales in a self-consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling.

  19. Group theory analysis of braided geometry structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wei; MA Wensuo

    2005-01-01

    The braided geometry structures are analyzed with point groups and space groups for which the continuous yarn of the braided preforms is segmented and expressed in some special symbols. All structures of braided material are described and classified with group theory, and new braiding methods are found. The group theory analysis lays the theoretical foundation for optimizing material performance.

  20. Compact Groups analysis using weak gravitational lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalela, Martín; Johana Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Foëx, Gael

    2017-01-01

    We present a weak lensing analysis of a sample of SDSS Compact Groups (CGs). Using the measured radial density contrast profile, we derive the average masses under the assumption of spherical symmetry, obtaining a velocity dispersion for the Singular Isothermal Spherical model, σV = 270 ± 40 km s-1, and for the NFW model, R_{200}=0.53± 0.10 h_{70}^{-1}Mpc. We test three different definitions of CGs centres to identify which best traces the true dark matter halo centre, concluding that a luminosity weighted centre is the most suitable choice. We also study the lensing signal dependence on CGs physical radius, group surface brightness, and morphological mixing. We find that groups with more concentrated galaxy members show steeper mass profiles and larger velocity dispersions. We argue that both, a possible lower fraction of interloper and a true steeper profile, could be playing a role in this effect. Straightforward velocity dispersion estimates from member spectroscopy yields σV ≈ 230 km s-1 in agreement with our lensing results.

  1. Analysis of roles and groups in blogosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Gliwa, Bogdan; Zygmunt, Anna; Koźlak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    In the paper different roles of users in social media, taking into consideration their strength of influence and different degrees of cooperativeness, are introduced. Such identified roles are used for the analysis of characteristics of groups of strongly connected entities. The different classes of groups, considering the distribution of roles of users belonging to them, are presented and discussed.

  2. Dimensional analysis and group theory in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Dimensional Analysis and Group Theory in Astrophysics describes how dimensional analysis, refined by mathematical regularity hypotheses, can be applied to purely qualitative physical assumptions. The book focuses on the continuous spectral of the stars and the mass-luminosity relationship. The text discusses the technique of dimensional analysis, covering both relativistic phenomena and the stellar systems. The book also explains the fundamental conclusion of dimensional analysis, wherein the unknown functions shall be given certain specified forms. The Wien and Stefan-Boltzmann Laws can be si

  3. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from the United Kingdom shows two genetically distinct clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAuliffe, Laura; Kokotovic, Branko; Ayling, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is an important veterinary pathogen causing pneumonia, arthritis, and mastitis in infected cattle. We investigated the genetic diversity of 53 isolates collected in the United Kingdom between 1996 and 2002 with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment length...... polymorphism (AFLP), and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. In addition, the influence of variable surface protein (Vsp) profiles on the profiles generated with molecular typing techniques was studied. Both AFLP and RAPD separated the isolates into two distinct groups, but PFGE showed less...

  4. The Control Group and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Hunter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Social scientists use a mixture of different methodologies, which creates problems for researchers attempting to review the cumulative results of all studies.  Standard practice for review studies using meta-analysis is to adjust the findings of all studies that use control groups and to include studies not having control groups without adjustment for extraneous effects, or to not use studies that lack a control group, which could produce an erroneous result.  Our study develops a novel meta-analytic procedure that combines the evidence on control group change with evidence on change from the intervention, making it possible to adjust for the effects of extraneous factors in all studies and bridges the gap between control group studies and other types of studies. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v5i1.18302

  5. Process Analysis of the CV Group's Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmsson, M

    2000-01-01

    This report will give an explanation of the internal reorganization that has been done because of the necessity to optimize operation in the cooling and ventilation group. The basic structure for the group was defined at the end of 1998. We understood then that change was needed to accommodate the increased workload due to the LHC project. In addition, we face a relatively large turnover of personnel (retirements and some recruitment) with related integration issues to consider. We would also like to implement new approaches in the management of both operations and maintenance. After some running-in problems during the first half of 1999, we realized that much more could be gained with the analysis and the definition and documenting of each single function and generic activity within the group. The authors will explain how this analysis was carried out and give some feedback of the outcome, so far.

  6. Harmonic analysis on exponential solvable Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first one that brings together recent results on the harmonic analysis of exponential solvable Lie groups. There still are many interesting open problems, and the book contributes to the future progress of this research field. As well, various related topics are presented to motivate young researchers. The orbit method invented by Kirillov is applied to study basic problems in the analysis on exponential solvable Lie groups. This method tells us that the unitary dual of these groups is realized as the space of their coadjoint orbits. This fact is established using the Mackey theory for induced representations, and that mechanism is explained first. One of the fundamental problems in the representation theory is the irreducible decomposition of induced or restricted representations. Therefore, these decompositions are studied in detail before proceeding to various related problems: the multiplicity formula, Plancherel formulas, intertwining operators, Frobenius reciprocity, and associated alge...

  7. Understanding Groups in Outdoor Adventure Education through Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostad, Jeremy; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Relationships are a critical component to the experience of an outdoor adventure education (OAE) program, therefore, more fruitful ways of investigating groups is needed. Social network analysis (SNA) is an effective tool to study the relationship structure of small groups. This paper provides an explanation of SNA and shows how it was used by the…

  8. Tl(+) showed negligible interaction with inner membrane sulfhydryl groups of rat liver mitochondria, but formed complexes with matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Kormilitsyn, Boris N; Furaev, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    The effects of Tl(+) on protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups, swelling, and respiration of rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were studied in a medium containing TlNO3 and sucrose, or TlNO3 and KNO3 as well as glutamate plus malate, or succinate plus rotenone. Detected with Ellman's reagent, an increase in the content of the SH groups was found in the inner membrane fraction, and a simultaneous decline was found in the content of the matrix-soluble fraction for RLM, incubated and frozen in 25-75 mM TlNO3 . This increase was greater in the medium containing KNO3 regardless of the presence of Ca(2+) . It was eliminated completely for RLM injected in the medium containing TlNO3 and then washed and frozen in the medium containing KNO3 . Calcium-loaded RLM showed increased swelling and decreased respiration. These results suggest that a ligand interaction of Tl(+) with protein SH groups, regardless of the presence of calcium, may underlie the mechanism of thallium toxicity.

  9. Internet cancer support groups: a feminist analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2005-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method.

  10. Proteome Analysis of the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Monilinia laxa Showing Host Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olja Bregar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown rot fungus Monilinia laxa (Aderh. & Ruhl. Honey is an important plant pathogen in stone and pome fruits in Europe. We applied a proteomic approach in a study of M. laxa isolates obtained from apples and apricots in order to show the host specifity of the isolates and to analyse differentially expressed proteins in terms of host specifity, fungal pathogenicity and identification of candidate proteins for diagnostic marker development. Extracted mycelium proteins were separated by 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE and visualized by Coomassie staining in a non-linear pH range of 3–11 and Mr of 14–116 kDa. We set up a 2-DE reference map of M. laxa, resolving up to 800 protein spots, and used it for image analysis. The average technical coefficient of variance (13 % demonstrated a high reproducibility of protein extraction and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE PAGE, and the average biological coefficient of variance (23 % enabled differential proteomic analysis of the isolates. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis discriminated isolates from two different hosts, providing new data that support the existence of a M. laxa specialized form f. sp. mali, which infects only apples. A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins were further analyzed by LC-MS/MS, yielding 41 positive identifications. The identified mycelial proteins were functionally classified into 6 groups: amino acid and protein metabolism, energy production, carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, fatty acid metabolism and other proteins. Some proteins expressed only in apple isolates have been described as virulence factors in other fungi. The acetolactate synthase was almost 11-fold more abundant in apple-specific isolates than in apricot isolates and it might be implicated in M. laxa host specificity. Ten proteins identified only in apple isolates are potential candidates for the development of M. laxa host-specific diagnostic markers.

  11. Replications of Two Closely Related Groups of Jumbo Phages Show Different Level of Dependence on Host-encoded RNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeru; Yoshikawa, Genki; Mihara, Tomoko; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakano, Miyako; Fujie, Makoto; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum phages ΦRP12 and ΦRP31 are jumbo phages isolated in Thailand. Here we show that they exhibit similar virion morphology, genome organization and host range. Genome comparisons as well as phylogenetic and proteomic tree analyses support that they belong to the group of ΦKZ-related phages, with their closest relatives being R. solanacearum phages ΦRSL2 and ΦRSF1. Compared with ΦRSL2 and ΦRSF1, ΦRP12 and ΦRP31 possess larger genomes (ca. 280 kbp, 25% larger). The replication of ΦRP12 and ΦRP31 was not affected by rifampicin treatment (20 μg/ml), suggesting that phage-encoded RNAPs function to start and complete the infection cycle of these phages without the need of host-encoded RNAPs. In contrast, ΦRSL2 and ΦRSF1, encoding the same set of RNAPs, did not produce progeny phages in the presence of rifampicin (5 μg/ml). This observation opens the possibility that some ΦRP12/ΦRP31 factors that are absent in ΦRSL2 and ΦRSF1 are involved in their host-independent transcription. PMID:28659872

  12. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  13. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  14. Action of glycosyl transferases upon "Bombay" (Oh) erythrocytes. Conversion to cells showing blood-group H and A specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel-Brunner, H; Prohaska, R; Tuppy, H

    1975-08-15

    Individuals of the rare "Bombay" (Oh) blood-group phenotype lacking, due to a genetic defect, the alpha(1-2)fucosyl transferase, which is responsible for converting blood-group H precursor substances to H-specific structures. Treatment with GDP-fucose and alpha(1-2)fucosyl transferase prepared from gastric mucosa of O individuals to transform native or ficin-treated "Bombay" erythrocytes into cells phenotypically resembling O cells. The transformation was achieved, however, after prior incubation of the "Bombay" erythrocytes with neuraminidase, indicating that blood-group H precursor molecules on the surface of these cells are masked by sialyl residues. Blood-group A specificity was conferred upon neuraminidase-treated "Bombay" cells by enzymatic transfer of alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine residues, in addition to alpha-fucose residues.

  15. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  16. 41 CFR 60-2.12 - Job group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Job group analysis. 60-2... group analysis. (a) Purpose: A job group analysis is a method of combining job titles within the... employed. (b) In the job group analysis, jobs at the establishment with similar content, wage rates,...

  17. Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Puppet Shows on Attitudes toward and Knowledge of Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from a meta-analysis of 26 studies investigating the effects of either the "Kids on the Block" or "Count Me In" puppet shows on changes in elementary students' attitudes toward and knowledge of individuals with disabilities are reported. The studies included 5,302 intervention group participants and 2,642…

  18. A test of the intergenerational conflict model in Indonesia shows no evidence of earlier menopause in female-dispersing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopkowski, Kristin; Moya, Cristina; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-08-07

    Menopause remains an evolutionary puzzle, as humans are unique among primates in having a long post-fertile lifespan. One model proposes that intergenerational conflict in patrilocal populations favours female reproductive cessation. This model predicts that women should experience menopause earlier in groups with an evolutionary history of patrilocality compared with matrilocal groups. Using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test this model at multiple timescales: deep historical time, comparing age at menopause in ancestrally patrilocal Chinese Indonesians with ancestrally matrilocal Austronesian Indonesians; more recent historical time, comparing age at menopause in ethnic groups with differing postmarital residence within Indonesia and finally, analysing age at menopause at an individual-level, assuming a woman facultatively adjusts her age at menopause based on her postmarital residence. We find a significant effect only at the intermediate timescale where, contrary to predictions, ethnic groups with a history of multilocal postnuptial residence (where couples choose where to live) have the slowest progression to menopause, whereas matrilocal and patrilocal ethnic groups have similar progression rates. Multilocal residence may reduce intergenerational conflicts between women, thus influencing reproductive behaviour, but our results provide no support for the female-dispersal model of intergenerational conflict as an explanation of menopause.

  19. A test of the intergenerational conflict model in Indonesia shows no evidence of earlier menopause in female-dispersing groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopkowski, Kristin; Moya, Cristina; Sear, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Menopause remains an evolutionary puzzle, as humans are unique among primates in having a long post-fertile lifespan. One model proposes that intergenerational conflict in patrilocal populations favours female reproductive cessation. This model predicts that women should experience menopause earlier in groups with an evolutionary history of patrilocality compared with matrilocal groups. Using data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test this model at multiple timescales: deep historical time, comparing age at menopause in ancestrally patrilocal Chinese Indonesians with ancestrally matrilocal Austronesian Indonesians; more recent historical time, comparing age at menopause in ethnic groups with differing postmarital residence within Indonesia and finally, analysing age at menopause at an individual-level, assuming a woman facultatively adjusts her age at menopause based on her postmarital residence. We find a significant effect only at the intermediate timescale where, contrary to predictions, ethnic groups with a history of multilocal postnuptial residence (where couples choose where to live) have the slowest progression to menopause, whereas matrilocal and patrilocal ethnic groups have similar progression rates. Multilocal residence may reduce intergenerational conflicts between women, thus influencing reproductive behaviour, but our results provide no support for the female-dispersal model of intergenerational conflict as an explanation of menopause. PMID:24966311

  20. Group Counseling with United States Racial Minority Groups: A 25-Year Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Rose, Rose M.; Livingston-Sacin, Tina M.; Merchant, Niloufer; Finley, Amanda C.

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year content analysis was conducted of published group work articles that focused on 5 racial groups (African American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Latino/a, Native American, and Intercultural group). Articles were included if they described an intervention or conceptual model with 1 of the racial groups. The analysis revealed 15 content…

  1. Group Counseling with United States Racial Minority Groups: A 25-Year Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Rose, Rose M.; Livingston-Sacin, Tina M.; Merchant, Niloufer; Finley, Amanda C.

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year content analysis was conducted of published group work articles that focused on 5 racial groups (African American, Asian American/Pacific Islander, Latino/a, Native American, and Intercultural group). Articles were included if they described an intervention or conceptual model with 1 of the racial groups. The analysis revealed 15 content…

  2. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  3. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  4. Record of two species of Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) new for Madagascar and molecular study showing the paraphylies of the subgenus Oecacta and the Schultzei group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augot, D; Randrianambinintsoa, F J; Gasser, A; Depaquit, J

    2013-08-01

    Culicoides are vectors of diseases of Veterinary Medicine importance (bluetongue, African horse sickness, Schmallenberg virus) all over the world. In the present study, we report two species new for Madagascar: C. nevilli and C. enderleini. They belong to the Schultzei group which is sometimes classified in the subgenus Oecacta and sometimes in the subgenus Remmia, depending on authors. Consequently, we carried out a molecular cladistics of these groups based on cytochrome C oxidase subunit I mtDNA sequences. We processed the Malagasy specimens and some C. furens (the Oecacta type-species) caught in Florida and we analyzed their sequences and those available in Genbank: C. schultzei, C. oxystoma, C. festivipennis, C. brunnicans, C. kibunensis, C. truncorum and C. vexans. C. (Avaritia) imicola have been selected as an outgroup. The maximum parsimony analysis showed the paraphylies of the Schultzei group (=Remmia) and of the subgenus Oecacta if the first group is excluded from the latter. Our results underline the doubtful current classification and need to be validated by other molecular markers in the future.

  5. Three applications of functional analysis with group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharwächter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Case illustrations from group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy are presented to demonstrate three applications of functional analysis and the resulting cognitive behavioral interventions. The principles of group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy are explained. A functional analysis is applied first to the problem behavior of an individual group member. A clinical case illustrates how the group members help to change this individual group member's behavior from a learning theory perspective. Next, the circular interactional problem behavior between two group members is reduced to the individual functional analysis of each of the two member's problem behaviors. It is then illustrated how the two group member's problem behaviors, as well as feedback from others, contribute toward helping to change each others behavior. The paper concludes that functional analysis and ensuing behavioral interventions can be also applied to group as a whole behavior.

  6. Expert group formation using facility location analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neshati, Mahmood; Beigy, Hamid; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an optimization framework to retrieve an optimal group of experts to perform a multi-aspect task. While a diverse set of skills are needed to perform a multi-aspect task, the group of assigned experts should be able to collectively cover all these required skills. We consid

  7. Analysis of transference in Gestalt group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, J E

    1990-04-01

    In Gestalt therapy, transference is viewed as a contact boundary disturbance which impairs the patient's ability to accurately perceive the present therapy situation. The boundary disturbances in Gestalt therapy most closely related to the analytic notion of transference are projection, introjection, and confluence. In Gestalt group psychotherapy, group members interfere with the process of need identification and satisfaction by distorting their contact with each other through projecting, introjecting, and being confluent. The Gestalt group therapist uses interventions directed to individuals and to the group to increase participants' awareness of these boundary disturbances and of the present contact opportunities available to them when these disturbances are resolved. In formulating interventions, the leader is mindful of the function of boundary disturbances to the group-as-a-whole as well as to individuals.

  8. A distinct group of CpG islands shows differential DNA methylation between replicas of the same cell line in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Sergio; Scala, Giovanni; Miele, Gennaro; Castaldo, Imma; Monticelli, Antonella

    2013-10-10

    CpG dinucleotide-rich genomic DNA regions, known as CpG islands (CGIs), can be methylated at their cytosine residues as an epigenetic mark that is stably inherited during cell mitosis. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are genomic regions showing different degrees of DNA methylation in multiple samples. In this study, we focused our attention on CGIs showing different DNA methylation between two culture replicas of the same cell line. We used methylation data of 35 cell lines from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) consortium to identify CpG islands that were differentially methylated between replicas of the same cell line and denoted them Inter Replicas Differentially Methylated CpG islands (IRDM-CGIs). We identified a group of IRDM-CGIs that was consistently shared by different cell lines, and denoted it common IRDM-CGIs. X chromosome CGIs were overrepresented among common IRDM-CGIs. Autosomal IRDM-CGIs were preferentially located in gene bodies and intergenic regions had a lower G + C content, a smaller mean length, and a reduced CpG percentage. Functional analysis of the genes associated with autosomal IRDM-CGIs showed that many of them are involved in DNA binding and development. Our results show that several specific functional and structural features characterize common IRDM-CGIs. They may represent a specific subset of CGIs that are more prone to being differentially methylated for their intrinsic characteristics.

  9. Where intersubjectivity and group analysis meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Intersubjectivity can be defined as the union or contact of the subjectivities (Gordon, 1991). In therapy, it refers to the interaction between therapist and patient, and the processes that affect and are affected by that interaction. The essence of these interactions in the setting of group therapy, the obstacles that may arise because of them, and ways in which the therapist may identify and facilitate intersubjectivity in order to promote discourse that will enrich the sessions are discussed. I briefly touch upon earlier theories of psychoanalysis, demonstrating how changes in approaches influenced perceptions of what occurs in therapy. The unique place of intersubjectivity within the group analytic setting is emphasized using several vignettes from sessions I have led as a group analyst candidate to better illustrate how intersubjectivity can be observed in vivo.

  10. Exclusively Visual Analysis of Classroom Group Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data…

  11. HOLOMORPHIC HARMONIC ANALYSIS ON COMPLEX REDUCTIVE GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Jinpeng; Qian Min; Wang Zhengdong

    2008-01-01

    The authors define the holomorphic Fourier transform of holomorphic func-tions on complex reductive groups, prove some properties such as the Fourier inversion formula, and give some applications. The definition of the holomorphic Fourier transform makes use of the notion of K-admissible measures. The authors prove that K-admissible measures are abundant, and the definition of holomorphic Fourier transform is independent of the choice of K-admissible measures.

  12. Likelihood Analysis of the Local Group Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Schmoldt, I M; Teodoro, L; Efstathiou, G P; Frenk, C S; Keeble, O; Maddox, S J; Oliver, S; Rowan-Robinson, M; Saunders, W J; Sutherland, W; Tadros, H; White, S D M

    1999-01-01

    We compute the acceleration on the Local Group using 11206 IRAS galaxies from the recently completed all-sky PSCz redshift survey. Measuring the acceleration vector in redshift space generates systematic uncertainties due to the redshift space distortions in the density field. We therefore assign galaxies to their real space positions by adopting a non-parametric model for the velocity field that solely relies on the linear gravitational instability and linear biasing hypotheses. Remaining systematic contributions to the measured acceleration vector are corrected for by using PSCz mock catalogues from N-body experiments. The resulting acceleration vector points approx. 15 degrees away from the CMB dipole apex, with a remarkable alignment between small and large scale contributions. A considerable fraction of the measured acceleration is generated within 40 h-1 Mpc with a non-negligible contribution from scales between 90 and 140 h-1 Mpc after which the acceleration amplitude seems to have converged. The local...

  13. Development of renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The renormalization group (RG) procedure for nonlinear, dissipative systems is now quite standard, and its applications to the problem of hydrodynamic turbulence are becoming well known. In summary, the RG method isolates self similar behavior and provides a systematic procedure to describe scale invariant dynamics in terms of large scale variables only. The parameterization of the small scales in a self consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling. This paper develops the homogeneous, isotropic turbulence and addresses the meaning and consequence of epsilon-expansion. The theory is then extended to include a weak mean flow and application of the RG method to a sequence of models is shown to converge to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Development of renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The renormalization group (RG) procedure for nonlinear, dissipative systems is now quite standard, and its applications to the problem of hydrodynamic turbulence are becoming well known. In summary, the RG method isolates self similar behavior and provides a systematic procedure to describe scale invariant dynamics in terms of large scale variables only. The parameterization of the small scales in a self consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling. This paper develops the homogeneous, isotropic turbulence and addresses the meaning and consequence of epsilon-expansion. The theory is then extended to include a weak mean flow and application of the RG method to a sequence of models is shown to converge to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Mathematical Analysis of Piaget's Grouping Concept. Papy's Minicomputer as a Grouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Through a mathematical analysis, Piaget's grouping concept can be formally interpreted as being a hybrid between the mathematical concepts of a group and a lattice. Some relevant pedagogical models are presented. Activities with Cuisenaire Rods, Dienes Blocks, and Papy's Minicomputer are shown to take place in groupings. (LS)

  16. Analysis of competition performance in dressage and show jumping of Dutch Warmblood horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, G; Ducro, B J; van Arendonk, J A M; Norberg, E; Madsen, P

    2016-12-01

    Most Warmblood horse studbooks aim to improve the performance in dressage and show jumping. The Dutch Royal Warmblood Studbook (KWPN) includes the highest score achieved in competition by a horse to evaluate its genetic ability of performance. However, the records collected during competition are associated with some aspects that might affect the quality of the genetic evaluation based on these records. These aspects include the influence of rider, censoring and preselection of the data. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of rider effect, censoring and preselection on the genetic analysis of competition data of dressage and show jumping of KWPN. Different models including rider effect were evaluated. To assess the impact of censoring, genetic parameters were estimated in data sets that differed in the degree of censoring. The effect of preselection on variance components was analysed by defining a binary trait (sport-status) depending on whether the horse has a competition record or not. This trait was included in a bivariate model with the competition trait and used all horses registered by KWPN since 1984. Results showed that performance in competition for dressage and show jumping is a heritable trait (h(2) ~ 0.11-0.13) and that it is important to account for the effect of rider in the genetic analysis. Censoring had a small effect on the genetic parameter for highest performance achieved by the horse. A moderate heritability obtained for sport-status indicates that preselection has a genetic basis, but the effect on genetic parameters was relatively small.

  17. Uncertainty Analysis of Method-Based Operating Event Groups Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Šimić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Safe operation and industrial improvements are coming from the technology development and operational experience (OE feedback. A long life span for many industrial facilities makes OE very important. Proper assessment and understanding of OE remains a challenge because of organization system relations, complexity, and number of OE events acquired. One way to improve OE events understanding is to focus their investigation and analyze in detail the most important. The OE ranking method is developed to select the most important events based on the basic event parameters and the analytical hierarchy process applied at the level of event groups. This paper investigates further how uncertainty in the model affects ranking results. An analysis was performed on the set of the two databases from the 20 years of nuclear power plants in France and Germany. From all uncertainties the presented analysis selected ranking indexes as the most relevant for consideration. Here the presented analysis of uncertainty clearly shows that considering uncertainty is important for all results, especially for event groups ranked closely and next to the most important one. Together with the previously performed sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment provides additional insights and a better judgment of the event groups’ importance in further detailed investigation.

  18. Network Analysis Shows Novel Molecular Mechanisms of Action for Copper-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms associated with the action of chemotherapeutic agents is fundamental to assess and account for possible side-effects of such treatments. Casiopeínas have demonstrated a cytotoxic effect by activation of pro-apoptotic processes in malignant cells. Such processes have been proved to activate the apoptotic intrinsic route, as well as cell cycle arrest. Despite this knowledge, the whole mechanism of action of Casiopeínas is yet to be completely understood. In this work we implement a systems biology approach based on two pathway analysis tools (Over-Representation Analysis and Causal Network Analysis) to observe changes in some hallmarks of cancer, induced by this copper-based chemotherapeutic agent in HeLa cell lines. We find that the metabolism of metal ions is exacerbated, as well as cell division processes being globally diminished. We also show that cellular migration and proliferation events are decreased. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms of liver protection are increased in the cell cultures under the actions of Casiopeínas, unlike the case in many other cytotoxic drugs. We argue that this chemotherapeutic agent may be promising, given its protective hepatic function, concomitant with its cytotoxic participation in the onset of apoptotic processes in malignant cells. PMID:26793116

  19. Renormalization group analysis of graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    We develop a field theoretical approach to massless Dirac fermions in a supercritical Coulomb potential. By introducing an Aharonov-Bohm solenoid at the potential center, the critical Coulomb charge can be made arbitrarily small for one partial wave sector, where a perturbative renormalization group analysis becomes possible. We show that a scattering amplitude for reflection of particle at the potential center exhibits the renormalization group limit cycle, i.e., log-periodic revolutions as a function of the scattering energy, revealing the emergence of discrete scale invariance. This outcome is further incorporated in computing the induced charge and current densities, which turn out to have power law tails with coefficients log-periodic with respect to the distance from the potential center. Our findings are consistent with the previous prediction obtained by directly solving the Dirac equation and can in principle be realized by graphene experiments with charged impurities.

  20. Renormalization group analysis of graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yusuke

    2016-08-01

    We develop a field-theoretic approach to massless Dirac fermions in a supercritical Coulomb potential. By introducing an Aharonov-Bohm solenoid at the potential center, the critical Coulomb charge can be made arbitrarily small for one partial-wave sector, where a perturbative renormalization group analysis becomes possible. We show that a scattering amplitude for reflection of particle at the potential center exhibits the renormalization group limit cycle, i.e., log-periodic revolutions as a function of the scattering energy, revealing the emergence of discrete scale invariance. This outcome is further incorporated in computing the induced charge and current densities, which turn out to have power-law tails with coefficients log-periodic with respect to the distance from the potential center. Our findings are consistent with the previous prediction obtained by directly solving the Dirac equation and can in principle be realized by graphene experiments with charged impurities.

  1. Analysis of allergen immunotherapy studies shows increased clinical efficacy in highly symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howarth, P; Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Molimard, M;

    2011-01-01

    To cite this article: Howarth P, Malling H-J, Molimard M, Devillier P. Analysis of allergen immunotherapy studies shows increased clinical efficacy in highly symptomatic patients. Allergy 2012; 67: 321-327. ABSTRACT: Background:  The assessment of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) efficacy...... in the treatment for seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SAR) symptoms is challenging. Allergen immunotherapy differs from symptomatic therapy in that while symptomatic therapy treats patients after symptoms appear and aims to reduce symptoms, AIT is administered before symptoms are present and aims to prevent...... them. Thus, clinical studies of AIT can neither establish baseline symptom levels nor limit the enrolment of patients to those with the most severe symptoms. Allergen immunotherapy treatment effects are therefore diluted by patients with low symptoms for a particular pollen season. The objective...

  2. Proteomic analysis shows synthetic oleanane triterpenoid binds to mTOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Yore

    Full Text Available New multifunctional drugs that target multiple disease-relevant networks offer a novel approach to the prevention and treatment of many diseases. New synthetic oleanane triterpenoids (SO, such as CDDO (2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oic acid and its derivatives, are multifunctional compounds originally developed for the prevention and treatment of inflammation and oxidative stress. However, the protein binding partners and mechanisms of action of these SO are not yet fully understood. Here we characterize the putative target profile of one SO, CDDO-Imidazolide (CDDO-Im, by combining affinity purification with mass spectroscopic proteomic analysis to identify 577 candidate binding proteins in whole cells. This SO pharmaco-interactome consists of a diverse but interconnected set of signaling networks; bioinformatic analysis of the protein interactome identified canonical signaling pathways targeted by the SO, including retinoic acid receptor (RAR, estrogen receptor (ER, insulin receptor (IR, janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN. Pull-down studies then further validated a subset of the putative targets. In addition, we now show for the first time that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a direct target of CDDO-Im. We also show that CDDO-Im blocks insulin-induced activation of this pathway by binding to mTOR and inhibiting its kinase activity. Our basic studies confirm that the SO, CDDO-Im, acts on a protein network to elicit its pharmacological activity.

  3. Dental microwear texture analysis shows within-species diet variability in fossil hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert S; Ungar, Peter S; Bergstrom, Torbjorn S; Brown, Christopher A; Grine, Frederick E; Teaford, Mark F; Walker, Alan

    2005-08-04

    Reconstructing the diets of extinct hominins is essential to understanding the paleobiology and evolutionary history of our lineage. Dental microwear, the study of microscopic tooth-wear resulting from use, provides direct evidence of what an individual ate in the past. Unfortunately, established methods of studying microwear are plagued with low repeatability and high observer error. Here we apply an objective, repeatable approach for studying three-dimensional microwear surface texture to extinct South African hominins. Scanning confocal microscopy together with scale-sensitive fractal analysis are used to characterize the complexity and anisotropy of microwear. Results for living primates show that this approach can distinguish among diets characterized by different fracture properties. When applied to hominins, microwear texture analysis indicates that Australopithecus africanus microwear is more anisotropic, but also more variable in anisotropy than Paranthropus robustus. This latter species has more complex microwear textures, but is also more variable in complexity than A. africanus. This suggests that A. africanus ate more tough foods and P. robustus consumed more hard and brittle items, but that both had variable and overlapping diets.

  4. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF GROWTH OF RICE VARIETY BY GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruyako V. N.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High growth-rate of plantlet is the integral index of intensity of physiological processes at rice and other cultures. 20 typical plantlets from each of two variants were studded (in the distilled water in thermostat at a temperature 29° C by: length of embryonic root and coleoptile. Comparative analysis of trait characterizing the growth rates of rice varieties showed reliable advantage of Russian ones above the Italian and Chinese. Local varieties, regionalized until the year 2000, exceed new ones on this trait. Highest growth rates were characterized by medium grain samples. The white grain and red grain varieties are excelled other groups on the height of plantlet. Analysis rates of height of plantlets in the distinguished groups showed the necessity of prosecution of improvement of the above enumerated signs at the varieties of late term of ripening, long grain, with Waxy gene, colored grain. We recommend to sow this type of varieties on fields with good leveling, because of low speed of growth

  5. HIV-1 phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; McGrath, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that (1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, (2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and (3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Patient Presentations at the Sydney (Australia) Royal Easter Show from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Nathan; Mo, Shirley; Ong, Leon; Jegathees, Thuvarahan; Wei, Daniel; Fahey, David; Liu, Jia Jenny

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Comprehensive studies on the relationship between patient demographics and subsequent treatment and disposition at a single mass-gathering event are lacking. The Sydney Royal Easter Show (SRES; Sydney Olympic Park, New South Wales, Australia) is an annual, 14-day, agricultural mass-gathering event occurring around the Easter weekend, attracting more than 800,000 patrons per year. In this study, patient records from the SRES were analyzed to examine relationships between weather, crowd size, day of week, and demographics on treatment and disposition. This information would help to predict factors affecting patient treatment and disposition to guide ongoing training of first responders and to evaluate the appropriateness of staffing skills mix at future events. Hypothesis Patient demographics, environmental factors, and attendance would influence the nature and severity of presentations at the SRES, which would influence staffing requirements. A retrospective analysis of 4,141 patient record forms was performed for patients who presented to St John Ambulance (Australian Capital Territory, Australia) at the SRES between 2012 and 2014 inclusive. Presentation type was classified using a previously published minimum data set. Data on weather and crowd size were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) and the SRES, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v22 (IBM; Armonk, New York USA). Between 2012 to 2014, over 2.5 million people attended the SRES with 4,141 patients treated onsite. As expected, the majority of presentations were injuries (49%) and illnesses (46%). Although patient demographics and presentation types did not change over time, the duration of treatment increased. A higher proportion of patients were discharged to hospital or home compared to the proportion of patients discharged back to the event. Patients from rural/regional locations (accounting for 15% of all patients) were

  7. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce

    Full Text Available It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D, Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Genotyping from American Indigenous Groups Shows Novel Amerindian vacA and cagA Alleles and Asian, African and European Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Valencia, Gerardo; Mendoza, Irma; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Ramos, Irma; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Romo, Carolina; Granados, Julio; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Berg, Douglas E.; Torres, Javier

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D), Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America. PMID:22073291

  9. Cooperative genome-wide analysis shows increased homozygosity in early onset Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Simón-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD occurs in both familial and sporadic forms, and both monogenic and complex genetic factors have been identified. Early onset PD (EOPD is particularly associated with autosomal recessive (AR mutations, and three genes, PARK2, PARK7 and PINK1, have been found to carry mutations leading to AR disease. Since mutations in these genes account for less than 10% of EOPD patients, we hypothesized that further recessive genetic factors are involved in this disorder, which may appear in extended runs of homozygosity.We carried out genome wide SNP genotyping to look for extended runs of homozygosity (ROHs in 1,445 EOPD cases and 6,987 controls. Logistic regression analyses showed an increased level of genomic homozygosity in EOPD cases compared to controls. These differences are larger for ROH of 9 Mb and above, where there is a more than three-fold increase in the proportion of cases carrying a ROH. These differences are not explained by occult recessive mutations at existing loci. Controlling for genome wide homozygosity in logistic regression analyses increased the differences between cases and controls, indicating that in EOPD cases ROHs do not simply relate to genome wide measures of inbreeding. Homozygosity at a locus on chromosome19p13.3 was identified as being more common in EOPD cases as compared to controls. Sequencing analysis of genes and predicted transcripts within this locus failed to identify a novel mutation causing EOPD in our cohort.There is an increased rate of genome wide homozygosity in EOPD, as measured by an increase in ROHs. These ROHs are a signature of inbreeding and do not necessarily harbour disease-causing genetic variants. Although there might be other regions of interest apart from chromosome 19p13.3, we lack the power to detect them with this analysis.

  10. Multiple Group Analysis in Multilevel Structural Equation Model Across Level 1 Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ehri

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and evaluates a procedure for conducting multiple group analysis in multilevel structural equation model across Level 1 groups (MG1-MSEM; Ryu, 2014). When group membership is at Level 1, multiple group analysis raises two issues that cannot be solved by a simple extension of the standard multiple group analysis in single-level structural equation model. First, the Level 2 data are not independent between Level 1 groups. Second, the standard procedure fails to take into account the dependency between members of different Level 1 groups within the same cluster. The MG1-MSEM approach provides solutions to these problems. In MG1-MSEM, the Level 1 mean structure is necessary to represent the differences between Level 1 groups within clusters. The Level 2 model is the same regardless of Level 1 group membership. A simulation study examined the performance of MUML (Muthén's maximum likelihood) estimation in MG1-MSEM. The MG1-MSEM approach is illustrated for both a multilevel path model and a multilevel factor model using empirical data sets.

  11. Sensitization to group direction in the postgraduate training on Group-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Bruschetta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The psychodynamic training group here introduced is a part of the General Training on Group Analysis of the Centre of Palermo of COIRAG Postgraduate School on Analytic Psychotherapy. The training project’s aim, built for the class of the third year, develops a sensitization device which provide a unique set of aquarium. The aim of that methodological artifice is not to engage students on specific group management techniques, but to allow the whole class group to bring into play the complexity of relations, of which is necessary to have awareness in order to lead a group within an institutional context: The main clinical referents that we chose to monitor in this experience are the relationship between conductors and participants and the relationship between group, task and setting. The brief description of this methodology is also including the reporting of two "cases" treated in the course of training. Keywords: Group leadership, Founding dimension, Cultural themes 

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Leaves Shows the Different Regulations to Osmotic Stress and Stress Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lie-Bo Shu; Wei Ding; Jin-Hong Wu; Fang-Jun Feng; Li-Jun Luo; Han-Wei Mei

    2010-01-01

    Following the idea of partial root-zone drying(PRD)in crop cultivation,the morphological and physiological responses to partial root osmotic stress(PROS)and whole root osmotic stress(WROS)were investigated in rice.WROS caused stress symptoms like leaf rolling and membrane leakage.PROS stimulated stress signals,but did not cause severe leaf damage.By proteomic analysis,a total of 58 proteins showed differential expression after one or both treatments,and functional classification of these proteins suggests that stress signals regulate photosynthesis,carbohydrate and energy metabolism.Two other proteins(anthranilate synthase and submergence-induced nickel-binding protein)were upregulated only in the PROS plants,indicating their important roles in stress resistance.Additionally,more enzymes were involved in stress defense,redox homeostasis,lignin and ethylene synthesis in WROS leaves,suggesting a more comprehensive regulatory mechanism induced by osmotic stress.This study provides new insights into the complex molecular networks within plant leaves involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress and stress signals.

  13. Analysis of experimental evidence that shows adverse effects of salt and its relation to hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bravo A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study by Taylor et al published in June 2010 in the American Journal of Hypertension questions the effectiveness of reducing salt intake in the diet in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure and other cardiovascular conditions. The publication of this article has lead to great controversy and medical associations and learned societies responded promptly. The response criticized the results of the meta-analysis and pointed out its methodological shortcomings. In this review we critically appraise the experimental evidence that shows the importance of diet salt intake and its role as a determinant of blood pressure. We briefly describe the paradigm that explains the role of salt intake in contributing in the regulation of blood pressure (Guyton hypothesis and model and we mention the experimental evidence that supports this. We briefly comment on the classical studies that indicate that salt intake (NaCl contributes directly to the development of high blood pressure and target tissues. Finally, we briefly mention the experimental data that is related with the controversy on the role of salt (NaCl or sodium as prohypertensive agents.

  14. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1)

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connell, Julia E; Frinchaboy, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    We present elemental abundances for all seven stars in Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1) to determine if they may be chemically related. These stars appear to be both spatially and kinematically related, but no spectroscopic abundance analysis exists in literature. Abundances for eight elements were derived via equivalent width analyses of high resolution (R $\\sim$60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio ($\\langle$SNR$\\rangle\\sim$100) spectra obtained with the Otto Struve 2.1m telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. The large star-to-star scatter in metallicity, -0.55 $\\leq$ [Fe/H] $\\leq$ 0.06 dex ($\\sigma$= 0.25), implies these stars were not produced from the same chemically homogeneous molecular cloud, and are therefore not part of a remnant or open cluster as previously proposed. Prior to this analysis, it was suggested that two stars in the group, W11449 & W11450, are possible wide binaries. The candidate wide binary pair show similar chemical abundance patterns with not only ir...

  15. Cascade algorithm and multiresolution analysis on the Heisenberg group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Heping; LIU Yu; PENG Lizhong; CHU Xiaoyong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between the convergence of cascade algorithm and orthogonal (or biorthogonal) multiresolution analysis on the Heisenberg group. It is proved that the (strong) convergence of cascade algorithm together with the perfect reconstruction condition induces an orthogonal multiresolution analysis and vice versa. Similar results are also proved for biorthogonal multiresolution analysis.

  16. Introducing Semantic Cohesion Analysis: A Study of Group Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Cohesive talk was observed over time and across psychotherapy groups led by self-disclosing or nondisclosing therapists. Despite individual therapist differences, the nondisclosing groups showed more cohesive interactions throughout therapy. No differences were observed in clients' perceptions of therapists or their attraction to the group.…

  17. Qualitative analysis fingertip patterns in ABO blood group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. KShirsagar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The inheritance of the dermatoglyphic patterns is polygenic. The genetic basis of the blood group is well established. The correlation between the dermatoglyphic patterns and the ABO blood group is studied by some workers in different populations. In the present study, the correlation between dermatoglyphics and ABO blood group is studied in the Marathwada Region of Maharashtra. The qualitative data included fingertip patterns and three indices. It was observed that, the Arch pattern is more common in blood group O both in male and female. Ulnar loop is most common in the blood group AB. Simple whorl and double loop whorl patterns are less frequent in blood group AB. Accidentals were not recorded in blood group A while blood group O show highest percentage of accidentals. Dankmeijer’s index was highest in blood group AB and lowest in blood group B.

  18. Harmonic and applied analysis from groups to signals

    CERN Document Server

    Mari, Filippo; Grohs, Philipp; Labate, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume explores the connection between the theoretical aspects of harmonic analysis and the construction of advanced multiscale representations that have emerged in signal and image processing. It highlights some of the most promising mathematical developments in harmonic analysis in the last decade brought about by the interplay among different areas of abstract and applied mathematics. This intertwining of ideas is considered starting from the theory of unitary group representations and leading to the construction of very efficient schemes for the analysis of multidimensional data. After an introductory chapter surveying the scientific significance of classical and more advanced multiscale methods, chapters cover such topics as An overview of Lie theory focused on common applications in signal analysis, including the wavelet representation of the affine group, the Schrödinger representation of the Heisenberg group, and the metaplectic representation of the symplectic group An introduction ...

  19. “I Want to be There When He Graduates:” Foster Parents Show Higher Levels of Commitment than Group Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Albert; Roben, Caroline K.P.; Maier, Collin; Fabian, Kim; Shauffer, Carole; Dozier, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Group care is a frequent placement for adolescents placed in out of home care when their birth parents’ care is deemed unsafe. In the present study, we assessed whether foster parents show greater commitment to children than group care providers. Given that group care represents a number of living arrangements, we considered both shift care (where staff work shifts and do not live with the children) and cottage care (where staff live for extended periods of time with the children in a group living context). Commitment was assessed using the This Is My Child Interview (adapted for adolescents). Thirty-one foster parents, 18 shift workers, and 28 cottage care providers were interviewed. As predicted, foster parents showed higher levels of commitment than both shift care workers and cottage care providers, and the associations held when children’s externalizing behaviors and the number of children the caregivers had cared for were controlled. The results suggest that foster care promotes greater commitment among caregivers than other out of home placements, and add to other findings that favor foster care as the out of home placement of choice for adolescents. PMID:25937687

  20. Maritime Group Motion Analysis: Representation, Learning, Recognition, and Deviation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Maritime Group Motion Analysis : Representation, Learning, Recognition, and Deviation Detection § Allen Waxman MultiSensor Scientific, LLC...while the authors were employed by, or sub-contractors of, Intelligent Software Solutions, Inc., of Colorado Springs, CO, USA, funded under contract...reading the PDF file of this manuscript.) Abstract - This paper introduces new concepts and methods in the analysis of group motions over extended

  1. Show them your teeth first! A game-theoretic analysis of lobbying and presure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Winden, F.A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the choice of an interest group between lobbying words and pressure actions in order to influence a policymaker. Both lobbying and pressure are modeled as strategic means of transmitting information that is relevant to the policymaker. However, only pressure is directly costl

  2. 24 Y-chromosomal STR haplotypic polymorphisms for Chinese Uygur ethnic group and its phylogenic analysis with other Chinese groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Pu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Chun-Hua; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Zhang, Li-Ping; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Ren, Jian-Wen; Sun, Jun-Yi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-02-01

    The Uygur ethnic minority is the largest ethnic group in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China, and is a precious resource for the study of ethnogeny and forensic biology. Previous studies have focused on the genetic background of the Uygur group, however, the patrilineal descent of the group is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the genetic diversity of 24 Y-STR loci in the Uygur group and analyzed the population differentiations as well as the genetic relationships between the Uygur group and other previously reported populations using 17 Y-filer loci. According to haplotypic analysis of the 24 Y-STR loci in 109 Uygur individuals, 104 different haplotypes were obtained, 99 of which were unique. The haplotypic diversity and discrimination capacity of these 24 Y-STR loci in Uygur group were 0.9992 and 0.9541, respectively. An additional 7 loci (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522, and DYS527a,b) showed high genetic diversity and improved the overall discrimination capacity of the 24 Y-STR system. Pairwise Fst and neighbor-joining analysis showed that the Uygur group was genetically close to the Han populations from different regions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Pioneer 10 and 11 orbit determination analysis shows no discrepancy with Newton-Einstein's laws of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Modenini, Dario

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the investigation of the navigation anomaly of Pioneer 10 and 11 probes which became known as the Pioneer Anomaly. It appeared as a linear drift in the Doppler data received by the spacecraft, which has been ascribed to an approximately constant sunward acceleration of about $8.5 \\times 10^{-13} km/s^2$. Since then, the existence of the anomaly has been confirmed independently by several groups and a large effort was devoted to find its origin. The present study consists of two main parts: thermal modeling of the spacecraft throughout its trajectory, and orbit determination analysis. Based on existing documentation and published telemetry data we built a thermal finite element model of the spacecraft, whose complexity has been constrained to a degree allowing for sensitivity analysis, leading to the computation of its formal uncertainty. The trajectory analysis and orbit determination was carried out using NASA/JPL's ODP (Orbit Determination Program) and our results show that orbita...

  4. Pioneer 10 and 11 orbit determination analysis shows no discrepancy with Newton-Einstein laws of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenini, D.; Tortora, P.

    2014-07-01

    The present work describes our investigation of the navigation anomaly of the Pioneer 10 and 11 probes which became known as the Pioneer Anomaly. It appeared as a linear drift in the Doppler data received by the spacecraft, which has been ascribed to an approximately constant Sunward acceleration of about 8.5×10-13 km/s2. Since then, the existence of the anomaly has been confirmed independently by several groups and a large effort was devoted to find its origin. Recently, different analyses were published where the authors claimed the acceleration due to anisotropic thermal emission to be the most likely cause of the unexplained acceleration. Here we report the methodology and the results of an independent study carried out in the last years, aimed at supporting the thermal origin of the anomaly. This work consists of two main parts: thermal modeling of the spacecraft throughout its trajectory, and orbit determination analysis. Based on existing documentation and published telemetry data, we built a thermal finite element model of the spacecraft, whose complexity has been constrained to a degree allowing for sensitivity analysis, leading to the computation of its formal uncertainty. The trajectory analysis and orbit determination were carried out using NASA/JPL's Orbit Determination Program, and our results show that orbital solutions are achieved that do not require the addition of any "unknown" acceleration other than that of thermal origin.

  5. Comparisons of coat protein gene sequences show that East African isolates of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus form a genetically distinct group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuze, J F; Karyeija, R F; Gibson, R W; Valkonen, J P

    2000-01-01

    Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus Potyvirus) infects sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) worldwide, but no sequence data on isolates from Africa are available. Coat protein (CP) gene sequences from eight East African isolates from Madagascar and different districts of Uganda (the second biggest sweet potato producer in the world) and two West African isolates from Nigeria and Niger were determined. They were compared by phylogenetic analysis with the previously reported sequences of ten SPFMV isolates from other continents. The East African SPFMV isolates formed a distinct cluster, whereas the other isolates were not clustered according to geographic origin. These data indicate that East African isolates of SPFMV form a genetically unique group.

  6. EPA Analysis Shows 2014 Decrease of Toxic Chemical Releases in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's most recent Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data is now available for the reporting year of 2014. In Maine, the reporting data show that overall releases of pollutants to the environment decreased since the previous reporting year (2013).

  7. EPA Analysis Shows 2014 Decrease of Toxic Chemical Releases in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s most recent Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data is now available for the reporting year of 2014. In Massachusetts, the reporting data show that overall releases of pollutants to the environment decreased since the previous reporting year (2013).

  8. EPA Analysis Shows 2014 Decrease of Toxic Chemical Releases in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s most recent Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data is now available for the reporting year of 2014. In Connecticut, the reporting data show that overall releases of pollutants to the environment decreased since the previous reporting year (2013).

  9. Show me the money: cost-benefit analysis in the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Charles; Dunn, Mary Lee

    2005-01-01

    During the last several decades, Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) has become a widely used technique in public policy-making. This review examines CBA from perspectives of both advocates and critics; it looks at its theory and practice, its purported advantages and shortcomings in application. It also proposes several ways in which the process can be made more accountable.

  10. Assessing Group Interaction with Social Language Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholand, Andrew J.; Tausczik, Yla R.; Pennebaker, James W.

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  11. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ~1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10(-11)) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10(-4)), excitability (P=9.0 × 10(-4)) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10(-3)). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  12. Analysis of Gender Differences in Color Reaction in TV Show You Are the One

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔芳

    2015-01-01

    The differences between men and women is not only biological sex but social gender.Gender gap is produced in a biased society where men and women treated differently behave differently.This paper wishes to analyze different reactions to color of both sexes by taking examples from TV show You Are the One to further gender studies.

  13. Analysis of competition performance in dressage and show jumping of Dutch Warmblood horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovere, G.; Ducro, B.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Norberg, E.; Madsen, P.

    2016-01-01

    Most Warmblood horse studbooks aim to improve the performance in dressage and show jumping. The Dutch Royal Warmblood Studbook (KWPN) includes the highest score achieved in competition by a horse to evaluate its genetic ability of performance. However, the records collected during competition are

  14. EPA Analysis Shows 2014 Decrease of Toxic Chemical Releases in New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s most recent Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data is now available for the reporting year of 2014. In New Hampshire, the reporting data show that overall releases of pollutants to the environment decreased since the previous reporting year (2013).

  15. Economic impact and market analysis of a special event: The Great New England Air Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick; David C. Bojanic; Atul Sheel; Apurv Mather; Deepak. Ninan

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a post-event evaluation for the Great New England Air Show to assess its general economic impact and to refine economic estimates where possible. In addition to the standard economic impact variables, we examined travel distance, purchase decision involvement, event satisfaction, and frequency of attendance. Graphic mapping of event visitors' home ZIP...

  16. Molecular Analysis of Mixed Endometrial Carcinomas Shows Clonality in Most Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbel, Martin; Meng, Bo; Hoang, Lien N; Almadani, Noorah; Li, Xiaodong; Soslow, Robert A; Gilks, C Blake; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2016-02-01

    Mixed endometrial carcinoma refers to a tumor that comprises 2 or more distinct histotypes. We studied 18 mixed-type endometrial carcinomas-11 mixed serous and low-grade endometrioid carcinomas (SC/EC), 5 mixed clear cell and low-grade ECs (CCC/EC), and 2 mixed CCC and SCs (CCC/SC), using targeted next-generation sequencing and immunohistochemistry to compare the molecular profiles of the different histotypes present in each case. In 16 of 18 cases there was molecular evidence that both components shared a clonal origin. Eight cases (6 EC/SC, 1 EC/CCC, and 1 SC/CCC) showed an SC molecular profile that was the same in both components. Five cases (3 CCC/EC and 2 SC/EC) showed a shared endometrioid molecular profile and identical mismatch-repair protein deficiency in both components. A single SC/EC case harbored the same POLE exonuclease domain mutation in both components. One SC/CCC and 1 EC/CCC case showed both shared and unique molecular features in the 2 histotype components, suggesting early molecular divergence from a common clonal origin. In 2 cases, there were no shared molecular features, and these appear to be biologically unrelated synchronous tumors. Overall, these results show that the different histologic components in mixed endometrial carcinomas typically share the same molecular aberrations. Mixed endometrial carcinomas most commonly occur through morphologic mimicry, whereby tumors with serous-type molecular profile show morphologic features of EC or CCC, or through underlying deficiency in DNA nucleotide repair, with resulting rapid accrual of mutations and intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity. Less commonly, mixed endometrial carcinomas are the result of early molecular divergence from a common progenitor clone or are synchronous biologically unrelated tumors (collision tumors).

  17. Subjects with hip osteoarthritis show distinctive patterns of trunk movements during gait-a body-fixed-sensor based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reininga Inge HF

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compensatory trunk movements during gait, such as a Duchenne limp, are observed frequently in subjects with osteoarthritis of the hip, yet angular trunk movements are seldom included in clinical gait assessments. Hence, the objective of this study was to quantify compensatory trunk movements during gait in subjects with hip osteoarthritis, outside a gait laboratory, using a body-fixed-sensor based gait analysis. Frontal plane angular movements of the pelvis and thorax and spatiotemporal parameters of persons who showed a Duchenne limp during gait were compared to healthy subjects and persons without a Duchenne limp. Methods A Body-fixed-sensor based gait analysis approach was used. Two body-fixed sensors were positioned at the dorsal side of the pelvis and on the upper thorax. Peak-to-peak frontal plane range of motion (ROM and spatiotemporal parameters (walking speed, step length and cadence of persons with a Duchenne limp during gait were compared to healthy subjects and persons without a Duchenne limp. Participants were instructed to walk at a self-selected low, preferred and high speed along a hospital corridor. Generalized estimating equations (GEE analyses were used to assess group differences between persons with a Duchenne limp, without a Duchenne limp and healthy subjects. Results Persons with a Duchenne limp showed a significantly larger thoracic ROM during walking compared to healthy subjects and to persons without a Duchenne limp. In both groups of persons with hip osteoarthritis, pelvic ROM was lower than in healthy subjects. This difference however only reached significance in persons without a Duchenne limp. The ratio of thoracic ROM relative to pelvic ROM revealed distinct differences in trunk movement patterns. Persons with hip osteoarthritis walked at a significantly lower speed compared to healthy subjects. No differences in step length and cadence were found between patients and healthy subjects, after

  18. SR-FTIR Coupled with Principal Component Analysis Shows Evidence for the Cellular Bystander Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, E; Bambery, K R; Lekki, J; Tobin, M J; Vogel, C; Whelan, D R; Wood, B R; Kwiatek, W M

    2015-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation-Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis was used as an independent modality to monitor the cellular bystander effect. Single, living prostate cancer PC-3 cells were irradiated with various numbers of protons, ranging from 50-2,000, with an energy of either 1 or 2 MeV using a proton microprobe. SR-FTIR spectra of cells, fixed after exposure to protons and nonirradiated neighboring cells (bystander cells), were recorded. Spectral differences were observed in both the directly targeted and bystander cells and included changes in the DNA backbone and nucleic bases, along with changes in the protein secondary structure. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the variance in the entire data set. The percentage of bystander cells relative to the applied number of protons with two different energies was calculated. Of all the applied quantities, the dose of 400 protons at 2 MeV was found to be the most effective for causing significant macromolecular perturbation in bystander PC-3 cells.

  19. Complete genome sequence analysis of goatpox virus isolated from China shows high variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chi, Xuelin; Li, Wei; Hao, Wenbo; Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Yifan; Rock, Daniel L; Luo, Shuhong; Wang, Shihua

    2014-09-17

    Goatpox virus (GTPV), a member of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family, is the causative agent of variolo caprina (goatpox). GTPV can cause significant economic losses of domestic ruminants in endemic regions and can threaten breeding stocks. In this study, we report on the compilation of the complete genomic sequence of an isolated GTPV field strain FZ (GTPV_FZ). The 150,194bp GTPV genome consists of a central coding region bounded by two identical 2301bp inverted terminal repeats and contains 151 putative genes. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the apparent genetic relationships among Capripoxviruses are close, but sufficient genomic variants in the field isolate strain FZ have been identified to distinguish it from other GTPV strains and other Capripoxvirus species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the p32 and complete GTPV genome can be used to differentiate SPPVs, GTPVs and LSDVs. These data may contribute to the epidemiological study of the Chinese capripoxvirus and help to develop more specific detection methods to distinguish GTPVs, SPPVs and LSDVs.

  20. A micro-epidemiological analysis of febrile malaria in Coastal Kenya showing hotspots within hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejon, Philip; Williams, Thomas N; Nyundo, Christopher; Hay, Simon I; Benz, David; Gething, Peter W; Otiende, Mark; Peshu, Judy; Bashraheil, Mahfudh; Greenhouse, Bryan; Bousema, Teun; Bauni, Evasius; Marsh, Kevin; Smith, David L; Borrmann, Steffen

    2014-04-24

    Malaria transmission is spatially heterogeneous. This reduces the efficacy of control strategies, but focusing control strategies on clusters or 'hotspots' of transmission may be highly effective. Among 1500 homesteads in coastal Kenya we calculated (a) the fraction of febrile children with positive malaria smears per homestead, and (b) the mean age of children with malaria per homestead. These two measures were inversely correlated, indicating that children in homesteads at higher transmission acquire immunity more rapidly. This inverse correlation increased gradually with increasing spatial scale of analysis, and hotspots of febrile malaria were identified at every scale. We found hotspots within hotspots, down to the level of an individual homestead. Febrile malaria hotspots were temporally unstable, but 4 km radius hotspots could be targeted for 1 month following 1 month periods of surveillance.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02130.001. Copyright © 2014, Bejon et al.

  1. Differential temperature Carnot heat analysis shows that computing machines are thermodynamically irreversible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael C.; Walker, Stuart D.

    2008-07-01

    We perform a differential temperature Carnot analysis of the changes in energy and entropy (degrees of freedom) associated with an ideal classical computing machine. Assuming that Carnot's maximum efficiency law is as equally applicable to a computing machine as to a mechanical machine, we find that useful computation is necessarily dissipative and thermodynamically irreversible. In addition, we find that copying or cloning of information is as dissipative as the original process employed to create the information (through a computation) in the first place. We prove minimum heat dissipation kT ln 2 per output calculation bit, where T is the thermodynamic temperature of unavoidable by-product bits (i.e. not the output calculation bits) rather than a generally assumed 'surrounding environment' temperature. Overall, this places computers into the same category as conventional machines, obeying the second law of thermodynamics and always operating below 100% efficiency, such that a perpetual calculating machine cannot exist.

  2. Genome-wide microarray analysis of tomato roots showed defined responses to iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Anita

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants react to iron deficiency stress adopting different kind of adaptive responses. Tomato, a Strategy I plant, improves iron uptake through acidification of rhizosphere, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and transport of Fe2+ into the cells. Large-scale transcriptional analyses of roots under iron deficiency are only available for a very limited number of plant species with particular emphasis for Arabidopsis thaliana. Regarding tomato, an interesting model species for Strategy I plants and an economically important crop, physiological responses to Fe-deficiency have been thoroughly described and molecular analyses have provided evidence for genes involved in iron uptake mechanisms and their regulation. However, no detailed transcriptome analysis has been described so far. Results A genome-wide transcriptional analysis, performed with a chip that allows to monitor the expression of more than 25,000 tomato transcripts, identified 97 differentially expressed transcripts by comparing roots of Fe-deficient and Fe-sufficient tomato plants. These transcripts are related to the physiological responses of tomato roots to the nutrient stress resulting in an improved iron uptake, including regulatory aspects, translocation, root morphological modification and adaptation in primary metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and TCA cycle. Other genes play a role in flavonoid biosynthesis and hormonal metabolism. Conclusions The transcriptional characterization confirmed the presence of the previously described mechanisms to adapt to iron starvation in tomato, but also allowed to identify other genes potentially playing a role in this process, thus opening new research perspectives to improve the knowledge on the tomato root response to the nutrient deficiency.

  3. Content analysis of neurodegenerative and mental diseases social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Bargiela-Flórez, Beatriz; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to characterize the different types of Facebook and Twitter groups for different mental diseases, their purposes, and their functions. We focused the search on depressive disorders, dementia, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and examined the Facebook (www.facebook.com) and Twitter (www.twitter.com) groups. We used four assessment criteria: (1) purpose, (2) type of creator, (3) telehealth content, and (4) free-text responses in surveys and interviews. We observed a total of 357 Parkinson groups, 325 dementia groups, 853 Alzheimer groups, and 1127 depression groups on Facebook and Twitter. Moreover, we analyze the responses provided by different users. The survey and interview responses showed that many people were interested in using social networks to support and help in the fight against these diseases. The results indicate that social networks are acceptable by users in terms of simplicity and utility. People use them for finding support, information, self-help, advocacy and awareness, and for collecting funds.

  4. PCR-DGGE analysis of the bacterial composition of a kaolin slurry showing altered rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Ildikó; Balázs, Margit; Tombácz, Etelka; Babcsán, Norbert; Kesserű, Péter; Kiss, István; Szvetnik, Attila

    2012-04-01

    Kaolin is an important industrial raw material and a basis of a range of different products. Microbial spoilage is a detrimental process observed especially in kaolin slurries, leading to low quality products and economic loss. Although the alteration of kaolin slurries in ceramic industry was observed, the process and the microbial background have not been analyzed in details. This study provides the first data using a cultivation independent molecular biological approach (PCR-DGGE) regarding the bacterial composition of an altered kaolin slurry. The results show that potential exopolymer (EPS) producer bacteria (e.g. Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas) appear in the altered kaolin slurry, which may have an important role in the modification of kaolin slurries.

  5. Application of Lie group analysis in geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Ranis

    2011-01-01

    This is the first monograph dealing with the applications of the Lie group analysis to the modeling equations governing internal wave propagation in the deep ocean. A new approach to describe the nonlinear interactions of internal waves in the ocean is presented. While the central idea of the book is to investigate oceanic internal waves through the prism of Lie group analysis, it is also shown for the first time that internal wave beams, representing exact solutions to the equation of motion of stratified fluid, can be found by solving the given model as invariant solutions of nonlinear equat

  6. Transcriptome Analysis Showed a Differential Signature between Invasive and Non-invasive Corticotrophinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Leonardo Jose Tadeu; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; de Castro, Margaret; Martins, Clarissa Silva; Bronstein, Marcello Delano; Machado, Marcio Carlos; Trarbach, Ericka Barbosa; Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson

    2017-01-01

    ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism caused by a pituitary adenoma [Cushing’s disease (CD)] is the most common cause of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome. CD is often associated with several morbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis/bone fractures, secondary infections, and increased cardiovascular mortality. While the majority (≈80%) of the corticotrophinomas visible on pituitary magnetic resonance imaging are microadenomas (MICs, hypopituitarism and visual defects. Given the clinical and molecular heterogeneity of corticotrophinomas, the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of genetic differential expression between MIC and MAC, including the invasiveness grade as a criterion for categorizing these tumors. In this study, were included tumor samples from patients with clinical, laboratorial, radiological, and histopathological diagnosis of hypercortisolism due to an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma. Differential gene expression was studied using an Affymetrix microarray platform in 12 corticotrophinomas, classified as non-invasive MIC (n = 4) and MAC (n = 5), and invasive MAC (n = 3), according to modified Hardy criteria. Somatic mutations in USP8 were also investigated, but none of the patients exhibited USP8 variants. Differential expression analysis demonstrated that non-invasive MIC and MAC have a similar genetic signature, while invasive MACs exhibited a differential expression profile. Among the genes differentially expressed, we highlighted CCND2, ZNF676, DAPK1, and TIMP2, and their differential expression was validated through quantitative real-time PCR in another cohort of 15 non-invasive and 3 invasive cortocotrophinomas. We also identified potential biological pathways associated with growth and invasiveness, TGF-β and G protein signaling pathways, DNA damage response pathway, and pathways associated with focal adhesion. Our study revealed a differential pattern of genetic signature in a subgroup of MAC

  7. Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

    2011-02-01

    Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

  8. Genome-wide expression analysis of soybean MADS genes showing potential function in the seed development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ming Fan

    Full Text Available The MADS family is an ancient and best-studied transcription factor and plays fundamental roles in almost every developmental process in plants. In the plant evolutionary history, the whole genome duplication (WGD events are important not only to the plant species evolution, but to expansion of members of the gene families. Soybean as a model legume crop has experience three rounds of WGD events. Members of some MIKC(C subfamilies, such as SOC, AGL6, SQUA, SVP, AGL17 and DEF/GLO, were expanded after soybean three rounds of WGD events. And some MIKC(C subfamilies, MIKC* and type I MADS families had experienced faster birth-and-death evolution and their traces before the Glycine WGD event were not found. Transposed duplication played important roles in tandem arrangements among the members of different subfamilies. According to the expression profiles of type I and MIKC paralog pair genes, the fates of MIKC paralog gene pairs were subfunctionalization, and the fates of type I MADS paralog gene pairs were nonfunctionalization. 137 out of 163 MADS genes were close to 186 loci within 2 Mb genomic regions associated with seed-relative QTLs, among which 115 genes expressed during the seed development. Although MIKC(C genes kept the important and conserved functions of the flower development, most MIKC(C genes showed potentially essential roles in the seed development as well as the type I MADS.

  9. Functional Renormalisation Group analysis of Tensorial Group Field Theories on $\\mathbb{R}^d$

    CERN Document Server

    Geloun, Joseph Ben; Oriti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Rank-d Tensorial Group Field Theories are quantum field theories defined on a group manifold $G^{\\times d}$, which represent a non-local generalization of standard QFT, and a candidate formalism for quantum gravity, since, when endowed with appropriate data, they can be interpreted as defining a field theoretic description of the fundamental building blocks of quantum spacetime. Their renormalisation analysis is crucial both for establishing their consistency as quantum field theories, and for studying the emergence of continuum spacetime and geometry from them. In this paper, we study the renormalisation group flow of two simple classes of TGFTs, defined for the group $G=\\mathbb{R}$ for arbitrary rank, both without and with gauge invariance conditions, by means of functional renormalisation group techniques. The issue of IR divergences is tackled by the definition of a proper thermodynamic limit for TGFTs. We map the phase diagram of such models, in a simple truncation, and identify both UV and IR fixed poin...

  10. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  11. On the Variable Selection Problem in Multiple Group Discriminant Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Carl J.

    This study was concerned with various schemes for reducing the number of variables in a multivariate analysis. Two sets of illustrative data were used; the numbers of criterion groups were 3 and 5. The proportion of correct classifications was employed as an index of discriminatory power of each subset of variables selected. Of the four procedures…

  12. Efficiency Evaluation of Research Groups Using Data Envelopment Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehssan Jandaghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare efficiency of research groups in the Center of Social and Cultural Research. There are several tools for efficiency evaluation. The method used in this study was Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA in which rate of output is evaluated by input and effective and non-effective units are determined. The first step in DEA is to prepare a list of inputs and outputs. The inputs in this study were personnel and administrative costs, the ratio of group staff to the total staff of the center and person-hours of labor. The outputs of this study contained the number of finished research projects, proportion of allocated budget to the total budget issued and the Percent of the projects’ progress. The survey was carried out in 20 research groups, using DEA method. The analysis indicated that 5 groups were efficient and 3 groups were on border line. To improve non-efficient groups and converting them to efficient ones, we suggest some adjustments in inputs and outputs.

  13. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes. METHODS: Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001. CONCLUSION: The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  14. The Effect of Goal Setting on Group Performance: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleingeld, Ad; van Mierlo, Heleen; Arends, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Updating and extending the work of O'Leary-Kelly, Martocchio, and Frink (1994), with this meta-analysis on goal setting and group performance we show that specific difficult goals yield considerably higher group performance compared with nonspecific goals (d = 0.80 plus or minus 0.35, k = 23 effect sizes). Moderately difficult and easy goals were…

  15. Behavioural activation for depression; an update of meta-analysis of effectiveness and sub group analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ekers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. METHOD: Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. RESULTS: Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD -0.74 CI -0.91 to -0.56, k = 25, N = 1088 and medication (SMD -0.42 CI -0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283. Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base.

  16. Mice repeatedly exposed to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus show perseverative behaviors, impaired sensorimotor gating, and immune activation in rostral diencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrì, Simone; Ceci, Chiara; Onori, Martina Proietti; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Bartolini, Erika; Altabella, Luisa; Canese, Rossella; Imperi, Monica; Orefici, Graziella; Creti, Roberta; Margarit, Immaculada; Magliozzi, Roberta; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-08-25

    Repeated exposure to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) may constitute a vulnerability factor in the onset and course of pediatric motor disturbances. GAS infections/colonization can stimulate the production of antibodies, which may cross the blood brain barrier, target selected brain areas (e.g. basal ganglia), and exacerbate motor alterations. Here, we exposed developing SJL male mice to four injections with a GAS homogenate and evaluated the following domains: motor coordination; general locomotion; repetitive behaviors; perseverative responses; and sensorimotor gating (pre-pulse inhibition, PPI). To demonstrate that behavioral changes were associated with immune-mediated brain alterations, we analyzed, in selected brain areas, the presence of infiltrates and microglial activation (immunohistochemistry), monoamines (HPLC), and brain metabolites (in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy). GAS-exposed mice showed increased repetitive and perseverative behaviors, impaired PPI, and reduced concentrations of serotonin in prefrontal cortex, a brain area linked to the behavioral domains investigated, wherein they also showed remarkable elevations in lactate. Active inflammatory processes were substantiated by the observation of infiltrates and microglial activation in the white matter of the anterior diencephalon. These data support the hypothesis that repeated GAS exposure may elicit inflammatory responses in brain areas involved in motor control and perseverative behavior, and result in phenotypic abnormalities.

  17. A Grouping Method of Distribution Substations Using Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka, Toshiya; Iwamoto, Shinichi

    Recently, it has been considered to group distribution substations together for evaluating the reinforcement planning of distribution systems. However, the grouping is carried out by the knowledge and experience of an expert who is in charge of distribution systems, and a subjective feeling of a human being causes ambiguous grouping at the moment. Therefore, a method for imitating the grouping by the expert has been desired in order to carry out a systematic grouping which has numerical corroboration. In this paper, we propose a grouping method of distribution substations using cluster analysis based on the interconnected power between the distribution substations. Moreover, we consider the geographical constraints such as rivers, roads, business office boundaries and branch boundaries, and also examine a method for adjusting the interconnected power. Simulations are carried out to verify the validity of the proposed method using an example system. From the simulation results, we can find that the imitation of the grouping by the expert becomes possible due to considering the geographical constraints and adjusting the interconnected power, and also the calculation time and iterations can be greatly reduced by introducing the local and tabu search methods.

  18. Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Group VA-H3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanda, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    During the eight weeks working at NASA, I was fortunate enough to work with the Expendable Launch Vehicle's (ELV) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Team, who is responsible for the evaluation and analysis of any EMI risk an ELV mission might face. This group of people concern themselves with practically any form of electromagnetic interference that may risk the safety of a rocket, a mission, or even people. Taking this into consideration, the group investigates natural forms of interference, such as lightning, to manmade interferences, such as antennas.

  19. Groups as units of functional analysis, individuals as proximate mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David Sloan

    2014-06-01

    Whenever selection operates at a given level of a multitier hierarchy, units at that level should become the object of functional analysis, and units at lower levels should be studied as proximate mechanisms. This intuition already exists for the study of genes in individuals, when individuals are the unit of selection. It is only beginning to be applied for the study of individuals in groups, when groups are the unit of selection. Smaldino's target article is an important step in this direction with an emphasis on human cultural evolution, but the same algorithm applies to all multilevel evolutionary processes.

  20. Show Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> Story: Show Time!The whole class presents the story"Under the Sea".Everyone is so excited and happy.Both Leo and Kathy show their parentsthe characters of the play."Who’s he?"asks Kathy’s mom."He’s the prince."Kathy replies."Who’s she?"asks Leo’s dad."She’s the queen."Leo replieswith a smile.

  1. Snobbish Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ The State Administration of Radio,Film and Television (SARFT),China's media watchdog,issued a new set of mles on June 9 that strictly regulate TV match-making shows,which have been sweeping the country's primetime programming. "Improper social and love values such as money worship should not be presented in these shows.Humiliation,verbal attacks and sex-implied vulgar content are not allowed" the new roles said.

  2. Berkeley Phylogenomics Group web servers: resources for structural phylogenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, Jake Gunn; Kirshner, Dan; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjölander, Kimmen

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenomic analysis addresses the limitations of function prediction based on annotation transfer, and has been shown to enable the highest accuracy in prediction of protein molecular function. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group provides a series of web servers for phylogenomic analysis: classification of sequences to pre-computed families and subfamilies using the PhyloFacts Phylogenomic Encyclopedia, FlowerPower clustering of proteins sharing the same domain architecture, MUSCLE multiple sequence alignment, SATCHMO simultaneous alignment and tree construction and SCI-PHY subfamily identification. The PhyloBuilder web server provides an integrated phylogenomic pipeline starting with a user-supplied protein sequence, proceeding to homolog identification, multiple alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, subfamily identification and structure prediction. The Berkeley Phylogenomics Group resources are available at http://phylogenomics.berkeley.edu.

  3. Galaxy groups in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey A Compactness Analysis of Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Zandivarez, A A; Ragone, C J; Muriel, H; Martínez, H J

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive study on compactness has been carried out on the 2dF Galaxy Group Catalogue constructed by Merch\\'an & Zandivarez. The compactness indexes defined in this work take into account different geometrical constraints in order to explore a wide range of possibilities. Our results show that there is no clear distinction between groups with high and low level of compactness when considering particular properties as the radial velocity dispersion, the relative fraction of galaxies per spectral type and luminosity functions of their galaxy members. Studying the trend of the fraction of galaxies per spectral type as a function of the dimensionless crossing time some signs of dynamical evolution are observed. From the comparison with previous works on compactness we realize that special care should be taken into account for some compactness criteria definitions in order to avoid possible biases in the identification.

  4. Constraint Force Analysis of Metamorphic Joints Basedon the Augmented Assur Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shujun; WANG Hongguang; YANG Qiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain a simple way for the force analysis of metamorphic mechanisms, the systematic method to unify the force analysis approach of metamorphic mechanisms as that of conventional planar mechanisms is proposed. A force analysis method of metamorphic mechanisms is developed by transforming the augmented Assur groups into Assur groups, so that the force analysis problem of metamorphic mechanisms is converted into the force analysis problems of conventional planar mechanisms. The constraint force change rules and values of metamorphic joints are obtained by the proposed method, and the constraint force analysis equations of revolute metamorphic joints in augmented Assur group RRRR and prismatic metamorphic joints in augmented Assur group RRPR are deduced. The constraint force analysis is illustrated by the constrained spring force design of paper folding metamorphic mechanism, and its metamorphic working process is controlled by the spring force and geometric constraints of metamorphic joints. The results of spring force show that developped design method and approach are feasible and practical. By transforming augmented Assur groups into Assur groups, a new method for the constraint force analysis of metamorphic joints is proposed firstly to provide the basis for dynamic analysis of metamorphic mechanism.

  5. A note on structured means analysis for a single group

    OpenAIRE

    Beauducel, Andre

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of common factor means in structured means analysis (SMM) is considered. The SMM equations imply that the unique factors are defined as having zero means. It was shown within the one factor solution that this definition implies larger absolute common factor loadings to co-occur with larger absolute expectations of the observed variables in the single group case. This result was illustrated by means of a small simulation study. It is argued that the proportionality of factor lo...

  6. LACEwING: A New Moving Group Analysis Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Blunt, Sarah C.; Lambrides, Erini L.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new nearby young moving group (NYMG) kinematic membership analysis code, LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups (LACEwING), a new Catalog of Suspected Nearby Young Stars, a new list of bona fide members of moving groups, and a kinematic traceback code. LACEwING is a convergence-style algorithm with carefully vetted membership statistics based on a large numerical simulation of the Solar Neighborhood. Given spatial and kinematic information on stars, LACEwING calculates membership probabilities in 13 NYMGs and three open clusters within 100 pc. In addition to describing the inputs, methods, and products of the code, we provide comparisons of LACEwING to other popular kinematic moving group membership identification codes. As a proof of concept, we use LACEwING to reconsider the membership of 930 stellar systems in the Solar Neighborhood (within 100 pc) that have reported measurable lithium equivalent widths. We quantify the evidence in support of a population of young stars not attached to any NYMGs, which is a possible sign of new as-yet-undiscovered groups or of a field population of young stars.

  7. Phase analysis of sunspot group numbers on both solar hemispheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Hua Deng; Zhong-Quan Qu; Xiao-Li Yan; Kai-Rang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are proposed to investigate the phase relationship between the monthly sunspot group numbers in the solar northern and southern hemispheres.It is found that (1) the monthly sunspot group numbers in the northern hemisphere begin two months earlier than those in the southern one,which should lead to phase asynchrony between them but with a slight effect; (2) the Schwabe cycle length for the monthly sunspot group numbers in the two hemispheres obviously differs from each other,and the mean Schwabe cycle length of the monthly sunspot group numbers in the northern hemisphere is slightly larger than that in the southern one; (3) the monthly sunspot group numbers in the northern hemisphere precede those in the southern hemisphere during the years of about 1874-1927,after which,the southern hemisphere leads the northern hemisphere in the years 1928-1964,and then the northern hemisphere leads in time till the present.

  8. The Effectiveness of Transactional Analysis Group-counseling on the Improvement of Couples’ Family Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Ali Yahyaee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Family functioning is among the most important factors ensuring the mental health of family members. Disorder or disturbance in family functioning would cause many psychological problems for family members. Current study intended to examine the effectiveness of transactional analysis group counseling on the improvement of couple's family functioning. Materials & Methods: The design of the study is as semi experimental research with pretest and posttest with follow up and control group. Statistical population consists all couples referring to the psychological and counseling centers of Rasht city in 2012. Samples were selected at first by available sampling method and after completing family assessment  device, and obtaining score for enter to research, were placement using random sampling method in two experimental and control groups (N = 8 couples per group. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group counseling based on transactional analysis and control group received no intervention. The gathered data were analyzed using covariance analysis. Results: The results show that there are significant differences between the pre-test and post test scores of the experimental group. This difference is significant at the level of 0.05. Therefore it seems that transactional group therapy improved the dimensions of family functioning in couples. Conclusions: The results indicated that transactional analysis group counseling can improve the family functioning and use this approach to working with couples is recommended.

  9. Examination of bariatric surgery Facebook support groups: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koball, Afton M; Jester, Dylan J; Domoff, Sarah E; Kallies, Kara J; Grothe, Karen B; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-08-01

    Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook. Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States. Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70). More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently. Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the "bariatric lifestyle" for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA barcoding resolves species complexes in Stigmella salicis and S. aurella species groups and shows additional cryptic speciation in S. salicis (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.; Mutanen, M.; Doorenweerd, C.

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced the mitochondrial barcoding marker COI and nuclear marker EF1-alpha for most Nordic and other European species of the Stigmella salicis and S. aurella species groups. In the S. salicis group both markers confirm the synonymy of S. lappovimella with S. zelleriella. Specimens previously i

  11. Has Group Work Education Lost Its Social Group Work Essence? A Content Analysis of MSW Course Syllabi in Search of Mutual Aid and Group Conflict Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweifach, Jay Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort to better understand the extent to which mutual aid and group conflict, two important dimensions of social group work, are included and featured as prominent elements in MSW-level group work instruction.

  12. Has Group Work Education Lost Its Social Group Work Essence? A Content Analysis of MSW Course Syllabi in Search of Mutual Aid and Group Conflict Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweifach, Jay Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort to better understand the extent to which mutual aid and group conflict, two important dimensions of social group work, are included and featured as prominent elements in MSW-level group work instruction.

  13. EROBATIC SHOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Visitors look at plane models of the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, developer of the count,s first homegrown large passenger jet C919, during the Singapore Airshow on February 16. The biennial event is the largest airshow in Asia and one of the most important aviation and defense shows worldwide. A number of Chinese companies took part in the event during which Okay Airways, the first privately owned aidine in China, signed a deal to acquire 12 Boeing 737 jets.

  14. Renormalization group analysis for an asymmetric simple exclusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sutapa

    2017-03-01

    A perturbative renormalization group method is used to obtain steady-state density profiles of a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with particle adsorption and evaporation. This method allows us to obtain a globally valid solution for the density profile without the asymptotic matching of bulk and boundary layer solutions. In addition, we show a nontrivial scaling of the boundary layer width with the system size close to specific phase boundaries.

  15. Independent vector analysis for capturing common components in fMRI group analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Astrid M. E.; Andersen, Kasper W.; Mørup, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    -subject studies. Independent vector analysis (IVA) is a promising alternative approach to perform group fMRI analysis, which has been shown to better capture components with high inter-subject variability. The most widely applied IVA method is based on the multivariate Laplace distribution (IVA-GL), which assumes...... independence within subject components coupled across subjects only through shared scaling. In this study, we propose a more natural formulation of IVA based on a Normal-Inverse-Gamma distribution (IVA-NIG), in which the components can be directly interpreted as realizations of a common mean component...... with individual subject variability. We evaluate the performance of IVA-NIG compared to IVA-GL and similar decomposition methods, through the application of two types of simulated data and on real task fMRI data. The results show that IVA-NIG offers superior detection of components in simulated fMRI data. On real...

  16. Topological analysis of group fragmentation in multiagent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLellis, Pietro; Porfiri, Maurizio; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-02-01

    In social animals, the presence of conflicts of interest or multiple leaders can promote the emergence of two or more subgroups. Such subgroups are easily recognizable by human observers, yet a quantitative and objective measure of group fragmentation is currently lacking. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of detecting group fragmentation by embedding the raw data from the individuals' motions on a low-dimensional manifold and analyzing the topological features of this manifold. To perform the embedding, we employ the isomap algorithm, which is a data-driven machine learning tool extensively used in computer vision. We implement this procedure on a data set generated by a modified à la Vicsek model, where agents are partitioned into two or more subsets and an independent leader is assigned to each subset. The dimensionality of the embedding manifold is shown to be a measure of the number of emerging subgroups in the selected observation window and a cluster analysis is proposed to aid the interpretation of these findings. To explore the feasibility of using this approach to characterize group fragmentation in real time and thus reduce the computational cost in data processing and storage, we propose an interpolation method based on an inverse mapping from the embedding space to the original space. The effectiveness of the interpolation technique is illustrated on a test-bed example with potential impact on the regulation of collective behavior of animal groups using robotic stimuli.

  17. An Analysis of Interaction Patterns in the Focus Group Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavora Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the analysis of a focus group interview of a moderator and a group of undergraduate students on the topic of self-regulation of learning. The purpose of the investigation was to identify interaction patterns that appeared in the talk of participants and the moderator. In the stream of communication two rudimentary interaction patterns were recognized. The first pattern was named the Catalogue. It consists of a sequence of turns of participants who respond to a request of the moderator and who provide their answers, one by one, without reacting on the content of the previous partner(s talk. The other interaction pattern was called the Domino. In this pattern participants respond to each other. The Catalogue pattern prevailed in the interview. Alongside with identification of patterns of interaction the study demonstrated the functions of the common ground and its accomplishment in the talk of the moderator and participants.

  18. Future Development Strategies for S Group Based on SWOT Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohui; QI; Ligen; CHEN

    2014-01-01

    In recent years,the real estate development enterprises are facing the gradually increased government’s macro-control,and the increasingly fierce market competition,so it is very imperative to timely adjust and change the enterprises’ development strategies to adapt to the new development situation.With S Group as the study object,we use SWOT analysis to analyze the company’s internal and external environment,study the current situation of the company and the existing problems,and clearly point out the opportunities and challenges facing the company.Finally we put forth some targeted strategic recommendations,in order to provide a reference for the development of S Group.

  19. Discrete Fourier Analysis and Chebyshev Polynomials with G2 Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The discrete Fourier analysis on the 30°-60°-90° triangle is deduced from the corresponding results on the regular hexagon by considering functions invariant under the group G2, which leads to the definition of four families generalized Chebyshev polynomials. The study of these polynomials leads to a Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem that contains two parameters, whose solutions are analogues of the Jacobi polynomials. Under a concept of m-degree and by introducing a new ordering among monomials, these polynomials are shown to share properties of the ordinary orthogonal polynomials. In particular, their common zeros generate cubature rules of Gauss type.

  20. Group analysis of a conformal perfect fluid spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govinder, K. S.; Hansraj, S.

    2012-04-01

    We find new exact solutions of the Einstein field equations for a perfect fluid metric conformal to a spacetime of type D in the Petrov classification scheme. We analyse the complete system of equations using Lie group analysis. While previous work was confined to conformal factors of the form U = U(t, x), we investigate the complete situation U = U(t, x, y, z) as well as an auxiliary integrability condition. New classes of solutions are generated via the symmetry generators. The resulting solutions are examined for physical plausibility. Expressions for the energy density and pressure are obtained explicitly and empirical results suggest that these dynamical quantities are positive as expected.

  1. Karyomorphometric analysis of Fritillaria montana group in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Samaropoulou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fritillaria Linnaeus, 1753 (Liliaceae is a genus of geophytes, represented in Greece by 29 taxa. Most of the Greek species are endemic to the country and/or threatened. Although their classical cytotaxonomic studies have already been presented, no karyomorphometric analysis has ever been given. In the present study, the cytological results of Fritillaria montana Hoppe ex W.D.J. Koch, 1832 group, which includes F. epirotica Turrill ex Rix, 1975 and F. montana are statistically evaluated for the first time. Further indices about interchromosomal and intrachromosomal asymmetry are given. A new population of F. epirotica is also investigated, while for F. montana, a diploid individual was found in a known as triploid population. Paired t-tests and PCoA analysis have been applied to compare the two species.

  2. Renormalization group analysis of the gluon mass equation

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, A C; Papavassiliou, J

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we carry out a systematic study of the renormalization properties of the integral equation that determines the momentum evolution of the effective gluon mass. A detailed, all-order analysis of the complete kernel appearing in this particular equation reveals that the renormalization procedure may be accomplished through the sole use of ingredients known from the standard perturbative treatment of the theory, with no additional assumptions. However, the subtle interplay of terms operating at the level of the exact equation gets distorted by the approximations usually employed when evaluating the aforementioned kernel. This fact is reflected in the form of the obtained solutions, whose deviations from the correct behavior are best quantified by resorting to appropriately defined renormalization-group invariant quantities. This analysis, in turn, provides a solid guiding principle for improving the form of the kernel, and furnishes a well-defined criterion for discriminating between various p...

  3. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais

    Full Text Available `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered.

  4. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Irum, Sania; Saleem, Salman

    2015-01-01

    `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered.

  5. Renormalization Group Analysis of Weakly Rotating Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓宏; 周全

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic renormalization group (RNG) analysis is applied to the investigation of the behavior of the infrared limits of weakly rotating turbulence. For turbulent How subject to weak rotation, the anisotropic part in the renormalized propagation is considered to be a perturbation of the isotropic part. Then, with a low-order approximation, the coarsening procedure of RNG transformation is performed. After implementing the coarsening and rescaling procedures, the RNG analysis suggests that the spherically averaged energy spectrum has the scaling behavior E(k) ∝ k11/5 for weakly rotating turbulence. It is also shown that the Coriolis force will disturb the stability of the Kolmogorov -5/3 energy spectrum and will change the scaling behavior even in the case of weak rotation.%Dynamic renormalization group(RNG)analysis is applied to the investigation of the behavior of the infrared limits of weakly rotating turbulence.For turbulent flow subject to weak rotation,the anisotropic part in the renormalized propagation is considered to be a perturbation of the isotropic part.Then,with a low-order approximation,the coarsening procedure of RNG transformation is performed.After implementing the coarsening and rescaling procedures,the RNG analysis suggests that the spherically averaged energy spectrum has the scaling behavior E(k)∝ k-11/5 for weakly rotating turbulence.It is also shown that the Coriolis force will disturb the stability of the Kolmogorov-5/3 energy spectrum and will change the scaling behavior even in the case of weak rotation.

  6. Novel Method To Identify Source-Associated Phylogenetic Clustering Shows that Listeria monocytogenes Includes Niche-Adapted Clonal Groups with Distinct Ecological Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nightingale, K. K.; Lyles, K.; Ayodele, M.

    2006-01-01

    While phylogenetic and cluster analyses are often used to define clonal groups within bacterial species, the identification of clonal groups that are associated with specific ecological niches or host species remains a challenge. We used Listeria monocytogenes, which causes invasive disease...... in humans and different animal species and which can be isolated from a number of environments including food, as a model organism to develop and implement a two-step statistical approach to the identification of phylogenetic clades that are significantly associated with different source populations...

  7. Exploring Venus: the Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, A.; Atreya, S.; Thompson, T.; Luhmann, J.; Mackwell, S.; Baines, K.; Cutts, J.; Robinson, J.; Saunders, S.

    In July 2005 NASA s Planetary Division established the Venus Exploration Analysis Group VEXAG http www lpi usra edu vexag in order to engage the scientific community at large in identifying scientific priorities and strategies for the exploration of Venus VEXAG is a community-based forum open to all interested in the exploration of Venus VEXAG was designed to provide scientific input and technology development plans for planning and prioritizing the study of Venus over the next several decades including a Venus surface sample return VEXAG regularly evaluates NASA s Venus exploration goals scientific objectives investigations and critical measurement requirements including the recommendations in the National Research Council Decadal Survey and NASA s Solar System Exploration Strategic Roadmap VEXAG will take into consideration the latest scientific results from ESA s Venus Express mission and the MESSENGER flybys as well as the results anticipated from JAXA s Venus Climate Orbiter together with science community inputs from venues such as the February 13-16 2006 AGU Chapman Conference to identify the scientific priorities and strategies for future NASA Venus exploration VEXAG is composed of two co-chairs Sushil Atreya University of Michigan Ann Arbor and Janet Luhmann University of California Berkeley VEXAG has formed three focus groups in the areas of 1 Planetary Formation and Evolution Surface and Interior Volcanism Geodynamics etc Focus Group Lead Steve Mackwell LPI 2 Atmospheric Evolution Dynamics Meteorology

  8. Pedigree analysis for the genetic management of group-living species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Mena, Belén; Schad, Kristine; Hanna, Nick; Lacy, Robert C

    2016-05-01

    Captive breeding programs are an important tool for the conservation of endangered species. These programs are commonly managed using pedigrees containing information about the history of each individual's family, such as breeding pairs and parentage. However, there are some species that are kept in groups where it is hard to distinguish between particular individuals within the group, making it very difficult to record any information at an individual level. Currently, software and methods commonly used for registering and analyzing pedigrees to help manage populations at an individual level are not adequate for managing these group-living species. Therefore, there is a need to further develop these tools and methodologies for pedigree analysis to better manage group-living species. PMx is a program used for the management of ex situ populations in zoos and aquariums. We adapted the pedigree analysis method implemented in PMx to analyze pedigrees (records of descendant lineages) of group-living species. In addition, we developed a group pedigree data entry sheet and group2PMx, a converter program that enables group datasets to be imported into PMx. We show how pedigree analysis of a group-living species can be used for population management using the studbook of the endangered Texas blind cave salamander Eurycea rathbuni. Such analyses of the pedigree of groups can improve the management of group-living species in ex situ breeding programs. Firstly, it enables better management decisions based on more accurate genetic measures between groups, allowing for greater control of inbreeding. Secondly, it can improve the conditions in which group-living species are held by adapting husbandry practices to better reflect conditions of these species living in the wild. The use of the spreadsheet and group2PMx extends the application of PMx, allowing conservation managers and other institutions outside the zoo and aquarium community to easily import and analyze their

  9. Is in-group bias culture-dependent? A meta-analysis across 18 societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Derham, Crysta

    2016-01-01

    We report a meta-analysis on the relationship between in-group bias and culture. Our focus is on whether broad macro-contextual variables influence the extent to which individuals favour their in-group. Data from 21,266 participants from 18 societies included in experimental and survey studies were available. Using Hofstede's (1980) and Schwartz (2006) culture-level predictors in a 3-level mixed-effects meta-analysis, we found strong support for the uncertainty-reduction hypothesis. An interaction between Autonomy and real vs artificial groups suggested that in low autonomy contexts, individuals show greater in-group bias for real groups. Implications for social identity theory and intergroup conflict are outlined.

  10. Mice repeatedly exposed to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus show perseverative behaviors, impaired sensorimotor gating, and immune activation in rostral diencephalon

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Macrì; Chiara Ceci; Martina Proietti Onori; Roberto William Invernizzi; Erika Bartolini; Luisa Altabella; Rossella Canese; Monica Imperi; Graziella Orefici; Roberta Creti; Immaculada Margarit; Roberta Magliozzi; Giovanni Laviola

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) may constitute a vulnerability factor in the onset and course of pediatric motor disturbances. GAS infections/colonization can stimulate the production of antibodies, which may cross the blood brain barrier, target selected brain areas (e.g. basal ganglia), and exacerbate motor alterations. Here, we exposed developing SJL male mice to four injections with a GAS homogenate and evaluated the following domains: motor coordination; gen...

  11. The karyotypes of five species of the Scinax perpusillus group (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae) of southeastern Brazil show high levels of chromosomal stabilization in this taxon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Marco Antônio Amorim; Lacerda, João Victor Andrade; Coelho-Augusto, Carolina; Feio, Renato Neves; Dergam, Jorge Abdala

    2015-12-01

    Based on morphological, bioacoustics, and morphological traits, the genus Scinax has been subdivided into two major clades: S. catharinae and S. ruber. The first clade includes S. catharinae and S. perpusillus groups, whereas the second clade includes S. rostratus and S. uruguayus groups. Chromosome morphology, NOR and C-banding patterns of variation support these clades. This study aims the cytogenetic characterization of five species currently included in the S. perpusillus group: Scinax sp. (gr. perpusillus), S. arduous, S. belloni, S. cosenzai, and S. v-signatus, including standard cytogenetic techniques and repetitive DNA FISH probes. All species had 2n = 24 chromosomes. Nucleolar organizing regions occurred in chromosome pair 6 in all species, but differed in their locations among some species, suggesting a putative synaponomastic character for the clade. In S. belloni, the first chromosome pair was a metacentric, contrasting with the submetacentric first pair reported in all other species of the genus. Scinax sp. (gr. perpusillus) and S. v-signatus had similar karyotypic formulae, suggesting they are related species. Scinax cosenzai had a divergent C-banding pattern. Repetitive DNA probes hybridized more frequently in chromosomal subtelomeric regions in all species indicating recent cladogenesis in these species. Karyotypic evidence indicates unreported high levels of stabilization within S. perpusillus and in S. catharinae clade, resulting in a wealth of characters potentially informative for higher phylogenetic analyses.

  12. Hamiltonian analysis of the BFCG theory for a generic Lie 2-group

    CERN Document Server

    Mikovic, Aleksandar; Vojinovic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    We perform a complete Hamiltonian analysis of the BFCG action for a general Lie 2-group by using the Dirac procedure. We show that the resulting dynamical constraints eliminate all local degrees of freedom which implies that the BFCG theory is a topological field theory.

  13. Renormalization group analysis of the random first-order transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Biroli, Giulio; Tarzia, Marco; Tarjus, Gilles

    2011-03-18

    We consider the approach describing glass formation in liquids as a progressive trapping in an exponentially large number of metastable states. To go beyond the mean-field setting, we provide a real-space renormalization group (RG) analysis of the associated replica free-energy functional. The present approximation yields in finite dimensions an ideal glass transition similar to that found in the mean field. However, we find that along the RG flow the properties associated with metastable glassy states, such as the configurational entropy, are only defined up to a characteristic length scale that diverges as one approaches the ideal glass transition. The critical exponents characterizing the vicinity of the transition are the usual ones associated with a first-order discontinuity fixed point.

  14. National logistics working groups: A landscape analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leab, Dorothy; Schreiber, Benjamin; Kasonde, Musonda; Bessat, Olivia; Bui, Son; Loisel, Carine

    2017-04-19

    Several countries have acknowledged the contributions made by national logistics working groups (NLWG) to ensure equitable access to the expanded program on immunization's (EPI) vaccines against preventable diseases. In order to provide key insights to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) supply chain hub - as well as other players, including national EPI - a landscape analysis study was conducted from September 2015 to February 2016. This is a cross-sectional survey taken by 43 countries that combines qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected through a desk review, consultation, interviews, and distance questioning. References and guidance were used to determine and specify the underlying mechanisms of NLWGs. The key findings are:This study has provided a general overview of the status of NLWGs for immunization in various countries. Based on the key insights of the study, technical assistance needs have been identified, and immunization partners will be required to help countries create and reinforce their NLWGs.

  15. Creating a group profile through error analysis in advanced L2 translation training

    OpenAIRE

    HEANEY, Dermot

    2011-01-01

    Error analysis and product assessment are increasingly viewed as reductive procedures in translation pedagogy. In the current paper, a case is made for ‘rehabilitating’ error analysis, especially in advanced L2 translation teaching. Attention is drawn to its usefulness in creating a group profile for L2 translation trainees, particularly as regards the scope it offers for showing how aspects of linguistic transfer frequently considered marginal, when taken individually, are, on...

  16. Renormalization group analysis of the gluon mass equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2014-04-01

    We carry out a systematic study of the renormalization properties of the integral equation that determines the momentum evolution of the effective gluon mass in pure Yang-Mills theory, without quark effects taken into account. A detailed, all-order analysis of the complete kernel appearing in this particular equation, derived in the Landau gauge, reveals that the renormalization procedure may be accomplished through the sole use of ingredients known from the standard perturbative treatment of the theory, with no additional assumptions. However, the subtle interplay of terms operating at the level of the exact equation gets distorted by the approximations usually employed when evaluating the aforementioned kernel. This fact is reflected in the form of the obtained solutions, for which the deviations from the correct behavior are best quantified by resorting to appropriately defined renormalization-group invariant quantities. This analysis, in turn, provides a solid guiding principle for improving the form of the kernel, and furnishes a well-defined criterion for discriminating between various possibilities. Certain renormalization-group inspired Ansätze for the kernel are then proposed, and their numerical implications are explored in detail. One of the solutions obtained fulfills the theoretical expectations to a high degree of accuracy, yielding a gluon mass that is positive definite throughout the entire range of physical momenta, and displays in the ultraviolet the so-called "power-law" running, in agreement with standard arguments based on the operator product expansion. Some of the technical difficulties thwarting a more rigorous determination of the kernel are discussed, and possible future directions are briefly mentioned.

  17. SHOW. A program for the integrated analysis of the data produced in a nuclear fusion experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, G.; Tudisco, O. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the program SHOW, an application devoted to the integrated analysis of the data produced in nuclear fusion experimental devices. The program is currently used for the analysis of the FTU data and a version is also available at JET. The code is written in FORTRAN 77, runs on IBM mainframes under MVS operating system and makes use of the GDDM graphical package. The program, that operates both in batch and interactive modes, permits to perform a graphical analysis of the data collected in the experimental databases. The report contains as appendixes the detailed description of all the program options together with a short illustration of the FTU databases. [Italiano] Il rapporto descrive il programma SHOW. Si tratta di una applicazione che permette l`analisi integrata dei dati prodotti da apparati sperimentali dedicati allo studio della fusione nucleare controllata. Il programma e` utilizzato per l`analisi dei dati di FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) e una versione e` disponibile anche al JET (Joint European Torus). Il codice e` scritto in FORTRAN 77 per mainframes IBM con sistema operativo MVS ed utilizza il pacchetto grafico GDDM. Il programma puo` funzionare sia in modo batch che in modo interattivo e permette di compiere l`elaborazione grafica dei dati raccolti nelle basi di dati sperimentali. Il rapporto contiene come appendici la descrizione dettagliata di tutte le opzioni del programma e una breve illustrazione delle basi di dati disponibili per FTU.

  18. The multilevel analysis of surface acting and mental health: A moderation of positive group affective tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Shiu; Huang, Jui-Chan; Wu, Tzu-Jung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among surface acting, mental health, and positive group affective tone. According to the prior theory, this study attempts to establish a comprehensive research framework among these variables, and furthermore tests the moderating effect of positive group affective tone. Data were collected from 435 employees in 52 service industrial companies by questionnaire, and this study conducted multilevel analysis. The results showed that surface acting will negatively affect the mental health. In addition, the positive group affective tone have significant moderating effect on the relationship among surface acting and mental health. Finally, this study discusses managerial implications and highlights future research suggestions.

  19. Anion order in perovskites: a group-theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanov, M V; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, V M

    2016-03-01

    Anion ordering in the structure of cubic perovskite has been investigated by the group-theoretical method. The possibility of the existence of 261 ordered low-symmetry structures, each with a unique space-group symmetry, is established. These results include five binary and 14 ternary anion superstructures. The 261 idealized anion-ordered perovskite structures are considered as aristotypes, giving rise to different derivatives. The structures of these derivatives are formed by tilting of BO6 octahedra, distortions caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect and other physical effects. Some derivatives of aristotypes exist as real substances, and some as virtual ones. A classification of aristotypes of anion superstructures in perovskite is proposed: the AX class (the simultaneous ordering of A cations and anions in cubic perovskite structure), the BX class (the simultaneous ordering of B cations and anions) and the X class (the ordering of anions only in cubic perovskite structure). In most perovskites anion ordering is accompanied by cation ordering. Therefore, the main classes of anion order in perovskites are the AX and BX classes. The calculated structures of some anion superstructures are reported. Comparison of predictions and experimentally investigated anion superstructures shows coherency of theoretical and experimental results.

  20. Analysis of HCV genotypes from blood donors shows three new HCV type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes in Myanmar in comparison with the rest of Southeast Asia is not well known. Serum samples were obtained from 201 HCV antibody-positive volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Of these, the antibody titers of 101 samples were checked by serial dilution using HCV antibody PA test II and Terasaki microplate as a low-cost method. To compare antibody titers by this method and RNA identification, we also checked HCV-RNA using the Amplicor 2.0 test. Most high-titer groups were positive for HCV-RNA. Of the 201 samples, 110 were successfully polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified. Among them, 35 (31.8% were of genotype 1, 52 (47.3% were of genotype 3, and 23 (20.9% were of type 6 variants, and phylogenetic analysis of these type 6 variants revealed that 3 new type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar. We named the subgroups M6-1, M6-2, and M6-3. M6-1 and M6-2 were relatively close to types 8 and 9, respectively. M6-3, though only found in one sample, was a brand-new subgroup. These subtypes were not seen in Vietnam, where type 6 group variants are widely spread. These findings may be useful for analyzing how and when these subgroups were formed.

  1. Pediatric primary central nervous system germ cell tumors of different prognosis groups show characteristic miRNome traits and chromosome copy number variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Muh-Lii

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial pediatric germ cell tumors (GCTs are rare and heterogeneous neoplasms and vary in histological differentiation, prognosis and clinical behavior. Germinoma and mature teratoma are GCTs that have a good prognosis, while other types of GCTs, termed nongerminomatous malignant germ cell tumors (NGMGCTs, are tumors with an intermediate or poor prognosis. The second group of tumors requires more extensive drug and irradiation treatment regimens. The mechanisms underlying the differences in incidence and prognosis of the various GCT subgroups are unclear. Results We identified a distinct mRNA profile correlating with GCT histological differentiation and prognosis, and also present in this study the first miRNA profile of pediatric primary intracranial GCTs. Most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were downregulated in germinomas, but miR-142-5p and miR-146a were upregulated. Genes responsible for self-renewal (such as POU5F1 (OCT4, NANOG and KLF4 and the immune response were abundant in germinomas, while genes associated with neuron differentiation, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, invasiveness and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (including SNAI2 (SLUG and TWIST2 were abundant in NGMGCTs. Clear transcriptome segregation based on patient survival was observed, with malignant NGMGCTs being closest to embryonic stem cells. Chromosome copy number variations (CNVs at cytobands 4q13.3-4q28.3 and 9p11.2-9q13 correlated with GCT malignancy and clinical risk. Six genes (BANK1, CXCL9, CXCL11, DDIT4L, ELOVL6 and HERC5 within 4q13.3-4q28.3 were more abundant in germinomas. Conclusions Our results integrate molecular profiles with clinical observations and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms causing GCT malignancy. The genes, pathways and microRNAs identified have the potential to be novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Doh; Kil, Chung Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Data testing of ENDF/B-VI.2 was performed and ACE-format continuous point-wise cross section library from ENDF/B-VI.2 for MCNP was validated through CSEWG benchmark and power plant mockup experiments. The calculated k-effective of ORNL-1, -2, -3, -4 and -10 with ENDF/B-VI are low by about 0.5% but those of L-7, -8, -9, -10 and -11 show good agreement with experiments. Overall results for uranium core with ENDF/B-VI is low in critically than with ENDF/B-V. The calculated results with ENDF/B-VI for PNL-6 {approx} 12 of plutonium core and PNL-30 {approx} 35 of mixed oxide core show good agreement with the experiments. The results of critically calculation for fast core benchmark do not show large difference between ENDF/B-VI and -V. But the calculated results of reaction rate ratio with ENDF/B-VI are improved, compared with ENDF/B-V. The calculated power distribution for VENUS PWR mockup core and typical BWR core of GE with both of ENDF/B-VI and -V agree well with measured values. From the above results, newly generated MCNP library from ENDF/B-VI is useful for nuclear and shielding design and analysis. 5 figs, 13 tabs, 11 refs. (Author).

  3. I-SG : Interactive Search Grouping - Search result grouping using Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Thomas; Kolenda, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We present a computational simple and efficient approach to unsupervised grouping the search result from any search engine. Along with each group a set of keywords are found to annotate the contents. This approach leads to an interactive search trough a hierarchial structure that is build online....... It is the users task to improve the search, trough expanding the search query using the topic keywords representing the desired groups. In doing so the search engine limits the space of possible search results, virtually moving down in the search hierarchy, and so refines the search....

  4. Language Ability Groups in Bilingual Children: A Latent Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapantzoglou, Maria; Restrepo, M. Adelaida; Gray, Shelley; Thompson, Marilyn S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Classifying children into two language ability groups, with and without language impairment, may underestimate the number of groups with distinct language ability patterns, or, alternatively, there may be only a single group characterized by a continuum of language performance. The purpose of the current study was to identify the number…

  5. Whole Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis Show Helicobacter pylori Strains from Latin America Have Followed a Unique Evolution Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ramírez, Zilia Y.; Mendez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Kato, Ikuko; Bravo, Maria M.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Thorell, Kaisa; Torres, Roberto; Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Camorlinga, Margarita; Canzian, Federico; Torres, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) genetics may determine its clinical outcomes. Despite high prevalence of HP infection in Latin America (LA), there have been no phylogenetic studies in the region. We aimed to understand the structure of HP populations in LA mestizo individuals, where gastric cancer incidence remains high. The genome of 107 HP strains from Mexico, Nicaragua and Colombia were analyzed with 59 publicly available worldwide genomes. To study bacterial relationship on whole genome level we propose a virtual hybridization technique using thousands of high-entropy 13 bp DNA probes to generate fingerprints. Phylogenetic virtual genome fingerprint (VGF) was compared with Multi Locus Sequence Analysis (MLST) and with phylogenetic analyses of cagPAI virulence island sequences. With MLST some Nicaraguan and Mexican strains clustered close to Africa isolates, whereas European isolates were spread without clustering and intermingled with LA isolates. VGF analysis resulted in increased resolution of populations, separating European from LA strains. Furthermore, clusters with exclusively Colombian, Mexican, or Nicaraguan strains were observed, where the Colombian cluster separated from Europe, Asia, and Africa, while Nicaraguan and Mexican clades grouped close to Africa. In addition, a mixed large LA cluster including Mexican, Colombian, Nicaraguan, Peruvian, and Salvadorian strains was observed; all LA clusters separated from the Amerind clade. With cagPAI sequence analyses LA clades clearly separated from Europe, Asia and Amerind, and Colombian strains formed a single cluster. A NeighborNet analyses suggested frequent and recent recombination events particularly among LA strains. Results suggests that in the new world, H. pylori has evolved to fit mestizo LA populations, already 500 years after the Spanish colonization. This co-adaption may account for regional variability in gastric cancer risk. PMID:28293542

  6. Functional analysis of glycoside hydrolase family 8 xylanases shows narrow but distinct substrate specificities and biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Annick; Schoepe, Jan; Dornez, Emmie; Strelkov, Sergei V; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2010-08-01

    The potential of glycoside hydrolase family (GH) 8 xylanases in biotechnological applications is virtually unexplored. Therefore, the substrate preference and hydrolysis product profiles of two GH8 xylanases were evaluated to investigate their activities and substrate specificities. A GH8 xylanase from an uncultured bacterium (rXyn8) shows endo action but very selectively releases xylotriose from its substrates. It has a higher activity than the Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis GH8 endo-xylanase (PhXyl) on xylononaose and smaller xylo-oligosaccharides. PhXyl preferably degrades xylan substrates with a high degree of polymerization. It is sterically more hindered by arabinose substituents than rXyn8, producing larger end hydrolysis products. The specificities of rXyn8 and PhXyl differ completely from these of the previously described GH8 xylanases from Bifidobacterium adolescentis (BaRexA) and Bacillus halodurans (BhRex). As reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanases, they selectively release xylose from the reducing end of small xylo-oligosaccharides. The findings of this study show that GH8 xylanases have a narrow substrate specificity, but also one that strongly varies between family members and is distinct from that of GH10 and GH11 xylanases. Structural comparison of rXyn8, PhXyl, BaRexA, and BhRex showed that subtle amino acid changes in the glycon as well as the aglycon subsites probably form the basis of the observed differences between GH8 xylanases. GH8 xylanases, therefore, are an interesting group of enzymes, with potential towards engineering and applications.

  7. Security Analysis of Broadcaster Group Key Exchange Protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHANG Huanguo

    2006-01-01

    Group key exchange protocols are basic protocols to provide privacy and integrity in secure group communication. This paper discusses the security of one type of group key exchange protocols and defines the kind of protocols as broadcaster group protocols. It points out two attacks on this kind of protocols. The first attack can be avoided by using fresh values in each action during one session of the group protocol. The second attack should be related with concrete application. It also proposes a dynamic key agreement protocol as an example of solutions at the last part of the paper.

  8. Analysis of a large dataset of mycorrhiza inoculation field trials on potato shows highly significant increases in yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    An increasing human population requires more food production in nutrient-efficient systems in order to simultaneously meet global food needs while reducing the environmental footprint of agriculture. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have the potential to enhance crop yield, but their efficiency has yet to be demonstrated in large-scale crop production systems. This study reports an analysis of a dataset consisting of 231 field trials in which the same AMF inoculant (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198) was applied to potato over a 4-year period in North America and Europe under authentic field conditions. The inoculation was performed using a liquid suspension of AMF spores that was sprayed onto potato seed pieces, yielding a calculated 71 spores per seed piece. Statistical analysis showed a highly significant increase in marketable potato yield (ANOVA, P < 0.0001) for inoculated fields (42.2 tons/ha) compared with non-inoculated controls (38.3 tons/ha), irrespective of trial year. The average yield increase was 3.9 tons/ha, representing 9.5 % of total crop yield. Inoculation was profitable with a 0.67-tons/ha increase in yield, a threshold reached in almost 79 % of all trials. This finding clearly demonstrates the benefits of mycorrhizal-based inoculation on crop yield, using potato as a case study. Further improvements of these beneficial inoculants will help compensate for crop production deficits, both now and in the future.

  9. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Shows an Elevation of Mdh1 Associated with Hepatotoxicity Induced by Copper Nanoparticle in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shu-wei; GAO Zhao-hui; SHEN Xiao-yun; XUE Hui-wen; LI Xia

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle is a new material widely used in biological medicine, animal husbandry and industrial areas, but its potential toxicity to human health and environment remains unclear. In order to study the hepatotoxic mechanisms of nanoparticles copper, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of lfight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) of proteomics technology were used to isolate and identify the differentially expressed proteins from liver, which associated with hepatotoxicity induced by copper nanoparticle in rats. In this study, we have screened 15 kinds of proteins related with hepatotoxicity, of which spot8212 was identiifed as Malate dehydrogenase (Mdh1). The mRNA expression trend of Mdh1 was consistent with the result of 2-DE by RT-PCR validation. Bioinformatics analysis showed that Mdh1 was stable and no signal peptides, subcellular location was in endoplasmic reticulum;it contained many functional sites such as malate dehydrogenase activity signal sites 155LTRLDHNRAKSQI167; α helixes and random coils were the two main elements. Homologous analysis demonstrated high homologous of Mdh1 in rats with mouse and human, and the phylogenetic tree of Mdh1 was constructed. The result indicated that copper nanoparticle could regulate up the Mdh1 protein expression so as to compensate the energy deifcit. Energy metabolic disturbance may be a pathway for copper nanoparticle particles to exert the hepatotoxic effects in rats.

  10. Expression analysis of genes associated with human osteosarcoma tumors shows correlation of RUNX2 overexpression with poor response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervigne Nilva K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric bone tumor. There is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying osteosarcoma oncogenesis, and a lack of good diagnostic as well as prognostic clinical markers for this disease. Recent discoveries have highlighted a potential role of a number of genes including: RECQL4, DOCK5, SPP1, RUNX2, RB1, CDKN1A, P53, IBSP, LSAMP, MYC, TNFRSF1B, BMP2, HISTH2BE, FOS, CCNB1, and CDC5L. Methods Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of these 16 genes as potential biomarkers of osteosarcoma oncogenesis and chemotherapy response in human tumors. We performed quantitative expression analysis in a panel of 22 human osteosarcoma tumors with differential response to chemotherapy, and 5 normal human osteoblasts. Results RECQL4, SPP1, RUNX2, and IBSP were significantly overexpressed, and DOCK5, CDKN1A, RB1, P53, and LSAMP showed significant loss of expression relative to normal osteoblasts. In addition to being overexpressed in osteosarcoma tumor samples relative to normal osteoblasts, RUNX2 was the only gene of the 16 to show significant overexpression in tumors that had a poor response to chemotherapy relative to good responders. Conclusion These data underscore the loss of tumor suppressive pathways and activation of specific oncogenic mechanisms associated with osteosarcoma oncogenesis, while drawing attention to the role of RUNX2 expression as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy failure in osteosarcoma.

  11. Marmosets, Raree shows and Pulcinelle: an Analysis and Edition of a Hitherto-Unpublished Carnival Play by Antonio de Zamora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Plata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an analyisis, annotation and edition of the Mojiganga del mundinovo (‘The raree show, a carnival play’ by Antonio de Zamora. The play was performed in 1698 Madrid by the troupe of Carlos Vallejo, along with the sacramental one-act play El templo vivo de Dios (‘The living temple of God’. The hitherto unpublished text is based on the only two extant manuscripts, located in archives in Madrid. Despite the play’s title, my analysis argues that the novelty in this play is not so much the raree show, a contraption popularized four decades earlier in Golden Age theater, as the marmosets. The death of two marmosets and the ensuing desolation of their owner, Ms. Estupenda, both trigger the play and provide it with a plot. The marmosets, too, point to a changing mentality in late 17th-century society, regarding the possession among ladies of marmosets and other monkeys as pets.

  12. Population analysis of the Fusarium graminearum species complex from wheat in China show a shift to more aggressive isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    Full Text Available A large number of Fusarium isolates was collected from blighted wheat spikes originating from 175 sampling sites, covering 15 provinces in China. Species and trichothecene chemotype determination by multilocus genotyping (MLGT indicated that F. graminearum s. str. with the 15-acetyl deoxynivalenol (15ADON chemotype and F. asiaticum with either the nivalenol (NIV or the 3-acetyl deoxynivalenol (3ADON chemotype were the dominant causal agents. Bayesian model-based clustering with allele data obtained with 12 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR markers, detected three genetic clusters that also show distinct chemotypes. High levels of population genetic differentiation and low levels of effective number of migrants were observed between these three clusters. Additional genotypic analyses revealed that F. graminearum s. str. and F. asiaticum are sympatric. In addition, composition analysis of these clusters indicated a biased gene flow from 3ADON to NIV producers in F. asiaticum. In phenotypic analyses, F. asiaticum that produce 3ADON revealed significant advantages over F. asiaticum that produce NIV in pathogenicity, growth rate, fecundity, conidial length, trichothecene accumulation and resistance to benzimidazole. These results suggest that natural selection drives the spread of a more vigorous, more toxigenic pathogen population which also shows higher levels of fungicide resistance.

  13. Quantitative fitness analysis shows that NMD proteins and many other protein complexes suppress or enhance distinct telomere cap defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gregory Addinall

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To better understand telomere biology in budding yeast, we have performed systematic suppressor/enhancer analyses on yeast strains containing a point mutation in the essential telomere capping gene CDC13 (cdc13-1 or containing a null mutation in the DNA damage response and telomere capping gene YKU70 (yku70Δ. We performed Quantitative Fitness Analysis (QFA on thousands of yeast strains containing mutations affecting telomere-capping proteins in combination with a library of systematic gene deletion mutations. To perform QFA, we typically inoculate 384 separate cultures onto solid agar plates and monitor growth of each culture by photography over time. The data are fitted to a logistic population growth model; and growth parameters, such as maximum growth rate and maximum doubling potential, are deduced. QFA reveals that as many as 5% of systematic gene deletions, affecting numerous functional classes, strongly interact with telomere capping defects. We show that, while Cdc13 and Yku70 perform complementary roles in telomere capping, their genetic interaction profiles differ significantly. At least 19 different classes of functionally or physically related proteins can be identified as interacting with cdc13-1, yku70Δ, or both. Each specific genetic interaction informs the roles of individual gene products in telomere biology. One striking example is with genes of the nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD pathway which, when disabled, suppress the conditional cdc13-1 mutation but enhance the null yku70Δ mutation. We show that the suppressing/enhancing role of the NMD pathway at uncapped telomeres is mediated through the levels of Stn1, an essential telomere capping protein, which interacts with Cdc13 and recruitment of telomerase to telomeres. We show that increased Stn1 levels affect growth of cells with telomere capping defects due to cdc13-1 and yku70Δ. QFA is a sensitive, high-throughput method that will also be useful to understand other

  14. Systematic analysis of group identification in stock markets

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Hee Kim; Hawoong Jeong

    2005-01-01

    We propose improved methods to identify stock groups using the correlation matrix of stock price changes. By filtering out the marketwide effect and the random noise, we construct the correlation matrix of stock groups in which nontrivial high correlations between stocks are found. Using the filtered correlation matrix, we successfully identify the multiple stock groups without any extra knowledge of the stocks by the optimization of the matrix representation and the percolation approach to t...

  15. Systematic analysis of group identification in stock markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Jeong, Hawoong

    2005-10-01

    We propose improved methods to identify stock groups using the correlation matrix of stock price changes. By filtering out the market-wide effect and the random noise, we construct the correlation matrix of stock groups in which nontrivial high correlations between stocks are found. Using the filtered correlation matrix, we successfully identify the multiple stock groups without any extra knowledge of the stocks by the optimization of the matrix representation and the percolation approach to the correlation-based network of stocks. These methods drastically reduce the ambiguities while finding stock groups using the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix.

  16. Infinite dimensional spherical analysis and harmonic analysis for groups acting on homogeneous trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelgaard, Emil

    of the groups, the so-called irreducible tame representations. We prove the existence of irreducible non-tame representations by constructing a compactification of the boundary of the tree - an object which until now has not played any role in the analysis of automorphism groups for trees which are not locally......In this thesis, we study groups of automorphisms for homogeneous trees of countable degree by using an inductive limit approach. The main focus is the thourough discussion of two Olshanski spherical pairs consisting of automorphism groups for a homogeneous tree and a homogeneous rooted tree...... finite. Finally, we discuss conditionally positive definite functions on the groups and use the generalized Bochner-Godement theorem for Olshanski spherical pairs to prove Levy-Khinchine formulas for both of the considered pairs....

  17. Brief Analysis of Group Structure in the Language Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹晨

    2013-01-01

    Group activities are commonly used in second language classroom in recent years mostly because they encourage stu⁃dents to work together, helping each other. However, it is of great importance for teachers to notice the group structures so that this class activity could play its important role in the classroom.

  18. Analysis of Conceptualization Patterns across Groups of People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes patterns of conceptualizations possessed by different groups of subjects. The eventual goal of this work is to dynamically learn and structure semantic representations for groups of people sharing domain knowledge. In this paper, we conduct a survey for collecting data...

  19. Ability Grouping in Schools: An Analysis of Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireson, Judith; Hallam, Susan; Mortimore, Peter; Hack, Sarah; Clark, Helen

    This paper presents preliminary findings from a large-scale study of ability grouping in English secondary schools. Forty-five secondary schools representing three levels of grouping took part in the research. Within these schools, data have been collected from a cohort of Year 9 pupils, aged 13-14 years. All these pupils took tests in English,…

  20. Business group performance, context, and strategy: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Carney (Michael); E.R. Gedajlovic (Eric); P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey); M. van Essen (Marc); J. van Oosterhout (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractResearch on business groups ?legally independent firms tied together in a variety of formal and informal ways ?is accelerating, but four questions still lack a definitive answer: Does business group membership enhance or diminish firm performance? Are members comparatively better off in

  1. Morphometric analysis of molars in a Middle Pleistocene population shows a mosaic of 'modern' and Neanderthal features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, María; Spěváčková, Petra; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Martínez, Ignacio; Bruner, Emiliano; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies of upper first molar (M1) crown shape have shown significant differences between Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis that were already present in the European Middle Pleistocene populations, including the large dental sample from Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos (SH). Analysis of other M1 features such as the total crown base area, cusp proportions, cusp angles and occlusal polygon have confirmed the differences between both lineages, becoming a useful tool for the taxonomic assignment of isolated teeth from Late Pleistocene sites. However, until now the pattern of expression of these variables has not been known for the SH sample. This fossil sample, the largest collection from the European Middle Pleistocene, is generally interpreted as being from the direct ancestors of Neanderthals, and thus is a reference sample for assessing the origin of the Neanderthal morphologies. Surprisingly, our study reveals that SH M(1) s present a unique mosaic of H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens features. Regarding the cusp angles and the relative occlusal polygon area, SH matches the H. neanderthalensis pattern. However, regarding the total crown base area and relative cusps size, SH M(1) s are similar to H. sapiens, with a small crown area, a strong hypocone reduction and a protocone enlargement, although the protocone expansion in SH is significantly larger than in any other group studied. The SH dental sample calls into question the uniqueness of some so-called modern traits. Our study also sounds a note of caution on the use of M(1) occlusal morphology for the alpha taxonomy of isolated M(1) s.

  2. Morphometric analysis of molars in a Middle Pleistocene population shows a mosaic of ‘modern’ and Neanderthal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, María; Spěváčková, Petra; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Martínez, Ignacio; Bruner, Emiliano; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Bermúdez de Castro, José María

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of upper first molar (M1) crown shape have shown significant differences between Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis that were already present in the European Middle Pleistocene populations, including the large dental sample from Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos (SH). Analysis of other M1 features such as the total crown base area, cusp proportions, cusp angles and occlusal polygon have confirmed the differences between both lineages, becoming a useful tool for the taxonomic assignment of isolated teeth from Late Pleistocene sites. However, until now the pattern of expression of these variables has not been known for the SH sample. This fossil sample, the largest collection from the European Middle Pleistocene, is generally interpreted as being from the direct ancestors of Neanderthals, and thus is a reference sample for assessing the origin of the Neanderthal morphologies. Surprisingly, our study reveals that SH M1s present a unique mosaic of H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens features. Regarding the cusp angles and the relative occlusal polygon area, SH matches the H. neanderthalensis pattern. However, regarding the total crown base area and relative cusps size, SH M1s are similar to H. sapiens, with a small crown area, a strong hypocone reduction and a protocone enlargement, although the protocone expansion in SH is significantly larger than in any other group studied. The SH dental sample calls into question the uniqueness of some so-called modern traits. Our study also sounds a note of caution on the use of M1 occlusal morphology for the alpha taxonomy of isolated M1s. PMID:23914934

  3. Continuous versus group sequential analysis for post-market drug and vaccine safety surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I R; Kulldorff, M

    2015-09-01

    The use of sequential statistical analysis for post-market drug safety surveillance is quickly emerging. Both continuous and group sequential analysis have been used, but consensus is lacking as to when to use which approach. We compare the statistical performance of continuous and group sequential analysis in terms of type I error probability; statistical power; expected time to signal when the null hypothesis is rejected; and the sample size required to end surveillance without rejecting the null. We present a mathematical proposition to show that for any group sequential design there always exists a continuous sequential design that is uniformly better. As a consequence, it is shown that more frequent testing is always better. Additionally, for a Poisson based probability model and a flat rejection boundary in terms of the log likelihood ratio, we compare the performance of various continuous and group sequential designs. Using exact calculations, we found that, for the parameter settings used, there is always a continuous design with shorter expected time to signal than the best group design. The two key conclusions from this article are (i) that any post-market safety surveillance system should attempt to obtain data as frequently as possible, and (ii) that sequential testing should always be performed when new data arrives without deliberately waiting for additional data. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  4. Local sphere-based co-registration for SAM group analysis in subjects without individual MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraeter, O; Teismann, Inga K; Wollbrink, A; Suntrup, S; Stoeckigt, K; Dziewas, R; Pantev, C

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) is a powerful MEG source localization method to analyze evoked as well as induced brain activity. To gain structural information of the underlying sources, especially in group studies, individual magnetic resonance images (MRI) are required for co-registration. During the last few years, the relevance of MEG measurements on understanding the pathophysiology of different diseases has noticeable increased. Unfortunately, especially in patients and small children, structural MRI scans cannot always be performed. Therefore, we developed a new method for group analysis of SAM results without requiring structural MRI data that derives its geometrical information from the individual volume conductor model constructed for the SAM analysis. The normalization procedure is fast, easy to implement and integrates seamlessly into an existing landmark based MEG-MRI co-registration procedure. This new method was evaluated on different simulated points as well as on a pneumatic index finger stimulation paradigm analyzed with SAM. Compared with an established MRI-based normalization procedure (SPM2) the new method shows only minor errors in single subject results as well as in group analysis. The mean difference between the two methods was about 4 mm for the simulated as well as for finger stimulation data. The variation between individual subjects was generally higher than the error induced by the missing MRIs. The method presented here is therefore sufficient for most MEG group studies. It allows accomplishing MEG studies with subject groups where MRI measurements cannot be performed.

  5. Dynamical analysis of strong-lensing galaxy groups at intermediate redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, R P; Verdugo, T; Garrido, F; Limousin, M; Padilla, N; Foëx, G; Cabanac, R; Gavazzi, R; Barrientos, L F; Richard, J

    2012-01-01

    We present VLT spectroscopic observations of 7 discovered galaxy groups between 0.3groups were selected from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S), a survey that consists in a systematic search for strong lensing systems in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We give details about the target selection, spectroscopic observations and data reduction for the first release of confirmed SL2S groups. The dynamical analysis of the systems reveals that they are gravitationally bound structures, with at least 4 confirmed members and velocity dispersions between 300 and 800 km/s. Their virial masses are between 10^13 and 10^14 M_sun, and so can be classified as groups or low mass clusters. Most of the systems are isolated groups, except two of them that show evidence of an ongoing merger of two sub-structures. We find a good agreement between the velocity dispersions estimated from the analysis of the kinematics of group galaxies and the weak lensing measurements, and conclude...

  6. Mathematical Model and Analysis of Negative Skin Friction of Pile Group in Consolidating Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangqiang Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate negative skin friction (NSF of pile group embedded in a consolidating soil, the dragload calculating formulas of single pile were established by considering Davis one-dimensional nonlinear consolidation soils settlement and hyperbolic load-transfer of pile-soil interface. Based on effective influence area theory, a simple semiempirical mathematical model of analysis for predicting the group effect of pile group under dragload was described. The accuracy and reliability of mathematical models built in this paper were verified by practical engineering comparative analysis. Case studies were studied, and the prediction values were found to be in good agreement with those of measured values. Then, the influences factors, such as, soil consolidation degree, the initial volume compressibility coefficient, and the stiffness of bearing soil, were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the mathematical models considering nonlinear soil consolidation and group effect can reflect the practical NSF of pile group effectively and accurately. The results of this paper can provide reference for practical pile group embedded in consolidating soil under NSF design and calculation.

  7. Analysis of a Group Decision-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of group decision and group thinking in the organization of a firm, taking as reference theoretical models and their practical applications. Organizational goals are often blocked by a pattern of thinking that develops within organizations. The article will also underline the importance oforganizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to reach, finally, to the desired result in the main goals of the organization.

  8. Analysis of a Group Decision-Making Process

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of group decision and group thinking in the organization of a firm, taking as reference theoretical models and their practical applications. Organizational goals are often blocked by a pattern of thinking that develops within organizations. The article will also underline the importance of organizations' focusing on sub-goals, in order to reach, finally, to the desired result in the main goals of the organization.

  9. “Prometheus” in group analysis: a reinterpretation of the mythological Foulkesian concept of “group matrix”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Nucara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we made an analysis of Foulkesian group-analytic the concept of matrix using as a privileged vertex of observation the greek myth of Prometheus. The narrative structureof this myth is then described and analyzed in its symbolic capacity to represent the complex and psychoanthropological concept of neoteny and its deep relationship with the concepts of culture and of founding group-analytical matrix (neotenic matrix.

  10. Entrepreneurial networking differences: An ethnic in-group and out-group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Urban

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Researching entrepreneurship using a network perspective is important, as social networks are assets for small business owners struggling to survive in competitive markets.Research purpose: The research question of this study has focused on what we can learn about entrepreneurial networking, considering that there is an under-explored and unarticulated set of networking principles and practices which have not been previously analysed in terms of a multiethnic country context.Motivation for the study: Often the lack of network use is reported as a feature of entrepreneurs, who have less opportunity to utilise formal social capital features. Social networks provided by extended family, community-based or organisational relationships are often theorised to supplement the effects of education, experience and financial capital.Research design, approach and method: Based on hypothesised differences in networking ties, network assistance and support relationships, a survey was used to collect data on quantitative measures. Descriptive statistics were calculated and differential tests were conducted to test the hypotheses.Main findings: Results indicate that entrepreneurial networking is largely independent on group composition. Generally at least some aspects of networking are generic and as a consequence, a more integrated view of networking can be adopted.Practical/managerial implications: The practical value of the present study points to several areas of interest to entrepreneurs, policy makers and educators, through demonstrating the multifaceted nature of entrepreneurial networks for different groups and their explanatory potential in understanding networking.Contribution/value-add: Despite the importance of entrepreneurial networking, little empirical or theoretical research has examined the dynamics of networking in a developing country context such as South Africa, which has lower than expected total entrepreneurship activity.

  11. A propensity score analysis shows that empirical treatment with linezolid does not increase the thirty-day mortality rate in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  12. Identification of different nutritional status groups in institutionalized elderly people by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Contreras, María José; López, Maria Ángeles; Canteras, Manuel; Candela, María Emilia; Zamora, Salvador; Pérez-Llamas, Francisca

    2014-03-01

    To apply a cluster analysis to groups of individuals of similar characteristics in an attempt to identify undernutrition or the risk of undernutrition in this population. A cross-sectional study. Seven public nursing homes in the province of Murcia, on the Mediterranean coast of Spain. 205 subjects aged 65 and older (131 women and 74 men). Dietary intake (energy and nutrients), anthropometric (body mass index, skinfold thickness, mid-arm muscle circumference, mid-arm muscle area, corrected arm muscle area, waist to hip ratio) and biochemical and haematological (serum albumin, transferrin, total cholesterol, total lymphocyte count). Variables were analyzed by cluster analysis. The results of the cluster analysis, including intake, anthropometric and analytical data showed that, of the 205 elderly subjects, 66 (32.2%) were over - weight/obese, 72 (35.1%) had an adequate nutritional status and 67 (32.7%) were undernourished or at risk of undernutrition. The undernourished or at risk of undernutrition group showed the lowest values for dietary intake and the anthropometric and analytical parameters measured. Our study shows that cluster analysis is a useful statistical method for assessing the nutritional status of institutionalized elderly populations. In contrast, use of the specific reference values frequently described in the literature might fail to detect real cases of undernourishment or those at risk of undernutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolution Analysis of the Aux/IAA Gene Family in Plants Shows Dual Origins and Variable Nuclear Localization Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The plant hormone auxin plays pivotal roles in many aspects of plant growth and development. The auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA gene family encodes short-lived nuclear proteins acting on auxin perception and signaling, but the evolutionary history of this gene family remains to be elucidated. In this study, the Aux/IAA gene family in 17 plant species covering all major lineages of plants is identified and analyzed by using multiple bioinformatics methods. A total of 434 Aux/IAA genes was found among these plant species, and the gene copy number ranges from three (Physcomitrella patens to 63 (Glycine max. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the canonical Aux/IAA proteins can be generally divided into five major clades, and the origin of Aux/IAA proteins could be traced back to the common ancestor of land plants and green algae. Many truncated Aux/IAA proteins were found, and some of these truncated Aux/IAA proteins may be generated from the C-terminal truncation of auxin response factor (ARF proteins. Our results indicate that tandem and segmental duplications play dominant roles for the expansion of the Aux/IAA gene family mainly under purifying selection. The putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs in Aux/IAA proteins are conservative, and two kinds of new primordial bipartite NLSs in P. patens and Selaginella moellendorffii were discovered. Our findings not only give insights into the origin and expansion of the Aux/IAA gene family, but also provide a basis for understanding their functions during the course of evolution.

  14. 3D Assembly Group Analysis for Cognitive Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Brecher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that allows the cognitive automation of robotic assembly processes is introduced. An assembly cell comprised of two robots was designed to verify the concept. For the purpose of validation a customer-defined part group consisting of Hubelino bricks is assembled. One of the key aspects for this process is the verification of the assembly group. Hence a software component was designed that utilizes the Microsoft Kinect to perceive both depth and color data in the assembly area. This information is used to determine the current state of the assembly group and is compared to a CAD model for validation purposes. In order to efficiently resolve erroneous situations, the results are interactively accessible to a human expert. The implications for an industrial application are demonstrated by transferring the developed concepts to an assembly scenario for switch-cabinet systems.

  15. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND ENVIRONMENTAL STABILITY OF POLYFLUORINATED GROUP SUBSTITUTED POLYTHIOPHENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuqing; SHEN Xueming; YANG Shiyong; LU Wei; ZHANG Jingyun

    1996-01-01

    Electrochemical polymerization of 3-fluoroalkoxy and 3-fluoroether thiophenes gives polymers with relatively high molecular weights and good processibility . Investigation of these polymers by means of GPC indicates that an increase in the number of fluorine atoms in the fluorinated group results in a decrease in degree of polymerization of the polymers in the same polythiophene series. As shown by NMR and FTIR, the polyfluorinated group substituted polythiophenes have regular 2, 5-coupling in their main chains.The SEM micrographs of the polymer films exhibit that polymer (1)-poly [3-2, 2, 3, 3-tetrafluoro-propoxy) thiophene] possesses more regular structure than the other polymers do. Substitution of polythiophenes by fluorinated groups leads to the polymers with high electric, electrochemical and thermal stability.

  16. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the

  17. Multi-modal analysis of small-group conversational dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, op den Rieks; Gatica-Perez, Daniel; Heylen, Dirk; Renals, Steve; Bourlard, Hervé; Carletta, Jean; Popescu-Belis, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic problems realted to automatic understanding of conversational group dynamics. It provides an overview of current research in automatic detection of the addressee(s) of the speaker in multiparty conversations, the visual focus of attention of participant

  18. Time Analysis Of King Matthias the Ist Sculptural Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Daniela CHELARU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on the degradation of the King Matthias I sculptural group, caused by environment factors and influenced by the casting technology and by the assembling method. During this study, samples from inside the statue were used and analyzed, using microscopy and X ray diffraction.

  19. Contingency Response Groups: An Analysis of Maintenance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    understanding through the multiple TDYs and the demands of the ASAM program. Thank you for your encouragement and motivation. vi...Advanced Study of Air Mobility ( ASAM )__________________ Status: [X ] Student [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Other Optimal Media Outlet...www.heritageflightacademy.com/americanairman/apcourse.html>. Carrabba, Peter. "Contingency Response Group Topics for ASAM ." Expeditionary Center, McGuire AFB, NJ. May 2010

  20. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease. National Epidemiology and Genetic Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaminckx, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Infections with group A streptococci (GAS), or S. pyogenes, range from mild and superficial to very severe and lethal invasive disease. In severe invasive GAS infections, hypotension and multiorgan failure may develop rapidly resulting in the development of toxic shock-like syndrome (TSS). In the no

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis of Viridans Group Streptococci Causing Endocarditis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, Keith E.; Hall, Lori; Woods, Christopher W.; Marco, Francesc; Miro, Jose M.; Cabell, Christopher; Hoen, Bruno; Marin, Mercedes; Utili, Riccardo; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Bradley, Suzanne; Mirrett, Stanley; Tambic, Arjana; Ryan, Suzanne; Gordon, David; Jones, Phillip; Korman, Tony; Wray, Dannah; Reller, L. Barth; Tripodi, Marie-Francoise; Plesiat, Patrick; Morris, Arthur J.; Lang, Selwyn; Murdoch, David R.; Petti, Cathy A.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) to the species level is difficult because VGS exchange genetic material. We performed multilocus DNA target sequencing to assess phylogenetic concordance of VGS for a well-defined clinical syndrome. The hierarchy of sequence data was often discordant, underscoring the importance of establishing biological relevance for finer phylogenetic distinctions. PMID:18650347

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of viridans group streptococci causing endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, Keith E; Hall, Lori; Woods, Christopher W; Marco, Francesc; Miro, Jose M; Cabell, Christopher; Hoen, Bruno; Marin, Mercedes; Utili, Riccardo; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Bradley, Suzanne; Mirrett, Stanley; Tambic, Arjana; Ryan, Suzanne; Gordon, David; Jones, Phillip; Korman, Tony; Wray, Dannah; Reller, L Barth; Tripodi, Marie-Francoise; Plesiat, Patrick; Morris, Arthur J; Lang, Selwyn; Murdoch, David R; Petti, Cathy A

    2008-09-01

    Identification of viridans group streptococci (VGS) to the species level is difficult because VGS exchange genetic material. We performed multilocus DNA target sequencing to assess phylogenetic concordance of VGS for a well-defined clinical syndrome. The hierarchy of sequence data was often discordant, underscoring the importance of establishing biological relevance for finer phylogenetic distinctions.

  3. Integrative analysis of multiple diverse omics datasets by sparse group multitask regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of high throughput genome-wide assays enable the exploration of genetic risk factors underlying complex traits. Although these studies have remarkable impact on identifying susceptible biomarkers, they suffer from issues such as limited sample size and low reproducibility. Combining individual studies of different genetic levels/platforms has the promise to improve the power and consistency of biomarker identification. In this paper, we propose a novel integrative method, namely sparse group multitask regression, for integrating diverse omics datasets, platforms and populations to identify risk genes/factors of complex diseases. This method combines multitask learning with sparse group regularization, which will: 1 treat the biomarker identification in each single study as a task and then combine them by multitask learning; 2 group variables from all studies for identifying significant genes; 3 enforce sparse constraint on groups of variables to overcome the ‘small sample, but large variables’ problem. We introduce two sparse group penalties: sparse group lasso and sparse group ridge in our multitask model, and provide an effective algorithm for each model. In addition, we propose a significance test for the identification of potential risk genes. Two simulation studies are performed to evaluate the performance of our integrative method by comparing it with conventional meta-analysis method. The results show that our sparse group multitask method outperforms meta-analysis method significantly. In an application to our osteoporosis studies, 7 genes are identified as significant genes by our method and are found to have significant effects in other three independent studies for validation. The most significant gene SOD2 has been identified in our previous osteoporosis study involving the same expression dataset. Several other genes such as TREML2, HTR1E and GLO1 are shown to be novel susceptible genes for osteoporosis, as confirmed

  4. Whole-genome single-nucleotide-polymorphism analysis for discrimination of Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Timme, Ruth; Raphael, Brian H; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a genetically diverse Gram-positive bacterium producing extremely potent neurotoxins (botulinum neurotoxins A through G [BoNT/A-G]). The complete genome sequences of three strains harboring only the BoNT/A1 nucleotide sequence are publicly available. Although these strains contain a toxin cluster (HA(+) OrfX(-)) associated with hemagglutinin genes, little is known about the genomes of subtype A1 strains (termed HA(-) OrfX(+)) that lack hemagglutinin genes in the toxin gene cluster. We sequenced the genomes of three BoNT/A1-producing C. botulinum strains: two strains with the HA(+) OrfX(-) cluster (69A and 32A) and one strain with the HA(-) OrfX(+) cluster (CDC297). Whole-genome phylogenic single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) analysis of these strains along with other publicly available C. botulinum group I strains revealed five distinct lineages. Strains 69A and 32A clustered with the C. botulinum type A1 Hall group, and strain CDC297 clustered with the C. botulinum type Ba4 strain 657. This study reports the use of whole-genome SNP sequence analysis for discrimination of C. botulinum group I strains and demonstrates the utility of this analysis in quickly differentiating C. botulinum strains harboring identical toxin gene subtypes. This analysis further supports previous work showing that strains CDC297 and 657 likely evolved from a common ancestor and independently acquired separate BoNT/A1 toxin gene clusters at distinct genomic locations.

  5. Multivariate analysis of chromatographic retention data as a supplementary means for grouping structurally related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoula, S; Zisi, Ch; Sampsonidis, I; Virgiliou, Ch; Theodoridis, G; Gika, H; Nikitas, P; Pappa-Louisi, A

    2015-03-27

    In the present study a series of 45 metabolite standards belonging to four chemically similar metabolite classes (sugars, amino acids, nucleosides and nucleobases, and amines) was subjected to LC analysis on three HILIC columns under 21 different gradient conditions with the aim to explore whether the retention properties of these analytes are determined from the chemical group they belong. Two multivariate techniques, principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis (DA), were used for statistical evaluation of the chromatographic data and extraction similarities between chemically related compounds. The total variance explained by the first two principal components of PCA was found to be about 98%, whereas both statistical analyses indicated that all analytes are successfully grouped in four clusters of chemical structure based on the retention obtained in four or at least three chromatographic runs, which, however should be performed on two different HILIC columns. Moreover, leave-one-out cross-validation of the above retention data set showed that the chemical group in which an analyte belongs can be 95.6% correctly predicted when the analyte is subjected to LC analysis under the same four or three experimental conditions as the all set of analytes was run beforehand. That, in turn, may assist with disambiguation of analyte identification in complex biological extracts.

  6. Symmetry group analysis of an ideal plastic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lamothe, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Lie point symmetry group of a system describing an ideal plastic plane flow in two dimensions in order to find analytical solutions. The infinitesimal generators that span the Lie algebra for this system are obtained. We completely classify the subalgebras of up to codimension two in conjugacy classes under the action of the symmetry group. Based on invariant forms, we use Ansatzes to compute symmetry reductions in such a way that the obtained solutions cover simultaneously many invariant and partially invariant solutions. We calculate solutions of the algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric and elliptic type. Some solutions depending on one or two arbitrary functions of one variable have also been found. In some cases, the shape of a potentially feasible extrusion die corresponding to the solution is deduced. These tools could be used to thin, curve, undulate or shape a ring in an ideal plastic material.

  7. The analysis of crystallographic symmetry types in finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Atikah Mohd; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Adam, Nooraishikin; Zamri, Siti Norziahidayu Amzee

    2014-06-01

    Undeniably, it is human nature to prefer objects which are considered beautiful. Most consider beautiful as perfection, hence they try to create objects which are perfectly balance in shape and patterns. This creates a whole different kind of art, the kind that requires an object to be symmetrical. This leads to the study of symmetrical objects and pattern. Even mathematicians and ethnomathematicians are very interested with the essence of symmetry. One of these studies were conducted on the Malay traditional triaxial weaving culture. The patterns derived from this technique are symmetrical and this allows for further research. In this paper, the 17 symmetry types in a plane, known as the wallpaper groups, are studied and discussed. The wallpaper groups will then be applied to the triaxial patterns of food cover in Malaysia.

  8. Lie group analysis for multi-scale plasma dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Vladimir F

    2011-01-01

    An application of approximate transformation groups to study dynamics of a system with distinct time scales is discussed. The utilization of the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky method of averaging to find solutions of the Lie equations is considered. Physical illustrations from the plasma kinetic theory demonstrate the potentialities of the suggested approach. Several examples of invariant solutions for the system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the two-component (electron-ion) plasma are presented.

  9. Failure mode and effects analysis A fuzzy group MCDM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hadi-Vencheh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fuzzy group decision making (FGDM model based on alpha-level sets, is proposed to generate, more accurate fuzzy using, risk priority numbers (RPNs and ensure to be robust against the uncertainty. This model allows decision makers (DMs to evaluate FMEA risk factors using linguistic terms rather than precise numerical values, allows them to express their opinions independently. A case study is investigated using the proposed model to illustrate its applications in RPN assessment.

  10. Selected papers on harmonic analysis, groups, and invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Nomizu, Katsumi

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains papers that originally appeared in Japanese in the journal Sūgaku. Ordinarily the papers would appear in the AMS translation of that journal, but to expedite publication the Society has chosen to publish them as a volume of selected papers. The papers range over a variety of topics, including representation theory, differential geometry, invariant theory, and complex analysis.

  11. 22 AN ANALYSIS OF AUDITORY MANIFESTATIONS IN A GROUP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    were found; with the types of hearing loss being mainly sensorineural in ... and management of patients with AIDS are raised. .... A review of the literature on auditory findings implies variability as far as ... common otologic problems reported in this population are serous otitis ..... Data Analysis and Statistical Procedures.

  12. An Analysis of Students’ Communication during Group Work in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelopi D. Vasileiadou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing observation grid and interview study methologies, this research examines the ways in which students communicate with each other while working in a team during problem solving in mathematics. The study focuses primarily on the language used for communication. Results suggest that participants make assumptions to solve mathematical problems and justify their individual opinions, and cooperate and help each other, rarely asking for their teacher’s help, while using both the ordinary, and the mathematical spoken and written language. The interview indicates that students, although not experienced in undertaking group work, are able to readily identify its benefits and positive aspects.

  13. An analysis of user engagement in student Facebook groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Lane

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysing the engagement of students in university-based Facebook groups can shed light on the nature of their learning experience and highlight leverage points to build on student success. While post-semester surveys and demographic participation data can highlight who was involved and how they subsequently felt about the experience, these techniques do not necessarily reflect real-time engagement. One way to gain insight into in-situ student experiences is by categorising the original posts and comments into predetermined frameworks of learning. This paper offers a systematic method of coding Facebook contributions within various engagement categories: motivation, discourse, cognition and emotive responses. 

  14. University-Community Engagement: A grid-group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Low

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available University-community engagement involves complex issues, entangling multiple and interacting points of view, all of which operate in a wider dynamic evolving social environment. For this reason, there is often disagreement about why engagement is necessary or desirable, and whether there is one optimal method to practice it. To address this issue, I argue that university-community engagement can be examined as a form of enquiry. In this view, engagement is viewed as a system that arises through the recognition of the dissent it embodies. As such, enquiry functions to process disagreements into diverse methods of communication. Most of the disagreements utilised by universities are derived from external sources, thus university-based enquiry must necessarily involve a dialogue with a broader community or environment. In this sense, university-community engagement can be viewed most generally as a method that processes disagreements into shared understandings through enquiry. To demonstrate how university-community engagement functions from an enquiry point of view, I use Mary Douglas’ grid-group diagramming method to develop a critical typology for classifying university-community engagement. My modified grid-group diagram provides a structured typological space within which four distinct methods of university-community engagement can be identified and discussed – both in relation to their internal communicational characteristics, and in relation to each other. The university-engagement grid-group diagram is constructed by locating each of Douglas’ four quadrants within Charles Peirce’s four methods of enquiry. Peirce’s work is introduced because each of his four methods of enquiry deals specifically with how disagreements are processed and resolved. When Peirce’s methods for fixing belief are located in Douglas’ grid-group diagram, they create a sense-making framework for university-community engagement. It is argued

  15. Tensor renormalization group analysis of CP(N-1) model

    CERN Document Server

    Kawauchi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    We apply the higher order tensor renormalization group to lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of the CP($N-1$) model in the presence of the $\\theta$-term is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the $\\theta$-term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region $\\beta \\gg 1$ and that obtained by Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of $\\beta$. The numerical computation including the $\\theta$-term is left for future challenges.

  16. Tensor renormalization group analysis of CP (N -1 ) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Hikaru; Takeda, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    We apply the higher-order tensor renormalization group to the lattice CP (N -1 ) model in two dimensions. A tensor network representation of the CP (N -1 ) model in the presence of the θ term is derived. We confirm that the numerical results of the CP(1) model without the θ term using this method are consistent with that of the O(3) model which is analyzed by the same method in the region β ≫1 and that obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation in a wider range of β . The numerical computation including the θ term is left for future challenges.

  17. Signed directed social network analysis applied to group conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Quan; Skillicorn, David; Walther, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Real-world social networks contain relationships of multiple different types, but this richness is often ignored in graph-theoretic modelling. We show how two recently developed spectral embedding techniques, for directed graphs (relationships are asymmetric) and for signed graphs (relationships...... are both positive and negative), can be combined. This combination is particularly appropriate for intelligence, terrorism, and law enforcement applications. We illustrate by applying the novel embedding technique to datasets describing conflict in North-West Africa, and show how unusual interactions can...

  18. Phylogenetic diversity of the Bacillus pumilus group and the marine ecotype revealed by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Qiliang; Dong, Chunming; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria closely related to Bacillus pumilus cannot be distinguished from such other species as B. safensis, B. stratosphericus, B. altitudinis and B. aerophilus simply by 16S rRNA gene sequence. In this report, 76 marine strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 7 housekeeping genes to understand the phylogeny and biogeography in comparison with other origins. A phylogenetic tree based on the 7 housekeeping genes concatenated in the order of gyrB-rpoB-pycA-pyrE-mutL-aroE-trpB was constructed and compared with trees based on the single genes. All these trees exhibited a similar topology structure with small variations. Our 79 strains were divided into 6 groups from A to F; Group A was the largest and contained 49 strains close to B. altitudinis. Additional two large groups were presented by B. safensis and B. pumilus respectively. Among the housekeeping genes, gyrB and pyrE showed comparatively better resolution power and may serve as molecular markers to distinguish these closely related strains. Furthermore, a recombinant phylogenetic tree based on the gyrB gene and containing 73 terrestrial and our isolates was constructed to detect the relationship between marine and other sources. The tree clearly showed that the bacteria of marine origin were clustered together in all the large groups. In contrast, the cluster belonging to B. safensis was mainly composed of bacteria of terrestrial origin. Interestingly, nearly all the marine isolates were at the top of the tree, indicating the possibility of the recent divergence of this bacterial group in marine environments. We conclude that B. altitudinis bacteria are the most widely spread of the B. pumilus group in marine environments. In summary, this report provides the first evidence regarding the systematic evolution of this bacterial group, and knowledge of their phylogenetic diversity will help in the understanding of their ecological role and distribution in marine environments.

  19. Social Network Analysis of an Online Melanoma Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Kathleen T.; McCray, Alexa T.; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    We have developed tools to explore social networks that share information in medical forums to better understand the unmet informational needs of patients and family members facing cancer treatments. We define metrics that demonstrate members discussing interleukin-2 receive a stronger response from the melanoma discussion group than a typical topic. The interleukin-2 network has a different topology than the melanoma network, has a higher density, and its members are more likely to have a higher intimacy level with another member and a lower inquisitiveness level than a typical melanoma user. Members are more likely to join the interleukin-2 network to answer a question than in the melanoma network (probability =.2 ±.05 p-value=.001). Within the melanoma network 20% of the questions posed to the community do not get an answer. In the interleukin-2 network, 1.3% of the questions (one question) do not get a response. PMID:21347134

  20. ANALYSIS OF GROUP MAINTENANCE STRATEGY -ROAD PAVEMENT AND SEWERAGE PIPES-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Keishi; Sugimoto, Yasuaki; Miyamoto, Shinya; Nada, Hideki; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    Recently, it is critical to manage deteriorating sewerage and road facilities efficiently and strategically. Since the sewerage pipes are mostly installed under road pavement, the works for the replacement of the sewerage pipes are partially common to the works for the road. This means that the replacement cost can be saved by coordinating the timing of the replacements by sewerage pipe and road pavement. The purpose of the study is to develop the model based on Markov decision process to derive the optimal group maintenance policy so as to minimize lifecycle cost. Then the model is applied to case study area and demonstrated to estimate the lifecycle cost using statistical data such as pipe replacement cost, road pavement rehabilitation cost, and state of deterioration of pipes and road pavement.

  1. Random Lie group actions on compact manifolds: a perturbative analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sadel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    A random Lie group action on a compact manifold generates a discrete time Markov process. The main object of this paper is the evaluation of associated Birkhoff sums in a regime of weak, but sufficiently effective coupling of the randomness. This effectiveness is expressed in terms of random Lie algebra elements and replaces the transience or Furstenberg's irreducibility hypothesis in related problems. The Birkhoff sum of any given smooth function then turns out to be equal to its integral w.r.t. a unique smooth measure on the manifold up to errors of the order of the coupling constant. Applications to the theory of products of random matrices and a model of a disordered quantum wire are presented.

  2. A renormalization group analysis of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenli Z.; Diamond, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The renormalization group (RNG) method is used to study the physics of two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. It is shown that, for a turbulent magnetofluid in two dimensions, no RNG transformation fixed point exists on account of the coexistence of energy transfer to small scales and mean-square magnetic flux transfer to large scales. The absence of a fixed point renders the RNG method incapable of describing the 2D MHD system. A similar conclusion is reached for 2D hydrodynamics, where enstrophy flows to small scales and energy to large scales. These analyses suggest that the applicability of the RNG method to turbulent systems is intrinsically limited, especially in the case of systems with dual-direction transfer.

  3. Renormalization group analysis of anisotropic diffusion in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Barton, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    The renormalization group is applied to compute anisotropic corrections to the scalar eddy diffusivity representation of turbulent diffusion of a passive scalar. The corrections are linear in the mean velocity gradients. All model constants are computed theoretically. A form of the theory valid at arbitrary Reynolds number is derived. The theory applies only when convection of the velocity-scalar correlation can be neglected. A ratio of diffusivity components, found experimentally to have a nearly constant value in a variety of shear flows, is computed theoretically for flows in a certain state of equilibrium. The theoretical value is well within the fairly narrow range of experimentally observed values. Theoretical predictions of this diffusivity ratio are also compared with data from experiments and direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and scalar gradients.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF CLASSICAL ABO BLOOD GROUPS AMONG TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS : AN ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Devi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present Diabetes Mellitus is a global phenomenon with the disease topping the list, comprising of about 32 million cases , India is in the forefront with 30% of the cases . The disease affects multiple organs and is a leading cause of much morbidity and mortality. Since it is a multi - factorial disease a major step would be to identify different associated factors, for an early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The ABO blood groups are often associated with several diseases, with one blood group more often seen with the patients of a particular disease. Our study will help to determine the frequency and distribution of blood groups in correlation with Diabetes Mellitus. MATERIAL & METHODS: This study was conducted in the Gandhi Medical College, Secunderabad, during a two year period. A random study involving every third diabetic patient was chosen and their blood group was determined. A total of 3 00 patients were selected with 150 male and 150 female patients. Another 300 volunteers who were not diabetics were chosen as controls and their blood groups were also determined. A pro - forma was given to both diabetics and controls which included the following variables : 1 . Demographic data 2. Blood grouping 3. Fasting and post prandial blood sugar. Following this, blood groups of both cohorts and controls were determined by antigen antibody agglutination method. Data analysis was do ne after data was entered into excel sheet and double checked for errors using SPSS Software RESULTS: Our a nalysis showed that O group was significantly more among diabetic patients when all patients were compared to control . ² there was a preponderance of blood group O among female diabetics and B among male diabetics. CONCLUSION: ABO blood groups have been determined in 300 diabetic patients and compared with the controls comprising of a series of 300 voluntary blood donors. When the results were analysed on the basis of sex, there was preponderance

  5. Genetic analysis of three US population groups using an X-chromosomal STR decaplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Iva; Prinz, Mechthild; Pereira, Rui; Meyers, Carole; Mikulasovich, Rebecca S; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Gusmão, Leonor

    2007-05-01

    An X-chromosomal multiplex amplifying ten short tandem repeats (STRs) in one single PCR reaction was developed and optimized in this work. The X-STRs included were DXS8378, DXS9898, DXS8377, HPRTB, GATA172D05, DXS7423, DXS6809, DXS7132, DXS101, and DXS6789. Decaplex performance was tested on 377 male samples from three United States population groups, namely, 130 African Americans, 104 Asians, and 143 Hispanics. DXS8377 was the most polymorphic locus across all three populations, whereas DXS7423 was the least informative marker. Genetic distance analysis (R (ST) and F (ST)) performed for the three populations residing in New York showed significant genetic distances between population groups for most pairwise comparisons, except for HPRTB, DXS6809, and DXS7132. When testing linkage disequilibrium for all pairs of loci in the three groups, no significant association was found between any pair of the loci studied, after applying Bonferroni correction. The high values for the average probability of excluding a random man obtained in all three populations when both mother and daughter are tested or when father/daughter relationships are evaluated support the potential of this decaplex system in kinship analysis. Also, the overall high power of discrimination values for samples of female and male origin, confirms the usefulness of this decaplex system in identification analysis. As expected, results also support the use of independent databases comprising these ten X-linked loci for the three US populations evaluated.

  6. PREFACE: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference (EMAG2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Ian

    2015-10-01

    2015 marked a new venture for the EMAG group of the Institute of Physics in that the conference was held in conjunction with the MMC2015 conference at the wonderful Manchester Central conference centre. As anyone who was there would be able to confirm, this went exceptionally well and was a really vibrant and top quality conference. The oral sessions were filled with good talks, the poster sessions were very lively, and there was a good balance between oral sessions with a specifically "EMAG" identity, and the integration into a larger conference with the ability to switch between up to six parallel sessions covering physical sciences, techniques, and life sciences. The large conference also attracted a wide range of exhibitors, and this is essential for the ongoing success of all of our work, in a field that is very dependent on continued technical innovation and on collaborations between academic researchers and commercial developers of microscopes, holders, detectors, spectrometers, sample preparation equipment, and software, among other things. As has long been the case at EMAG, all oral and poster presenters were invited to submit papers for consideration for the proceedings. As ever, these papers were independently reviewed by other conference attendees, with the aim of continuing the long tradition of the EMAG proceedings being a top quality, peer-reviewed publication, worthy of reference in future years. Whilst I recognise that not all presenters were able to submit papers to the proceedings (for instance due to the need not to prejudice publication in some other journals, or due to avoiding duplicate publication of data), we are gratified that our presenters submitted as many papers as they did. The 41 papers included provide an interesting snapshot of many of the areas covered in the conference presentations, including functional materials, coatings, 3D microscopy, FIB and SEM, nanomaterials, magnetic and structural materials, advances in EM techniques

  7. Classical and Quantum Burgers Fluids: A Challenge for Group Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Broadbridge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most general second order irrotational vector field evolution equation is constructed, that can be transformed to a single equation for the Cole–Hopf potential. The exact solution to the radial Burgers equation, with constant mass influx through a spherical supply surface, is constructed. The complex linear Schrödinger equation is equivalent to an integrable system of two coupled real vector equations of Burgers type. The first velocity field is the particle current divided by particle probability density. The second vector field gives a complex valued correction to the velocity that results in the correct quantum mechanical correction to the kinetic energy density of the Madelung fluid. It is proposed how to use symmetry analysis to systematically search for other constrained potential systems that generate a closed system of vector component evolution equations with constraints other than irrotationality.

  8. Quasiclassical analysis of spectra in two groups of central potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shpatakovskaya, G V

    2001-01-01

    The method for the spectra analysis in the gravitational central potentials with the Coulomb feature in the zero (interatomic potentials) and the finite ones in the zero (potentials in the spheric clusters nuclei) is proposed. It is shown that by the degeneration removal by the orbital quantum number for the n-shell by small l the difference epsilon sub n sub l - epsilon sub n sub 0 approx = a subepsilon sub sub n sub sub 0 (l + 1/2) sup 2. The correctness of the presented formula for the internal electrons is demonstrated by the mercury atoms spectrum calculations. The reverse dependence takes place, as a rule, in the cluster potentials. The dependence of the area position with the degenerated level on the N cluster size is analyzed by the example of the Al sub N aluminium clusters. It is known that the increase in the N leads to the pressing-out of this area upwards

  9. Likelihood analysis of the Local Group acceleration revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ciecielag, P

    2004-01-01

    We reexamine likelihood analyzes of the Local Group (LG) acceleration, paying particular attention to nonlinear effects. Under the approximation that the joint distribution of the LG acceleration and velocity is Gaussian, two quantities describing nonlinear effects enter these analyzes. The first one is the coherence function, i.e. the cross-correlation coefficient of the Fourier modes of gravity and velocity fields. The second one is the ratio of velocity power spectrum to gravity power spectrum. To date, in all analyzes of the LG acceleration the second quantity was not accounted for. Extending our previous work, we study both the coherence function and the ratio of the power spectra. With the aid of numerical simulations we obtain expressions for the two as functions of wavevector and \\sigma_8. Adopting WMAP's best determination of \\sigma_8, we estimate the most likely value of the parameter \\beta and its errors. As the observed values of the LG velocity and gravity, we adopt respectively a CMB-based estim...

  10. Mutation analysis in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients from Bulgaria shows a peculiar distribution of breakpoints by intron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, A.; Bronzova, J.; Kremensky, I. [Univ. Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sofia (Bulgaria)] [and others

    1996-10-02

    For the first time in Bulgaria, a deletion/duplication screening was performed on a group of 84 unrelated Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy patients, and the breakpoint distribution in the dystrophin gene was analyzed. Intragenic deletions were detected in 67.8% of patients, and intragenic duplications in 2.4%. A peculiar distribution of deletion breakpoints was found. Only 13.2% of the deletion breakpoints fell in the {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} hot spot in intron 44, whereas the majority (> 54%) were located within the segment encompassing introns 45-51, which includes intron 50, the richest in breakpoints (16%) in the Bulgarian sample. Comparison with data from Greece and Turkey points at the probable existence of a deletion hot spot within intron 50, which might be a characteristic of populations of the Balkan region. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Analysis of admixture and genetic structure of two Native American groups of Southern Argentinean Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Andrea; Corach, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Argentinean Patagonia is inhabited by people that live principally in urban areas and by small isolated groups of individuals that belong to indigenous aboriginal groups; this territory exhibits the lowest population density of the country. Mapuche and Tehuelche (Mapudungun linguistic branch), are the only extant Native American groups that inhabit the Argentinean Patagonian provinces of Río Negro and Chubut. Fifteen autosomal STRs, 17 Y-STRs, mtDNA full length control region sequence and two sets of Y and mtDNA-coding region SNPs were analyzed in a set of 434 unrelated individuals. The sample set included two aboriginal groups, a group of individuals whose family name included Native American linguistic root and urban samples from Chubut, Río Negro and Buenos Aires provinces of Argentina. Specific Y Amerindian haplogroup Q1 was found in 87.5% in Mapuche and 58.82% in Tehuelche, while the Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups were present in all the aboriginal sample contributors investigated. Admixture analysis performed by means of autosomal and Y-STRs showed the highest degree of admixture in individuals carrying Mapuche surnames, followed by urban populations, and finally by isolated Native American populations as less degree of admixture. The study provided novel genetic information about the Mapuche and Tehuelche people and allowed us to establish a genetic correlation among individuals with Mapudungun surnames that demonstrates not only a linguistic but also a genetic relationship to the isolated aboriginal communities, representing a suitable proxy indicator for assessing genealogical background.

  12. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae biofilms shows shift to anaerobic respiration and changes in nutrient transport and outermembrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J Phillips

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea, can form biofilms in vitro and in vivo. In biofilms, the organism is more resistant to antibiotic treatment and can serve as a reservoir for chronic infection. We have used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC to compare protein expression in biofilm and planktonic organisms. Two parallel populations of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291, which is an arginine auxotroph, were grown for 48 h in continuous-flow chambers over glass, one supplemented with (13C(6-arginine for planktonic organisms and the other with unlabeled arginine for biofilm growth. The biofilm and planktonic cells were harvested and lysed separately, and fractionated into three sequential protein extracts. Corresponding heavy (H planktonic and light (L biofilm protein extracts were mixed and separated by 1D SDS-PAGE gels, and samples were extensively analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Overall, 757 proteins were identified, and 152 unique proteins met a 1.5-fold cutoff threshold for differential expression with p-values <0.05. Comparing biofilm to planktonic organisms, this set included 73 upregulated and 54 downregulated proteins. Nearly a third of the upregulated proteins were involved in energy metabolism, with cell envelope proteins making up the next largest group. Of the downregulated proteins, the largest groups were involved in protein synthesis and energy metabolism. These proteomics results were compared with our previously reported results from transcriptional profiling of gonococcal biofilms using microarrays. Nitrite reductase and cytochrome c peroxidase, key enzymes required for anaerobic growth, were detected as highly upregulated in both the proteomic and transcriptomic datasets. These and other protein expression changes observed in the present study were consistent with a shift to anaerobic respiration in gonococcal biofilms, although changes in membrane proteins not

  13. Global gene analysis of oocytes from early stages in human folliculogenesis shows high expression of novel genes in reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markholt, Sara; Grøndahl, M L; Ernst, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The pool of primordial follicles in humans is laid down during embryonic development and follicles can remain dormant for prolonged intervals, often decades, until individual follicles resume growth. The mechanisms that induce growth and maturation of primordial follicles are poorly understood...... but follicles once activated either continue growth or undergo atresia. We have isolated pure populations of oocytes from human primordial, intermediate and primary follicles using laser capture micro-dissection microscopy and evaluated the global gene expression profiles by whole-genome microarray analysis...

  14. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Dargis, R; Højholt, K; Christensen, J J; Skovgaard, O; Justesen, U S; Rosenvinge, F S; Moser, C; Lukjancenko, O; Rasmussen, S; Nielsen, X C

    2016-10-01

    Identification of Mitis group streptococci (MGS) to the species level is challenging for routine microbiology laboratories. Correct identification is crucial for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, identification of treatment failure, and/or infection relapse. Eighty MGS from Danish patients with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were observed in single gene analyses. Species identification based on single gene analysis showed their limitations when more strains were included. In contrast, analyses incorporating more sequence data, like MLSA, SNPs and core-genome analyses, provided more distinct clustering. The core-genome tree showed the most distinct clustering.

  15. University student understanding of cancer: analysis of ethnic group variances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estaville, Lawrence; Trad, Megan; Martinez, Gloria

    2012-06-01

    Traditional university and college students ages 18-24 are traversing an important period in their lives in which behavioral intervention is critical in reducing their risk of cancer in later years. The study's purpose was to determine the perceptions and level of knowledge about cancer of white, Hispanic, and black university students (n=958). Sources of student information about cancer were also identified. The survey results showed all students know very little about cancer and their perceptions of cancer are bad with many students thinking that cancer and death are synonymous. We also discovered university students do not discuss cancer often in their classrooms nor with their family or friends. Moreover, university students are unlikely to perform monthly or even yearly self-examinations for breast or testicular cancers; black students have the lowest rate of self-examinations.

  16. Global gene analysis of oocytes from early stages in human folliculogenesis shows high expression of novel genes in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markholt, S; Grøndahl, M L; Ernst, E H; Andersen, C Yding; Ernst, E; Lykke-Hartmann, K

    2012-02-01

    The pool of primordial follicles in humans is laid down during embryonic development and follicles can remain dormant for prolonged intervals, often decades, until individual follicles resume growth. The mechanisms that induce growth and maturation of primordial follicles are poorly understood but follicles once activated either continue growth or undergo atresia. We have isolated pure populations of oocytes from human primordial, intermediate and primary follicles using laser capture micro-dissection microscopy and evaluated the global gene expression profiles by whole-genome microarray analysis. The array data were confirmed by qPCR for selected genes. A total of 6301 unique genes were identified as significantly expressed representing enriched specific functional categories such as 'RNA binding', 'translation initiation' and 'structural molecule activity'. Several genes, some not previously known to be associated with early oocyte development, were identified with exceptionally high expression levels, such as the anti-proliferative transmembrane protein with an epidermal growth factor-like and two follistatin-like domains (TMEFF2), the Rho-GTPase-activating protein oligophrenin 1 (OPHN1) and the mitochondrial-encoded ATPase6 (ATP6). Thus, the present study provides not only a technique to capture and perform transcriptome analysis of the sparse material of human oocytes from the earliest follicle stages but further includes a comprehensive basis for our understanding of the regulatory factors and pathways present during early human folliculogenesis.

  17. A statistical analysis of the Two Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey: The impact of feedback on group properties

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ria; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) We present a statistical analysis of 28 nearby galaxy groups from the Two-Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey (2dXGS). We focus on entropy and the role of feedback, dividing the sample into cool core (CC) and non cool core (NCC) systems, the first time the latter have been studied in detail in the group regime. The coolest groups have steeper entropy profiles than the warmest systems, and NCC groups have higher central entropy and exhibit more scatter than their CC counterparts. We compare the entropy distribution of the gas in each system to the expected theoretical distribution ignoring non-gravitational processes. In all cases, the observed maximum entropy far exceeds that expected theoretically, and simple models for modifications of the theoretical entropy distribution perform poorly. Applying initial pre-heating, followed by radiative cooling, generally fails to match the low entropy behaviour, and only performs well when the difference between the maximum entropy of the observed and theoreti...

  18. GALA: group analysis leads to accuracy, a novel approach for solving the inverse problem in exploratory analysis of group MEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozunov, Vladimir V; Ossadtchi, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Although MEG/EEG signals are highly variable between subjects, they allow characterizing systematic changes of cortical activity in both space and time. Traditionally a two-step procedure is used. The first step is a transition from sensor to source space by the means of solving an ill-posed inverse problem for each subject individually. The second is mapping of cortical regions consistently active across subjects. In practice the first step often leads to a set of active cortical regions whose location and timecourses display a great amount of interindividual variability hindering the subsequent group analysis. We propose Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy (GALA)-a solution that combines the two steps into one. GALA takes advantage of individual variations of cortical geometry and sensor locations. It exploits the ensuing variability in electromagnetic forward model as a source of additional information. We assume that for different subjects functionally identical cortical regions are located in close proximity and partially overlap and their timecourses are correlated. This relaxed similarity constraint on the inverse solution can be expressed within a probabilistic framework, allowing for an iterative algorithm solving the inverse problem jointly for all subjects. A systematic simulation study showed that GALA, as compared with the standard min-norm approach, improves accuracy of true activity recovery, when accuracy is assessed both in terms of spatial proximity of the estimated and true activations and correct specification of spatial extent of the activated regions. This improvement obtained without using any noise normalization techniques for both solutions, preserved for a wide range of between-subject variations in both spatial and temporal features of regional activation. The corresponding activation timecourses exhibit significantly higher similarity across subjects. Similar results were obtained for a real MEG dataset of face-specific evoked responses.

  19. GALA: Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy, a novel approach for solving the inverse problem in exploratory analysis of group MEG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eKozunov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although MEG/EEG signals are highly variable between subjects, they allow characterizing systematic changes of cortical activity in both space and time. Traditionally a two-step procedure is used. The first step is a transition from sensor to source space by the means of solving an ill-posed inverse problem for each subject individually. The second is mapping of cortical regions consistently active across subjects. In practice the first step often leads to a set of active cortical regions whose location and timecourses display a great amount of interindividual variability hindering the subsequent group analysis.We propose Group Analysis Leads to Accuracy (GALA - a solution that combines the two steps into one. GALA takes advantage of individual variations of cortical geometry and sensor locations. It exploits the ensuing variability in electromagnetic forward model as a source of additional information. We assume that for different subjects functionally identical cortical regions are located in close proximity and partially overlap and their timecourses are correlated. This relaxed similarity constraint on the inverse solution can be expressed within a probabilistic framework, allowing for an iterative algorithm solving the inverse problem jointly for all subjects.A systematic simulation study showed that GALA, as compared with the standard min-norm approach, improves accuracy of true activity recovery, when accuracy is assessed both in terms of spatial proximity of the estimated and true activations and correct specification of spatial extent of the activated regions. This improvement obtained without using any noise normalization techniques for both solutions, preserved for a wide range of between-subject variations in both spatial and temporal features of regional activation. The corresponding activation timecourses exhibit significantly higher similarity across subjects. Similar results were obtained for a real MEG dataset of face

  20. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis of Yukon Thellungiella plants grown in cabinets and their natural habitat show phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara David R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella salsuginea is an important model plant due to its natural tolerance to abiotic stresses including salt, cold, and water deficits. Microarray and metabolite profiling have shown that Thellungiella undergoes stress-responsive changes in transcript and organic solute abundance when grown under controlled environmental conditions. However, few reports assess the capacity of plants to display stress-responsive traits in natural habitats where concurrent stresses are the norm. Results To determine whether stress-responsive changes observed in cabinet-grown plants are recapitulated in the field, we analyzed leaf transcript and metabolic profiles of Thellungiella growing in its native Yukon habitat during two years of contrasting meteorological conditions. We found 673 genes showing differential expression between field and unstressed, chamber-grown plants. There were comparatively few overlaps between genes expressed under field and cabinet treatment-specific conditions. Only 20 of 99 drought-responsive genes were expressed both in the field during a year of low precipitation and in plants subjected to drought treatments in cabinets. There was also a general pattern of lower abundance among metabolites found in field plants relative to control or stress-treated plants in growth cabinets. Nutrient availability may explain some of the observed differences. For example, proline accumulated to high levels in cold and salt-stressed cabinet-grown plants but proline content was, by comparison, negligible in plants at a saline Yukon field site. We show that proline accumulated in a stress-responsive manner in Thellungiella plants salinized in growth cabinets and in salt-stressed seedlings when nitrogen was provided at 1.0 mM. In seedlings grown on 0.1 mM nitrogen medium, the proline content was low while carbohydrates increased. The relatively higher content of sugar-like compounds in field plants and seedlings on low nitrogen

  1. Transitioning from traditional to green cleaners: an analysis of custodian and manager focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Nancy; Wakai, Sara; Welsh, Loyola; Westinghouse, Carol; Morse, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Custodians represent one of the largest occupational groups using cleaning agents, and yet their voices are infrequently heard in relation to the introduction of "green" cleaners and the laws regarding environmentally preferable products (EPP). This study reflects worker voices on use and effectiveness of chemicals, as well as incentives and obstacles for green cleaning programs. Sixty-four custodians and staff participated in 10 focus groups. Data were entered into Atlas Ti and the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis was used to identify themes. Themes included satisfaction in a "well-done" job, more effort required for job, lack of involvement in EPP selection process, EPP's ease of use for workers with English as a Second Language (ESL), misuse of disinfectants, health complaints, and need for training. This study shows that custodians have a voice, and that improved communication and feedback among all the stakeholders are needed to make the transition to green cleaning more effective.

  2. Transcriptional profiling by cDNA-AFLP analysis showed differential transcript abundance in response to water stress in Populus hopeiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yuepeng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is one of the main environmental factors limiting tree growth and productivity of plantation forests worldwide. Populus hopeiensis Hu et Chow is one of the most important commercial plantation tree species in China. However, the genes controlling drought tolerance in this species have not been identified or characterized. Here, we conducted differential expression analyses and identified a number of genes that were up- or downregulated in P. hopeiensis during water stress. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study of differentially expressed genes in water-stressed P. hopeiensis. Results Using the cDNA-AFLP detection technique, we used 256 primer combinations to identify differentially expressed genes in P. hopeiensis during water stress. In total, 415 transcript derived-fragments (TDFs were obtained from 10× deep sequencing of 473 selected TDFs. Of the 415 TDFs, 412 were annotated by BLAST searches against various databases. The majority of these genes encoded products involved in ion transport and compartmentalization, cell division, metabolism, and protein synthesis. The TDFs were clustered into 12 groups on the basis of their expression patterns. Of the 415 reliable TDFs, the sequences of 35 were homologous to genes that play roles in short or long-term resistance to drought stress. Some genes were further selected for validation of cDNA-AFLP expression patterns using real-time PCR analyses. The results confirmed the expression patterns that were detected using the cDNA-AFLP technique. Conclusion The cDNA-AFLP technique is an effective and powerful tool for identifying candidate genes that are differentially expressed under water stress. We demonstrated that 415 TDFs were differentially expressed in water-stressed poplar. The products of these genes are involved in various biological processes in the drought response of poplar. The results of this study will aid in the identification of

  3. Mutational analysis of sclerostin shows importance of the flexible loop and the cystine-knot for Wnt-signaling inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschert, Verena; van Dinther, Maarten; Weidauer, Stella; van Pee, Katharina; Muth, Eva-Maria; Ten Dijke, Peter; Mueller, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    The cystine-knot containing protein Sclerostin is an important negative regulator of bone growth and therefore represents a promising therapeutic target. It exerts its biological task by inhibiting the Wnt (wingless and int1) signaling pathway, which participates in bone formation by promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. The core structure of Sclerostin consists of three loops with the first and third loop (Finger 1 and Finger 2) forming a structured β-sheet and the second loop being unstructured and highly flexible. Biochemical data showed that the flexible loop is important for binding of Sclerostin to Wnt co-receptors of the low-density lipoprotein related-protein family (LRP), by interacting with the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 or -6 it inhibits Wnt signaling. To further examine the structural requirements for Wnt inhibition, we performed an extensive mutational study within all three loops of the Sclerostin core domain involving single and multiple mutations as well as truncation of important regions. By this approach we could confirm the importance of the second loop and especially of amino acids Asn92 and Ile94 for binding to LRP6. Based on a Sclerostin variant found in a Turkish family suffering from Sclerosteosis we generated a Sclerostin mutant with cysteines 84 and 142 exchanged thereby removing the third disulfide bond of the cystine-knot. This mutant binds to LRP6 with reduced binding affinity and also exhibits a strongly reduced inhibitory activity against Wnt1 thereby showing that also elements outside the flexible loop are important for inhibition of Wnt by Sclerostin. Additionally, we examined the effect of the mutations on the inhibition of two different Wnt proteins, Wnt3a and Wnt1. We could detect clear differences in the inhibition of these proteins, suggesting that the mechanism by which Sclerostin antagonizes Wnt1 and Wnt3a is fundamentally different.

  4. Mutational analysis of sclerostin shows importance of the flexible loop and the cystine-knot for Wnt-signaling inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Boschert

    Full Text Available The cystine-knot containing protein Sclerostin is an important negative regulator of bone growth and therefore represents a promising therapeutic target. It exerts its biological task by inhibiting the Wnt (wingless and int1 signaling pathway, which participates in bone formation by promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. The core structure of Sclerostin consists of three loops with the first and third loop (Finger 1 and Finger 2 forming a structured β-sheet and the second loop being unstructured and highly flexible. Biochemical data showed that the flexible loop is important for binding of Sclerostin to Wnt co-receptors of the low-density lipoprotein related-protein family (LRP, by interacting with the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 or -6 it inhibits Wnt signaling. To further examine the structural requirements for Wnt inhibition, we performed an extensive mutational study within all three loops of the Sclerostin core domain involving single and multiple mutations as well as truncation of important regions. By this approach we could confirm the importance of the second loop and especially of amino acids Asn92 and Ile94 for binding to LRP6. Based on a Sclerostin variant found in a Turkish family suffering from Sclerosteosis we generated a Sclerostin mutant with cysteines 84 and 142 exchanged thereby removing the third disulfide bond of the cystine-knot. This mutant binds to LRP6 with reduced binding affinity and also exhibits a strongly reduced inhibitory activity against Wnt1 thereby showing that also elements outside the flexible loop are important for inhibition of Wnt by Sclerostin. Additionally, we examined the effect of the mutations on the inhibition of two different Wnt proteins, Wnt3a and Wnt1. We could detect clear differences in the inhibition of these proteins, suggesting that the mechanism by which Sclerostin antagonizes Wnt1 and Wnt3a is fundamentally different.

  5. Anatomical network analysis shows decoupling of modular lability and complexity in the evolution of the primate skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Esteve-Altava

    Full Text Available Modularity and complexity go hand in hand in the evolution of the skull of primates. Because analyses of these two parameters often use different approaches, we do not know yet how modularity evolves within, or as a consequence of, an also-evolving complex organization. Here we use a novel network theory-based approach (Anatomical Network Analysis to assess how the organization of skull bones constrains the co-evolution of modularity and complexity among primates. We used the pattern of bone contacts modeled as networks to identify connectivity modules and quantify morphological complexity. We analyzed whether modularity and complexity evolved coordinately in the skull of primates. Specifically, we tested Herbert Simon's general theory of near-decomposability, which states that modularity promotes the evolution of complexity. We found that the skulls of extant primates divide into one conserved cranial module and up to three labile facial modules, whose composition varies among primates. Despite changes in modularity, statistical analyses reject a positive feedback between modularity and complexity. Our results suggest a decoupling of complexity and modularity that translates to varying levels of constraint on the morphological evolvability of the primate skull. This study has methodological and conceptual implications for grasping the constraints that underlie the developmental and functional integration of the skull of humans and other primates.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Neolithic slate plaques from the southwestern Iberian Peninsula are not genealogical recording systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel García Rivero

    Full Text Available Prehistoric material culture proposed to be symbolic in nature has been the object of considerable archaeological work from diverse theoretical perspectives, yet rarely are methodological tools used to test the interpretations. The lack of testing is often justified by invoking the opinion that the slippery nature of past human symbolism cannot easily be tackled by the scientific method. One such case, from the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, involves engraved stone plaques from megalithic funerary monuments dating ca. 3,500-2,750 B.C. (calibrated age. One widely accepted proposal is that the plaques are ancient mnemonic devices that record genealogies. The analysis reported here demonstrates that this is not the case, even when the most supportive data and techniques are used. Rather, we suspect there was a common ideological background to the use of plaques that overlay the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, with little or no geographic patterning. This would entail a cultural system in which plaque design was based on a fundamental core idea, with a number of mutable and variable elements surrounding it.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Neolithic slate plaques from the southwestern Iberian Peninsula are not genealogical recording systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rivero, Daniel; O'Brien, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Prehistoric material culture proposed to be symbolic in nature has been the object of considerable archaeological work from diverse theoretical perspectives, yet rarely are methodological tools used to test the interpretations. The lack of testing is often justified by invoking the opinion that the slippery nature of past human symbolism cannot easily be tackled by the scientific method. One such case, from the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, involves engraved stone plaques from megalithic funerary monuments dating ca. 3,500-2,750 B.C. (calibrated age). One widely accepted proposal is that the plaques are ancient mnemonic devices that record genealogies. The analysis reported here demonstrates that this is not the case, even when the most supportive data and techniques are used. Rather, we suspect there was a common ideological background to the use of plaques that overlay the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, with little or no geographic patterning. This would entail a cultural system in which plaque design was based on a fundamental core idea, with a number of mutable and variable elements surrounding it.

  8. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Lopes, Fernando; da Silva, Marcelo Corrêa; Magnabosco, Cláudio Ulhôa; Goncalves Narciso, Marcelo; Sainz, Roberto Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs). Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age) and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA), back-fat thickness (BF), and rump fat thickness (RF)), registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance) EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3) (P multivariate index (LD1) were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs). Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection.

  9. Design-around biotechnology patents: an analysis of US Federal Circuit decisions shows the possibility of designing around biotechnology patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of design-around for patents, we reviewed 40 no-infringement cases out of all 4,760 Federal Circuit Court of Appeals (CAFC) cases decided from 2001 to 2009. Based on this analysis, designing around a biotechnology patent first requires a thorough reading of the patent specification and prosecution history. These written descriptions offer explicit directions about claim meanings or the scope being disclaimed. By statute, claims recite and define the structure or acts of an invention, and serve as tools to determine whether or not a patent is infringed. The next procedure would include omitting a part or property from the claim, reversing the action used in the claim, or changing the claim's structure or range to prevent the new design from falling within the scope of the claim. However, cases where patent infringement was found demonstrated that changing the structure or range not recited in the claim, such as enlarging the diameter, reducing concentration or alerting the shape, still falls within the scope of the patent. Although the 40 cases analyzed in this study were not related to vaccines, the thought process can serve as a guideline for patents related to vaccine development.

  10. Genetic analysis shows that morphology alone cannot distinguish asian carp eggs from those of other cyprinid species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; McCalla, Sunnie; Chapman, Duane C.; Rees, Christopher B.; Knights, Brent C.; Vallazza, Jon; George, Amy E.; Richardson, William B.; Amberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Fish eggs and embryos (hereafter collectively referred to as “eggs”) were collected in the upper Mississippi River main stem (~300 km upstream of previously reported spawning by invasive Asian carp) during summer 2013. Based on previously published morphological characteristics, the eggs were identified as belonging to Asian carp. A subsample of the eggs was subsequently analyzed by using molecular methods to determine species identity. Genetic identification using the cytochrome-c oxidase 1 gene was attempted for a total of 41 eggs. Due to the preservation technique used (formalin) and the resulting DNA degradation, sequences were recovered from only 17 individual eggs. In all 17 cases, cyprinids other than Asian carp (usually Notropis sp.) were identified as the most likely species. In previously published reports, a key characteristic that distinguished Asian carp eggs from those of other cyprinids was size: Asian carp eggs exhibited diameters ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 mm and were thought to be much larger than the otherwise similar eggs of native species. Eggs from endemic cyprinids were believed to rarely reach 3.0 mm and had not been observed to exceed 3.3 mm. However, many of the eggs that were genetically identified as originating from native cyprinids were as large as 4.0 mm in diameter (at early developmental stages) and were therefore large enough to over- lap with the lower end of the size range observed for Asian carp eggs. Researchers studying the egg stages of Asian carp and other cyprinids should plan on preserving subsets of eggs for genetic analysis to confirm morphological identifications.

  11. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Brito Lopes

    Full Text Available This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs. Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA, back-fat thickness (BF, and rump fat thickness (RF, registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3 (P < 0.001. Estimates of genetic correlation among growth and carcass traits and the estimates of heritability were moderate to high, suggesting that a correlated response approach is suitable for practical decision making. Estimates of correlation between selection indices and the multivariate index (LD1 were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs. Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection.

  12. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  13. An actuarial analysis shows that offering lung cancer screening as an insurance benefit would save lives at relatively low cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyenson, Bruce S; Sander, Marcia S; Jiang, Yiding; Kahn, Howard; Mulshine, James L

    2012-04-01

    Lung cancer screening is not established as a public health practice, yet the results of a recent large randomized controlled trial showed that screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography reduces lung cancer mortality. Using actuarial models, this study estimated the costs and benefits of annual lung cancer screening offered as a commercial insurance benefit in the high-risk US population ages 50-64. Assuming current commercial reimbursement rates for treatment, we found that screening would cost about $1 per insured member per month in 2012 dollars. The cost per life-year saved would be below $19,000, an amount that compares favorably with screening for cervical, breast, and colorectal cancers. Our results suggest that commercial insurers should consider lung cancer screening of high-risk individuals to be high-value coverage and provide it as a benefit to people who are at least fifty years old and have a smoking history of thirty pack-years or more. We also believe that payers and patients should demand screening from high-quality, low-cost providers, thus helping set an example of efficient system innovation.

  14. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  15. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of Ox1r-/- mice showed implication of orexin receptor-1 in mood, anxiety and social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Golam Abbas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B, which are exclusively produced by neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, play an important role in the regulation of a wide range of behaviors and homeostatic processes, including regulation of sleep/wakefulness states and energy homeostasis. The orexin system has close anatomical and functional relationships with systems that regulate the autonomic nervous system, emotion, mood, the reward system and sleep/wakefulness states. Recent pharmacological studies using selective antagonists have suggested that orexin receptor-1 (OX1R is involved in physiological processes that regulate emotion, the reward system and autonomic nervous system. Here, we examined Ox1r-/- mice with a comprehensive behavioral test battery to screen additional OX1R functions. Ox1r-/- mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior, altered depression-like behavior, slightly decreased spontaneous locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, increased startle response and decreased prepulse inhibition. These results suggest that OX1R plays roles in social behaviour and sensory motor gating in addition to roles in mood and anxiety.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Enterococcus faecalis during mammalian infection shows cells undergo adaptation and exist in a stringent response state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L Frank

    Full Text Available As both a commensal and a major cause of healthcare-associated infections in humans, Enterococcus faecalis is a remarkably adaptable organism. We investigated how E. faecalis adapts in a mammalian host as a pathogen by characterizing changes in the transcriptome during infection in a rabbit model of subdermal abscess formation using transcriptional microarrays. The microarray experiments detected 222 and 291 differentially regulated genes in E. faecalis OG1RF at two and eight hours after subdermal chamber inoculation, respectively. The profile of significantly regulated genes at two hours post-inoculation included genes involved in stress response, metabolism, nutrient acquisition, and cell surface components, suggesting genome-wide adaptation to growth in an altered environment. At eight hours post-inoculation, 88% of the differentially expressed genes were down-regulated and matched a transcriptional profile consistent with a (pppGpp-mediated stringent response. Subsequent subdermal abscess infections with E. faecalis mutants lacking the (pppGpp synthetase/hydrolase RSH, the small synthetase RelQ, or both enzymes, suggest that intracellular (pppGpp levels, but not stringent response activation, influence persistence in the model. The ability of cells to synthesize (pppGpp was also found to be important for growth in human serum and whole blood. The data presented in this report provide the first genome-wide insights on E. faecalis in vivo gene expression and regulation measured by transcriptional profiling during infection in a mammalian host and show that (pppGpp levels affect viability of E. faecalis in multiple conditions relevant to mammalian infection. The subdermal abscess model can serve as a novel experimental system for studying the E. faecalis stringent response in the context of the mammalian immune system.

  17. 3D finite element analysis on pile-soil interaction of passive pile group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming-hua; LIU Dun-ping; ZHANG Ling; JIANG Chong

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between pile and soft soil of the passive pile group subjected to soil movement was analyzed with three-dimensional finite element model by using ANSYS software. The soil was assumed to be elastic-plastic complying with the Drucker-Prager yield criterion in the analysis. The large displacement of soil was considered and contact elements were used to evaluate the interaction between pile and soil. The influences of soil depth of layer and number of piles on the lateral pressure of the pile were investigated, and the lateral pressure distributions on the (2×1) pile group and on the (2×2) pile group were compared. The results show that the adjacent surcharge may result in significant lateral movement of the soft soil and cousiderable pressure on the pile. The pressure acting on the row near the surcharge is higher than that on the other row, due to the "barrier" and arching effects in pile groups. The passive load and its distribution should be taken into account in the design of the passive piles.

  18. Genetic analysis of 19 X chromosome STR loci for forensic purposes in four Chinese ethnic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhu, Junyong; Chen, Linli; Liu, Changhui; Feng, Xingling; Chen, Ling; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    A new 19 X- short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex PCR system has recently been developed, though its applicability in forensic studies has not been thoroughly assessed. In this study, 932 unrelated individuals from four Chinese ethnic groups (Han, Tibet, Uighur and Hui) were successfully genotyped using this new multiplex PCR system. Our results showed significant linkage disequilibrium between markers DXS10103 and DXS10101 in all four ethnic groups; markers DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS6809 and DXS6789, and HPRTB and DXS10101 in Tibetan populations; and markers DXS10074 and DXS10075 in Uighur populations. The combined powers of discrimination in males and females were calculated according to haplotype frequencies from allele distributions rather than haplotype counts in the relevant population and were high in four ethnic groups. The cumulative powers of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci were 1.000000000000000 and 0.999999999997940 in females and males, respectively. All 19 X-STR loci are highly polymorphic. The highest Reynolds genetic distances were observed for the Tibet-Uighur pairwise comparisons. This study represents an extensive report on X-STR marker variation in minor Chinese populations and a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of these 19 X STR markers in four Chinese ethnic groups. PMID:28211539

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms Analysis of Pharmacogenomic VIP Variants in Miao Ethnic Group of Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tianbo; Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Zhang, Mingxi; Geng, Tingting; Feng, Tian; Kang, Longli; Luo, Man Lin

    2015-12-03

    BACKGROUND Genetic polymorphisms have a potential clinical role in determining both inter-individual and inter-ethnic differences in drug efficacy, but we have not found any pharmacogenomics information regarding minorities, such as the Miao ethnic group. Our study aimed to screen numbers of the Miao ethnic group for genotype frequencies of VIP variants and to determine differences between the Miao and other human populations worldwide. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this study, we genotyped 66 Very Important Pharmacogene (VIP) variants selected from PharmGKB in 98 unrelated, healthy Miao individuals from the Guizhou province and compared our data with 12 other populations, including 11 populations from the HapMap data set and Xi'an Han Chinese. RESULTS Using the χ2 test, we found that the allele frequencies of the VDR rs1544410 and VKORC1 (rs9934438) variants in the Miao population are quite different from that in other ethnic groups. Furthermore, we found that genotype frequencies of rs1801133 (MTHFR) in the 13 selected populations are significantly different. Population structure and F-statistics (Fst) analysis show that the genetic background of the Miao is relatively close to that of Chinese in metropolitan Denver, CO, USA (CHD). CONCLUSIONS Our results help complete the information provided by the pharmacogenomics database of the Miao ethnic group and provide a theoretical basis for safer drug administration, which may be useful for diagnosing and treating diseases in this population.

  20. Genetic analysis of 19 X chromosome STR loci for forensic purposes in four Chinese ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhu, Junyong; Chen, Linli; Liu, Changhui; Feng, Xingling; Chen, Ling; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-17

    A new 19 X- short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex PCR system has recently been developed, though its applicability in forensic studies has not been thoroughly assessed. In this study, 932 unrelated individuals from four Chinese ethnic groups (Han, Tibet, Uighur and Hui) were successfully genotyped using this new multiplex PCR system. Our results showed significant linkage disequilibrium between markers DXS10103 and DXS10101 in all four ethnic groups; markers DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS6809 and DXS6789, and HPRTB and DXS10101 in Tibetan populations; and markers DXS10074 and DXS10075 in Uighur populations. The combined powers of discrimination in males and females were calculated according to haplotype frequencies from allele distributions rather than haplotype counts in the relevant population and were high in four ethnic groups. The cumulative powers of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci were 1.000000000000000 and 0.999999999997940 in females and males, respectively. All 19 X-STR loci are highly polymorphic. The highest Reynolds genetic distances were observed for the Tibet-Uighur pairwise comparisons. This study represents an extensive report on X-STR marker variation in minor Chinese populations and a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of these 19 X STR markers in four Chinese ethnic groups.

  1. Body mass index and percent body fat: a meta analysis among different ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurenberg, P; Yap, M; van Staveren, W A

    1998-12-01

    To study the relationship between percent body fat and body mass index (BMI) in different ethnic groups and to evaluate the validity of the BMI cut-off points for obesity. Meta analysis of literature data. Populations of American Blacks, Caucasians, Chinese, Ethiopians, Indonesians, Polynesians and Thais. Mean values of BMI, percent body fat, gender and age were adapted from original papers. The relationship between percent body fat and BMI differs in the ethnic groups studied. For the same level of body fat, age and gender, American Blacks have a 1.3 kg/m2 and Polynesians a 4.5 kg/m2 lower BMI compared to Caucasians. By contrast, in Chinese, Ethiopians, Indonesians and Thais BMIs are 1.9, 4.6, 3.2 and 2.9 kg/m2 lower compared to Caucasians, respectively. Slight differences in the relationship between percent body fat and BMI of American Caucasians and European Caucasians were also found. The differences found in the body fat/BMI relationship in different ethnic groups could be due to differences in energy balance as well as to differences in body build. The results show that the relationship between percent body fat and BMI is different among different ethnic groups. This should have public health implications for the definitions of BMI cut-off points for obesity, which would need to be population-specific.

  2. Does Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp show a sustainable effect on delusions? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eMehl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Behavior Therapy for psychosis (CBTp is an effective treatment resulting in small to medium effect sizes with regard to changes in positive symptoms and psychopathology. As a consequence, CBTp is recommended by national guidelines for all patients with schizophrenia. However, although CBTp was originally developed as a means to improve delusions, meta-analyses have generally integrated effects for positive symptoms rather than for delusions. Thus, it is still an open question whether more broadly defined CBTp is more effective with regard to change in delusions compared to treatment as usual (TAU and to other interventions, and whether this effect remains stable over a follow-up period. Moreover, it would be interesting to explore whether newer studies that focus on specific factors involved in the formation and maintenance of delusions (causal-interventionist approach are more effective than the first generation of CBTp studies. A systematic search of the trial literature identified 19 RCTs that compared CBTp with TAU and/or other interventions and reported delusions as an outcome measure. Meta-analytic integration resulted in a significant small to medium effect size for CBTp in comparison to TAU at end-of-therapy (k=13; d ̅=0.27 and after an average follow-up period of 47 weeks (k=12; d ̅=0.25. When compared with other interventions, there was no significant effect of CBTp at end-of-therapy (k=8; d ̅=0.16 and after a follow-up period (k=5; d ̅=–0.04. Comparison between newer studies taking a causal-interventionist approach (k=4 and first-generation studies showed a difference of 0.33 in mean effect sizes in favor of newer studies at end-of-therapy. The findings suggest that CBTp is superior to TAU, but is not superior to other interventions, in bringing about a change in delusions, and that this superiority is maintained over the follow-up period. Moreover, interventions that focus on causal factors of delusions seem to be a

  3. Design and analysis of a wideband photonic crystal waveguide with low group-velocity and low dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The slow light propagation in a line waveguide in the two-dimensional triangular photonic crystal has been numerically studied, based on which a wideband photonic crystal waveguide with low group-velocity and low dispersion is proposed. The numerical simulation analysis shows that it is possible to maximize the group index and minimize the group-velocity dispersion in wide bandwidth by increasing the radius of the basic air hole and changing the position of the first two rows of air holes in photonic crystal waveguides. Such a photonic crystal waveguide exhibits low group velocity and low group-velocity dispersion over a broad wavelength range. A larger group index-bandwidth product is achieved in this type of waveguide structure. The numerically computed results present the normalized bandwidth as 0.32%, 0.48% and 0.642% corresponding to the group index of 85, 58 and 45, respectively.

  4. [Goal analysis and goal operationalisation: a group intervention for the enhancement of work motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Rana; Fiedler, Rolf G; Dietrich, Hilke; Greitemann, Bernhard; Heuft, Gereon

    2010-08-01

    Work motivation, mental well-being and competencies of self-regulation are linked to successful job-related reintegration after rehabilitation. Based on the Diagnostical Instrument to assess Work motivation (Diagnostikinstrument für Arbeitsmotivation DIAMO) and existing training programs, a new group intervention, the goal analysis and goal operationalization, was developed and evaluated. The objective of this intervention, designed for participants of a rehabilitation program was to enhance work motivation and volitional control processes (self-regulation and self-control), to encourage job-related goal orientation and to thereby increase the probability of goal achievement. In a quasi-experimental longitudinal design 207 patients (111 experimental group/96 control group) were tested. The experimental group took part in the job-related training (ZAZO) in addition to the usual rehabilitation. The evaluation was conducted through various scales at t0 (beginning) and t1 (end of the training). Scales for the measurement of work motivation, mental well-being, status of rehabilitation, competencies of self-regulation and the subjective prognosis of the ability to work were used. As direct effects of the training an enhancement of work motivation and of an improved subjective prognosis of the ability to work were expected. Accordingly, a positive influence on the subjective well-being as indirect effects, were anticipated in the long run, the experimental group should also show an enhanced job-related reintegration. Participants of the experimental group showed significantly higher values on particular scales of the Diagnostical Instrument of Work motivation as opposed to the control group (curiosity motive, attitudes to work and contact motive). Most notably, significant interactional effects could be found on the scale for the subjective prognosis of the ability to work, which is a highly reliable instrument and important predictor for prospective job

  5. Multiple-Group Analysis Using the sem Package in the R System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evermann, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-group analysis in covariance-based structural equation modeling (SEM) is an important technique to ensure the invariance of latent construct measurements and the validity of theoretical models across different subpopulations. However, not all SEM software packages provide multiple-group analysis capabilities. The sem package for the R…

  6. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  7. Using Molecular Modeling in Teaching Group Theory Analysis of the Infrared Spectra of Organometallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A new method is introduced for teaching group theory analysis of the infrared spectra of organometallic compounds using molecular modeling. The main focus of this method is to enhance student understanding of the symmetry properties of vibrational modes and of the group theory analysis of infrared (IR) spectra by using visual aids provided by…

  8. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  9. Using multiple group modeling to test moderators in meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoemann, Alexander M

    2016-12-01

    Meta-analysis is a popular and flexible analysis that can be fit in many modeling frameworks. Two methods of fitting meta-analyses that are growing in popularity are structural equation modeling (SEM) and multilevel modeling (MLM). By using SEM or MLM to fit a meta-analysis researchers have access to powerful techniques associated with SEM and MLM. This paper details how to use one such technique, multiple group analysis, to test categorical moderators in meta-analysis. In a multiple group meta-analysis a model is fit to each level of the moderator simultaneously. By constraining parameters across groups any model parameter can be tested for equality. Using multiple groups to test for moderators is especially relevant in random-effects meta-analysis where both the mean and the between studies variance of the effect size may be compared across groups. A simulation study and the analysis of a real data set are used to illustrate multiple group modeling with both SEM and MLM. Issues related to multiple group meta-analysis and future directions for research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Rapid milk group classification by 1H NMR analysis of Le and H epitopes in human milk oligosaccharide donor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Sander S; Schoemaker, Ruud J W; Gerwig, Gerrit J; van Leusen-van Kan, Ellen J M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2014-08-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a major constituent of human breast milk and play an important role in reducing the risk of infections in infants. The structures of these HMOs show similarities with blood group antigens in protein glycosylation, in particular in relation to fucosylation in Lewis blood group-type epitopes, matching the maternal pattern. Previously, based on the Secretor and Lewis blood group system, four milk groups have been defined, i.e. Lewis-positive Secretors, Lewis-positive non-Secretors, Lewis-negative Secretors and Lewis-negative non-Secretors. Here, a rapid one-dimensional (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis method is presented that identifies the presence/absence of (α1-2)-, (α1-3)- and (α1-4)-linked fucose residues in HMO samples, affording the essential information to attribute different HMO samples to a specific milk group. The developed method is based on the NMR structural-reporter-group concept earlier established for glycoprotein glycans. Further evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of 36 HMO samples shows that within each of the four milk groups the relative levels of the different fucosylation epitopes can greatly vary. The data also allow a separation of the Lewis-positive Secretor milk group into two sub-groups.

  11. ABO blood group system and the coronary artery disease: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Xu, Hao; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-03-18

    ABO blood group system, a well-known genetic risk factor, has clinically been demonstrated to be linked with thrombotic vascular diseases. However, the relationship between ABO blood group and coronary artery disease (CAD) is still controversial. We here performed an updated meta-analysis of the related studies and tried to elucidate the potential role of ABO blood group as a risk factor for CAD. All detectable case-control and cohort studies comparing the risk of CAD in different ABO blood groups were collected for this analysis through searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Ultimately, 17 studies covering 225,810 participants were included. The combined results showed that the risk of CAD was significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.26, p = 0.01) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94, p = 0.0008). Even when studies merely about myocardial infarction (MI) were removed, the risk of CAD was still significantly higher in blood group A (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.10, p = 0.03) and lower in blood group O (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85 to 0.93, p < 0.00001). This updated systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that both blood group A and non-O were the risk factors of CAD.

  12. Whole genome association analysis shows that ACE is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and fails to replicate most candidates from Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jennifer; Reiman, Eric M; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta D; Pearson, John V; Hu-Lince, Diane; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Coon, Keith D; Beach, Thomas; Rohrer, Kristen C; Zhao, Alice S; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; Mastroeni, Diego; Grover, Andrew; Rogers, Joseph; Heun, Reinhard; Jessen, Frank; Kölsch, Heike; Heward, Christopher B; Ravid, Rivka; Hutton, Michael L; Melquist, Stacey; Petersen, Ron C; Caselli, Richard J; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Hardy, John; Myers, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    For late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the only confirmed, genetic association is with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus on chromosome 19. Meta-analysis is often employed to sort the true associations from the false positives. LOAD research has the advantage of a continuously updated meta-analysis of candidate gene association studies in the web-based AlzGene database. The top 30 AlzGene loci on May 1(st), 2007 were investigated in our whole genome association data set consisting of 1411 LOAD cases and neuropathoiogicaiiy verified controls genotyped at 312,316 SNPs using the Affymetrix 500K Mapping Platform. Of the 30 "top AlzGenes", 32 SNPs in 24 genes had odds ratios (OR) whose 95% confidence intervals that did not include 1. Of these 32 SNPs, six were part of the Affymetrix 500K Mapping panel and another ten had proxies on the Affymetrix array that had >80% power to detect an association with α=0.001. Two of these 16 SNPs showed significant association with LOAD in our sample series. One was rs4420638 at the APOE locus (uncorrected p-value=4.58E-37) and the other was rs4293, located in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) locus (uncorrected p-value=0.014). Since this result was nominally significant, but did not survive multiple testing correction for 16 independent tests, this association at rs4293 was verified in a geographically distinct German cohort (p-value=0.03). We present the results of our ACE replication aiongwith a discussion of the statistical limitations of multiple test corrections in whole genome studies.

  13. Text grouping in patent analysis using adaptive K-means clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanie, Tiara; Suprijadi, Jadi; Zulhanif

    2017-03-01

    Patents are one of the Intellectual Property. Analyzing patent is one requirement in knowing well the development of technology in each country and in the world now. This study uses the patent document coming from the Espacenet server about Green Tea. Patent documents related to the technology in the field of tea is still widespread, so it will be difficult for users to information retrieval (IR). Therefore, it is necessary efforts to categorize documents in a specific group of related terms contained therein. This study uses titles patent text data with the proposed Green Tea in Statistical Text Mining methods consists of two phases: data preparation and data analysis stage. The data preparation phase uses Text Mining methods and data analysis stage is done by statistics. Statistical analysis in this study using a cluster analysis algorithm, the Adaptive K-Means Clustering Algorithm. Results from this study showed that based on the maximum value Silhouette, generate 87 clusters associated fifteen terms therein that can be utilized in the process of information retrieval needs.

  14. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts

  15. Young Adults’ Attitude Towards Advertising: a multi-group analysis by ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ting

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study aims to investigate the attitude of Malaysian young adults towards advertising. How this segment responds to advertising, and how ethnic/cultural differences moderate are assessed. Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative questionnaire is used to collect data at two universities. Purposive sampling technique is adopted to ensure the sample represents the actual population. Structural equation modelling (SEM and multi-group analysis (MGA are utilized in analysis. Findings - The findings show that product information, hedonism, and good for economy are significant predictors of attitude towards advertising among young adults. Additionally, falsity is found to be significant among the Chinese, while social role and materialism among the Dayaks. No difference is observed in the effect of attitude on intention towards advertising by ethnicity. While homogeneity in advertising beliefs is assumed across ethnic groups, the Chinese and Dayak young adults are different in some of their advertising beliefs. Practical implications – Despite cultural effect being well-documented, young adults today seem to have similar beliefs and attitude towards advertising. Knowing what is shared and what is not for this segment is essential. Hence, it is imperative to keep track of their values in diversified communities to ensure effective communication process in advertising. Originality/value – In addition to the theory of reasoned action, MGA is utilized to assess the moderating effect of ethnic/culture on the whole model. This affords a more comprehensive understanding on the subject matter in multi-ethnic and cultural countries.

  16. Effectiveness of Cognitive and Transactional Analysis Group Therapy on Improving Conflict-Solving Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram A. Ghanbari-Hashemabadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, learning the communication skills such as conflict solving is very important. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of cognitive and transactional analysis group therapy on improving the conflict-solving skill.Materials and Method: This study is an experimental study with pretest-posttest and control group. Forty-five clients who were referring to the counseling and psychological services center of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad were chosen based on screening method. In addition, they were randomly divided into three equal groups: control group (15 participants, cognitive experimental group (15 participants and transactional analysis group (15 participants. Conflict-solving questionnaire was used to collect data and the intervention methods were cognitive and transactional analysis group therapy that was administrated during 8 weekly two-hour sessions. Mean and standard deviation were used for data analysis in the descriptive level and One-Way ANOVA method was used at the inference level.Results: The results of the study suggest that the conflict-solving skills in the two experimental groups were significantly increased. Conclusion: The finding of this research is indicative of the fact that both cognitive and transactional analysis group therapy could be an effective intervention for improving conflict-solving skills

  17. 75 FR 70921 - Simon Property Group, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... Simon Property Group, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid Public... practices or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes both the... following Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes the terms of the consent agreement, and the...

  18. Supervised multivariate analysis of sequence groups to identify specificity determining residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Desmond G

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that evolve from a common ancestor can change functionality over time, and it is important to be able identify residues that cause this change. In this paper we show how a supervised multivariate statistical method, Between Group Analysis (BGA, can be used to identify these residues from families of proteins with different substrate specifities using multiple sequence alignments. Results We demonstrate the usefulness of this method on three different test cases. Two of these test cases, the Lactate/Malate dehydrogenase family and Nucleotidyl Cyclases, consist of two functional groups. The other family, Serine Proteases consists of three groups. BGA was used to analyse and visualise these three families using two different encoding schemes for the amino acids. Conclusion This overall combination of methods in this paper is powerful and flexible while being computationally very fast and simple. BGA is especially useful because it can be used to analyse any number of functional classes. In the examples we used in this paper, we have only used 2 or 3 classes for demonstration purposes but any number can be used and visualised.

  19. State and group dynamics of world stock market by principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobi, Ashadun; Lee, Jae Woo

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamic interactions and structural changes by a principal component analysis (PCA) to cross-correlation coefficients of global financial indices in the years 1998-2012. The variances explained by the first PC increase with time and show a drastic change during the crisis. A sharp change in PC coefficient implies a transition of market state, a situation which occurs frequently in the American and Asian indices. However, the European indices remain stable over time. Using the first two PC coefficients, we identify indices that are similar and more strongly correlated than the others. We observe that the European indices form a robust group over the observation period. The dynamics of the individual indices within the group increase in similarity with time, and the dynamics of indices are more similar during the crises. Furthermore, the group formation of indices changes position in two-dimensional spaces due to crises. Finally, after a financial crisis, the difference of PCs between the European and American indices narrows.

  20. State and group dynamics of world stock market by principal component analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nobi, Ashadun

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamic interactions and structural changes in global financial indices in the years 1998-2012. We apply a principal component analysis (PCA) to cross-correlation coefficients of the stock indices. We calculate the correlations between principal components (PCs) and each asset, known as PC coefficients. A change in market state is identified as a change in the first PC coefficients. Some indices do not show significant change of PCs in market state during crises. The indices exposed to the invested capitals in the stock markets are at the minimum level of risk. Using the first two PC coefficients, we identify indices that are similar and more strongly correlated than the others. We observe that the European indices form a robust group over the observation period. The dynamics of the individual indices within the group increase in similarity with time, and the dynamics of indices are more similar during the crises. Furthermore, the group formation of indices changes position in two-dimensional spa...

  1. X-ray analysis of the galaxy group UGC03957 beyond R200 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Thölken, S; Reiprich, T H; Hasenbusch, J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gas properties of the galaxy group UGC03957 up to $1.4R_{200} \\approx 1.4$Mpc in four azimuthal directions with the Suzaku satellite and performed a spectral analysis of five Suzaku observations with 138ks good exposure time in total as well as five Chandra snapshot observations for point source detection. We found a temperature drop of a factor of ${\\sim} 3$ from the center to the outskirts which is consistent with previous results for galaxy clusters. The metal abundance profile shows a flat behavior towards large radii which is a hint for galactic winds as the primary ICM enrichment process. The entropy profile is consistent with numerical simulations after applying a gas mass fraction correction. Previous analyses for clusters and groups often showed an entropy flattening or even a drop around ${\\sim} R_{200}$ which can be an indicator for clumping or non-equilibrium states in the outskirts. Such entropy behaviour is absent in UGC03957. The gas mass fraction is well below the cosmic me...

  2. THE STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF POPULATION BY AGE GROUPS IN THE RURAL AREAS OF BUCOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA ILEANA MORAR (BUMBU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure analysis of population by age groups in the rural area of Bucovina desires to create a recent image of the rural population by age groups in the region of Bucovina , provided that after the year 2000 have occurred socio – economic changes with repercussions on the demographic component. The structure analysis by age group will be based on the share of population indicators on the major age groups, the share of population by age and quinquennial gender illustrated by age pyramid, the index of demographic aging and age-dependency ratio. This study is definitely needed in forecasting future regional development objectives and measures.

  3. Group differences in physician responses to handheld presentation of clinical evidence: a verbal protocol analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlovic Nada J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify individual differences in physicians' needs for the presentation of evidence resources and preferences for mobile devices. Methods Within-groups analysis of responses to semi-structured interviews. Interviews consisted of using prototypes in response to task-based scenarios. The prototypes were implemented on two different form factors: a tablet style PC and a pocketPC. Participants were from three user groups: general internists, family physicians and medicine residents, and from two different settings: urban and semi-urban. Verbal protocol analysis, which consists of coding utterances, was conducted on the transcripts of the testing sessions. Statistical relationships were investigated between staff physicians' and residents' background variables, self-reported experiences with the interfaces, and verbal code frequencies. Results 47 physicians were recruited from general internal medicine, family practice clinics and a residency training program. The mean age of participants was 42.6 years. Physician specialty had a greater effect on device and information-presentation preferences than gender, age, setting or previous technical experience. Family physicians preferred the screen size of the tablet computer and were less concerned about its portability. Residents liked the screen size of the tablet, but preferred the portability of the pocketPC. Internists liked the portability of the pocketPC, but saw less advantage to the large screen of the tablet computer (F[2,44] = 4.94, p = .012. Conclusion Different types of physicians have different needs and preferences for evidence-based resources and handheld devices. This study shows how user testing can be incorporated into the process of design to inform group-based customization.

  4. Facebook and Health Information: Content Analysis of Groups Related to Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, Christina; Sakellari, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Facebook Groups is a space for connecting people with common interests. People with a psychiatric diagnosis use social networking sites. However Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia have not been investigated before. We aimed to examine Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia. Deductive content analysis was applied. Out of the included groups (N=32), the majority's principal objective was awareness creation (n=11, 34%) and support to those with schizophrenia and their caregivers (n=9, 28%). Monitoring the Facebook Groups' content related to schizophrenia and other mental disorders is essential, since it could be an important communication and support platform for people with the disorder and their caregivers.

  5. From knowledge to recognition: Evaluation of the process of a supervision group through lexical and textual statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Di Falco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The following article shows the process analysis of group supervision within a Therapeutic Community for adolescents with psychiatric problems. The main aim is to explore the influence of the group supervision on the quality of the patients care and, at the same time, the relationship between the therapists. The evaluation was made recording the group meetings and analyzing the transcriptions (representation of therapists’ speeches in written form through the use of statistical text analysis. Data analysis describes the frame of an institution – the TC – where it seems possible to “think” and “rethink” the clinical work and the relationship with patients bearing in mind – at the same time – institutional aspects; patients’ family role; social context; emotional and relational aspects of the therapists.Keywords: Process, Supervision, Therapeutic community

  6. Comprehensive analysis of blood group antigen binding to classical and El Tor cholera toxin B-pentamers by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Francesca; Reina, José J; Potenza, Donatella; Heggelund, Julie E; Mackenzie, Alasdair; Krengel, Ute; Bernardi, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease responsible for the deaths of thousands, possibly even hundreds of thousands of people every year, and its impact is predicted to further increase with climate change. It has been known for decades that blood group O individuals suffer more severe symptoms of cholera compared with individuals with other blood groups (A, B and AB). The observed blood group dependence is likely to be caused by the major virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae, the cholera toxin (CT). Here, we investigate the binding of ABH blood group determinants to both classical and El Tor CTB-pentamers using saturation transfer difference NMR and show that all three blood group determinants bind to both toxin variants. Although the details of the interactions differ, we see no large differences between the two toxin genotypes and observe very similar binding constants. We also show that the blood group determinants bind to a site distinct from that of the primary receptor, GM1. Transferred NOESY data confirm that the conformations of the blood group determinants in complex with both toxin variants are similar to those of reported X-ray and solution structures. Taken together, this detailed analysis provides a framework for the interpretation of the epidemiological data linking the severity of cholera infection and an individual's blood group, and brings us one step closer to understanding the molecular basis of cholera blood group dependence.

  7. Obesity paradox in group 1 pulmonary hypertension: analysis of the NIH-Pulmonary Hypertension registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazimba, S; Holland, E; Nagarajan, V; Mihalek, A D; Kennedy, J L W; Bilchick, K C

    2017-08-01

    The 'obesity paradox' refers to the fact that obese patients have better outcomes than normal weight patients. This has been observed in multiple cardiovascular conditions, but evidence for obesity paradox in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains sparse. We categorized 267 patients from the National Institute of Health-PH registry into five groups based on body mass index (BMI): underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese. Mortality was compared in BMI groups using the χ(2) statistic. Five-year probability of death using the PH connection (PHC) risk equation was calculated, and the model was compared with BMI groups using Cox proportional hazards regression and Kaplan-Meier (KM) survival curves. Patients had a median age of 39 years (interquartile range 30-50 years), a median BMI of 23.4 kg m(-)(2) (21.0-26.8 kg m(-2)) and an overall mortality at 5 years of 50.2%. We found a U-shaped relationship between survival and 1-year mortality with the best 1-year survival in overweight patients. KM curves showed the best survival in the overweight, followed by obese and morbidly obese patients, and the worst survival in normal weight and underweight patients (log-rank P=0.0008). In a Cox proportional hazards analysis, increasing BMI was a highly significant predictor of improved survival even after adjustment for the PHC risk equation with a hazard ratio for death of 0.921 per kg m(-2) (95% confidence interval: 0.886-0.954) (Pparadox' than an 'obesity paradox'. This has implications for risk stratification and prognosis in group 1 PH patients.

  8. A geometrical formulation of the renormalization group method for global analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kunihiro, T

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the classical theory of envelope,we formulate the renormalization group (RG) method for global analysis, recently proposed by Goldenfeld et al. It is clarified why the RG equation improves things.

  9. Ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selig, W.

    1977-11-08

    The literature on the use of ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis is surveyed in some detail. The survey is complete through Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 83 (1975). 40 figures, 52 tables, 236 references.

  10. Systematic analysis of finite family symmetry groups and their application to the lepton sector

    CERN Document Server

    Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will investigate Lagrangians of the standard model extended by three right-handed neutrinos, and the consequences of invariance under finite groups G for lepton masses and mixing matrices are studied. The main part of this thesis is the systematic analysis of finite subgroups of SU(3). The analysis of these groups may act as a toolkit for future model building.

  11. Interpretive focus groups: a participatory method for interpreting and extending secondary analysis of qualitative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Redman-MacLaren

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Participatory approaches to qualitative research practice constantly change in response to evolving research environments. Researchers are increasingly encouraged to undertake secondary analysis of qualitative data, despite epistemological and ethical challenges. Interpretive focus groups can be described as a more participative method for groups to analyse qualitative data. Objective: To facilitate interpretive focus groups with women in Papua New Guinea to extend analysis of existing qualitative data and co-create new primary data. The purpose of this was to inform a transformational grounded theory and subsequent health promoting action. Design: A two-step approach was used in a grounded theory study about how women experience male circumcision in Papua New Guinea. Participants analysed portions or ‘chunks’ of existing qualitative data in story circles and built upon this analysis by using the visual research method of storyboarding. Results: New understandings of the data were evoked when women in interpretive focus groups analysed the data ‘chunks’. Interpretive focus groups encouraged women to share their personal experiences about male circumcision. The visual method of storyboarding enabled women to draw pictures to represent their experiences. This provided an additional focus for whole-of-group discussions about the research topic. Conclusions: Interpretive focus groups offer opportunity to enhance trustworthiness of findings when researchers undertake secondary analysis of qualitative data. The co-analysis of existing data and co-generation of new data between research participants and researchers informed an emergent transformational grounded theory and subsequent health promoting action.

  12. The Educational Gradient in Intermarriage: A Comparative Analysis of Immigrant Groups in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmijn, Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    A common claim in the literature is that higher-educated persons are more likely to marry outside their ethnic/racial group than lower-educated persons. We re-examine this "educational gradient" with a multilevel analysis of 46 immigrant groups in the Current Population Survey. We find that there are positive effects not only of individual…

  13. Transactional Analysis and Gestalt Therapy Used in Conjunction with Group Counseling for Married Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, P. Joe; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of combining Transactional Analysis and Gestalt therapy with group counseling for married couples. Six treatment couples and 12 control group members were pre/post administered the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale to assess changes in the level of their self-esteem. There were some significant results. (Author/JEL)

  14. A Behavior Analysis of Individuals' Use of the Fairness Heuristic when Interacting with Groups and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present analysis the author utilizes the groups as patches model (Goltz, 2009, 2010) to extend fairness heuristic theory (Lind, 2001) in which the concept of fairness is thought to be a heuristic that allows individuals to match responses to consequences they receive from groups. In this model, individuals who are reviewing possible groups…

  15. MULTIRESOLUTION ANALYSIS, SELF-SIMILAR TILINGS AND HAAR WAVELETS ON THE HEISENBERG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Heping; Liu Yu; Wang Haihui

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the properties of multiresolution analysis and self-similar tilings on the Heisenberg group are studied. Moreover, we establish a theory to construct an orthonormal Haar wavelet base in L~2(H~d) by using self-similar tilings for the acceptable dilations on the Heisenberg group.

  16. Analysis of Caesarean-Section rates according to Robson's ten group classification system and evaluating the indications within the groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Ray

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With Caesarean sections on the rise WHO proposes that health care facilities use the Robson's 10 group classification system to audit their C-sections rates. This classification would help understand the internal structure of the CS rates at individual health facilities identify key population groups, indications in each group and formulate strategies to reduce these rates. Methods: This was a cross sectional study for a period of 24 months at a tertiary care hospital in a tribal area of Kerala South India. Women who delivered during this period were included and classified into 10 Robson's classes and percentages were calculated for the overall rate, the representation of groups, contribution of groups and Caesarean percentage in each group. Results: Highest contribution was by Group 5 and Group 2. Together these two groups contributed to 38% of the total Caesareans. Followed by Group 8 and 10. All four added contributed to 63% of the section rate The least contribution was by Group 3. Groups 6, 7 and 9 by themselves did not contribute much but within their groups had a 100% C-Section rate. Conclusions: The contribution of the various Robson's Group to the absolute C-Section rates needs to be looked into. Reducing primary section rates, adequate counselling and encouraging for VBAC, changing the norms for dystocia and non-reassuring fetal status, training and encouraging obstetricians to perform versions when not contraindicated could reduce the contribution of Robson's groups towards the absolute C-Section rates.

  17. The first double-blind, randomised, parallel-group certolizumab pegol study in methotrexate-naive early rheumatoid arthritis patients with poor prognostic factors, C-OPERA, shows inhibition of radiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Eguchi, Katsumi; Watanabe, Akira; Origasa, Hideki; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Yamanishi, Yuji; Kita, Yasuhiko; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Shoji, Toshiharu; Okada, Toshiyuki; van der Heijde, Désirée; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of combination therapy using certolizumab pegol (CZP) and methotrexate (MTX) as first-line treatment for MTX-naive, early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with poor prognostic factors, compared with MTX alone. MTX-naive, early RA patients with ≤12 months persistent disease, high anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, and either rheumatoid factor positive and/or presence of bone erosions were enrolled in this multicentre, double-blind, randomised placebo (PBO)-controlled study. Patients were randomised 1:1 to CZP+MTX or PBO+MTX for 52 weeks. Primary endpoint was inhibition of radiographic progression (change from baseline in modified Total Sharp Score (mTSS CFB)) at week 52. Secondary endpoints were mTSS CFB at week 24, and clinical remission rates at weeks 24 and 52. 316 patients randomised to CZP+MTX (n=159) or PBO+MTX (n=157) had comparable baseline characteristics reflecting features of early RA (mean disease duration: 4.0 vs 4.3 months; Disease Activity Score 28-joint assessment (DAS28)) (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)): 5.4 vs 5.5; mTSS: 5.2 vs 6.0). CZP+MTX group showed significantly greater inhibition of radiographic progression relative to PBO+MTX at week 52 (mTSS CFB=0.36 vs 1.58; p<0.001) and week 24 (mTSS CFB=0.26 vs 0.86; p=0.003). Clinical remission rates (Simple Disease Activity Index, Boolean and DAS28 (ESR)) of the CZP+MTX group were significantly higher compared with those of the PBO+MTX group, at weeks 24 and 52. Safety results in both groups were similar, with no new safety signals observed with addition of CZP to MTX. In MTX-naive early RA patients with poor prognostic factors, CZP+MTX significantly inhibited structural damage and reduced RA signs and symptoms, demonstrating the efficacy of CZP in these patients. (NCT01451203). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.; Kostenko, M. M.; Lučivjanský, T.

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997), 10.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ =4 -d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ . All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  19. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M; Kostenko, M M; Lučivjanský, T

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997)TMPHAH0040-577910.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ=4-d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ. All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  20. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in Brazilian Samples of Different Age Groups: Findings from Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Brietzke, Elisa; Viola, Thiago Wendt; Manfro, Gisele Gus; Kristensen, Christian Haag; Arteche, Adriane Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is internationally accepted as a key tool for the assessment of childhood abuse and neglect experiences. However, there are relative few psychometric studies available and some authors have proposed two different factor solutions. We examined the dimensional structure and internal consistency of the Brazilian version of the CTQ. A total of 1,925 participants from eight different clinical and non-clinical samples including adolescents, adults and elders were considered in this study. First, we performed Confirmatory Factor Analysis to investigate the goodness of fit of the two proposed competitive factor structure models for the CTQ. We also investigated the internal consistency of all factors. Second, multi-group analyses were used to investigate measurement invariance and population heterogeneity across age groups and sex. Our findings revealed that the alternative factor structure as opposed to the original factor structure was the most appropriate model within adolescents and adults Brazilian samples. We provide further evidence for the validity and reliability of the CTQ within the Brazilian samples and report that the alternative model showed an improvement in fit indexes and may be a better alternative over the original model. PMID:24475237

  1. Contrasting group analysis of Brazilian students with dyslexia and good readers using the computerized reading and writing assessment battery "BALE".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo Piza, Carolina M J; de Macedo, Elizeu C; Miranda, Monica C; Bueno, Orlando F A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of cognitive processes underpinning reading and writing skills may help to distinguish different reading ability profiles. The present study used a Brazilian reading and writing battery to compare performance of students with dyslexia with two individually matched control groups: one contrasting on reading competence but not age and the other group contrasting on age but not reading competence. Participants were 28 individuals with dyslexia (19 boys) with a mean age of 9.82 (SD ± 1.44) drawn from public and private schools. These were matched to: (1) an age control group (AC) of 26 good readers with a mean age of 9.77 (SD ± 1.44) matched by age, sex, years of schooling, and type of school; (2) reading control group (RC) of 28 younger controls with a mean age of 7.82 (SD ± 1.06) matched by sex, type of school, and reading level. All groups were tested on four tasks from the Brazilian Reading and Writing Assessment battery ("BALE"): Written Sentence Comprehension Test (WSCT); Spoken Sentence Comprehension Test (OSCT); Picture-Print Writing Test (PPWT 1.1-Writing); and the Reading Competence Test (RCT). These tasks evaluate reading and listening comprehension for sentences, spelling, and reading isolated words and pseudowords (non-words). The dyslexia group scored lower and took longer to complete tasks than the AC group. Compared with the RC group, there were no differences in total scores on reading or oral comprehension tasks. However, dyslexics presented slower reading speeds, longer completion times, and lower scores on spelling tasks, even compared with younger controls. Analysis of types of errors on word and pseudoword reading items showed students with dyslexia scoring lower for pseudoword reading than the other two groups. These findings suggest that the dyslexics overall scores were similar to those of younger readers. However, specific phonological and visual decoding deficits showed that the two groups differ in terms of underpinning

  2. Contrasting group analysis of Brazilian students with dyslexia and good readers using the computerized reading and writing assessment battery BALE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eToledo-Piza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of cognitive processes underpinning reading and writing skills may help to distinguish different reading ability profiles. The present study used a Brazilian reading and writing battery to compare performance of students with dyslexia with two individually matched control groups: one contrasting on reading competence but not age and the other group contrasting on age but not reading competence. Participants were 28 individuals with dyslexia (19 boys with a mean age of 9.82 (SD ± 1.44 drawn from public and private schools. These were matched to: 1 an Age Control Group (AC of 26 good readers with a mean age of 9.77 (SD ± 1.44 matched by age, sex, years of schooling and type of school. 2 Reading Control Group (RC of 28 younger controls with a mean age of 7.82 (SD ± 1.06 matched by sex, type of school and reading level. All groups were tested on 4 tasks from the Brazilian Reading and Writing Assessment battery (BALE: Written Sentence Comprehension Test (WSCT; Spoken Sentence Comprehension Test (OSCT; Picture-Print Writing Test (PPWT 1.1-Writing; and the Reading Competence Test (RCT. These tasks evaluate reading and listening comprehension for sentences, spelling and reading isolated words and pseudowords (nonwords. The dyslexia group scored lower and took longer to complete tasks than the AC group. Compared with the RC group, there were no differences in total scores on reading or oral comprehension tasks. However, dyslexics presented slower reading speeds, longer completion times and lower scores on spelling tasks, even compared with younger controls. Analysis of types of errors on word and pseudoword reading items showed students with dyslexia scoring lower for pseudoword reading than the other two groups. This findings suggest that the dyslexics overall scores were similar to those of younger readers. However, specific phonological and visual decoding deficits showed that the two groups differ in terms of underpinning reading

  3. Copy number alteration and uniparental disomy analysis categorizes Japanese papillary thyroid carcinomas into distinct groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Matsuse

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate chromosomal aberrations in sporadic Japanese papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs, concomitant with the analysis of oncogene mutational status. Twenty-five PTCs (11 with BRAF(V600E, 4 with RET/PTC1, and 10 without mutation in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RET/PTC1, or RET/PTC3 were analyzed using Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 which allows us to detect copy number alteration (CNA and uniparental disomy (UPD, also referred to as copy neutral loss of heterozygosity, in a single experiment. The Japanese PTCs showed relatively stable karyotypes. Seven cases (28% showed CNA(s, and 6 (24% showed UPD(s. Interestingly, CNA and UPD were rarely overlapped in the same tumor; the only one advanced case showed both CNA and UPD with a highly complex karyotype. Thirteen (52% showed neither CNA nor UPD. Regarding CNA, deletions tended to be more frequent than amplifications. The most frequent and recurrent region was the deletion in chromosome 22; however, it was found in only 4 cases (16%. The degree of genomic instability did not depend on the oncogene status. However, in oncogene-positive cases (BRAF(V600E and RET/PTC1, tumors with CNA/UPD were less frequent (5/15, 33%, whereas tumors with CNA/UPD were more frequent in oncogene-negative cases (7/10, 70%, suggesting that chromosomal aberrations may play a role in the development of PTC, especially in oncogene-negative tumors. These data suggest that Japanese PTCs may be classified into three distinct groups: CNA(+, UPD(+, and no chromosomal aberrations. BRAF(V600E mutational status did not correlate with any parameters of chromosomal defects.

  4. How Chinese are entrepreneurial strategies of ethnic Chinese business groups in Southeast Asia? : a multifaceted analysis of the Salim Group of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, Maria Helena

    2007-01-01

    Family business groups are ubiquitous in most emerging markets. This book provides a richly documented analysis of the strategy of the Salim Group, one of the largest family conglomerates in Southeast Asia. It argues that the strategy of this group oscillated irregularly between a business model bui

  5. How Chinese are entrepreneurial strategies of ethnic Chinese business groups in Southeast Asia? : a multifaceted analysis of the Salim Group of Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, Maria Helena

    2007-01-01

    Family business groups are ubiquitous in most emerging markets. This book provides a richly documented analysis of the strategy of the Salim Group, one of the largest family conglomerates in Southeast Asia. It argues that the strategy of this group oscillated irregularly between a business model

  6. Qualitative analysis of experiences of members of a psychoeducational assertiveness group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrakouli, Effi; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2007-04-01

    This study describes qualitatively a psychoeducational assertiveness intervention for 20 women's perceptions of positive and negative experiences, undertaken to identify whether therapeutic mechanisms operating in group therapy as described by Yalom might be inferred. There were 14 90-min. weekly sessions organized around educational material. Two groups were conducted with 10 university women each (M= 20.9 yr., SD= 1.9). Qualitative analysis of the 20 interviews identified five of Yalom's therapeutic mechanisms, namely, self-understanding, universality, acceptance, catharsis, and self-disclosure. The positive experiences were group cohesiveness, self-understanding, self-disclosure, positive views about the self and learning, and cognitive benefits. Self-disclosing at the early stages of group development was the most frequently reported negative experience or difficulty in the group. Although participants stated they improved interpersonal communication skills, analysis suggested the cultural context was an important mediator of assertive behavior.

  7. Turnover and heterogeneity in top management networks - A demographic analysis of two Swedish business groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin, S. & Umans, T.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A theory based on the demography of top management teams is used to explain membership turnover in two Swedish business groups, network analysis being used to define group membership. The results suggest these business groups possess a combination of financial and industrial experience as a group resource and the socialising strategy of control as a force counteracting the conflict-producing force of heterogeneity. An organisational demographic perspective focusing on opposing forces of heterogeneity and homogeneity is developed. It is shown that the perspective can be applied both to formal organisations and to informal ones such as networks.

  8. An Integrated Approach with Group Decision-Making for Strategy Selection in SWOT Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    İhsan Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the analytical dimension of SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis with group decision-making, which underlines the analysis of internal and external environments that in turn, will improve the definition of corporate strategy within the strategic planning process. The main issue of the study was how to select the most appropriate strategy by taking into consideration different effects of each factor of SWOT analysis on strat...

  9. Famers’ satisfaction with group market arrangements as a measure of group market performance: A transaction cost analysis of Non Timber Forest Products’ producer groups in Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foundjem Tita, D.; Haese, D' M.; Degrande, A.; Tchoundjeu, Z.; Damme, Van P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of Non Timber Forest Product (NTFP) group market initiatives by examining whether these groups meet the objectives for which they were created. Group marketing has often been cited as one way through which farmers can increase their access to markets by improving

  10. Numerical analysis of Thai members of the Eugenia-Syzygium group (Myrtaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parnell, J.

    1999-01-01

    Four different analyses of Thai Syzygium show, with very small discrepancies, that one smaller monophyletic and one larger polyphyletic group can be recognised. The smaller monophyletic group warrants sectional rank as Syzygium section Jambosa and consists of S. anacardiifolium, S. aqueum, S. diospy

  11. Using Cluster Analysis to Group Countries for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: An Application to Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Louise B; Bhanot, Gyan; Kim, Sun-Young; Sinha, Anushua

    2017-08-01

    To explore the use of cluster analysis to define groups of similar countries for the purpose of evaluating the cost-effectiveness of a public health intervention-maternal immunization-within the constraints of a project budget originally meant for an overall regional analysis. We used the most common cluster analysis algorithm, K-means, and the most common measure of distance, Euclidean distance, to group 37 low-income, sub-Saharan African countries on the basis of 24 measures of economic development, general health resources, and past success in public health programs. The groups were tested for robustness and reviewed by regional disease experts. We explored 2-, 3- and 4-group clustering. Public health performance was consistently important in determining the groups. For the 2-group clustering, for example, infant mortality in Group 1 was 81 per 1,000 live births compared with 51 per 1,000 in Group 2, and 67% of children in Group 1 received DPT immunization compared with 87% in Group 2. The experts preferred four groups to fewer, on the ground that national decision makers would more readily recognize their country among four groups. Clusters defined by K-means clustering made sense to subject experts and allowed a more detailed evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of maternal immunization within the constraint of the project budget. The method may be useful for other evaluations that, without having the resources to conduct separate analyses for each unit, seek to inform decision makers in numerous countries or subdivisions within countries, such as states or counties.

  12. Radial Velocity Prospects Current and Future: A White Paper Report prepared by the Study Analysis Group 8 for the Exoplanet Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG)

    CERN Document Server

    Plavchan, Peter; Gaudi, Scott; Crepp, Justin; Xavier, Dumusque; Furesz, Gabor; Vanderburg, Andrew; Blake, Cullen; Fischer, Debra; Prato, Lisa; White, Russel; Makarov, Valeri; Marcy, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Haywood, Raphaëlle; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Anglada, Guillem; Muirhead, Philip

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] The Study Analysis Group 8 of the NASA Exoplanet Analysis Group was convened to assess the current capabilities and the future potential of the precise radial velocity (PRV) method to advance the NASA goal to "search for planetary bodies and Earth-like planets in orbit around other stars.: (U.S. National Space Policy, June 28, 2010). PRVs complement other exoplanet detection methods, for example offering a direct path to obtaining the bulk density and thus the structure and composition of transiting exoplanets. Our analysis builds upon previous community input, including the ExoPlanet Community Report chapter on radial velocities in 2008, the 2010 Decadal Survey of Astronomy, the Penn State Precise Radial Velocities Workshop response to the Decadal Survey in 2010, and the NSF Portfolio Review in 2012. The radial-velocity detection of exoplanets is strongly endorsed by both the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey "New Worlds, New Horizons" and the NSF Portfolio Review, and the community has recommended robust...

  13. Population Analysis of Adverse Events in Different Age Groups Using Big Clinical Trials Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jake; Eldredge, Christina; Cho, Chi C; Cisler, Ron A

    2016-10-17

    Understanding adverse event patterns in clinical studies across populations is important for patient safety and protection in clinical trials as well as for developing appropriate drug therapies, procedures, and treatment plans. The objective of our study was to conduct a data-driven population-based analysis to estimate the incidence, diversity, and association patterns of adverse events by age of the clinical trials patients and participants. Two aspects of adverse event patterns were measured: (1) the adverse event incidence rate in each of the patient age groups and (2) the diversity of adverse events defined as distinct types of adverse events categorized by organ system. Statistical analysis was done on the summarized clinical trial data. The incident rate and diversity level in each of the age groups were compared with the lowest group (reference group) using t tests. Cohort data was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, and 186,339 clinical studies were analyzed; data were extracted from the 17,853 clinical trials that reported clinical outcomes. The total number of clinical trial participants was 6,808,619, and total number of participants affected by adverse events in these trials was 1,840,432. The trial participants were divided into eight different age groups to support cross-age group comparison. In general, children and older patients are more susceptible to adverse events in clinical trial studies. Using the lowest incidence age group as the reference group (20-29 years), the incidence rate of the 0-9 years-old group was 31.41%, approximately 1.51 times higher (P=.04) than the young adult group (20-29 years) at 20.76%. The second-highest group is the 50-59 years-old group with an incidence rate of 30.09%, significantly higher (Pdata suggest that age-associated adverse events should be considered in planning, monitoring, and regulating clinical trials.

  14. Cluster analysis for identifying sub-groups and selecting potential discriminatory variables in human encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowcroft Natasha S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis is an acute clinical syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS, often associated with fatal outcome or permanent damage, including cognitive and behavioural impairment, affective disorders and epileptic seizures. Infection of the central nervous system is considered to be a major cause of encephalitis and more than 100 different pathogens have been recognized as causative agents. However, a large proportion of cases have unknown disease etiology. Methods We perform hierarchical cluster analysis on a multicenter England encephalitis data set with the aim of identifying sub-groups in human encephalitis. We use the simple matching similarity measure which is appropriate for binary data sets and performed variable selection using cluster heatmaps. We also use heatmaps to visually assess underlying patterns in the data, identify the main clinical and laboratory features and identify potential risk factors associated with encephalitis. Results Our results identified fever, personality and behavioural change, headache and lethargy as the main characteristics of encephalitis. Diagnostic variables such as brain scan and measurements from cerebrospinal fluids are also identified as main indicators of encephalitis. Our analysis revealed six major clusters in the England encephalitis data set. However, marked within-cluster heterogeneity is observed in some of the big clusters indicating possible sub-groups. Overall, the results show that patients are clustered according to symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents. Exposure variables such as recent infection, sick person contact and animal contact have been identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions It is in general assumed and is a common practice to group encephalitis cases according to disease etiology. However, our results indicate that patients are clustered with respect to mainly symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents

  15. Molecular analysis of multiple isolates of the major serotypes of group B streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Fasola, E; Livdahl, C; Ferrieri, P

    1993-01-01

    Serotyping of clinical isolates is a widely used technique for epidemiologic study of group B streptococcal infections. However, serotyping cannot definitively determine epidemiologically related or unrelated isolates. We investigated the use of restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) with both conventional agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in 50 isolates of the major serotypes of group B streptococci. Single digestion with HindIII and HaeIII and do...

  16. Group Analysis of Nonlinear Internal Waves in Oceans. II: The symmetries and rotationally invariant solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Nail H; Kovalev, Vladimir F

    2011-01-01

    74J30The maximal group of Lie point symmetries of a system of nonlinear equations used in geophysical fluid dynamics is presented. The Lie algebra of this group is infinite-dimensional and involves three arbitrary functions of time. The invariant solution under the rotation and dilation is constructed. Qualitative analysis of the invariant solution is provided and the energy of this solution is presented.

  17. The Group's Absence Norm and Commitment to the Group as Predictors of Group Member Absence in the Next Session: An Actor-Partner Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Kivlighan, D. Martin, III; Cole, Odessa Dorian

    2012-01-01

    The group's absence norm, a construct from the applied psychology literature, was used to examine session absences in personal growth groups. Rather than examining the absence norm statically, we modeled it dynamically as a time-varying covariate (Tasca et al., 2010). We also examined moderation by modeling the interaction of the absence norm and…

  18. ABO blood group system and gastric cancer: a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Liu, Lei; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Yan, Min; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan

    2012-10-17

    This study focuses on the association between the ABO blood group system and the risk of gastric cancer or Helicobacter pylori infection. The data for the ABO blood group was collected from 1045 cases of gastric cancer, whereby the patient underwent a gastrectomy in Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai. The information on the ABO blood group from 53,026 healthy blood donors was enrolled as control. We searched the Pubmed database on the relationship between ABO blood groups and gastric cancer risk for meta-analysis. In our case-control study, the risk of gastric cancer in blood group A was significantly higher than that in non-A groups (O, B and AB) (odd ratio, OR1.34; 95% confidential interval, CI 1.25-1.44). Compared with non-O groups (A, B and AB), individuals with blood group O demonstrated a reduced risk of gastric cancer (OR = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72-0.88). The proportion of H. pylori infection in blood group A individuals was significantly higher than that in non-A blood groups (OR = 1.42; 95% CI 1.05-1.93). We further combined our data with the published data of others, and crossreferenced the risk of gastric cancer with the blood type, finding consistent evidence that gastric cancer risk in the blood A group was higher than that in the non-A groups (OR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.07-1.15), and that blood type O individuals were consistently shown gastric cancer risk reduction (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.89-0.94). Our study concluded that there was a slightly increased risk of gastric cancer in blood group A individuals, and people with blood type A are more prone to be infected by H. pylori than other ABO blood type individuals, whereas, a slightly decreased risk of gastric cancer was identified in blood type O individuals.

  19. A unified framework for group independent component analysis for multi-subject fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Pagnoni, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is becoming increasingly popular for analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. While ICA has been successfully applied to single-subject analysis, the extension of ICA to group inferences is not straightforward and remains an active topic of research. Current group ICA models, such as the GIFT [Calhoun, V.D., Adali, T., Pearlson, G.D., Pekar, J.J., 2001. A method for making group inferences from functional MRI data using independent component analysis. Hum. Brain Mapp. 14, 140-151.] and tensor PICA [Beckmann, C.F., Smith, S.M., 2005. Tensorial extensions of independent component analysis for multisubject FMRI analysis. Neuroimage 25, 294-311.], make different assumptions about the underlying structure of the group spatio-temporal processes and are thus estimated using algorithms tailored for the assumed structure, potentially leading to diverging results. To our knowledge, there are currently no methods for assessing the validity of different model structures in real fMRI data and selecting the most appropriate one among various choices. In this paper, we propose a unified framework for estimating and comparing group ICA models with varying spatio-temporal structures. We consider a class of group ICA models that can accommodate different group structures and include existing models, such as the GIFT and tensor PICA, as special cases. We propose a maximum likelihood (ML) approach with a modified Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for the estimation of the proposed class of models. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) are presented to compare between different group ICA models. The LRT can be used to perform model comparison and selection, to assess the goodness-of-fit of a model in a particular data set, and to test group differences in the fMRI signal time courses between subject subgroups. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method under varying structures of group spatio

  20. Diversity of Xiphinema americanum-group Species and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of Morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, F; Ciancio, A

    1993-09-01

    Of the 39 species composing the Xiphinema americanum group, 14 were described originally from North America and two others have been reported from this region. Many species are very similar morphologically and can be distinguished only by a difficult comparison of various combinations of some morphometric characters. Study of morphometrics of 49 populations, including the type populations of the 39 species attributed to this group, by principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis placed the populations into five subgroups, proposed here as the X. brevicolle subgroup (seven species), the X. americanum subgroup (17 species), the X. taylori subgroup (two species), the X. pachtaicum subgroup (eight species), and the X. lambertii subgroup (five species).

  1. NASA ExoPAG Study Analysis Group 11: Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Yee, Jennifer C; Barry, Richard K; Bennett, David; Bryden, Geoff; Chung, Sun-Ju; Gaudi, B Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Gould, Andrew; Penny, Matthew T; Rattenbury, Nicholas; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Skowron, Jan; Street, Rachel; Sumi, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    NASA's proposed WFIRST-AFTA mission will discover thousands of exoplanets with separations from the habitable zone out to unbound planets, using the technique of gravitational microlensing. The Study Analysis Group 11 of the NASA Exoplanet Program Analysis Group was convened to explore scientific programs that can be undertaken now, and in the years leading up to WFIRST's launch, in order to maximize the mission's scientific return and to reduce technical and scientific risk. This report presents those findings, which include suggested precursor Hubble Space Telescope observations, a ground-based, NIR microlensing survey, and other programs to develop and deepen community scientific expertise prior to the mission.

  2. FRAME MULTIRESOLUTION ANALYSIS AND INFINITE TREES IN BANACH SPACES ON LOCALLY COMPACT ABELIAN GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. S. Panday

    2004-01-01

    We extend the concept of frame multiresolution analysis to a locally compact abelian group and use it to define certain weighted Banach spaces and the spaces of their antifunctionals. We define analysis and synthesis operators on these spaces and establish the continuity of their composition. Also, we prove a general result to characterize infinite trees in the above Banach spaces of antifunctionals. This paper paves the way for the study of corresponding problems associated with some other types of Banach spaces on locally compact abelian groups including modulation spaces.

  3. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties of Chemicals using Group-Contribution Property Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    or time constraints, property prediction models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate flammability data. The estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as less time consuming as possible. However, GC property prediction methods frequently lack rigorous uncertainty analysis. Hence......, there is no information about the reliability of the data. Furthermore, the global optimality of the GC parameters estimation is often not ensured. In this research project flammability-related property data, like LFL and UFL, are estimated using the Marrero and Gani group contribution method (MG method). In addition...... the group contribution in three levels: The contributions from a specific functional group (1st order parameters), from polyfunctional (2nd order parameters) as well as from structural groups (3rd order parameters). The latter two classes of GC factors provide additional structural information beside...

  4. Analysis of individual versus group behavior of zebrafish: a model using pH sublethal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Danielly de Paiva; Buss, Daniel Forsin; da Cunha, Rodolfo Armando; Linde-Arias, Ana Rosa; Baptista, Darcilio Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    An image analysis biomonitoring system was used to evaluate sublethal effects of pH on the mean swimming velocity of zebrafish. Responses to stress were tested comparing individual and group responses. Group analysis indicated no effect for all acid pH and for pH 9.0-9.5. Individual analysis indicated behavioral differences for most acid pH and higher than 9.5. Sensitivity to sublethal pH was best assessed when using individual analysis. Zebrafish decreased hyperactivity and increased hypoactivity with more acid or alkaline pH. Individual approach allowed to determine hyperactivity or hypoactivity and the species' thresholds of exposure, which is critical for the management of impairments.

  5. An Integrated Approach with Group Decision-Making for Strategy Selection in SWOT Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Yüksel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to improve the analytical dimension of SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis with group decision-making, which underlines the analysis of internal and external environments that in turn, will improve the definition of corporate strategy within the strategic planning process. The main issue of the study was how to select the most appropriate strategy by taking into consideration different effects of each factor of SWOT analysis on strategy selection. The proposed model addresses strengths and opportunities as benefits and weaknesses and threats as costs. The model was solved with analytic network process (ANP and fuzzy technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS technique with group decision-making. The integrated ANP and Fuzzy TOPSIS model proposed at the end of the present study has been shown to be applicable to SWOT analysis and strategy selection.

  6. Validation of a blood group genotyping method based on high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxiang; Hong, Ying; Wang, Naihong; Fu, Xuemei; Zhou, Changhua

    2014-01-01

    The detection of polymorphism is the basis of blood group genotyping and phenotype prediction. Genotyping may be useful to determine blood groups when serologic results are unclear. The development and application of different methods for blood group genotyping may be needed as a substitute for blood group typing. The purpose of this study is to establish an approach for blood group genotyping based on a melting curve analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using DNA extracted from whole blood, we developed and validated a DNA typing method for detecting DO*01/DO*02, DO*01/DI*02, LU*01/LU*02, and GYPB*03/GYBP*04 alleles using a melting curve analysis. All assays were confirmed with a commercial reagent containing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), and a cohort of the samples was confirmed with sequencing. Results for all blood groups were within the range of specificity and assay variability. Genotypes of 300 blood donors were fully consistent with PCR-SSP data. The obtained genotype distribution is in complete concordance with existing data for the Chinese population. There are several advantages for this approach of blood group genotyping: lower contamination rates with PCR products in this laboratory, ease of performance, automation potential, and rapid cycling time.

  7. THE MOTOR LEARNING, MEMORY, KNOWLEDGE OF RESULTS: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF HOMOGENEOUS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Perrotta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is ample experimental evidence of the positive-fixing motor task of having both a lower relativefrequency (FR which is provided with the knowledge of the result (CR to the subject of learning, The outcomeof the response, both the application of the formulation of a subjective estimate of first CR (SS.It 'was, however, suggested the possibility of an interaction between these two variables,meaning thatthe individual, when he has to make an estimate subjective error, would benefit from greater FR. Taking up aninteresting research is shown in a dissertation in Physiotherapy (Giulia Days 2000/01 Which is credited withhaving carried out a rigorous investigation and Articles The authors of this paper have wanted to see exactlyProposing given to 60 young subjects, righthanded and in good health, and the same working hypothesis, butwith a different device (Biodex System 4: a simple right elbow flexion with isokinetic contraction at 30 degrees/ second. Subjects were asked:1 to Assess Whether or not the mistake made after the end of the year,2 CR was provided after each trial (100% FR, or after a trial every five (20% FR3 to mark the difference between the subjects who did not Had Gold SS to make an the latter was askedimmediately after the conclusion of the trial, of perform a simple calculation. All subjects performed 20 sets of10 repetitions each during a single session of practice. The next day was made a test of retention (consisting of 1 set of 15 repetitions without CR or SS The comparison between the groups at the retention test was performed with Analysis of variance, before and after adjustment for the initial conditions. The results showed that afteradjustment the group of subjects who received the CR with 100% FR and formulation of SS during the period of practice, a test of retention in a Significantly better.

  8. 75 FR 34530 - Analysis by the President's Working Group on Financial Markets on the Long-Term Availability and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Analysis by the President's Working Group on Financial Markets on the Long-Term Availability and... President's Working Group on Financial Markets to perform an analysis and report to Congress regarding the... Working Group on Financial Markets is to conduct its analysis in consultation with the...

  9. Stability analysis of multi-group deterministic and stochastic epidemic models with vaccination rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Gao, Rui-Mei; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Han, Qi-Xing

    2014-09-01

    We discuss in this paper a deterministic multi-group MSIR epidemic model with a vaccination rate, the basic reproduction number ℛ0, a key parameter in epidemiology, is a threshold which determines the persistence or extinction of the disease. By using Lyapunov function techniques, we show if ℛ0 is greater than 1 and the deterministic model obeys some conditions, then the disease will prevail, the infective persists and the endemic state is asymptotically stable in a feasible region. If ℛ0 is less than or equal to 1, then the infective disappear so the disease dies out. In addition, stochastic noises around the endemic equilibrium will be added to the deterministic MSIR model in order that the deterministic model is extended to a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations. In the stochastic version, we carry out a detailed analysis on the asymptotic behavior of the stochastic model. In addition, regarding the value of ℛ0, when the stochastic system obeys some conditions and ℛ0 is greater than 1, we deduce the stochastic system is stochastically asymptotically stable. Finally, the deterministic and stochastic model dynamics are illustrated through computer simulations.

  10. Excision repair cross complementation group 1 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Chao; DENG Zai-chun; ZHANG Yan-mei; WANG Ran; SUN Shi-fang; CHEN Zhong-bo; MA Hong-ying; YU Yi-ming; DING Qun-li; SHU Li-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have evaluated the association between polymorphisms of encoding excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) enzyme and lung cancer risk in diverse populations but with conflicting results.By pooling the relatively small samples in each study, it is possible to perform a meta-analysis of the evidence by rigorous methods.Methods Embase, Ovid, Medline and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched. Additional studies were identified from references in original studies or review articles. Articles meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed systematically, and the reported data were aggregated using the statistical techniques of meta-analysis.Results We found 3810 cases with lung cancer and 4332 controls from seven eligible studies. T19007C polymorphism showed no significant effect on lung cancer risk (C allele vs. T allele: odds ratio (OR)=0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.80-1.04; CC vs. TT: OR=0.76, 95% CI=0.56-1.02; CC vs. (CT+TT): OR=0.96, 95% CI=-0.84-1.10). Similarly,there was no significant main effects for T19007C polymorphism on lung cancer risk when stratified analyses by ethnicity (Chinese or Caucasian). No significant association was found between C8092A polymorphism (3060 patients and 2729 controls) and the risk of lung cancer (A allele vs. C allele: OR=1.03, 95% CI=0.95-1.11; AA vs. CC: OR=1.08, 95% CI=-0.88-1.33; AA vs. (AC+CC): OR=1.08, 95% CI=-0.88-1.31).Conclusion We found little evidence of an association between the T1900C or C8092A polymorphisms of ERCC 1 and the risk of lung cancer in Caucasian or Han Chinese people.

  11. Genetic analysis of the porcine group B rotavirus NSP2 gene from wild-type Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Médici

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Group B rotaviruses (RV-B were first identified in piglet feces, being later associated with diarrhea in humans, cattle, lambs, and rats. In human beings, the virus was only described in China, India, and Bangladesh, especially infecting adults. Only a few studies concerning molecular analysis of the RV-B NSP2 gene have been conducted, and porcine RV-B has not been characterized. In the present study, three porcine wild-type RV-B strains from piglet stool samples collected from Brazilian pig herds were used for analysis. PAGE results were inconclusive for those samples, but specific amplicons of the RV-B NSP2 gene (segment 8 were obtained in a semi-nested PCR assay. The three porcine RV-B strains showed the highest nucleotide identity with the human WH1 strain and the alignments with other published sequences resulted in three groups of strains divided according to host species. The group of human strains showed 92.4 to 99.7% nucleotide identity while the porcine strains of the Brazilian RV-B group showed 90.4 to 91.8% identity to each other. The identity of the Brazilian porcine RV-B strains with outer sequences consisting of group A and C rotaviruses was only 35.3 to 38.8%. A dendrogram was also constructed to group the strains into clusters according to host species: human, rat, and a distinct third cluster consisting exclusively of the Brazilian porcine RV-B strains. This is the first study of the porcine RV-B NSP2 gene that contributes to the partial characterization of this virus and demonstrates the relationship among RV-B strains from different host species.

  12. Integrated Analysis and Visualization of Group Differences in Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity: Applications in Typical Ageing and Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn D Langen

    Full Text Available Structural and functional brain connectivity are increasingly used to identify and analyze group differences in studies of brain disease. This study presents methods to analyze uni- and bi-modal brain connectivity and evaluate their ability to identify differences. Novel visualizations of significantly different connections comparing multiple metrics are presented. On the global level, "bi-modal comparison plots" show the distribution of uni- and bi-modal group differences and the relationship between structure and function. Differences between brain lobes are visualized using "worm plots". Group differences in connections are examined with an existing visualization, the "connectogram". These visualizations were evaluated in two proof-of-concept studies: (1 middle-aged versus elderly subjects; and (2 patients with schizophrenia versus controls. Each included two measures derived from diffusion weighted images and two from functional magnetic resonance images. The structural measures were minimum cost path between two anatomical regions according to the "Statistical Analysis of Minimum cost path based Structural Connectivity" method and the average fractional anisotropy along the fiber. The functional measures were Pearson's correlation and partial correlation of mean regional time series. The relationship between structure and function was similar in both studies. Uni-modal group differences varied greatly between connectivity types. Group differences were identified in both studies globally, within brain lobes and between regions. In the aging study, minimum cost path was highly effective in identifying group differences on all levels; fractional anisotropy and mean correlation showed smaller differences on the brain lobe and regional levels. In the schizophrenia study, minimum cost path and fractional anisotropy showed differences on the global level and within brain lobes; mean correlation showed small differences on the lobe level. Only

  13. Integrated Analysis and Visualization of Group Differences in Structural and Functional Brain Connectivity: Applications in Typical Ageing and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Carolyn D; White, Tonya; Ikram, M Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W; Niessen, Wiro J

    2015-01-01

    Structural and functional brain connectivity are increasingly used to identify and analyze group differences in studies of brain disease. This study presents methods to analyze uni- and bi-modal brain connectivity and evaluate their ability to identify differences. Novel visualizations of significantly different connections comparing multiple metrics are presented. On the global level, "bi-modal comparison plots" show the distribution of uni- and bi-modal group differences and the relationship between structure and function. Differences between brain lobes are visualized using "worm plots". Group differences in connections are examined with an existing visualization, the "connectogram". These visualizations were evaluated in two proof-of-concept studies: (1) middle-aged versus elderly subjects; and (2) patients with schizophrenia versus controls. Each included two measures derived from diffusion weighted images and two from functional magnetic resonance images. The structural measures were minimum cost path between two anatomical regions according to the "Statistical Analysis of Minimum cost path based Structural Connectivity" method and the average fractional anisotropy along the fiber. The functional measures were Pearson's correlation and partial correlation of mean regional time series. The relationship between structure and function was similar in both studies. Uni-modal group differences varied greatly between connectivity types. Group differences were identified in both studies globally, within brain lobes and between regions. In the aging study, minimum cost path was highly effective in identifying group differences on all levels; fractional anisotropy and mean correlation showed smaller differences on the brain lobe and regional levels. In the schizophrenia study, minimum cost path and fractional anisotropy showed differences on the global level and within brain lobes; mean correlation showed small differences on the lobe level. Only fractional anisotropy

  14. A cladistic analysis of Aristotle's animal groups in the Historia animalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lieven, Alexander Fürst; Humar, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    The Historia animalium (HA) of Aristotle contains an extraordinarily rich compilation of descriptions of animal anatomy, development, and behaviour. It is believed that Aristotle's aim in HA was to describe the correlations of characters rather than to classify or define animal groups. In order to assess if Aristotle, while organising his character correlations, referred to a pre-existing classification that underlies the descriptions in HA, we carried out a cladistic analysis according to the following procedure: by disentangeling 147 species and 40 higher taxa-designations from 157 predicates in the texts, we transcribed Aristotle's descriptions on anatomy and development of animals in books I-V of HA into a character matrix for a cladistic analysis. By analysing the distribution of characters as described in his books, we obtained a non-phylogenetic dendrogram displaying 58 monophyletic groups, 29 of which have equivalents among Aristotle's group designations. Eleven Aristotelian groupings turned out to be non-monophyletic, and six of them are inconsistent with the monophyletic groups. Twelve of 29 taxa without equivalents in Aristotle's works have equivalents in modern classifications. With this analysis we demonstate there exists a fairly consistent underlying classification in the zoological works of Aristotle. The peculiarities of Aristotle's character basis are discussed and the dendrogram is compared with a current phylogenetic tree.

  15. EEGIFT: Group Independent Component Analysis for Event-Related EEG Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Eichele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA is a powerful method for source separation and has been used for decomposition of EEG, MRI, and concurrent EEG-fMRI data. ICA is not naturally suited to draw group inferences since it is a non-trivial problem to identify and order components across individuals. One solution to this problem is to create aggregate data containing observations from all subjects, estimate a single set of components and then back-reconstruct this in the individual data. Here, we describe such a group-level temporal ICA model for event related EEG. When used for EEG time series analysis, the accuracy of component detection and back-reconstruction with a group model is dependent on the degree of intra- and interindividual time and phase-locking of event related EEG processes. We illustrate this dependency in a group analysis of hybrid data consisting of three simulated event-related sources with varying degrees of latency jitter and variable topographies. Reconstruction accuracy was tested for temporal jitter 1, 2 and 3 times the FWHM of the sources for a number of algorithms. The results indicate that group ICA is adequate for decomposition of single trials with physiological jitter, and reconstructs event related sources with high accuracy.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of a bayesian latent group analysis for the detection of malingering-related poor effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Alonso; Labrenz, Stephan; Markowitsch, Hans J; Piefke, Martina

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, different statistical techniques have been introduced to improve assessment of malingering-related poor effort. In this context, we have recently shown preliminary evidence that a Bayesian latent group model may help to optimize classification accuracy using a simulation research design. In the present study, we conducted two analyses. Firstly, we evaluated how accurately this Bayesian approach can distinguish between participants answering in an honest way (honest response group) and participants feigning cognitive impairment (experimental malingering group). Secondly, we tested the accuracy of our model in the differentiation between patients who had real cognitive deficits (cognitively impaired group) and participants who belonged to the experimental malingering group. All Bayesian analyses were conducted using the raw scores of a visual recognition forced-choice task (2AFC), the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM, Trial 2), and the Word Memory Test (WMT, primary effort subtests). The first analysis showed 100% accuracy for the Bayesian model in distinguishing participants of both groups with all effort measures. The second analysis showed outstanding overall accuracy of the Bayesian model when estimates were obtained from the 2AFC and the TOMM raw scores. Diagnostic accuracy of the Bayesian model diminished when using the WMT total raw scores. Despite, overall diagnostic accuracy can still be considered excellent. The most plausible explanation for this decrement is the low performance in verbal recognition and fluency tasks of some patients of the cognitively impaired group. Additionally, the Bayesian model provides individual estimates, p(zi |D), of examinees' effort levels. In conclusion, both high classification accuracy levels and Bayesian individual estimates of effort may be very useful for clinicians when assessing for effort in medico-legal settings.

  17. Therapist's Directive and Nondirective Behavior: Analysis of Their Effects in a Parent Training Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Fabiane Ferraz; Bolsoni-Silva, Alessandra Turini; Meyer, Sonia Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    The study described the interaction between therapist and clients in a group intervention with two mothers and a grandmother. Five out of thirteen taped sessions were designated for analysis. Main results: a) therapist's categories that stood out: approval, recommendation, interpretation, information and information request; b) clients' categories…

  18. Boundary Layer Equations and Lie Group Analysis of a Sisko Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Sarı

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Boundary layer equations are derived for the Sisko fluid. Using Lie group theory, a symmetry analysis of the equations is performed. A partial differential system is transferred to an ordinary differential system via symmetries. Resulting equations are numerically solved. Effects of non-Newtonian parameters on the solutions are discussed.

  19. A collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brion, María; Dupuy, Berit M; Heinrich, Marielle

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative study was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the performance of Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis in different European laboratories. Four blood samples were sent to the laboratories, to be analysed for 11 Y-chromosome single nucle...

  20. Gender Issues on the Information Highway: An Analysis of Communication Styles in Electronic Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Paolo

    A study investigated gender differences in language use in electronic mail discussion groups. A review of research on discourse analysis identifies areas in which gender differences are found in interpersonal interaction and language use in general, and how these reflect differences in socialization. Research on electronic discussion groups…

  1. Application of AHP-Ansoff Matrix Analysis in Business Diversification: The case of Evergrande Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Nan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of enterprise strategic research, the AHP—Ansoff Matrix analysis method, is put forward in this paper for the first time and applied in the enterprise practices. By using this research method, the development strategy of enterprise diversification is analyzed scientifically and reasonably with Evergrande group as the example. And finally, main procedures of the method are summarized.

  2. Non-parametric group-level statistics for source-resolved ERP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Clement; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Delorme, Arnaud; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Makeig, Scott

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new statistical framework for group-level event-related potential (ERP) analysis in EEGLAB. The framework calculates the variance of scalp channel signals accounted for by the activity of homogeneous clusters of sources found by independent component analysis (ICA). When ICA data decomposition is performed on each subject's data separately, functionally equivalent ICs can be grouped into EEGLAB clusters. Here, we report a new addition (statPvaf) to the EEGLAB plug-in std_envtopo to enable inferential statistics on main effects and interactions in event related potentials (ERPs) of independent component (IC) processes at the group level. We demonstrate the use of the updated plug-in on simulated and actual EEG data.

  3. The analysis of a personality profile of selected groups of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Joanna; Rotter, Iwona; Kemicer-Chmielewska, Ewa; Karakiewicz, Beata; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of a personality profile of selected groups of Polish nurses. 72 nurses working in internal diseases departments and departments of surgery in Szczecin were investigated. To examine the personality profiles a diagnostic survey was used. It was based on an authorised Polish elaboration of Cattell's 16 Personality Factors Test. To examine their personality profile an authorised Polish elaboration of a diagnostic survey based on a standardized elaboration of personality profiles by Raymond B. Cattell was used. The analysis of the results indicated no significant differences between groups. The average sten scores from each of 16 examined factors were within the established limits. The personality profiles of the examined groups of nurses indicated a greater probability of the appearance of desirable features among the investigated people working in medical professions and demanding team cooperation, as well as relationship-building skills. Nurses, regardless of workplace, had personality traits indicating the need for education and improving occupational qualifications.

  4. Multiple Group Testing Procedures for Analysis of High-Dimensional Genomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyoseok; Kim, Kipoong

    2016-01-01

    In genetic association studies with high-dimensional genomic data, multiple group testing procedures are often required in order to identify disease/trait-related genes or genetic regions, where multiple genetic sites or variants are located within the same gene or genetic region. However, statistical testing procedures based on an individual test suffer from multiple testing issues such as the control of family-wise error rate and dependent tests. Moreover, detecting only a few of genes associated with a phenotype outcome among tens of thousands of genes is of main interest in genetic association studies. In this reason regularization procedures, where a phenotype outcome regresses on all genomic markers and then regression coefficients are estimated based on a penalized likelihood, have been considered as a good alternative approach to analysis of high-dimensional genomic data. But, selection performance of regularization procedures has been rarely compared with that of statistical group testing procedures. In this article, we performed extensive simulation studies where commonly used group testing procedures such as principal component analysis, Hotelling's T2 test, and permutation test are compared with group lasso (least absolute selection and shrinkage operator) in terms of true positive selection. Also, we applied all methods considered in simulation studies to identify genes associated with ovarian cancer from over 20,000 genetic sites generated from Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27K Beadchip. We found a big discrepancy of selected genes between multiple group testing procedures and group lasso.

  5. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  6. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  7. Chemometric analysis of chromatographic fingerprints shows potential of Cyclopia maculata (Andrews) Kies for production of standardized extracts with high xanthone content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Alexandra E; de Beer, Dalene; de Villiers, André; Manley, Marena; Joubert, Elizabeth

    2014-10-29

    Cyclopia species are used for the production of honeybush tea and food ingredient extracts associated with many health benefits. A species-specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for Cyclopia maculata, developed and validated, allowed quantification of the major compounds in extracts from "unfermented" and fermented C. maculata. Two xanthones were tentatively identified for the first time in a Cyclopia species, whereas an additional four compounds were tentatively identified for the first time in C. maculata. "Fermentation" (oxidation) decreased the content of all compounds, with the exception of vicenin-2. Similarity analysis of the chromatographic fingerprints of unfermented C. maculata aqueous extracts showed extremely low variation (r ≥ 0.97) between samples. Some differences between wild-harvested and cultivated seedling plants were, however, demonstrated using principal component analysis. Quantitative data of selected compounds confirmed the low level of variation, making this Cyclopia species ideal for the production of standardized food ingredient extracts.

  8. Group analysis of evolutionary integro-differential equations describing nonlinear waves: the general model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, Nail H [Department of Mathematics and Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE-371 79 Karlskrona (Sweden); Meleshko, Sergey V [School of Mathematics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Rudenko, Oleg V, E-mail: nib@bth.se, E-mail: sergey@math.sut.ac.th, E-mail: rudenko@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-05

    The paper deals with an evolutionary integro-differential equation describing nonlinear waves. A particular choice of the kernel in the integral leads to well-known equations such as the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation, the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and others. Since the solutions of these equations describe many physical phenomena, the analysis of the general model studied in this paper is important. One of the methods for obtaining solutions of differential equations is provided by the Lie group analysis. However, this method is not applicable to integro-differential equations. Therefore, we discuss new approaches developed in modern group analysis and apply them to the general model considered in this paper. Reduced equations and exact solutions are also presented.

  9. Hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum heavy fractions using the TLC-FID technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.K.; Sarowha, S.L.S.; Bhagat, S.D. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India); Tiwari, R.K.; Gupta, S.K.; Venkataramani, P.S. [Defence Materials and Stores, Research and Development, Establishment, Kanpur (India)

    1998-03-01

    Hydrocarbon group type analysis is important in all conversion processes and in preparation of feed for these conversion processes so as to learn the selectivity of the different type of catalysts for product yield and quality. The use of the Mark 5 Iatroscan detector and the method reported here allowed for a rapid and quantitative hydrocarbon group type analysis of petroleum residues without prior separation of asphaltenes. SARA type analyses of petroleum residues have been performed by a three stage development using n-hexane, toluene and DCM (95%):MeOH (5%). The standard deviation and coefficient of variation in repeated measurements by this method were as low as 0.65 wt% or less and 3.5 wt% or less, respectively. The time required for analysis of 10 samples could be as short as 90 min. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 tabs., 21 refs.

  10. Genetic and serological analysis of the immunogenic 67-kDa lipoprotein of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, J; Cheng, X; Monnerat, M P; Abdo, E M; Krawinkler, M; Bölske, G; Nicolet, J

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a lipoprotein of 67 kDa, named P67, was cloned from Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 strain PG50 and expressed in Escherichia coli K12. Analysis of the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence of the P67 gene revealed a typical prokaryotic signal peptidase II membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site and a transmembrane structure domain in the leader sequence at the amino-terminal end of the protein. Protein P67 showed 91% identical amino acid residues to the lipoprotein P72 of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC) and 53% identical amino acid residues to a peptide of an unassigned gene on the genome of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum. Antibodies made against recombinant P67 reacted with a 67-kDa protein in all Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 strains tested and also, to some extent, with P72 of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. The gene encoding P67 was present in all strains of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 analysed, but not in other Mycoplasma sp. of the "mycoides cluster" and not in the phylogenetically related Mycoplasma putrefaciens. PCR and restriction fragment analysis revealed that the gene of P67 is conserved in all strains of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7. A specific PCR reaction based on the P67 gene sequence enabled rapid identification of strains belonging to Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7.

  11. A content analysis of chronic diseases social groups on Facebook and Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; Antón-Rodríguez, Míriam

    2012-01-01

    Research on the use of social networks for health-related purposes is limited. This study aims to characterize the purpose and use of Facebook and Twitter groups concerning colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and diabetes. We searched in Facebook ( www.facebook.com ) and Twitter ( www.twitter.com ) using the terms "colorectal cancer," "breast cancer," and "diabetes." Each important group has been analyzed by extracting its network name, number of members, interests, and Web site URL. We found 216 breast cancer groups, 171 colorectal cancer groups, and 527 diabetes groups on Facebook and Twitter. The largest percentage of the colorectal cancer groups (25.58%) addresses prevention, similarly to breast cancer, whereas diabetes groups are mainly focused on research issues (25.09%). There are more social groups about breast cancer and diabetes on Facebook (around 82%) than on Twitter (around 18%). Regarding colorectal cancer, the difference is less: Facebook had 62.23%, and Twitter 31.76%. Social networks are a useful tool for supporting patients suffering from these three diseases. Regarding the use of these social networks for disease support purposes, Facebook shows a higher usage rate than Twitter, perhaps because Twitter is newer than Facebook, and its use is not so generalized.

  12. Enhancing medical students' reflectivity in mentoring groups for professional development - a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Pankoke, Nina; Goldblatt, Hadass; Hofmann, Marzellus; Zupanic, Michaela

    2017-07-14

    Professional competence is important in delivering high quality patient care, and it can be enhanced by reflection and reflective discourse e.g. in mentoring groups. However, students are often reluctant though to engage in this discourse. A group mentoring program involving all preclinical students as well as faculty members and co-mentoring clinical students was initiated at Witten-Herdecke University. This study explores both the attitudes of those students towards such a program and factors that might hinder or enhance how students engage in reflective discourse. A qualitative design was applied using semi-structured focus group interviews with preclinical students and semi-structured individual interviews with mentors and co-mentors. The interview data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Students' attitudes towards reflective discourse on professional challenges were diverse. Some students valued the new program and named positive outcomes regarding several features of professional development. Enriching experiences were described. Others expressed aversive attitudes. Three reasons for these were given: unclear goals and benefits, interpersonal problems within the groups hindering development and intrapersonal issues such as insecurity and traditional views of medical education. Participants mentioned several program setup factors that could enhance how students engage in such groups: explaining the program thoroughly, setting expectations and integrating the reflective discourse in a meaningful way into the curriculum, obliging participation without coercion, developing a sense of security, trust and interest in each other within the groups, randomizing group composition and facilitating group moderators as positive peer and faculty role models and as learning group members. A well-designed and empathetic setup of group mentoring programs can help raise openness towards engaging in meaningful reflective discourse. Reflection on and communication of

  13. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautter M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Sven Andreesen,2 Nadja Köhl-Hackert,2 Katja Hoffmann,3 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, University of Heidelberg, 2Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, 3Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Peer-assisted learning (PAL has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective.Purpose: To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors.Methods: A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80. The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants. The discussions were analyzed using content analysis.Results: The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available.Conclusion: On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor–student working alliance

  14. Special aspects of social support: Qualitative analysis of oncologic rehabilitation through a belly dancing peer support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, M; Szirmai, A; Füge, K; Makai, A; Erdélyi, G; Prémusz, V; Bódis, J

    2017-02-13

    Tumour-related peer support groups (PSGs) show long-term development in quality of life and coping, and decrease distress in cancer care. To clarify channels of social support in oncologic rehabilitation by combined exercise and psychosocial therapy, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted after 1 year additional belly dance rehabilitation in a closed PSG among 51 patients with malignant tumour diagnosis in Budapest, Hungary. Interview data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis (ATLAS.ti 6 Win). Results suggest that group experience provides emotional-, practical- and informational support. We could point out specific social effects of "role model" function and extend the coping model. The group dispose all the features of effective suggestion and may be effectively applied as additional therapy for patients with malignancies. The extended coping model and the introduction of "role model" function could be useful for PSGs' efficacy assessment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Group theoretical analysis of the H3+ +H2 ↔ H5+ reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    The H3+ +H2 →H2 + H3+ proton transfer reaction is complicated due to the proton scrambling from the large amplitude motions in the H5+ intermediate. In order to understand this reaction, high-resolution spectroscopic studies are necessary for the reactants/products and the intermediate, and the group theoretical analysis is an essential aspect in the prediction and interpretation of these spectra. With five indistinguishable protons, H5+ is characterized using the G240 complete nuclear permutation-inversion (CNPI) group. For most of the configurations sampled by the reaction path, the feasible permutations depend on the distance between the H3+ and H2 fragments. Subgroups of G240 can be used to describe these feasible permutations. Specifically, we consider two limits of the molecular configurations. The equilibrium structure of H5+ , i.e., [H2 -H -H2 ]+, can be described using the G16 molecular symmetry group, while the dissociation products, i.e., H3+ ⋯H2 , require the G24 molecular symmetry group. In the present study, a group theoretical analysis is performed for both limits, providing the symmetries for the nuclear spins and rovibrational wave functions. Also, spectroscopic properties for [H2 -H -H2 ]+, particularly rovibrational couplings and electric dipole selection rules, as well as correlations of energy levels between [H2 -H -H2 ]+ and H3+ ⋯H2 , are obtained.

  16. Hippocampal gene expression analysis using the ORESTES methodology shows that homer 1a mRNA is upregulated in the acute period of the pilocarpine epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedissian, Marcelo; Longo, Beatriz M; Jaqueta, Carolina B; Schnabel, Beatriz; Paiva, Paulo B; Mello, Luiz Eugênio A M; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2007-01-01

    In the study of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) the characterization of genes expressed in the hippocampus is of central importance for understanding their roles in epileptogenic mechanisms. Although several large-scale studies on TLE gene expression have been reported, precise assignment of individual genes associated with this syndrome is still debatable. Here we investigated differentially expressed genes by comparison of mRNAs from normal and epileptic rat hippocampus in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. For this we used a powerful EST sequencing methodology, ORESTES (Open Reading frame Expressed Sequence Tags), which generates sequence datasets enriched for mRNAs open reading frames (ORFs) rather than simple 5' and 3' ends of mRNAs. Analysis of our sequences shows that ORESTES readily enables the identification of epilepsy associated ORFs. PFAM analysis of protein motifs present in our ORESTES epilepsy database revealed diverse important protein family domains, such as cytoskeletal, cell signaling and protein kinase domains, which could be involved in processes underlying epileptogenesis. More importantly, we show that the expression of homer 1a, known to be coupled to mGluR and NMDA synaptic transmission, is associated with pilocarpine induced status epilepticus (SE). The combined use of the pilocarpine model of epilepsy with the ORESTES technique can significantly contribute to the identification of specific genes and proteins related to TLE. This is the first study applying a large-scale method for rapid shotgun sequencing directed to ORFs in epilepsy research.

  17. Gene network analysis shows immune-signaling and ERK1/2 as novel genetic markers for multiple addiction phenotypes: alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Yuan, Christine; Wang, Jian; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Shete, Sanjay

    2015-06-05

    Addictions to alcohol and tobacco, known risk factors for cancer, are complex heritable disorders. Addictive behaviors have a bidirectional relationship with pain. We hypothesize that the associations between alcohol, smoking, and opioid addiction observed in cancer patients have a genetic basis. Therefore, using bioinformatics tools, we explored the underlying genetic basis and identified new candidate genes and common biological pathways for smoking, alcohol, and opioid addiction. Literature search showed 56 genes associated with alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction. Using Core Analysis function in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, we found that ERK1/2 was strongly interconnected across all three addiction networks. Genes involved in immune signaling pathways were shown across all three networks. Connect function from IPA My Pathway toolbox showed that DRD2 is the gene common to both the list of genetic variations associated with all three addiction phenotypes and the components of the brain neuronal signaling network involved in substance addiction. The top canonical pathways associated with the 56 genes were: 1) calcium signaling, 2) GPCR signaling, 3) cAMP-mediated signaling, 4) GABA receptor signaling, and 5) G-alpha i signaling. Cancer patients are often prescribed opioids for cancer pain thus increasing their risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Our findings provide candidate genes and biological pathways underlying addiction phenotypes, which may be future targets for treatment of addiction. Further study of the variations of the candidate genes could allow physicians to make more informed decisions when treating cancer pain with opioid analgesics.

  18. The fading affect bias shows positive outcomes at the general but not the individual level of analysis in the context of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Jeffrey A; Horowitz, Kyle A; Dunlap, Spencer M

    2017-08-01

    Unpleasant affect fades faster than pleasant affect (e.g., Walker, Vogl, & Thompson, 1997); this effect is referred to as the Fading Affect Bias (FAB; Walker, Skowronski, Gibbons, Vogl, & Thompson, 2003a). Research shows that the FAB is consistently related to positive/healthy outcomes at a general but not at a specific level of analysis based on event types and individual differences (e.g., Gibbons et al., 2013). Based on the positive outcomes for FAB and negative outcomes for social media (Bolton et al., 2013; Huang, 2010), the current study examined FAB in the context of social media events along with related individual differences. General positive outcomes were shown in the form of robust FAB effects across social media and non-social media events, a larger FAB for non-social media events than for social media events, negative correlations of FAB with depression, anxiety, and stress as well as a positive correlation of FAB with self-esteem. However, the lack of a negative correlation between FAB and anxiety for social media events in a 3-way interaction did not show positive outcomes at a specific level of analysis. Rehearsal ratings mediated the 3-way interaction. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of interest group influence on federal school meals regulations 1992 to 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Suzanne Havala; Ricketts, Thomas C; Dodds, Janice M; Milio, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Regulatory changes proposed by the US Department of Agriculture in 1994 promised to bring progressive changes to school meals. However, lobbying by interest groups resulted in substantial changes to the final rule. This analysis retrospectively examines the federal school meals policy-making process during 1992 to 1996. Key questions address why the policy changed and what the role of interest groups was in affecting the shape, pace, and direction of the policy. The study provides suggestions for using the experiences of 1992 to 1996 to guide future advocacy efforts and for adapting the approach for application to other food and nutrition policies.

  20. Time Development of Early Social Networks: Link analysis and group dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bruun, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Empirical data on early network history are rare. Students beginning their studies at a university with no or few prior connections to each other offer a unique opportunity to investigate the formation and early development of social networks. During a nine week introductory physics course, first year physics students were asked to identify those with whom they communicated about problem solving in physics during the preceding week. We use these students' self reports to produce time dependent student interaction networks. These networks have also been investigated to elucidate possible effects of gender and students' final course grade. Changes in the weekly number of links are investigated to show that while roughly half of all links change from week to week, students also reestablish a growing number of links as they progress through their first weeks of study. To investigate how students group, Infomap is used to establish groups. Further, student group flow is examined using alluvial diagrams, showing th...

  1. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant activity, fatty acids composition, and functional group analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sohail; Ahmad, Shabir; Bibi, Ahtaram; Ishaq, Muhammad Saqib; Afridi, Muhammad Siddique; Kanwal, Farina; Zakir, Muhammad; Fatima, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Heliotropium bacciferum is paramount in medicinal perspective and belongs to Boraginaceae family. The crude and numerous fractions of leaves, stem, and roots of the plant were investigated for phytochemical analysis and DPPH radical scavenging activity. Phytochemical analysis of crude and fractions of the plant revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, glycosides, and phenols. The antioxidant (free radical scavenging) activity of various extracts of the Heliotropium bacciferum was resolute against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical with the avail of UV spectrophotometer at 517 nm. The stock solution (1000 mg/mL) and then several dilutions (50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg/mL) of the crude and fractions were prepared. Ascorbic acid was used as a standard. The plant leaves (52.59 ± 0.84 to 90.74 ± 1.00), stem (50.19 ± 0.92 to 89.42 ± 1.10), and roots extracts (49.19 ± 0.52 to 90.01 ± 1.02) divulged magnificent antioxidant activities. For the ascertainment of the fatty acid constituents a gas chromatograph hyphenated to mass spectrometer was used. The essential fatty acids for growth maintenance such as linoleic acid (65.70%), eicosadienoic acid (15.12%), oleic acid (8.72%), and palmitic acid (8.14%) were found in high percentage. The infrared spectra of all extracts of the plant were recorded by IR Prestige-21 FTIR model.

  2. Analysis of the first IPTA Mock Data Challenge by the EPTA timing data analysis working group

    CERN Document Server

    van Haasteren, Rutger; Vecchio, Alberto; Lassus, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of the methods we used to analyse the first IPTA Mock Data Challenge (MDC), and the obtained results. We have used a Bayesian analysis in the time domain, accelerated using the recently developed ABC-method which consists of a form of lossy linear data compression. The TOAs were first processed with Tempo2, where the design matrix was extracted for use in a subsequent Bayesian analysis. We used different noise models to analyse the datasets: no red noise, red noise the same for all pulsars, and individual red noise per pulsar. We sampled from the likelihood with four different samplers: "emcee", "t-walk", "Metropolis-Hastings", and "pyMultiNest". All but emcee agreed on the final result, with emcee failing due to artefacts of the high-dimensionality of the problem. An interesting issue we ran into was that the prior of all the 36 (red) noise amplitudes strongly affects the results. A flat prior in the noise amplitude biases the inferred GWB amplitude, whereas a flat prior in log-amplitude se...

  3. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Børsting, C;

    2013-01-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds....... However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs......, Kurds and eighteen other worldwide populations. For each of the three Iranian ethnic groups, the lowest FST values calculated between an Iranian and non-Iranian populations were observed between Iranians and populations in Iraq and Turkey. The three Iranian ethnic groups grouped together with other West...

  4. Detecting and accounting for multiple sources of positional variance in peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelter, Andrey; Rouchka, Eric C; Moseley, Hunter N B

    2017-08-16

    Peak lists derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are commonly used as input data for a variety of computer assisted and automated analyses. These include automated protein resonance assignment and protein structure calculation software tools. Prior to these analyses, peak lists must be aligned to each other and sets of related peaks must be grouped based on common chemical shift dimensions. Even when programs can perform peak grouping, they require the user to provide uniform match tolerances or use default values. However, peak grouping is further complicated by multiple sources of variance in peak position limiting the effectiveness of grouping methods that utilize uniform match tolerances. In addition, no method currently exists for deriving peak positional variances from single peak lists for grouping peaks into spin systems, i.e. spin system grouping within a single peak list. Therefore, we developed a complementary pair of peak list registration analysis and spin system grouping algorithms designed to overcome these limitations. We have implemented these algorithms into an approach that can identify multiple dimension-specific positional variances that exist in a single peak list and group peaks from a single peak list into spin systems. The resulting software tools generate a variety of useful statistics on both a single peak list and pairwise peak list alignment, especially for quality assessment of peak list datasets. We used a range of low and high quality experimental solution NMR and solid-state NMR peak lists to assess performance of our registration analysis and grouping algorithms. Analyses show that an algorithm using a single iteration and uniform match tolerances approach is only able to recover from 50 to 80% of the spin systems due to the presence of multiple sources of variance. Our algorithm recovers additional spin systems by reevaluating match tolerances in multiple iterations. To facilitate evaluation of the

  5. 基于RMP分析的泉州木偶戏旅游开发%Development of Quanzhou Puppet Show Based on RMP Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林炜铃; 陈金华

    2011-01-01

    基于昂普(RMP)分析模式,从资源(Resource)、市场(Market)和产品(Product)三方面对泉州木偶戏旅游进行系统的评价分析,认为泉州木偶戏历史与文化意义深远、拥有显著的地域特色、广泛的戏剧市场、旅游价值极高,但目前木偶戏的旅游市场份额不足。文中提出木偶戏与创意产业联合开发、木偶戏产品空间组合开发、木偶戏推介方式多样化等三个方面的开发设想。同时提出以智力开路、官员推进、政府主导为主要手段的木偶戏旅游开发保障措施。%This article makes a complete estimate analysis on the tourism resource of Quanzhou Puppet show's estimate from the resource,the market and the product based on the RMP analysis.It displays there is a profound history and culture,prominent regional features,wide drama markets and high tourism value in Quanzhou puppet show,but a short tourism market share at the moment.This article points out a development assume on the united development of puppet show and created industry,the space combination development of puppetoon product and the various introduction of puppet show.As suggested at the same time that to develop created?tourism by intellect,official and government as guarantee measures of tourism development.

  6. Analysis of the severe group dust storms in eastern part of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the available original dust storm records from 60 meteorological stations, we discussed the identification standard of severe dust storms at a single station and constructed a quite complete time series of severe group dust storms in the eastern part of Northwest China in 1954-2001.The result shows that there were 99 severe group dust storms in this region in recent 48 years. The spatial distribution indicates that the Alax Plateau, most parts of the Ordos Plateau and most parts of the Hexi Corridor are the main areas influenced by severe group dust storms. In addition, the seasonand the month with the most frequent severe group dust storms are spring and April, accounting for 78.8% and 41.4% of the total events respectively. During the past 48 years the lowest rate of severe group dust storms occurred in the 1990s. Compared with the other 4 decades, on the average, the duration and the affected area of severe group dust storms are relatively short and small during the 1990s. In 2000 and 2001, there were separately 4 severe group dust storms as the higher value after 1983 in the eastern part of Northwest China.

  7. Phytochemical Analysis, Antioxidant Activity, Fatty Acids Composition, and Functional Group Analysis of Heliotropium bacciferum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heliotropium bacciferum is paramount in medicinal perspective and belongs to Boraginaceae family. The crude and numerous fractions of leaves, stem, and roots of the plant were investigated for phytochemical analysis and DPPH radical scavenging activity. Phytochemical analysis of crude and fractions of the plant revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, glycosides, and phenols. The antioxidant (free radical scavenging activity of various extracts of the Heliotropium bacciferum was resolute against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical with the avail of UV spectrophotometer at 517 nm. The stock solution (1000 mg/mL and then several dilutions (50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mg/mL of the crude and fractions were prepared. Ascorbic acid was used as a standard. The plant leaves (52.59 ± 0.84 to 90.74 ± 1.00, stem (50.19 ± 0.92 to 89.42 ± 1.10, and roots extracts (49.19 ± 0.52 to 90.01 ± 1.02 divulged magnificent antioxidant activities. For the ascertainment of the fatty acid constituents a gas chromatograph hyphenated to mass spectrometer was used. The essential fatty acids for growth maintenance such as linoleic acid (65.70%, eicosadienoic acid (15.12%, oleic acid (8.72%, and palmitic acid (8.14% were found in high percentage. The infrared spectra of all extracts of the plant were recorded by IR Prestige-21 FTIR model.

  8. Showing Value (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available When Su Cleyle and I first decided to start Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, one of the things we agreed upon immediately was that the journal be open access. We knew that a major obstacle to librarians using the research literature was that they did not have access to the research literature. Although Su and I are both academic librarians who can access a wide variety of library and information literature from our institutions, we belong to a profession where not everyone has equal access to the research in our field. Without such access to our own body of literature, how can we ever hope for practitioners to use research evidence in their decision making? It would have been contradictory to the principles of evidence based library and information practice to do otherwise.One of the specific groups we thought could use such an open access venue for discovering research literature was school librarians. School librarians are often isolated and lacking access to the research literature that may help them prove to stakeholders the importance of their libraries and their role within schools. Certainly, school libraries have been in decline and the use of evidence to show value is needed. As Ken Haycock noted in his 2003 report, The Crisis in Canada’s School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Reinvestment, “Across the country, teacher-librarians are losing their jobs or being reassigned. Collections are becoming depleted owing to budget cuts. Some principals believe that in the age of the Internet and the classroom workstation, the school library is an artifact” (9. Within this context, school librarians are looking to our research literature for evidence of the impact that school library programs have on learning outcomes and student success. They are integrating that evidence into their practice, and reflecting upon what can be improved locally. They are focusing on students and showing the impact of school libraries and

  9. Random pinning glass transition: hallmarks, mean-field theory and renormalization group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Biroli, Giulio

    2013-03-28

    We present a detailed analysis of glass transitions induced by pinning particles at random from an equilibrium configuration. We first develop a mean-field analysis based on the study of p-spin spherical disordered models and then obtain the three-dimensional critical behavior by the Migdal-Kadanoff real space renormalization group method. We unveil the important physical differences with the case in which particles are pinned from a random (or very high temperature) configuration. We contrast the pinning particles approach to the ones based on biasing dynamical trajectories with respect to their activity and on coupling to equilibrium configurations. Finally, we discuss numerical and experimental tests.

  10. Analysis of a support group for children of parents with mental illnesses: managing stressful situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Brenda M; McKeever, Patricia; Seeman, Mary; Boydell, Katherine M

    2014-09-01

    We report an ethnographic analysis of a psycho-education and peer-support program for school-aged children of parents with mental illnesses. We conducted a critical discourse analysis of the program manual and observed group interactions to understand whether children shared program goals predetermined by adults, and how, or if, the intervention was responsive to their needs. Children were expected to learn mental illness information because "knowledge is power," and to express difficult feelings about being a child of a mentally ill parent that was risky. Participants used humor to manage group expectations, revealing how they made sense of their parents' problems, as well as their own. Suggestions are made for determining good mental health literacy based on children's preferences for explaining circumstances in ways they find relevant, and for supporting children's competencies to manage relationships that are important to them. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Genome analysis shows Bacillus axarquiensis is not a later heterotypic synonym of Bacillus mojavensis; reclassification of Bacillus malacitensis and Brevibacterium halotolerans as heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus axarquiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Bowman, Michael J; Schisler, David A; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis were previously reported to be later heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus mojavensis, based primarily on DNA-DNA relatedness values. We have sequenced draft genomes of Bacillus axarquiensis NRRL B-41617T and Bacillus malacitensis NRRL B-41618T. Comparative genomics and DNA-DNA relatedness calculations showed that while Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis are synonymous with each other, they are not synonymous with Bacillus mojavensis. In addition, a draft genome was completed for Brevibacterium halotolerans, a strain long suspected of being a Bacillus subtilis group member based on 16S rRNA similarities (99.8 % with Bacillus mojavensis). Comparative genomics and DNA-DNA relatedness calculations showed that Brevibacterium halotolerans is synonymous with Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis. The pairwise in silico DNA-DNA hybridization values calculated in comparisons between the three conspecific strains were all greater than 92 %, which is well above the standard species threshold of 70 %. While the pairwise in silico DNA-DNA hybridization values calculated in comparisons of the three conspecific strains with Bacillus mojavensis were all less than 65 %. The combined results of our genotype and phenotype studies showed that Bacillus axarquiensis, Bacillus malacitensis and Brevibacterium halotolerans are conspecific and distinct from Bacillus mojavensis. Because the valid publication of the name Bacillus axarquiensis predates the publication of the name Bacillus malacitensis, we propose that Bacillus malacitensis be reclassified as a synonym of Bacillus axarquiensis. In addition, we propose to reclassify Brevibacterium halotolerans as a synonym of Bacillus axarquiensis. An amended description of Bacillus axarquiensis is provided.

  12. Applications of Group Analysis to the Three-Dimensional Equations of Fluids with Internal Inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Siriwat, Piyanuch

    2008-01-01

    Group classification of the three-dimensional equations describing flows of fluids with internal inertia, where the potential function $W= W(\\rho,\\dot{\\rho})$, is presented. The given equations include such models as the non-linear one-velocity model of a bubbly fluid with incompressible liquid phase at small volume concentration of gas bubbles, and the dispersive shallow water model. These models are obtained for special types of the function $W(\\rho,\\dot{\\rho})$. Group classification separates out the function $W(\\rho,\\dot{\\rho})$ at 15 different cases. Another part of the manuscript is devoted to one class of partially invariant solutions. This solution is constructed on the base of all rotations. In the gas dynamics such class of solutions is called the Ovsyannikov vortex. Group classification of the system of equations for invariant functions is obtained. Complete analysis of invariant solutions for the special type of a potential function is given.

  13. Applications of Group Analysis to the Three-Dimensional Equations of Fluids with Internal Inertia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Meleshko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Group classification of the three-dimensional equations describing flows of fluids with internal inertia, where the potential function W = W(ρ,ρ·, is presented. The given equations include such models as the non-linear one-velocity model of a bubbly fluid with incompressible liquid phase at small volume concentration of gas bubbles, and the dispersive shallow water model. These models are obtained for special types of the function W(ρ,ρ·. Group classification separates out the function W(ρ,ρ· at 15 different cases. Another part of the manuscript is devoted to one class of partially invariant solutions. This solution is constructed on the base of all rotations. In the gas dynamics such class of solutions is called the Ovsyannikov vortex. Group classification of the system of equations for invariant functions is obtained. Complete analysis of invariant solutions for the special type of a potential function is given.

  14. SPM analysis on groups of single aerosol particles around steel plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙因; 王安璞; 等

    1996-01-01

    Several methods for preparing samples of dispersed single aeroslo particles used in scanning proton microprobe(SPM) analysis were tested.Many elements such as Al,Si,S,Cl,Ca,Ti,Cr,Mn,Fe,Ni,Cu and Zn in the groups of different single aerosol particles from the Capital Steel Plant area were analyzed by SPM,The distributions of elemental contents in the group of single particles were mapped with three dimensional contour and the isometric.A new approach to study the group of different single aerosol particles for air pollution is developed in the present work.The results are significant to assessing the environmental impact of the dispersed single aerosol particles.

  15. Symmetries and Laplacians introduction to harmonic analysis, group representations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurarie, D

    1992-01-01

    Designed as an introduction to harmonic analysis and group representations,this book covers a wide range of topics rather than delving deeply into anyparticular one. In the words of H. Weyl ...it is primarily meant forthe humble, who want to learn as new the things set forth therein, rather thanfor the proud and learned who are already familiar with the subject and merelylook for quick and exact information.... The main objective is tointroduce the reader to concepts, ideas, results and techniques that evolvearound symmetry-groups, representations and Laplacians. Morespecifically, the main interest concerns geometrical objects and structures{X}, discrete or continuous, that possess sufficiently large symmetrygroup G, such as regular graphs (Platonic solids), lattices, andsymmetric Riemannian manifolds. All such objects have a natural Laplacian&Dgr;, a linear operator on functions over X, invariant underthe group action. There are many problems associated with Laplacians onX, such as continuous or discrete...

  16. Spectral Analysis of Transition Operators, Automata Groups and Translation in BBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Zuk, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    We give the automata that describe time evolution rules of the box-ball system with a carrier. It can be shown by use of tropical geometry that such systems are ultradiscrete analogues of KdV equation. We discuss their relation with the lamplighter group generated by an automaton. We present spectral analysis of the stochastic matrices induced by these automata and verify their spectral coincidence.

  17. Group Analysis of Nonlinear Internal Waves in Oceans. I: Self-adjointness, conservation laws, invariant solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Nail H

    2011-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the group analysis of equations of motion of two-dimensional uniformly stratified rotating fluids used as a basic model in geophysical fluid dynamics. It is shown that the nonlinear equations in question have a remarkable property to be self-adjoint. This property is crucial for constructing conservation laws provided in the present paper. Invariant solutions are constructed using certain symmetries. The invariant solutions are used for defining internal wave beams.

  18. Phase structure analysis of CP(N-1) model using Tensor renormalization group

    CERN Document Server

    Kawauchi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    The phase structure of the lattice CP($N-1$) model in two dimensions is analyzed by the tensor renormalization group (TRG) method. We focus on the case $N=2$ and compare the numerical result of the TRG method with that of the strong-coupling analysis in the presence of the $\\theta$ term and investigate the nature of the phase transition at $\\theta=\\pi$.

  19. Savagery, Show and Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Dan G.

    After 50 grade school children witnessed a violent murder, group therapy and psychodrama sessions were initiated with the children, and parents and teachers were instructed in how to deal with the children's emotions and behavior. (CL)

  20. Comparative analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes of three geographical topmouth culter (Culter alburnus) groups and implications for their phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwu; Wang, Dexia; Wang, Junhua; Sheng, Junqing; Peng, Kou; Hu, Beijuan; Zeng, Liugen; Xiao, Minghe; Hong, Yijiang

    2017-03-01

    Topmouth culter (C. alburnus) is an important commercial fish in China. We compared the nucleotide variations in the mtDNA genomes among three geographical groups of Culter alburnus: Liangzi Lake, Hubei Province (referred to as LZH); Taihu Lake, Jiangsu Province (TH); and Poyang Lake, Jiangxi Province (PYH). The similarity of whole mtDNA genomes ranged from 0.992 to 0.999. The similarity among 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, and the D-loop sequences was found to range from 0.982 to 0.996. This is useful data for future designing work for making specific molecular marker for distinguishing individuals of C. alburnus from the three geographical groups. An extended termination-associated sequence (ETAS) and several conserved blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3) were identified in the mtDNA control regions. A phylogenetic analysis shows a monophyletic relationship of the LZF-female and the LZF-male. However, the analysis also showed paraphyletic relationships for the other two geological groups. This result will be useful for the future breeding work of C. alburnus.

  1. "My YAP Family": Analysis of a Facebook Group for Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaysynsky, Anna; Romansky-Poulin, Kathryn; Arpadi, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Little research exists regarding the use of social networking sites, like Facebook, for improving patient well-being. The aim of this study was to evaluate a private Facebook group established for members of an HIV clinic's young adult program. This study employed directed content analysis to examine the types and frequencies of interactions observable in the 3,838 posts and comments that appeared on the Facebook group page between March 1, 2011 and July 1, 2012. Analysis revealed that a large percentage (41.7 %) of the content was classified as "administrative/engagement in group" and functioned to enhance the operations of the program as a whole. Additionally, positive interactions were frequently observed, especially socializing (24.8 %), banter (20.2 %), and offers of social support (15.1 %). Emotional support was the most frequent type of support requested, while esteem support was the most commonly provided form of support. The results of this study demonstrate that a Facebook group can be a means of providing patients with social support and positive social interaction and can improve services for young adults with HIV.

  2. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, Julien [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: julien.dron@up.univ-mrs.fr; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF{sub 3}/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L{sup -1}. Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  3. Analysis of conservative tracer measurement results using the Frechet distribution at planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel and showing the effect of clogging processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical process, developed in Maple environment, has been successful in decreasing the error of measurement results and in the precise calculation of the moments of corrected tracer functions. It was proved that with this process, the measured tracer results of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C) can be fitted more accurately than with the conventionally used distribution functions (Gaussian, Lognormal, Fick (Inverse Gaussian) and Gamma). This statement is true only for the planted HSFCW-Cs. The analysis of unplanted HSFCW-Cs needs more research. The result of the analysis shows that the conventional solutions (completely stirred series tank reactor (CSTR) model and convection-dispersion transport (CDT) model) cannot describe these types of transport processes with sufficient accuracy. These outcomes can help in developing better process descriptions of very difficult transport processes in HSFCW-Cs. Furthermore, a new mathematical process can be developed for the calculation of real hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dispersion coefficient values. The presented method can be generalized to other kinds of hydraulic environments.

  4. The use of an online support group for neuromuscular disorders: a thematic analysis of message postings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Oonagh; Buchanan, Heather; Coulson, Neil

    2017-06-08

    People affected by neuromuscular disorders can experience adverse psychosocial consequences and difficulties accessing information and support. Online support groups provide new opportunities for peer support. The aim of this study was to understand how contributors used the message board function of a newly available neuromuscular disorders online support group. Message postings (n = 1951) from the first five months of the message board of a newly formed online support group for neuromuscular disorders hosted by a charitable organization were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Members created a sense of community through disclosing personal information, connecting with people with similar illness experiences or interests, welcoming others and sharing aspirations for the development of a resourceful community. Experiences, emotional reactions and support were shared in relation to: delayed diagnosis; symptom interpretation; illness management and progression; the isolating impact of rare disorders; and the influence of social and political factors on illness experiences. This study provided a novel insight into individuals' experiences of accessing a newly available online support group for rare conditions hosted by a charitable organization. The findings highlight how the online support group provided an important peer support environment for members to connect with others, exchange information and support and engender discussion on political and social issues unique to living with often-rare neuromuscular disorders. Online support groups may therefore provide an important and easily accessible support outlet for people with neuromuscular disorders as well as a platform for empowering members to raise awareness about the impact of living with these conditions. Further research is needed to examine member motivations for using such groups and any effects of participation in greater detail. Implications for rehabilitation Online support groups may

  5. Small Group Learning in Medical Education: A Second Look at the Springer, Stanne, and Donovan Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliver, Jerry A.; Feltovich, Paul J.; Verhulst, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the studies on which a meta-analysis by Springer, Stanne, and Donovan (1999) were based; the meta-analysis had concluded that small group learning in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education is effective. Concludes that the meta-analysis' call for more widespread implementation of small group learning is not supported.…

  6. Small Group Learning in Medical Education: A Second Look at the Springer, Stanne, and Donovan Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliver, Jerry A.; Feltovich, Paul J.; Verhulst, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the studies on which a meta-analysis by Springer, Stanne, and Donovan (1999) were based; the meta-analysis had concluded that small group learning in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education is effective. Concludes that the meta-analysis' call for more widespread implementation of small group learning is not supported.…

  7. Genomic analysis of the TRIM family reveals two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanella Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TRIM family is composed of multi-domain proteins that display the Tripartite Motif (RING, B-box and Coiled-coil that can be associated with a C-terminal domain. TRIM genes are involved in ubiquitylation and are implicated in a variety of human pathologies, from Mendelian inherited disorders to cancer, and are also involved in cellular response to viral infection. Results Here we defined the entire human TRIM family and also identified the TRIM sets of other vertebrate (mouse, rat, dog, cow, chicken, tetraodon, and zebrafish and invertebrate species (fruitfly, worm, and ciona. By means of comparative analyses we found that, after assembly of the tripartite motif in an early metazoan ancestor, few types of C-terminal domains have been associated with this module during evolution and that an important increase in TRIM number occurred in vertebrate species concomitantly with the addition of the SPRY domain. We showed that the human TRIM family is split into two groups that differ in domain structure, genomic organization and evolutionary properties. Group 1 members present a variety of C-terminal domains, are highly conserved among vertebrate species, and are represented in invertebrates. Conversely, group 2 is absent in invertebrates, is characterized by the presence of a C-terminal SPRY domain and presents unique sets of genes in each mammal examined. The generation of independent sets of group 2 genes is also evident in the other vertebrate species. Comparing the murine and human TRIM sets, we found that group 1 and 2 genes evolve at different speeds and are subject to different selective pressures. Conclusion We found that the TRIM family is composed of two groups of genes with distinct evolutionary properties. Group 2 is younger, highly dynamic, and might act as a reservoir to develop novel TRIM functions. Since some group 2 genes are implicated in innate immune response, their evolutionary features may account for

  8. Single Molecule Analysis of the Arabidopsis FRA1 Kinesin Shows that It Is a Functional Motor Protein with Unusually High Processivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanmei Zhu; Ram Dixit

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis FRA1 kinesin contributes to the organization of cellulose microfibrils through an unknown mechanism.The cortical localization of this kinesin during interphase raises the possibility that it transports cell wallrelated cargoes along cortical microtubules that either directly or indirectly influence cellulose microfibril patterning.To determine whether FRA1 is an authentic motor protein,we combined bulk biochemical assays and single molecule fluorescence imaging to analyze the motor properties of recombinant,GFP-tagged FRA1 containing the motor and coiled-coil domains (designated as FRA1(707)-GFP).We found that FRA1(707)-GFP binds to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner and that its ATPase activity is dramatically stimulated by the presence of microtubules.Using single molecule studies,we found that FRA1(707)-GFP moves processively along microtubule tracks at a velocity of about 0.4 μm s-1.In addition,we found that FRA1(707)-GFP is a microtubule plus-end-directed motor and that it moves along microtubules as a dimer.Interestingly,our single molecule analysis shows that the processivity of FRA1(707)-GFP is at least twice the processivity of conventional kinesin,making FRA1 the most processive kinesin to date.Together,our data show that FRA1 is a bona fide motor protein that has the potential to drive long-distance transport of cargo along cortical microtubules.

  9. An Analysis of Trafficking Receptors Shows that CD44 and P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 Collectively Control the Migration of Activated Human T-Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Amal J.

    2017-05-03

    Selectins guide the traffic of activated T-cells through the blood stream by mediating their tethering and rolling onto inflamed endothelium, in this way acting as beacons to help navigate them to sites of inflammation. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of E-selectin ligands expressed on activated human T-cells. We identified several novel glycoproteins that function as E-selectin ligands. Specifically, we compared the role of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, known E-selectin ligands, to CD44, a ligand that has not previously been characterized as an E-selectin ligand on activated human T-cells. We showed that CD44 acts as a functional E-selectin ligand when expressed on both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Moreover, the CD44 protein carries a binding epitope identifying it as hematopoietic cell E- and/or L-selectin ligand (HCELL). Furthermore, by knocking down these ligands individually or together in primary activated human T-cells, we demonstrated that CD44/HCELL, and not CD43, cooperates with PSGL-1 as a major E-selectin ligand. Additionally, we demonstrated the relevance of our findings to chronic autoimmune disease, by showing that CD44/HCELL and PSGL-1, but not CD43, from T-cells isolated from psoriasis patients, bind E-selectin.

  10. Analysis of large new South African dataset using two host-specificity indices shows generalism in both adult and larval ticks of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinaze, Marcela P A; Hellard, Eléonore; Horak, Ivan G; Cumming, Graeme S

    2016-03-01

    Ticks and tick-borne pathogens can have considerable impacts on the health of livestock, wildlife and people. Knowledge of tick-host preferences is necessary for both tick and pathogen control. Ticks were historically considered as specialist parasites, but the range of sampled host species has been limited, infestation intensity has not been included in prior analyses, and phylogenetic distances between hosts have not been previously considered. We used a large dataset of 35 604 individual collections and two host-specificity indices to assess the specificity of 61 South African tick species, as well as distinctions between adult and juvenile ticks, for 95 mammalian hosts. When accounting for host phylogeny, most adult and juvenile ticks behaved as generalists, with juveniles being significantly more generalist than adults. When we included the intensity of tick infestation, ticks exhibited a wider diversity of specificity in all life stages. Our results show that ticks of mammals in South Africa tend to behave largely as generalists and that adult ticks are more host-specific. More generally, our analysis shows that the incorporation of life-stage differences, infestation intensity and phylogenetic distances between hosts, as well as the use of more than one specificity index, can all contribute to a deeper understanding of host-parasite interactions.

  11. Statistical group differences in anatomical shape analysis using Hotelling T2 metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek; Xu, Shun; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Gerig, Guido

    2007-03-01

    Shape analysis has become of increasing interest to the neuroimaging community due to its potential to precisely locate morphological changes between healthy and pathological structures. This manuscript presents a comprehensive set of tools for the computation of 3D structural statistical shape analysis. It has been applied in several studies on brain morphometry, but can potentially be employed in other 3D shape problems. Its main limitations is the necessity of spherical topology. The input of the proposed shape analysis is a set of binary segmentation of a single brain structure, such as the hippocampus or caudate. These segmentations are converted into a corresponding spherical harmonic description (SPHARM), which is then sampled into a triangulated surfaces (SPHARM-PDM). After alignment, differences between groups of surfaces are computed using the Hotelling T2 two sample metric. Statistical p-values, both raw and corrected for multiple comparisons, result in significance maps. Additional visualization of the group tests are provided via mean difference magnitude and vector maps, as well as maps of the group covariance information. The correction for multiple comparisons is performed via two separate methods that each have a distinct view of the problem. The first one aims to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) or false-positives via the extrema histogram of non-parametric permutations. The second method controls the false discovery rate and results in a less conservative estimate of the false-negatives. Prior versions of this shape analysis framework have been applied already to clinical studies on hippocampus and lateral ventricle shape in adult schizophrenics. The novelty of this submission is the use of the Hotelling T2 two-sample group difference metric for the computation of a template free statistical shape analysis. Template free group testing allowed this framework to become independent of any template choice, as well as it improved the

  12. ANALYSIS OF RAILWAY USER TRAVEL BEHAVIOUR PATTERNS OF DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa AKIYAMA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been requirments for a transport environment that will foster the development of safe, comfortable townships. The study of urban activities amid an aging society and effective use of public transport modes in addressing environmental problems have become particularly important issues. This study analyzes travel behaviour patterns of varying age groups using urban railways in order to examine the relationship between urban public transport use and urban activities. specifically, it analyzes the composition of urban activity and travel behaviour patterns among urban railway users in the Keihanshin (Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe metropolitan area. This paper looks at urban activities within aging societies and identifies the differences in travel behaviour of railway users by separating them into young, middle aged and senior citizen age groups. Analysis makes particular use of the Railway station Database, which is a compilation of existing studies into attributes of railway stations and their surroundings, and results of person trip surveys. Rail use behaviour characteristics have been sorted by age group because mobility via urban railway systems is varied by age group. As a result, differences in railway usage patterns (travel objectives, distance and time, and number of transfers, etc. have been identified and so too have differences in urban activity patterns related to free activities (shopping, recreation. Furthermore, the study developed a travel behaviour pattern estimation model which is capable of categorizing specific transport behaviour patterns and estimating rail users and transport behaviour patterns from the relationship with areas surrounding railway stations to ensure future mobility by public transport for older age groups. The results make it possible to put forward proposals for urban rail services that will facilitate urban activities for the different age groups. Eventually, it will be possible to understand

  13. Validation of the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) in Ireland: a multi-group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Yvonne; Fitzgerald, Amanda; Dooley, Barbara

    2016-04-29

    Resilience is a process reflecting positive adaptation in the face of adversity. The Resilience Scale for Adolescence (READ) incorporates intrapersonal and interpersonal protective factors mapping onto the three salient domains of resilience, including individual, family and external environment. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the READ by means of factor analysis, multi-group analysis, inter-correlations and internal consistency measures. Participants were 6085 young people in Ireland aged 12-18 years. Participants completed the My World Survey - Second Level (MWS-SL), assessing risk and protective factors of mental health. Confirmatory factor analysis validated the original five-factor structure of the READ including Personal Competence, Social Competence, Structured Style, Family Cohesion, and Social Resources, χ(2) (340) = 6146.02, p resilience factors among adolescents in Ireland, demonstrating its applicability in a different cultural context and with a wider age range of adolescents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Pooling and Analysis of Published in Vitro Data: A Proof of Concept Study for the Grouping of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtill Simkó

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to test the applicability of pooling of nanomaterials-induced in vitro data for identifying the toxic capacity of specific (SiO2, TiO2, ZnO, CuO, CeO2 and carbon nanotubes, [CNT] nanoparticles (NP and to test the usefulness for grouping purposes. Publication selection was based on specific criteria regarding experimental conditions. Two relevant biological endpoints were selected; generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and viability above 90%. The correlations of the ROS ratios with the NP parameters’ size, concentration, and exposure time were analysed. The obtained data sets were then analysed with multiple regression analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey post-hoc test. The results show that this method is applicable for the selected metal oxide NP, but might need reconsideration and a larger data set for CNT. Several statistically significant correlations and results were obtained, thus validating the method. Furthermore, the relevance of the combination of ROS release with a cell viability test was shown. The data also show that it is advisable to compare ROS production of professional phagocytic with non-phagocytic cells. In conclusion, this is the first systematic analysis showing that pooling of available data into groups is a useful method for evaluation of data regarding NP induced toxicity in vitro.

  15. Intersubject variability in the analysis of diffusion tensor images at the group level: fractional anisotropy mapping and fiber tracking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hans-Peter; Unrath, Alexander; Riecker, Axel; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Ludolph, Albert C; Kassubek, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides comprehensive information about quantitative diffusion and connectivity in the human brain. Transformation into stereotactic standard space is a prerequisite for group studies and requires thorough data processing to preserve directional inter-dependencies. The objective of the present study was to optimize technical approaches for this preservation of quantitative and directional information during spatial normalization in data analyses at the group level. Different averaging methods for mean diffusion-weighted images containing DTI information were compared, i.e., region of interest-based fractional anisotropy (FA) mapping, fiber tracking (FT) and corresponding tractwise FA statistics (TFAS). The novel technique of intersubject FT that takes into account directional information of single data sets during the FT process was compared to standard FT techniques. Application of the methods was shown in the comparison of normal subjects and subjects with defined white matter pathology (alterations of the corpus callosum). Fiber tracking was applied to averaged data sets and showed similar results compared with FT on single subject data. The application of TFAS to averaged data showed averaged FA values around 0.4 for normal controls. The values were in the range of the standard deviation for averaged FA values for TFAS applied to single subject data. These results were independent of the applied averaging technique. A significant reduction of the averaged FA values was found in comparison to TFAS applied to data from subjects with defined white matter pathology (FA around 0.2). The applicability of FT techniques in the analysis of different subjects at the group level was demonstrated. Group comparisons as well as FT on group averaged data were shown to be feasible. The objective of this work was to identify the most appropriate method for intersubject averaging and group comparison which incorporates intersubject variability of

  16. Why Do MEPs Defect? An Analysis of Party Group Cohesion in the 5 th European Parliament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Faas

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses party group cohesion and patterns of defections of national party delegations from party group lines in the present European Parliament, using a total of 1,370 roll call votes. The study confirms previous findings according to which party groups in the EP show (surprisingly high levels of cohesion. In addition and notwithstanding that, it reveals the circumstances under which MEPs and their national delegations are more likely to defect. Among other factors, it was analysed how the nature of the candidate selection process, the electoral system, and the relationships between MEPs and their home parties influence these defections. Assuming that MEPs have three different goals (re-election, office, and policy and want to first of all secure re-election, one can theoretically expect that those MEPs whose chances of re-election are more dependent on national parties than others’ (due to their specific candidate selection process or their relationship to their home party are more willing to vote against the party group line, if a conflict between party group and national party emerges. Empirically, this is confirmed. In other words, MEPs in general are very well aware of their specific situation. They know who deserves their primary attention and they act accordingly.

  17. Breakthroughs in the biodiversity, biogeography, biostratigraphy, and basin analysis of the Beaufort group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, P. J.; Rubidge, B. S.

    2001-08-01

    Over the past decade researchers working on the rocks of the Beaufort Group in the main Karoo Basin of South Africa have vastly increased our understanding of this important Permo-Triassic sequence. Many new fossil forms have been discovered, allowing for breakthroughs into the biodiversity, biogeography and biostratigraphy of the group. Taxonomic and phylogenetic advances are many and varied, and cover most of the vertebrate taxa, but with emphasis placed on the temnospondyl amphibians, archosauriforms and non-mammalian synapsids, in particular the anomodontia. Biostratigraphic breakthroughs have centered on the Middle Permian Eodicynodon and Tapinocephalus assemblage zones, the Late Permian Dicynodon Assemblage Zone, and the Triassic Lystrosaurus and Cynognathus assemblage zones. Correlation of these biozones with better dated sequences in Europe, Russia and China has allowed for many chronostratigraphic refinements, which are in turn vital for sequence stratigraphical analysis of the basin fill. Based on fossil data, both the lower (Ecca-Beaufort) and upper (Beaufort-Molteno) contacts of the group have been proved to be highly diachronous. The refined chronostratigraphic framework has also allowed for a better analysis of the basin evolution through time, particularly in terms of the correlation of external stimuli that affect basin sedimentation patterns.

  18. Challenges to validity in single-group interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel

    2017-04-01

    Single-group interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) is a popular evaluation methodology in which a single unit of observation is studied; the outcome variable is serially ordered as a time series, and the intervention is expected to "interrupt" the level and/or trend of the time series, subsequent to its introduction. The most common threat to validity is history-the possibility that some other event caused the observed effect in the time series. Although history limits the ability to draw causal inferences from single ITSA models, it can be controlled for by using a comparable control group to serve as the counterfactual. Time series data from 2 natural experiments (effect of Florida's 2000 repeal of its motorcycle helmet law on motorcycle fatalities and California's 1988 Proposition 99 to reduce cigarette sales) are used to illustrate how history biases results of single-group ITSA results-as opposed to when that group's results are contrasted to those of a comparable control group. In the first example, an external event occurring at the same time as the helmet repeal appeared to be the cause of a rise in motorcycle deaths, but was only revealed when Florida was contrasted with comparable control states. Conversely, in the second example, a decreasing trend in cigarette sales prior to the intervention raised question about a treatment effect attributed to Proposition 99, but was reinforced when California was contrasted with comparable control states. Results of single-group ITSA should be considered preliminary, and interpreted with caution, until a more robust study design can be implemented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Group method analysis of mixed convection stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a vertical stretching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabwey, Hossam A.; Boumazgour, Mohamed; Rashad, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    The group method analysis is applied to study the steady mixed convection stagnation-point flow of a non-Newtonian nanofluid towards a vertical stretching surface. The model utilized for the nanofluid incorporates the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Applying the one-parameter transformation group which reduces the number of independent variables by one and thus, the system of governing partial differential equations has been converted to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and these equations are then computed numerically using the implicit finite-difference scheme. Comparison with previously published studies is executed and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. Results for the velocity, temperature, and the nanoparticle volume fraction profiles as well as the local skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are presented in graphical and tabular forms, and discussed for different values of the governing parameters to show interesting features of the solutions.

  20. Disc distraction shows evidence of regenerative potential in degenerated intervertebral discs as evaluated by protein expression, magnetic resonance imaging, and messenger ribonucleic acid expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehring, Thorsten; Omlor, Georg W; Lorenz, Helga; Engelleiter, Karl; Richter, Wiltrud; Carstens, Claus; Kroeber, Markus

    2006-07-01

    An animal model of degeneration was used to determine the effects of disc distraction, and was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as gene and protein expression levels. To investigate gene expression and MRI effects of distraction. Disc degeneration can result from hyper-physiologic loading. Distracted discs with degeneration showed histologic signs of tissue recovery. There were 18 rabbits that underwent 28 days of compression (200 N) to induce moderate disc degeneration followed by 28 days of distraction (120 N; attached and loaded distraction device) or sham distraction (attached but unloaded distraction device). Comparison was performed with 56 days of compressed discs without distraction. Quantitative outcome measures were MRI signal intensity and gene expression analysis to determine: messenger ribonucleic acid levels for extracellular matrix genes, including collagen 1, collagen 2, biglycan, decorin, aggrecan, fibromodulin, and osteonectin; and matrix-regulative genes, including matrix metalloproteinase-13, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. Immunohistology was performed for collagen 2 and BMP-2 to label cells semiquantitatively by staining of the cell-surrounding matrix. A total of 28 days of compression decreased signal intensity. Distraction over the same period reestablished physiologic signal intensity, however, a persistent reduction was found in sham distraction. Distraction resulted in gene expression up-regulation of collagen 1 (5.4-fold), collagen 2 (5.5-fold), biglycan (7.7-fold), and decorin (3.4-fold), while expression of fibromodulin (0.16-fold), tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (0.05-fold), and BMP-2 (0.15-fold) was decreased, as compared with 56 days compression. Distracted discs showed more BMP-2 (19.67 vs. 3.67 in 56 days compression) and collagen 2 (18.67 vs. 11.33 in 56 days compression) positive cells per field. Distraction results in disc rehydration

  1. Genome-wide analysis of AP2/ERF family genes from Lotus corniculatus shows LcERF054 enhances salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhan-Min; Zhou, Mei-Liang; Xiao, Xing-Guo; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2014-09-01

    Lotus corniculatus is used in agriculture as a main forage plant. Members of the Apetala2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) family play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to many forms of stress, including drought and salt. Here, starting from database of the L. corniculatus var. japonicus genome, we identified 127 AP2/ERF genes by insilico cloning method. The phylogeny, gene structures, and putative conserved motifs in L. corniculatus var. japonicus ERF proteins were analyzed. Based on the number of AP2/ERF domains and the function of the genes, 127 AP2/ERF genes from L. corniculatus var. japonicus were classified into five subfamilies named the AP2, dehydration-responsive element binding factor (DREB), ERF, RAV, and a soloist. Outside the AP2/ERF domain, many L. corniculatus var. japonicus-specific conserved motifs were detected. Expression profile analysis of AP2/ERF genes by quantitative real-time PCR revealed that 19 LcERF genes, including LcERF054 (KJ004728), were significantly induced by salt stress. The results showed that the LcERF054 gene encodes a nuclear transcription activator. Overexpression of LcERF054 in Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerances to salt stress, showed higher germination ratio of seeds, and had elevated levels of relative moisture contents, soluble sugars, proline, and lower levels of malondialdehyde under stress conditions compared to wild-type plants. The expression of hyperosmotic salinity response genes COR15A, LEA4-5, P5CS1, and RD29A was found to be elevated in the LcERF054-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants compared to wild type. These results revealed that the LcERF genes play important roles in L. corniculatus cv Leo under salt stress and that LcERFs are attractive engineering targets in applied efforts to improve abiotic stress tolerances in L. corniculatus cv Leo or other crops.

  2. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Pekar, James J.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S.

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively. PMID:28278208

  3. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Pekar, James J; Lindquist, Martin A; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively.

  4. Time to tackle the incumbency advantage in science: A survey of scientists shows strong support for funding policies that would distribute funds more evenly among laboratories and thereby benefit new and smaller research groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Hemenway, David; Scita, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The fact that larger, well‐established labs have more success securing research grants creates an unfair situation for younger researchers. A survey shows that many scientists favour alternative funding schemes that would distribute grant money more equally or based on the merit of the individual.

  5. Health adaptation policy for climate vulnerable groups: a 'critical computational linguistics' analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bastian M; Bell, Erica

    2014-11-28

    Many countries are developing or reviewing national adaptation policy for climate change but the extent to which these meet the health needs of vulnerable groups has not been assessed. This study examines the adequacy of such policies for nine known climate-vulnerable groups: people with mental health conditions, Aboriginal people, culturally and linguistically diverse groups, aged people, people with disabilities, rural communities, children, women, and socioeconomically disadvantaged people. The study analyses an exhaustive sample of national adaptation policy documents from Annex 1 ('developed') countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change: 20 documents from 12 countries. A 'critical computational linguistics' method was used involving novel software-driven quantitative mapping and traditional critical discourse analysis. The study finds that references to vulnerable groups are relatively little present or non-existent, as well as poorly connected to language about practical strategies and socio-economic contexts, both also little present. The conclusions offer strategies for developing policy that is better informed by a 'social determinants of health' definition of climate vulnerability, consistent with best practice in the literature and global policy prescriptions.

  6. Connectome-scale group-wise consistent resting-state network analysis in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the organizational architecture of human brain function and its alteration patterns in diseased brains such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD patients are of great interests. In-vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI offers a unique window to investigate the mechanism of brain function and to identify functional network components of the human brain. Previously, we have shown that multiple concurrent functional networks can be derived from fMRI signals using whole-brain sparse representation. Yet it is still an open question to derive group-wise consistent networks featured in ASD patients and controls. Here we proposed an effective volumetric network descriptor, named connectivity map, to compactly describe spatial patterns of brain network maps and implemented a fast framework in Apache Spark environment that can effectively identify group-wise consistent networks in big fMRI dataset. Our experiment results identified 144 group-wisely common intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs shared between ASD patients and healthy control subjects, where some ICNs are substantially different between the two groups. Moreover, further analysis on the functional connectivity and spatial overlap between these 144 common ICNs reveals connectomics signatures characterizing ASD patients and controls. In particular, the computing time of our Spark-enabled functional connectomics framework is significantly reduced from 240 hours (C++ code, single core to 20 hours, exhibiting a great potential to handle fMRI big data in the future.

  7. Considerations related to the Analysis of the Financial Balance of the Trading Company Interlink Group SRL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton C.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the financial balance in the company’s activity implies the amortization of the resources with the needs, reflected as the functional balance sheet. The information transmitted by means of the accounting balance sheet as a synthesis document, is processed and grouped so that the view on the company appears from the functional point of view and the functional presentation of the balance sheet highlights financial, structural aspects that best respond to the requirements of the company managers. According to the functional point of view, the company is the economic entity whose essential objective is the production of goods and services, its activity implying the exertion of the production, trade, investments and financing functions. The paper aims at establishing a financial diagnosis allowing the appreciation of the conditions in which financial balance is made for the continuity of INTERLINK GROUP SRL company’s activity and attaining the proposed intend.

  8. THE DEMOBILIZATION OF TWO ILLEGAL ARMED GROUPS: ANALYSIS OF THE COVERAGE BY NATIONAL PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeny Serrano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Given the start of new peace talks between the FARC guerrillas and the Colom-bian government, it is crucial to understand the role of Colombian journalists in reporting peace and war.This article presents an analysis on the National Press coverage of the demobilizations of a paramilitary group (Bloque Cacique Nutibara and a section of the FARC guerrillas (BloqueCacicaGaitana within a frame that reflects over the ethical practice of journalism in the context of war. The results are consistent with literature arguing that ethical codes are not documents dictating how journalists should do their job, but rather they repre-sent political acts of communication which allow journalists to reclaim their prof-fessional independence from sources and defend themselves from threats. The paper also discusses the apparent tension between journalism ethics, and the barriers imposed by the media´s informational needs and the strategic military aims of armed groups.

  9. Corrective interpersonal experience in psychodrama group therapy: a comprehensive process analysis of significant therapeutic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVea, Charmaine S; Gow, Kathryn; Lowe, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the process of resolving painful emotional experience during psychodrama group therapy, by examining significant therapeutic events within seven psychodrama enactments. A comprehensive process analysis of four resolved and three not-resolved cases identified five meta-processes which were linked to in-session resolution. One was a readiness to engage in the therapeutic process, which was influenced by client characteristics and the client's experience of the group; and four were therapeutic events: (1) re-experiencing with insight; (2) activating resourcefulness; (3) social atom repair with emotional release; and (4) integration. A corrective interpersonal experience (social atom repair) healed the sense of fragmentation and interpersonal disconnection associated with unresolved emotional pain, and emotional release was therapeutically helpful when located within the enactment of this new role relationship. Protagonists who experienced resolution reported important improvements in interpersonal functioning and sense of self which they attributed to this experience.

  10. Teamwork for clinical emergencies: interprofessional focus group analysis and triangulation with simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Hambly, Helen; Angouri, Jo; Yelland, Andrew; Draycott, Timothy J; Fox, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Our purpose was to investigate health care professionals' beliefs about effective teamwork in medical emergencies based on their experiences. We used framework analysis of interprofessional focus groups in four secondary and tertiary maternity units. The participants were randomly selected senior and junior doctors, senior and junior midwives, and health care assistants, in five groups of 5 to 7 participants each. We found that optimal teamwork was perceived to be dependent on good leadership and availability of experienced staff. The participants described a good leader as one who verbally declares being the leader, communicates clear objectives, and allocates critical tasks, including communication with patients or their family, to suitable individual members. We triangulated the results with evidence from simulation to identify convergent findings and issues requiring further research. The findings will inform the development of teaching programs for medical teams who manage emergencies to improve patient safety and experience.

  11. Classification of fracture and non-fracture groups by analysis of coherent X-ray scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, A. J.; Evans, J. P. O.; Rogers, K. D.; Stone, N.; Greenwood, C.; Godber, S. X.; Clement, J. G.; Lyburn, I. D.; Martin, R. M.; Zioupos, P.

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic fractures present a significant social and economic burden, which is set to rise commensurately with the aging population. Greater understanding of the physicochemical differences between osteoporotic and normal conditions will facilitate the development of diagnostic technologies with increased performance and treatments with increased efficacy. Using coherent X-ray scattering we have evaluated a population of 108 ex vivo human bone samples comprised of non-fracture and fracture groups. Principal component fed linear discriminant analysis was used to develop a classification model to discern each condition resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 91%, respectively. Evaluating the coherent X-ray scatter differences from each condition supports the hypothesis that a causal physicochemical change has occurred in the fracture group. This work is a critical step along the path towards developing an in vivo diagnostic tool for fracture risk prediction.

  12. A rigorous methodology for development and uncertainty analysis of group contribution based property models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    . The GC model uses the Marrero-Gani (MR) method which considers the group contribution in different levels both functional and structural. The methodology helps improve accuracy and reliability of property modeling and provides a rigorous model quality check and assurance. This is expected to further......Property prediction models are a fundamental tool of process modeling and analysis, especially at the early stage of process development. Furthermore, property prediction models are the fundamental tool for Computer-aided molecular design used for the development of new refrigerants. Group...... contribution (GC) based prediction methods use structurally dependent parameters in order to determine the property of pure components. The aim of the GC parameter estimation is to find the best possible set of model parameters that fits the experimental data. In that sense, there is often a lack of attention...

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of Drosophila larvae infected by entomopathogenic nematodes shows involvement of complement, recognition and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefin, Badrul; Kucerova, Lucie; Dobes, Pavel; Markus, Robert; Strnad, Hynek; Wang, Zhi; Hyrsl, Pavel; Zurovec, Michal; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Heterorhabditis bacteriophora is an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) which infects its host by accessing the hemolymph where it releases endosymbiotic bacteria of the species Photorhabdus luminescens. We performed a genome-wide transcriptional analysis of the Drosophila response to EPN infection at the time point at which the nematodes reached the hemolymph either via the cuticle or the gut and the bacteria had started to multiply. Many of the most strongly induced genes have been implicated in immune responses in other infection models. Mapping of the complete set of differentially regulated genes showed the hallmarks of a wound response, but also identified a large fraction of EPN-specific transcripts. Several genes identified by transcriptome profiling or their homologues play protective roles during nematode infections. Genes that positively contribute to controlling nematobacterial infections encode: a homolog of thioester-containing complement protein 3, a basement membrane component (glutactin), a recognition protein (GNBP-like 3) and possibly several small peptides. Of note is that several of these genes have not previously been implicated in immune responses.

  14. Molecular analysis of a case of nevus of ota showing progressive evolution to melanoma with intermediate stages resembling cellular blue nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerami, Pedram; Pouryazdanparast, Pedram; Vemula, Swapna; Bastian, Boris C

    2010-05-01

    Nevus of Ota is a variant of congenital nevus, which is morphologically paucicellular and resembles a common blue nevus. Although nevus of Ota is a risk factor for uveal melanoma in white people, the development of cutaneous melanoma within nevus of Ota is a very rare occurrence with only a few reported cases. We present a case of a long-standing nevus of Ota, with radiologic imaging demonstrating a large retro-orbital mass and a biopsy showing melanoma. The histopathology of the eye exenteration specimen illustrated various stages of melanocytic progression including areas resembling a nevus of Ota, blue nevus, cellular blue nevus, and melanoma. There was heterogeneity in the overtly malignant sections with some areas displaying expansile nodules of blander appearing spindled cells, whereas other areas were composed of epithelioid cells with higher mitotic counts and zones of necrosis. The extensive lesion also infiltrated the soft tissue and bone. We performed gene mutation analysis for GNAQ, BRAF, NRAS, and KIT and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting commonly altered chromosomal loci in melanoma and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Copy number changes typical of melanoma were identified by both FISH and CGH in the morphologically malignant areas illustrating the relationship of tumor progression and the progressive acquisition of genetic aberrations.

  15. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  16. The Health Show

    OpenAIRE

    Swann, David

    2011-01-01

    Dr David Swann interviewed on The Health Show, Series 1, Episode 5, 2011 for BBC World about the award-winning 21st Century Nursing Bag. BBC World News reaches 241million people every week, available in 296 million homes, 1.8 million hotel rooms and has the highest average viewership on a weekday of any international news channel. The Health Show is a new 26-part series for BBC World News covering the most important news stories from around the world.

  17. Using computerized text analysis to assess communication within an Italian type 1 diabetes Facebook group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alda Troncone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess messages posted by mothers of children with type 1 diabetes in the Italian Facebook group “Mamme e diabete” using computerized text analysis. The data suggest that these mothers use online discussion boards as a place to seek and provide information to better manage the disease’s daily demands—especially those tasks linked to insulin correction and administration, control of food intake, and bureaucratic duties, as well as to seek and give encouragement and to share experiences regarding diabetes and related impact on their life. The implications of these findings for the management of diabetes are discussed.

  18. Lie group analysis method for two classes of fractional partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Jiang, Yao-Lin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we deal with two classes of fractional partial differential equation: n order linear fractional partial differential equation and nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, by using the Lie group analysis method. The infinitesimal generators general formula of n order linear fractional partial differential equation is obtained. For nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, the properties of their infinitesimal generators are considered. The four special cases are exhaustively investigated respectively. At the same time some examples of the corresponding case are also given. So it is very convenient to solve the infinitesimal generator of some fractional partial differential equation.

  19. Using computerized text analysis to assess communication within an Italian type 1 diabetes Facebook group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncone, Alda; Cascella, Crescenzo; Chianese, Antonietta; Iafusco, Dario

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess messages posted by mothers of children with type 1 diabetes in the Italian Facebook group "Mamme e diabete" using computerized text analysis. The data suggest that these mothers use online discussion boards as a place to seek and provide information to better manage the disease's daily demands-especially those tasks linked to insulin correction and administration, control of food intake, and bureaucratic duties, as well as to seek and give encouragement and to share experiences regarding diabetes and related impact on their life. The implications of these findings for the management of diabetes are discussed.

  20. Dental computed tomographic imaging as age estimation: morphological analysis of the third molar of a group of Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis

    2013-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is capable of providing accurate and measurable 3-dimensional images of the third molar. The aims of this study were to analyze the development of the mandibular third molar and its relation to chronological age and to create new reference data for a group of Turkish participants aged 9 to 25 years on the basis of cone-beam CT images. All data were obtained from the patients' records including medical, social, and dental anamnesis and cone-beam CT images of 752 patients. Linear regression analysis was performed to obtain regression formulas for dental age calculation with chronological age and to determine the coefficient of determination (r) for each sex. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between age and third-molar development for the males (r2 = 0.80) and the females (r2 = 0.78). Computed tomographic images are clinically useful for accurate and reliable estimation of dental ages of children and youth.

  1. Efficacy of group social skills interventions for youth with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Jacquelyn A; Kang, Erin; Lerner, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Group-based social skills interventions (GSSIs) are widely used for treating social competence among youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but their efficacy is unclear. Previous meta-analysis of the literature on well-designed trials of GSSIs is limited in size and scope, collapsing across highly heterogeneous sources (parents; youths; teachers; observers; behavioral tasks). The current meta-analysis of randomized control trials (RCTs) was conducted to ascertain overall effectiveness of GSSIs and differences by reporting sources. Nineteen RCTs met inclusion criteria. Results show that overall positive aggregate effects were medium (g=0.51, pskilled social behaviors (social knowledge; g=1.15, psocial performance; g=0.28, p=0.31). Social skills interventions presently appear modestly effective for youth with ASD, but may not generalize to school settings or self-reported social behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Renormalization group analysis of reduced magnetohydrodynamics with application to subgrid modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D. W.; Sudan, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The technique for obtaining a subgrid model for Navier-Stokes turbulence, based on renormalization group analysis (RNG), is extended to the reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMND) equations. It is shown that a RNG treatment of the Alfven turbulence supported by the RMHD equations leads to effective values of the viscosity and resistivity at large scales, k yields 0, dependent on the amplitude of turbulence. The effective viscosity and resistivity become independent of the molecular quantities when the RNG analysis is augmented by the Kolmogorov argument for energy cascade. A self-contained system of equations is derived for the range of scales, k = 0-K, where K = pi/Delta is the maximum wave number for a grid size Delta. Differential operators, whose coefficients depend upon the amplitudes of the large-scale quantities, represent in this system the resistive and viscous dissipation.

  3. Population genetic analysis among five Indian population groups using six microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anu; Das, Birajalaxmi; Seshadri, M

    2003-04-01

    Genetic variation at six tetranucleotide microsatellites (HUMTHO1, HUMVWA, F13A01, D3S1359, D12S66, and D12S67) has heen determined in five endogamous ethnic population groups of India belonging to two major linguistic families. The populations analyzed were Konkanastha Brahmins and Marathas (Maharashtra state) from the Indo-Aryan linguistic family and Nairs, Ezhavas, and Muslims (Kerala state) from the Dravidian family. All six loci show high gene diversity, ranging from 0.63 +/- 0.04 to 0.84 +/- 0.02. The average GST value observed was 1.7%, indicating that the differences between the populations account for less than 2% of the diversity, while the genetic variation is high within the five population groups studied (>98%). The phylogenetic tree fails to show any clear cluster. The absence of any cluster along with low average GST is suggestive of substantial genetic similarity among the studied populations, in spite of clear geographical, linguistic, and cultural barriers. This similarity indicates either a greater gene flow between these groups or, alternatively, may reflect a recent evolution for them, considering that the Indian caste system evolved only about 3000 years ago.

  4. MULTIDIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS OF SELF-ESTEEM IN A GROUP OF CHILDREN WITH ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lamberti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is characterised by low levels of internalizing symptoms and self-efficacy which causes low self-esteem, while externalizing behaviours appear to be related to high levels of stress in the parents. The purpose of this research is to analyze the impact of ADHD on self-esteem and parental stress. A multidimensional assessment of self-esteem was performed using the MSCS (Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale in a group of 12 male patients with ADHD (age range 9-11 years. Parental stress was investigated using the Parenting Stress Index (PSI. These results were compared with a group of 12 healthy children (age 9-11 years, with both parametric statistics and correlation statistics. The comparison between ADHD children and control subjects, performed by a calculation to rank with the Mann-Whitney, showed a high significance in two dimensional components of self-esteem: social relationships (Z -2.028 p 0.045 and academic success (Z - 2.166 p 0.028. The total self-esteem score differed significantly between the two groups (Z -2.227 p 0.024. Parental stress increaseed with the level of the child‟s oppositional symptoms (p 0.790 but it did not correlate with the other scores (cognitive problems / inattention p 0.381; hyperactivity p 0.414; ADHD index p 0.324. The present study shows that self-esteem is impaired among children with ADHD.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of a Self-Replicator With Reduced Template Inhibition Based on an Informational Leaving Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigan, Erwan; Mattelaer, Henri-Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-03-01

    The first non-enzymatic self-replicating systems, as proposed by von Kiedrowski (Angew Chem Int Ed Engl 25(10):932-935, 1986) and Orgel (Nature 327(6120):346-347, 1987), gave rise to the analytical background still used today to describe artificial replicators. What separates a self-replicating from an autocatalytic system is the ability to pass on structural information (Orgel, Nature 358(6383):203-209, 1992). Utilising molecular information, nucleic acids were the first choice as prototypical examples. But early self-replicators showed parabolic over exponential growth due to the strongly bound template duplex after template-directed ligation of substrates. We propose a self-replicating scheme with a weakly bound template duplex, using an informational leaving group. Such a scheme is inspired by the role of tRNA as leaving group and information carrier during protein synthesis, and is based on our previous experience with nucleotide chemistry. We analyse theoretically this scheme and compare it to the classical minimal replicator model. We show that for an example hexanucleotide template mirroring that is used by von Kiedrowski (Bioorganic chemistry frontiers, 1993) for the analysis of the classical minimal replicator, the proposed scheme is expected to result in higher template self-replication rate. The proposed self-replicating scheme based on an informational leaving group is expected to outperform the classical minimal replicator because of a weaker template duplex bonding, resulting in reduced template inhibition.

  6. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery and mini-incision technique for total hip arthroplasty: a sub-group meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang; LIN Tiao; CAI Xun-zi; YAN Shi-gui

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well accepted that the minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for total hip arthroplasty (THA) should combine with less or no muscle damage and is different from mini-incision technique and MIS should have better outcomes than mini-incision surgery.The aim of current analysis was to apply an explicitly defined sub-group analysis to confirm whether this hypothesis is true.Methods A computerized literature search was applied to find any data concerning MIS or mini-incision THAs.A multistage screening was then performed to identify randomized studies fulfilling the inclusive criteria for the analysis.The data were extracted,and sub-group analyses of MIS or mini-incision surgery for different kinds of outcomes were carried out.The P(sub) value for difference between MIS sub-group and mini-incision sub-group was also calculated.Results Eleven studies that fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included,with 472 cases in the study group (MIS or mini-incision) and 492 cases in the conventional group.The overall analysis showed the study group would achieve less surgical duration (P=0.037),intraoperative blood (P <0.001) and incision length (P <0.001) than conventional group.The difference between sub-groups showed,the MIS would achieve shorter incision length (P(sub) <0.05) and bigger cup abduction angle (P(sub) <0.05),and cause more blood loss (P (sub) <0.05) than mini-incision technique.Other indexeswere comparable between the two sub-groups.Conclusions Though further high quality studies are still needed,the result of current analysis offered an initial conclusion that MIS THA failed to achieve a better clinical outcome than mini-incision technique.The exact definition of MIS still needs to be improved.

  7. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westers, Theresia M.; Cremers, Eline M.P.; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R.; Wells, Denise A.; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; Preijers, Frank W.M.B.; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117+ erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84–94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86–97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage. PMID:27758818

  8. A Fashion Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>Story: The yearly fashion show day.The children take turns to walk on the stage and show the class their favorite clothes.Now it’s Joe’s and Phoebe’s turn.Joe walks on the stage and says,“My shorts are blue.Do you like my blue shorts?”On the other side of the stage, Phoebe is wearing her favorite pink skirt.“My skirt is pink.Do you like my pink skirt?”asks

  9. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of a Novel Light-Dependent Lesion Mimic Mutant, lm3, Showing Adult-Plant Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Common Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Lesion mimics (LMs that exhibit spontaneous disease-like lesions in the absence of pathogen attack might confer enhanced plant disease resistance to a wide range of pathogens. The LM mutant, lm3 was derived from a single naturally mutated individual in the F1 population of a 3-1/Jing411 cross, backcrossed six times with 3-1 as the recurrent parent and subsequently self-pollinated twice. The leaves of young seedlings of the lm3 mutant exhibited small, discrete white lesions under natural field conditions. The lesions first appeared at the leaf tips and subsequently expanded throughout the entire leaf blade to the leaf sheath. The lesions were initiated through light intensity and day length. Histochemical staining revealed that lesion formation might reflect programmed cell death (PCD and abnormal accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The chlorophyll content in the mutant was significantly lower than that in wildtype, and the ratio of chlorophyll a/b was increased significantly in the mutant compared with wildtype, indicating that lm3 showed impairment of the biosynthesis or degradation of chlorophyll, and that Chlorophyll b was prone to damage during lesion formation. The lm3 mutant exhibited enhanced resistance to wheat powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici; Bgt infection, which was consistent with the increased expression of seven pathogenesis-related (PR and two wheat chemically induced (WCI genes involved in the defense-related reaction. Genetic analysis showed that the mutation was controlled through a single partially dominant gene, which was closely linked to Xbarc203 on chromosome 3BL; this gene was delimited to a 40 Mb region between SSR3B450.37 and SSR3B492.6 using a large derived segregating population and the available Chinese Spring chromosome 3B genome sequence. Taken together, our results provide information regarding the identification of a novel wheat LM gene, which will facilitate the additional fine

  10. Analysis of the melanin distribution in different ethnic groups by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, C.; Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSM) is able to visualize differences in melanin content and distribution in different Skin Phototypes. The investigations were carried out on six healthy volunteers with Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI. Representative skin samples of Skin Phototypes II, V, and VI were obtained for histological analysis from remaining tissue of skin grafts and were used for LSM-pathologic correlation. LSM evaluation showed significant differences in melanin distribution in Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI, respectively. Based on the differences in overall reflectivity and image brightness, a visual evaluation scheme showed increasing brightness of the basal and suprabasal layers with increasing Skin Phototypes. The findings correlated well with histological analysis. The results demonstrate that LSM may serve as a promising adjunctive tool for real time assessment of melanin content and distribution in human skin, with numerous clinical applications and therapeutic and preventive implications.

  11. Structural analysis of the alcohol acyltransferase protein family from Cucumis melo shows that enzyme activity depends on an essential solvent channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz, Sebastián; Morales-Quintana, Luis; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2013-03-01

    Alcohol acyltransferases (AAT) play a key role in ester biosynthesis. In Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis, AATs are encoded by a gene family of four members (CmAAT1-4). CmAAT1, CmAAT3 and CmAAT4 are capable of synthesizing esters, with CmAAT1 the most active. CmAAT2 is inactive and has an Ala268 residue instead of a threonine which is present in all other active AATs, although the role of this residue is still unclear. The present work aims to understand the molecular mechanism involved in ester biosynthesis in melon fruit and to clarify the importance of the Ala268 residue. First, structural models for each protein were built by comparative modelling methodology. Afterwards, conformational interaction between the protein and several ligands, alcohols and acyl-CoAs was explored by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Structural analysis showed that CmAATs share a similar structure. Also, well-defined solvent channels were described in the CmAATs except for CmAAT2 which does not have a proper channel and instead has a small pocket around Ala268. Residues of the catalytic HxxxD motif interact with substrates within the solvent channel, with Ser363 also important. Strong binding interaction energies were described for the best substrate couple of each CmAAT (hexyl-, benzyl- and cinnamyl-acetate for CmAAT1, 3 and 4 respectively). CmAAT1 and CmAAT2 protein surfaces share similar electrostatic potentials; nevertheless the entrance channels for the substrates differ in location and electrostatic character, suggesting that Ala268 might be responsible for that. This could partly explain the major differences in activity reported for these two enzymes.

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of the interaction between Helianthus annuus and its obligate parasite Plasmopara halstedii shows single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRN sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouzy Jérôme

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downy mildew in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L. is caused by the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii (Farl. Berlese et de Toni. Despite efforts by the international community to breed mildew-resistant varieties, downy mildew remains a major threat to the sunflower crop. Very few genomic, genetic and molecular resources are currently available to study this pathogen. Using a 454 sequencing method, expressed sequence tags (EST during the interaction between H. annuus and P. halstedii have been generated and a search was performed for sites in putative effectors to show polymorphisms between the different races of P. halstedii. Results A 454 pyrosequencing run of two infected sunflower samples (inbred lines XRQ and PSC8 infected with race 710 of P. halstedii, which exhibit incompatible and compatible interactions, respectively generated 113,720 and 172,107 useable reads. From these reads, 44,948 contigs and singletons have been produced. A bioinformatic portal, HP, was specifically created for in-depth analysis of these clusters. Using in silico filtering, 405 clusters were defined as being specific to oomycetes, and 172 were defined as non-specific oomycete clusters. A subset of these two categories was checked using PCR amplification, and 86% of the tested clusters were validated. Twenty putative RXLR and CRN effectors were detected using PSI-BLAST. Using corresponding sequences from four races (100, 304, 703 and 710, 22 SNPs were detected, providing new information on pathogen polymorphisms. Conclusions This study identified a large number of genes that are expressed during H. annuus/P. halstedii compatible or incompatible interactions. It also reveals, for the first time, that an infection mechanism exists in P. halstedii similar to that in other oomycetes associated with the presence of putative RXLR and CRN effectors. SNPs discovered in CRN effector sequences were used to determine the genetic distances between the four races

  13. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W.; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-01-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks). PMID:25051224

  14. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-11-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks).

  15. On not showing scalps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    proposed by Janet Marstine, the editor of the Routledge Companion to Museum Ethics, I show how the museum succeeded in engaging users in questions of museum ethics. However, this specific debate on human remains in museums developed into an encounter between a global, museological discourse...

  16. Violence and TV Shows

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Yrd. Doç. Dr. Şinasi

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to discuss theories on theviolent effects of TV shows on viewers, especiallyon children. Therefore, this study includes a briefdiscussion of definitions of violence, discussionof violence theories, main results of researcheson televised violence, measuring TV violence,perception of televised violence, individualdifferences and reactions to TV violence,aggressiveness and preferences for TV violence.

  17. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  18. A Visionary Show

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Seduction. Distinction. Relax. Pulsation. These are the "style universes" on display at Première Vision, heralded as "The World’s Premiere Fabric Show." Started more than 35 years ago by 15 French weavers, Première Vision has expanded beyond its

  19. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  20. Suicide Ideation and Peers Group: Analysis of a Venezuelan Adolescents Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Ramírez, Juan Antonio; Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela. Escuela de Criminología.; Oduber, Jesús Angel; Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela. Escuela de Criminología.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine a model of relationship in order to predict school-age adolescents suicide ideation. A model based on peers’ suicidal behavior, father and mother’s support, family violence and depression was proposed. A sample of 912 subjects was used. The results through path analysis suggest that teenagers with depression symptoms prefer relating with friends who show suicidal behavior. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar un modelo de relaciones para predec...

  1. Investigation of stingray spines by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis to recognize functional groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muthuramalingam Uthaya Siva; Mohideen Abdul Badhul Haq; Deivasigamani Selvam; Ganesan Dinesh Babu; Rathinam Bakyaraj

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate functional groups of toxic spines in stingray by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis.Methods:sephen were centrifuged at 6000 r/min for 10 min. The supernatant was collected and preserved separately in methanol, ethanol, chloroform, acetone (1:2) and then soaked in the mentioned solvents for 48 h. Then extracts were filtered and used for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis.Results:The venom extract of Himantura gerrardi, Himantura imbricata and Pastinachus and random coiled secondary structure. The presence of O-H stretch, C=O stretch, C-H stretch, N-H deformation, O-H deformation and C-O stretch in the sample aligned with standard bovine serum albumin. The influence of functional groups within the molecule was because of the impact of preferred spatial orientation, chemical and physical interaction on the molecule. In conclusion, compared to bovine serum albumin, Himantura imbricata consists of two C=O stretch, are involved in the hydrogen bonding that takes place between the different elements of secondary structure.Conclusions:The results identified that the presence of free amino acids and protein having β-sheet medicine not available for treatment against injuries causing stingray. Therefore, it's the baseline study, to motivate further process and produce effective antibiotics. The venom of poisonous animals has been extensively studied, since standard.

  2. Investigation of stingray spines by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis to recognize functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuramalingam Uthaya Siva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate functional groups of toxic spines in stingray by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. Methods: The venom extract of Himantura gerrardi, Himantura imbricata and Pastinachus sephen were centrifuged at 6 000 r/min for 10 min. The supernatant was collected and preserved separately in methanol, ethanol, chloroform, acetone (1:2 and then soaked in the mentioned solvents for 48 h. Then extracts were filtered and used for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. Results: The results identified that the presence of free amino acids and protein having β-sheet and random coiled secondary structure. The presence of O-H stretch, C=O stretch, C-H stretch, N-H deformation, O-H deformation and C-O stretch in the sample aligned with standard bovine serum albumin. The influence of functional groups within the molecule was because of the impact of preferred spatial orientation, chemical and physical interaction on the molecule. In conclusion, compared to bovine serum albumin, Himantura imbricata consists of two C=O stretch, are involved in the hydrogen bonding that takes place between the different elements of secondary structure. Conclusions: The venom of poisonous animals has been extensively studied, since standard medicine not available for treatment against injuries causing stingray. Therefore, it's the baseline study, to motivate further process and produce effective antibiotics.

  3. SMA carrier testing: a meta-analysis of differences in test performance by ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William Kim; Hamilton, David; Kuhle, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe autosomal recessive genetic disease that occurs in about one in every 10 000 births. Prenatal carrier testing is available for SMA, and the utility of universal screening is actively debated. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of SMA genotype frequency, carrier frequency, and carrier test performance in different ethnic groups. We performed a systematic review of the literature for studies on SMA carrier screening test performance. Ethnicity-specific allele frequencies, carrier rates, and screening test performance were determined from data of 169 000 individuals in 14 published studies. Pooled estimates were calculated for each ethnic group using a random effects meta-analysis. The detection rate of SMA screening in the non-Black population was 87-95%; however, detection rates fell to 71% among the Black population. These results highlight that although SMA carrier testing generally performs well and could be considered as a routine prenatal screen, SMA testing should be used cautiously in the Black population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. New Developments in Mass Spectrometry for Group-Type Analysis of Petroleum Cuts (First Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fafet A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of petroleum cuts constitutes a necessary stage to perfect understanding of the reaction mechanisms and to the description of the kinetics of certain refining processes such as hydrotreating or catalytic cracking. Mass spectrometry (MS, thanks to group-type quantitative analysis methods, enables to access detailed description of complex hydrocarbon mixtures such as middle distillates or heavy cuts such as vacuum distillates. But these methods are also subject to some drawbacks and we shall expose, thereunder, two examples of improvements. In a first part, the accuracy of MS quantification of thiophenic sulphured compounds in middle distillates is studied by intertechnique comparison with the results obtained by gas phase chromatography coupled to sulphur-specific detection by chemiluminescence (GC/SCD. Improving on the MS method is suggested. In the second part, a new system for introducing the sample in the spectrometer source, dedicated to group-type analysis of heavy cuts is described. Its validation, by comparison of the MS results to those of liquid chromatography (LC as well as its performances, is exposed.

  5. PREFACE: Seventh International Workshop: Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems (GADEISVII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaneeva, Olena; Sophocleous, Christodoulos; Popovych, Roman; Boyko, Vyacheslav; Damianou, Pantelis

    2015-06-01

    The Seventh International Workshop "Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems" (GADEIS-VII) took place at Flamingo Beach Hotel, Larnaca, Cyprus during the period June 15-19, 2014. Fifty nine scientists from nineteen countries participated in the Workshop, and forty one lectures were presented. The Workshop topics ranged from theoretical developments of group analysis of differential equations, hypersymplectic structures, theory of Lie algebras, integrability and superintegrability to their applications in various fields. The Series of Workshops is a joint initiative by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Cyprus, and the Department of Applied Research of the Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine. The Workshops evolved from close collaboration among Cypriot and Ukrainian scientists. The first three meetings were held at the Athalassa campus of the University of Cyprus (October 27, 2005, September 25-28, 2006, and October 4-5, 2007). The fourth (October 26-30, 2008), the fifth (June 6-10, 2010) and the sixth (June 17-21, 2012) meetings were held at the coastal resort of Protaras. We would like to thank all the authors who have published papers in the Proceedings. All of the papers have been reviewed by at least two independent referees. We express our appreciation of the care taken by the referees. Their constructive suggestions have improved most of the papers. The importance of peer review in the maintenance of high standards of scientific research can never be overstated. Olena Vaneeva, Christodoulos Sophocleous, Roman Popovych, Vyacheslav Boyko, Pantelis Damianou

  6. On Segal-Bargmann analysis for finite Coxeter groups and its heat kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We prove identities involving the integral kernels of three versions of the Segal-Bargmann transform associated to a Coxeter group (defined by a finite root system) acting on a finite dimensional, real Euclidean space (one of these kernels having been introduced around the same time by Ben Said and Orsted and independently by Soltani) and the Dunkl heat kernel of the Dunkl Laplacian associated with the same Coxeter group, due to Rosler. All but one of our relations are originally due to Hall in the context of standard Segal-Bargmann analysis on Euclidean space. Hall's results (trivial Dunkl structure and arbitrary finite dimension) as well as our own results in mu-deformed quantum mechanics (non-trivial Dunkl structure, dimension one) are particular cases of the results proved here. So we can understand all of these versions of the Segal-Bargmann transform associated to a Coxeter group as Hall type transforms. In particular, we define an analogue of Hall's "Version C" generalized Segal-Bargmann transform whic...

  7. The Spinel Explorer--Interactive Visual Analysis of Spinel Group Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján Ganuza, María; Ferracutti, Gabriela; Gargiulo, María Florencia; Castro, Silvia Mabel; Bjerg, Ernesto; Gröller, Eduard; Matković, Krešimir

    2014-12-01

    Geologists usually deal with rocks that are up to several thousand million years old. They try to reconstruct the tectonic settings where these rocks were formed and the history of events that affected them through the geological time. The spinel group minerals provide useful information regarding the geological environment in which the host rocks were formed. They constitute excellent indicators of geological environments (tectonic settings) and are of invaluable help in the search for mineral deposits of economic interest. The current workflow requires the scientists to work with different applications to analyze spine data. They do use specific diagrams, but these are usually not interactive. The current workflow hinders domain experts to fully exploit the potentials of tediously and expensively collected data. In this paper, we introduce the Spinel Explorer-an interactive visual analysis application for spinel group minerals. The design of the Spinel Explorer and of the newly introduced interactions is a result of a careful study of geologists' tasks. The Spinel Explorer includes most of the diagrams commonly used for analyzing spinel group minerals, including 2D binary plots, ternary plots, and 3D Spinel prism plots. Besides specific plots, conventional information visualization views are also integrated in the Spinel Explorer. All views are interactive and linked. The Spinel Explorer supports conventional statistics commonly used in spinel minerals exploration. The statistics views and different data derivation techniques are fully integrated in the system. Besides the Spinel Explorer as newly proposed interactive exploration system, we also describe the identified analysis tasks, and propose a new workflow. We evaluate the Spinel Explorer using real-life data from two locations in Argentina: the Frontal Cordillera in Central Andes and Patagonia. We describe the new findings of the geologists which would have been much more difficult to achieve using the

  8. Shanghai Shows Its Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The city known as China’s economic powerhouse showed a more caring face as host of the Special Olympic Games Between October 2 and 11,the Special Olympics Summer Games were hosted in Shanghai,the first time the 40-year-old athletic com- petition for people with intellectual disabilities came to a developing country. This Special Olympics was also larger than all previous games in temps of the number of athletes.

  9. General analysis of group velocity effects in collinear optical parametric amplifiers and generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisholm, Gunnar

    2007-05-14

    Group velocity mismatch (GVM) is a major concern in the design of optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) and generators (OPGs) for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds. By simplifying the coupled propagation equations and exploiting their scaling properties, the number of free parameters for a collinear OPA is reduced to a level where the parameter space can be studied systematically by simulations. The resulting set of figures show the combinations of material parameters and pulse lengths for which high performance can be achieved, and they can serve as a basis for a design.

  10. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Børsting, C

    2013-01-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds....... However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs...

  11. The crystal structure of the streptococcal collagen-like protein 2 globular domain from invasive M3-type group A Streptococcus shows significant similarity to immunomodulatory HIV protein gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeglia, Flavia; Bachert, Beth; De Simone, Alfonso; Lukomski, Slawomir; Berisio, Rita

    2014-02-21

    The arsenal of virulence factors deployed by streptococci includes streptococcal collagen-like (Scl) proteins. These proteins, which are characterized by a globular domain and a collagen-like domain, play key roles in host adhesion, host immune defense evasion, and biofilm formation. In this work, we demonstrate that the Scl2.3 protein is expressed on the surface of invasive M3-type strain MGAS315 of Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the crystal structure of Scl2.3 globular domain, the first of any Scl. This structure shows a novel fold among collagen trimerization domains of either bacterial or human origin. Despite there being low sequence identity, we observed that Scl2.3 globular domain structurally resembles the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1, an essential subunit for viral fusion to human T cells. We combined crystallographic data with modeling and molecular dynamics techniques to gather information on the entire lollipop-like Scl2.3 structure. Molecular dynamics data evidence a high flexibility of Scl2.3 with remarkable interdomain motions that are likely instrumental to the protein biological function in mediating adhesive or immune-modulatory functions in host-pathogen interactions. Altogether, our results provide molecular tools for the understanding of Scl-mediated streptococcal pathogenesis and important structural insights for the future design of small molecular inhibitors of streptococcal invasion.

  12. Program and Portfolio Tradeoffs Under Uncertainty Using Epoch-Era Analysis: A Case Application to Carrier Strike Group Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Program and Portfolio Tradeoffs Under Uncertainty Using Epoch-Era Analysis A Case Application to Carrier Strike Group Design Parker D. Vascik...Analysis: A Case Application to Carrier Strike Group Design 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...for Affordability • Case Application: Carrier Strike Group (CSG) seari.mit.edu 2 May 13-14, 2015 THE CHALLENGE OF DESIGN UNDER

  13. Angiographic analysis of the circle of wills: comparison between normal and aneurysm groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Suh, Dae Chul; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il [Pochon CHA University College of Medicine, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate angiographic variations of the circle of Willis in a normal group, and to compare the pattern of these variations between normal and aneurysm groups. We reviewed 220 cases in which subjects had undergone digital subtraction cerebral angiography which showed the circle of Willis in its entirety. One hundred patients were diagnosed as normal, and 110 had an aneurysm. We reviewed the absence or presence and relative size of each segment, and the configuration of the distal basilar artery. Where the circle was complete, we evaluated whether or not the circle was balanced. And we compared the pattern of these variations between the two groups. In the normal group, the most common pattern was a small anterior communicating artery with symmetrically large A1 segments in the anterior circulation(27%) and symmetrically small posterior communication arteries with large P1 segments in the posterior circulation(39%). The anterior half of the circle was complete in 90% of cases, and the posterior half in 63%. In cases in which it was incomplete, there was agenesis of the anterior communicating artery in 9% of cases, of the A1 segment in 1%, of the posterior communicating artery in 36%, and of the P1 segment in 3%. Unilateral absence of the posterior communicating artery and P1 segment was noted in two cases. In the distal basilar artery, symmetric cranial fusion was most common, accounting for 77% of cases. In contrast, incomplete circles with agenesis of the A1 (1% vs 12%, p < .05) or P1 segment (3% vs 10%, p < .05) were more common in the aneurysm group than among normal subjects. Unbalanced types with a size discrepancy between A1 segments(8% vs 18%, p < .05), or posterior communicating arteries equal to or larger than the P1 segment (27% vs 46%, p < .05) were also more common. In the distal basilar artery, symmetric cranial fusion was most common, and accounted for 69% of cases. A complete and balanced circle was more common in the normal group. The most common

  14. Detailed photometric analysis of young star groups in the galaxy NGC 300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M. J.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The purpose of this work is to understand the global characteristics of the stellar populations in NGC 300. In particular, we focused our attention on searching young star groups and study their hierarchical organization. The proximity and orientation of this Sculptor Group galaxy make it an ideal candidate for this study. Methods: The research was conducted using archival point spread function (PSF) fitting photometry measured from images in multiple bands obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys of the Hubble Space Telescope (ACS/HST). Using the path linkage criterion (PLC), we cataloged young star groups and analyzed them from the observation of individual stars in the galaxy NGC 300. We also built stellar density maps from the bluest stars and applied the SExtractor code to identify overdensities. This method provided an additional tool for the detection of young stellar structures. By plotting isocontours over the density maps and comparing the two methods, we could infer and delineate the hierarchical structure of the blue population in the galaxy. For each region of a detected young star group, we estimated the size and derived the radial surface density profiles for stellar populations of different color (blue and red). A statistical decontamination of field stars was performed for each region. In this way it was possible to build the color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) and compare them with theoretical evolutionary models. We also constrained the present-day mass function (PDMF) per group by estimating a value for its slope. Results: The blue population distribution in NGC 300 clearly follows the spiral arms of the galaxy, showing a hierarchical behavior in which the larger and loosely distributed structures split into more compact and denser ones over several density levels. We created a catalog of 1147 young star groups in six fields of the galaxy NGC 300, in which we present their fundamental characteristics. The mean and the mode radius values

  15. [Survey on evidence-based medicine teaching activities in the German-speaking area: a target-group specific analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Joshua; Valipour, Arash; Strametz, Reinhard; Meyer, Gabriele; Lühmann, Dagmar; Steurer, Johann; Horvath, Karl; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Forster, Johannes; Sauder, Karsta; Ollenschläger, Günther; Ochsendorf, Falk; Weberschock, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    A survey conducted in 2011/12 on evidence-based medicine teaching activities in Germany, Austria and Switzerland shows an apparent increase of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching activities addressing different target groups. The potential target-group specific or generalised nature of teaching activities in EbM were explored by comparing the contents and structures of educational offers in order to detect differences and commonalities. First, several large institutions of the healthcare system were contacted. In addition, the participants of the EbM Academy were consulted as key informants, and the members of the German-speaking colleges of general practitioners and the German Network for EBM were asked to identify potential providers of EbM teaching activities. In the second step pretested detailed questionnaires were sent out that allowed a target-group specific analysis of contents, structures and didactic methods. Altogether, 185 teaching activities in EbM are described; 117 (6.8%) of these address students, 70 (37.8%) physicians and 55 (29.7%) caregivers and members of other healthcare professions. Further target groups include people interested in the healthcare system with a total of 38 (i.e., 20.5%) and patients with 18 (9.7%) teaching activities (multiple responses allowed). Students are mainly taught in obligatory seminars, courses or lectures with a high number of participants, whereas teaching activities addressing other target groups are mostly offered to small groups of participants in the form of optional seminars, courses or workshops lasting a similar length of time. As regards the content, attendees from all target groups with only little previous knowledge are taught the first three steps of EbM according to Sackett. Specialised contents are not distributed evenly and reveal some adaptation to the respective target groups. Structural differences between the target groups are most likely attributed to distinct framework conditions in

  16. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  17. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a candidate gene for ataxia-telangiectasia group D (ATDC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, E.A.; Kapp, L.N.; Young, B.R.; Murnane, J.P. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    A radioresistant cell clone (1B3) was previously isolated after transfection of an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) group D cell line with a human cosmid library. A cosmid rescued from the integration site in 1B3 contained human DNA from chromosome position 11q23, the same region shown by both genetic linkage and chromosome transfer to contain the genes for AT complementation groups A/B, C, and D. A gene within the cosmid (ATDC) was found to produce mRNAs of different sizes. A cDNA for one of the most abundant mRNAs (3.0 kb) was isolated from a HeLa cell library. In the present study, the authors sequenced the 3.0-kb cDNA and the surrounding intron DNA in the cosmids. They used polymerase chain reaction, with primers in the introns, to confirm the number of exons and to analyze DNA from AT group D cells for mutations within this gene. Although no mutations were found, they do not rule out the possibility that mutations may be present within the regulatory sequences or coding sequences found in other mRNAs specific for this gene. From the sequence analysis, they found that the ATDC gene product is one of a group of proteins that share multiple zinc finger motifs and an adjacent leucine zipper motif. These proteins have been proposed to form homo- or hetero-dimers involved in nucleic acid binding, consistent with the fact that many of these proteins appear to be transcriptional regulatory factors involved in carcinogenesis and/or differentiation. The likelihood that the ATDC gene product is involved in transcriptional regulation could explain the pleiomorphic characteristics of AT, including abnormal cell cycle regulation. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Analysis of group ICA-based connectivity measures from fMRI: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a powerful tool for the in vivo study of the pathophysiology of brain disorders and disease. In this manuscript, we propose an analysis stream for fMRI functional connectivity data and apply it to a novel study of Alzheimer's disease. In the first stage, spatial independent component analysis is applied to group fMRI data to obtain common brain networks (spatial maps and subject-specific mixing matrices (time courses. In the second stage, functional principal component analysis is utilized to decompose the mixing matrices into population-level eigenvectors and subject-specific loadings. Inference is performed using permutation-based exact logistic regression for matched pairs data. The method is applied to a novel fMRI study of Alzheimer's disease risk under a verbal paired associates task. We found empirical evidence of alternative ICA-based metrics of connectivity when comparing subjects evidencing mild cognitive impairment relative to carefully matched controls.

  19. Observing real-world groups in the virtual field: The analysis of online discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David C

    2016-09-01

    This article sets out to establish the naturalistic study of online social communication as a substantive topic in social psychology and to discuss the challenges of developing methods for a formal analysis of the structural and interactional features of message threads on discussion forums. I begin by outlining the essential features of online communication and specifically discussion forum data, and the important ways in which they depart from spoken conversation. I describe the handful of attempts to devise systematic analytic techniques for adapting methods such as conversation and discourse analysis to the study of online discussion. I then present a case study of a thread from the popular UK parenting forum Mumsnet which presents a number of challenges for existing methods, and examine some of the interactive phenomena typical of forums. Finally, I consider ways in which membership categorization analysis and social identity theory can complement one another in the exploration of both group processes and the rhetorical deployment of identities as dynamic phenomena in online discussion.

  20. Is the log-law a first principle result from Lie-group invariance analysis?

    CERN Document Server

    Frewer, Michael; Foysi, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The invariance method of Lie-groups in the theory of turbulence carries the high expectation of being a first principle method for generating statistical scaling laws. The purpose of this comment is to show that this expectation has not been met so far. In particular for wall-bounded turbulent flows, the prospects for success are not promising in view of the facts we will present herein. Although the invariance method of Lie-groups is explicitly able to generate statistical scaling laws for wall-bounded turbulent flows, like the log-law for example, these invariant results yet not only fail to fulfil the basic requirements for a first principle result, but also are strongly misleading. The reason is that not the functional structure of the log-law itself is misleading, but that its invariant Lie-group based derivation yielding this function is what is misleading. By revisiting the study of Oberlack (2001) [Oberlack, M., 2001. A unified approach for symmetries in plane parallel turbulent shear flows. J. Fluid ...

  1. Genetic Sequencing Analysis of A307 Subgroup of ABO Blood Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Jiajin; Zhu, Suiyong

    2015-09-18

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the serology and gene sequence characteristics of the A307 subgroup of the ABO blood group. MATERIAL AND METHODS Monoclonal anti-A and anti-B antibodies were used to detect the ABO antigens of a proband whose positive blood type was not consistent with the negative blood type of the ABO blood group. Standard A-, B-, and O-negative typing cells were used to test for ABO antibodies in the serum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) was used to confirm the genotype, and subsequently, exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were detected by gene sequencing. Samples from the wife and daughters of the proband were also used for serological and genetic testing. RESULTS Red blood cells of the proband showed weak agglutination reaction with anti-A antibody, while anti-B antibody was detected in the serum. Moreover, PCR-SSP detected A307 and O02 alleles, while gene sequencing revealed mutation of c.745C>T in exon 7, which produced a polypeptide chain p.R249W. The A307 gene of the proband was not inherited by his daughters. CONCLUSIONS A mutation (c.745 C>T) in exon 7 of the ABO blood group gene resulted in low activity of a-1,3-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase, producing A3 phenotype.

  2. Genetic sequencing analysis of the A307 subgroup of ABO blood group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Jiajin; Zhu, Suiyong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the serology and gene sequence characteristics of the A307 subgroup of ABO blood group. Monoclonal anti-A and anti-B antibodies were used to detect the ABO antigens of a proband whose positive blood type was not consistent with the negative blood type of ABO blood group. Meanwhile, standard A-, B-, and O-negative typing cells were used to test for ABO antibodies in the serum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) was used to confirm the genotype, and subsequently, exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were detected by gene sequencing. Samples from the wife and daughters of the proband were also used for serological and genetic testing. Red blood cells of the proband showed weak agglutination reaction with anti-A antibody, while anti-B antibody was detected in the serum. Moreover, PCR-SSP detected A307 and O02 alleles, while gene sequencing revealed mutation of c.745C>T in exon 7, which produced a polypeptide chain p.R249W. Furthermore, the A307 gene of the proband was not inherited by his daughters. A mutation (c.745 C>T) in exon 7 of the ABO blood group gene resulted in low activity of α-1, 3-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase, producing A3 phenotype.

  3. Not a "reality" show.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  4. Financial liquidity analysis of CSR based Capital Group Żywiec SA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Gąsior

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the Capital Group Grupa Żywiec plc. as an enterprise operating in food industry which has received a "Golden Leaf Award for CSR” (Pichola, Rudzki, 2013 and has been ranked among the top ten companies in the aforementioned sector. It is a beer producer, i.e. a good which is controversial in the opinion of society. In order to change the attitude of the public toward the Capital Group and show concern for ecological aspects, the company has made attempts to create and implement CSR strategy in formal terms. It should be emphasized that major shareholder (Heineken company has already been following the strategy of sustainable development referred to as Brewing a Better Future (Social Report, 2013. However, the period during which the aforementioned actions were taken arouses a number of doubts, e.g. if the enterprise is able to continue its activity having achieved a certain level of liquidity. In times of great financial crisis, which started at the turn of 2007 and 2008, maintaining adequate liquidity was the main problem. It was then that enterprises ought to pay special attention to this aspect (Gorczyńska, 2011; Raport, 2010. Having the above in mind, the paper discusses issues relating to financial liquidity of the Capital Group Żywiec plc. in times of economic crisis and at the initial stage of CSR strategy implementation. Case study is the main method employed to verify the hypothesis formulated at the beginning of the article. Selected financial ratios are used in order to compare the liquidity of the Capital Group with the liquidity of the entire sector.

  5. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-03-15

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes.

  6. Student Teaching Abroad Inter-Group Outcomes: A Comparative, Country-Specific Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Jiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As student diversity becomes the norm in U.S. schools, future teachers must be comprehensively prepared to work with the increasingly diverse student population through application of informed instruction that enhances general and individual student learning and outcomes. Teacher Education programs increasingly promote student teaching in international settings as a substantive step to develop teachers who embody these new competencies and instructional practices. The proposed paper presentation offers a framework and analysis highlighting similarities and differences between two groups of student teachers in Belize (2005 and 2008. Findings are comparative and relate to the type and degree of (1 cultural-, professional-, and character-development influences on student teachers, and (2 emergent common intergroup patterns.

  7. Chromosomal evolution in the Drosophila cardini group (Diptera: Drosophilidae): photomaps and inversion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Juliana; De Toni, Daniela Cristina; da Silva, Gisele de Souza; Valente, Vera Lucia da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Detailed chromosome photomaps are the first step to develop further chromosomal analysis to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species, considering that chromosomal rearrangements, such as inversions, are common features of genome evolution. In this report, we analyzed inversion polymorphisms in 25 different populations belonging to six neotropical species in the cardini group: Drosophila cardini, D. cardinoides, D. neocardini, D. neomorpha, D. parthenogenetica and D. polymorpha. Furthermore, we present the first reference photomaps for the Neotropical D. cardini and D. parthenogenetica and improved photomaps for D. cardinoides, D. neocardini and D. polymorpha. We found 19 new inversions for these species. An exhaustive pairwise comparison of the polytene chromosomes was conducted for the six species in order to understand evolutionary patterns of their chromosomes.

  8. Group Theory Analysis of Free Convective Boundary—Layer Behavior at a Stretching Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunmeiShi; XueziXu; 等

    1995-01-01

    In the present study,free convection and heat transfer behavior of electrically conducting fluid in the boundary layer over a vertical continuously stretching surface is investigated.The effects of free convection,magnetic field,suction/blowing at the surface and the stretching speed of the surface on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are considered.By applying one-parametric group theory to analysis of the problem,a similarity solution is found.The governing equations of continuity,momentum and energy are solved numerically by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme.The numerical results.which are obtained for the flow and heat transfer characteristics,reveal the influences of the parameters.

  9. The Renormalization-Group Method Applied to Asymptotic Analysis of Vector Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kunihiro, T

    1996-01-01

    The renormalization group method of Goldenfeld, Oono and their collaborators is applied to asymptotic analysis of vector fields. The method is formulated on the basis of the theory of envelopes, as was done for scalar fields. This formulation actually completes the discussion of the previous work for scalar equations. It is shown in a generic way that the method applied to equations with a bifurcation leads to the Landau-Stuart and the (time-dependent) Ginzburg-Landau equations. It is confirmed that this method is actually a powerful theory for the reduction of the dynamics as the reductive perturbation method is. Some examples for ordinary diferential equations, such as the forced Duffing, the Lotka-Volterra and the Lorenz equations, are worked out in this method: The time evolution of the solution of the Lotka-Volterra equation is explicitly given, while the center manifolds of the Lorenz equation are constructed in a simple way in the RG method.

  10. Public medical shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  11. Control-group feature normalization for multivariate pattern analysis of structural MRI data using the support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Kristin A; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Doshi, Jimit; Davatzikos, Christos; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-15

    Normalization of feature vector values is a common practice in machine learning. Generally, each feature value is standardized to the unit hypercube or by normalizing to zero mean and unit variance. Classification decisions based on support vector machines (SVMs) or by other methods are sensitive to the specific normalization used on the features. In the context of multivariate pattern analysis using neuroimaging data, standardization effectively up- and down-weights features based on their individual variability. Since the standard approach uses the entire data set to guide the normalization, it utilizes the total variability of these features. This total variation is inevitably dependent on the amount of marginal separation between groups. Thus, such a normalization may attenuate the separability of the data in high dimensional space. In this work we propose an alternate approach that uses an estimate of the control-group standard deviation to normalize features before training. We study our proposed approach in the context of group classification using structural MRI data. We show that control-based normalization leads to better reproducibility of estimated multivariate disease patterns and improves the classifier performance in many cases.

  12. Genomic Analysis of the Emergence and Rapid Global Dissemination of the Clonal Group 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jolene R; Kitchel, Brandon; Driebe, Elizabeth M; MacCannell, Duncan R; Roe, Chandler; Lemmer, Darrin; de Man, Tom; Rasheed, J Kamile; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul; Limbago, Brandi M

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the KPC carbapenemase have rapidly spread throughout the world, causing severe healthcare-associated infections with limited antimicrobial treatment options. Dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is largely attributed to expansion of a single dominant strain, ST258. In this study, we explore phylogenetic relationships and evolution within ST258 and its clonal group, CG258, using whole genome sequence analysis of 167 isolates from 20 countries collected over 17 years. Our results show a common ST258 ancestor emerged from its diverse parental clonal group around 1995 and likely acquired blaKPC prior to dissemination. Over the past two decades, ST258 has remained highly clonal despite diversity in accessory elements and divergence in the capsule polysaccharide synthesis locus. Apart from the large recombination event that gave rise to ST258, few mutations set it apart from its clonal group. However, one mutation occurs in a global transcription regulator. Characterization of outer membrane protein sequences revealed a profile in ST258 that includes a truncated OmpK35 and modified OmpK37. Our work illuminates potential genomic contributors to the pathogenic success of ST258, helps us better understand the global dissemination of this strain, and identifies genetic markers unique to ST258.

  13. A Case Study: An Analysis of Organizational Changes of YTO Group Corporation%A Case Study:An Analysis of Organizational Changes of YTO Group Corporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing WANG

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes change events as a case study in a company called YTO (Luoyang)Group Corporation, and analyzes the change events utilizing constructs of organizational environments, structure, leadership and culture, in order to get a better understanding of the change in an organization.

  14. Preserving Subject Variability in Group fMRI Analysis: Performance Evaluation of GICA versus IVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eMichael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of component spatial variability and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs and time courses (TCs of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1 at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2 at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3 both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4 if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5 in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift.

  15. Cluster analysis and food group consumption in a national sample of Australian girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, J A; Scott, J; Cobiac, L

    2012-02-01

    Food preferences develop early in life and track into later life. There is limited information on food consumption and dietary patterns in Australian girls. The present study aimed to: (i) determine the frequency of food groups consumed over 1day; (ii) identify dietary clusters based on food group consumption; and (iii) compare dietary intakes and activity variables between clusters. A cross-sectional analysis of 9-16-year-old girls (n=1114) from the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey was performed. Over the whole day, 30% of all girls consumed carbonated sugar drinks, 46% consumed take-away food, 56% consumed fruit, 70% consumed at least one vegetable, and 19% and 30% consumed white and/or red meat, respectively. K-means cluster analysis derived four clusters. Approximately one-third of girls were identified in a Meat and vegetable cluster; these girls had the highest intakes of red meat and vegetables, and tended to have higher intakes of fruit, whole grain breads, low fat yoghurt, and lower intakes of take-away foods and soft drinks. They also had the highest intakes of protein, fibre and micronutrients; and tended to perform more physical activity, compared to girls in the remaining clusters. Girls identified in the Meat and vegetable cluster, on average, consumed more lean red meat, vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy products, and had a higher intakes of many nutrients. The high percentage of girls not identified in this cluster suggests the need to inform them on how to make healthy, nutrient dense food choices, and why they require increased nutrient intakes at this time. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Preserving subject variability in group fMRI analysis: performance evaluation of GICA vs. IVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Andrew M; Anderson, Mathew; Miller, Robyn L; Adalı, Tülay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely applied technique to derive functionally connected brain networks from fMRI data. Group ICA (GICA) and Independent Vector Analysis (IVA) are extensions of ICA that enable users to perform group fMRI analyses; however a full comparison of the performance limits of GICA and IVA has not been investigated. Recent interest in resting state fMRI data with potentially higher degree of subject variability makes the evaluation of the above techniques important. In this paper we compare component estimation accuracies of GICA and an improved version of IVA using simulated fMRI datasets. We systematically change the degree of inter-subject spatial variability of components and evaluate estimation accuracy over all spatial maps (SMs) and time courses (TCs) of the decomposition. Our results indicate the following: (1) at low levels of SM variability or when just one SM is varied, both GICA and IVA perform well, (2) at higher levels of SM variability or when more than one SMs are varied, IVA continues to perform well but GICA yields SM estimates that are composites of other SMs with errors in TCs, (3) both GICA and IVA remove spatial correlations of overlapping SMs and introduce artificial correlations in their TCs, (4) if number of SMs is over estimated, IVA continues to perform well but GICA introduces artifacts in the varying and extra SMs with artificial correlations in the TCs of extra components, and (5) in the absence or presence of SMs unique to one subject, GICA produces errors in TCs and IVA estimates are accurate. In summary, our simulation experiments (both simplistic and realistic) and our holistic analyses approach indicate that IVA produces results that are closer to ground truth and thereby better preserves subject variability. The improved version of IVA is now packaged into the GIFT toolbox (http://mialab.mrn.org/software/gift).

  17. A meta-analysis of functional group responses to forest recovery outside of the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spake, Rebecca; Ezard, Thomas H G; Martin, Philip A; Newton, Adrian C; Doncaster, C Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Both active and passive forest restoration schemes are used in degraded landscapes across the world to enhance biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Restoration is increasingly also being implemented in biodiversity offset schemes as compensation for loss of natural habitat to anthropogenic development. This has raised concerns about the value of replacing old-growth forest with plantations, motivating research on biodiversity recovery as forest stands age. Functional diversity is now advocated as a key metric for restoration success, yet it has received little analytical attention to date. We conducted a meta-analysis of 90 studies that measured differences in species richness for functional groups of fungi, lichens, and beetles between old-growth control and planted or secondary treatment forests in temperate, boreal, and Mediterranean regions. We identified functional-group-specific relationships in the response of species richness to stand age after forest disturbance. Ectomycorrhizal fungi averaged 90 years for recovery to old-growth values (between 45 years and unrecoverable at 95% prediction limits), and epiphytic lichens took 180 years to reach 90% of old-growth values (between 140 years and never for recovery to old-growth values at 95% prediction limits). Non-saproxylic beetle richness, in contrast, decreased as stand age of broadleaved forests increased. The slow recovery by some functional groups essential to ecosystem functioning makes old-growth forest an effectively irreplaceable biodiversity resource that should be exempt from biodiversity offsetting initiatives. © 2015 The Authors Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. A simplified analysis method for piled raft and pile group foundations with batter piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiyodom, Pastsakorn; Matsumoto, Tatsunori

    2002-11-01

    A simplified method of numerical analysis has been developed to estimate the deformation and load distribution of piled raft foundations subjected to vertical, lateral, and moment loads, using a hybrid model in which the flexible raft is modelled as thin plates and the piles as elastic beams and the soil is treated as springs. Both the vertical and lateral resistances of the piles as well as the raft base are incorporated into the model. Pile-soil-pile, pile-soil-raft and raft-soil-raft interactions are taken into account based on Mindlin's solutions for both vertical and lateral forces. The validity of the proposed method is verified through comparisons with several existing methods for single piles, pile groups and piled rafts. Workable design charts are given for the estimation of the lateral displacement and the load distribution of piled rafts from the stiffnesses of the raft alone and the pile group alone. Additionally, parametric studies were carried out concerning batter pile foundations. It was found that the use of batter piles can efficiently improve the deformation characteristics of pile foundations subjected to lateral loads.

  19. Analysis of Feedback processes in Online Group Interaction: a methodological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Espasa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the feedback. Research on feedback processes has predominantly focused on feedback design rather than on how students utilize feedback to improve learning. This methodological model fills this gap contributing to analyse the implementation of the feedback processes while students discuss collaboratively in a specific case of writing assignments. A review of different methodological models was carried out to define a framework adjusted to the analysis of the relationship of written and asynchronous group interaction, and students' activity and changes incorporated into the final text. The model proposed includes the following dimensions: 1 student participation 2 nature of student learning and 3 quality of student learning. The main contribution of this article is to present the methodological model and also to ascertain the model's operativity regarding how students incorporate such feedback into their essays.

  20. Exploring online support spaces: using cluster analysis to examine breast cancer, diabetes and fibromyalgia support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Annie T

    2012-05-01

    This study sought to characterize and compare online discussion forums for three conditions: breast cancer, type 1 diabetes and fibromyalgia. Though there has been considerable work examining online support groups, few studies have considered differences in discussion content between health conditions. In addition, in contrast to the extant literature, this study sought to employ a semi-automated approach to examine health-related online communities. Online discussion content for the three conditions was compiled, pre-processed, and clustered at the thread level using the bisecting k-means algorithm. Though the clusters for each condition differed, the clusters fell into a set of common categories: Generic, Support, Patient-Centered, Experiential Knowledge, Treatments/Procedures, Medications, and Condition Management. The cluster analyses facilitate an increased understanding of various aspects of patient experience, including significant emotional and temporal aspects of the illness experience. The clusters highlighted the changing nature of patients' information needs. Information provided to patients should be tailored to address their needs at various points during their illness. In addition, cluster analysis may be integrated into online support groups or other types of online interventions to assist patients in finding information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. At what age group blood pressure discontinue to increase? An assessment using change-point analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalib A. Latiff

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim To study at what age group blood pressure ceases to increase for women and men.Methods Applying change-point technique, we used our existing database - mega base-line cross-sectional Hulu Langat Health Study that was initiated in 2000 - to locate the most appropriate age limit in planning promotive, preventive and controlling strategies against systolic hypertension.Results Systolic hypertension was found to be constantly increasing for both gender right from the early age until the middle age group. However, women achieved the systolic peak 15 years earlier (at 41-45 years old than men (at 56-60 years old. Systolic blood pressure was steadily declined after the peak.Conclusions Hypertension intervention, we recommend age before 40 (women and 55 (men be the most appropriate period to apply various public health intervention, after that, the action must be exclusively curative. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:136-41Keywords: change-point analysis, public health intervention, systolic hypertension

  2. Time series analysis applied to construct US natural gas price functions for groups of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikov, V.V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial y de Sistemas, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur, Col. Tecnologico, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 64849 (Mexico); Matis, T.I. [Deparment of Industrial Engineering, Texas Tech University, 2500 Broadway, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Perez-Valdes, G.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial y de Sistemas, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Av. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur, Col. Tecnologico, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, 64849 (Mexico); Deparment of Industrial Engineering, Texas Tech University, 2500 Broadway, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The study of natural gas markets took a considerably new direction after the liberalization of the natural gas markets during the early 1990s. As a result, several problems and research opportunities arose for those studying the natural gas supply chain, particularly the marketing operations. Consequently, various studies have been undertaken about the econometrics of natural gas. Several models have been developed and used for different purposes, from descriptive analysis to practical applications such as price and consumption forecasting. In this work, we address the problem of finding a pooled regression formula relating the monthly figures of price and consumption volumes for each state of the United States during the last twenty years. The model thus obtained is used as the basis for the development of two methods aimed at classifying the states into groups sharing a similar price/consumption relationship: a dendrogram application, and an heuristic algorithm. The details and further applications of these grouping techniques are discussed, along with the ultimate purpose of using this pooled regression model to validate data employed in the stochastic optimization problem studied by the authors. (author)

  3. The Great Cometary Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  4. Structural difference between group I and group II cobra cardiotoxins: X-ray, NMR, and CD analysis of the effect of cis-proline conformation on three-fingered toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Shou; Chung, Fong-Yu; Tjong, Siu-Cin; Goh, King-Siang; Huang, Wei-Ning; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Po-Long; Lin, Hua-Ching; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2005-05-24

    Natural homologues of cobra cardiotoxins (CTXs) were classified into two structural subclasses of group I and II based on the amino acid sequence and circular dichroism analysis, but the exact differences in their three-dimensional structures and biological significance remain elusive. We show by circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic analyses of a newly purified group I CTX A6 from eastern Taiwan cobra (Naja atra) venoms that its loop I conformation adopts a type VIa turn with a cis peptide bond located between two proline residues of PPxY. A similar "banana-twisted" conformation can be observed in other group I CTXs and also in cyclolinopeptide A and its analogues. By binding to the membrane environment, group I CTX undergoes a conformational change to adopt a more extended hydrophobic domain with beta-sheet twisting closer to the one adopted by group II CTX. This result resolves a discrepancy in the CTX structural difference reported previously between solution as well as crystal state and shows that, in addition to the hydrophobicity, the exact loop I conformation also plays an important role in CTX-membrane interaction. Potential protein targets of group I CTXs after cell internalization are also discussed on the basis of the determined loop I conformation.

  5. A systematic review of the effectiveness of CBT/ERP group therapy of OCD: A meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben; Bennedsen, Birgit;

    , as well as reviewers of the literature have focused on within single treatments effect sizes rather between group effect sizes. OBJECTIVES To make a systematic review, and by methods of meta analysis compute a pooled within effect size of studies of group CBT of OCD and compare these to previously.......05 and 1.25 respectively, with an overall combined pooled within effect size across the categories at 1.18. Finally a between effect sizes of the four studies comparing group therapy to waitlist control group was reported at.1.12 CONCLUSION The reported within effect sizes in this meta-analysis (range 1...

  6. Group theory for magnetic structure determination: Recent developments and quadrupolar ordering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: sikora@novell.ftj.agh.edu.pl; Pytlik, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Bialas, F. [Nowy Sacz School of Busines-National Louis University, 33-300 Nowy Sacz (Poland); Malinowski, J. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, al.Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-09-13

    In this paper, the recent developments in practical applications of symmetry analysis are described. The theoretical basis shortly described in Section 1 has been implemented in several computer applications, one of which is the program 'MODY-win', developed by the authors of the paper. The program calculates the so-called basis vectors of irreducible representations of a given symmetry group, which can be used for calculation of possible ordering modes. Its practical application is demonstrated on some examples, presenting the recent aspects of using the symmetry analysis to description of various types of ordering encountered in solids. The scalar-type ordering (occupation probability) is discussed shortly for occupation of interstitial sites by hydrogen atoms in inter-metallic compounds. The description of vector ordering is demonstrated on the magnetic ordering modes, with special attention focused on the freedom that is left in the structure after imposing all the symmetry constraints. In practice, the final ordering mode usually contains some free parameters that cannot be determined from the symmetry itself. The last application presented in the paper is the description of quadrupolar ordering, recently found in some compounds of 4f (5f) elements. For the latter case, an additional advantage is demonstrated by calculation of possible displacements of neighboring atoms after the establishment of non-zero quadrupolar order parameter on the central atom.

  7. The analysis of individual Visegrad group members’ agrarian export sensitivity in relation to selected macroeconomic aggregations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Svatoš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the development of agricultural trade of the countries of the Visegrad Group with emphasis on development of the value of agricultural exports of the individual countries. The subject matter of the analysis is the sensitivity of the commodity structure of agricultural exports of individual countries and the identification of aggregations that are the least and the most sensitive to changes to the external and internal economic environment. From the conducted research, agricultural trade in the V4 countries was found to have developed very dynamically from 1993 to 2008, while the commodity structure of exports has constantly narrowed as the degree of specialization of the individual countries has increased (this applies especially to the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary. From the results of analysis of sensitivity to changes of selected variables relating to the development of the value of agricultural exports of the individual V4 countries, it appears that the aggregations that react most sensitively to changes are those that are the subject of re-exports, followed by the aggregations that are characterized by a high degree of added value. In general it can be said that products of agricultural primary production exhibit less sensitivity in comparison with grocery industry products. This is confirmed by the general trend arising from the very nature of consumer behaviour.

  8. Group B strains of human respiratory syncytial virus in Saudi Arabia: molecular and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M

    2014-04-01

    The genetic variability and circulation pattern of human respiratory syncytial virus group B (HRSV-B) strains, identified in Riyadh during the winters of 2008 and 2009, were evaluated by partial sequencing of the attachment (G) protein gene. The second hypervariable region (HVR-2) of G gene was amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced and compared to representatives of different HRSV-B genotypes. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Saudi strains belonged to the genotype BA, which is characterized by 60-nucleotide duplication at HVR-2. Only strains of 2008 were clustered with subgroup BA-IV, while those isolated at 2009 were clustered among the most recent subgroups (particularly BA-X and CB-B). Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated 18 amino acid substitutions in Saudi HRSV-B strains; among which five are specific for individual strains. Furthermore, two potential N-glycosylation sites at residues 230 and 296 were identified for all Saudi strains, and an additional site at amino acid 273 was found only in Riyadh 28/2008 strain. O-glycosylation was predicted in 42-43 sites, where the majority (no = 38) are highly conserved among Saudi strains. The average ratio between non-synonymous and synonymous mutations (ω) implied stabilizing selection pressure on G protein, with evidences of positive selection on certain Saudi strains. This report provides preliminary data on the circulation pattern and molecular characteristics of HRSV-B strains circulating in Saudi Arabia.

  9. Individual patient data meta-analysis shows a significant association between the ATM rs1801516 SNP and toxicity after radiotherapy in 5456 breast and prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Rosenstein, Barry S; Kerns, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several small studies have indicated that the ATM rs1801516 SNP is associated with risk of normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy. However, the findings have not been consistent. In order to test this SNP in a well-powered study, an individual patient data meta-analysis was carried ou...

  10. Meta-analysis of beta radiation augmentation for trabeculectomy - results in distinct ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Issa de Fendi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis on the efficacy of trabeculectomy (TREC followed by beta irradiation (BRT/TREC compared to TREC alone for glaucoma in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP control and adverse effects of treatment in different ethnic groups. METHODS: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT was performed comparing adjunct BRT treatment for glaucoma with standard TREC after 12 months. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cochrane Library databases, Trial registers, bibliographic databases and recent studies of relevant journals were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed relevant reports and the references from these reports were searched for additional trials, using guidelines set by QUOROM statement criteria. RESULTS: Of a total of 1,350 citations, eight studies (five cohorts, three randomized were identified and only 3 RCT were included in this meta-analysis. Higher IOP reductions were verified in the BRT arm compared to the control arm (mean difference=1.68 mmHg, 95% CI= 0.61-2.68, P=0.002. Uncontrolled postoperative IOP (>21 mmHg was less frequent when BRT was used (BRT/ TREC arm compared to the control arm (38/218=17.4% versus 9/239=3.8%; OR=6.7; 95% CI 3.2-14.3, P<0.0001. Although better IOP control was observed in all patients treated with adjuvant BRT, only Black patients displayed a significant difference (P=0.005. There were no significant differences between the BRT and control arms regarding loss of visual acuity, postoperative complications and necessity of cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Adjunct BRT increases the success rate of TREC, with better results in non Caucasian patients, and does not influence the occurrence of postoperative complications.

  11. Analysis of Feed for Digestibility Bali Cow in Group "Simantri" Program in Bali on Different Topographic

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    I Dewa Nyoman Sudita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the availability of feed ingredients, types and diversity as well as the proportion, relation to digestibility, VFA production and N-NH3 for Bali cow holding in the group "Simantri" program  in Bali on the different topography. Retrieving data using the method of observation at 27 group "Simantri", at 3 altitude / topography (lowland, medium and high. Variables measured: feed amount given, type and diversity of feed ingredients and proportions, sampling of feed materials, and take the liquid contents rumen. Sampling feed material to determine the nutrient content and digestibility of the ration, while knowing VFA rumen fluid contents (total and partial and N-NH3.  The results showed the higher the percentage of a natural grass in the lower ration. This condition causes the higher topography and diversity of the types of feed materials more and more.  The proportion of shrub legume Gliricidia leaves of trees, especially in the diet is relatively small (6.6%, while the potential of Gliricidia leaves pretty much at all altitude. Judging from the fulfillment of nutrients, Bali cow rations at all topographic meet the needs/head/day in the range of 6.10 to 8.14 kgDM, protein (CP ± of 750,2g  and energy ± 12 526 kcal ME.  In the test VFA rumen fluid obtained from 71.68 to 85.07 mMol in the category enough, while N-NH3: 5,21-6,11mMol still relatively low .  From this study we can conclude supply of feed for Bali cow in the group "Simantri" program in Bali nutrient content rations have to meet the needs.  The higher the proportion of legume shrub tree (Gliricidia leaves the digestibility, VFA production and N-NH3 getting better.

  12. Scaling in landscape erosion: Renormalization group analysis of a model with infinitely many couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Kakin, P. I.

    2017-02-01

    Applying the standard field theory renormalization group to the model of landscape erosion introduced by Pastor-Satorras and Rothman yields unexpected results: the model is multiplicatively renormalizable only if it involves infinitely many coupling constants (i.e., the corresponding renormalization group equations involve infinitely many β-functions). We show that the one-loop counterterm can nevertheless be expressed in terms of a known function V (h) in the original stochastic equation and its derivatives with respect to the height field h. Its Taylor expansion yields the full infinite set of the one-loop renormalization constants, β-functions, and anomalous dimensions. Instead of a set of fixed points, there arises a two-dimensional surface of fixed points that quite probably contains infrared attractive regions. If that is the case, then the model exhibits scaling behavior in the infrared range. The corresponding critical exponents turn out to be nonuniversal because they depend on the coordinates of the fixed point on the surface, but they satisfy certain universal exact relations.

  13. Numeric analysis of the global stiffness of group purlin-sheeting in lateral steel panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Bertolino Junior

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the behaviour of lateral panels of steel buildings starting from computational modeling using the purlin-sheeting group in the longitudinal contention. The sheeting was fastened on 2nd and 5th waves and also in all waves. The sheeting was fastened in purlin and this system connected in the frame of the building to guarantee the functionality as a rigid panel, action diaphragm. It was also verified the behaviour of lateral panels, with traditional braced system using the same dimensions of the panels diaphragm. The panel was analyzed with dimensions of 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 meters, using the software SAP2000NonLinear. The results showed an increment of 84% related to the system traditional braced.

  14. Optimal Coordinated Strategy Analysis for the Procurement Logistics of a Steel Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianbo Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the optimization of an internal coordinated procurement logistics system in a steel group and the decision on the coordinated procurement strategy by minimizing the logistics costs. Considering the coordinated procurement strategy and the procurement logistics costs, the aim of the optimization model was to maximize the degree of quality satisfaction and to minimize the procurement logistics costs. The model was transformed into a single-objective model and solved using a simulated annealing algorithm. In the algorithm, the supplier of each subsidiary was selected according to the evaluation result for independent procurement. Finally, the effect of different parameters on the coordinated procurement strategy was analysed. The results showed that the coordinated strategy can clearly save procurement costs; that the strategy appears to be more cooperative when the quality requirement is not stricter; and that the coordinated costs have a strong effect on the coordinated procurement strategy.

  15. Performance analysis of a concatenated erbium-doped fiber amplifier supporting four mode groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zujun; Fan, Di; Zhang, Wentao; Xiong, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) supporting four mode groups has been theoretically designed by concatenating two sections of erbium-doped fibers (EDFs). Each EDF has a simple erbium doping profile for the purpose of reducing its fabrication complexity. We propose a modified genetic algorithm (GA) to provide detailed investigations on the concatenated amplifier. Both the optimal fiber length and erbium doping radius in each EDF have been found to minimize the gain difference between signal modes. Results show that the parameters of the central-doped EDF have a greater impact on the amplifier performance compared to those of the annular-doped one. We then investigate the influence of the small deviations of the erbium fiber length, doping radius and doping concentration of each EDF from their optimal values upon the amplifier performance, and discuss their design tolerances in obtaining a desirable amplification characteristics.

  16. A renormalisation group analysis of 2d freely decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P

    1996-01-01

    We study two dimensional freely decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We investigate the time evolution of the probability law of the gauge field and the stream function. Assuming that this probability law is initially defined by a statistical field theory in the basin of attraction of a renormalisation group fixed point, we show that its time evolution is generated by renormalisation transformations. In the long time regime, the probability law is described by non-unitary conformal field theories. In that case, we prove that the kinetic and magnetic energy spectra are proportional. We then construct a family of fixed points using the (p,p+2) non-unitary minimal models of conformal field theories.

  17. Invariant Inhomogeneous Bianchi Type-I Cosmological Models with Electromagnetic Fields Using Lie Group Analysis in Lyra Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad T. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We find a new class of invariant inhomogeneous Bianchi type-I cosmological models in electromagnetic field with variable magnetic permeability. For this, Lie group analysis method is used to identify the generators that leave the given system of nonlinear partial differential equations (NLPDEs (Einstein field equations invariant. With the help of canonical variables associated with these generators, the assigned system of PDEs is reduced to ordinary differential equations (ODEs whose simple solutions provide nontrivial solutions of the original system. A new class of exact (invariant-similarity solutions have been obtained by considering the potentials of metric and displacement field as functions of coordinates x and t. We have assumed that F12 is only nonvanishing component of electromagnetic field tensor Fij. The Maxwell equations show that F12 is the function of x alone whereas the magnetic permeability μ¯ is the function of x and t both. The physical behavior of the obtained model is discussed.

  18. Single-Cell Analysis and Next-Generation Immuno-Sequencing Show That Multiple Clones Persist in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH gene rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL provides a unique molecular signature; however, we demonstrate that 26/198 CLL patients (13% had more than one IGH rearrangement, indicating the power of molecular technology over phenotypic analysis. Single-cell PCR analysis and next-generation immuno-sequencing identified IGH-defined clones. In 23% (18/79 of cases whose clones carried unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV genes (U-CLL, IGH rearrangements were bialleic with one productive (P and one non-productive (NP allele. Two U-CLL were biclonal, each clone being monoallelic (P. In 119 IGHV-mutated (M-CLL cases, one had biallelic rearrangements in their CLL (P/NP and five had 2-4 distinct clones. Allelic exclusion was maintained in all B-clones analyzed. Based on single-cell PCR analysis, 5/11 partner clones (45% reached levels of >5x10(9 cells/L, suggesting second CLL clones. Partner clones persisted over years. Conventional IGH characterization and next-generation sequencing of 13 CLL, 3 multiple myeloma, 2 Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and 3 age-matched healthy donors consistently identified the same rearranged IGH sequences. Most multiple clones occurred in M-CLL, perhaps indicative of weak clonal dominance, thereby associating with a good prognosis. In contrast, biallelic CLL occurred primarily in U-CLL thus being associated with poor prognosis. Extending beyond intra-clonal diversity, molecular analysis of clonal evolution and apparent subclones in CLL may also reflect inter-clonal diversity.

  19. The Constitution of Outdoor Education Groups: An Analysis of the Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Groups are ubiquitous in outdoor education and while there is a lot of literature on groups, there is limited examination of the assumptions made about groups and the effects these assumptions have on the practices of outdoor education. I utilise some of Michel Foucault's (1992) tools to investigate literature on outdoor education groups.…

  20. The Constitution of Outdoor Education Groups: An Analysis of the Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Groups are ubiquitous in outdoor education and while there is a lot of literature on groups, there is limited examination of the assumptions made about groups and the effects these assumptions have on the practices of outdoor education. I utilise some of Michel Foucault's (1992) tools to investigate literature on outdoor education groups.…