WorldWideScience

Sample records for groundwater pumping case

  1. Potential uses of pumped urban groundwater: a case study in Sant Adrià del Besòs (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Anna; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Pujades, Estanislao

    2017-09-01

    Urban groundwater has often been over-exploited for industrial uses. Now, this usage tends to be reduced or the resource abandoned due to pollution and/or changes in land use. The use and the subsequent disuse of groundwater has resulted in rising water tables that damage underground structures (e.g., building basements and underground car parks and tunnels), leading to the need for additional pumping in urban areas. In the case of the underground parking lot of Sant Adrià del Besòs (Barcelona, NE Spain), large amounts of urban groundwater are pumped to avoid seepage problems. Can this pumped groundwater be used for other purposes (e.g., drinking water and urban irrigation) instead of wasting this valuable resource? To answer this question, it was necessary to quantify the groundwater recharge and to assess the evolution of groundwater quality. The limiting factor at this study site is the groundwater quality because ammonium and some metals (iron and manganese) are present at high concentrations. Hence, further treatment would be needed to meet drinking water requirements. The pumped groundwater could also be used for supplementing river flow for ecological benefit and/or for mitigating seawater intrusion problems. Currently, only a small amount of this urban groundwater is used for cleaning public areas and watering public gardens. This situation highlighted the urgent need to manage this resource in a responsible and more efficient manner, especially in moments of high water demand such as drought periods.

  2. Reconciling Groundwater Storage Depletion Due to Pumping with Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annukka Lipponen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater pumping causes depletion of groundwater storage. The rate of depletion incurred by any new well is gradually decreasing and eventually becomes zero in the long run, after induced recharge and reduction of natural discharge of groundwater combined (capture have become large enough to balance the pumping rate completely. If aquifer-wide aggregated pumping rates are comparatively large, then such a new dynamic equilibrium may not be reached and groundwater storage may become exhausted. Decisions to pump groundwater are motivated by people’s need for domestic water and by expected benefits of using water for a variety of activities. But how much finally is abstracted from an aquifer (or is considered to be an optimal aggregate abstraction rate depends on a wide range of other factors as well. Among these, the constraint imposed by the groundwater balance (preventing aquifer exhaustion has received ample attention in the professional literature. However, other constraints or considerations related to changes in groundwater level due to pumping are observed as well and in many cases they even may dominate the decisions on pumping. This paper reviews such constraints or considerations, examines how they are or may be incorporated in the decision-making process, and evaluates to what extent the resulting pumping rates and patterns create conditions that comply with principles of sustainability.

  3. Numerical simulation of seasonal groundwater pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonova, Elena; Baldenkov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Increasing scarcity and contamination of water recourses require innovative water management strategies such as combined water system. The combined water system is a complex technology comprising two separate wells, major catchment-zone well and compensation pumping well, located inside a single stream basin. The major well is supplied by the well's catchment zone or surface flow, thus depleting the stream flow. The pumping rate of a major well is determined by the difference between the current stream flow and the minimum permissible stream flow. The deficiency of the stream flow in dry seasons can be compensated for by the short-term pumping of groundwater. The compensation pumping rate is determined by the difference between water demand and the permissible water withdrawal of the major well. The source for the compensation well is the aquifer storage. The estimation of streamflow depletion caused by compensation pumping is major question to evaluate the efficiency of the combined water system. Short-term groundwater pumping can use aquifer storage instead of catchment-zone water until the drawdown reaches the edge of the stream. Traditionally pumping simulation calculates in two-step procedure. Natural conditions, an aquifer system is in an approximate dynamic equilibrium, describe by steady-state model. A steady-state solution provides an initial heads, a set of flows through boundaries, and used as initial state for transient solutions, when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions estimates the capture and the streamflow depletion. Numerical modeling of cyclical compensation pumping has special features: the periodic solution, the seasonal changes through the boundaries and the importance even small drawdown of stream level. When seasonality is a modeling feature, traditional approach leads to mistaken values of

  4. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  5. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  6. A Numerical Study on System Performance of Groundwater Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Sang Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater heat pumps have energy saving potential where the groundwater resources are sufficient. System Coefficients of Performance (COPs are measurements of performance of groundwater heat pump systems. In this study, the head and power of submersible pumps, heat pump units, piping, and heat exchangers are expressed as polynomial equations, and these equations are solved numerically to determine the system performance. Regression analysis is used to find the coefficients of the polynomial equations from a catalog of performance data. The cooling and heating capacities of water-to-water heat pumps are determined using Energy Plus. Results show that system performance drops as the water level drops, and the lowest flow rates generally achieve the highest system performance. The system COPs are used to compare the system performance of various system configurations. The groundwater pumping level and temperature provide the greatest effects on the system performance of groundwater heat pumps along with the submersible pumps and heat exchangers. The effects of groundwater pumping levels, groundwater temperatures, and the heat transfer coefficient in heat exchanger on the system performance are given and compared. This analysis needs to be included in the design process of groundwater heat pump systems, possibly with analysis tools that include a wide range of performance data.

  7. Impacts of Groundwater Pumping on Regional and Global Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide

    2016-01-01

    Except frozen water in ice and glaciers (68%), groundwater is the world's largest distributed store of freshwater (30%), and has strategic importance to global food and water security. In this chapter, the most recent advances assessing human impact on regional and global groundwater resources are reviewed. This chapter critically evaluates the recently advanced modeling approaches quantifying the effect of groundwater pumping in regional and global groundwater resources and the evidence of feedback to the Earth system including sea-level rise associated with groundwater use. At last, critical challenges and opportunities are identified in the use of groundwater to adapt to growing food demand and uncertain climate.

  8. Megacity pumping and preferential flow threaten groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahfuzur R.; Koneshloo, Mohammad; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Ahmed, Kazi M.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Mozumder, Rajib H.; Zahid, Anwar; Harvey, Charles F.; van Geen, Alexander; Michael, Holly A.

    2016-09-01

    Many of the world's megacities depend on groundwater from geologically complex aquifers that are over-exploited and threatened by contamination. Here, using the example of Dhaka, Bangladesh, we illustrate how interactions between aquifer heterogeneity and groundwater exploitation jeopardize groundwater resources regionally. Groundwater pumping in Dhaka has caused large-scale drawdown that extends into outlying areas where arsenic-contaminated shallow groundwater is pervasive and has potential to migrate downward. We evaluate the vulnerability of deep, low-arsenic groundwater with groundwater models that incorporate geostatistical simulations of aquifer heterogeneity. Simulations show that preferential flow through stratigraphy typical of fluvio-deltaic aquifers could contaminate deep (>150 m) groundwater within a decade, nearly a century faster than predicted through homogeneous models calibrated to the same data. The most critical fast flowpaths cannot be predicted by simplified models or identified by standard measurements. Such complex vulnerability beyond city limits could become a limiting factor for megacity groundwater supplies in aquifers worldwide.

  9. Development of dual-source hybrid heat pump system using groundwater and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Yujin; Ooka, Ryozo [Cw403 Institute of Industry Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Shiba, Yoshiro [Zeneral Heatpump Industry Co., Ltd., Nagoya 459-8001 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    To achieve high heat pump efficiency, groundwater heat pump (GWHP) system uses groundwater, which is relatively stable AT temperature compared with outdoor air, as a heat source. However, it is difficult to meet annual heating and cooling loads using only groundwater as a heat source. In order to optimize the operation method of GWHP systems, it is necessary to develop a system utilizing both groundwater and air sources according to the building load conditions. Furthermore, during intermediate seasons (such as spring and autumn) with reduced heating and cooling loads, GWHP system is less efficient than air source heat pump (ASHP) system according to temperature conditions. In order to more efficiently use GWHP systems, it is necessary to develop a system which utilizes both groundwater and air sources according to temperature conditions and building loads. This research has developed a GWHP system that employs a hybrid heat pump system with groundwater wells using dual groundwater and air heat sources. In this paper, the annual performance of the developed system has been calculated, and several case studies have been conducted on the effect of introduction location, refrigerant and pumping rate. Furthermore, the coefficient of system performance and the effects on underground environments have been evaluated by real-scale experiment using two wells. (author)

  10. Separating Pumping and Other Influences on Groundwater Head Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapoori, V.; Western, A. W.; Peterson, T. J.; Costelloe, J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of unconfined groundwater levels are usually the result of numerous and interacting factors, such as land cover change, climate variability and groundwater pumping. Estimating the impact from pumping is highly significant for resource management but also very challenging. A variety of methods are used to model water-table dynamics influenced by pumping, ranging from spatially explicit, numerical models to stochastic approaches. Transfer function noise (TFN) modelling can be used to model the dynamic behaviour of a wide range of hydrologic variables, including time series of groundwater head. Recently, TFN models have been developed to better link water table dynamics with different types of individual stresses, including pumping (Von Asmuth et al. 2002). Peterson & Western (2011) advanced the transfer function noise model of Von Asmuth et al. (2002) to account for non-linear hydrological processes by inclusion of a parsimonious vertically lumped soil moisture storage(SMS). Shapoori et al. (2011) proposed an improved time series formulation for estimation of the impacts of pumping. That study undertook a synthetic assessment of the ability of a range of time series models to represent the impacts of pumping by applying them to groundwater head time series from a synthetic aquifer. This paper further expands the Shapoori at al. (2011) time series method for quantifying the impact of groundwater pumping within unconfined sedimentary aquifers by applying it to real data and by taking account of a surface water body. The study area is the Clydebank groundwater subregion located in Victoria Australia. Nine salinity control pumping bores are used in some of the worst salinity areas to lower the groundwater table and consequently reduce soil salinity. The method has been applied to 43 observation bores and the results show that the model has good predictive performance with mean and minimum coefficient efficiency values of 0.7 and 0.5 respectively. In addition

  11. Groundwater pumping effects on contaminant loading management in agricultural regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Kyu; Bae, Gwang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2014-06-15

    Groundwater pumping changes the behavior of subsurface water, including the location of the water table and characteristics of the flow system, and eventually affects the fate of contaminants, such as nitrate from agricultural fertilizers. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the importance of considering the existing pumping conditions for contaminant loading management and to develop a management model to obtain a contaminant loading design more appropriate and practical for agricultural regions where groundwater pumping is common. Results from this study found that optimal designs for contaminant loading could be determined differently when the existing pumping conditions were considered. This study also showed that prediction of contamination and contaminant loading management without considering pumping activities might be unrealistic. Motivated by these results, a management model optimizing the permissible on-ground contaminant loading mass together with pumping rates was developed and applied to field investigation and monitoring data from Icheon, Korea. The analytical solution for 1-D unsaturated solute transport was integrated with the 3-D saturated solute transport model in order to approximate the fate of contaminants loaded periodically from on-ground sources. This model was further expanded to manage agricultural contaminant loading in regions where groundwater extraction tends to be concentrated in a specific period of time, such as during the rice-growing season, using a method that approximates contaminant leaching to a fluctuating water table. The results illustrated that the simultaneous management of groundwater quantity and quality was effective and appropriate to the agricultural contaminant loading management and the model developed in this study, which can consider time-variant pumping, could be used to accurately estimate and to reasonably manage contaminant loading in agricultural areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Influence of groundwater pumping on streamflow restoration following upstream dam removal

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    Constantz, J.; Essaid, H.

    2007-01-01

    We compared streamflow in basins under the combined impacts of an upland dam and groundwater pumping withdrawals, by examining streamflow in the presence and absence of each impact. As a qualitative analysis, inter-watersbed streamflow comparisons were performed for several rivers flowing into the east side of the Central Valley, CA. Results suggest that, in the absence of upland dams supporting large reservoirs, some reaches of these rivers might develop ephemeral streamflow in late summer. As a quantitative analysis, we conducted a series of streamflow/ groundwater simulations (using MODFLOW-2000 plus the streamflow routing package, SFR1) for a representative hypothetical watershed, with an upland dam and groundwater pumping in the downstream basin, under humid, semi-arid, and and conditions. As a result of including the impact of groundwater pumping, post-dam removal simulated streamflow was significantly less than natural streamflow. The model predicts extensive ephemeral conditions in the basin during September for both the arid and semi-arid cases. The model predicts continued perennial conditions in the humid case, but spatially weighted, average streamflow of only 71% of natural September streamflow, as a result of continued pumping after dam removal.

  13. Low-cost water-lifting from groundwater sources: a comparison of the EMAS Pump with the Rope Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCarthy, Michael F.; Carpenter, Jacob D.; Mihelcic, James R.

    2017-08-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, low-cost groundwater supply systems offer great opportunities for the current unserved population of >300 million to access drinking water. A comparative study was performed in Uganda of the EMAS Pump (designed by Escuela Móvil Aguas y Saneamiento Básico) with the trade-named Rope Pump, two low-cost manual water-lifting devices appropriate to pumping from shallow groundwater sources. Pumping rates, energy expended, material costs, and construction requirements were analyzed. Focus was on low-cost application for use in shallow groundwater systems at the household level in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The study site was northern Uganda, with testing performed at several drilled boreholes. Two variants of each pump were tested by a male and female user, pumping from multiple static water-level depths ranging from 5 to 28 m. Results demonstrated the most common version of the EMAS Pump to perform similarly to the comparable version of the Rope Pump in terms of average pumping rate at depth range 5 to 18 m (93-111%), but less so at deeper depths (63-85%). Normalized pumping rates (considering energy expended) accentuated differences between these versions of the EMAS Pump and Rope Pump (47-97%). Cost of materials to construct the EMAS Pump were 21-60% those of the Rope Pump, and EMAS Pump construction requirements were also less. Based on the assessed factors, it is concluded that the EMAS Pump has potential for success in "self-supply" groundwater systems in sub-Saharan Africa and is particularly appropriate to link with low-cost shallow groundwater sources.

  14. A city scale study on the effects of intensive groundwater heat pump systems on heavy metal contents in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Garrido, Eduardo; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Lázaro, Jesús Mateo; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; Huggenberger, P; Calvo, Miguel Ángel Marazuela

    2016-12-01

    As a result of the increasing use of shallow geothermal resources, hydraulic, thermal and chemical impacts affecting groundwater quality can be observed with ever increasing frequency (Possemiers et al., 2014). To overcome the uncertainty associated with chemical impacts, a city scale study on the effects of intensive geothermal resource use by groundwater heat pump systems on groundwater quality, with special emphasis on heavy metal contents was performed. Statistical analysis of geochemical data obtained from several field campaigns has allowed studying the spatiotemporal relationship between temperature anomalies in the aquifer and trace element composition of groundwater. The relationship between temperature and the concentrations of trace elements resulted in weak correlations, indicating that temperature changes are not the driving factor in enhancing heavy metal contaminations. Regression models established for these correlations showed a very low reactivity or response of heavy metal contents to temperature changes. The change rates of heavy metal contents with respect to temperature changes obtained indicate a low risk of exceeding quality threshold values by means of the exploitation regimes used, neither producing nor enhancing contamination significantly. However, modification of pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity correlated with the concentrations of heavy metals. In this case, the change rates of heavy metal contents are higher, with a greater risk of exceeding threshold values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors governing sustainable groundwater pumping near a river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Hubbard, S.S.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this paper is to provide new insights into processes affecting riverbank filtration (RBF). We consider a system with an inflatable dam installed for enhancing water production from downstream collector wells. Using a numerical model, we investigate the impact of groundwater pumping and dam operation on the hydrodynamics in the aquifer and water production. We focus our study on two processes that potentially limit water production of an RBF system: the development of an unsaturated zone and riverbed clogging. We quantify river clogging by calibrating a time-dependent riverbed permeability function based on knowledge of pumping rate, river stage, and temperature. The dynamics of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1) riverbed permeability is the dominant factor affecting infiltration needed for sustainable RBF production; (2) dam operation can influence pumping efficiency and prevent the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed only under conditions of sufficient riverbed permeability; (3) slow river velocity, caused by dam raising during summer months, may lead to sedimentation and deposition of fine-grained material within the riverbed, which may clog the riverbed, limiting recharge to the collector wells and contributing to the development of an unsaturated zone beneath the riverbed; and (4) higher river flow velocities, caused by dam lowering during winter storms, scour the riverbed an thus increase its permeability. These insights can be used as the basis for developing sustainable water management of a RBF system.

  16. Application of Integral Pumping Tests to estimate the influence of losing streams on groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Urban streams receive effluents of wastewater treatment plants and untreated wastewater during combined sewer overflow events. In the case of losing streams substances, which originate from wastewater, can reach the groundwater and deteriorate its quality. The estimation of mass flow rates Mex from losing streams to the groundwater is important to support groundwater management strategies, but is a challenging task. Variable inflow of wastewater with time-dependent concentrations of wastewater constituents causes a variable water composition in urban streams. Heterogeneities in the structure of the streambed and the connected aquifer lead, in combination with this variable water composition, to heterogeneous concentration patterns of wastewater constituents in the vicinity of urban streams. Groundwater investigation methods based on conventional point sampling may yield unreliable results under these conditions. Integral Pumping Tests (IPT) can overcome the problem of heterogeneous concentrations in an aquifer by increasing the sampled volume. Long-time pumping (several days) and simultaneous sampling yields reliable average concentrations Cav and mass flow rates Mcp for virtual control planes perpendicular to the natural flow direction. We applied the IPT method in order to estimate Mex of a stream section in Leipzig (Germany). The investigated stream is strongly influenced by combined sewer overflow events. Four pumping wells were installed up- and downstream of the stream section and operated for a period of five days. The study was focused on four inorganic (potassium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate) and two organic (caffeine and technical-nonylphenol) wastewater constituents with different transport properties. The obtained concentration-time series were used in combination with a numerical flow model to estimate Mcp of the respective wells. The difference of the Mcp's between up- and downstream wells yields Mex of wastewater constituents that increase

  17. Water Follies: Groundwater Pumping and the Fate of America's Fresh Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R.

    2002-12-01

    The next time you open a bottle of spring water, consider that it may have come from a well that is drying up a blue-ribbon trout stream. The next time you super-size a meal at McDonald's, note that the fries are all the same length. That's because the potato farmers irrigate their fields with groundwater from wells, some adjacent to nearby rivers. The next time you purchase gold jewelry, consider that it may have come from a mine that has pumped so much groundwater to de-water the gold-bearing rock that 60 to100 years will pass before the water table recovers. The next time you water your suburban lawn, pause to reflect on what that's doing to the nearby wetland. And the next time you visit Las Vegas and flip on the light in your hotel room, consider that the electricity may have been generated by a coal-fired power plant supplied by a slurry pipeline that uses groundwater critical to springs sacred to the Hopi people. These and countless other seemingly innocuous activities reflect our individual and societal dependence on groundwater that is hydrologically connected to surface water. Hydrologists understand that ground and surface water are interconnected, but frequently the legal rules governing water distinguish between ground and surface water. This has led to groundwater pumping that has dried up many rivers, particularly in the arid West. In Arizona, many once verdant streams have become desiccated sandboxes as city, mines, and farms pumped groundwater to such an extent that surface flows were totally depleted. The problem of the impact of groundwater pumping on the environment, however, is not confined to the arid West. It is an enormous national, indeed international problem. This presentation will focus on the United States and illustrate with examples from around the country the array of environmental problems caused by excessive groundwater pumping. The locations of these case studies range from Maine to California, from Minnesota to Florida, and from

  18. Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; MacEwan, Duncan; Howitt, Richard E.; Koruakos, George; Dogrul, Emin C.; Brush, Charles F.; Kadir, Tariq N.; Harter, Thomas; Melton, Forrest; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-09-01

    As in many places, groundwater in California (USA) is the major alternative water source for agriculture during drought, so groundwater's availability will drive some inevitable changes in the state's water management. Currently, agricultural, environmental, and urban uses compete for groundwater, resulting in substantial overdraft in dry years with lowering of water tables, which in turn increases pumping costs and reduces groundwater pumping capacity. In this study, SWAP (an economic model of agricultural production and water use in California) and C2VISim (the California Department of Water Resources groundwater model for California's Central Valley) are connected. This paper examines the economic costs of pumping replacement groundwater during drought and the potential loss of pumping capacity as groundwater levels drop. A scenario of three additional drought years continuing from 2014 show lower water tables in California's Central Valley and loss of pumping capacity. Places without access to groundwater and with uncertain surface-water deliveries during drought are the most economically vulnerable in terms of crop revenues, employment and household income. This is particularly true for Tulare Lake Basin, which relies heavily on water imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Remote-sensing estimates of idle agricultural land between 2012 and 2014 confirm this finding. Results also point to the potential of a portfolio approach for agriculture, in which crop mixing and conservation practices have substantial roles.

  19. Effects of upstream dams versus groundwater pumping on stream temperature under varying climate conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John C. Risley; Jim Constantz; Hedeff Essaid; Stewart Rounds

    2010-01-01

      The relative impact of a large upstream dam versus in-reach groundwater pumping on stream temperatures was analyzed for humid, semiarid, and arid conditions with long dry seasons to represent typical...

  20. Geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems in an urban alluvial aquifer with evaporitic bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido Schneider, Eduardo A. [Geological Survey of Spain (IGME), C/ Manuel Lasala no. 44, 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain); García-Gil, Alejandro, E-mail: agargil@unizar.es [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18–26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Vázquez-Suñè, Enric [GHS, Institute of Environmental Assessment & Water Research (IDAEA), CSIC, Jordi Girona 18–26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Sánchez-Navarro, José Á. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    In the last decade, there has been an extensive use of shallow geothermal exploitations in urban environments. Although the thermal interference between exploitations has been recently studied, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the geochemical impacts of those systems on the aquifers where they are installed. Groundwater flow line scale and well-doublet scale research work has been conducted at city scale to quantify the geochemical interaction of shallow geothermal exploitations with the environment. A comprehensive analysis was conducted on data obtained from a monitoring network specifically designed to control and develop aquifer policies related to thermal management of the aquifer. The geochemical impacts were evaluated from a thermodynamic point of view by means of saturation index (SI) calculations with respect to the different mineral species considered in the system. The results obtained indicate limited geochemical interaction with the urban environment in most of the situations. However, there are some cases where the interaction of the groundwater heat pump installations with the evaporitic bedrock resulted in the total disablement of the exploitation system operation wells. The application of the tool proposed proved to be pragmatic in the evaluation of geochemical impacts. Injection of water into the aquifer can trigger an important bedrock gypsum and halite dissolution process that is partly responsible for scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain in the vicinity of injection wells. - Highlights: • We studied geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems. • We have sampled a monitoring network in an energetically exploited urban aquifer. • A limited geochemical interaction has been found in most of the exploitations. • Reinjection into the aquifer produces an important bedrock gypsum dissolution. • Scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain have been observed.

  1. Impact of groundwater pumping vs. a large upstream dam on streamflows and temperature under varying climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, J. C.; Constantz, J. E.; Essaid, H.; Rounds, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The relative impact of in-reach groundwater pumping versus a large upstream dam on streamflows and stream temperature was analyzed for humid, semiarid, and arid conditions with long dry seasons representing typical climate conditions where large dams are present, such as the western US or eastern Australia. A MODFLOW-2000 model, with the SFR1 stream-aquifer interaction module, the streamflow-routing package, and the grid-block rewetting option, was constructed to simulate monthly streamflows for 12 watershed scenarios described below. For each scenario streamflow output became input into a stream temperature simulation model. Stream temperatures were simulated using the CE-QUAL-W2 water quality model over a 110 km model grid, with the presence/absence of a dam at the top of the reach and pumping in the lower 60 km of the reach. Measured meteorological data from three representative locations in Oregon and California were used as model input to simulate the impact of varying climate conditions on streamflows and stream temperature. For each climate condition four hypothetical watershed scenarios were modeled: (1) natural [no dam or pumping], (2) large upstream dam present, (3) dam with in-reach pumping, and (4) no dam with pumping continued, resulting in 12 cases. Dam removal, in the presence or absence of pumping, created significant changes in streamflow resulting in significant changes in stream temperature throughout the year for all three climate conditions. From March to August, the presence of a dam caused monthly-mean stream temperatures to decrease on average by approximately 3.0, 2.5, and 2.0 oC for the humid, semiarid, and arid conditions, respectively; however, stream temperatures generally increased from September to February. Pumping caused stream temperatures to warm in summer and cool in winter by generally less than 0.5 oC. Though the impact of a large dam led to greater changes in stream temperature than the impact of pumping, ephemeral conditions

  2. Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2001-11-05

    The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

  3. Effects of Dual-Pump Recovery on Crude-Oil Contamination of Groundwater, Bemidji, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, G. N.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Lounsbury, S.

    2009-12-01

    In 1979 a crude-oil pipeline ruptured near Bemidji, Minnesota spilling about 1.7 million liters of crude oil onto a glacial-outwash deposit. Initial remediation efforts in 1979-80 removed about 75% of this oil. In 1983 the U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions began research to study the fate and transport of the petroleum hydrocarbons in the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In 1998 the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) requested that the pipeline company remove as much of the remaining oil as possible. A dual-pump recovery system was installed using five wells to remove the free-phase oil. Each well had an oil skimming pump as well as a deeper pump in the groundwater, which was used to create a cone of depression in the water table near the well. The oil/water mixture from the skimming pump was pumped to a treatment facility where the oil was separated for later removal from the site. Pumped wastewater was injected into an upgradient infiltration gallery. Despite large public and private expenditures on development and implementation of this type of remediation system, few well-documented field-scale case studies have been published. The renewed remediation presented an opportunity to document how the dissolution, biodegradation, vapor transport, and other processes changed as the site transitioned from natural attenuation to a condition of pump-and-treat remediation and back again following termination of the remediation. Impacts of the remediation were evaluated in part using measurements of oil thicknesses in wells, dissolved-oxygen concentrations in groundwater, and concentrations of methane and other gases in the unsaturated zone. The remediation from 1999 - 2004 resulted in removal of about 114,000 liters of crude oil from the site, or about 27% of the total that remained following the initial remediation in 1979-80. Although the renewed remediation decreased oil thicknesses in the immediate vicinity of remediation

  4. Geochemical impacts of groundwater heat pump systems in an urban alluvial aquifer with evaporitic bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Schneider, Eduardo A; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñè, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Á

    2016-02-15

    In the last decade, there has been an extensive use of shallow geothermal exploitations in urban environments. Although the thermal interference between exploitations has been recently studied, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the geochemical impacts of those systems on the aquifers where they are installed. Groundwater flow line scale and well-doublet scale research work has been conducted at city scale to quantify the geochemical interaction of shallow geothermal exploitations with the environment. A comprehensive analysis was conducted on data obtained from a monitoring network specifically designed to control and develop aquifer policies related to thermal management of the aquifer. The geochemical impacts were evaluated from a thermodynamic point of view by means of saturation index (SI) calculations with respect to the different mineral species considered in the system. The results obtained indicate limited geochemical interaction with the urban environment in most of the situations. However, there are some cases where the interaction of the groundwater heat pump installations with the evaporitic bedrock resulted in the total disablement of the exploitation system operation wells. The application of the tool proposed proved to be pragmatic in the evaluation of geochemical impacts. Injection of water into the aquifer can trigger an important bedrock gypsum and halite dissolution process that is partly responsible for scaling in well casing pipes and collapse of the terrain in the vicinity of injection wells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Groundwater Flow near a Partially Penetrating River under Riverside Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bingchen; ZHENG Xilai; QIAN Hui; LIN Guoqing; XU Qiant

    2004-01-01

    According to practical geological and hydrogeological conditions of riverside water-supply well fields in northwestern China, an ideal hydrogeological model has been generalized and a three-dimensional mathematical model has been set up. A finite difference method was applied to simulating groundwater flow near a partially penetrating river under riverside pumping, and to analyzing the effects of river width, partial penetration and permeability of riverbed sediments on groundwater recharges. Results show that riverside pumping may cause groundwater to flow beneath the partially penetrating river, and that river width, penetration and riverbed permeability obviously influence flows from the partially penetrating river and constant-head boundaries. However, the pumping output is mainly from the partially penetrating river.

  6. Considering groundwater use to improve the assessment of groundwater pumping for irrigation in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuel, Sylvain; Amichi, Farida; Ameur, Fatah; Calvez, Roger; Jenhaoui, Zakia; Bouarfa, Sami; Kuper, Marcel; Habaieb, Hamadi; Hartani, Tarik; Hammani, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater resources in semi-arid areas and especially in the Mediterranean face a growing demand for irrigated agriculture and, to a lesser extent, for domestic uses. Consequently, groundwater reserves are affected and water-table drops are widely observed. This leads to strong constraints on groundwater access for farmers, while managers worry about the future evolution of the water resources. A common problem for building proper groundwater management plans is the difficulty in assessing individual groundwater withdrawals at regional scale. Predicting future trends of these groundwater withdrawals is even more challenging. The basic question is how to assess the water budget variables and their evolution when they are deeply linked to human activities, themselves driven by countless factors (access to natural resources, public policies, market, etc.). This study provides some possible answers by focusing on the assessment of groundwater withdrawals for irrigated agriculture at three sites in North Africa (Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria). Efforts were made to understand the different features that influence irrigation practices, and an adaptive user-oriented methodology was used to monitor groundwater withdrawals. For each site, different key factors affecting the regional groundwater abstraction and its past evolution were identified by involving farmers' knowledge. Factors such as farmer access to land and groundwater or development of public infrastructures (electrical distribution network) are crucial to decode the results of well inventories and assess the regional groundwater abstraction and its future trend. This leads one to look with caution at the number of wells cited in the literature, which could be oversimplified.

  7. Considering groundwater use to improve the assessment of groundwater pumping for irrigation in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuel, Sylvain; Amichi, Farida; Ameur, Fatah; Calvez, Roger; Jenhaoui, Zakia; Bouarfa, Sami; Kuper, Marcel; Habaieb, Hamadi; Hartani, Tarik; Hammani, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Groundwater resources in semi-arid areas and especially in the Mediterranean face a growing demand for irrigated agriculture and, to a lesser extent, for domestic uses. Consequently, groundwater reserves are affected and water-table drops are widely observed. This leads to strong constraints on groundwater access for farmers, while managers worry about the future evolution of the water resources. A common problem for building proper groundwater management plans is the difficulty in assessing individual groundwater withdrawals at regional scale. Predicting future trends of these groundwater withdrawals is even more challenging. The basic question is how to assess the water budget variables and their evolution when they are deeply linked to human activities, themselves driven by countless factors (access to natural resources, public policies, market, etc.). This study provides some possible answers by focusing on the assessment of groundwater withdrawals for irrigated agriculture at three sites in North Africa (Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria). Efforts were made to understand the different features that influence irrigation practices, and an adaptive user-oriented methodology was used to monitor groundwater withdrawals. For each site, different key factors affecting the regional groundwater abstraction and its past evolution were identified by involving farmers' knowledge. Factors such as farmer access to land and groundwater or development of public infrastructures (electrical distribution network) are crucial to decode the results of well inventories and assess the regional groundwater abstraction and its future trend. This leads one to look with caution at the number of wells cited in the literature, which could be oversimplified.

  8. Effects of Large Dam Removal and Groundwater Pumping on Stream Temperature under Humid, Semiarid, and Arid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, J. C.; Constantz, J. E.; Essaid, H.; Rounds, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of large upstream dam removal and in-reach groundwater pumping on streamflows and stream temperature was analyzed for humid, semiarid, and arid conditions with long dry seasons representing typical climate conditions where large dams are present, such as the western US or eastern Australia. A MODFLOW-2000 model, with options for stream-aquifer interaction and grid-block rewetting, was constructed to simulate monthly streamflows for 12 watershed scenarios described below. For each scenario, streamflow output became input into a stream temperature simulation model. Stream temperatures were simulated using the CE-QUAL-W2 water quality model over a 110 km model grid, with the presence and removal of a dam at the top of the reach and pumping in the lower 60 km of the reach. Measured meteorological data from three locations in Oregon and California representing the three meterologic conditions were used as model input to simulate the impact of varying climate conditions on streamflows and stream temperature. For each climate condition, four hypothetical watershed scenarios were modeled: (1) natural (no dam or pumping), (2) large upstream dam present, (3) dam with in-reach pumping, and (4) no dam with pumping continued, resulting in 12 cases. Dam removal, in the presence or absence of pumping, created significant changes in streamflow characteristics, resulting in significant changes in stream temperature throughout the year for all three climate conditions. From March to August, the presence of a dam caused monthly mean stream temperatures to decrease on average by approximately 3.0°C, 2.5°C, and 2.0°C for the humid, semiarid, and arid conditions, respectively; however, stream temperatures generally increased from September to February. Pumping caused stream temperatures to warm in summer and cool in winter by generally less than 0.5°C. Though dam removal led to greater changes in stream temperature than pumping, ephemeral conditions were increased both

  9. The thermal consequences of river-level variations in an urban groundwater body highly affected by groundwater heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñe, Enric; Schneider, Eduardo Garrido; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo-Lázaro, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    The extensive implementation of ground source heat pumps in urban aquifers is an important issue related to groundwater quality and the future economic feasibility of existent geothermal installations. Although many cities are in the immediate vicinity of large rivers, little is known about the thermal river-groundwater interaction at a kilometric-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the thermal impact of river water recharges induced by flood events into an urban alluvial aquifer anthropogenically influenced by geothermal exploitations. The present thermal state of an urban aquifer at a regional scale, including 27 groundwater heat pump installations, has been evaluated. The thermal impacts of these installations in the aquifer together with the thermal impacts from "cold" winter floods have also been spatially and temporally evaluated to ensure better geothermal management of the aquifer. The results showed a variable direct thermal impact from 0 to 6 °C depending on the groundwater-surface water interaction along the river trajectory. The thermal plumes far away from the riverbed also present minor indirect thermal impacts due to hydraulic gradient variations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential depletion of surface water in the Colorado River and agricultural drains by groundwater pumping in the Parker-Palo Verde-Cibola area, Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.; Heilman, Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    Water use along the lower Colorado River is allocated as “consumptive use,” which is defined to be the amount of water diverted from the river minus the amount that returns to the river. Diversions of water from the river include surface water in canals and water removed from the river by pumping wells in the aquifer connected to the river. A complication in accounting for water pumped by wells occurs if the pumping depletes water in drains and reduces measured return flow in those drains. In that case, consumptive use of water pumped by the wells is accounted for in the reduction of measured return flow. A method is needed to understand where groundwater pumping will deplete water in the river and where it will deplete water in drains. To provide a basis for future accounting for pumped groundwater in the Parker-Palo Verde-Cibola area, a superposition model was constructed. The model consists of three layers of finite-difference cells that cover most of the aquifer in the study area. The model was run repeatedly with each run having a pumping well in a different model cell. The source of pumped water that is depletion of the river, expressed as a fraction of the pumping rate, was computed for all active cells in model layer 1, and maps were constructed to understand where groundwater pumping depletes the river and where it depletes drains. The model results indicate that if one or more drains exist between a pumping well location and the river, nearly all of the depletion will be from drains, and little or no depletion will come from the Colorado River. Results also show that if a well pumps on a side of the river with no drains in the immediate area, depletion will come from the Colorado River. Finally, if a well pumps between the river and drains that parallel the river, a fraction of the pumping will come from the river and the rest will come from the drains. Model results presented in this report may be considered in development or refinement of strategies

  11. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF AN OPEN-LOOP GROUND-WATER HEAT PUMP SYSTEM IN AN URBAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Baccino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a multidisciplinary methodology for analyzing the opportunities for exploitation of open-loop groundwater heat pump is proposed. The approach starts from a model for calculation of a time profile of thermal requirements (heat and domestic hot water. This curve is then coupled with a model of the control system in order to determine the heat pump operation, which includes its energy performances (primary energy consumption as well as profiles of water discharge to the aquifer in terms of mass flow rate and temperature. Then the thermo-fluid dynamics of the aquifer is performed in order to determine the system impact on the environment as on possible other systems. The application to a case study in the Piedmont region, in Italy, is proposed. Energy analysis of the system shows that ground-water heat pumps constitute an interesting option in areas with small housing density, where there is not district heating. In comparison with typical heating/cooling systems, environmental benefits are related with reduction in global emissions. These benefits may be significantly enhanced using renewables as the primary energy source to produce electricity. The analysis also shows that possible issues related with the extension of the subsurface thermal plume may arise in the case of massive utilization of this technology.

  12. Relative Contribution of Monsoon Precipitation and Pumping to Changes in Groundwater Storage in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoka, Akarsh; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Mishra, Vimal

    2017-01-01

    The depletion of groundwater resources threatens food and water security in India. However, the relative influence of groundwater pumping and climate variability on groundwater availability and storage remains unclear. Here we show from analyses of satellite and local well data spanning the past decade that long-term changes in monsoon precipitation are driving groundwater storage variability in most parts of India either directly by changing recharge or indirectly by changing abstraction. We find that groundwater storage has declined in northern India at the rate of 2 cm/yr and increased by 1 to 2 cm/yr in southern India between 2002 and 2013. We find that a large fraction of the total variability in groundwater storage in north-central and southern India can be explained by changes in precipitation. Groundwater storage variability in northwestern India can be explained predominantly by variability in abstraction for irrigation, which is in turn influenced by changes in precipitation. Declining precipitation in northern India is linked to Indian Ocean warming, suggesting a previously unrecognized teleconnection between ocean temperatures and groundwater storage.

  13. Relative Contribution of Monsoon Precipitation and Pumping to Changes in Groundwater Storage in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoka, Akarsh; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Mishra, Vimal

    2017-01-01

    The depletion of groundwater resources threatens food and water security in India. However, the relative influence of groundwater pumping and climate variability on groundwater availability and storage remains unclear. Here we show from analyses of satellite and local well data spanning the past decade that long-term changes in monsoon precipitation are driving groundwater storage variability in most parts of India either directly by changing recharge or indirectly by changing abstraction. We find that groundwater storage has declined in northern India at the rate of 2 cm/yr and increased by 1 to 2 cm/yr in southern India between 2002 and 2013. We find that a large fraction of the total variability in groundwater storage in north-central and southern India can be explained by changes in precipitation. Groundwater storage variability in northwestern India can be explained predominantly by variability in abstraction for irrigation, which is in turn influenced by changes in precipitation. Declining precipitation in northern India is linked to Indian Ocean warming, suggesting a previously unrecognized teleconnection between ocean temperatures and groundwater storage.

  14. Depletion and response of deep groundwater to climate-induced pumping variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Tess A.; Lall, Upmanu

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater constitutes a critical component of our water resources. Widespread groundwater level declines have occurred in the USA over recent decades, including in regions not typically considered water stressed, such as areas of the Northwest and mid-Atlantic Coast. This loss of water storage reflects extraction rates that exceed natural recharge and capture. Here, we explore recent changes in the groundwater levels of deep aquifers from wells across the USA, and their relation to indices of interannual to decadal climate variability and to annual precipitation. We show that groundwater level changes correspond to selected global climate variations. Although climate-induced variations of deep aquifer natural recharge are expected to have multi-year time lags, we find that deep groundwater levels respond to climate over timescales of less than one year. In irrigated areas, the annual response to local precipitation in the deepest wells may reflect climate-induced pumping variability. An understanding of how the human response to drought through pumping leads to deep groundwater changes is critical to manage the impacts of interannual to decadal and longer climate variability on the nation’s water resources.

  15. Stream Temperature Spatial and Temporal Response to Large Dam Removal and Groundwater Pumping under Varying Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, J. C.; Constantz, J. E.; Essaid, H.; Rounds, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    We simulated the effects of large upstream dam removal and in-reach groundwater pumping on stream temperature spatial and temporal patterns in a hypothetical river basin under varying climate conditions. A MODFLOW-2000 model, with options for stream-aquifer interaction and grid-block rewetting, was constructed to simulate monthly streamflows for 12 watershed scenarios described below. For each scenario, streamflow output became input into a stream temperature simulation model. Stream temperatures were simulated using the CE-QUAL-W2 water quality model over a 110 km model grid, with the presence and removal of a dam at the top of the reach and pumping in the lower 60 km of the reach. Measured meteorological data from three locations in Oregon and California representing the three meteorological conditions were used as model input to simulate the impact of varying climate conditions on streamflows and stream temperature. For each climate condition, four hypothetical watershed scenarios were modeled: (1) natural (no dam or pumping), (2) large upstream dam present, (3) dam with in-reach pumping, and (4) no dam with pumping continued, resulting in 12 cases. If a transition from a humid to more arid environment occurs under future climate change, the simulations showed that decreased streamflow, increased solar radiation, and increased air temperatures would result in overall increased stream temperatures as expected. From March to August, the presence of a dam caused monthly mean stream temperatures to decrease on average by approximately 3.0°C, 2.5°C, and 2.0°C for the humid, semiarid, and arid conditions, respectively; however, stream temperatures generally increased from September to February. Pumping caused stream temperatures to warm in summer and cool in winter by generally less than 0.5°C. Though dam removal led to greater changes in stream temperature than pumping, ephemeral conditions were increased both temporally and spatially by pumping.

  16. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  17. Numerical groundwater-flow modeling to evaluate potential effects of pumping and recharge: implications for sustainable groundwater management in the Mahanadi delta region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sasmita; Jha, Madan K.

    2017-07-01

    Process-based groundwater models are useful to understand complex aquifer systems and make predictions about their response to hydrological changes. A conceptual model for evaluating responses to environmental changes is presented, considering the hydrogeologic framework, flow processes, aquifer hydraulic properties, boundary conditions, and sources and sinks of the groundwater system. Based on this conceptual model, a quasi-three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was designed using MODFLOW to simulate the groundwater system of Mahanadi River delta, eastern India. The model was constructed in the context of an upper unconfined aquifer and lower confined aquifer, separated by an aquitard. Hydraulic heads of 13 shallow wells and 11 deep wells were used to calibrate transient groundwater conditions during 1997-2006, followed by validation (2007-2011). The aquifer and aquitard hydraulic properties were obtained by pumping tests and were calibrated along with the rainfall recharge. The statistical and graphical performance indicators suggested a reasonably good simulation of groundwater flow over the study area. Sensitivity analysis revealed that groundwater level is most sensitive to the hydraulic conductivities of both the aquifers, followed by vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining layer. The calibrated model was then employed to explore groundwater-flow dynamics in response to changes in pumping and recharge conditions. The simulation results indicate that pumping has a substantial effect on the confined aquifer flow regime as compared to the unconfined aquifer. The results and insights from this study have important implications for other regional groundwater modeling studies, especially in multi-layered aquifer systems.

  18. Energetic Efficiency Evaluation by Using GroundWater Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokar Adriana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Romania has significant energy potential from renewable sources, but the potential used is much lower due to technical and functional disadvantages, to economic efficiency, the cost elements and environmental limitations. However, efforts are being made to integrate renewable energy in the national energy system. To promote and encourage private investments for renewable energy utilization, programs have been created in order to access funds needed to implement these technologies. Assessment of such investments was carried out from technical and economical point of view, by analyzing a heat pump using as heat source the solar energy from the ground.

  19. How do groundwater-dependent lakes react if the aquifer they rely on is being pumped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainu, Marko; Terasmaa, Jaanus

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is a valuable source of drinking water, but at the same time it is the primary contributor to the existence of many surface water bodies. If the latter truth is overlooked in water resources management, and ground- and surface water are not considered as a single resource, then the sustainability of groundwater-dependent ecosystems will become under threat. The necessity for implementing an integrated management of ground- and surface water has also been stressed in the EU Water Framework Directive. This study aims to evaluate the effect of increased groundwater abstraction to groundwater and lake levels; and to evaluate the effect of increased groundwater abstraction to the seepage patterns in one example lake. The Kurtna Lake District in northeastern Estonia contains almost 40 small lakes which are situated in and around the Kurtna Kame Field and constitute an EU Special Area of Conservation. The sands that form the kame field contain a Quaternary groundwater aquifer. Water has been pumped from the aquifer for household use with varying rates since the 1970s, but starting from the summer of 2012 the average pumping rate was increased by 51% compared to the year before. During the current study the water levels of five lakes were monitored regularly from May 2012 to June 2013 - before and after the increase in the pumping rate. The water levels dropped 0.3 to 0.7 m during the year in three closed-basin lakes closest to the abstraction wells, but did not change neither in a flow-through lake nor in a closed-basin lake situated 1.6 km from the wells. Groundwater level in the aquifer (monitored by the Estonian Geological Survey) dropped up to 0.8 m near the abstraction wells in the course of the year, but did not change further from the wells. The estimates of average annual groundwater recharge were derived for the twelve months before both June 2012 and June 2013. Although the recharge rate was lower in the first year, the water-level drop was

  20. Insulin Pump Malfunction During Hospitalization: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, Eileen R; Wyne, Kathleen L; Buschur, Elizabeth O; McDaniel, Jodi; Dungan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Insulin pump malfunctions and failures continue to occur; however, more severe malfunctions such as the "runaway pump" phenomenon are rarely reported. This article describes two cases of pump malfunction in which pump users appear to have received an unsolicited bolus of insulin resulting in severe episodes of hypoglycemia during hospitalization. Both cases of insulin pump malfunction occurred in the inpatient setting at a large academic medical center in the United States. An analysis of the corresponding insulin pump downloads was performed. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database was searched for similar cases involving Medtronic (Northridge, CA) insulin pumps using the terms "pump," "infusion," "insulin AND malfunction AND Medtronic." The two cases described show remarkable similarities, each demonstrating a severe hypoglycemic event preceded by an infusion site change followed by an alarm. In both cases a rapid spraying of insulin was reported. The insulin pump downloads validated much of the patients' and medical staff's descriptions of events. The FDA's MAUDE database search revealed 425 cases meeting our search term criteria. All cases were reviewed. Seven cases were identified involving independent movement of the reservoir piston. The cases detailed are the first to describe an insulin pump malfunction of this nature in the hospital setting involving unsolicited insulin boluses leading to severe hypoglycemia. The cases are particularly compelling in that they were witnessed by medical personnel. Providers and patients should receive instruction education on the recognition and management of insulin pump malfunction.

  1. Transient effects on groundwater chemical compositions from pumping of supply wells at the Nevada National Security Site, 1951-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Moreo, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    . Analysis of chemical trends in this report primarily rely on specific conductance measurements and major ion concentrations, data considered to be the most accurate and reliable over the entire time span of investigation. The analysis uses parametric and non-parametric evaluations to provide a statistical basis for trend identification. Trace element and isotope data are examined for consistency, but typically are too inaccurate or infrequent to provide a reliable long term basis for trend evaluation. Groundwater withdrawal records compiled in a companion report are included graphically in this report to allow qualitative comparisons between water quality and pumping history. Data for each supply well include (1) a borehole description and summary of pumping history, (2) a description of water-quality parameters, (3) an evaluation of temporal variations of specific conductance and major ion concentrations, and (4) an examination of supporting information from trace element and isotope data. A range of responses are observed for individual supply wells that likely include the effects of both aquifer dynamics and changing borehole conditions. Data from most wells show little or no evidence for temporal variation in water-quality parameters indicating that aquifers at the Nevada National Security Site are capable of producing large volumes of compositionally uniform water over many years of pumping. A smaller number of wells show evidence of transient changes. Wells that have ceased pumping commonly show compositions that shift toward lower concentrations in subsequent bailed samples, which indicates that more dilute water entered the well over time due to either leakage of meteoric water into the well casing or more wide-spread recharge into the shallow phreatic zone. Wells that show systematic changes in water compositions during episodes of pumping commonly have multiple open intervals whose contributions to water in the well may change over time due to hydraulic

  2. Numerical study on the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge in a deep confined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang-Qing; Wang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Jin-Jian; Li, Ming-Guang

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater drawdown and strata settlements induced by dewatering in confined aquifers can be relieved by artificial recharge. In this study, numerical simulations of a field multi-well pumping-recharge test in a deep confined aquifer are conducted to analyze the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed in a finite-difference software, which considers the fluid-mechanical interaction using the Biot consolidation theory. The predicted groundwater drawdown and ground settlements are compared to the measured data to confirm the validation of the numerical analysis of the pumping and recharge. Both numerical results and measured data indicate that the effect of recharge on controlling the groundwater drawdown and strata settlements correlates with the injection rate and well arrangements. Since the groundwater drawdown induced by pumping can be controlled by artificial recharge, soil compression can be relieved by reducing the changes of effective stress of the soils. Consequently, strata settlement induced by pumping can be relieved by artificial recharge and ground settlements can be eliminated if an appropriate injection rate and well arrangement are being determined. Moreover, the changes of the pore pressure and seepage force induced by pumping and recharge will also result in significant horizontal deformations in the strata near the recharge wells.

  3. Simulating spatial adaption of groundwater pumping on seawater intrusion in coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, Jens; Ladwig, Robert; Schütze, Niels; Walther, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Coastal aquifer systems are used intensively to meet the growing demands for water in those regions. They are especially at risk for the intrusion of seawater due to aquifer overpumping, limited groundwater replenishment and unsustainable groundwater management which in turn also impacts the social and economical development of coastal regions. One example is the Al-Batinah coastal plain in northern Oman where irrigated agriculture is practiced by lots of small scaled farms in different distances from the sea, each of them pumping their water from coastal aquifer. Due to continuous overpumping and progressing saltwater intrusion farms near the coast had to close since water for irrigation got too saline. For investigating appropriate management options numerical density dependent groundwater modelling is required which should also portray the adaption of groundwater abstraction schemes on the water quality. For addressing this challenge a moving inner boundary condition is implemented in the numerical density dependent groundwater model which adjusts the locations for groundwater abstraction according to the position of the seawater intrusion front controlled by thresholds of relative chloride concentration. The adaption process is repeated for each management cycle within transient model simulations and allows for considering feedbacks with the consumers e.g. the agriculture by moving agricultural farms more inland or towards the sea if more fertile soils at the coast could be recovered. For finding optimal water management strategies efficiently, the behaviour of the numerical groundwater model for different extraction and replenishment scenarios is approximated by an artificial neural network using a novel approach for state space surrogate model development. Afterwards the derived surrogate is coupled with an agriculture module within a simulation based water management optimisation framework to achieve optimal cropping pattern and water abstraction schemes

  4. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Krieg, R.; Martienssen, M.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-10-01

    Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSOs) can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates per stream length unit Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPTs) up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPTs the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany). Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3- showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg mstream-1 d-1, respectively, while Cl- (16.8 to 47.3 g mstream-1 d-1) and SO42- (20.3 to 32.2 g mstream-1 d-1) revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  5. Ground-water heat pumps: an examination of hydrogeologic, environmental, legal, and economic factors affecting their use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, D M; Bacon, D J; Massey-Norton, J T; Miller, J D

    1980-11-12

    Groundwater is attractive as a potential low-temperature energy source in residential space-conditioning applications. When used in conjuncton with a heat pump, ground water can serve as both a heat source (for heating) and a heat sink (for cooling). Major hydrogeologic aspects that affect system use include groundwater temperature and availability at shallow depths as these factors influence operational efficiency. Ground-water quality is considered as it affects the performance and life-expectancy of the water-side heat exchanger. Environmental impacts related to groundwater heat pump system use are most influenced by water use and disposal methods. In general, recharge to the subsurface (usually via injection wells) is recommended. Legal restrictions on system use are often stricter at the municipal and county levels than at state and Federal levels. Although Federal regulations currently exist, the agencies are not equipped to regulate individual, domestic installations. Computer smulations indicate that under a variety of climatologic conditions, groundwater heat pumps use less energy than conventional heating and cooling equipment. Life-cycle cost comparisons with conventional equipment depend on alternative system choices and well cost options included in the groundwater heat pump system.

  6. Analytical and numerical study of the thermal feedback in Groundwater Heat Pumps (GWHP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasso, Alessandro; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Ground Water Heat Pumps (GWHP) are a promising renewable heating and cooling technology, which can noticeably reduce primary energy consumption of air conditioning in buildings. To ensure their efficiency and sustainability over time, hydrogeological modelling is of pivotal importance, since thermal feedback between injection and extraction well can heavily impair their performances. On the other hand, an accurate numerical flow and heat transport simulation is not usually performed and is not affordable on small installations. The aim of this study is to solve the hydraulic and thermal transport problem of an injection and an extraction well, in presence of a subsurface flow, by means of a finite-difference approximation of the potential flow theory. The results of this approach have been firstly validated against FEM numerical simulation showing a good agreement in a wide a range of operating conditions, then used in order to develop an approximated analytical relationship which describes the evolution of the thermal feedback over time. The relationship is dependent on the most relevant parameters of the aquifer system and of the GWHP and it can be effectively used for a fast dimensioning of full scale installations. References Ampofo F., Maidment G.G., Missenden J.F., 2006, Review of groundwater cooling systems in London, Applied Thermal Engineering 26, pp. 2055-2062 Brashears M.L., 1941, Ground-water temperature on Long Island, New York, as affected by recharge of warm water, Economic Geology 36, pp. 811-828 Clyde C.G., Madabhushi G.V., 1983, Spacing of wells for heat pumps, Journal of Water Resources Planning & Management - ASCE 109, pp. 203-212 Ferguson G., 2006, Potential use of particle tracking in the analysis of low-temperature geothermal developments, Geothermics 35, pp. 44-58 Gringarten A.C., Sauty J.P., 1975, A theoretical study of heat extraction from aquifers with uniform regional flow, Journal of Geophysical Research 80, pp. 4956-4962 Lippmann M

  7. Random Boundary Simulation of Pumping Groundwater on Two-layer Soft Soil Structure with Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on random theory,fluid dynamics,porous media and soil mechanics,the porosity and random characteristic of the two-layer soft soil in Wuhan region were studied in this paper.The random seepage coefficient on the two-layer soft soil was analyzed,and the seepage model and its random distribution function were given.The groundwater flow differential equations related to the two layer soft soil structure were also established.The evaluation procedure of effect boundary on the pumping water in deep foundation pit was put forward.Moreover,with an engineering example,the probability distribution on random boundary prediction for pumping water of foundation pit was computed.

  8. Mines as lower reservoir of an UPSH (Underground Pumping Storage Hydroelectricity): groundwater impacts and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodeux, Sarah; Pujades, Estanislao; Orban, Philippe; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The energy framework is currently characterized by an expanding use of renewable sources. However, their intermittence could not afford a stable production according to the energy demand. Pumped Storage Hydroelectricity (PSH) is an efficient possibility to store and release electricity according to the demand needs. Because of the topographic and environmental constraints of classical PSH, new potential suitable sites are rare in countries whose topography is weak or with a high population density. Nevertheless, an innovative alternative is to construct Underground Pumped Storage Hydroelectricity (UPSH) plants by using old underground mine works as lower reservoir. In that configuration, large amount of pumped or injected water in the underground cavities would impact the groundwater system. A representative UPSH facility is used to numerically determine the interactions with surrounding aquifers Different scenarios with varying parameters (hydrogeological and lower reservoir characteristics, boundaries conditions and pumping/injection time-sequence) are computed. Analysis of the computed piezometric heads around the reservoir allows assessing the magnitude of aquifer response and the required time to achieve a mean pseudo-steady state under cyclic solicitations. The efficiency of the plant is also evaluated taking the leakage into the cavity into account. Combining these two outcomes, some criterions are identified to assess the feasibility of this type of projects within potential old mine sites from a hydrogeological point of view.

  9. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 2. Groundwater monitoring devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Anderson, E. G.; Johnson, P. E.

    1983-05-01

    Six types of devices for groundwater monitoring were used on an experimental basis in the investigation of the plume of contamination in the unconfined sandy aquifer at the Borden landfill. These include: standpipe piezometers, water-table standpipes, an auger-head sampler, suction-type and positive-displacement-type multilevel point-samplers, and bundle-piezometers. With the exception of the first two, each of these devices provides a means of obtaining vertical sample profiles of groundwater from a single borehole. The auger-head sampler, which is a device that is attached to the cutting head of conventional continuous-flight hollow-stem augers, yields samples from relatively undisturbed aquifer zones as the augers are advanced downward in the borehole from one depth of sampling to another. This method is a rapid means of aquiring water-quality profiles for mapping the distribution of a contaminant plume. The other three profiling devices can be used to establish permanent networks for groundwater-quality monitoring. A suction-type multilevel sampler consists of twenty or more narrow polyethylene or polypropylene tubes contained in a PVC casing that is capped at the bottom. Each tube extends to a different depth and is attached to a small screened sampling point that extends through the casing to draw water from the aquifer when suction is applied. A positive-displacement multilevel sampler is similar except that each sampling point is connected to a positive-displacement pumping device located inside the PVC casing adjacent to the screen. Use of the suction-type multilevel sampler is limited to zones where the water table is less than the suction-lift depth of 8 or 9 m. The positive-displacement sampler can be used even if the water table is at a much greater depth. A bundle-piezometer consists of 1.2-cm O.D. flexible polyethylene tubes, each with a short screened section at the bottom, fastened as a bundle around a semi-rigid center-piezometer constructed of

  10. Estimating pumping time and ground-water withdrawals using energy-consumption data. Water-Resources Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurr, R.T.; Litke, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydrology of an aquifer requires knowledge about the volume of ground water in storage and also about the volume of ground-water withdrawals. Totalizer flow meters may be installed at pumping plants to measure withdrawals; however, it generally is impractical to equip all wells in an area with meters. A viable alternative is the use of rate-time methods to estimate withdrawals. The relation between power demand and pumping rate at a pumping plant can be described through the use of the power-consumption coefficient. Where equipment and hydrologic conditions are stable, this coefficient can be applied to total energy consumption at a site to estimate total ground-water withdrawals. Random sampling of power-consumption coefficients can be used to estimate area-wide ground-water withdrawals.

  11. Simulation of groundwater and surface-water interaction and effects of pumping in a complex glacial-sediment aquifer, east central Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Jack R.; Carlson, Carl S.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of groundwater pumping on surface-water features were evaluated by use of a numerical groundwater model developed for a complex glacial-sediment aquifer in northeastern Framingham, Massachusetts, and parts of surrounding towns. The aquifer is composed of sand, gravel, silt, and clay glacial-fill sediments up to 270 feet thick over an irregular fractured bedrock surface. Surface-water bodies, including Cochituate Brook, the Sudbury River, Lake Cochituate, Dudley Pond, and adjoining wetlands, are in hydraulic connection with the aquifer and can be affected by groundwater withdrawals. Groundwater and surface-water interaction was simulated with MODFLOW-NWT under current conditions and a variety of hypothetical pumping conditions. Simulations of hypothetical pumping at reactivated water supply wells indicate that captured groundwater would decrease baseflow to the Sudbury River and induce recharge from Lake Cochituate. Under constant (steady-state) pumping, induced groundwater recharge from Lake Cochituate was equal to about 32 percent of the simulated pumping rate, and flow downstream in the Sudbury River decreased at the same rate as pumping. However, surface water responded quickly to pumping stresses. When pumping was simulated for 1 month and then stopped, streamflow depletions decreased by about 80 percent within 2 months and by about 90 percent within about 4 months. The fast surface water response to groundwater pumping offers the potential to substantially reduce streamflow depletions during periods of low flow, which are of greatest concern to the ecological integrity of the river. Results indicate that streamflow depletion during September, typically the month of lowest flow, can be reduced by 29 percent by lowering the maximum pumping rates to near zero during September. Lowering pumping rates for 3 months (July through September) reduces streamflow depletion during September by 79 percent as compared to constant pumping. These results

  12. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Leschik

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSO's can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPT's up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPT's the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany. Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3 showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg m−1stream d−1, respectively, while Cl (16.8 to 47.3 g m−1stream d−1 and SO42− (20.3 to 32.2 g m−1stream d−1 revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  13. Application of integral pumping tests to investigate the influence of a losing stream on groundwater quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Leschik

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Losing streams that are influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSOs can be a source of groundwater contamination. Released micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupters and other ecotoxicologically relevant substances as well as inorganic wastewater constituents can reach the groundwater, where they may deteriorate groundwater quality. This paper presents a method to quantify exfiltration mass flow rates per stream length unit Mex of wastewater constituents from losing streams by the operation of integral pumping tests (IPTs up- and downstream of a target section. Due to the large sampled water volume during IPTs the results are more reliable than those from conventional point sampling. We applied the method at a test site in Leipzig (Germany. Wastewater constituents K+ and NO3 showed Mex values of 1241 to 4315 and 749 to 924 mg mstream−1 d−1, respectively, while Cl (16.8 to 47.3 g mstream−1 d−1 and SO42− (20.3 to 32.2 g mstream−1 d−1 revealed the highest observed Mex values at the test site. The micropollutants caffeine and technical-nonylphenol were dominated by elimination processes in the groundwater between upstream and downstream wells. Additional concentration measurements in the stream and a connected sewer at the test site were performed to identify relevant processes that influence the concentrations at the IPT wells.

  14. Effects of changes in pumping on regional groundwater-flow paths, 2005 and 2010, and areas contributing recharge to discharging wells, 1990–2010, in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2017-06-06

    A previously developed regional groundwater flow model was used to simulate the effects of changes in pumping rates on groundwater-flow paths and extent of recharge discharging to wells for a contaminated fractured bedrock aquifer in southeastern Pennsylvania. Groundwater in the vicinity of the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was found to be contaminated with organic compounds, such as trichloroethylene (TCE), in 1979. At the time contamination was discovered, groundwater from the underlying fractured bedrock (shale) aquifer was the main source of supply for public drinking water and industrial use. As part of technical support to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the Remedial Investigation of the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site from 2000 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a model of regional groundwater flow to describe changes in groundwater flow and contaminant directions as a result of changes in pumping. Subsequently, large decreases in TCE concentrations (as much as 400 micrograms per liter) were measured in groundwater samples collected by the EPA from selected wells in 2010 compared to 2005‒06 concentrations.To provide insight on the fate of potentially contaminated groundwater during the period of generally decreasing pumping rates from 1990 to 2010, steady-state simulations were run using the previously developed groundwater-flow model for two conditions prior to extensive remediation, 1990 and 2000, two conditions subsequent to some remediation 2005 and 2010, and a No Pumping case, representing pre-development or cessation of pumping conditions. The model was used to (1) quantify the amount of recharge, including potentially contaminated recharge from sources near the land surface, that discharged to wells or streams and (2) delineate the areas contributing recharge that discharged to wells or streams for the five conditions.In all simulations, groundwater divides differed from

  15. Acceleration of groundwater remediation by deep sweeps and vortex ejections induced by rapidly pulsed pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, David M.; Kabala, Zbigniew J.

    2016-05-01

    One key limiting factor to groundwater remediation is contaminant sequestered in pores whose contents do not mix well with the bulk flow. Mixing between well-connected (pores whose volume is flushed as water flows through the aquifer) and poorly connected pores (pores whose volume does not exchange readily when water flows through the aquifer) is of primary concern. Under steady flow, contaminants are effectively trapped in the poorly connected pores and are transferred only by molecular diffusion. This slow mixing process between pore types is a bottleneck to remediation. We present a novel rapidly pulsed pumping method that increases the mixing between these pore types. We do it in the context of pump-and-treat remediation because it is the most common remediation practice. In rapidly pulsed pumping, the increase in flow causes a deep sweep, which pushes the flow into poorly connected pores and sweeps out sequestered contaminants. The decrease in flow causes a vortex ejection, which causes the vortex within the poorly connected pore to emerge with contaminant. These actions are modeled with computational fluid mechanics to elucidate the individual mechanisms and determine how they function and interact. Cleanup of single and multiple poorly connected pore systems were simulated and show the acceleration possible. This technique can decrease the time and cost needed to remediate contaminated aquifers, which in the United States has been estimated to exceed $1 trillion. Since our rapidly pulsed pumping method enhances mixing between well-connected and poorly connected pores, it can be applied to other remediation schemes such as in situ methods.

  16. Hydrology of Eagle Creek Basin and effects of groundwater pumping on streamflow, 1969-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matherne, Anne Marie; Myers, Nathan C.; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2010-01-01

    Urban and resort development and drought conditions have placed increasing demands on the surface-water and groundwater resources of the Eagle Creek Basin, in southcentral New Mexico. The Village of Ruidoso, New Mexico, obtains 60-70 percent of its water from the Eagle Creek Basin. The village drilled four production wells on Forest Service land along North Fork Eagle Creek; three of the four wells were put into service in 1988 and remain in use. Local citizens have raised questions as to the effects of North Fork well pumping on flow in Eagle Creek. In response to these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Village of Ruidoso, conducted a hydrologic investigation from 2007 through 2009 of the potential effect of the North Fork well field on streamflow in North Fork Eagle Creek. Mean annual precipitation for the period of record (1942-2008) at the Ruidoso climate station is 22.21 inches per year with a range from 12.27 inches in 1970 to 34.81 inches in 1965. Base-flow analysis indicates that the 1970-80 mean annual discharge, direct runoff, and base flow were 2,260, 1,440, and 819 acre-ft/yr, respectively, and for 1989-2008 were 1,290, 871, and 417 acre-ft/yr, respectively. These results indicate that mean annual discharge, direct runoff, and base flow were less during the 1989-2008 period than during the 1970-80 period. Mean annual precipitation volume for the study area was estimated to be 12,200 acre-feet. Estimated annual evapotranspiration for the study area ranged from 8,730 to 8,890 acre-feet. Estimated annual basin yield for the study area was 3,390 acre-ft or about 28 percent of precipitation. On the basis of basin-yield computations, annual recharge was estimated to be 1,950 acre-ft, about 16 percent of precipitation. Using a chloride mass-balance method, groundwater recharge over the study area was estimated to average 490 acre-ft, about 4.0 percent of precipitation. Because the North Fork wells began pumping in 1988, 1969

  17. Study on Law of Groundwater Evolution under Natural and Artificial Forcing with Case study of Haihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jinjun; Gan, Hong; Wang, Lin; Bi, Xue; Du, Sisi

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of groundwater is one of the key problems of water cycle study. It is a result of joint effect of natural condition and human activities, but until now the driving forces of groundwater system evolution were not fully understood due to the complexity of groundwater system structures and the uncertainty of affecting factors. Geology, precipitation and human activity are the main factors affecting the groundwater system evolution and interact each other, but the influence of such three factors on groundwater system are not clarified clearly on a macroscopic scale. The precipitation changes the volume of water recharge and the groundwater pumping effect the discharge of groundwater. Another important factor influencing balance of groundwater storage is the underlaying that affects the renewablility of groundwater. The underlaying is decided mainly by geological attributes but also influenced by human activited. The macroscopic environment of groundwater evolves under the natural and anthropic factors. This paper study the general law of groundwater evolution among the factors based on the case study in Haihe River Basin, a typical area with dramatic groundwater change under natural precipitation attenuation and gradually increase of water suuply. Haihe River Basin is located in north-China, covers an area of 320,041 km2 with over 40% plain areas. The plain area of Haihe Basin is densely populated with many large and medium-sized cities, including metropolis of Beijing and Tianjin, and concentrated irrigated areas, playing important roles in China's economy and food production. It is the unique basin where groundwater occupies majority of total water supply in China. Long-term groundwater over-exploitation causes a series of ecological and environmental problems that threats the sustainable development. In this paper, the historical process of groundwater balance in Haihe Basin is divided into three phases by decrease of rainfall and increase of water

  18. [Waterborne iron migration by groundwater irrigation pumping in a typical irrigation district of Sanjiang Plain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Chun; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Huo, Li-Li; Lü, Xian-Guo; Jiang, Ming

    2012-04-01

    The iron concentration in groundwater, iron's seasonal migration from groundwater to sun-basked pools, paddy fields and drainage canals, and its distribution in the sediments/soils were observed in the Jiansanjiang Branch Bureau, Heilongjiang Agricultural Cultivation Bureau. The results suggested that the total iron mass concentration of the studied area was (1.73 +/- 0.41) mg x L(-1), ranging from 0.01 to 11.4 mg x L(-1), with the variation coefficient of 1.29%. The annual iron input mass from groundwater to paddy fields and other surface water bodies was 4 976.40 t in 2010, according to the rice planting area and rating irrigation volume. Dissolved Fe2+, Fe3+ and iron, as well as the total iron (dissolved and particle) had seasonal variation, with greater values presented in June and July. These waterborne irons in paddy field waters were greater than those in sun-basked pools and drainage canals. Obvious enrichment effect was observed in sun-basked pools and paddy fields, with their total iron mass concentrations were 6.17 and 21.65 times greater than that in groundwater. Either the total iron or iron oxides in sun-baked pool sediments were greater than that in paddy field soils, field canal and main canal sediments. The differences of the total iron and iron oxides in paddy field soils, field canal and main canal sediments were not significantly different. Considerable irons were precipitated within sun-basked pools and paddy fields during the transfer from groundwater to surface water, with a part of irons exporting into canals through drainage and then precipitated there. Not only the change of total iron mass, but the transformation of iron chemical speciation was observed during the transfer, which was affected by paddy irrigation management directly. The long-term irrigation pumping could cause the substantial enrichment of iron in paddy soils and canal sediments, resulting in the increase of potential pollution risk.

  19. Impacts on groundwater recharge areas of megacity pumping: analysis of potential contamination of Kolkata, India, water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Paulami; Michael, Holly A.; Voss, Clifford I.; Sikdar, Pradip K.

    2013-01-01

    Water supply to the world's megacities is a problem of quantity and quality that will be a priority in the coming decades. Heavy pumping of groundwater beneath these urban centres, particularly in regions with low natural topographic gradients, such as deltas and floodplains, can fundamentally alter the hydrological system. These changes affect recharge area locations, which may shift closer to the city centre than before development, thereby increasing the potential for contamination. Hydrogeological simulation analysis allows evaluation of the impact on past, present and future pumping for the region of Kolkata, India, on recharge area locations in an aquifer that supplies water to over 13 million people. Relocated recharge areas are compared with known surface contamination sources, with a focus on sustainable management of this urban groundwater resource. The study highlights the impacts of pumping on water sources for long-term development of stressed city aquifers and for future water supply in deltaic and floodplain regions of the world.

  20. Geohydrology of the Central Oahu, Hawaii, Ground-Water Flow System and Numerical Simulation of the Effects of Additional Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was developed for the central Oahu flow system, which is the largest and most productive ground-water flow system on the island. The model is based on the computer code SHARP which simulates both freshwater and saltwater flow. The ground-water model was developed using average pumping and recharge conditions during the 1950's, which was considered to be a steady-state period. For 1950's conditions, model results indicate that 62 percent (90.1 million gallons per day) of the discharge from the Schofield ground-water area flows southward and the remaining 38 percent (55.2 million gallons per day) of the discharge from Schofield flows northward. Although the contribution of recharge from infiltration of rainfall and irrigation water directly on top of the southern and northern Schofield ground-water dams was included in the model, the distribution of natural discharge from the Schofield ground-water area was estimated exclusive of the recharge on top of the dams. The model was used to investigate the long-term effects of pumping under future land-use conditions. Future recharge was conservatively estimated by assuming no recharge associated with agricultural activities. Future pumpage used in the model was based on the 1995-allocated rates. Model results indicate that the long-term effect of pumping at the 1995-allocated rates will be a reduction of water levels from present (1995) conditions in all ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system. In the Schofield ground-water area, model results indicate that water levels could decline about 30 feet from the 1995 water-level altitude of about 275 feet. In the remaining ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system, water levels may decline from less than 1 foot to as much as 12 feet relative to 1995 water levels. Model results indicate that the bottoms of several existing deep wells in northern and southern Oahu extend below the model

  1. Underground Pumped Storage Hydropower using abandoned open pit mines: influence of groundwater seepage on the system efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, Estanislao; Bodeux, Sarah; Orban, Philippe; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Pumped Storage Hydropower (PSH) plants can be used to manage the production of electrical energy according to the demand. These plants allow storing and generating electricity during low and high demand energy periods, respectively. Nevertheless, PSH plants require a determined topography because two reservoirs located at different heights are needed. At sites where PSH plants cannot be constructed due to topography requirements (flat regions), Underground Pumped Storage Hydropower (UPSH) plants can be used to adjust the electricity production. These plants consist in two reservoirs, the upper one is located at the surface (or at shallow depth) while the lower one is underground (or deeper). Abandoned open pit mines can be used as lower reservoirs but these are rarely isolated. As a consequence, UPSH plants will interact with surrounding aquifers exchanging groundwater. Groundwater seepage will modify hydraulic head inside the underground reservoir affecting global efficiency of the UPSH plant. The influence on the plant efficiency caused by the interaction between UPSH plants and aquifers will depend on the aquifer parameters, underground reservoir properties and pumping and injection characteristics. The alteration of the efficiency produced by the groundwater exchanges, which has not been previously considered, is now studied numerically. A set of numerical simulations are performed to establish in terms of efficiency the effects of groundwater exchanges and the optimum conditions to locate an UPSH plant.

  2. Methodology of determining soil structure in important groundwater areas: case studies in Kauvonkangas, Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupila, Juho

    2016-04-01

    Finland is fully self-sufficient in clean groundwater and even has a capacity of exportation. There are approx. 6000 groundwater areas with a total yield of 5.4 million m3/day. Currently only 10% of this groundwater resource is in use. For the efficient and safe exploitation of these areas in the future, detailed modeling of soil structure is an important method in groundwater surveys. 3D -models improve the general knowledge of linkage between land use planning and groundwater protection. Results can be used as a base information in water supply service development and when performing the measures needed in case of environmental accidents. Also, when creating the groundwater flow models the collected information is utilized and is usually the main data source. Geological Survey of Finland has carried out soil structure studies in co-operation with authorities, municipalities and the local water suppliers. The main objectives of these projects are to determine the geological structure of groundwater area for estimating the validity of the present exclusion area, the quantity of ground water volume and recharge capability and possible risks to the groundwater. Research areas are usually under an active water supply service. Kauvonkangas groundwater area is located in the municipality of Tervola, in Southern part of Finnish Lapland. Extent of the area is 7.9 km2 and it is an important water source for the local and nearby population centers. There are two active water supply companies in the area. Field studies in the project will include general geological and hydrological mapping, soil drilling with observation pipe installation, test pumping and water sampling. Geophysical measures will play a key-role, including ground penetrating radar (GPR) and gravimetric measurements. Studies will be carried out in spring and summer 2016. The main results will be the models of the bedrock and groundwater level and main characteristics of the soil layers in the area. Results

  3. A reactive transport model for the quantification of risks induced by groundwater heat pump systems in urban aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Ayora, Carlos; Garrido, Eduardo; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Huggenberger, Peter; Gimenez, Ana Cristina

    2016-11-01

    Shallow geothermal resource exploitation through the use of groundwater heat pump systems not only has hydraulic and thermal effects on the environment but also induces physicochemical changes that can compromise the operability of installations. This study focuses on chemical clogging and dissolution subsidence processes observed during the geothermal re-injection of pumped groundwater into an urban aquifer. To explain these phenomena, two transient reactive transport models of a groundwater heat pump installation in an alluvial aquifer were used to reproduce groundwater-solid matrix interactions occurring in a surrounding aquifer environment during system operation. The models couple groundwater flow, heat and solute transport together with chemical reactions. In these models, the permeability distribution in space changes with precipitation-dissolution reactions over time. The simulations allowed us to estimate the calcite precipitation rates and porosity variations over space and time as a function of existent hydraulic gradients in an aquifer as well as the intensity of CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere. The results obtained from the numerical model show how CO2 exolution processes that occur during groundwater reinjection into an aquifer and calcite precipitation are related to hydraulic efficiency losses in exploitation systems. Finally, the performance of reinjection wells was evaluated over time according to different scenarios until the systems were fully obstructed. Our simulations also show a reduction in hydraulic conductivity that forces re-injected water to flow downwards, thereby enhancing the dissolution of evaporitic bedrock and producing subsidence that can ultimately result in a dramatic collapse of the injection well infrastructure.

  4. Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Ground-water system, estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties, and effects of pumping on ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks in and near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Lansdale, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial supply. In 1979, ground water in the Lansdale area was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other man-made organic compounds, and in 1989, the area was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Priority List as the North Penn Area 6 site. To assist the USEPA in the hydrogeological assessment of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to describe the ground-water system and to determine the effects of changes in the well pumping patterns on the direction of ground-water flow in the Lansdale area. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1995-98 and on results of the simulation of the regional ground-water-flow system by use of a numerical model.Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicate that the sedimentary rock beds strike generally northeast and dip at angles less than 30 degrees to the northwest. The ground-water system is confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths; depth to bedrock commonly is less than 20 feet (6 meters); and depth to water commonly is about 15 to 60 feet (5 to 18 meters) below land surface. Single-well, aquifer-interval-isolation (packer) tests indicate that vertical permeability of the sedimentary rocks is low. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate that the system is heterogeneous and that flow appears primarily in discrete zones parallel to bedding. Preferred horizontal flow along strike was not observed in the aquifer tests for wells open to the pumped interval. Water levels in wells that are open to the pumped interval, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells that do not intersect the pumped interval. A regional potentiometric map based on measured water levels indicates that ground water flows from Lansdale towards discharge

  6. Numerical simulation of seepage flow field in groundwater source heat pump system and its influence on temperature field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jihua HU; Yanjun ZHANG; Danyan DU; Gang WU; Ziwang YU; Chen WANG; Fuquan NI

    2008-01-01

    Energy utilization in the aquifers is a new technology closely related to development of heat pump technique. It is significant for the flow distribution to be predicted in the aquifer surrounding the Groundwater Source Heat Pump System (GSHPS). The authors presented a new concept of "flow transfixion" by analyzing general features of aquifers, and then discussed interaction of the flow transfixion with the heat transfixion, which has practical significance to projects. A numerical model of groundwater flow was established based on the basic tenets of water-heat transferring in the aquifer. On this basis the flow field and the temperature field of GSHPS for a site in Shenyang City were numerically simulated. The basis of the flow transfixion was obtained; it was discussed for the influence of the flow transfixion on the heat transfixion. To a certain extent, the study offers some reference for the projects' design of GSHP in the studied area.

  7. Groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment under high climatic variability and over-pumping: Ajlun Highlands example, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggad, Marwan; Salameh, Elias; Magri, Fabien; Siebert, Christian; Roediger, Tino; Moller, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Jordan's ground water resources are being exploited up to 190% of the safe yield while rainfall rates are decreasing and highly variable, thereby affecting recharge volumes of the aquifers. The Ajlun highlands, forming the northwestern edge of Jordan are characterized by annual rainfall rates exceeding 500 mm, the highest in the country, which leads to accordingly high replenishment of almost the entire groundwater system in northern Jordan. The high recharge and the NW-wards dipping strata lead to a groundwater flow towards the north and northwest, areas which host the vital aquifers of the region. Limited and degraded groundwater recharge combined with growing over-pumping are the main issues that regard the northern groundwater basins, such as Wadi Arab, Yarmouk and the Jordan Valley side basins. To evaluate the groundwater potential under high recharge variability, groundwater recharge was modeled and compared to different Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Groundwater recharge was calculated based on climatic data covering the time period from 1965 to 2014. Recharge modeling was conducted by applying the J2000 water budget model. The simulation of hydrologic processes uses independent parameters that are calculated prior to simulate the recharge flow. The simulations estimate recharge of 47.6 MCM, which is 12% less than the values given by the Jordanian authorities. The low calculated recharge is likely due to an overestimation of the evapotranspiration in areas with high topographic slopes. To examine the variability of groundwater recharge under current climatic conditions, statistical downscaling of global circulation models was conducted for the time period 1965 - 2000. Data for the time period 2001 - 2014 was used for the model validation. Results indicated a decline of 18.7% in precipitation by the year 2050 with an increase of 1.7 and 2.2 degrees in maximum and minimum temperatures respectively. Accordingly recharge for the year 2050 is 27% less than

  8. Environmental restoration: Integrating hydraulic control of groundwater, innovative contaminant removal technologies and wetlands restoration--A case study at SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C.M.; Serkiz, S.M.; Adams, J.; Welty, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater remediation program at the F and H Seepage Basins, Savannah River Sits (SRS) is a case study of the integration of various environmental restoration technologies at a single waste site. Hydraulic control measures are being designed to mitigate the discharge of groundwater plumes to surface water. One of the primary constituents of the plumes is tritium. An extraction and reinjection scenario is being designed to keep the tritium in circulation in the shallow groundwater, until it can naturally decay. This will be accomplished by extracting groundwater downgradient of the waste sites, treatment, and reinjection of the tritiated water into the water table upgradient of the basins. Innovative in-situ technologies, including electrolytic migration, are being field tested at the site to augment the pump-treat-reinject system. The in-situ technologies target removal of contaminants which are relatively immobile, yet represent long term risks to human health and the environment. Wetland restoration is an integral part of the F and H remediation program. Both in-situ treatment of the groundwater discharging the wetlands to adjust the pH, and replacement of water loss due to the groundwater extraction program ar being considered. Toxicity studies indicate that drought and the effects of low pH groundwater discharge have been factors in observed tree mortality in wetlands near the waste sites.

  9. Advective Heat Transport in an Unconfined Aquifer Induced by the Field Injection of an Open-Loop Groundwater Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano L. Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The increasing diffusion of low-enthalpy geothermal open-loop Groundwater Heat Pumps (GWHP providing buildings air conditioning requires a careful assessment of the overall effects on groundwater system, especially in the urban areas. The impact on the groundwater temperature in the surrounding area of the re-injection well is directly linked to the aquifer properties. Physical processes affecting heat transport within an aquifer include advection (or convection and hydrodynamic thermodispersion (diffusion and mechanical dispersion. If the groundwater flows, the advective components tend to dominate the heat transfer process within the aquifer and the diffusion can be considered negligible. This study illustrates the experimental results derived from the groundwater monitoring in the surrounding area of an injection well connected to an open-loop GWHP plant which has been installed in the "Politecnico di Torino" (NW Italy for cooling some of the university buildings. Groundwater pumping and injection interfere only with the upper unconfined aquifer. Approach: After the description of the hydrogeological setting the authors examined the data deriving from multiparameter probes installed inside the pumping well (P2, the injection well (P4 and a downgradient piezometer (S2. Data refers to the summer 2009. To control the aquifer thermal stratification some multi-temporal temperature logs have been performed in the S2. Results: After the injection of warm water in P4 the plume arrived after 30 days in the S2. That delay is compatible with the calculated plume migration velocity (1.27 m d-1 and their respective distance (35 m. The natural temperature in the aquifer due to the switching-off of the GWHP plant has been reached after two month. The Electrical Conductivity (EC values tend to vary out of phase with the temperature. The temperature logs in the S2 highlighted a thermal stratification in the aquifer due to a low vertical

  10. Underground pumped storage hydroelectricity using abandoned works (deep mines or open pits) and the impact on groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, Estanislao; Willems, Thibault; Bodeux, Sarah; Orban, Philippe; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Underground pumped storage hydroelectricity (UPSH) plants using open-pit or deep mines can be used in flat regions to store the excess of electricity produced during low-demand energy periods. It is essential to consider the interaction between UPSH plants and the surrounding geological media. There has been little work on the assessment of associated groundwater flow impacts. The impacts on groundwater flow are determined numerically using a simplified numerical model which is assumed to be representative of open-pit and deep mines. The main impact consists of oscillation of the piezometric head, and its magnitude depends on the characteristics of the aquifer/geological medium, the mine and the pumping and injection intervals. If an average piezometric head is considered, it drops at early times after the start of the UPSH plant activity and then recovers progressively. The most favorable hydrogeological conditions to minimize impacts are evaluated by comparing several scenarios. The impact magnitude will be lower in geological media with low hydraulic diffusivity; however, the parameter that plays the more important role is the volume of water stored in the mine. Its variation modifies considerably the groundwater flow impacts. Finally, the problem is studied analytically and some solutions are proposed to approximate the impacts, allowing a quick screening of favorable locations for future UPSH plants.

  11. Analytical Investigation of Arsenic and Iron in hand pump and tube-well groundwater of Gambat, Sindh, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *M. A. Jakhrani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of drinking water especially with heavy metals is now a major issue from both the public health and the environmental health perspectives. In present work we are reporting a multivariate study for the concentrations of Arsenic and Iron in groundwater n=334 collected from Gambat, Khairpur, Sindh, Pakistan during year 2008. The analysis was performed using Hydride Generator Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HG-ASS Perkin Elmer A-100 coupled with MHS-15. Arsenic and Iron were evaluated in hand pump and tube well water sample with detection limit 0.02µgL-1and 01µgL-1 respectively. The level of arsenic was found in hand pump and tube well water ranged from <0.01 to 126µgL-1 and <0.01-38 µgl-1 respectively. While level of Iron was found in the rage of <0.004-1.6mgL-1 and <0.004-1.5mgL-1 in hand pump and tube well groundwater respectively. It has observed that in most of the samples level of these both elements were above than the maximum permissible level of World Health Organization.

  12. Ground-water geology and pump irrigation in Frenchman Creek Basin above Palisade, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, W.D.E.; Jenkins, Edward D.

    1963-01-01

    quantities of water to wells. The ground-water reservoir is recharged only from precipitation on the basin. Of the average annual precipitation of 19.5 inches, about 0.9 inch infiltrates to the water table, thereby contributing about 220,000 acre-feet of water annually to the ground-water reservoir. About 81 million acre-feet of water that could drain under gravity, and thus theoretically is available to wells, is held in groundwater storage in the basin. Water is discharged from the ground-water reservoir by wells, evaporation and transpiration, springs, seepage into streams, and movement into adjacent areas to the east and southeast. Most of the domestic, stock, and irrigation water supplies and all the public supplies are pumped from wells. During 1953, 96 wells were used to irrigate 10,000 acres of land with 19,000 acre-feet of water. About 34,000 acre-feet of water is evaporated and transpired annually in the valleys of the main streams and in areas of shallow water table in the sandhills. From the projection of base-flow measurements made during 1952, it was estimated that the average annual flow of Frenchman Creek into the reservoir above Enders Dam is about 57,000 acre-feet. By similar determinations, the average annual flow of Frenchman Creek at the gaging station at Palisade, Nebr., about 22 miles downstream from Enders Dam, is about 76,000 acre-feet, and the flow of Stinking Water Creek at the gaging station near Palisade is about 22,000 acre-feet. The combined flow of Frenchman and Stinking Water Creeks at their confluence near Palisade thus is about 98,000 acre-feet per year. About 90,000 acre-feet of ground water is estimated to move eastward each year across the Colorado-Nebraska State line within the basin. Additional irrigation wells that will tap the Ogallala formation and the alluvium in the major valleys undoubtedly will be drilled. On the basis of current estimates of future irrigation.withdrawals, it is concluded that by the

  13. [Groundwater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González De Posada, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of Hydrogeology, the concept and an introductory general typology of groundwater are established. From the perspective of Geotechnical Engineering works, the physical and mathematical equations of the hydraulics of permeable materials, which are implemented, by electric analogical simulation, to two unique cases of global importance, are considered: the bailing during the construction of the dry dock of the "new shipyard of the Bahia de Cádiz" and the waterproofing of the "Hatillo dam" in the Dominican Republic. From a physical fundamental perspective, the theories which are the subset of "analogical physical theories of Fourier type transport" are related, among which the one constituted by the laws of Adolf Fick in physiology occupies a historic role of some relevance. And finally, as a philosophical abstraction of so much useful mathematical process, the one which is called "the Galilean principle of the mathematical design of the Nature" is dealt with.

  14. Simulated effects of proposed ground-water pumping in 17 basins of east-central and southern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Harrill, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Las Vegas Valley Water District filed 146 applications in 1989 to pump about 180,800 acre- ft/yr in 17 basins for use in Las Vegas Valley. A previously constructed, two-layer computer model of the carbonate-rock province area was configured to simulate transient conditions and used to develop first approximations of the possible effects of these withdrawals. Simulations were made using the phased pumping schedule proposed by the water district. Ground-water-level declines of several hundred feet could ultimately develop in the basins scheduled to supply most of the pumped ground water. Simulated declines in the carbonate-rock aquifer were somewhat larger than simulated declines in the overlying basin-fill deposits. Decreases in simulated regional spring flow were shown in several cells including those representing the Muddy River Springs, Hiko-Crystal-Ash spring area, and the Ash Meadows spring area. Model simulations show flow decreases of about 11 percent, 14 percent, and 2 percent, respectively, at these springs after almost 100 years of pumping. Simulated evapotranspiration also decreased in many basins, with the largest decreases occurring in the basins where ground-water withdrawals were greatest. These basins include Railroad, Spring, and Snake Valleys. The largest decrease in simulated evapotranspiration occurred in Railroad Valley, 64 percent after almost 100 years of pumpage. Model-sensitivity tests indicate that long-term results were relatively insensitive to variations in values used for aquifer storage. The adequacy of the model to simulate the effects of this proposed pumping will remain untested until actual pumping stresses have been in place long enough to cause measurable effects within the system.

  15. The Influence of Pumping on Observed Bacterial Counts in Groundwater Samples: Implications for Sampling Protocol and Water Quality Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuskanich, J.; Novakowski, K.; Anderson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Drinking water quality has become an important issue in Ontario following the events in Walkerton in 2000. Many rural communities are reliant on private groundwater wells for drinking water, and it is the responsibility of the owner to have the water tested to make sure it is safe for human consumption. Homeowners can usually take a sample to the local health unit for total coliform and E. Coli analysis at no charge to determine if the water supply is being tainted by surface water or fecal matter, both of which could indicate the potential for negative impacts on human health. However, is the sample coming out of the tap representative of what is going on the aquifer? The goal of this study is to observe how bacterial counts may vary during the course of well pumping, and how those changing results influence the assessment of water quality. Multiple tests were conducted in bedrock monitoring wells to examine the influence of pumping rate and pumped volume on observed counts of total coliform, E. Coli, fecal streptococcus, fecal coliform and heterotrophic plate count. Bacterial samples were collected frequently during the course of continuous purging events lasting up to 8 hours. Typical field parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and ORP) were also continuously monitored during the course of each test. Common practice in groundwater studies is to wait until these parameters have stabilized or three well volumes have been removed prior to sampling, to ensure the sample is taken from new water entering the well from the aquifer, rather than the original water stored in the borehole prior to the test. In general, most bacterial counts were low, but did go above the drinking water standard of 0 counts/100mL (total coliform and E. Coli) at times during the tests. Results show the greatest variability in the observed bacterial counts at the onset of pumping prior to the removal of three well volumes. Samples taken after the removal of three well

  16. Effects of groundwater pumping on the sustainability of a mountain wetland complex, Yosemite National Park, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cooper

    2015-03-01

    New Hydrological Insights for the Region: Daily hydraulic head and water table variations at sampling locations within 100 m of the pumping well were strongly correlated with the timing and duration of pumping. The effect of pumping varied by distance from the pumping well, depth of the water table when the pumping started, and that water year's snow water equivalent (SWE. Pumping in years with below average SWE and/or early melting snow pack, resulted in a water table decline to the base of the fen peat body by mid summer. Pumping in years with higher SWE and later melting snowpack, resulted in much less water level drawdown from the same pumping schedule. Predictive modeling scenarios showed that, even in a dry water year like 2004, distinct increases in fen water table elevation can be achieved with reductions in pumping. A high water table during summers following low snowpack water years had a more significant influence on vegetation composition than depth of water table in wet years or peat thickness, highlighting the impact of water level drawdown on vegetation.

  17. Simulated effects of groundwater pumping and artificial recharge on surface-water resources and riparian vegetation in the Verde Valley sub-basin, Central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Stanley A.; Pool, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    In the Verde Valley sub-basin, groundwater use has increased in recent decades. Residents and stakeholders in the area have established several groups to help in planning for sustainability of water and other resources of the area. One of the issues of concern is the effect of groundwater pumping in the sub-basin on surface water and on groundwater-dependent riparian vegetation. The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater-Flow Model by Pool and others (in press) is the most comprehensive and up-to-date tool available to understand the effects of groundwater pumping in the sub-basin. Using a procedure by Leake and others (2008), this model was modified and used to calculate effects of groundwater pumping on surface-water flow and evapotranspiration for areas in the sub-basin. This report presents results for the upper two model layers for pumping durations of 10 and 50 years. Results are in the form of maps that indicate the fraction of the well pumping rate that can be accounted for as the combined effect of reduced surface-water flow and evapotranspiration. In general, the highest and most rapid responses to pumping were computed to occur near surface-water features simulated in the modified model, but results are not uniform along these features. The results are intended to indicate general patterns of model-computed response over large areas. For site-specific projects, improved results may require detailed studies of the local hydrologic conditions and a refinement of the modified model in the area of interest.

  18. PUMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  19. Ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Rogers, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Ground-source heat pump systems are one of the promising new energy technologies that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to consumers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school and commercial building applications. In order to verify the performance, information was collected for 253 case studies from mainly utilities throughout the United States. The case studies were compiled into a database. The database was organized into general information, system information, ground system information, system performance, and additional information. Information was developed on the status of demand-side management of ground-source heat pump programs for about 60 electric utility and rural electric cooperatives on marketing, incentive programs, barriers to market penetration, number units installed in service area, and benefits.

  20. Groundwater heat pumps with turbines for the return water; Grundwasser-Waermepumpe mit Rueckgabe-Turbinierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, M.

    2007-09-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on improvements in the efficiency of a ground water heat pump installation in an office building. The water return well was equipped with a turbine. In this installation, the ground water is pumped up from a depth of 45 meters which means that a lot of electricity is needed for the pumping of the water. Coefficients of performance of the system are quoted for the situation with and without the turbine. The conversion of a pump for use as a turbine is commented on. The construction of a specially developed turbine with reduced electricity consumption is suggested. Seasonal performance data of the system is provided in tabular form.

  1. [First contact with an insulin pump. Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Torre, Elena; Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Torres-Manrique, Blanca; Rodríguez-Martín, Elías

    2011-01-01

    Insulin pumps are devices that inject insulin continuously into the body in a similar way to the pancreatic secretion, and with endless possibilities to adjust schedules, meals and physical activities, giving diabetics the chance to lead a life with many less restraints due to their illness. Besides giving them this freedom, the therapy allows more precise control of blood glucose, significantly improving the overall self-control and thus the quality of life of the diabetics, reducing the appearance of long-term complications. Although all diabetics receive many guidelines and recommendations for optimal control throughout their illness patients included in this protocol must be especially aware and involved in self-control, since the treatment demands more involvement both when learning to use the device as well as making decisions once they are using it. We present the case of a type 1 diabetic patient, twenty-one years of onset, who while admitted to hospital for a day, had a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump implanted (insulin pump). To this end, we developed a patient care plan of patient following the steps of scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy and on the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively.

  2. Case studies for utilizing groundwater-source and low-enthalpy geothermal resources in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shin, J.; Lee, K.-K.; Lee, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    As one of the top 10 oil-consuming countries in the world, Korea recently has had a great interest in extending the ways to utilize renewable energy. In this regard, geothermal energy resource is attracting more concerns from both of the government and the research field. Korea has neither active volcanic sites nor areas with abnormally higher heat flow. In spite of these natural conditions, many efforts have been exerted to utilize geothermal energy. Here, we introduce two case studies of using groundwater-source geothermal energy with relatively low-enthalpy: One is a riverbank filtration facility, which has been using some of its riverbank filtrate water for the indoor air-conditioning. The other is the first EGS plant planning site, where a few fault-related artesian wells reaching 70C were discovered lately. Numerical simulations to predict the temperature evolution of the two sites, which is dominated by several hydrogeologic factors, were carried out and compared. Simulation of temperature profile of riverbank filtrate water using HydroGeoSphere shows that the primary factor in determining filtrate water temperature is the pumping rate. It also shows that maintaining the facility operation with present pumping rate for the next 30 years will not cause any significant change of water temperature. However, following the new plan of the facility to install additional 37 wells with 6 times higher pumping rate than the current rate might cause about 2C decrease in filtrate water temperature in 10 years after the extension. Simulation for the temperature evolution in a faulted geothermal reservoir in EGS planning site under the supposed injection-extraction operating conditions were carried out using TOUGH2. A MINC model including a hydraulic discontinuity, which reflected the analysis from several geophysical explorations, was generated. Temperature distribution calculated from the simulation shows a rise of relatively hot geothermal water along the fault plane

  3. Potential effects of groundwater pumping on water levels, phreatophytes, and spring discharges in Spring and Snake Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in Nevada and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Keith J.; Plume, Russell W.

    2011-01-01

    Fish Springs, and changes in discharge on selected creek reaches were measurement observations. The effects of uncertain distributed groundwater-discharge estimates in Spring and Snake Valleys on transmissivity estimates were bounded with alternative models. Annual distributed groundwater discharges from Spring and Snake Valleys in the alternative models totaled 151,000 and 227,000 acre-feet, respectively and represented 20 percent differences from the 187,000 acre-feet per year that discharges from the GBNP-C model. Transmissivity estimates in the basin fill between Baker and Big Springs changed less than 50 percent between the two alternative models. Potential effects of pumping from Snake Valley were estimated with the Great Basin National Park predictive (GBNP-P) model, which is a transient groundwater-flow model. The hydraulic conductivity of basin fill and transmissivity of basement rock were the GBNP-C model distributions. Specific yields were defined from aquifer tests. Captures of distributed groundwater and spring discharges were simulated in the GBNP-P model using a combination of well and drain packages in MODFLOW. Simulated groundwater captures could not exceed measured groundwater-discharge rates. Four groundwater-development scenarios were investigated where total annual withdrawals ranged from 10,000 to 50,000 acre-feet during a 200-year pumping period. Four additional scenarios also were simulated that added the effects of existing pumping in Snake Valley. Potential groundwater pumping locations were limited to nine proposed points of diversion. Results are presented as maps of groundwater capture and drawdown, time series of drawdowns and discharges from selected wells, and time series of discharge reductions from selected springs and control volumes. Simulated drawdown propagation was attenuated where groundwater discharge could be captured. General patterns of groundwater capture and water-table declines were similar for all scenarios. Simulated

  4. Future groundwater extraction scenarios for an aquifer in a semiarid environment: case study of Guadalupe Valley Aquifer, Baja California, Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Gaytan, Jose Ruben; Kretzschmar, Thomas; Herrera-Oliva, Claudia Soledad

    2014-11-01

    Semiarid northwestern Mexico presents a growing water demand produced by agricultural and domestic requirements during the last two decades. The community of Guadalupe Valley and the city of Ensenada rely on groundwater pumping from the local aquifer as its sole source of water supply. This dependency has resulted in an imbalance between groundwater pumpage and natural recharge. A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was applied to the Guadalupe Valley Aquifer, which was calibrated and validated for the period 1984-2005. The model analysis verified that groundwater levels in the region are subject to steep declines due to decades of intensive groundwater exploitation for agricultural and domestic purposes. The calibrated model was used to assess the effects of different water management scenarios for the period 2007-2025. If the base case (status quo) scenario continues, groundwater levels are in a continuous drawdown trend. Some wells would run dry by August 2017, and water demand may not be met without incurring in an overdraft. The optimistic scenario implies the achievement of the mean groundwater recharge and discharge. Groundwater level depletion could be stopped and restored. The sustainable scenario implies the reduction of current extraction (up to about 50 %), when groundwater level depletion could be stopped. A reduction in current extraction mitigates water stress in the aquifer but cannot solely reverse declining water tables across the region. The combination of reduced current extraction and an implemented alternative solution (such as groundwater artificial recharge), provides the most effective measure to stabilize and reverse declining groundwater levels while meeting water demands in the region.

  5. Ground-water temperature of the Wyoming quadrangle in central Delaware : with application to ground-water-source heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Arthur L.

    1982-01-01

    Ground-water temperature was measured during a one-year period (1980-81) in 20 wells in the Wyoming Quadrangle in central Delaware. Data from thermistors set at fixed depths in two wells were collected twice each week, and vertical temperature profiles of the remaining 18 wells were made monthly. Ground-water temperature at 8 feet below land surface in well Jc55-1 ranged from 45.0 degrees F in February to 70.1 degrees F in September. Temperature at 35 feet below land surface in the same well reached a minimum of 56.0 degrees F in August, and a maximum of 57.8 degrees F in February. Average annual temperature of ground water at 25 feet below land surface in all wells ranged from 54.6 degrees F to 57.8 degrees F. Variations of average temperature probably reflect the presence or absence of forestation in the recharge areas of the wells. Ground-water-source heat pumps supplied with water from wells 30 or more feet below land surface will operate more efficiently in both heating and cooling modes than those supplied with water from shallower depths. (USGS)

  6. Hydrodynamic and hydrochemicalcharacterization of groundwater in agricultural area (case of Agafay farm-Western Haouz) Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiani, Salma; El mandour, Abdennabi; Laftouhi, Nour-Eddine; Khalil, Nourdine; Chehbouni, Abdelghani; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Khabba, Said; Hamaoui, Addi; Kamal, Safia

    2016-04-01

    Water resources play an important role in the socio-economic development of the Haouz plain. The agriculture and tourism are two essential components of this development. They represent more than 85% of the water consumption of the Tensift catchment. Under a semi-arid climate, according to hydric stress water used for irrigation essential for most crops, comes from pumping in groundwater from the unconfined aquifer of the Haouz. The use of groundwater for irrigation causes problems of soil degradation by the intensification of salinization processes, sodisation or alkalizing at several degrees. These situations are closely related to the natural characteristics of the environment (soil and climate) and the modalities of water management dedicated for irrigation highly affected by water quality. It is in this sense that the study was conducted in an irrigated citrus orchard drip, located in the western part of Haouz at 35 km of Marrakesh. The aim of this study is to characterize the area on hydrogeological and hydrochemical point of view, on the basis of a measurement and sampling campaign of thirty wells corresponding to June 2014. The piezometric map shows parallel flow lines oriented northwest. The aquifer recharge is ensured by lateral flow from the High Atlas and by the infiltration from surface water from Chichaoua, Assif El Mal and N'fis rivers. The low amount of flow rate recorded and measured in the vicinity of the study area at the sensing points are relative to the rise of Paleozoic substratum which reduces the recharge of the aquifer. On the hydrochemical level, groundwater quality is generally good (86% of cases). The strong mineralization is concentrated mainly in irrigated areas downstream along the flow direction of the aquifer and at the Guemassa substratum.

  7. Sustainable Management of Groundwater Resources: A Case Study from the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Zheng, C.; Zheng, L.; Wu, J.; Lei, Y.

    2005-12-01

    With the dramatic increase of population and rapid growth of municipal and industrial water demands, global water shortage is becoming more and more acute. One of the most striking examples for groundwater depletion is the North China Plain (NCP). As the most important center of agricultural production and home to more than 200 million people in China, NCP is experiencing a rapid depletion of its groundwater resources. Groundwater levels in many parts of NCP are currently declining at a rate of 1 m/year or even more due to excessive pumping. A numerical groundwater flow model was developed in this study for the Shijiazhuang region, a typical part of NCP where groundwater is the main water supply source for local agriculture irrigation and municipal and industrial water needs. The model indicated unsustainable groundwater utilization as the pumping exceeds recharge by a large amount. In this study, management optimization modeling was conducted to quantify and improve the sustainability of groundwater utilization in the study area. Based on the calibrated flow model, an optimization formulation was first set up to identify the optimal pumping well locations and rates that lead to the maximum total yield subject to a series of water level constraints. A second optimization formulation was then considered to minimize the total management costs required to meet the projected total water demands, also subject to the same set of water level constraints. The optimization models in this study provide a useful tool for developing cost-effective strategies for sustainable management of groundwater resources on the NCP. The findings from this study are of potentially wide interest to other parts of the world under similar hydrogeological and economic conditions.

  8. Groundwater flow to a pumping well in a sloping fault zone unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Sheng; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2014-05-01

    This study develops a mathematical model for simulating the hydraulic head distribution in response to pumping in a sloping fault zone aquifer under a water table boundary condition. A two-dimensional equation with a sink term representing the pumping is used for describing the head distribution in the aquifer. In addition, a first-order free surface equation is adopted to represent the change in water table at the outcrop. The analytical solution of the model, derived by the Laplace and finite Fourier cosine transforms, is expressed in terms of a double series. A finite difference solution within a deformable grid framework is developed to assess the solution obtained by specifying the free surface equation at the outcrop. Based on the analytical solution, we have found that the model's prediction tends to overestimate drawdown in a late pumping period. The temporal head distribution is independent of the aquifer slope if the water table change is small, and exhibits a double-humped shape due to the effect of the free surface. The temporal drawdown predicted from the analytical solution is further compared with those measured from a pumping test conducted in northern Portugal.

  9. Integration of various data sources for transient groundwater modeling with spatio-temporally variable fluxes—Sardon study case, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubczynski, Maciek W.; Gurwin, Jacek

    2005-05-01

    Spatio-temporal variability of recharge ( R) and groundwater evapotranspiration ( ETg) fluxes in a granite Sardon catchment in Spain (˜80 km 2) have been assessed based on integration of various data sources and methods within the numerical groundwater MODFLOW model. The data sources and methods included: remote sensing solution of surface energy balance using satellite data, sap flow measurements, chloride mass balance, automated monitoring of climate, depth to groundwater table and river discharges, 1D reservoir modeling, GIS modeling, field cartography and aerial photo interpretation, slug and pumping tests, resistivity, electromagnetic and magnetic resonance soundings. The presented study case provides not only detailed evaluation of the complexity of spatio-temporal variable fluxes, but also a complete and generic methodology of modern data acquisition and data integration in transient groundwater modeling for spatio-temporal groundwater balancing. The calibrated numerical model showed spatially variable patterns of R and ETg fluxes despite a uniform rainfall pattern. The seasonal variability of fluxes indicated: (1) R in the range of 0.3-0.5 mm/d within ˜8 months of the wet season with exceptional peaks as high as 0.9 mm/d in January and February and no recharge in July and August; (2) a year round stable lateral groundwater outflow ( Qg) in the range of 0.08-0.24 mm/d; (3) ETg=0.64, 0.80, 0.55 mm/d in the dry seasons of 1997, 1998, 1999, respectively, and <0.05 mm/d in wet seasons; (4) temporally variable aquifer storage, which gains water in wet seasons shortly after rain showers and looses water in dry seasons mainly due to groundwater evapotranspiration. The dry season sap flow measurements of tree transpiration performed in the homogenous stands of Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica indicated flux rates of 0.40 and 0.15 mm/d, respectively. The dry season tree transpiration for the entire catchment was ˜0.16 mm/d. The availability of dry season

  10. Study on a groundwater source heat pump cooling system in solar greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Lilong; Ma, Chengwei [China Agricultural Univ., Beijing (China). Coll. of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering. Dept. of Agricultural Structure and Bio-environmental Engineering], E-mail: macwbs@cau.edu.cn

    2008-07-01

    This study aims at exploiting the potential of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology in cooling agricultural greenhouse, and advocating the use of renewable and clean energy in agriculture. GSHP has the multi-function of heating, cooling and dehumidifying, which is one of the fastest growing technologies of renewable energy air conditioning in recent years. The authors carried out experiment on the ground source heat pump system in cooling greenhouse in Beijing region during the summertime of 2007, and conducted analysis on the energy efficiency of the system by using coefficient of performance (COP). According to the data collected during Aug.13-18th, 2007, the coefficient of performance of GSHP system (COP{sub sys}) has reached 3.15 on average during the test. (author)

  11. Study on a groundwater source heat pump cooling system in solar greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Lilong; Ma, Chengwei [China Agricultural Univ., Beijing (China). Coll. of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering. Dept. of Agricultural Structure and Bio-environmental Engineering], E-mail: macwbs@cau.edu.cn

    2008-07-01

    This study aims at exploiting the potential of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology in cooling agricultural greenhouse, and advocating the use of renewable and clean energy in agriculture. GSHP has the multi-function of heating, cooling and dehumidifying, which is one of the fastest growing technologies of renewable energy air conditioning in recent years. The authors carried out experiment on the ground source heat pump system in cooling greenhouse in Beijing region during the summertime of 2007, and conducted analysis on the energy efficiency of the system by using coefficient of performance (COP). According to the data collected during Aug.13-18th, 2007, the coefficient of performance of GSHP system (COP{sub sys}) has reached 3.15 on average during the test. (author)

  12. A GIS-based methodology to delineate potential areas for groundwater development: a case study from Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vishnu P.; Shrestha, Sangam; Kazama, Futaba

    2013-06-01

    For an effective planning of activities aimed at recovering aquifer depletion and maintaining health of groundwater ecosystem, estimates of spatial distribution in groundwater storage volume would be useful. The estimated volume, if analyzed together with other hydrogeologic characteristics, may help delineate potential areas for groundwater development. This study proposes a GIS-based ARC model to delineate potential areas for groundwater development; where `A' stands for groundwater availability, `R' for groundwater release potential of soil matrix, and `C' for cost for groundwater development. The model is illustrated with a case of the Kathmandu Valley in Central Nepal, where active discussions are going on to develop and implement groundwater management strategies. The study results show that shallow aquifers have high groundwater storage potential (compared to the deep) and favorable areas for groundwater development are concentrated at some particular areas in shallow and deep aquifers. The distribution of groundwater storage and potential areas for groundwater development are then mapped using GIS.

  13. Numerical modelling of groundwater flow to understand the impacts of pumping on arsenic migration in the aquifer of North Bengal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, P. K.; Chakraborty, Surajit

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, numerical simulations of regional-scale groundwater flow of North Bengal Plain have been carried out with special emphasis on the arsenic (As)-rich alluvium filled gap between the Rajmahal hills on the west and the Garo hills on the east. The proposed concern of this modelling arose from development that has led to large water table declines in the urban area of English Bazar block, Malda district, West Bengal and possible transport of As in the near future from the adjacent As-polluted aquifer. Groundwater occurs under unconfined condition in a thick zone of saturation within the Quaternary alluvial sediments. Modelling indicates that current pumping has significantly changed the groundwater flowpaths from pre-development condition. At the present pumping rate, the pumping wells of the urban area may remain uncontaminated till the next 25 yrs, considering only pure advection of water but some water from the As-polluted zone may enter wells by 50 yrs. But geochemical and other processes such as adsorption, precipitation, redox reaction and microbial activity may significantly retard the predicted rate by advective transport. In the rural areas, majority of the water pumped from the aquifer is for irrigation, which is continuously re-applied on the surface. The near-vertical nature of the flowpaths indicates that, where As is present or released at shallow depths, it will continue to occur in pumping wells. Modelling also indicates that placing all the pumping wells at depths below 100 m may not provide As-free water permanently.

  14. Numerical modelling of groundwater flow to understand the impacts of pumping on arsenic migration in the aquifer of North Bengal Plain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sikdar; Surajit Chakraborty

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, numerical simulations of regional-scale groundwater flow of North Bengal Plain have been carried out with special emphasis on the arsenic (As)-rich alluvium filled gap between the Rajmahal hills on the west and the Garo hills on the east. The proposed concern of this modelling arose from development that has led to large water table declines in the urban area of English Bazar block, Malda district, West Bengal and possible transport of As in the near future from the adjacent As-polluted aquifer. Groundwater occurs under unconfined condition in a thick zone of saturation within the Quaternaryalluvial sediments. Modelling indicates that current pumping has significantly changed the groundwater flowpaths from pre-development condition. At the present pumping rate, the pumping wells of the urban area may remain uncontaminated till the next 25 yrs, considering only pure advection of water but some water from the As-polluted zone may enter wells by 50 yrs. But geochemical and other processes such as adsorption, precipitation, redox reaction and microbial activity may significantly retard the predicted rate by advective transport. In the rural areas, majority of the water pumped from the aquifer is forirrigation, which is continuously re-applied on the surface. The near-vertical nature of the flowpaths indicates that, where As is present or released at shallow depths, it will continue to occur in pumping wells. Modelling also indicates that placing all the pumping wells at depths below 100 m may not provideAs-free water permanently.

  15. Radon as a tracer to characterize the interactions between groundwater and surface water around the ground source heat pump system in riverside area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Lee, Seong-Sun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    The interaction characteristics between groundwater and surface water was examined by using Radon-222 at Han River Environmental Research Center (HRERC) in Korea where a geothermal resource using indirect open loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) has been developed. For designing a high efficiency performance of the open loop system in shallow aquifer, the riverside area was selected for great advantage of full capacity of well. From this reason groundwater properties of the study site can be easily influenced by influx of surrounding Han River. Therefore, 12 groundwater wells were used for monitoring radon concentration and groundwater level with fluctuation of river stage from May, 2014 to Apr., 2015. The short term monitoring data showed that the radon concentration was changed in accordance with flow meter data which was reflected well by the river stage fluctuation. The spatial distribution of radon concentration from long term monitoring data was also found to be affected by water level fluctuation by nearby dam activity and seasonal effect such as heavy rainfall and groundwater pumping. The estimated residence time indicates that river flows to the study site change its direction according to the combined effect of river stage and groundwater hydrology. In the linear regression of the values, flow velocities were yielded around 0.04 to 0.25 m/day which were similar to flow meter data. These results reveal that Radon-222 can be used as an appropriate environmental tracer in examining the characteristics of interaction in consideration of fluctuating river flow on operation of GSHP in the riverside area. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work was supported by the research project of "Advanced Technology for Groundwater Development and Application in Riversides (Geowater+) in "Water Resources Management Program (code 11 Technology Innovation C05)" of the MOLIT and the KAIA in Korea.

  16. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. O. Nelson

    2003-09-01

    This operations and maintenance plan supports the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF) remedial action work plan and identifies the approach and requirements for the operations and maintenance activities specific to the final medical zone treatment remedy. The NPTF provides the treatment system necessary to remediate the medical zone portion of the OU 1-07B contaminated groundwater plume. Design and construction of the New Pump and Treat Facility is addressed in the NPTF remedial action work plan. The scope of this operation and maintenance plan includes facility operations and maintenance, remedy five-year reviews, and the final operations and maintenance report for the NPTF.

  17. Optimization of ground source heat pumps related to soil and groundwater conditions as well as grouting material; Optimierung von Waermepumpen in Bezug auf Boden- und Grundwasserverhaeltnisse sowie Verpressmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenbach, R.; Clauss, F.; Waberseck, T. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. und Versuchsanstalt fuer Geotechnik; Sass, J. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Fachgebiet Ingenieurgeologie

    2006-07-01

    The capacity and the performance of ground source heat pumps and seasonal thermal storage systems with borehole heat exchangers depend on the conditions of the encountered subsoil and the groundwater and furthermore on the thermal properties of the grouting material used for conclusive backfilling of the annular space after installing the heat exchanger pipes in the borehole. Intensive investigations are carried out at the Technische Universitaet Darmstadt with the aim of an economical optimisation of the dimensioning of ground source heat pumps and seasonal thermal storage systems. (orig.)

  18. Groundwater and surface-water interaction and effects of pumping in a complex glacial-sediment aquifer, phase 2, east-central Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Jack R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Carlson, Carl S.

    2015-12-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Framingham, Massachusetts, has investigated the potential of proposed groundwater withdrawals at the Birch Road well site to affect nearby surface water bodies and wetlands, including Lake Cochituate, the Sudbury River, and the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in east-central Massachusetts. In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey developed a Phase 1 numerical groundwater model of a complex glacial-sediment aquifer to synthesize hydrogeologic information and simulate potential future pumping scenarios. The model was developed with MODFLOW-NWT, an updated version of a standard USGS numerical groundwater flow modeling program that improves solution of unconfined groundwater flow problems. The groundwater model and investigations of the aquifer improved understanding of groundwater–surface-water interaction and the effects of groundwater withdrawals on surface-water bodies and wetlands in the study area. The initial work also revealed a need for additional information and model refinements to better understand this complex aquifer system.

  19. Case studies illustrating in-situ remediation methods for soil and groundwater contaminated with petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Robert A.; Lance, P.E.; Downs, A.; Kier, Brian P. [EMCON Northwest Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Four case studies of successful in-situ remediation are summarized illustrating cost-effective methods to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile and non-volatile petrochemicals. Each site is in a different geologic environment with varying soil types and with and without groundwater impact. The methods described include vadose zone vapor extraction, high-vacuum vapor extraction combined with groundwater tab.le depression, air sparging with groundwater recovery and vapor extraction, and bio remediation of saturated zone soils using inorganic nutrient and oxygen addition

  20. Final report : results of aquifer pumping and groundwater sampling at Everest, Kansas, in January-March 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. As a result of this meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities to augment the CCC/USDA's investigations at Everest, Kansas, and assist in the selection of remedial approaches to be evaluated as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. The requested actions included the following: (1) Construction of several additional interpretive cross sections illustrating the hydrogeologic setting along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the Nigh property. (2) Installation of additional permanent monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western, northern, and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. (3) Development of technical recommendations for a phased pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property.

  1. Pump shaft failures - a compendium of case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernt, F

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of failure. Pump shafts are generally exposed to the liquid being pumped either on a continual basis or at certain locations along the length of the shaft. Specialised sealing arrangements comprising sleeves and o-rings can be used to reduce the amount...

  2. Groundwater management institutions to protect riparian habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Patricia; Colby, Bonnie

    2004-12-01

    Groundwater pumping affects riparian habitat when it causes the water table to drop beyond the reach of riparian plants. Riparian habitat provides services that are not directly traded in markets, as is the case with many environmental amenities. There is no direct market where one may buy or sell the mix of services provided by a riparian corridor. The objective of this article is to review groundwater management mechanisms and assess their strengths and weaknesses for preserving the ecological integrity of riparian areas threatened by groundwater pumping. Policy instruments available to those concerned with the effects of groundwater pumping on riparian areas fall into three broad categories: (1) command and control (CAC), (2) incentive-based economic instruments, and (3) cooperative/suasive strategies. The case of the San Pedro River illustrates multiple and overlapping strategies applied in an ongoing attempt to reverse accumulating damage to a riparian ecosystem. Policy makers in the United States can choose among a broad menu of policy options to protect riparian habitat from groundwater pumping. They can capitalize on the clarity of command-and-control strategies, the flexibility and less obtrusive nature of incentive-based economic strategies, and the benefits that collaborative efforts can bring in the form of mutual consideration. While collaborative problem solving and market-based instruments are important policy tools, experience indicates that a well-formulated regulatory structure to limit regional groundwater pumping is an essential component of an effective riparian protection strategy.

  3. Drugs of abuse in urban groundwater. A case study: Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, A.; Mastroianni, N.; Vazquez-Suñe, E.; Carrera, J.; Tubau, I.; Pujades, E.; Postigo, C.; Lopez de Alda, M.; Barceló, D.

    2012-04-01

    This study is concerned with drugs of abuse (DAs) and their metabolites in urban groundwater at field scale in relation to (1) the spatial distribution of the groundwater samples, (2) the depth of the groundwater sample, (3) the presence of DAs in recharge sources, and (4) the identification of processes affecting the fate of DAs in groundwater. To this end, urban groundwater samples were collected in the city of Barcelona and a total of 21 drugs were analyzed including cocainics, amphetamine-like compounds, opioids, lysergics and cannabinoids and the prescribed drugs benzodiazepines. Overall, the highest groundwater concentrations and the largest number of detected DAs were found in zones basically recharged by a river that receives large amounts of effluents from waste water treatment plants (WWTPs). In contrast, the urbanized areas yielded not only lower concentrations but also a much smaller number of drugs, which suggests a local origin. In fact, cocaine and its metabolite were dominant in more prosperous neighbourhoods, whereas the cheaper (MDMA) was the dominant DA in poorer districts. Concentrations of DAs estimated mainly from the waste water fraction in groundwater samples were consistently higher than the measured ones, suggesting that DAs undergo removal processes in both reducing and oxidizing conditions.

  4. Impacts of heavy groundwater pumping on hydrogeological conditions in Libya: Past and present development and future prognosis on a regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgzeli, Yousef M.; Ondovčin, Tomáš; Hrkal, Zbyněk; Krásný, Jiří; Mls, Jiří

    2013-06-01

    Elgzeli, Y.M., Ondovčin, T., Hrkal, Z., Krasny, J. and Mls, J. 2011. Impacts of heavy groundwater pumping on hydrogeological conditions in Libya: Past and present development and future prognosis on a regional scale. Acta Geologica Polonica, 63 (2), 283-296. Warszawa. Libya, like many other regions with arid climates, suffers from inadequate water resources to cover all the needs of this rapidly developing country. Increasing amounts of water are needed to supply the population, as well as for agricultural irrigation and industrial use. As groundwater is the main water source in the country, it represents a natural resource of the highest economic and social importance. Conceptual and numerical models were implemented on a regional scale to show how the natural situation has changed following heavy groundwater abstraction during the last decades in the northwestern part of the country. The results of the numerical model indicated that the current zones of depression of the piezometric surface could have been caused by smaller withdrawn amounts than previously estimated. The differences in the assessed withdrawn groundwater volumes seem to be quite high and might have a considerable influence on the future possibilities of groundwater use in the study region.

  5. Is Insulin Pump a game changer in the management of Diabetes Mellitus: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Ghazanfar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of diabetes has drastically increased over the past decade and it has a debilitating effect on one’s quality of life. The Insulin Pump is a relatively new modality in the management of Diabetic patients. The objective of our case series was to assess the impact of insulin pump on glycemic control and quality of life of diabetic patients. In this case series we have presented four Type 2 diabetic cases which presented with different common complications associated with diabetes as well as its management, particularly the complication of hypoglycemic episodes. Worldwide introduction of insulin pump can prove to be a trend changer in the management of diabetes

  6. Innovative reactive barrier technologies for regional contaminated groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkel, P.; Weiβ, H.; Teutsch, G.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    At many industrial sites inadequate waste disposal, leakages and war damages have led to severe groundwater contamination on a regional scale. Standard hydraulic groundwater remediation methods, such as pump-and-treat, in most cases do not lead to satisfactory results, due to the persistence of orga

  7. Innovative reactive barrier technologies for regional contaminated groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkel, P.; Weiβ, H.; Teutsch, G.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    At many industrial sites inadequate waste disposal, leakages and war damages have led to severe groundwater contamination on a regional scale. Standard hydraulic groundwater remediation methods, such as pump-and-treat, in most cases do not lead to satisfactory results, due to the persistence of

  8. Optimization of a Centrifugal Boiler Circulating Pump's Casing Based on CFD and FEM Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zuo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to evaluate the economic efficiency of boiler circulating pumps in manufacturing process from the manufacturers' point of view. The possibility of optimizing the pump casing with respect to structural pressure integrity and hydraulic performance was discussed. CFD analyses of pump models with different pump casing sizes were firstly carried out for the hydraulic performance evaluation. The effects of the working temperature and the sealing ring on the hydraulic efficiency were discussed. A model with casing diameter of 0.875D40 was selected for further analyses. FEM analyses were then carried out on different combinations of casing sizes, casing wall thickness, and materials, to evaluate its safety related to pressure integrity, with respect to both static and fatigue strength analyses. Two models with forging and cast materials were selected as final results.

  9. Groundwater recharge dynamics in unsaturated fractured chalk: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicolaetta M.

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of the unsaturated zone controls its hydraulic response to rainfall and the extent to which pollutants are delayed or attenuated before reaching groundwater. It plays therefore a very important role in the recharge of aquifers and the transfer of pollutants because of the presence of temporary storage zones and preferential flows. A better knowledge of the physical processes in the unsaturated zone would allow an improved assessment of the natural recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer and of its vulnerability to surface-applied pollution. The case study regards the role of the thick unsaturated zone of the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in Picardy (North of France) that controls the hydraulic response to rainfall. In the North Paris Basin, much of the recharge must pass through a regional chalk bed that is composed of a porous matrix with embedded fractures. Different types of conceptual models have been formulated to explain infiltration and recharge processes in the unsaturated fractured rock. The present study analyses the episodic recharge in fractured Chalk aquifer using the kinematic diffusion theory to predict water table fluctuation in response to rainfall. From an analysis of the data, there is the evidence of 1) a seasonal behavior characterized by a constant increase in the water level during the winter/spring period and a recession period, 2) a series of episodic behaviors during the summer/autumn. Kinematic diffusion models are useful for predict preferential fluxes and dynamic conditions. The presented approach conceptualizes the unsaturated flow as a combination of 1) diffusive flow refers to the idealized portion of the pore space of the medium within the flow rate is driven essentially by local gradient of potential; 2) preferential flow by which water moves across macroscopic distances through conduits of macropore length.

  10. Trouble Shooting in Vertical Fire Hydrant Pump by Vibration Analysis - A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G . Arajpure

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The vertically mounted fire fighting pump used in pump house generally subjected to mechanical, structural and hydraulic problems. This generates dynamic load and produces vibrations of high frequencies and stresses which affects the pump performance and increases the maintenance cost. These problems leading to failure and damage of the costly components of pump houses. In this regard vibration analysis is necessary, to detect and diagnose faults of the fire fighting pumping house, to avoid any failure and efficient operation of pump system. This paper presents, the vibration analysis of different components of pump by actual measurement and performance testing at test rig. The vibrations are measured at no load as well as at full load condition. The defects in different components are identified and balanced. The balancing of the unbalanced motor fan enhances dynamic performance greatly due to decreased vibrations. The two different case studies of old as well as new pump are discussed here. The study becomes the benchmark for erection, commissioning and provides guidelines for fault diagnose of fire fighting pumps.

  11. Numerical simulation on dimension decrease for annular casing of one centrifugal boiler circulation pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y. Z.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, Y. L.; Sha, Y. J.

    2012-11-01

    Primary formulation derivation indicates that the dimension of one existing centrifugal boiler circulation pump casing is too large. As great manufacture cost can be saved by dimension decrease, a numerical simulation research is developed in this paper on dimension decrease for annular casing of this pump with a specific speed equaling to 189, which aims at finding an appropriately smaller dimension of the casing while hydraulic performance and strength performance will hardly be changed according to the requirements of the cooperative company. The research object is one existing centrifugal pump with a diffuser and a semi-spherical annular casing, working as the boiler circulation pump for (ultra) supercritical units in power plants. Dimension decrease, the modification method, is achieved by decreasing the existing casing's internal radius (marked as "Ri0") while keeping the wall thickness. The research analysis is based on primary formulation derivation, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation and FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation. Primary formulation derivation estimates that a design casing's internal radius should be less than 0.75 Ri0. CFD analysis indicates that smaller casing with 0.75 Ri0 has a worse hydraulic performance when working at large flow rates and a better hydraulic performance when working at small flow rates. In consideration of hydraulic performance and dimension decrease, an appropriate casing's internal radius is determined, which equals to 0.875 Ri0. FEM analysis then confirms that modified pump casing has nearly the same strength performance as the existing pump casing. It is concluded that dimension decrease can be an economical method as well as a practical method for large pumps in engineering fields.

  12. Groundwater Suitability for Irrigation: a Case Study from Debre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    irrigation water quality, the groundwater is suitable for irrigation with some minor ... specific toxicity effect on vegetables and field crops, however, there are ... alone cannot sustain the practice, the issues like ecological and social are to be taken in to ... particularly for crops that are sensitive to changes in quality (Bohn et al., ...

  13. Concentration comparison of selected constituents between groundwater samples collected within the Missouri River alluvial aquifer using purge and pump and grab-sampling methods, near the city of Independence, Missouri, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krempa, Heather M.

    2015-10-29

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Independence, Missouri, Water Department, has historically collected water-quality samples using the purge and pump method (hereafter referred to as pump method) to identify potential contamination in groundwater supply wells within the Independence well field. If grab sample results are comparable to the pump method, grab samplers may reduce time, labor, and overall cost. This study was designed to compare constituent concentrations between samples collected within the Independence well field using the pump method and the grab method.

  14. Groundwater Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Llamas

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The groundwaters released through springs constituted a basic element for the survival and progressive development of human beings. Man came to learn how to take better advantage of these waters by digging wells, irrigation channels, and galleries. Nevertheless, these activities do not require cooperation nor the collective agreement of relatively large groups of people, as in the case of creating the necessary structures to take advantage of the resources of surfacewaters. The construction and operation of these structures was a powerful factor in the birth of an urban or civil society – the designated water civilizations. The difference between people taking advantage of groundwater, quasi-individually, and those of surface water, where people work in a group, has continued to the present day. Whereas earlier, this difference did not bring about any special problems, the technological advances of this century, especially theturbine pump, have led to a spectacular increase in the use of roundwater. This advance has significantly contributed to reducing hunger in the world and has provided potable water in developing countries. However, the almost generalized lack of planning and control in the exploitation of these groundwaters reflects that they are little or badly understood by the managers of water policy in almost every country. As such, problems have occurred which have often become exaggerated, giving rise to water-myths. These problems, though, should be addressed if the aim is the sustainable usage of surface water as well as groundwater. To counter any misconceptions and to seek solutions to the problems, distinct plans of action can be highlighted: educating the public; fomenting a system of participative management and decisive support for the communities of users of subterranean waters; integrating a sufficient number of experts in hydrology in the various water management organizations;and assuring transparency of the data on

  15. Review of epinephrine solution use in 400 consecutive cases of burn reconstruction. Are infusion pumps safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña, Pirko; Velez, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Infiltration of diluted epinephrine solutions is often used in reconstructive surgery to produce local vasoconstriction and minimize bleeding. A total of 400 burn reconstruction procedures were performed with the aid of epinephrine solution between July 2008 and July 2011. We used to consider this practice very safe, but after encountering several complications, we decided to perform a retrospective review to look at all complications in detail and identify opportunities to improve safety. We encountered nine complications including one case of flash pulmonary edema and one patient with acute carpal tunnel syndrome. All severe complications were seen when the epinephrine solution was infiltrated with the aid of an electric infusion pump. Infusion pumps do not allow for reliable control of the amount of infiltration of epinephrine solutions. We conclude that infusion pumps may unnecessarily increase the risk for complications. This has resulted in a change in our practice. We now use infusion pumps only in selected cases.

  16. Study on the Influence of Water Source Heat Pump Wells'Layout on Groundwater Flow%水源热泵井群布置方案对地下水流场影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦婷; 车巧慧; 韩玉杰

    2014-01-01

    According to the actual field text data of pumping and recharging test on a real case , the paper establishes a numerical simulation model of underground flow to find out the optimum layout of water source heat pump and made quantitative research on the influence scope and degree of ground water flow field under different wells layout scheme .Research results shows that for the same re-charging aquifer , longer recharging time leads to greater pumping and recharging capacity and more little influence on exploitation of surrounding groundwater .That is to say, the most practical and reasonable layout is to make pumping wells and recharging wells inter -lace and centralize partial recharge wells .%以某地下水源热泵系统工程为例,依据工程场地实际抽水-回灌试验数据,建立研究区地下水流数值模拟模型,分析该地区适宜的井群布置方案,并定量研究不同井群布置方案对地下水流场的影响范围与程度,为确定合理的井群布置方案提供技术支撑。研究表明:对于同一含水层回灌,随着抽水-回灌时间的延长,就有利于抽水-回灌能力及尽量减小对周边地下水开采的影响而言,抽水井、回灌井交叉布置,部分回灌井集中布置的方案较为合理。

  17. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Kshitij C. Jha; Zhuonan Liu; Hema Vijwani; Mallikarjuna Nadagouda; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.; Mesfin Tsige

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE), th...

  18. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CENTRIFUGAL PUMP CASINGS TO DETECT THE CRACK AT THE TONGUE REGION.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify one of the reasons for the crack to initiate at the tongue region. The design of the tongue region of the centrifugal pump casing plays an important role in influencing the pump performance and cavitation. Tongue region should have enough strength to withstand against repeated loads imparted by the impeller. Crack at the tongue region is examined under hydrostatic pressure conditions .Practically, at the site location it was observed that the crack w...

  19. A case of groundwater depletion in Balochistan, Pakistan: Enter into the void

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank van Steenbergen

    2015-09-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: In Kuchlagh the loss of opportunities in high value horticulture were cushioned by emerging urban employment, by developing agriculture in other parts of the Province or by simply ‘chasing the water table deeper’, i.e. investment in pumping from the hard rock layers underneath the alluvial aquifer. This suggests that if groundwater depletion occurs in a single isolated place it may not necessarily lead to human disaster or trigger a turn-around as the loss of resources may be compensated by other intervening opportunities.

  20. Geogenic Groundwater Contamination: A Case Study Of Canakkale - Western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Ozan; Çalık, Ayten

    2016-04-01

    Study area is located NW of Turkey. Total area of the drainage basin is 465 square kilometers and mostly covered by volcanic rocks. Majority of these rocks have highly altered and lost their primary properties because of alteration processes. Especially argillic alteration is common. Tectonic movements and cooling fractures were created suitable circulation environment of groundwater in the rocks (secondary porosity). Alteration affects the composition of groundwater and some rock elements pass into groundwater during the movement of water in the cavities of rocks. High concentration of natural contaminants related to water-rock interaction in spring water has been studied in this research. Field measurements such as pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, oxidation-reduction potential and salinity carried out in 500 water points (spring, drilling, well and stream). 150 water samples taken from the water points and 50 rock samples taken from the source of springs has been investigated in point of major anion-cations, heavy metals and trace elements. Some components in the water such as pH (3.5-9.1), specific electrical conductivity (84-6400 microS/cm), aluminum (27-44902 ppb), iron (10-8048 ppb), manganese (0.13-8740 ppb), nickel (0.2-627 ppb), lead (0.1-42.5 ppb) and sulphate (10 to 1940 ppm) extremely high or low in the springs sourced from especially highly altered Miocene aged volcanic rocks. Some measured parameters highly above according to European Communities Drinking Water Regulations (2007) and TS266 (2015-Intended for Human Consumption Water Regulations of Turkey) drinking water standards. The most common element which is found in the groundwater is aluminum that is higher than to the drinking water standards (200 microg/L). The highest levels of the Al values measured in acidic waters with very low pH (3.4) emerging from altered volcanic rocks because of acid mine drainage in Obakoy district, north of the study area. The abundance of this element in

  1. Pump impeller failures - a compendium of case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Bennekom, A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available particular plant has to be retained and recycled within the plant rather than discarding the e?uent into rivers or the environment. Unfortunately, the e?uent becomes more contaminated with each recycle and as such several problems can be encountered... with pumps and associated piping systems since many of these systems were simply not designed to handle such concentrated or contaminated solutions. One of the best ways to avoid future failures is to examine the causes of failure in the past and to try...

  2. Groundwater simulation and management models for the upper Klamath Basin, Oregon and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannett, Marshall W.; Wagner, Brian J.; Lite, Kenneth E.

    2012-01-01

    the pumped water comes from groundwater storage over a broad geographic area even after two decades. Moreover, because the effects are spread out over a broad area, the impacts to individual features are much smaller than in the case of nearby pumping. Simulations show that the discharge features most affected by pumping in the area of the Bureau of Reclamation's Klamath Irrigation Project are agricultural drains, and impacts to other surface-water features are small in comparison. A groundwater management model was developed that uses techniques of constrained optimization along with the groundwater flow model to identify the optimal strategy to meet water user needs while not violating defined constraints on impacts to groundwater levels and streamflows. The coupled groundwater simulation-optimization models were formulated to help identify strategies to meet water demand in the upper Klamath Basin. The models maximize groundwater pumping while simultaneously keeping the detrimental impacts of pumping on groundwater levels and groundwater discharge within prescribed limits. Total groundwater withdrawals were calculated under alternative constraints for drawdown, reductions in groundwater discharge to surface water, and water demand to understand the potential benefits and limitations for groundwater development in the upper Klamath Basin. The simulation-optimization model for the upper Klamath Basin provides an improved understanding of how the groundwater and surface-water system responds to sustained groundwater pumping within the Bureau of Reclamation's Klamath Project. Optimization model results demonstrate that a certain amount of supplemental groundwater pumping can occur without exceeding defined limits on drawdown and stream capture. The results of the different applications of the model demonstrate the importance of identifying constraint limits in order to better define the amount and distribution of groundwater withdrawal that is sustainable.

  3. Control of Groundwater Remediation Process as Distributed Parameter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendel M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of groundwater requires the implementation of appropriate solutions which can be deployed for several years. The case of local groundwater contamination and its subsequent spread may result in contamination of drinking water sources or other disasters. This publication aims to design and demonstrate control of pumping wells for a model task of groundwater remediation. The task consists of appropriately spaced soil with input parameters, pumping wells and control system. Model of controlled system is made in the program MODFLOW using the finitedifference method as distributed parameter system. Control problem is solved by DPS Blockset for MATLAB & Simulink.

  4. First step to understand the importance of new deep aquifer pumping regime in groundwater system in a developing country, Kwale, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Nuria; Folch, Albert; Lane, Mike; Thomas, Mike; Sasaka, Willie; Wara, Calvince; Banje, Said; Olago, Dan; Katuva, Jacob; Thomson, Patrick; Hope, Rob

    2016-04-01

    The population growth in the world carries on the one hand, an increased demand of fresh water and on the other hand, a decrease of quality and quantity of this resource. To avoid this deterioration it is essential doing a good management of surface water and groundwater, specially the second one, which has become the major source of water supply for domestic, industrial and agricultural sectors of many countries (UNEP 1999). This groundwater management starts with an accurate hydrogeological characterization of aquifer systems, mainly in that aquifer systems in which is changing the abstraction regime. In this context of population growth and new abstraction regimes on aquifer system is where the project "Gro for Good: Groundwater Risk for Growth and Development" is founded by UPGro. This interdisciplinary project has the main goal to design, test and transfer to the society an innovative Groundwater Risk Management Tool to improve and get by new governance transformations the balance between economic growth, groundwater sustainability (in terms of quality and quantity) and human development (http://upgro.org/consortium/gro-for-good/). The study area is located on the south eastern coast of Kenya, in Kwale County. The Kwale coastal groundwater system formed by a shallow and deep aquifer systems has long served urban water demands and an established tourism industry but now faces unprecedented ground and surface water resource demands especially from KISCOL's (5,500 hectares of irrigated sugarcane) and the country's largest mining operation (Base Titanium Ltd.). Despite both companies have drilled deep boreholes around the study area (416 km2) to extract groundwater from deep aquifer; no major pumping activity has started yet, allowing baseline evaluation. Scattered around the study are 440 handpumps providing drinking water to over 90,000 people. The relationship between the shallow and deep aquifers remains uncertain and so, the future influence on groundwater

  5. Hydraulic losses in the spiral case of low specific speed pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Roman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is focused on analysis of pressure losses in spiral case of centrifugal pump with thick trailing edges and with recirculation channels. Recirculation channels have different geometrical configuration and influence the size of available specific energy as well as hydraulic efficiency. Subsequently, the contribution analyses the flow in spiral case itself with respect to its function and its filling with liquid. Studied phenomena affect the research of pumps with low specific speed, the stability of specific energy characteristic curves and also the configuration of recirculation channels.

  6. Off-pump coronary artery bypass in poland syndrome with dextrocardia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    More Ranjit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poland Syndrome is a congenital disorder characterised by hypoplasia of the pectoral muscles along with upper extremity deformities. We encountered a patient with Poland syndrome associated with dextrocardia and also failed pectus excavatum repairs who presented to us with symptomatic ischaemic heart disease requiring intervention. He underwent successful off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCABG. As far as we are aware, this is the first case report of OPCABG in a case of Poland syndrome with dextrocardia. We describe here the management of this complex patient and wish to emphasise that the off-pump option is feasible in dextrocardia with some technical modifications.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Kshitij C; Liu, Zhuonan; Vijwani, Hema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-07-21

    Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE), the most ubiquitous of the COCs, is presented along with examination of forces contributing to adsorption of analogous contaminants at the molecular level. Second, we present results on TCE adsorption and remediation on pure and hybrid CNT systems with a stress on the specific nature of substrate and molecular architecture that would contribute to competitive adsorption. The delineation of intermolecular interactions that contribute to efficient remediation is needed for custom, scalable field design of purification systems for a wide range of contaminants.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitij C. Jha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs on carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE, the most ubiquitous of the COCs, is presented along with examination of forces contributing to adsorption of analogous contaminants at the molecular level. Second, we present results on TCE adsorption and remediation on pure and hybrid CNT systems with a stress on the specific nature of substrate and molecular architecture that would contribute to competitive adsorption. The delineation of intermolecular interactions that contribute to efficient remediation is needed for custom, scalable field design of purification systems for a wide range of contaminants.

  9. Mixing of groundwaters with uncertain end-members: case study in the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan aquifer, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, Eric

    2012-05-01

    Groundwater geochemical data from the northern portion of the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan Valley, in the state of Morelos, Mexico, are analyzed to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the region. The geochemical data suggest that the chemical composition of groundwater is the result of a mixing process between two end-members represented by groundwater from an upper aquifer composed of volcanic-sedimentary rocks and groundwater from a lower aquifer composed of carbonate rocks. Analysis of published data demonstrates that the chemical composition of at least one of the end-members varies significantly in time. Mixing ratios are computed, taking into account the uncertainty in identifying end-members and the time variability in their chemical composition, using published methods. Computed mixing ratios suggest there is a significant contribution from the lower aquifer to the water pumped by the wells in the area, which should be taken into account in the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the region.

  10. Application effect evaluation of groundwater ground-source heat pump systems in Beijing%北京市地下水地源热泵系统应用效果分析评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林跃朝; 刘立才

    2014-01-01

    统计分析了29个热泵项目的调研数据,对比相关规范要求,主要评价了地下水地源热泵系统的性能、节能性、回灌效果以及抽灌井之间的“热突破”程度。结果表明,北京市地下水地源热泵系统的性能一般,节能效果较好,抽灌井之间的“热突破”程度较低,回灌效果总体较好。%Counts and analyses the field investigation data of 29 heat pump projects,and mainly evaluates the efficient,energy saving,groundwater injection and thermal breakthrough between the pumping wells and injection wells for the groundwater ground-source heat pump systems,according to the requirements of correlative standards.The results show that the groundwater ground-source heat pump systems in Beijing have general efficient,good energy saving and slight thermal breakthrough,and the effect of groundwater injection is good as a whole.

  11. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 1. Groundwater flow and plume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, D. S.; Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Sudicky, E. A.

    1983-05-01

    A landfill-derived contaminant plume with a maximum width of ˜600 m, a length of ˜700 m and a maximum depth of 20 m in an unconfined sand aquifer was delineated by means of a monitoring network that includes standpipe piezometers, multilevel point-samplers and bundle-piezometers. The extent of detectable contamination caused by the landfill, which began operation in 1940 and which became inactive in 1976, was determined from the distributions of chloride, sulfate and electrical conductance in the sand aquifer, all of which have levels in the leachate that are greatly above those in uncontaminated groundwater. The maximum temperature of groundwater in the zone of contamination beneath the landfill is 12°C, which is 4-5°C above background. The thermal plume in the aquifer extends ˜150 m downgradient from the centre of the landfill. A slight transient water-table mound exists beneath the landfill in the late spring and summer in response to snowmelt and heavy rainfall. Beneath the landfill, the zone of leachate contamination extends to the bottom of the aquifer, apparently because of transient downward components of hydraulic gradient caused by the water-table mound and possibly because of the higher density and lower viscosity of the contaminated water. Values of hydraulic conductivity, which show variations due to local heterogeneity, were obtained from slug tests of piezometers, from pumping tests and from laboratory tests. Because of the inherent uncertainty in the aquifer parameter values, the 38-yr. frontal position of the plume calculated using the Darcy equation with the assumption of plug flow can differ from the observed frontal position by many hundreds of metres, although the use of mean parameter values produces a close agreement. The width of the plume is large relative to the width of the landfill and can be accounted for primarily by variable periods of lateral east- and westward flow caused by changes in water-table configuration due to the

  12. 地下水源热泵系统热平衡模拟三维数值模型%Three-dimensional numerical model for heat balance simulation of ground-water heat pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆祖江; 李伟; 王琰; 张德忠; 方连育

    2014-01-01

    In order to simulate and predict the change law of heat balance accurately and avoid heat penetration phenomenon during the groundwater heat pump operation, a three dimensional coupling numerical model of groundwater seepage and thermal transport was established and applied to the demonstration project of groundwater heat pump system in Zhengding, Hebei province. The model was based on the groundwater seepage theory, saturated water-bearing medium thermal transport theory and Terzaghi effective stress principle, combined with the design scheme and operation situation of groundwater heat pump, the future heat balance development tendency of groundwater heat pump system under three different conditions was forecasted and analyzed. The water temperature difference between the pumping well and recharge well reduced by 20%(eight degree centigrade) or increased by 20%(twelve degree centigrade) was the first condition which means the cooling and heating load was kept constant. Second condition was the water temperature difference between pumping well and recharge well confirmed and the circulating water volume increased by 20%, or the volume of circulating water kept constant and water temperature difference between pumping well and recharge well increased 20%, which means the cooling and heating load was increased. Meanwhile, in the third condition, the cooling and heating load was reduced. The water temperature difference between the pumping well and recharge well was confirmed and the volume of circulating water reduced 20%, or the water temperature difference between pumping well and recharge well reduced 20%while the circulating water volume kept constant. It was shown that there is a heat penetration phenomenon between the pumping well and recharge well in the demonstration project under the condition of design scheme, which has one pumping well and one recharge well. When the cooling and heating load of the groundwater heat pump system is confirmed, increasing 20

  13. Groundwater contamination mechanism in a geothermal field: a case study of Balcova, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Niyazi; Simşek, Celalettin; Gunduz, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The Balcova Geothermal Field (BGF) located in Izmir, Turkey is situated on an east-west directed graben plain within which the hot waters surface from a fault zone that cuts the Mesozoic aged Bornova Flysch. Due to the low permeability and porosity of the Bornova Flysch, the geothermal water cycles along the immediate vicinity of the Agamemnon fault and mixes with cold waters at different depths of this fractured zone. Within the scope of this study, the mixing patterns and the groundwater contamination mechanisms are analyzed by, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical methods. Based on the results of this research, it has been found out that the hot geothermal water and the cold regional groundwater resources of the surficial aquifer mix within the fractured zone in Bornova Flysch and within the Quaternary alluvium aquifer due to natural and anthropogenic activities including (i) the natural upward movement of geothermal fluid along the fault line, (ii) the accelerated upward seepage of geothermal fluid from faulty constructed boreholes drilled in the area, (iii) the faulty reinjection applications; and, (iv) the uncontrolled discharge of waste geothermal fluid to the natural drainage network. As a result of these activities, the cold groundwater reserves of the alluvial aquifer are contaminated thermally and chemically in such a way that various toxic chemicals including arsenic, antimony and boron are introduced to the heavily used surficial aquifer waters hindering their use for human consumption and agricultural irrigation. Furthermore, the excessive pumping from the surficial aquifer as well as the reduced surface water inflow into BGF due to the dam constructed on Ilica Creek intensify the detrimental effects of this contamination. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that the groundwater pollution in BGF will expand and reach to the levels of no return unless a series of preventive measures is taken immediately.

  14. Groundwater contamination mechanism in a geothermal field: A case study of Balcova, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Niyazi; Şimşek, Celalettin; Gunduz, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The Balcova Geothermal Field (BGF) located in Izmir, Turkey is situated on an east-west directed graben plain within which the hot waters surface from a fault zone that cuts the Mesozoic aged Bornova Flysch. Due to the low permeability and porosity of the Bornova Flysch, the geothermal water cycles along the immediate vicinity of the Agamemnon fault and mixes with cold waters at different depths of this fractured zone. Within the scope of this study, the mixing patterns and the groundwater contamination mechanisms are analyzed by, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical methods. Based on the results of this research, it has been found out that the hot geothermal water and the cold regional groundwater resources of the surficial aquifer mix within the fractured zone in Bornova Flysch and within the Quaternary alluvium aquifer due to natural and anthropogenic activities including (i) the natural upward movement of geothermal fluid along the fault line, (ii) the accelerated upward seepage of geothermal fluid from faulty constructed boreholes drilled in the area, (iii) the faulty reinjection applications; and, (iv) the uncontrolled discharge of waste geothermal fluid to the natural drainage network. As a result of these activities, the cold groundwater reserves of the alluvial aquifer are contaminated thermally and chemically in such a way that various toxic chemicals including arsenic, antimony and boron are introduced to the heavily used surficial aquifer waters hindering their use for human consumption and agricultural irrigation. Furthermore, the excessive pumping from the surficial aquifer as well as the reduced surface water inflow into BGF due to the dam constructed on Ilica Creek intensify the detrimental effects of this contamination. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that the groundwater pollution in BGF will expand and reach to the levels of no return unless a series of preventive measures is taken immediately.

  15. Modelling the effect of buried valleys on groundwater flow: case study in Ventspils vicinity, Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads; Bikse, Janis; Retike, Inga; Babre, Alise; Kalvane, Gunta

    2015-04-01

    Buried subglacial valleys are widely distributed in glaciated regions and they can have great influence on groundwater flow and hence on groundwater resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the buried valleys on groundwater flow in a confined aquifer (Middle Devonian Eifelian stage Arukila aquifer, D2ar) applying numerical modelling. The study area is located at vicinity of Ventspils Town, near wellfield Ogsils where number of the buried valleys with different depth and filling material are present. Area is located close to the Baltic Sea at Piejūra lowland Rinda plain and regional groundwater flow is towards sea. Territory is covered by thin layer of Quaternary sediments in thicknesses of 10 to 20 meters although Prequaternary sediments are exposed at some places. Buried valleys are characterized as narrow, elongated and deep formations that is be filled with various, mainly Pleistocene glacigene sediments - either till loam of different ages or sand and gravel or interbedding of both above mentioned. The filling material of the valleys influences groundwater flow in the confined aquifers which is intercepted by the valleys. It is supposed that glacial till loam filled valleys serves as a barrier to groundwater flow and as a recharge conduit when filled with sand and gravel deposits. Numerical model was built within MOSYS modelling system (Virbulis et al. 2012) using finite element method in order to investigate buried valley influence on groundwater flow in the study area. Several conceptual models were tested in numerical model depending on buried valley filling material: sand and gravel, till loam or mixture of them. Groundwater flow paths and travel times were studied. Results suggested that valley filled with glacial till is acting as barrier and it causes sharp drop of piezometric head and downward flow. Valley filled with sand and gravel have almost no effect on piezometric head distribution, however it this case buried valleys

  16. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ground Source Heat Pump Research, TaC Studios Residence, Atlanta, Georigia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This case study describes the construction of a new test home that demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a high performance ground source heat pump for heating and cooling, a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low-density spray foam insulation, and glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements.

  17. Transitioning insulin pump therapy from the outpatient to the inpatient setting: a review of 6 years' experience with 253 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Curtiss B; Beer, Karen A; Seifert, Karen M; Boyle, Mary E; Mackey, Patricia A; Castro, Janna C

    2012-09-01

    We reviewed the care of a large cohort of patients with diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy who required an inpatient stay. Records were reviewed of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. A total of 136 patients using insulin pumps had 253 hospitalizations. Mean (standard deviation) patient age was 55 (16) years, diabetes duration was 29 (15) years, and pump duration was 6 (5) years. Insulin pump therapy was continued in 164 (65%) hospitalizations. Adherence to core process measures improved over time: by 2011, 100% of cases had an endocrinology consultation, 100% had the required insulin pump order set completed, and 94% had documentation of the signed agreement specifying patient responsibilities for continued use of the technology while hospitalized. Documentation of the insulin pump flow sheet also increased but could still be located in only 64% of cases by the end of 2011. Mean glucose was not significantly different among patients who remained on insulin pump therapy compared to those for whom it was discontinued (p > .1), but episodes of severe hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dl) and hypoglycemia (pump users. No pump site infections, mechanical pump failures, or episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis were observed among patients remaining on therapy. With appropriate patient selection and usage guidelines, most patients using insulin pumps can safely have their therapy transitioned to the inpatient setting. Further study is needed to determine whether this approach can be translated to other hospital settings. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  19. Bacterial communities in tetrachloroethene-polluted groundwaters: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, Michael; Davidová, Anna; Voříšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2013-06-01

    The compositions of bacterial groundwater communities of three sites contaminated with chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by pyrosequencing their 16S rRNA genes. For each location, the entire and the active bacterial populations were characterized by independent molecular analysis of the community DNA and RNA. The sites were selected to cover a broad range of different environmental conditions and contamination levels, with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) being the primary contaminants. Before sampling the biomass, a long-term monitoring of the polluted locations revealed high concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC), which are toxic by-products of the incomplete bacterial degradation of PCE and TCE. The applied pyrosequencing technique enabled known dechlorinators to be identified at a very low detection level (study revealed that only a few species dominated the bacterial communities, with Albidiferax ferrireducens being the only highly prominent member found at all three sites. Only a limited number of OTUs with abundances of up to 1% and high sequence identities to known dechlorinating microorganisms were retrieved from the RNA pools of the two highly contaminated sites. The dechlorinating consortium was likely to be comprised of cDCE-assimilating bacteria (Polaromonas spp.), anaerobic organohalide respirers (mainly Geobacter spp.), and Burkholderia spp. involved in cometabolic dechlorination processes, together with methylotrophs (Methylobacter spp.). The deep sequencing results suggest that the indigenous dechlorinating consortia present at the investigated sites can be used as a starting point for future bioremediation activities by stimulating their anaerobic and aerobic chloroethene degradation capacities (i.e. reductive dechlorination, and metabolic and cometabolic oxidation).

  20. Rare case-series of electrocautery burn following off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Niazi, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: With an increasing number of off-pump coronary artery surgery procedures in high-risk patients with coagulopathy, including renal failure, hepatic failure and anticoagulant drug-using patients, the frequency of related complications such as repeated exploration for bleeding is also increasing. The associated co-morbidity and repeated use of electrocautery in postoperative bleeding leaves patients susceptible to electrocautery ulcers. In this case series, rare cases of cautery burn with unique causative mechanisms are described. PMID:23669602

  1. A case-based reasoning approach for estimating the costs of pump station projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Marzouk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective estimation of costs is crucial to the success of construction projects. Cost estimates are used to evaluate, approve and/or fund projects. Organizations use some form of classification system to identify the various types of estimates that may be prepared during the lifecycle of a project. This research presents a parametric-cost model for pump station projects. Fourteen factors have been identified as important to the influence of the cost of pump station projects. A data set that consists of forty-four pump station projects (fifteen water and twenty-nine waste water are collected to build a Case-Based Reasoning (CBR library and to test its performance. The results obtained from the CBR tool are processed and adopted to improve the accuracy of the results. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the development of the effectiveness of the tool.

  2. [Incorrect programming of a target controlled infusion pump. Case SENSAR of the trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. During general anaesthesia maintenance, the patient received a remifentanyl infusion via a target controlled infusion (TCI) system. The infusion pump that was prepared to deliver the infusion showed malfunction at the beginning of the surgery, so it was quickly replaced with a second pump. After a few minutes into the surgery, the patient presented with hypotension refractory to treatment. The remifentanyl syringe also emptied faster than expected. On reviewing the TCI pump, it was found that it was erroneously programmed for propofol instead of remifentanyl, thus the patient had received a very high dose of remifentanyl that was probably the cause of the haemodynamic disturbances. The incident was an error in equipment use, facilitated by hurry, lack of checking of the equipment prior to its use, and the complex and unclear design of the devices' screens. After analysis of this incident, all TCI pumps were reviewed, and all the programs for infrequently used drugs were deleted. Furthermore, 2 pumps were selected for exclusive use in the cardiac surgery theatre, one with propofol-only programming, and the other with remifentanyl-only programming, both clearly marked and situated in fixed places in that theatre. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydroeconomic modeling of sustainable groundwater management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Duncan; Cayar, Mesut; Taghavi, Ali; Mitchell, David; Hatchett, Steve; Howitt, Richard

    2017-03-01

    In 2014, California passed legislation requiring the sustainable management of critically overdrafted groundwater basins, located primarily in the Central Valley agricultural region. Hydroeconomic modeling of the agricultural economy, groundwater, and surface water systems is critically important to simulate potential transition paths to sustainable management of the basins. The requirement for sustainable groundwater use by 2040 is mandated for many overdrafted groundwater basins that are decoupled from environmental and river flow effects. We argue that, for such cases, a modeling approach that integrates a biophysical response function from a hydrologic model into an economic model of groundwater use is preferable to embedding an economic response function in a complex hydrologic model as is more commonly done. Using this preferred approach, we develop a dynamic hydroeconomic model for the Kings and Tulare Lake subbasins of California and evaluate three groundwater management institutions—open access, perfect foresight, and managed pumping. We quantify the costs and benefits of sustainable groundwater management, including energy pumping savings, drought reserve values, and avoided capital costs. Our analysis finds that, for basins that are severely depleted, losses in crop net revenue are offset by the benefits of energy savings, drought reserve value, and avoided capital costs. This finding provides an empirical counterexample to the Gisser and Sanchez Effect.

  4. Simulated flow of groundwater and brine from a flooded salt mine in Livingston County, New York, and effects of remedial pumping on an overlying aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Richard M.; Miller, Todd S.; Kappel, William M.; Misut, Paul E.; Langevin, Christian D.; Parkhurst, David L.; deVries, M. Peter

    2012-01-01

    began a brine-mitigation project that entailed pumping five wells finished in limestone and shale units within the collapse areas to alter the flow gradient and thereby prevent further movement of brine and saline water into the LCA. The pumped brine was routed to an onsite desalination plant. At the same time, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a study in cooperation with the New York State Office of the Attorney General to construct numerical models to analyze the groundwater chemistry and delineate the directions of flow. Specific objectives of the study were to: * Assess the sources of salinity within the collapse area and identify the factors that control the movement and mixing of freshwater, saline waters from fracture zones, and brine; * Evaluate the likelihood that the pumping will induce anhydrite dissolution and lead to continued land subsidence; * Construct variable-density groundwater flow models to predict the effect of remedial pumping on salinity within the LCA; * Evaluate the effectiveness of remedial pumping in preventing the movement of saline water into the LCA; and * Predict the extent of brine migration 8 years after a hypothetical shutdown of all pumping in 2008. This report (1) summarizes the hydrogeologic setting and effects of mine flooding, (2) describes the geochemical and variable-density model simulations and their principal results, (3) discusses the implications of (a) continued pumping and desalination to protect the LCA and (b) a full shutdown of pumping after 2008, and (4) suggests further research that could lead to refinement of model predictions. Additional information may be found in Yager and others (2001 and 2009). These reports can be accessed at http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/pp1611/ and http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/pp1767/, respectively. A summary of simulation results can be accessed at http://ny.water.usgs.gov/projects/Coram/seawat/seawat.html.

  5. A GIS analysis of the relationship between sinkholes, dry-well complaints and groundwater pumping for frost-freeze protection of winter strawberry production in Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Aurit

    Full Text Available Florida is riddled with sinkholes due to its karst topography. Sometimes these sinkholes can cause extensive damage to infrastructure and homes. It has been suggested that agricultural practices, such as sprinkler irrigation methods used to protect crops, can increase the development of sinkholes, particularly when temperatures drop below freezing, causing groundwater levels to drop quickly during groundwater pumping. In the strawberry growing region, Dover/Plant City, Florida, the effects have caused water shortages resulting in dry-wells and ground subsidence through the development of sinkholes that can be costly to maintain and repair. In this study, we look at how frost-freeze events have affected West Central Florida over the past 25 years with detailed comparisons made between two cold-years (with severe frost-freeze events and a warm year (no frost-freeze events. We analyzed the spatial and temporal correlation between strawberry farming freeze protection practices and the development of sinkholes/dry well complaints, and assessed the economic impact of such events from a water management perspective by evaluating the cost of repairing and drilling new wells and how these compared with using alternative crop-protection methods. We found that the spatial distribution of sinkholes was non-random during both frost-freeze events. A strong correlation between sinkhole occurrence and water extraction and minimum temperatures was found. Furthermore as temperatures fall below 41°F and water levels decrease by more than 20 ft, the number of sinkholes increase greatly (N >10. At this time alternative protection methods such as freeze-cloth are cost prohibitive in comparison to repairing dry wells. In conclusion, the findings from this study are applicable in other agricultural areas and can be used to develop comprehensive water management plans in areas where the abstraction of large quantities of water occur.

  6. The vulnerability of a groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem to chemical and quantitative anthropogenic pressures: case study from southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Anna J.; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Witczak, Stanislaw

    2016-04-01

    The protected Wielkie Bloto fen in southern Poland is a Groundwater Depended Terrestrial Ecosystem (GDTE). The vulnerability of this GDTE was assessed in the contexts of both quality and quantity of groundwater supporting the fen. The qualitative aspect of vulnerability was assessed with an approach based on evaluation of timescales of pollution transport in the aquifer supporting the ecosystem with groundwater. Assessment of the quantitative aspect was based on the conceptualization of the relations of the Wielkie Bloto fen to the underlying groundwater system. The fen relies on groundwater from a shallow Quaternary aquifer and from the deeper Neogene aquifer. Upward leakage from the Neogene to the Quaternary aquifer and to the fen was confirmed by multidisciplinary research (Zurek et al. 2015). In July 2009 a cluster of new pumping wells abstracting water from the Neogene aquifer was commissioned 1 km north of the edge of Wielkie Bloto fen. Consequently, lowering of water levels occurred in this aquifer. However, it remains unclear whether the fen ecosystem will be affected by the pumping. The objective of the study was to assess the dependence of the fen on groundwater. The spatial distribution of physico-chemical parameters of water (pH, conductivity, Na/Cl ratio) in the fen area suggests that the degree of dependence on groundwater is strongly heterogeneous spatially and the recharge rate from the deeper aquifer varies considerably. Groundwater contributions to the fen, which can be used as an indicator of GDTE vulnerability, were quantified and mapped. Acknowledgements. The work was carried out as part of the statutory funds of the AGH University of Science and Technology (project No.11.11.140.026 and 11.11.220.01). References: Zurek A.J., Witczak S., Dulinski M., Wachniew P., Rozanski K., Kania J., Postawa A., Karczewski J., and Moscicki W.J.: 2015. Quantification of anthropogenic impact on groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem using geochemical and

  7. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  8. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CENTRIFUGAL PUMP CASINGS TO DETECT THE CRACK AT THE TONGUE REGION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramana Podugu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to identify one of the reasons for the crack to initiate at the tongue region. The design of the tongue region of the centrifugal pump casing plays an important role in influencing the pump performance and cavitation. Tongue region should have enough strength to withstand against repeated loads imparted by the impeller. Crack at the tongue region is examined under hydrostatic pressure conditions .Practically, at the site location it was observed that the crack was formed at the tongue region when the casing was tested under hydrostatic pressure. Static linear analysis is performed to identify the critical zone where the maximum stress occurs that causes failure. Maximum stress is observed at the tongue region. To reduce the maximum stress, ribs thickness was increased in addition to increasing the portion of the volute thickness. Geometrical modifications are suggested in such a way that there is no effect on the hydraulic performance and to avoid increase in manufacturing cost. Stress distribution of the centrifugal pump casing volute is simulated using finite element software like Ansys. In this paper an attempt was made to validate finite element analysisresults with test conditions and found good concurrence between FEA results and theoretical results.

  9. MODFLOW-2000 and MODPATH5 model data sets used to evaluate the effects of changes in pumping on regional groundwater-flow paths, 2005 and 2010, and areas contributing recharge to discharging wells, 1990-2010, in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey data release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A three-dimensional, groundwater-flow model (MODFLOW-2000) and a particle-tracking program (MODPATH5) were used to evaluate the effects of changes in pumping on...

  10. Modeling the impact of the nitrate contamination on groundwater at the groundwater body scale : The Geer basin case study (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouyere, S.; Orban, P.; Hérivaux, C.

    2009-12-01

    In the next decades, groundwater managers will have to face regional degradation of the quantity and quality of groundwater under pressure of land-use and socio-economic changes. In this context, the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive require that groundwater be managed at the scale of the groundwater body, taking into account not only all components of the water cycle but also the socio-economic impact of these changes. One of the main challenges remains to develop robust and efficient numerical modeling applications at such a scale and to couple them with economic models, as a support for decision support in groundwater management. An integrated approach between hydrogeologists and economists has been developed by coupling the hydrogeological model SUFT3D and a cost-benefit economic analysis to study the impact of agricultural practices on groundwater quality and to design cost-effective mitigation measures to decrease nitrate pressure on groundwater so as to ensure the highest benefit to the society. A new modeling technique, the ‘Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell’ approach has been developed for large scale modeling purposes. The principle of this method is to fully couple different mathematical and numerical approaches to solve groundwater flow and solute transport problems. The mathematical and numerical approaches proposed allows an adaptation to the level of local hydrogeological knowledge and the amount of available data. In combination with long time series of nitrate concentrations and tritium data, the regional scale modelling approach has been used to develop a 3D spatially distributed groundwater flow and solute transport model for the Geer basin (Belgium) of about 480 km2. The model is able to reproduce the spatial patterns of nitrate concentrations together nitrate trends with time. The model has then been used to predict the future evolution of nitrate trends for two types of scenarios: (i) a “business as usual scenario

  11. Proton Pump Inhibitors in the Management of Tachypnoea following Panproctocolectomy: A Case of High Output Ileostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville Azzopardi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available High output ileostomies are important complications of stoma formation following bowel surgery. Adequate management of such stomas might prevent severe morbidity and mortality when this potentially fatal complication develops. In this case report, we describe a female patient with a recent ileostomy formation following panproctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis who presented with progressively increasing shortness of breath. The patient was found to have a hypochloraemic metabolic acidosis on arterial blood gases. She rapidly improved with adequate sodium and fluid replacement and with the use of a course of proton pump inhibitors. This case highlights the importance of recognising high output ileostomies early and important management issues in their regard.

  12. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  13. Off-Pump CABG in a Patient with Dextrocardia Totalis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronary revascularization in patients with dextrocardia is not a common clinical condition. There are very few cases of off-pump coronary artery bypass. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to a university hospital due to exertional chest pain. Her primary diagnosis was coronary artery disease superimposed on dextrocardia, which was first suspected on physical examination, with the patient having right-sided heart sounds on auscultation. It was corroborated by chest X-ray. After diagnostic evaluations, including coronary angiography, she underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting due to a significant left main coronary artery stenosis associated with dextrocardia. Two years later, multi-slice CT angiography revealed patent grafts, demonstrating good clinical results.

  14. Off-Pump CABG in a Patient with Dextrocardia Totalis: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Ali; Bolourian, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    Coronary revascularization in patients with dextrocardia is not a common clinical condition. There are very few cases of off-pump coronary artery bypass. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to a university hospital due to exertional chest pain. Her primary diagnosis was coronary artery disease superimposed on dextrocardia, which was first suspected on physical examination, with the patient having right-sided heart sounds on auscultation. It was corroborated by chest X-ray. After diagnostic evaluations, including coronary angiography, she underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting due to a significant left main coronary artery stenosis associated with dextrocardia. Two years later, multi-slice CT angiography revealed patent grafts, demonstrating good clinical results.

  15. Groundwater vulnerability assessment using fuzzy logic: a case study in the Zayandehrood aquifers, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshad; Safavi, Hamid R; Ahmadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of water, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where surface water is scarce. Groundwater pollution in these regions is consequently a major concern, especially as pollution control and removal in these resources are not only expensive but at times impossible. It is, therefore, essential to prevent their contamination in the first place by properly identifying vulnerable zones. One method most commonly used for evaluating groundwater pollution is the DRASTIC method, in which the Boolean logic is used to rank and classify the parameters involved. Problems arise, however, in the application of the Boolean logic. In this paper, the fuzzy logic has been used to avoid the problems. For this purpose, three critical cases of minimum, maximum, and mean values have been considered for the net recharge parameter. The process has been performed on the Zayandehrood river basin aquifers. The fuzzy-DRASTIC vulnerability map thus obtained indicates that the western areas of the basin generally have the maximum pollution potential followed by the areas located in the east. The central parts of the study area are found to have a low pollution potential. Finally, two sensitivity analyses are performed to show the significance of each value of the net recharge parameter in the calculation of vulnerability index.

  16. Vulnerability Assessment of Groundwater Resources by Nutrient Source Apportionment to Individual Groundwater Wells: A Case Study in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, R.; Obenour, D. R.; Keyworth, A. J.; Genereux, D. P.; Mahinthakumar, K.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) is a major concern in water table aquifers that underlie agricultural areas in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain of the United States. High nutrient concentrations leaching into shallow groundwater can lead to human health problems and eutrophication of receiving surface waters. Liquid manure from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) stored in open-air lagoons and applied to spray fields can be a significant source of nutrients to groundwater, along with septic waste. In this study, we developed a model-based methodology for source apportionment and vulnerability assessment using sparse groundwater quality sampling measurements for Duplin County, North Carolina (NC), obtained by the NC Department of Environmental Quality (NC DEQ). This model provides information relevant to management by estimating the nutrient transport through the aquifer from different sources and addressing the uncertainty of nutrient contaminant propagation. First, the zones of influence (dependent on nutrient pathways) for individual groundwater monitoring wells were identified using a two-dimensional vertically averaged groundwater flow and transport model incorporating geologic uncertainty for the surficial aquifer system. A multiple linear regression approach is then applied to estimate the contribution weights for different nutrient source types using the nutrient measurements from monitoring wells and the potential sources within each zone of influence. Using the source contribution weights and their uncertainty, a probabilistic vulnerability assessment of the study area due to nutrient contamination is performed. Knowledge of the contribution of different nutrient sources to contamination at receptor locations (e.g., private wells, municipal wells, stream beds etc.) will be helpful in planning and implementation of appropriate mitigation measures.

  17. Evaluation of groundwater pollution in a mining area using analytical solution: a case study of the Yimin open-pit mine in China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tianxin; Li, Li; Song, Hongqing; Meng, Linglong; Zhang, Shuli; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study focused on using analytical and numerical models to develop and manage groundwater resources, and predict the effects of management measurements in the groundwater system. Movement of contaminants can be studied based on groundwater flow characteristics. This study can be used for prediction of ion concentration and evaluation of groundwater pollution as the theoretical basis. Case description The Yimin open-pit mine is located in the northern part of the Inner Mongoli...

  18. Pumpage for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents ground-water discharged from the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) through pumped wells. Pumping from wells in...

  19. 浅层地下水源热泵系统若干问题的研究%Research on several issues of shallow groundwater source heat pump system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭银华

    2012-01-01

    对浅层地下水源热泵系统中易忽视的空调循环水泵并联、空调井外网保温、空调井、水源热泵+地板辐射采暖系统等相关问题进行了探讨,并对可能解决的方案进行了讨论,对浅层地下水源热泵系统的设计与施工有一定指导意义。%This article explores issues including parallel air-conditioning cycling pumping, thermal insulation of external airconditioning shaft network, air-conditioning shaft, water source heating pump + radiant floor heating system which are easily neglected in shallow groundwater source heat pump system, and discusses possible solving schemes, which has certain guiding meaning for the design and construction of shallow groundwater source heat pump system.

  20. Characterization of shallow groundwater quality in the Lower St. Johns River Basin: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; Jia-En Zhang; Prem. Parajuli

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of groundwater quality allows the evaluation of groundwater pollution and provides information for better management of groundwater resources. This study characterized the shallow groundwater quality and its spatial and seasonal variations in the Lower St. Johns River Basin, Florida, USA, under agricultural, forest, wastewater, and residential land...

  1. Increasing the success rate of groundwater exploration in developing nation using geophysical methods: Case of a small community in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiorho, S. A.; Omole, D.; Aizebeokhai, A.

    2016-12-01

    About 35 percent of Nigeria's population of the more than 180 M relies on groundwater. Due to the lack of an adequate water supply system within Ogun State, many homes result to drilling their own private wells. Most groundwater is sourced from shallow wells (less than 30 m) and is often of poor water quality. The number of borehole failures is also alarming. Several entrepreneurs have seized on the lack of adequate water supply to drill for groundwater. Several of these wells have either failed or are not adequate for the purposed use of the water. There also appears to be no proper coordination of the citing of these wells. To increase the success rates of the boreholes, the use of geophysical methods amongst others is recommended. This study examines the exploration for groundwater and water quality in Ogun State in Nigeria, using Ota as an example. Ogun State has both significant surface and groundwater resources. However, due to the indiscriminate and lack of proper waste disposal, the vast majority of the surface waters and shallow well waters are impaired making them unsuitable for many users. To access a deeper groundwater source, a geophysical survey was performed to assist in finding a possible location for a borehole. A geophysical survey using the vertical electric sounding (VES) with Schlumberger configuration was carried out. The data shows that there are five layers within the proposed borehole site. Based on the data, it was suggested that a well be placed at a depth between 65-75 m (213-246 ft.). The borehole was drilled to 67m. This depth, from the literature, corresponds to the Abeokuta formation. A pump was installed at 66 m (217 ft.) depth and the first 50 feet of the borehole was grouted to prevent surface water from getting into the hole. A pumping test was performed for about two hours. While this was noteworthy, the data is not made available to any centralized body. No water chemistry was undertaken and more still needs to be done with

  2. Vane Pump Casing Machining of Dumpling Machine Based on CAD/CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yusen; Li, Shilong; Li, Chengcheng; Yang, Zhen

    Automatic dumpling forming machine is also called dumpling machine, which makes dumplings through mechanical motions. This paper adopts the stuffing delivery mechanism featuring the improved and specially-designed vane pump casing, which can contribute to the formation of dumplings. Its 3D modeling in Pro/E software, machining process planning, milling path optimization, simulation based on UG and compiling post program were introduced and verified. The results indicated that adoption of CAD/CAM offers firms the potential to pursue new innovative strategies.

  3. District heating and gas engine heat pump: Economic analysis based on a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.; Noro, M. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella, S. Nicola, 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2006-02-01

    'S. Nicola' HVAC plant in Vicenza features innovative and significant energy savings characteristics. It has been set up by a gas engine heat pump (coupled to two condensing boilers) whose performances are here evaluated during three years of operation. Due to a grid expansion, the University received the offer of being connected to the district heating grid. This possibility that is often considered advantageous was economically evaluated. As a result of this, a significant increasing of the building annual energy bill was demonstrated in case of acceptance. (author)

  4. Stable groundwater quality in deep aquifers of Southern Bangladesh: The case against sustainable abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravenscroft, P., E-mail: pravenscroft@unicef.org [UNICEF, BSL Office Complex, Minto Road, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); McArthur, J.M.; Hoque, M.A. [Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    In forty six wells > 150 m deep, from across the arsenic-polluted area of south-central Bangladesh, groundwater composition remained unchanged between 1998 and 2011. No evidence of deteriorating water quality was found in terms of arsenic, iron, manganese, boron, barium or salinity over this period of 13 years. These deep tubewells have achieved operating lives of more than 20 years with minimal institutional support. These findings confirm that tubewells tapping the deep aquifers in the Bengal Basin provide a safe, popular, and economic, means of arsenic mitigation and are likely to do so for decades to come. Nevertheless, concerns remain about the sustainability of a resource that could serve as a source of As-safe water to mitigate As-pollution in shallower aquifers in an area where tens of millions of people are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic in well water. The conjunction of the stable composition in deep groundwater and the severe adverse health effects of arsenic in shallow groundwater lead us to challenge the notion that strong sustainability principles should be applied to the management of deep aquifer abstraction in Bangladesh is, the notion that the deep groundwater resource should be preserved for future generations by protecting it from adverse impacts, probably of a minor nature, that could occur after a long time and might not happen at all. Instead, we advocate an ethical approach to development of the deep aquifer, based on adaptive abstraction management, which allows possibly unsustainable exploitation now in order to alleviate crippling disease and death from arsenic today while also benefiting future generations by improving the health, education and economy of living children. - Highlights: • Tens of millions of people in Bangladesh are affected by arsenic pollution of groundwater. • Deep wells in potentially non-renewable aquifers are the dominant form of mitigation. • Water quality in these aquifers has remained stable for 13

  5. Submarine groundwater discharge into typical tropical lagoons: A case study in eastern Hainan Island, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilong; Du, Jinzhou

    2016-11-01

    Assessing submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into lagoons and bays can be helpful to understand biogeochemical processes, especially nutrient dynamics. In the present paper, radium (Ra) isotopes were used to quantify SGD in two typical tropical lagoons (Laoye Lagoon (LY Lagoon) and Xiaohai Lagoon (XH Lagoon)) of eastern Hainan Island, China. The Ra mass balance model provided evidence that SGD plays an important role in the hydrology of the LY Lagoon and the XH Lagoon, delivering average SGD fluxes of 1.7 × 106 (94 L m-2 d-1) and 1.8 × 106 (41 L m-2 d-1) m3 d-1, respectively. Tidal pumping was one of the important driving forces for SGD fluxes in the LY and the XH Lagoons. Tidal-driven SGD into the tidal channels of both lagoons can account for approximately 10% of the total SGD flux into the lagoons. In addition, the dissolved inorganic nutrient budgets were reassessed in the LY Lagoon and the XH Lagoon, which showed that SGD was the major source of nutrients entering the LY Lagoon and that the LY Lagoon behaved as a source for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and as a sink for dissolved silicate (DSi). Nutrient loads in the XH Lagoon were mainly derived from riverine inputs and SGD, and the XH Lagoon behaved as a source for DIP, but a sink for DIN and DSi.

  6. Evaluating Contaminant Flux from the Vadose Zone to the Groundwater in the Hanford Central Plateau. SX Tank Farms Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tartakovsky, Guzel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    At the DOE Hanford Site, contaminants were discharged to the subsurface through engineered waste sites in the Hanford Central Plateau. Additional waste was released through waste storage tank leaks. Much of the contaminant inventory is still present within the unsaturated vadose zone sediments. The nature and extent of future groundwater contaminant plumes and the growth or decline of current groundwater plumes beneath the Hanford Central Plateau are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to the groundwater. In general, contaminant transport is slow through the vadose zone and it is difficult to directly measure contaminant flux in the vadose zone. Predictive analysis, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, was applied using a structured, systems-based approach to estimate the future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions for the vadose zone and groundwater (Truex and Carroll 2013). The SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of the existing contaminant inventory in the vadose zone, observations of elevated moisture content in portions of the vadose zone, presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount and wide variety of data available for the site. Although the SX Tank Farm case study is most representative of conditions at tank farm sites, the study has elements that are also relevant to other types of disposal sites in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  7. Environmental- and health-risk-induced remediation design for benzene-contaminated groundwater under parameter uncertainty: a case study in Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; He, L; Lu, H W; Li, J

    2014-09-01

    This study proposes an environmental- and health-risk-induced remediation design approach for benzene-contaminated groundwater. It involves exposure frequency and intake rates that are important but difficult to be exactly quantified as breakthrough point. Flexible health-risk control is considered in the simulation and optimization work. The proposed approach is then applied to a petroleum-contaminated site in western Canada. Different situations about remediation durations, public concerns, and satisfactory degrees are addressed by the approach. The relationship between environmental standards and health-risk limits is analyzed, in association with their effect on remediation costs. Insights of three uncertain factors (i.e. exposure frequency, intake rate and health-risk threshold) for the remediation system are also explored, on a basis of understanding their impacts on health risk as well as their importance order. The case study results show that (1) nature attenuation plays a more important role in long-term remediation scheme than the pump-and-treat system; (2) carcinogenic risks have greater impact on total pumping rates than environmental standards for long-term remediation; (3) intake rates are the second important factor affecting the remediation system's performance, followed by exposure frequency; (4) the 10-year remediation scheme is the most robust choice when environmental and health-risk concerns are not well quantified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Groundwater overexploitation: why is the red flag waved? Case study on the Kairouan plain aquifer (central Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuel, Sylvain; Riaux, Jeanne

    2017-09-01

    In many parts of the world, groundwater users regularly face serious resource-depletion threat. At the same time, "groundwater overexploitation" is massively cited when discussing groundwater management problems. A kind of standard definition tends to relegate groundwater overexploitation only as a matter of inputs and outputs. However, a thorough state-of-the-art analysis shows that groundwater overexploitation is not only a matter of hydrogeology but also a qualification of exploitation based on political, social, technical, economic or environmental criteria. Thus, an aquifer with no threat to groundwater storage can rightly be considered as overexploited because of many other prejudicial aspects. So, why is groundwater overexploitation so frequently only associated with resource-depletion threat and so rarely related to other prejudicial aspects? In that case, what really lies behind the use of the overexploitation concept? The case of the Kairouan plain aquifer in central Tunisia was used to analyze the way that the overexploitation message emerges in a given context, how groundwater-use stakeholders (farmers, management agencies and scientists) each qualify the problem in their own way, and how they see themselves with regard to the concept of overexploitation. The analysis shows that focusing messages on overexploitation conceals the problems encountered by the various stakeholders: difficulties accessing water, problems for the authorities in controlling the territory and individual practices, and complications for scientists when qualifying hydrological situations. The solutions put forward to manage overexploitation are at odds with the problems that arise locally, triggering tensions and leading to misunderstandings between the parties involved.

  9. Unintended purge during the start-up process of a syringe pump: report of a case presented with vascular collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbood, Arash; Kazemi, Asif Parviz; Akbari, Kamal

    2010-12-01

    The case of a 50 year-old woman who developed a sudden decrease in arterial pressure while she was being prepared for surgery for a fractured lumbar spine in the prone position, is reported. She was receiving propofol, remifentanil, and sodium nitroprusside via three syringe pumps through an intravenous cannula at the dorsum of her left hand. The cause of the vascular collapse was the purge of the syringe pumps during the self-check process.

  10. Experiment on single well groundwater heat pump systems in different distances between pumping and injection screens%不同抽回间距的单井循环地下水源热泵系统试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋伟; 倪龙; 姚杨

    2014-01-01

    As the global energy crises and environmental problems become more and more serious, ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used green HVAC system, with an estimated 1.1 million ground source heat pumps installed worldwide. These systems have become an important energy-saving and environment protection technology for use in residential and commercial buildings in China. These applications included two types of systems: closed-loop (ground-coupled) and open-loop. As one kind of semi-closed-loop systems, single well groundwater heat pump (SWGWHP) systems have become increasingly popular for use because of their economic advantages from lower installation cost, lower operating cost, and improved overall performance in regions with suitable geological conditions. In general, SWGWHP systems included three different variations, i.e. standing column well (SCW) system, pumping & recharging well (PRW) system, and pumping&recharging well filled with gravel (PRWFG) system. Compared with SCW system, the well pipe in PRW system and PRWFG system are divided into three parts by clapboards, i.e. production zone, seals zone and injection zone. In recent decades, considerable research efforts have been spent on SWGWHP systems, especially on SCW system. However, little attention has been focused on the PRW system and PRWFG system. For GSHP systems, sand tank experiment is one of the important methods of laboratory investigation for discussing the performance of geothermal heat exchanger, due to many parameters can be set and adjusted more easily and economically than that in in-situ experiments. In order to provide a framework for discussing the influence on distances between pumping and injection screens (DPI) in SWGWHP systems, a sand tank experiment system was designed and set up in Harbin Institute of Technology, China. In this study, we tested the temperature of outlet and inlet water, the aquifer temperature, and flow rate of outlet water. From the

  11. Preliminary simulation of chloride transport in the Equus Beds aquifer and simulated effects of well pumping and artificial recharge on groundwater flow and chloride transport near the city of Wichita, Kansas, 1990 through 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klager, Brian J.; Kelly, Brian P.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas is a primary water-supply source for the city of Wichita. Water-level declines because of groundwater pumping for municipal and irrigation needs as well as sporadic drought conditions have caused concern about the adequacy of the Equus Beds aquifer as a future water supply for Wichita. In March 2006, the city of Wichita began construction of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project, a plan to artificially recharge the aquifer with excess water from the Little Arkansas River. Artificial recharge will raise groundwater levels, increase storage volume in the aquifer, and deter or slow down a plume of chloride brine approaching the Wichita well field from the Burrton, Kansas area caused by oil production activities in the 1930s. Another source of high chloride water to the aquifer is the Arkansas River. This study was prepared in cooperation with the city of Wichita as part of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project. Chloride transport in the Equus Beds aquifer was simulated between the Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers near the Wichita well field. Chloride transport was simulated for the Equus Beds aquifer using SEAWAT, a computer program that combines the groundwater-flow model MODFLOW-2000 and the solute-transport model MT3DMS. The chloride-transport model was used to simulate the period from 1990 through 2008 and the effects of five well pumping scenarios and one artificial recharge scenario. The chloride distribution in the aquifer for the beginning of 1990 was interpolated from groundwater samples from around that time, and the chloride concentrations in rivers for the study period were interpolated from surface water samples. Five well-pumping scenarios and one artificial-recharge scenario were assessed for their effects on simulated chloride transport and water levels in and around the Wichita well field. The scenarios were: (1) existing 1990 through 2008 pumping conditions, to serve as a

  12. Groundwater quality and hydrogeological characteristics of Malacca state in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazi Sharif Moniruzzaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater quality and aquifer productivity of Malacca catchment in Peninsular Malaysia are presented in this article. Pumping test data were collected from 210 shallow and 17 deep boreholes to get well inventory information. Data analysis confirmed that the aquifers consisting of schist, sand, limestone and volcanic rocks were the most productive aquifers for groundwater in Malacca state. GIS-based aquifer productivity map was generated based on bedrock and discharge capacity of the aquifers. Aquifer productivity map is classified into three classes, namely high, moderate and low based on discharge capacity. Groundwater potential of the study area is 35, 57 and 8% of low, moderate and high class respectively. Fifty two shallow and 14 deep aquifer groundwater samples were analyzed for water quality. In some cases, groundwater quality analysis indicated that the turbidity, total dissolved solids, iron, chloride and cadmium concentrations exceeded the limit of drinking water quality standards.

  13. The problem of sustainable groundwater management: the case of La Mancha aquifers, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Encarna; Albiac, José

    2012-08-01

    Gisser and Sánchez (Water Resour Res 16(4):638-642, 1980) compared two different strategies to manage aquifers: "free market" and policy regulation. They stated that the outcome of both is practically the same, and that policy regulation could not improve social welfare. This study challenges this argument by analyzing the management strategies in two large aquifers located in southern Spain, the Eastern La Mancha and the Western La Mancha aquifers. The appeal of this case stems from the fact that management of the Eastern La Mancha aquifer is almost sustainable. In stark contrast, its neighboring Western La Mancha aquifer is being grossly mismanaged. The results engage two major questions from previous groundwater literature. The first question is whether or not aquifer management requires policy intervention. The answer depends upon the consideration and magnitude of environmental damages in the model. The second question addresses the nature of groundwater policies. The contrast in management outcomes between the Western and the Eastern La Mancha aquifers is related to the different types of policy instruments implemented for each aquifer. The results of these policies underline the importance of nurturing the stakeholders' collective action under the appropriate institutional setting.

  14. Evaluation of groundwater pollution in a mining area using analytical solution: a case study of the Yimin open-pit mine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianxin; Li, Li; Song, Hongqing; Meng, Linglong; Zhang, Shuli; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on using analytical and numerical models to develop and manage groundwater resources, and predict the effects of management measurements in the groundwater system. Movement of contaminants can be studied based on groundwater flow characteristics. This study can be used for prediction of ion concentration and evaluation of groundwater pollution as the theoretical basis. The Yimin open-pit mine is located in the northern part of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. High concentrations of iron and manganese are observed in Yimin open-pit mine because of exploitation and pumping that have increased the concentration of the ions in groundwater. In this study, iron was considered as an index of contamination, and the solute model was calibrated using concentration observations from 14 wells in 2014. The groundwater flow model and analytical solutions were used in this study to forecast pollution concentration and variation trend after calibration. With continuous pumping, contaminants will migrate, and become enriched, towards the wellhead in the flow direction. The concentration of the contaminants and the range of pollution increase with the flow rate increased. The suitable flow rate of single well should be <380 m/day at Yimin open-pit for the standard value of pollution concentration.

  15. Ecohydrological Responses to Diversion of Groundwater: Case Study of a Deep-Rock Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent [EmpTec, Taeby (Sweden)], E-mail: kent.werner@emptec.se; Collinder, Per [Ekologigruppen AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Berglund, Sten [HydroResearch AB, Taeby (Sweden); Maartensson, Erik [DHI Sverige AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    Planning and license applications concerning groundwater diversion in areas containing water-dependent or water-favored habitats must take into account both hydrological effects and associated ecological consequences. There is at present no established methodology to assess such ecohydrological responses. Thus, this paper describes a new stepwise methodology to assess ecohydrological responses to groundwater diversion from, e.g., water-drained pits, shafts, tunnels, and caverns in rock below the groundwater table. The methodology is illustrated using the planned deep-rock repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in central Sweden as a case study, offering access to a unique hydrological and ecological dataset. The case study demonstrates that results of ecohydrological assessments can provide useful inputs to planning of monitoring programs and mitigation measures in infrastructure projects. As a result of the assessment, artificial water supply to wetlands is planned in order to preserve biological diversity, nature values, and vulnerable species.

  16. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Stable water isotopes (δ2H, δ18O) were used to trace hydrological processes and tritium (3H) to evaluate the relative contribution of modern water in samples. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal groundwater, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3-type. It originates as recharge at "La Primavera" caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal groundwater is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na and HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed-HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural return flow. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Twenty-seven groundwater samples contain at least a small fraction of modern water. The application of a multivariate mixing model allowed the mixing proportions of hydrothermal fluids, polluted waters and cold groundwater in sampled water to be evaluated. This study will help local water authorities to identify and dimension groundwater contamination, and act accordingly. It may be broadly applicable to

  17. Catheter Migration After Implantationan Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Pump for Severe Spasticity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Chou Li

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intrathecal baclofen infusion pump implantation complicated by migration of the catheter tip. A 55-year-old man required an intrathecal baclofen infusion for severe spasticity 4 years after a cervical spinal cord injury with incomplete tetraparesis. Twelve months after initial implantation of the device, the patient began to experience a recurrence of trunk tightness and spasticity. Subsequent X-ray and computed tomography evaluations of the catheter system revealed pooling of contrast medium outside of the intrathecal distribution in the lumbar subcutaneous region of the back and therefore migration of the pump catheter tip. At surgical revision, emphasis was placed on minimizing the length of catheter outside of the spine and securing the catheter in the supraspinous fascia with a right-angled anchor. The distance between the anchors and the entry point of the catheter into the supraspinous fascia was also reduced to prevent slipping when the patient bends forward. After surgery, the patient's spasticity improved and, 1 year later, he has experienced no further complications during follow-up, requiring an average baclofen dose of 150 mg/day. Here, we describe several surgical methods intended to secure the intrathecal catheter and prevent catheter migration. Other complications related to catheter failure are also highlighted.

  18. Sealable joint steel sheet piling for groundwater control and remediation: Case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, D. [Univ. of Waterloo (Canada); Jowett, R. [Waterloo Barrier Inc., Rockwood, Ontario (Canada); Gamble, M. [C3 Environmental, Breslau, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The Waterloo Barrier{trademark} steel sheet piling (patents pending) incorporates a cavity at each interlocking joint that is flushed clean and injected with sealant after the piles have been driven into the ground to form a vertical cutoff wall. The installation and sealing procedures allow for a high degree of quality assurance and control. Bulk wall hydraulic conductivities of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} cm/sec have been demonstrated at field installations. Recent case histories are presented in which Waterloo Barrier{trademark} cutoff walls are used to prevent off-site migration of contaminated groundwater or soil gases to adjacent property and waterways. Full enclosures to isolate DNAPL source zones or portions of contaminated aquifers for pilot-scale remediation testing will also be described. Monitoring data will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waterloo Barrier{trademark} in these applications.

  19. A rare case of a scuba diver's death due to propeller injuries of a desalination pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, G; Di Battista, B; Montana, A; Pavia, J; Cauchi, S; Zerafa, N M; Pomara, C

    2015-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, as well as pleasure boat cruising are becoming increasingly popular hobbies. As a result, the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. Injuries by propellers, amputation, death by drowning, and bleeding are rare reported events in forensic literature. The most common circumstances surrounding boat-propeller-related injuries are concerned with getting into or out of the boat, personal watercraft use or water skiing, and falling or being thrown from the boat. A case of a scuba diver's death that occurred during an illegal scuba fishing trip around a desalination plant is presented. A complete autopsy and histological study of all organs and surfaces of dismembered cadaveric sections, performed in order to determine the phases of death, are reported. An underwater scene investigation was conducted by an engineering team studying the mouth of the pump and the dynamic characteristic of rotating propeller blades.

  20. Coastal forests and groundwater: Using case studies to understand the effects of drivers and stressors for resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy Callahan; Devendra Amatya; Peter Stone

    2017-01-01

    Forests are receiving more attention for the ecosystem goods and services they provide and the potential change agents that may affect forest health and productivity. Highlighting case examples from coastal forests in South Carolina, USA, we describe groundwater processes with respect to stressors and potential responses of a wetland-rich forested landscape,...

  1. Innovative Approaches to Collaborative Groundwater Governance in the United States: Case Studies from Three High-Growth Regions in the Sun Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megdal, Sharon B.; Gerlak, Andrea K.; Huang, Ling-Yee; Delano, Nathaniel; Varady, Robert G.; Petersen-Perlman, Jacob D.

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater is an increasingly important source of freshwater, especially where surface water resources are fully or over-allocated or becoming less reliable due to climate change. Groundwater reliance has created new challenges for sustainable management. This article examines how regional groundwater users coordinate and collaborate to manage shared groundwater resources, including attention to what drives collaboration. To identify and illustrate these facets, this article examines three geographically diverse cases of groundwater governance and management from the United States Sun Belt: Orange County Water District in southern California; Prescott Active Management Area in north-central Arizona; and the Central Florida Water Initiative in central Florida. These regions have different surface water laws, groundwater allocation and management laws and regulations, demographics, economics, topographies, and climate. These cases were selected because the Sun Belt faces similar pressures on groundwater due to historical and projected population growth and limited availability of usable surface water supplies. Collectively, they demonstrate groundwater governance trends in the United States, and illustrate distinctive features of regional groundwater management strategies. Our research shows how geophysical realities and state-level legislation have enabled and/or stimulated regions to develop groundwater management plans and strategies to address the specific issues associated with their groundwater resources. We find that litigation involvement and avoidance, along with the need to finance projects, are additional drivers of regional collaboration to manage groundwater. This case study underscores the importance of regionally coordinated and sustained efforts to address serious groundwater utilization challenges faced by the regions studied and around the world.

  2. Innovative Approaches to Collaborative Groundwater Governance in the United States: Case Studies from Three High-Growth Regions in the Sun Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megdal, Sharon B; Gerlak, Andrea K; Huang, Ling-Yee; Delano, Nathaniel; Varady, Robert G; Petersen-Perlman, Jacob D

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater is an increasingly important source of freshwater, especially where surface water resources are fully or over-allocated or becoming less reliable due to climate change. Groundwater reliance has created new challenges for sustainable management. This article examines how regional groundwater users coordinate and collaborate to manage shared groundwater resources, including attention to what drives collaboration. To identify and illustrate these facets, this article examines three geographically diverse cases of groundwater governance and management from the United States Sun Belt: Orange County Water District in southern California; Prescott Active Management Area in north-central Arizona; and the Central Florida Water Initiative in central Florida. These regions have different surface water laws, groundwater allocation and management laws and regulations, demographics, economics, topographies, and climate. These cases were selected because the Sun Belt faces similar pressures on groundwater due to historical and projected population growth and limited availability of usable surface water supplies. Collectively, they demonstrate groundwater governance trends in the United States, and illustrate distinctive features of regional groundwater management strategies. Our research shows how geophysical realities and state-level legislation have enabled and/or stimulated regions to develop groundwater management plans and strategies to address the specific issues associated with their groundwater resources. We find that litigation involvement and avoidance, along with the need to finance projects, are additional drivers of regional collaboration to manage groundwater. This case study underscores the importance of regionally coordinated and sustained efforts to address serious groundwater utilization challenges faced by the regions studied and around the world.

  3. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  4. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernández-Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla Valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal water, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3 type. It originates as recharge at Primavera caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal water is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na, HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural practices. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Tritium method elucidated that practically all of the sampled groundwater contains at least a small fraction of modern water. The multivariate mixing model M3 indicates that the proportion of hydrothermal fluids in sampled well water is between 13 (local groundwater and 87% (hydrothermal water, and the proportion of polluted water in wells ranges from 0 to 63%. This study may help local water authorities to identify and quantify groundwater contamination and act accordingly.

  5. Groundwater availability of the Mississippi embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian R.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    indications of the reversal began in the early 1960s with a trend in loss of streamflow leakage coupled with the first consistent inflow from storage. While groundwater pumped out of the alluvial aquifer was derived primarily from storage, pumpage out of the middle Claiborne aquifer was derived primarily from other aquifers (up to 15 percent from the alluvial aquifer), followed by flow from storage and net recharge. The potential consequences of climate change have been identified as a major concern facing the sustainability of the Nation's groundwater resources. To address this concern, two climate simulations were developed through the use of the MERAS model by extending the simulation period by 30 years to the year 2038 using extrapolated precipitation based on frequency analysis of historic climate cycles. There is little difference between the dry and wet scenarios in terms of percent water-level change. Both scenarios resulted in 14.6 to 13.9 percent of the area containing more than 100 feet of decline, 14.5 to 13.8 percent containing between 75 and 100 feet of decline, and 15.8 to 15.7 percent containing 51 to 75 feet of decline in the alluvial aquifer. The middle Claiborne aquifer water-level changes also were similar between the two scenarios. These scenarios indicate that even with a 25-percent increase in precipitation from that of the dry scenario, there is little difference in the resultant water levels. This is in large part because of the magnitude of differences between changes in net recharge and changes in pumping. When compared to the volume of water pumped out of the system, the effect of this change in net recharge is negligible. The groundwater-level monitoring network used to construct the 2007 middle Claiborne aquifer potentiometric surface was used as an example case to demonstrate statistical technique and to evaluate the importance of individual groundwater-level observations. To calculate the importance of each water-level observation to a

  6. Limits to global groundwater consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, I.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest accessible freshwater resource worldwide and is of critical importance for irrigation, and so for global food security. For many regions of the world where groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge, persistent groundwater depletion occurs. A direct consequence of depletion is falling groundwater levels, reducing baseflows to rivers, harming ecosystems. Also, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence can occur. Water demands are expected to increase further due to growing population, economic development and climate change, posing the urgent question how sustainable current water abstractions are worldwide and where and when these abstractions approach conceivable limits with all the associated problems. Here, we estimated past and future trends (1960-2050) in groundwater levels resulting from changes in abstractions and climate and predicted when limits of groundwater consumption are reached. We explored these limits by predicting where and when groundwater levels drop that low that groundwater becomes unattainable for abstractions and how river flows are affected. Water availabilities, abstractions, and lateral groundwater flows are simulated (5 arcmin. resolution) using a coupled version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and a groundwater model based on MODFLOW. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of the worlds confined and unconfined aquifer systems, needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Results show that, next to the existing regions experiencing groundwater depletion (like India, Pakistan, Central Valley) new regions will develop, e.g. Southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Using a limit that reflects present-day feasibility of groundwater abstraction, we estimate that in 2050 groundwater becomes unattainable for 20% of the global population, mainly in the developing countries and pumping cost will increase significantly. Largest impacts are found

  7. Practical considerations for measuring hydrogen concentrations in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Woodward, J.C.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen (H2) in groundwater including 1 sampling methods 2 pumping methods and (3) effects of well casing materials were evaluated. Three different sampling methodologies (a downhole sampler, a gas- stripping method, and a diffusion sampler) were compared. The downhole sampler and gas-stripping methods gave similar results when applied to the same wells, the other hand, appeared to The diffusion sampler, on overestimate H2 concentrations relative to the downhole sampler. Of these methods, the gas-stripping method is better suited to field conditions because it is faster (~ 30 min for a single analysis as opposed to 2 h for the downhole sampler or 8 h for the diffusion sampler), the analysis is easier (less sample manipulation is required), and the data computations are more straightforward (H2 concentrations need not be corrected for water sample volume). Measurement of H2 using the gas-stripping method can be affected by different pumping equipment. Peristaltic, piston, and bladder pumps all gave similar results when applied to water produced from the same well. It was observed, however, that peristaltic-pumped water (which draws water under a negative pressure) enhanced the gas-stripping process and equilibrated slightly faster than either piston or bladder pumps (which push water under a positive pressure). A direct current(dc) electrically driven submersible pump was observed to produce H2 and was not suitable for measuring H2 in groundwater. Measurements from two field sites indicate that iron or steel well casings, produce H2, which masks H2 concentrations in groundwater. PVC-cased wells or wells cased with other materials that do not produce H2 are necessary for measuring H2 concentrations in groundwater.Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen in groundwater including sampling methods, pumping methods, and effects of

  8. Innovation-enabling policy and regime transformation towards increased energy efficiency: The case of the circulator pump industry in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruby, Tobias Møller

    2015-01-01

    When new energy efficient products are struggling with their commercialisation and diffusion into widespread applications you would typically expect policy-makers and green lead-users to guide the way. This paper examines the case of the hot water circulator pump industry in Europe, where parts o...

  9. Methods for studying medical device technology and practitioner cognition : The case of user-interface issues with infusion pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.; Verhoeven, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose : The aims of this study were to investigate how a variety of research methods is commonly employed to study technology and practitioner cognition. User-interface issues with infusion pumps were selected as a case because of its relevance to patient safety. Methods : Starting from a Cognitiv

  10. Methods for studying medical device technology and practitioner cognition: the case of user-interface issues with infusion pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.; Verhoeven, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate how a variety of research methods is commonly employed to study technology and practitioner cognition. User-interface issues with infusion pumps were selected as a case because of its relevance to patient safety. Methods Starting from a Cognitive S

  11. Identifying the groundwater basin boundaries, using environmental isotopes: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroğlu, Muhterem

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater, which is renewable under current climatic conditions separately from other natural sources, in fact is a finite resource in terms of quality and fossil groundwater. Researchers have long emphasized the necessity of exploiting, operating, conserving and managing groundwater in an efficient and sustainable manner with an integrated water management approach. The management of groundwater needs reliable information about changes on groundwater quantity and quality. Environmental isotopes are the most important tools to provide this support. No matter which method we use to calculate the groundwater budget and flow equations, we need to determine boundary conditions or the physical boundaries of the domain. The Groundwater divide line or basin boundaries that separate the two adjacent basin recharge areas from each other must be drawn correctly to be successful in defining complex groundwater basin boundary conditions. Environmental isotope data, as well as other methods provide support for determining recharge areas of the aquifers, especially for karst aquifers, residence time and interconnections between aquifer systems. This study demonstrates the use of environmental isotope data to interpret and correct groundwater basin boundaries giving as an example the Yeniçıkrı basin within the main Sakarya basin.

  12. Identifying the groundwater basin boundaries, using environmental isotopes: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiroğlu, Muhterem

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater, which is renewable under current climatic conditions separately from other natural sources, in fact is a finite resource in terms of quality and fossil groundwater. Researchers have long emphasized the necessity of exploiting, operating, conserving and managing groundwater in an efficient and sustainable manner with an integrated water management approach. The management of groundwater needs reliable information about changes on groundwater quantity and quality. Environmental isotopes are the most important tools to provide this support. No matter which method we use to calculate the groundwater budget and flow equations, we need to determine boundary conditions or the physical boundaries of the domain. The Groundwater divide line or basin boundaries that separate the two adjacent basin recharge areas from each other must be drawn correctly to be successful in defining complex groundwater basin boundary conditions. Environmental isotope data, as well as other methods provide support for determining recharge areas of the aquifers, especially for karst aquifers, residence time and interconnections between aquifer systems. This study demonstrates the use of environmental isotope data to interpret and correct groundwater basin boundaries giving as an example the Yeniçıkrı basin within the main Sakarya basin.

  13. Impact of Preservation of Subsoil Water Act on Groundwater Depletion: The Case of Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Amarnath; Mishra, Ashok K.; Verma, Geetanjali

    2016-07-01

    Indian states like Punjab and Haryana, epicenters of the Green Revolution, are facing severe groundwater shortages and falling water tables. Recognizing it as a serious concern, the Government of Punjab enacted the Punjab Preservation of Subsoil Water Act in 2009 (or the 2009 act) to slow groundwater depletion. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of this policy on groundwater depletion, using panel data from 1985 to 2011. Results from this study find a robust effect of the 2009 act on reducing groundwater depletion. Our models for pre-monsoon, post-monsoon, and overall periods of analysis find that since implementation of the 2009 act, groundwater tables have improved significantly. Second, our study reveals that higher shares of tube wells per total cropped area and increased population density have led to a significant decline in the groundwater tables. On the other hand, rainfall and the share of area irrigated by surface water have had an augmenting effect on groundwater resources. In the two models, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, this study shows that seasonality plays a key role in determining the groundwater table in Punjab. Specifically, monsoon rainfall has a very prominent impact on groundwater.

  14. Study on the groundwater exploitation test in the Yellow River lower reaches--A case study on the north suburb waterworks of Zhengzhou,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Zisheng; LIN Xueyu; SHI Qinzhou; Gnansounou Raoul; DU Xinqiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the studies on groundwater resources potential of the Yellow River (YR) terrace in Zhengzhou area, China. The main aim of the research was to resolve water shortage problems induced by recent but frequent drying ups of the YR in its lower reaches. Geologic explorations and grouped-pumping tests were conducted in the area. Based on collected data a groundwater flow net was established. The buried depth of groundwater level and water bearing potential of the aquifers were evaluated.Conventional method was used to determine recharge of the groundwater by lateral infiltration of the YR in pumping patterns. The results show that the study region has a high water bearing potential and offers conditions for the construction of large water works. However, only limited recharge by lateral infiltration from the river is available when developing large scale groundwater exploitation in the riverside of the YR.Environmental impacts induced by embankment stability of the Great dyke of the YR could be minimized or eliminated by appropriate engineering methods.

  15. Quantifying the Groundwater Mixing Processes under the Land-Use Change and Anthropogenic Impact: A Case Study of the Quaternary Groundwater System underlying the New Reclaimed Lands, the Eastern Fringe of the Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M. M. A. M.; Tokunaga, T.; Massoud, U. S.

    2015-12-01

    The stable (δ2H, δ18O and δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) isotopic compositions of water and hydrochemical information were analyzed and used to quantify the contribution of different sources, i.e., groundwater in the original Quaternary and the Miocene aquifers, surface water in the Ismailia canal and wastewater, to the Quaternary aquifer system. 14C activities and isotope data suggest that about 52% of groundwater in the Quaternary aquifer is derived from the past rainfall, i.e., presumably 5000-7800 years B.P. Northward (EC 6000 µS/cm, low HCO3- concentration, δ13C-enriched, δ18O/δ2H-depleted, and 14C ≤ 42 pMC) spatial changes in chemical and isotopic compositions of groundwater in the Quaternary aquifer are attributed to the contributions of the Ismailia canal in the north and the groundwater of the Miocene aquifer in the south, respectively. Temporal changes of isotopic composition of the Nile water in response to the construction of the Aswan High Dam are also detected and the information is used to evaluate the groundwater recharge processes from the Ismailia canal. Current contribution from the Ismailia canal (25%) is considered to be greatly enhanced through surface water diversion and related irrigation practices, i.e., freshwater ponds. Contribution of the groundwater from the Miocene aquifer was also detected locally, and it was thought to be related to the excessive pumping. Increase in nitrate concentrations, change in the stable isotopic composition of groundwater from wells adjacent to wastewater ponds, along with the information obtained from the analysis of city water balance and recent geophysical data show that local recharge from wastewater ponds (4%) occurs to the Quaternary aquifer system. The results are expected to be helpful for formulating appropriate protection and sustainable water management strategies.

  16. Biocorrosion of evaporators of water/water heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denier, P.; Sutter, E.M.M.; Cornet, A. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts et Industries, 67 - Strasbourg (FR))

    1990-12-01

    During the last twenty years, many heat pumps were installed in Alsace (France) using groundwater. It appeared that water contained bacteria able to induce metallic corrosion. Thus, it was necessary to have a better knowledge of the situation. A statistical study on water analysis was realised. There is no noticeable relation between bacterial contamination and water chemistry or geographical location. Most of corrosion origines were - a bad water network conception (erosion, cavitation, oxygen differential cells...) - a bad use of metal coupling (galvanic corrosion). The presence of bacteria generally increases the phenomena described above. Solutions proposed are: PVC casing, stainless steel water pumps, heat pump evaporators in noble alloys or metals, PVC or resines lagging. For the actual set of heat pumps, there are less solutions but in some cases an intermediary exchanger would be a good and easy solution.

  17. Economic feasibility of large scale PV water pumping applications utilizing real field data for a case study in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Odeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Economic viability of photovoltaic, diesel and grid connected water pumping systems is investigated and compared for system capacities in the range 1500 m4/day to 100,000 m4/day. Actual performance data from installed systems are considered in calculating systems outputs for base case scenarios. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to generalize results for other locations and conditions. Several scenarios of the effect of variation electricity tariffs, components prices, diesel fuel prices, operation cost and interest rate on the output water unit cost (US$/1000m4  are investigated.  Breakeven points of PV pumping systems are determined at certain input parameters.

  18. Monitoring of aquifer pump tests with Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS): a synthetic case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, E.; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    calculates the MRS-signal generated by an aquifer pump test. A synthetic MRS-dataset was subsequently used to determine the hydrogeological parameters in an inverse parameter estimation approach. This was done for a virtual pump test with a partially and a fully penetrating well. With the MRS data we were...... able to retrieve the hydrogeological parameters of the aquifer. However, the differences in MRS signal in time were small compared to the electromagnetic noise. This limits the applicability of the MRS technique for pump tests in which a partially penetrating pumping well is used, as the limited...... drawdown around the extraction well causes smaller changes in received signal....

  19. Impact of over-exploitation on groundwater quality: A case study from WR-2Watershed, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil M Pophare; Bhushan R Lamsoge; Yashwant B Katpatal; Vijay P Nawale

    2014-10-01

    The WR-2 watershed is located in the Deccan trap basaltic terrain of Maharashtra State, India. The watershed area incorporates a rich orange orchard belt that requires a huge quantity of water for irrigation. This requirement is mostly met through groundwater, extracted from the shallow aquifers of the WR-2 watershed. However, over the years, excess withdrawal of groundwater from these aquifers has resulted in depletion of groundwater level. The declining trends of groundwater level, both long term and short term, have had a negative impact on the groundwater quality of the study area. This effect can be gauged through the rising electrical conductivity (EC) of groundwater in the shallow aquifers (dug wells) of the WR-2 watershed. It is observed that the long term declining trend of groundwater level, during 1977–2010, varied from 0.03 to 0.04 m per year, whereas the corresponding trend of rising EC varied from 1.90 to 2.94 S/cm per year. During 2007–2010, about 56% dug wells showed a positive correlation between depleting groundwater level and rising EC values. The groundwater level depletion during this period ranged from 0.03 to 0.67 m per year, whereas the corresponding trend of rising EC ranged from 0.52 to 46.91 S/cm per year. Moreover, the water quality studies reveal that groundwater from more than 50% of the dug wells of the WR-2 watershed is not suitable for drinking purpose. The groundwater, though mostly suitable for irrigation purpose, is corrosive and saturated with respect to mineral equilibrium and shows a tendency towards chemical scale formation.

  20. 石油类污染场地地下水抽水过程水质变化成因%ANALYSIS OF GROUNDWATER QUALITY CHANGING IN PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SITE DURING PUMPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 蔡五田; 王丹; 王凯丽; 李楠; 李金英

    2011-01-01

    在某石油类污染场地抽水试验过程中对地下水五项常规水质指标进行了连续监测.通过对指标的相关性和主成分分析,基于抽水、弥散试验,揭示了该场地抽水过程中水质变化的原因,探讨了以水质指标描述石油类污染场地地下水净化的方法.结果显示,水质变化是由昼夜水温变化、抽水和生化耗氧作用三者引起.其中,水温变化是由昼夜变化引起;电导率减小是抽水作用使导电粒子减少的结果;溶解氧(DO)主要受生化耗氧作用和水温引起的氧溶解度变化的影响;pH受水温引起的水的离子积常数变化、抽水作用引起的酸碱性物质减少和生化耗氧作用产生CO2的影响;氧化还原电位(ORP)受抽水作用引起的反应物质浓度减少和水温变化引起的地下水即时溶解氧变化的影响.其中,pH与DO的关系主要是生化耗氧作用的直接结果.温度、电导率、DO、pH和ORP五项指标可提取为地下水自净速率和净化能力两个主成分,描述地下水净化.%Five conventional indices of groundwater quality were monitored continuously in a petroleum-contaminated site during a pumping test.Based on the pumping and dispersion test,the causes of changes in water quality in the site were revealed through correlation and principal component analyses,and a method of describing the purification of petroleum-contaminated groundwater was discussed.The research shows that the changes in groundwater quality are the combined results of day-and-night water temperature change,pumping effect and bio-chemical oxygen effect.The water temperature change results from Day-and-Night change;The reduction of conductivity arises from decreased conductive particles caused by pumping effect;DO change is mainly affected by bio-chemical oxygen effect and oxygen solubility variation due to temperature change;pH varies with water ionic product constant change caused by water temperature

  1. Limits to Global Groundwater Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaf, I. D.; Van Beek, R.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems, groundwater is often used as an additional fresh water source. For many regions of the world groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge and persistent groundwater depletion occurs. The most direct effect of groundwater depletion is declining of water tables, leading to reduced groundwater discharge needed to sustain base-flow to e.g. rivers. Next to that, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence occurs. These problems are expected to increase in the near future due to growing population and climate changes. This poses the urgent question of what the limits are of groundwater consumption worldwide. We simulate global water availability (5 arc-minute resolution, for 1960-2050) using the hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al. 2011), coupled to a groundwater model based on MODFLOW (de Graaf et al. 2015), allowing for groundwater - surface water interactions. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of world's confined and unconfined aquifer systems needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Water demands are included (from Wada et al. 2014). We study the limits to water consumption, focusing on locally attainable groundwater and groundwater levels critical to rivers to sustain low flows. We show an increasing trend (1960-2050) in groundwater head declines, due to increase in groundwater demand. Also, stream flow will decrease and low flow conditions will occur more frequent and will be longer in duration in the near future, especially for irrigated areas. Next to that, we provide a global overview of the years it takes until groundwater gets unattainable for e.g. a local farmer (100 m below land-surface used as a proxy), and estimate the increase in pumping cost for the near future. The results show where and when limits of groundwater consumption are reached globally.

  2. Experience of valve replacement under mild hypothermia on pump-beating heart:an analysis of 800 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈柏成; 肖颖彬; 陈林; 钟前进; 王学锋; 周骐; 易广兵

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome of valve replacement under mild hypothermia on pump-beating heart and to discuss the risk factors of cardiac valve surgery. Methods: In the period from November 1997 to May 2003, a total of 800cases of valve replacement were carried out in our institute. The clinical data were reviewed and the technique of mild hypothermia and pump-beating heart to replace cardiac valve was described in detail. Results: 800 patients, 308 male and 492female, with age range from 8 to 66 years, weighing 19 to 88 kg, underwent operation. The average cardiopulmonary bypass time was (109.38 ± 40.64) min, the average clamping time of the vena cava was (77.87 ± 27.99) min and the average mechanical ventilation time was (17.78 ± 12.21) h. There were 17 patients died in the early postoperative stage with an early mortality rate of 2.13%. The causes of death were failure in the weaning of extracorporeal circulation in 2 cases, severe low output syndrome in 3 cases, ventricular fibrillation in 3 cases, obstruction of coronary ostium of mechanical prosthetic valve in 1 case, hepatic failure in 2 cases, pulmonary failure in 1 case, multiorgan failure in 4 cases, and prosthetic valve dysfunction in 1 case. Severe postopertive complications occurred in 51 cases (6.375%), which included reexploration because of excessive bleeding in 16 cases (2.0%), lavage of poststemal infection in 2 cases (0.25%), postoperative strike in 7 cases (0.875%), pulmonary failure in 5 cases (0.625%), hepatic failure in 4 cases (0.5%), multiorgan failure in 11 cases (1.375 % ), ventricular arrhythmia in 5 cases (0.625%) and peripheral circulation failure in 1 case(0. 125 % ). Conclusion: Mild hypothermia and pump-beating heart result in satisfying clinical outcome in patients undergoing valve replacement. The integrated sequenced deairing procedure ensures the avoidance of air embolism during operation.Pump-beating heart technique offers a safe and practical option especially in

  3. Mapping Model of Groundwater Catchment Area based on Geological Fault : Case Study in Semarang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qudus, N.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a naturally renewable resource because groundwater is an integral part of hydrological cycle. However, in reality, there are many limiting factors which influence its usage, in both quality and quantity, the provision ability of groundwater will decrease if its availability is exceeded. The problems of ground water potential in both quantity and quality are always related to its constituents' characteristics or its geological element where the groundwater resides. This present study aims at determining the groundwater catchment area based on the geological condition of an area so that groundwater recharge can be accomplished. In addition, it is necessary for groundwater catchment area to comply with the geological condition. The geologically unfit area will only result in land movement or landslide if it is used as groundwater catchment area. The results of geo-electricity analysis which was conducted in Semarang city showed that there are 3 faults; Sukorejo fault, Tinjomoyo fault and Jangli fault which will be explained in detail in the paper. Those faults intersect the underground water stream in Semarang from south to north towards the Java Sea. The majority of underground water stream in Semarang flows from south to north. In contrary, the results of the analysis showed that there are some points that become local basins such as in the south area and southwest of Semarang where flow direction is on the opposite direction. In addition, the results of the analysis showed that some coastal areas in Semarang have experienced salt water intrusion.

  4. Geochemical occurrences of arsenic and fluoride in bedrock groundwater: a case study in Geumsan County, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joo Sung

    2012-01-01

    Bedrock groundwaters in Geumsan County, Korea, were surveyed to investigate the distribution and geochemical behaviors of arsenic and fluoride, mobilized through geogenic processes. The concentrations were enriched up to 113 μg/L for arsenic and 7.54 mg/L for fluoride, and 16% of 150 samples exceeded World Health Organization drinking water guidelines for each element. Simple Ca-HCO(3) groundwater types and positive correlations with pH, Ca, SO(4), and HCO(3) were characteristics of high (>10 μg/L) As groundwaters. The oxidation reaction of sulfide minerals in metasedimentary rocks and locally mineralized zones seems to be ultimately responsible for the existence of arsenic in groundwater. Desorption process under high pH conditions may also control the arsenic mobility in the study area. High (>1.5 mg/L) F groundwaters were found in the Na-HCO(3) type and with greater depth. Fluoride seemed to be enriched by deep groundwater interaction with granitic rocks, and continuous supply to shallow Ca-HCO(3)-type groundwater kept the concentration high. In the study area, drinking water management should include periodic As and F monitoring in groundwater.

  5. Delineation of groundwater potential zone: An AHP/ANP approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Etishree Agarwal; Rajat Agarwal; R D Garg; P K Garg

    2013-06-01

    The sustainable development and management of groundwater resource requires precise quantitative assessment based on scientific principle and modern techniques. In the present study, groundwater potential zone are delineated using remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS) and multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) techniques in Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh. The analytical network process (ANP) is a method that makes it possible for one to deal systematically, and includes the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) as a special case. The AHP and ANP are used to determine the weights of various themes and their classes for identifying the groundwater potential zone. These weights are applied in a linear combination to obtain five different groundwater potential zone in the study area, namely ‘very poor’, ‘poor’, ‘moderate’, ‘good’ and ‘very good’. It has been concluded that about 153.39 km2 area has very good groundwater potential which is only 3.37% of the total study area. However, the area having very poor groundwater potential is about 850 km2 which is about 19.63% of the study area. The area having good, moderate and poor groundwater potential is about 540.25, 1135.5, 1868.6 km2, respectively. The groundwater potential zone map was finally verified using the well yield data of 37 pumping wells, and the result was found satisfactory.

  6. Defining an Ecologically Ideal Shallow Groundwater Depth for Regional Sustainable Management: Conceptual Development and Case Study on the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihua Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The depth and fluctuation of shallow groundwater influence water supply to land surface vegetation. Knowledge of an ecologically ideal depth range of shallow groundwater for a vegetation ecosystem can be crucial for sustainability of regional water resource management and ecological conservation. In this study, we developed a conceptual model that identifies an upper and a lower boundary of shallow groundwater for sustaining present vegetation ecosystems, termed ecologically ideal shallow groundwater depth (EISGD. We then applied the conceptual model to the Sanjiang Plain (10.9 × 104 km2 in northeast China in order to gain insights into sustainable shallow groundwater usage in this intensively irrigated agricultural region. Using soil capillary rise, plant rooting depth, extinction depth, and the actual groundwater depth, we identified an upper boundary range of EISGD between 0.5 and 2.8 m and a lower boundary range of EISGD between 2.0 and 14.3 m for different vegetation covers in the Sanjiang Plain. Based on the ranges, we estimated allowable shallow groundwater withdrawal (i.e., without degrading the present vegetation ecosystem for the region and identified an area of 2.54 × 1010 m2 with a total of 9.14 × 108 m3 water deficit. Currently, the entire Sanjiang Plain has a total volume of 45.30 × 108 m3 EISGD allowable shallow groundwater withdrawal, thus the plain’s northeast region can be considered as having a high allowable pumping capacity. This study demonstrates that application of an EISGD concept can be useful for developing regional management strategies and plans for ecological protection and sustainable groundwater utilization.

  7. Artificial groundwater recharge zones mapping using remote sensing and GIS: a case study in Indian Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amanpreet; Panda, S N; Kumar, K S; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-07-01

    Artificial groundwater recharge plays a vital role in sustainable management of groundwater resources. The present study was carried out to identify the artificial groundwater recharge zones in Bist Doab basin of Indian Punjab using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) for augmenting groundwater resources. The study area has been facing severe water scarcity due to intensive agriculture for the past few years. The thematic layers considered in the present study are: geomorphology (2004), geology (2004), land use/land cover (2008), drainage density, slope, soil texture (2000), aquifer transmissivity, and specific yield. Different themes and related features were assigned proper weights based on their relative contribution to groundwater recharge. Normalized weights were computed using the Saaty's analytic hierarchy process. Thematic layers were integrated in ArcGIS for delineation of artificial groundwater recharge zones. The recharge map thus obtained was divided into four zones (poor, moderate, good, and very good) based on their influence to groundwater recharge. Results indicate that 15, 18, 37, and 30 % of the study area falls under "poor," "moderate," "good," and "very good" groundwater recharge zones, respectively. The highest recharge potential area is located towards western and parts of middle region because of high infiltration rates caused due to the distribution of flood plains, alluvial plain, and agricultural land. The least effective recharge potential is in the eastern and middle parts of the study area due to low infiltration rate. The results of the study can be used to formulate an efficient groundwater management plan for sustainable utilization of limited groundwater resources.

  8. A Use Case for implementing Earth observation (EO) to avoid regional groundwater contamination in the Midwest US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Pearlman, J.

    2016-12-01

    A use case to implement Landsat data for application in decisions in the agricultural sector is being developed. Stakeholders are at both the farm level and regional level. Decisions by individual farmers and communities about the intensity of use of agrochemicals on crops can affect the future quality of the groundwater in Iowa. An initial case study was completed to examine some of the technical perspectives of adapting and coupling satellite imagery and in situ water quality measurements to forecast changes in groundwater quality. This analysis was conducted to identify the benefits of EO to assist in specific decisions to improve agricultural land management and regulation of groundwater contamination. Results demonstrated that Landsat information facilitates spatiotemporal analysis of the impact of nitrates on groundwater resources. Value is dependent on whether additional information reduces the variance (uncertainty) in outcomes. The use case ultimately involves scientific experts, farmers and their representatives, and the Government. Decisions involve some level of uncertainty in scientific measurement and statistical variability affects its informational value. These issues are concerns with implementing remote sensing technology and must be examined with end users and their impact discussed and understood. Thus, the study team held meetings with subject experts from Iowa State University and the Iowa Farm Bureau to explore the next steps in developing the use case. Discussion with the subject experts focused on more detail to capture new agricultural science advances and engineering options that could be linked in a multi-scale approach. A second meeting between the study and the Iowa Farm Bureau centered on the need for efficient regulation of land use and regulation of agrochemical application in the Midwest. The impacts of these discussions and other user inputs on the directions of the use case will be presented.

  9. Fertilizer standards for controlling groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture: El Salobral-Los Llanos case study, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Haro, S.; Llopis-Albert, C.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Pulido-Velazquez, D.

    2010-10-01

    would be required to reduce nitrate concentrations in groundwater below the standard of 50 mg/l. In this particular case, it is more cost-efficient to apply standards to fertilizer use than taxes, although the instrument of fertilizer standards is more difficult to implement and control.

  10. Assessment of climate change impacts on groundwater resources: the case study of Veneto and Friuli plain in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critto, Andrea; Pasini, Sara; Torresan, Silvia; Rizzi, Jonathan; Zabeo, Alex; Marcomini, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    with different extension and magnitude in the case study area. Particularly, qualitative and quantitative impacts on groundwater will occur with more severe consequences in the wettest and in the driest scenario (respectively) and on natural and anthropic systems through the reduction in quality and quantity of water availability for agricultural and other uses (about 80% of agricultural areas and 27% of groundwater bodies at risk). While, such impacts will likely have little direct effects on related ecosystems - croplands, forests and natural environments - lying along the spring area (about 12% of croplands and 2% of natural environments at risk). The major outcomes of the described RRA application are here presented and discussed.

  11. Proposition of Corrosion Expertise method for water pumping stations Application to the case of northern station of Fez city - Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatimad AKHRIF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a constant progress of a regulatory and environmental context, the diagnostic and the expertise of the corrosion, the determination of its causes and factors, and the proposed solutions to this phenomenon represent a real challenge for all stakeholders of industry. We propose in this paper to a complete study of the corrosion risk in the case of water pumping stations, based on some industrial methods of risk analysis (FMEA and multiple laboratory tests and analysis. Finally we have proposed a masterplan (chart as perspectives, indicating the encounter corrosion problems in the case of the northern pumping station of Fez city (as case study. The masterplan includes also the corresponding solutions, that can stop or minimize degradation of the focused equipments by the various mechanisms of corrosion. Our proposals will serve as reference during futur installation of new water equipments, or during the study and choice of appropriate materials in the Water Studies Department.

  12. A Conflict-Resolution Model for the Conjunctive Use of Surface and Groundwater Resources that Considers Water-Quality Issues: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargan-Lari, Mohammad Reza; Kerachian, Reza; Mansoori, Abbas

    2009-03-01

    The conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources is one alternative for optimal use of available water resources in arid and semiarid regions. The optimization models proposed for conjunctive water allocation are often complicated, nonlinear, and computationally intensive, especially when different stakeholders are involved that have conflicting interests. In this article, a new conflict-resolution methodology developed for the conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources using Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) and Young Conflict-Resolution Theory (YCRT) is presented. The proposed model is applied to the Tehran aquifer in the Tehran metropolitan area of Iran. Stakeholders in the study area have conflicting interests related to water supply with acceptable quality, pumping costs, groundwater quality, and groundwater table fluctuations. In the proposed methodology, MODFLOW and MT3D groundwater quantity and quality simulation models are linked with the NSGA-II optimization model to develop Pareto fronts among the objectives. The best solutions on the Pareto fronts are then selected using YCRT. The results of the proposed model show the significance of applying an integrated conflict-resolution approach to conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources in the study area.

  13. Variable infiltration and river flooding resulting in changing groundwater quality - A case study from Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotliński, Konrad; Postma, Dieke; Kowalczyk, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThe changes in groundwater quality occurring in a buried valley aquifer following a reduction in groundwater exploitation and enhanced infiltration due to extensive flooding of the Odra River in 1997 were investigated. Long-time series data for the chemical composition of groundwater in a large well field for drinking water supply indicated the deterioration of groundwater quality in the wells capturing water from the flooded area, which had been intensively cultivated since the 1960s. Infiltration of flooded river water into the aquifer is suggested by an elevated chloride concentration, although salt flushing from the rewatered unsaturated zone due to the enhanced recharge event is much more feasible. Concomitantly with chloride increases in the concentrations of sulphate, ferrous iron, manganese, and nickel imply the oxidation of pyrite (FeS 2) which is abundant in the aquifer. The proton production resulting from pyrite oxidation is buffered by the dissolution of calcite, while the Ca:SO 4 stoichiometry of the groundwater indicates that pyrite oxidation coupled with nitrate reduction is the dominant process occurring in the aquifer. The pyritic origin of SO42- is confirmed by the sulphur isotopic composition. The resultant Fe 2+ increase induces Mn-oxide dissolution and the mobilisation of Ni 2+ previously adsorbed to Mn-oxide surfaces. The study has a major implication for groundwater quality prediction studies where there are considerable variations in water level associated with groundwater management and climate change issues.

  14. Comparison of no-purge and pumped sampling methods for monitoring concentrations of ordnance-related compounds in groundwater, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2012-01-01

    Field tests were conducted near the Impact Area at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to determine the utility of no-purge groundwater sampling for monitoring concentrations of ordnance-related explosive compounds and perchlorate in the sand and gravel aquifer. The no-purge methods included (1) a diffusion sampler constructed of rigid porous polyethylene, (2) a diffusion sampler constructed of regenerated-cellulose membrane, and (3) a tubular grab sampler (bailer) constructed of polyethylene film. In samples from 36 monitoring wells, concentrations of perchlorate (ClO4-), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the major contaminants of concern in the Impact Area, in the no-purge samples were compared to concentrations of these compounds in samples collected by low-flow pumped sampling with dedicated bladder pumps. The monitoring wells are constructed of 2- and 2.5-inch-diameter polyvinyl chloride pipe and have approximately 5- to 10-foot-long slotted screens. The no-purge samplers were left in place for 13-64 days to ensure that ambient groundwater flow had flushed the well screen and concentrations in the screen represented water in the adjacent formation. The sampling methods were compared first in six monitoring wells. Concentrations of ClO4-, RDX, and HMX in water samples collected by the three no-purge sampling methods and low-flow pumped sampling were in close agreement for all six monitoring wells. There is no evidence of a systematic bias in the concentration differences among the methods on the basis of type of sampling device, type of contaminant, or order in which the no-purge samplers were tested. A subsequent examination of vertical variations in concentrations of ClO4- in the 10-foot-long screens of six wells by using rigid porous polyethylene diffusion samplers indicated that concentrations in a given well varied by less than 15 percent

  15. Intrathecal baclofen pump, useful and safe therapeutic intervention in spasticity? Report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres-Jerez, Luz Elena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity may cause immobility, prostration, chronic pain, bedsores, infections, thrombosis and pneumonia; the purposes of its treatment are to control pain, improve mobility and quality of life, and reincorporate the patient to its daily activities by means of oral anti-spastic drugs; however, patients suffering from severe spasticity may require high oral doses of these medications, which may lead to adverse effects. In such cases, intrathecal baclofen has been proposed as a solution. This procedure has not been widely used in Colombia, so that protocols to perform it have not been established. We report the results obtained with the intrathecal administration of baclofen in four severely spastic patients, who had not previously responded to oral anti-spastic drugs, including high doses of baclofen. Pain, spasticity and quality of life significantly improved in three of them. The remaining one presented tolerance to the medication. Intrathecal baclofen pump is a useful and safe procedure for patients with severe spasticity and poor response to oral treatment.

  16. Value of information analysis for groundwater quality monitoring network design Case study: Eocene Aquifer, Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, A.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    Value of information (VOI) analysis evaluates the benefit of collecting additional information to reduce or eliminate uncertainty in a specific decision-making context. It makes explicit any expected potential losses from errors in decision making due to uncertainty and identifies the “best” information collection strategy as one that leads to the greatest expected net benefit to the decision-maker. This study investigates the willingness to pay for groundwater quality monitoring in the Eocene Aquifer, Palestine, which is an unconfined aquifer located in the northern part of the West Bank. The aquifer is being used by 128,000 Palestinians to fulfill domestic and agricultural demands. The study takes into account the consequences of pollution and the options the decision maker might face. Since nitrate is the major pollutant in the aquifer, the consequences of nitrate pollution were analyzed, which mainly consists of the possibility of methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). In this case, the value of monitoring was compared to the costs of treating for methemoglobinemia or the costs of other options like water treatment, using bottled water or importing water from outside the aquifer. And finally, an optimal monitoring network that takes into account the uncertainties in recharge (climate), aquifer properties (hydraulic conductivity), pollutant chemical reaction (decay factor), and the value of monitoring is designed by utilizing a sparse Bayesian modeling algorithm called a relevance vector machine.

  17. Insights and participatory actions driven by a socio-hydrogeological approach for groundwater management: the Grombalia Basin case study (Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, C.; Re, V.; Siciliano, G.; Chkir, N.; Tuci, C.; Zouari, K.

    2017-08-01

    Sustainable groundwater management strategies in water-scarce countries need to guide future decision-making processes pragmatically, by simultaneously considering local needs, environmental problems and economic development. The socio-hydrogeological approach named `Bir Al-Nas' has been tested in the Grombalia region (Cap Bon Peninsula, Tunisia), to evaluate the effectiveness of complementing hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological investigations with the social dimension of the issue at stake (which, in this case, is the identification of groundwater pollution sources). Within this approach, the social appraisal, performed through social network analysis and public engagement of water end-users, allowed hydrogeologists to get acquainted with the institutional dimension of local groundwater management, identifying issues, potential gaps (such as weak knowledge transfer among concerned stakeholders), and the key actors likely to support the implementation of the new science-based management practices resulting from the ongoing hydrogeological investigation. Results, hence, go beyond the specific relevance for the Grombaila basin, showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the importance of including social assessment in any given hydrogeological research aimed at supporting local development through groundwater protection measures.

  18. Insights and participatory actions driven by a socio-hydrogeological approach for groundwater management: the Grombalia Basin case study (Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, C.; Re, V.; Siciliano, G.; Chkir, N.; Tuci, C.; Zouari, K.

    2017-02-01

    Sustainable groundwater management strategies in water-scarce countries need to guide future decision-making processes pragmatically, by simultaneously considering local needs, environmental problems and economic development. The socio-hydrogeological approach named `Bir Al-Nas' has been tested in the Grombalia region (Cap Bon Peninsula, Tunisia), to evaluate the effectiveness of complementing hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological investigations with the social dimension of the issue at stake (which, in this case, is the identification of groundwater pollution sources). Within this approach, the social appraisal, performed through social network analysis and public engagement of water end-users, allowed hydrogeologists to get acquainted with the institutional dimension of local groundwater management, identifying issues, potential gaps (such as weak knowledge transfer among concerned stakeholders), and the key actors likely to support the implementation of the new science-based management practices resulting from the ongoing hydrogeological investigation. Results, hence, go beyond the specific relevance for the Grombaila basin, showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the importance of including social assessment in any given hydrogeological research aimed at supporting local development through groundwater protection measures.

  19. Boundary condition effects on maximum groundwater withdrawal in coastal aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Chen, Yiming; Luo, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of sea water intrusion in coastal aquifers subject to groundwater withdrawal requires optimization of well pumping rates to maximize the water supply while avoiding sea water intrusion. Boundary conditions and the aquifer domain size have significant influences on simulating flow and concentration fields and estimating maximum pumping rates. In this study, an analytical solution is derived based on the potential-flow theory for evaluating maximum groundwater pumping rates in a domain with a constant hydraulic head landward boundary. An empirical correction factor, which was introduced by Pool and Carrera (2011) to account for mixing in the case with a constant recharge rate boundary condition, is found also applicable for the case with a constant hydraulic head boundary condition, and therefore greatly improves the usefulness of the sharp-interface analytical solution. Comparing with the solution for a constant recharge rate boundary, we find that a constant hydraulic head boundary often yields larger estimations of the maximum pumping rate and when the domain size is five times greater than the distance between the well and the coastline, the effect of setting different landward boundary conditions becomes insignificant with a relative difference between two solutions less than 2.5%. These findings can serve as a preliminary guidance for conducting numerical simulations and designing tank-scale laboratory experiments for studying groundwater withdrawal problems in coastal aquifers with minimized boundary condition effects.

  20. Analysis of groundwater discharge with a lumped-parameter model, using a case study from Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakov, S. P.; Shestakov, V. M.

    A lumped-parameter model of groundwater balance is proposed that permits an estimate of discharge variability in comparison with the variability of recharge, by taking into account the influence of aquifer parameters. Recharge-discharge relationships are analysed with the model for cases of deterministic and stochastic recharge time-series variations. The model is applied to study the temporal variability of groundwater discharge in a river valley in the territory of Tajikistan, an independent republic in Central Asia. Résumé Un modèle global de bilan d'eau souterraine a été développé pour estimer la variabilité de l'écoulement par rapport à celle de la recharge, en prenant en compte l'influence des paramètres de l'aquifère. Les relations entre recharge et écoulement sont analysées à l'aide du modèle pour des variations des chroniques de recharge soit déterministes, soit stochastiques. Le modèle est appliquéà l'étude de la variabilité temporelle de l'écoulement souterrain vers une rivière, dans le Tadjikistan, une république indépendante d'Asie centrale. Resumen Se propone un modelo de parámetros concentrados para realizar el balance de aguas subterráneas, el cual permite estimar la variabilidad en la descarga con respecto a la variabilidad en la recarga, en función de los parámetros que caracterizan el acuífero. Las relaciones entre recarga y descarga se analizan con el modelo para distintos casos de series temporales de recarga, tanto deterministas como estocásticas. El modelo se aplica al estudio de la variabilidad temporal de la descarga en un valle aluvial de Tadyikistán, una república independiente del Asia Central.

  1. Groundwater Sustainability through a Novel Dewatering Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Holzbecher, E.; Ebneth, S.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater plays a key role in the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem balances. Over the past decades, groundwater is intensively extracted in order to keep construction or mining sites dry. For the latter purpose the pumped water is usually discharged into a nearby surface water body or injected into an aquifer distant from the abstraction sites. As a result, aquifers are depleted and the local eco-system is disrupted as a consequence of falling groundwater tables. Given ongoing pressure on aquifer from abstraction sites, it is vital to bring up adequate attention on groundwater conservation. We demonstrate a novel technique, Düsensauginfiltration (DSI, translated as 'nozzel-suction-infiltration'), which avoids water conveyance but still lowers the groundwater table locally. The method combines abstraction of groundwater at the upper part of the aquifer with injection in the same borehole, but at a greater depth. Hence no water is withdrawn from the system. The method is already used practically in Germany, Netherlands, and China, however, it is not yet fully scientifically understood and evaluated. Currently, two tests sites in Germany, for single and multi well respectively, are selected, at which the DSI technology is currently examined. The project is cooperated with a leading dewatering company (Hoelscher Wasserbau GmbH) and funded by Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU). To provide the basic principle of the method, we present numerical models solving the differential equation, which is derived from Darcy's Law and mass conservation, describing groundwater flow. We set up stationary numerical models in 2D (vertical cross section for single well case) and 3D (multi well case and/or when ambient groundwater flow is considered) using COMSOL Multiphysics. Since our model region only involves the saturated part of the unconfined aquifer, the numerical model solves a free boundary problem using hydraulic pressure as unknown variable. Two physical modes are included

  2. Sarns centrifugal pump for repair of thoracic aortic injury: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, J T; Curtis, J J; Boley, T

    1989-09-01

    A new centrifugal pump (Sarns), originally designed for ventricular assist, was successfully used in two patients during repair of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. The distal thoracic aorta was perfused without heparinization to avoid spinal cord and visceral ischemia, reduce afterload on the heart, and avoid clamp injury to the aorta. Distal mean aortic pressure was maintained above 50 mm Hg with a mean pump flow of 1.75 liter/minute. Proposed structural advantages of the Sarns centrifugal pump for perfusion of the distal thoracic aorta without heparin are resistance to thrombus formation, air embolus, and hemolysis.

  3. Plant traits in response to raising groundwater levels in wetland restoration: evidence from three case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Grootjans, A.P.; Sorrell, B.K.; Bekker, R.M.; Bakker, C.; Ozinga, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Question: Is raising groundwater tables successful as a wetland restoration strategy? Location: Kennemer dunes, The Netherlands; Moksloot dunes, The Netherlands and Bullock Creek fen, New Zealand. Methods: Generalizations were made by analysing soil dynamics and the responsiveness of integrative pla

  4. Plant traits in response to raising groundwater levels in wetland restoration : evidence from three case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, P.M. van; Grootjans, A.P.; Sorrell, B.K.; Bekker, R.M.; Bakker, C.; Ozinga, W.A.; Middleton, B.

    2006-01-01

    Question: Is raising groundwater tables successful as a wetland restoration strategy? Location: Kennemer dunes, The Netherlands; Moksloot dunes, The Netherlands and Bullock Creek fen, New Zealand. Methods: Generalizations were made by analysing soil dynamics and the responsiveness of integrative pla

  5. Development and Testing of Active Groundwater Samplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Bertel; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Lars Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Active groundwater sampling techniques are methods where the aquifer is flushed by pumping. The methods developed and tested represent non-dedicated methods for use in existing water wells. This paper describes two different sampling techniques: the Separation Pumping Technique (SP) and the Packer...... on numerical modelling and controlled laboratory experiments. Active groundwater sampling techniques can be used for remedial pumping optimization and in obtaining hydraulic data and represent a fast operational and reliable sampling tool, also under heterogeneous and low permeability conditions....

  6. Hydro-chemical assessment and groundwater recharge mechanism in the humid tropics: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, A Shahul; Prasad, N B Narasimha

    2008-10-01

    The study related to assessment of various chemical constituents in the groundwater, their origin and suitability for human use has been carried out in the Chaliyar river basin of Kerala (India). Groundwater samples were collected from 27 open dug wells and 7 bore wells, and analyzed. Piper tri-linear classification was followed in segregating the data with respect to source of dissolved constituents in groundwater. Most of the wells fall within the no dominant ion zone in the piper diagram, indicating the equal distribution of alkalis and alkaline earths. High level of dissolved solids, with the presence of chloride and sulphate, was observed in a few wells in the coastal region, which may be due to the salinity intrusion from the sea. The groundwater quality was found fairly good and potable in the lateritic midland region, except for a few wells, which were having significant level of nitrate and/or chloride. An attempt has been made to understand the source of groundwater recharge in the basin using environmental tritium as a tracer. It has been observed that the groundwater is predominantly recharged through rainfall, as evidenced from the level of tritium close to that of local precipitation.

  7. Hydrogeochemical Modelling for Groundwater in Neyveli Aquifer, Tamil Nadu, India, Using PHREEQC: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P. [Annamalai University, Department of Earth Sciences (India); Prasanna, M. V., E-mail: geoprasanna@gmail.com [Curtin University, Department of Applied Geology, School of Engineering and Science (Malaysia); Ramanathan, AL. [Jawaharlal Nehru University, School of Environmental Sciences (India); Srinivasamoorthy, K. [Pondicherry University, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences (India); Senthil Kumar, G. [HNB Garwhal University, Department of Geology (India)

    2012-09-15

    Sophisticated geochemical models have been used to describe and predict the chemical behaviour of complex natural waters and also to protect the groundwater resources from future contamination. One such model is used to study the hydrogeochemical complexity in a mine area. Extraction of groundwater from the coastal aquifer has been in progress for decades to mine lignite in Neyveli. This extraction has developed a cone of depression around the mine site. This cone of depression is well established by the geochemical nature of groundwater in the region. 42 groundwater samples were collected in a definite pattern and they were analysed for major cations, anions and trace elements. The saturation index (SI) of the groundwater for carbonate, sulphate and silica minerals was studied and it has been correlated with the recharge and the discharge regions. The SI of alumino silicates has been used to decipher the stage of weathering. The SI{sub Gibbsite} - SI{sub K-feldspar} has been spatially distributed and the regions of discharge and recharge were identified. Then two flow paths A1 and A2 were identified and inverse modelling using PHREEQC were carried out to delineate the geochemical process that has taken place from recharge to discharge. The initial and final solutions in both the flow paths were correlated with the thermodynamic silicate stability diagrams of groundwater and it was found that the state of thermodynamic stability of the end solutions along the flow path were approaching similar states of equilibrium at the discharge.

  8. Metal PCP field trial pushes up pumping window for heavy oil hot production : Joslyn field case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauquin, J.L.; Ndinemenu, F. [Total SA, Paris (France); Chalier, G. [Total E and P Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Lemay, L.; Seince, L. [PCM, Verves (France); Jahn, S. [Kudu Industries Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented details of field trials conducted for a novel all-metal progressive cavity pump (PCP) system at a steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) facility in Canada's Joslyn field. The fully metallic helical profile was produced by hydro-forming processes. The pump's stator was comprised of 3 elements welded together and coated for high temperature and wear resistance. During the field trials, the well pads were equipped with metal PCPs as well as topside and down hole instrumentation in order to obtain real time well data and pump performance data. Results of the study showed that initial volumetric efficiencies were 55 per cent. When pressure communication between injector and producer wells increased, pump intake pressure and speed also increased. Performance data from the field trial were then compared with results from high temperature electric submersible pumps (ESPs). It was concluded that the metal PCP is a promising artificial lift technology for SAGD processes. The pump design is now being modified to minimize vibrations and improve run life. 1 ref., 11 figs.

  9. Motor Pump Revolution in Ethiopia: Promises at a Crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengistu Dessalegn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, motor pump irrigation is at an earlier stage than in Asia but is growing rapidly in many countries. The focus of both policy and research in Africa to date has been on facilitating supply chains to make pumps available at a reasonable price. In Africa, pump irrigation is mainly based on two sources: shallow groundwater aquifers and small streams and rivers. Both usually have limited and variable yields. We present a case study from Ethiopia where pump irrigation based on small rivers and streams is expanding rapidly, and draw parallels to experiences in Asia and other African countries. We show that while farmers understand the social nature of community-managed irrigation, they share with policymakers a narrow understanding of pump irrigation as being primarily 'technical'. They perceive pumps as liberating them from the 'social' limitations of traditional communal irrigation. However, the rapid expansion of pump irrigation is leading to increasing competition and conflict over the limited water resource. We analyse the wider implications for Africa of this blindness to the social dimension of pump irrigation and offer suggestions on future policy and applied research to address the problem before it becomes a widespread crisis.

  10. [External lumbar drainage with volumetric continuing infusion pump in patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak. A case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso Melgosa, Ana Belén; García Gutiérrez, Helena; Fernández Porras, Mónica; Castrillo Manero, Ana Berta; Pérez Marijuán, Belén

    To describe the incidence and complications arising in a number of cases of patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak treated by external lumbar drainage with infusion pump (IP) volumetric continuous from 2001 to 2014. Quantify cerebrospinal fluid leak closed by lumbar drainage with IP. Retrospective descriptive case series study. patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, Chiari surgery and laminectomy, that developed postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak treated with continuous external lumbar drainage by IP. age, sex, type of intervention, variables related to the practice of the pump and complications. Average and medians were calculated for quantitative variables, frequencies and percentages for qualitative. Sample: 11 subjects. Incidence in running IP: disconnection, occlusion and acoustic alarm activation. Most frequently complication is headache; a case of pneumocephalus. The small number of subjects and the heterogeneity of these do not allow for comparison or establishing associations between variables. The resolution of the cerebrospinal fluid leak with continuous IP is lower in this study than others, and may be influenced by the small number of subjects. It should be noted the frequent activation of the pump alarm for no apparent cause. Protocol would be developed for preparing the IP team to reduce the acoustic alarm activation, and would make a prospective multicenter study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Groundwater Drought and Recovery: a Case Study from the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, D.; McKenzie, A. A.; Bloomfield, J.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the processes leading to the onset, duration and end of hydrological droughts is necessary to help improve the management of stressed or scarce water resources during such periods. In particular, the role and use of groundwater during episodes of drought is crucially important, since groundwater can provide relatively resilient water supplies during early stages of drought but maybe highly susceptible to relatively persistent or sustained droughts. Nevertheless, groundwater is seldom considered in drought analyses, and compared with other types of hydrological drought there have been few studies to date. The few previous studies of groundwater droughts at catchment- and regional-scale have shown that catchment and aquifer characteristics exert a strong influence on the spatio-temporal development of groundwater droughts as water deficit propagates through the terrestrial water cycle. In this context, the relationships between hydrogeological heterogeneity, catchment engineering infrastructure (storage), and decisions related to water resource management during drought events all shape the evolution and consequences of groundwater droughts. Here we examine the evolution of a recent regionally significant two-year drought across the United Kingdom (UK) and use it to investigate these relationships. We identify the drivers, characterise the development and spatio-temporal extent of the groundwater drought. In particular, we focus on the unusually rapid end and recovery from drought during what would normally be a period of groundwater recession. The UK, and in particular southern England, relies extensively on groundwater for public water supply, agricultural and industrial use, as well as for sustaining river flows that are essential to ecosystem health. In normal years relatively consistent rainfall patterns prevail, recharging aquifers over winter when evapotranspiration is minimal. However, by March 2012 large parts of the southern UK had

  12. Modes and Approaches of Groundwater Governance: A Survey of Lessons Learned from Selected Cases across the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Varady

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The crucial role of groundwater and the centrality of water governance in accommodating growing water demands sustainably are becoming well recognized. We review 10 case studies of groundwater governance—representing diverse global regions and local contexts—from the perspective of four well-established elements: (1 institutional setting; (2 availability and access to information and science; (3 robustness of civil society; and (4 economic and regulatory frameworks. For institutional setting, we find that governing is often a thankless task that paradoxically requires popularity; legislation does not always translate to implementation; conflict resolution is central to governance; and funding is critical for governance. In terms of information access, we see: a need for research for natural systems, social systems, and institutions; trust as an essential element in research; and that urbanized landscapes are critical components of groundwater governance. Looking at civil society robustness, we observe that equity is an essential element for governance; community-based governance requires intention; and leaders can play a powerful role in uniting stakeholders. As for frameworks, the cases suggest that economic incentives sometimes yield unintended results; “indirect” management should be used cautiously; and economic incentives’ effectiveness depends on the system employed. Collectively, the lessons speak to the need for shared governance capacities on the part of governments at multiple levels and civil society actors.

  13. Case Study for the ARRA-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Ball State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henderson, Jr., Hugh [CDH Energy Corp., Beijing (China)

    2016-12-01

    With funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground-source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects is a district central GSHP system installed at Ball State University (BSU) in Muncie, IN. Prior to implementing the district GSHP system, 47 major buildings in BSU were served by a central steam plant with four coal-fired and three natural-gas-fired steam boilers. Cooling was provided by five water-cooled centrifugal chillers at the District Energy Station South (DESS). The new district GSHP system replaced the existing coal-fired steam boilers and conventional water-cooled chillers. It uses ground-coupled heat recovery (HR) chillers to meet the simultaneous heating and cooling demands of the campus. The actual performance of the GSHP system was analyzed based on available measured data from August 2015 through July 2016, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. Since Phase 1 was funded in part by the ARRA grant, it is the focus of this case study. The annual energy consumption of the GSHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional water-cooled chiller and natural-gas-fired boiler system, both of which meet the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE 90.1-2013). The comparison was made to determine source energy savings, energy cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the GSHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the GSHP system. The following sections summarize the results of the analysis, the lessons learned, and recommendations for improvement

  14. The Suitability Zoning Division for Groundwater Source Heat Pump Based on Analytic Hierarchy Process in Qinhuangdao%基于层次分析法的秦皇岛地下水源热泵适宜性区划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    回广荣

    2015-01-01

    The shallow geothermal energy is a new type of clean energy. The paper makes suitability zoning for groundwa-ter source heat pump in Qinhuangdao by Analytic Hierarchy Process, to provide the basis for exploitation and utilization plan-ning of shallow geothermal energy. It introduces the steps and methods of determining the weights by AHP, and establishes the evaluation index system about suitability zoning of groundwater source heat pump. At last, the comprehensive evaluation index method is used to evaluate the suitability. The evaluation results indicate that the less suitable area 114. 67 km2,accounting for 19% of the study area, and the unsuitable area 304. 09 km2,accounted for 50. 4%.%浅层地温能是一种新型清洁能源,采用层次分析法在秦皇岛进行地下水地源热泵适宜性区划,为浅层地温能开发利用规划提供依据. 讨论层次分析法确定权重的步骤和方法,针对地下水地源热泵适宜性区划指标体系的建立和指标量化,利用综合评价指数法将本区分为地下水地源热泵较适宜区和不适宜区. 较适宜区面积114. 67 km2,占研究区19%,不适宜区分布面积304. 09 km2,占研究区50. 4%.

  15. Geochemical controls on fluoriferous groundwaters of the Pliocene and the more recent aquifers: The case of Aigion region, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanou, K.; Siavalas, G.; Lambrakis, N.

    2013-12-01

    High fluoride concentrations (> 8 mg/L) in the groundwater of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments are rare; however, this is the case around Aigion town, where teeth fluorosis has been detected since the 80s. Aiming to investigate the origin and the mobility mechanism of fluorine in groundwater and sediments a hydrogeological and geochemical research has been conducted. The hydrogeological research revealed that the Na-HCO3 water type of boreholes aligned along a fault and hosted in the confined aquifers display the higher fluoride content. The unconfined aquifer is mostly dominated by Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water, which displays much lower fluoride concentrations. The most permeable sectors of this aquifer host fresh water of Ca-HCO3 type. The geochemical research revealed significant amount of fluorine in the base of a lignite sequence hosted in the Plio-Pleistocene sediments.

  16. Risk Assessment and Prediction of Heavy Metal Pollution in Groundwater and River Sediment: A Case Study of a Typical Agricultural Irrigation Area in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuang; Geng, Hui; Zhang, Fengjun; Liu, Zhaoying; Wang, Tianye; Song, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    The areas with typical municipal sewage discharge river and irrigation water function were selected as study sites in northeast China. The samples from groundwater and river sediment in this area were collected for the concentrations and forms of heavy metals (Cr(VI), Cd, As, and Pb) analysis. The risk assessment of heavy metal pollution was conducted based on single-factor pollution index (I) and Nemerow pollution index (NI). The results showed that only one groundwater sampling site reached a polluted level of heavy metals. There was a high potential ecological risk of Cd on the N21-2 sampling site in river sediment. The morphological analysis results of heavy metals in sediment showed that the release of heavy metals can be inferred as one of the main pollution sources of groundwater. In addition, the changes in the concentration and migration scope of As were predicted by using the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). The predicted results showed that As will migrate downstream in the next decade, and the changing trend of As polluted areas was changed with As content districts because of some pump wells downstream to form groundwater depression cone, which made the solute transfer upstream.

  17. Risk Assessment and Prediction of Heavy Metal Pollution in Groundwater and River Sediment: A Case Study of a Typical Agricultural Irrigation Area in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuang; Geng, Hui; Zhang, Fengjun; Liu, Zhaoying; Wang, Tianye; Song, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    The areas with typical municipal sewage discharge river and irrigation water function were selected as study sites in northeast China. The samples from groundwater and river sediment in this area were collected for the concentrations and forms of heavy metals (Cr(VI), Cd, As, and Pb) analysis. The risk assessment of heavy metal pollution was conducted based on single-factor pollution index (I) and Nemerow pollution index (NI). The results showed that only one groundwater sampling site reached a polluted level of heavy metals. There was a high potential ecological risk of Cd on the N21-2 sampling site in river sediment. The morphological analysis results of heavy metals in sediment showed that the release of heavy metals can be inferred as one of the main pollution sources of groundwater. In addition, the changes in the concentration and migration scope of As were predicted by using the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). The predicted results showed that As will migrate downstream in the next decade, and the changing trend of As polluted areas was changed with As content districts because of some pump wells downstream to form groundwater depression cone, which made the solute transfer upstream. PMID:26366176

  18. Risk Assessment and Prediction of Heavy Metal Pollution in Groundwater and River Sediment: A Case Study of a Typical Agricultural Irrigation Area in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The areas with typical municipal sewage discharge river and irrigation water function were selected as study sites in northeast China. The samples from groundwater and river sediment in this area were collected for the concentrations and forms of heavy metals (Cr(VI, Cd, As, and Pb analysis. The risk assessment of heavy metal pollution was conducted based on single-factor pollution index (I and Nemerow pollution index (NI. The results showed that only one groundwater sampling site reached a polluted level of heavy metals. There was a high potential ecological risk of Cd on the N21-2 sampling site in river sediment. The morphological analysis results of heavy metals in sediment showed that the release of heavy metals can be inferred as one of the main pollution sources of groundwater. In addition, the changes in the concentration and migration scope of As were predicted by using the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS. The predicted results showed that As will migrate downstream in the next decade, and the changing trend of As polluted areas was changed with As content districts because of some pump wells downstream to form groundwater depression cone, which made the solute transfer upstream.

  19. GROUNDWATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT FOR DRINKING PURPOSES USING GIS MODELLING (CASE STUDY: CITY OF TABRIZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jeihouni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tabriz is the largest industrial city in North West of Iran and it is developing rapidly. A large proportion of water requirements for this city are supplied from dams. In this research, groundwater quality assessed through sampling 70 wells in Tabriz and its rural areas. The purposes of this study are: (1 specifying spatial distribution of groundwater quality parameters such as Chloride, Electrical Conductivity (EC, pH, hardness and sulphate (2 mapping groundwater quality for drinking purpose by employing Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP method in the study area using GIS and Geosatistics. We utilized an interpolation technique of ordinary kriging for generating thematic map of each parameter. The final map indicates that the groundwater quality esaeicni from North to South and from West to East of the study area. The areas located in Center, South and South West of the study area have the optimum quality for drinking purposes which are the best locations to drill wells for supplying water demands of Tabriz city. In critical conditions, the groundwater quality map as a result of this research can be taken into account by East Azerbaijan Regional Water Company as decision support system to drill new wells or selecting existing wells to supply drinking water to Tabriz city.

  20. Groundwater recharge estimation under semi arid climate: Case of Northern Gafsa watershed, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melki, Achraf; Abdollahi, Khodayar; Fatahi, Rouhallah; Abida, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Natural groundwater recharge under semi arid climate, like rainfall, is subjected to large variations in both time and space and is therefore very difficult to predict. Nevertheless, in order to set up any strategy for water resources management in such regions, understanding the groundwater recharge variability is essential. This work is interested in examining the impact of rainfall on the aquifer system recharge in the Northern Gafsa Plain in Tunisia. The study is composed of two main parts. The first is interested in the analysis of rainfall spatial and temporal variability in the study basin while the second is devoted to the simulation of groundwater recharge. Rainfall analysis was performed based on annual precipitation data recorded in 6 rainfall stations over a period of 56 years (1960-2015). Potential evapotranspiration data were also collected from 1960 to 2011 (52 years). The hydrologic distributed model WetSpass was used for the estimation of groundwater recharge. Model calibration was performed based on an assessment of the agreement between the sum of recharge and runoff values estimated by the WetSpass hydrological model and those obtained by the climatic method. This latter is based on the difference calculated between rainfall and potential evapotranspiration recorded at each rainy day. Groundwater recharge estimation, on monthly scale, showed that average annual precipitation (183.3 mm/year) was partitioned to 5, 15.3, 36.8, and 42.8% for interception, runoff, actual evapotranspiration and recharge respectively.

  1. Quantifying the Impact of a Transboundary Streamflow Agreement on Groundwater Resources in the US High Plains Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, J.; Hyndman, D. W.; Kendall, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Many groundwater aquifers in important agricultural areas are exploited beyond their sustainable limits. Groundwater overuse can reduce streamflow across political boundaries, leading to transboundary management challenges. Although conflicts over transboundary water resources do arise, these conflicts can also prompt improved aquifer management. Portions of the Republican River Basin, which overlies the High Plains Aquifer in the central United States, have been under court-ordered groundwater restrictions to meet interstate streamflow requirements since 2004, following the 2002 Kansas v. Nebraska and Colorado Supreme Court case. We examined the impacts of these restrictions on groundwater levels, pumping volume, agricultural productivity, and streamflow in the Nebraska portion of the basin to assess how transboundary agreements can affect groundwater sustainability in agricultural systems. We synthesized available data for 1990-2014 to analyze trends before and after restrictions went into effect in 2004. After controlling for climate covariates, we found that restrictions reduced pumping volumes in the study area, resulting in increased streamflow across the Nebraska-Kansas border. Furthermore, restrictions appear to have reversed the declining trend in groundwater storage. Notably, this reversal contrasts with continuing decline in the unrestricted Kansas portion of the basin, suggesting the court-ordered restrictions have altered the sustainability trajectory of this region. The impacts of pumping restrictions on regional agricultural yields and productivity are examined. Our analysis of this system suggests that by setting external limits on resource use, enforceable transboundary water agreements can stimulate sustainable groundwater management and counter local incentives for overextraction.

  2. Modeling of Groundwater Quantity and Quality Management, Nile Valley, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owlia, R.; Fogg, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater levels have been rising in the Luxor area of Egypt due to increased agricultural irrigation following the construction of the Aswan High Dam (AHD) in 1970. This has led to soil and groundwater salinity problems caused by increasing evapotranspiration from shallower water table, as well as the degradation of historical monuments whose foundations are weakening by capillary rise of water into the columns and stonework. While similar salinity problems exist elsewhere in the world (e.g., San Joaquin Valley of California), we hypothesize that as long as groundwater discharge to the Nile River continues and serves as a sink for the salt, the regional salt balance will be manageable and will not lead to irreversible salinization of soils. Further, we hypothesize that if a groundwater system such as this one becomes overdrafted, thereby cutting off groundwater discharge to the River, the system salt balance will be less manageable and possibly non-sustainable. With groundwater flow modeling we are investigating approaches for managing the irrigation and groundwater levels so as to eliminate water stresses on Egyptian monuments and antiquities. Consequences of possible actions for managing the water table through groundwater pumping and alternative irrigation practices will be presented. Moreover, through the use of high resolution modeling of system heterogeneity, we will simulate the long term salt balance of the system under various scenarios, including the overdraft case. The salt source will be a function of groundwater discharge to the surface via bare-soil evaporation and crop transpiration. The built-in heterogeneity will account for dispersion, fast transport in connected media and slow mass transfer between aquifer and aquitard materials. Key Words: Groundwater, modeling, water quality, sustainability, salinity, irrigated agriculture, Nile aquifer.

  3. Stratigraphic and structural controls on groundwater flow in an outcropping fossil fan delta: the case of Sant Llorenç del Munt range (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglés, Marc; Folch, Albert; Oms, Oriol; Maestro, Eudald; Mas-Pla, Josep

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogeological models of mountain regions present the opportunity to understand the role of geological factors on groundwater resources. The effects of sedimentary facies and fracture distribution on groundwater flow and resource exploitation are studied in the ancient fan delta of Sant Llorenç de Munt (central Catalonia, Spain) by integrating geological field observations (using sequence stratigraphy methods) and hydrogeological data (pumping tests, hydrochemistry and environmental isotopes). A comprehensive analysis of data portrays the massif as a single unit, constituted by different compartments determined by specific layers and sets of fractures. Two distinct flow systems—local and regional—are identified based on pumping test analysis as well as hydrochemical and isotopic data. Drawdown curves derived from pumping tests indicate that the behavior of the saturated layers, whose main porosity is given by the fracture network, corresponds to a confined aquifer. Pumping tests also reflect a double porosity within the system and the occurrence of impervious boundaries that support a compartmentalized model for the whole aquifer system. Hydrochemical data and associated spatial evolution show the result of water-rock interaction along the flow lines. Concentration of magnesium, derived from dolomite dissolution, is a tracer of the flow-path along distinct stratigraphic units. Water stable isotopes indicate that evaporation (near a 5% loss) occurs in a thick unsaturated zone within the massif before infiltration reaches the water table. The hydrogeological analysis of this outcropping system provides a methodology for the conceptualization of groundwater flow in similar buried systems where logging and hydrogeological information are scarce.

  4. Aquifer geochemistry and effects of pumping on ground-water quality at the Green Belt Parkway Well Field, Holbrook, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Colabufo, Steven; Coates, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Geochemistry, microbiology, and water quality of the Magothy aquifer at a new supply well in Holbrook were studied to help identify factors that contribute to iron-related biofouling of public-supply wells. The organic carbon content of borehole sediments from the screen zone, and the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs), varied by depth. TEAP assays of core sediments indicated that iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and undetermined (possibly oxic) reactions and microbial activity are correlated with organic carbon (lignite) content. The quality of water from this well, therefore, reflects the wide range of aquifer microenvironments at this site. High concentrations of dissolved iron (3.6 to 6.4 micromoles per liter) in water samples from this well indicate that some water is derived from Fe(III)-reducing sediments within the aquifer, but traces of dissolved oxygen indicate inflow of shallow, oxygenated water from shallow units that overlie the local confining units. Water-quality monitoring before and during a 2-day pumping test indicates that continuous pumping from the Magothy aquifer at this site can induce downward flow of shallow, oxygenated water despite the locally confined conditions. Average concentrations of dissolved oxygen are high (5.2 milligrams per liter, or mg/L) in the overlying upper glacial aquifer and at the top of the Magothy aquifer (4.3 mg/L), and low (<0.1 mg/L) in the deeper, anaerobic part of the Magothy; average concentrations of phosphate are high (0.4 mg/L) in the upper glacial aquifer and lower (0.008 mg/L) at the top of the Magothy aquifer and in the deeper part of the Magothy (0.013 mg/L). Concentrations of both constituents increased during the 2 days of pumping. The d34S of sulfate in shallow ground water from observation wells (3.8 to 6.4 per mil) was much heavier than that in the supplywell water (-0.1 per mil) and was used to help identify sources of water entering the supply well. The d34S of sulfate in a

  5. Geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity at basin scale: a case study from Datong basin, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    A hydrogeochemical investigation using integrated methods of stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, Cl/Br ratios, chloride-mass balance, mass balance and hydrogeochemical modeling was conducted to interpret the geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity in Datong basin, northern China. The δ(2)H, δ(18)O ratios in precipitation exhibited a local meteoric water line of δ(2)H = 6.4 δ(18)O -5 (R(2) = 0.94), while those in groundwater suggested their meteoric origin in a historically colder climatic regime with a speculated recharge rate of less than 20.5 mm overall per year, in addition to recharge from a component of deep residual ancient lake water enriched with Br. According to the Sr isotope binary mixing model, the mixing of recharges from the Shentou karst springs (24%), the western margins (11%) and the eastern margins (65%) accounts for the groundwater from the deep aquifers of the down-gradient parts in the central basin is a possible mixing mechanism. In Datong, hydrolysis of silicate minerals is the most important hydrogeochemical process responsible for groundwater chemistry, in addition to dissolution of carbonate and evaporites. In the recharge areas, silicate chemical weathering is typically at the bisiallitization stage, while that in the central basin is mostly at the monosiallitization stage with limited evidence of being in equilibrium with gibbsite. Na exchange with bound Ca, Mg prevails at basin scale, and intensifies with groundwater salinity, while Ca, Mg exchange with bound Na locally occurs in the east pluvial and alluvial plains. Although groundwater salinity increases with the progress of water-rock/sediment interactions along the flow path, as a result of carbonate solubility control and continuous evapotranspiration, Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl-SO4 types of water are usually characterized respectively in the deep and the shallow aquifers of an inland basin with a silicate terrain in an arid climatic regime.

  6. Investigation of the geochemical evolution of groundwater under agricultural land: A case study in northeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Ruiz, Rogelio; Pastén-Zapata, Ernesto; Parra, Roberto; Harter, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Zona Citrícola is an important area for Mexico due to its citriculture activity. Situated in a sub-humid to humid climate adjacent to the Sierra Madre Oriental, this valley hosts an aquifer system that represents sequences of shales, marls, conglomerates, and alluvial deposits. Groundwater flows from mountainous recharge areas to the basin-fill deposits and provides base flows to supply drinking water to the adjacent metropolitan area of Monterrey. Recent studies examining the groundwater quality of the study area urge the mitigation of groundwater pollution. The objective of this study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the groundwater and to assess the processes controlling the groundwater's chemistry. Correlation was used to identify associations among various geochemical constituents. Factor analysis was applied to identify the water's chemical characteristics that were responsible for generating most of the variability within the dataset. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed in combination with a post-hoc analysis of variance to partition the water samples into hydrochemical water groups: recharge waters (Ca-HCO3), transition zone waters (Ca-HCO3-SO4 to Ca-SO4-HCO3) and discharge waters (Ca-SO4). Inverse geochemical models of these groups were developed and constrained using PHREEQC to elucidate the chemical reactions controlling the water's chemistry between an initial (recharge) and final water. The primary reactions contributing to salinity were the following: (1) water-rock interactions, including the weathering of evaporitic rocks and dedolomitization; (2) dissolution of soil gas carbon dioxide; and (3) input from animal/human wastewater and manure in combination with by denitrification processes. Contributions from silicate weathering to salinity ranged from less important to insignificant. The findings suggest that it may not be cost-effective to regulate manure application to mitigate groundwater pollution.

  7. Uranium Groundwater Monitoring and Seismic Analysis: A Case Study of the Gran Sasso Hydrogeological Basin, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletti, Marta; Plastino, Wolfango; Peresan, Antonella; Nisi, Stefano; Copia, Lorenzo; Panza, Giuliano F.; Povinec, Pavel P.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium groundwater anomalies, observed before the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6th, 2009) and before the seismic swarm, which occurred in the second half of 2010, represent a key geochemical signal of a progressive increase of deep fluids fluxes at middle-lower crustal levels associated with the geodynamics of the earthquake. In this paper, temporal variations of uranium groundwater are studied in association with the seismic pattern around Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS-INFN). The normalized seismic energy release and the number of earthquakes are analyzed in detail by means of monthly sliding time windows. They are compared with uranium anomalies to highlight any possible correlation.

  8. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  9. Nutrient loads of small-scale swine manure composting to groundwater and its prevention by covering: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianbo; Qiao, Junjing; Chen, Yucheng; Yang, Zhimin

    2015-10-01

    Small-scale composting is applied to recycle manure and biomass around the globe. Piles frequently site outside near field where bio-waste comes or compost goes within developing rural regions. However, little equipment or policy besides cover of common materials addressed concerns about its exposure to rainfall and subsequent leachate towards groundwater. In addition, little is known about its nutrient load to groundwater and covers' effect on nutrient unloading. Differently covered swine manure piles were composted outdoors with exposure to rain, then columns consisted of resultant compost of varying maturing age and soil were leached by simulated rainfall. Leachate TN, NH4 (+)-N, NO3 (-)-N, TP, and DP were modeled by regression analysis, and further, integral of quadratic curve or nutrient load index (NLI) was designated as proxy for nutrient load. Log response ratio was employed to qualify covers' effect on nutrient unloading. This case raised higher concern about leachate NH4 (+)-N than NO3 (-)-N for former's lower category in groundwater quality standard. The integrated NLIs or general nutrient load for six intervals, averagely divided from composting day of 60-120, decreased by 31, 37, 45, 56, and 73 % consecutively. Covers could unload nutrient to underground and function better to prevent P than N from leaching. Capabilities of piles covered by rice straw (CR) and soil (CS) to unload respectively are 77 and 72 % of by film (CF).

  10. In-well degassing issues for measurements of dissolved gases in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, J W; Ryan, M C

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of dissolved gases in groundwater is becoming increasingly common and important. Many of these measurements involve monitoring or sampling within wells or from water pumped from wells. We used total dissolved gas pressure (TDGP) sensors placed in the screened section of various wells (4 to 72 m deep) to assess the dissolved gas conditions for open wells compared to the conditions when sealed (i.e., isolated from the atmosphere) with a hydraulic packer (one well) or when pumped. When the packer was installed (non-pumping conditions), TDGP rose from 3.1 atm (314 kPa), with declines noted when the packer was removed or deflated. While pumping, TDGP measured in many of the wells rose to substantially higher levels, up to 4.0 atm (408 kPa) in one case. Thus, when groundwater is gas charged, the background aquifer TDGP, and likewise the dissolved gas concentrations, may be substantially higher than initially measured in open wells, indicating significant in-well degassing. This raises concerns about past and current methods of measuring the dissolved gases in groundwater. Additional procedures that may be required to obtain representative measurements from wells include (1) installing in-well hydraulic packers to seal the well, or (2) pumping to bring in fresh groundwater. However, observed transient decreased TDGPs during pumping, believed to result from gas bubble formation induced by drawdown in the well below a critical pressure (relative to TDGP), may disrupt the measurements made during or after pumping. Thus, monitoring TDGP while pumping gas-charged wells is recommended. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  11. Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Business Case Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment', ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations. All system options were scored by the ORNL building equipment research team and by William Goetzler of Navigant Consulting. These scores were reviewed by DOE/BT's Residential Integration program leaders and Building America team members. Based on these results, the two centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) systems (air source and ground source versions) were selected for advancement to Stage 2 (Exploratory Development) business case assessments in FY06. This report describes results of these business case assessments. It is a compilation of three separate reports describing the initial business case study (Baxter 2006a), an update to evaluate the impact of an economizer cooling option (Baxter 2006b), and a second update to evaluate the impact of a winter humidification option

  12. Any link between sexual inactivity and treadle pump performance characteristics: The Malawi case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Chidanti-Malunga; Yamikani, Malunga

    In mitigating the effects of climate change in Malawi, government promotes the use of low cost irrigation technologies to small-scale farmers, especially in wetlands where water is available. The treadle pump is one such technology. The pump is a manual water lifting device operated by feet. Although the technology has been widely accepted by small-scale farmers, there are documented reports that some farmers abandon the technology, preferring other technologies such as river diversion. One theory for the abandonment is that female farmers claim that the technology makes their male counterparts sexually inactive. This research seeks to find an explanation to the misconception. The study analyzed the physical characteristics of the treadle pump and its users. The results show that the technology is male-dominated (30% were females out of a sample of 40). The results also show that the technology is labor-intensive with very small discharge rates (an average of 0.78 l/s) achieved regardless of the BMI of the operator. With such small discharge rates, in order to fulfill irrigation requirements of a crop, the operator has to pump for long hours. This exercise makes men naturally tired, perhaps making them sexually inactive as well.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING LEAN MANUFACTURING IMPLEMENTATION IN PUMP MANUFACTURING COMPANIES IN INDIA - A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Badgujar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lean Manufacturing has now become a common word in the industrial corridors. It has now been applied to the industries of several domains. No wonder that the Pump manufacturing has also witnessed profound influence of Lean philosophy. Pump manufacturing in India has a history as old as 80 years with more than 500 pump manufacturing units presently working. The present research is an explorative study and was undertaken to identify various factors affecting lean manufacturing implementation in pump manufacturing industry. Analysis of results revealed that the companies registered increase in productivity and reduction in costs and wastes. Lack of understanding, Supply chain and Company culture are found to be the strongest barriers of lean manufacturing implementation. The multiple regression model revealed that Lack of workers support can be fairly reduced by educating them about Lean Manufacturing and establishing a healthy communication with workers. An analysis across different management levels revealed disparity in perceptions and views of personnel. There is a need for top management to align organization toward common goals so as to achieve better success in implementing lean manufacturing.

  14. Groundwater quality assessment using geoelectrical and geochemical approaches: case study of Abi area, southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Ebong D.; Akpan, Anthony E.; Emeka, Chimezie N.; Urang, Job G.

    2016-06-01

    The electrical resistivity technique which involved the Schlumberger depth sounding method and geochemical analyses of water samples collected from boreholes was used to investigate the suitability of groundwater aquifers in Abi for drinking and irrigation purposes. Fifty randomly located electrical resistivity data were collected, modeled, and interpreted after calibration with lithologic logs. Ten borehole water samples were collected and analysed to determine anion, cation concentrations and some physical and chemical parameters, such as water colour, temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductivity. The results show that the lithostratigraphy of the study area is composed of sands, sandstones (fractured, consolidated and loosed), siltstones, shales (compacted and fractured) of the Asu River Group, Eze-Aku Formation which comprises the aquifer units, and the Nkporo Shale Formation. The aquifer conduits are known to be rich in silicate minerals, and the groundwater samples in some locations show a significant amount of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+. These cations balanced the consumption of H+ during the hydrolytic alteration of silicate minerals. The geochemical analysis of groundwater samples revealed dominant calcium-magnesium-carbonate-bicarbonate water facies. Irrigation water quality parameters, such as sodium absorption ratio, percentage of sodium, and permeability index, were calculated based on the physico-chemical analyses. The groundwater quality was observed to be influenced by the interaction of some geologic processes but was classified to be good to excellent, indicating its suitability for domestic and irrigation purposes.

  15. Case studies of groundwater- surface water interactions and scale relationships in small alluvial aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Love, Dave; de Hamer, Wouter; Owen, Richard J.S.; Booij, Martijn J.; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; van der Zaag, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    An alluvial aquifer can be described as a groundwater system, generally unconfined, that is hosted in laterally discontinuous layers of gravel, sand, silt and clay, deposited by a river in a river channel, banks or flood plain. In semi-arid regions, streams that are associated with alluvial aquifers

  16. Groundwater quality assessment using geoelectrical and geochemical approaches: case study of Abi area, southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Ebong D.; Akpan, Anthony E.; Emeka, Chimezie N.; Urang, Job G.

    2017-09-01

    The electrical resistivity technique which involved the Schlumberger depth sounding method and geochemical analyses of water samples collected from boreholes was used to investigate the suitability of groundwater aquifers in Abi for drinking and irrigation purposes. Fifty randomly located electrical resistivity data were collected, modeled, and interpreted after calibration with lithologic logs. Ten borehole water samples were collected and analysed to determine anion, cation concentrations and some physical and chemical parameters, such as water colour, temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductivity. The results show that the lithostratigraphy of the study area is composed of sands, sandstones (fractured, consolidated and loosed), siltstones, shales (compacted and fractured) of the Asu River Group, Eze-Aku Formation which comprises the aquifer units, and the Nkporo Shale Formation. The aquifer conduits are known to be rich in silicate minerals, and the groundwater samples in some locations show a significant amount of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+. These cations balanced the consumption of H+ during the hydrolytic alteration of silicate minerals. The geochemical analysis of groundwater samples revealed dominant calcium-magnesium-carbonate-bicarbonate water facies. Irrigation water quality parameters, such as sodium absorption ratio, percentage of sodium, and permeability index, were calculated based on the physico-chemical analyses. The groundwater quality was observed to be influenced by the interaction of some geologic processes but was classified to be good to excellent, indicating its suitability for domestic and irrigation purposes.

  17. Assessment of well vulnerability for groundwater source protection based on a solute transport model: a case study from Jilin City, northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Huan; Wang, Jinsheng; Lai, Desheng; Teng, Yanguo; Zhai, Yuanzheng

    2015-05-01

    Well vulnerability assessment is essential for groundwater source protection. A quantitative approach to assess well vulnerability in a well capture zone is presented, based on forward solute transport modeling. This method was applied to three groundwater source areas (Jiuzhan, Hadawan and Songyuanhada) in Jilin City, northeast China. The ratio of the maximum contaminant concentration at the well to the released concentration at the contamination source ( c max/ c 0) was determined as the well vulnerability indicator. The results indicated that well vulnerability was higher close to the pumping well. The well vulnerability in each groundwater source area was low. Compared with the other two source areas, the cone of depression at Jiuzhan resulted in higher spatial variability of c max/ c 0 and lower minimum c max/ c 0 by three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis indicated that the denitrification rate in the aquifer was the most sensitive with respect to well vulnerability. A process to derive a NO3-N concentration at the pumping well is presented, based on determining the maximum nitrate loading limit to satisfy China's drinking-water quality standards. Finally, the advantages, disadvantages and prospects for improving the precision of this well vulnerability assessment approach are discussed.

  18. Off-Pump Complete Coronary Revascularization with 860 Cases and Two Year Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢斌; 张镜芳; Pravin Kuma; Devi Prasad Shetty

    2002-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) produces a well-documented diffuse inflammatory response that affects multiple organ systems. To avoid the deleterious effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting is becoming increasingly popular world- wide.We reviewed our experience of complete coronary artery revascularization on the beating heart without CPB.Methods From Aug 1998 to Aug 2000, 860off-pump revascularizations (99 % since January 1999) were performed at Manipal Hospital Heart Foundation. The patients consist of males 757(88%), females 103(12%) . Averaged age 64. 2±15years. All surgeries were performed through a median sternotomy. Exposure techniques are tailored to individual vessels and cardiac regions. Local immobilization is performed with octopus. Vascular control is achieved with occluders and shunts. Results Among 860 off-pump CABG patients. Single graft 72(8.3 % ), two grafts 208 (24. 2 % ), three grafts 469(54.5 % ), four grafts 101 (11.8 % ), five graft 10(1.2 % ) . The average number of grafts per patient was 2.72 ±0. 32. Operative mortality was 0.69 % (6patients). Anesthetic time 3.9 + 1.2hours, extubation time 6 ± 2. 5 hours, Blood requirement 360 ±90 ml,Preoperative LVEF 60.2 + 8.5 %, Post LVEF 64. 1 +14 % Low cardiac output 48 patients (5.6 % ), IABP requirement: 25 patients(2.9 %), 25 patients converted to CPB during OP-CAB (2.9 % ) and 20 of them were done with on pump beating heart. 25 patientsshowed myocardial ischemic and 16 patients showed perioperative myocardial infarction. ICU stay 1. 1 ± 0.8days, hospital stay 6.2±1.1 days. Conclusion Off-pump coronary artery bypass in complete revas cularization is a safe, effective technique and suitable.

  19. Hemolysis during cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a case-control comparison of roller pumps and centrifugal pumps in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Jonathan; McKamie, Wes; Swearingen, Christopher; Prodhan, Parthak; Bhutta, Adnan; Jaquiss, Robert; Imamura, Michiaki; Fiser, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving therapy, which has been used for the support of children with a broad range of diseases. Two pumps of differing mechanisms have been used to generate the extracorporeal flow: roller-head pumps and centrifugal pumps. Seven patients supported during ECMO with Levitronix Centrimag (Centrimag group [CG]) were matched to 14 patients supported with Stockert-Shiley SIII (Stockert-Shiley group [SSG]) at a single institution from July 2007 to July 2009. We hypothesized that hemolysis as measured by plasma-free hemoglobin (PFH) is elevated in the SSG versus the CG during cardiac ECMO. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Plasma-free hemoglobin differences between groups were analyzed using both Wilcoxon rank sum and beta regression. Overall, SSG patients had two times the odds of having a higher PFH than CG patients adjusting for repeated measures (odds ratio [OR] = 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [1.15-3.34], p pump supported group, when compared with the CG, a centrifugal pump supported group. Differences in circuit life did not reach statistical significance. This pilot study contrasts with past studies, which have demonstrated more hemolysis occurring with centrifugal pumps when compared with roller-head pumps.

  20. Impacts of urbanization and climate on groundwater in a growing Africa city: the case of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhouddine, Alihoumadi; Yameogo, Suzanne; Genthon, Pierre; Travi, Yves

    2016-04-01

    African cities are presently facing the combined impacts of growing urbanization and climate change. In several instances; providing safe drinking water for all is still a challenge, especially for cities located on basement aquifers, were groundwater is scarce. Here we assess the effects of climate change and land use change on groundwater amount and quality in the main city of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) taking advantage of the CIEH borehole, where a mostly continuous record lasts since 1978. This record spans most of the Great African Drought (1970-1990) and recovery from the Drought since the 2000s. A piezometric network of 14 wells and boreholes was setup around the CIEH borehole and monitored during the 2013-2014 hydrologic year. The piezometric network spans an old settlement, the Ouagadougou University, a vegetable gardening area and a natural forested area. Water balance estimates are provided by a 1D box model. The study area, although it lies partly on an old settlement in Ouagadougou and on the University area, presents a rather uniform runoff coefficient of 22% and ET amounting to 80-90 % of rainfall, which usually characterizes natural areas. It is suspected that the almost absence of asphalted surfaces, the presence of trees and flow of rainwater from roofs toward bare soils or sumps could be responsible of this budget. However, the two wells located in the forested Bangr Weogo recreational area are characterized by almost no runoff and a nearly 100 % ET. While drinking water can be pumped in several places in the city of Ouagadougou, chemical major analyses show that two mechanisms impact groundwater quality during the rainy season: (i) rise of the water table at pit latrine level, mainly in old settlements, and entrainment of harmful substances from soil to the aquifer in gardening area near some artisan activities. The CIEH borehole is not fully representative of its neighboring area since (i) it lies in a piezometric low, (ii) it presents the

  1. On the use of multiple-point statistics to improve groundwater flow modeling in karst aquifers: A case study from the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coz, Mathieu; Bodin, Jacques; Renard, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Limestone aquifers often exhibit complex groundwater flow behaviors resulting from depositional heterogeneities and post-lithification fracturing and karstification. In this study, multiple-point statistics (MPS) was applied to reproduce karst features and to improve groundwater flow modeling. For this purpose, MPS realizations were used in a numerical flow model to simulate the responses to pumping test experiments observed at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France. The main flow behaviors evident in the field data were simulated, particularly (i) the early-time inflection of the drawdown signal at certain observation wells and (ii) the convex behavior of the drawdown curves at intermediate times. In addition, it was shown that the spatial structure of the karst features at various scales is critical with regard to the propagation of the depletion wave induced by pumping. Indeed, (i) the spatial shape of the cone of depression is significantly affected by the karst proportion in the vicinity of the pumping well, and (ii) early-time inflection of the drawdown signal occurs only at observation wells crossing locally well-developed karst features.

  2. A new approach to calibrate steady groundwater flow models with time series of head observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obergfell, C.; Bakker, M.; Maas, C.

    2012-04-01

    We developed a new method to calibrate aquifer parameters of steady-state well field models using measured time series of head fluctuations. Our method is an alternative to standard pumping tests and is based on time series analysis using parametric impulse response functions. First, the pumping influence is isolated from the overall groundwater fluctuation observed at monitoring wells around the well field, and response functions are determined for each individual well. Time series parameters are optimized using a quasi-Newton algorithm. For one monitoring well, time series model parameters are also optimized by means of SCEM-UA, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, as a control on the validity of the parameters obtained by the faster quasi-Newton method. Subsequently, the drawdown corresponding to an average yearly pumping rate is calculated from the response functions determined by time series analysis. The drawdown values estimated with acceptable confidence intervals are used as calibration targets of a steady groundwater flow model. A case study is presented of the drinking water supply well field of Waalwijk (Netherlands). In this case study, a uniform aquifer transmissivity is optimized together with the conductance of ditches in the vicinity of the well field. Groundwater recharge or boundary heads do not have to be entered, which eliminates two import sources of uncertainty. The method constitutes a cost-efficient alternative to pumping tests and allows the determination of pumping influences without changes in well field operation.

  3. An Institutional Analysis of Groundwater Quality Control: Experiences in Hadano, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Endo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of studies have been made of institutional arrangements that can prevent excessive groundwater pumping based on Hardin’s seminal work, the “tragedy of the commons.” In contrast, this paper is concerned with groundwater quality control for which policy studies are very limited. This paper not only clarifies institutional challenges specific to groundwater contamination, but also demonstrates how government and industry could solve them using a case study of Hadano, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, which has pioneered countermeasures for groundwater pollution in Japan. Hadano solved the challenges by enacting an innovative local ordinance with three pillars: Proxy purification by the city government, fundraising for purification activities and a retroactive system. Lessons learnt from the Hadano case will be very useful to policy makers because these problems already occur in other urban areas, or are likely to occur in the near future.

  4. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaka, Lydia A., E-mail: lydiaolaka@gmail.com [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Wilke, Franziska D.H. [Geoforschungs Zentrum, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Olago, Daniel O.; Odada, Eric O. [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Mulch, Andreas [Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Musolff, Andreas [UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02–75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5 mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F{sup −} concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2–9.2 mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27–75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ{sup 18}O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from − 6.2 to + 5.8‰ and − 31.3 to + 33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750–6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (< 1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F{sup −} enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management

  5. Determination of the critical time of canal storage capacity controlled by cross pump stations “Case Study: Egypt, El-Salam Canal”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Belasy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El-Salam Pump Stations (1 and (2 are located at 22.1 km and 54.3 km respectively at El-Salam Canal. When El-Salam Pump Station (1 is in operation, and switching off El-Salam Pump Station (2, water level rises upstream El-Salam Pump Station (2. Water level overtops El-Salam Pump Station (2 and banks upstream it. Flooding then takes place as Wadi El Noqra Canal, Egypt. This necessitates discharging the excess water to protect the pump station and the canal from water flooding when the electricity is shut down. The hydrodynamic simulation of El-Salam Canal determinates the critical time for storage capacity according to location and type of emergency spillways through the numerical model to prevent water overtopping upstream pump stations. Determination of the critical time of storage capacity is considered as a new parameter in case of the hydraulic design of the canal controlled by cross pump stations.

  6. The framing of product ideas in the making: a case study of the development of an energy saving pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gish, Liv; Clausen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    and shifting understandings of what seems to constitute a successful product, the article offers a new perspective on navigating the players’ ideas in the political processes of innovation. It suggests that navigation of technological frames can offer a new perspective to make explicit the implicated actors......-material interaction of organisational members and engagement in idea work. The article contributes a case study of the development process behind the energy-saving Alpha Pro circulator launched by the Danish pump manufacturer Grundfos. Based on an analysis of how organisational players engage in the controversial......’ world views, including what they perceive as relevant problems and related strategies for solving them....

  7. Averting a Disaster with Groundwater Depletion in India: The General Case of Water Management Principles and Development (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, U.

    2013-12-01

    Many countries, including the USA, China, and India are experiencing chronic groundwater depletion. In part this unsustainable water use results from climatic factors that reduce surface water availability and also the recharge to the aquifer system. However, a more critical factor is uncontrolled use for agriculture and energy and mineral processing. Interestingly in places such as India endowments have been politically created that lead to ever increasing use, through the provision of free energy for pumping. Reversing the situation is considered politically challenging, and the concept of metering and payment for what is essentially economic use of water is also considered difficult to apply. In this talk I use the Indian situation as a general example and discuss the role central planning strategies for demand and resource management can play recognizing the private action by millions of users as an inevitable tool that needs to be leveraged without necessarily the high transaction costs that come with monitoring and fee collection for monitored use. Specifically, targeting and stimulating potential cropping strategies and on farm water and energy management emerge as a choice in a difficult management environment. In a broader development context, I argue that the role of private sector aggregators in developing farm to market procurement strategies can play a role in both improving rural economies and providing a trajectory for more efficient water use through technology and crop choice.

  8. The Case of Pump Communities in the Kassena-Nankana '°

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents the results of a survey and long-term field research that focused .... of Sirigu (2004-2006), which is known in Upper East Region for its ecu-tourism pro ... host one up to eight related households but quarters are rented out to a number ... A number of 40 compounds per pump were locally perceived as an ...

  9. Two proposals for pumping calculations of non–newtonian fluids, water treatment plants disposal sludges case

    OpenAIRE

    H. Gardea–Villegas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two ways to calculate the pumping power of non Newtonian fluids and especially yield pseudoplastics which are the kind of disposal fluids from Water Treatment Plants. Fluids called sludges. The proposals included here, are based in methods suggested by Levenspiel (1986) applicable to determine the performance of Bingham plastics and pseudoplastic fluids using a graphical approximation of the rheological behavior of these materials. This approach has the advantage that is a...

  10. Case Study of Developing Gear Pump Design System with SolidEdge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGXiao-ying

    2004-01-01

    Part and Draft modules of SolidEdge are used to construct 3D solid models and generate part drawings, while ActiveX Automation of VB is used to access engineering database files to realize dimension-driven modification of the designed parts. Moreover, VB plays the enabling role of integrating all work processes of gear pump design, resulting in a comprehensiveCAD system.

  11. Land-use change and costs to rural households: a case study in groundwater nitrate contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Bonnie L.; Polasky, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Loss of grassland from conversion to agriculture threatens water quality and other valuable ecosystem services. Here we estimate how land-use change affects the probability of groundwater contamination by nitrate in private drinking water wells. We find that conversion of grassland to agriculture from 2007 to 2012 in Southeastern Minnesota is expected to increase the future number of wells exceeding 10 ppm nitrate-nitrogen by 45% (from 888 to 1292 wells). We link outputs of the groundwater well contamination model to cost estimates for well remediation, well replacement, and avoidance behaviors to estimate the potential economic value lost due to nitrate contamination from observed land-use change. We estimate 0.7-12 million in costs (present values over a 20 year horizon) to address the increased risk of nitrate contamination of private wells. Our study demonstrates how biophysical models and economic valuation can be integrated to estimate the welfare consequences of land-use change.

  12. Use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of listeriosis. A nationwide registry-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistholm Jensen, Anne; Simonsen, Jacob; Ethelberg, Steen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for listeriosis. We aimed to investigate a potential association in cases of non-pregnancy associated listeriosis, using registry data. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study using...... Danish health registries. Case-patients (n=721) were defined as patients ≥45 years notified with listeriosis, July 1994 to December 2012. We selected 34,800 control-subjects by risk-set sampling. Controls were individually matched for age, sex, municipality and time. Person data on use of PPI and other...... conditional logistic regression, matched odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for CMI and confounders were estimated. RESULTS: The adjusted OR with current use of PPIs for development of listeriosis was 2.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.14-3.69). PPI usage up to 90 days before the index date remained statistically...

  13. Outflows of groundwater in lakes: case study of Lake Raduńske Górne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Roman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to locate and describe groundwater outflows in a selected lake basin. The study hypothesis was based on the fact that, according to the specialist literature, one of the forms of lake water supply is through groundwater outflows. It was also assumed that the lakes of the Kashubian Lake District are characterised by such a form of lake water supply. The time scope of the work included the period from January 2011 to September 2012. The spatial scope of the work included the area of Lake Raduńskie Górne, located in the Kashubian Lake District in north Poland. The research plot was in the north-eastern part of the lake. Office works were aimed at gathering and studying source materials and maps. Cartographic materials were analysed with the use of the MapInfo Professional 9.5. The purpose of the field work was to find the groundwater outflows in the basin of Lake Raduńskie Górne. During the field research diving was carried out in the lake. During the dive audiovisual documentation was conducted using a Nikon D90 camera with Ikelite underwater housing for Nikon D90 and an Ikelite DS 161 movie substrobe, as well as a GoPro HD HERO 2 Outdoor camera. During the project, four groundwater outflows were found. In order to examine these springs audiovisual and photographic documentation was made. To systematise the typology of the discovered springs, new nomenclature was suggested, namely under-lake springs with subtypes: an under-lake slope spring and under-lake offshore spring

  14. Stable groundwater quality in deep aquifers of Southern Bangladesh: the case against sustainable abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, P; McArthur, J M; Hoque, M A

    2013-06-01

    In forty six wells >150 m deep, from across the arsenic-polluted area of south-central Bangladesh, groundwater composition remained unchanged between 1998 and 2011. No evidence of deteriorating water quality was found in terms of arsenic, iron, manganese, boron, barium or salinity over this period of 13 years. These deep tubewells have achieved operating lives of more than 20 years with minimal institutional support. These findings confirm that tubewells tapping the deep aquifers in the Bengal Basin provide a safe, popular, and economic, means of arsenic mitigation and are likely to do so for decades to come. Nevertheless, concerns remain about the sustainability of a resource that could serve as a source of As-safe water to mitigate As-pollution in shallower aquifers in an area where tens of millions of people are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic in well water. The conjunction of the stable composition in deep groundwater and the severe adverse health effects of arsenic in shallow groundwater lead us to challenge the notion that strong sustainability principles should be applied to the management of deep aquifer abstraction in Bangladesh is, the notion that the deep groundwater resource should be preserved for future generations by protecting it from adverse impacts, probably of a minor nature, that could occur after a long time and might not happen at all. Instead, we advocate an ethical approach to development of the deep aquifer, based on adaptive abstraction management, which allows possibly unsustainable exploitation now in order to alleviate crippling disease and death from arsenic today while also benefiting future generations by improving the health, education and economy of living children.

  15. Quantifying Groundwater Recharge Uncertainty: A Multiple-Model Framework and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, C.; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2014-12-01

    In practice, it is difficult to estimate groundwater recharge accurately. Despite this challenge, most recharge investigations produce a single, best estimate of recharge. However, there is growing recognition that quantification of natural recharge uncertainty is critical for groundwater management. We present a multiple-model framework for estimating recharge uncertainty. In addition, we show how direct water flux measurements can be used to reduce the uncertainty of estimates of total basin recharge for an arid, closed hydrologic basin in the Atacama Desert, Chile. We first formulated multiple hydrogeologic conceptual models of the basin based on existing data, and implemented each conceptual model for the purpose of conducting numerical simulations. For each conceptual model, groundwater recharge was inversely estimated; then, Null-Space Monte Carlo techniques were used to quantify the uncertainty on the initial estimate of total basin recharge. Second, natural recharge components - including both deep percolation and streambed infiltration - were estimated from field data. Specifically, vertical temperature profiles were measured in monitoring wells and streambeds, and water fluxes were estimated from thermograph analysis. Third, calculated water fluxes were incorporated as prior information to the model calibration and Null-Space Monte Carlo procedures, yielding revised estimates of both total basin recharge and associated uncertainty. The fourth and final component of this study uses value of information analyses to identify potentially informative locations for additional water flux measurements. The uncertainty quantification framework presented here is broadly transferable; furthermore, this research provides an applied example of the extent to which water flux measurements may serve to reduce groundwater recharge uncertainty at the basin scale.

  16. Groundwater Quality Assessment Using Averaged Water Quality Index: A Case Study of Lahore City, Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umair Shahid, Syed; Iqbal, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Water quality is considered as a major issue in mega cities of developing countries. The city of Lahore has over 10 million populations with the highest population density in the Punjab Province, Pakistan. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water in Lahore. The groundwater quality should be regularly monitored to cope up with drinking water quality issues. The water quality index (WQI), previously used in many studies was usually based on one-year data to analyze the water quality situation of the study area. However, the results obtained from the data, based on single observation from different points may have distortion. This might have occurred due to the inclusion of multiple types of errors induced in the data as a result of improper sampling design, lack of expertise in terms of both sampling method and sample testing, instrumental and human errors, etc. Therefore, the study evaluated the groundwater physicochemical parameters (turbidity, pH, total dissolved solids, hardness, chlorides, alkalinity and calcium) for three years. The averaged water quality index (AWQI) was computed using ArcGIS 10.3 model builder. The AWQI map indicated that the water quality in the study area was generally good except in few places like Anarkali, Baghbanpura, Allama Iqbal Town, Mughalpura and Mozang due to relatively higher turbidity levels. The results of this study can be used for decision making regarding provision of clean drinking water to the city of Lahore. Moreover, the methodology adopted in this study can be implemented in other mega cities as well to monitor groundwater quality.

  17. Hydrological connectivity of alluvial Andean valleys: a groundwater/surface-water interaction case study in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Pablo; Anibas, Christian; Batelaan, Okke; Huysmans, Marijke; Wyseure, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The Andean region is characterized by important intramontane alluvial and glacial valleys; a typical example is the Tarqui alluvial plain, Ecuador. Such valley plains are densely populated and/or very attractive for urban and infrastructural development. Their aquifers offer opportunities for the required water resources. Groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction generally entails recharge to or discharge from the aquifer, dependent on the hydraulic connection between surface water and groundwater. Since GW-SW interaction in Andean catchments has hardly been addressed, the objectives of this study are to investigate GW-SW interaction in the Tarqui alluvial plain and to understand the role of the morphology of the alluvial valley in the hydrological response and in the hydrological connection between hillslopes and the aquifers in the valley floor. This study is based on extensive field measurements, groundwater-flow modelling and the application of temperature as a groundwater tracer. Results show that the morphological conditions of a valley influence GW-SW interaction. Gaining and losing river sections are observed in narrow and wide alluvial valley sections, respectively. Modelling shows a strong hydrological connectivity between the hillslopes and the alluvial valley; up to 92 % of recharge of the alluvial deposits originates from lateral flow from the hillslopes. The alluvial plain forms a buffer or transition zone for the river as it sustains a gradual flow from the hills to the river. Future land-use planning and development should include concepts discussed in this study, such as hydrological connectivity, in order to better evaluate impact assessments on water resources and aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Evaluating Renewable Groundwater Stress with GRACE data in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V.; Gemitzi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is a resilient water source and its importance as a fundamental resource is even greater in times of drought where groundwater stress conditions are greatest for areas like Mediterranean and adverse climate change effects are expected. The present study evaluates Renewable Groundwater Stress (RGS) as the ratio of groundwater use to groundwater availability, quantifying use as the trend in GRACE-derived subsurface anomalies (ΔGWtrend) and renewable groundwater availability as mean annual recharge. Estimates for mean annual recharge were used from groundwater studies conducted for the various regions in Greece, mainly in the form of numerical models. Our results highlighted two RGS regimes in Greece out of the four characteristic stress regimes, i.e. Overstressed, Variable Stress, Human-Dominated Stress and Unstressed, defined as a function of the sign of use and the sign of groundwater availability (positive or negative). Variable Stress areas are found in central Greece (Thessaly region), where intense agricultural activities take place, with negative ΔGWtrend values combined with positive mean annual recharge rates. RGS values range from -0.05 - 0, indicating however a low impact area. Within this region, adverse effects of groundwater overexploitation are already evident, based on the negative GRACE anomalies, recharge however still remains positive, amending the adverse over pumping impacts. The rest of Greek aquifers fall within the unstressed category, with RGS values from 0.02 - 0.05, indicating that the rate of use is less than the natural recharge rate. The highest Unstressed RGS values are observed in Crete Island and in Northeastern Greece. However, the case of Crete is highly uncertain, as precipitation and recharge in this area demonstrate exceptionally high variability and the coarse resolution of GRACE results does not allow for reliable estimates.

  19. Long-term detection and hydrochemistry of groundwater resources in Egypt: Case study of Siwa Oasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar A. Aly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water, it is said, will be the oil of the twenty-first century. Successful water management will be the key to future economic growth and social wealth in both developed and developing countries. Due to the continuous agricultural expansion, urban development, and increased demands on limited water supplies, Egypt is compelled to look for unconventional water resources. One of the most important sources is groundwater in the western desert of Egypt. More water abstraction is currently taking place raising the dangers of overexploitation and deterioration of water quality in Siwa Oasis located in Egypt western desert. The main objectives of this study are to monitor the quality of the Siwa Oasis groundwater over ten years. The present paper presents the results of this investigation and the future outlook for the situation of the limited water resources of the oasis. The data showed spatial differences between water qualities obtained from different locations within the Oasis. It was also observed that there are temporal changes and that water quality is deteriorating in alarming rate over time. Most studied water samples were considered unsuitable for irrigation due to salinity hazards. The reason that may contribute to speeding up groundwater quality deterioration is the unsafe ground water mining on the deep sandstone aquifers which causes the decreases of the fresh water vertical movement from the deep sandstone aquifer to the surface limestone aquifer.

  20. Geophysical Investigation of Groundwater Regime: Case Study of Etioro-Akoko Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril C. Okpoli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The electrical resistivity study of Etioro-Akoko has become imperative because of non-functional potable water. The study aims at resolving the geology setup through hydro-geophysical methods and modeling of the wells. Dipole- dipole, Schlumberger array and the positioning of the hand dug wells were carried out in the study area.Dipole-dipole array results in the study area do not show structures indicative of high groundwater yield potential. Three layers comprising of the topsoil, weathered layer, and the fresh basement were delineated using the Schlumberger array with overburden thicknesses ranging from 4.5-7.7m.The values are too thin to support productive wells. Well inventory (depth to well-base results ranges from 5.3-7.3m and were used to model the direction of flow pattern of groundwater. The southernmost part of the map is continuously discharged. To tap into the groundwater resources in this area requires detailed geophysical mapping and investigations of the discharge area.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.69.3.5334

  1. Impact of landfill leachate on the groundwater quality: A case study in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda M. Abd El-Salam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alexandria Governorate contracted an international company in the field of municipal solid waste management for the collection, transport and disposal of municipal solid waste. Construction and operation of the sanitary landfill sites were also included in the contract for the safe final disposal of solid waste. To evaluate the environmental impacts associated with solid waste landfilling, leachate and groundwater quality near the landfills were analyzed. The results of physico-chemical analyses of leachate confirmed that its characteristics were highly variable with severe contamination of organics, salts and heavy metals. The BOD5/COD ratio (0.69 indicated that the leachate was biodegradable and un-stabilized. It was also found that groundwater in the vicinity of the landfills did not have severe contamination, although certain parameters exceeded the WHO and EPA limits. These parameters included conductivity, total dissolved solids, chlorides, sulfates, Mn and Fe. The results suggested the need for adjusting factors enhancing anaerobic biodegradation that lead to leachate stabilization in addition to continuous monitoring of the groundwater and leachate treatment processes.

  2. Effect of pesticide fate parameters and their uncertainty on the selection of 'worst-case' scenarios od pesticide leaching to groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderborght, J.; Tiktak, A.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the registration of pesticides in the European Union, model simulations for worst-case scenarios are used to demonstrate that leaching concentrations to groundwater do not exceed a critical threshold. A worst-case scenario is a combination of soil and climate properties for which

  3. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  4. Groundwater Challenges of the Lower Rio Grande: A Case Study of Legal Issues in Texas and New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Wheat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1938, Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado signed the Rio Grande Compact, establishing terms of apportionment for some of the water from the Rio Grande for the three states. Following congressional approval in 1939, this compact governs water allocation in a region with a variable climate and frequent drought conditions and established the Rio Grande Compact Commission, comprised of a commissioner from each state and one from the federal government, to enforce the compact. With an increasing population and declining surface water supply, the Compact has been tested among the parties and within the states themselves. In a case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court, Texas v. New Mexico and Colorado (2013, Texas claims New Mexico is violating the Compact and Rio Grande Project Act by using water in excess of its apportionment through its allowance of diversions of surface and groundwater. The issue is further compounded by disputes within Texas over separate legal regimes for groundwater and surface water. Combined with growing scarcity issues, the allocation of water in the Lower Rio Grande presents a timely natural resource challenge. This review explores legal issues involved in the case as well as growing challenges of population growth, agricultural development needs, and water shortages.

  5. A Case Study of Using Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles for Groundwater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Z.; Kaback, D.; Bennett, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (nZVI) is a promising technology for rapid in situ remediation of numerous contaminants, including chlorinated solvents, in groundwater and soil. Because of the high specific surface area of nZVI particles, this technology achieves treatment rates that are significantly faster than micron-scale and granular ZVI. However, a key technical challenge facing this technology involves agglomeration of nZVI particles. To improve nZVI mobility/deliverability and reactivity, an innovative method was recently developed using a low-cost and bio-degradable organic polymer as a stabilizer. This nZVI stabilization strategy offers unique advantages including: (1) the organic polymer is cost-effective and "green" (completely bio-compatible), (2) the organic polymer is highly effective in stabilizing nZVI particles; and (3) the stabilizer is applied during particle preparation, making nZVI particles more stable. Through a funding from the U.S. Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment (AFCEE), AMEC performed a field study to test the effectiveness of this innovative technology for degradation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater at a military site. Laboratory treatability tests were conducted using groundwater samples collected from the test site and results indicated that trichloroethene (main groundwater contaminant at the site) was completely degraded within four hours by nZVI particles. In March and May 2011, two rounds of nZVI injection were performed at the test site. Approximately 700 gallons of nZVI suspension with palladium as a catalyst were successfully prepared in the field and injected into the subsurface. Before injection, membrane filters with a pore size of 450 nm were used to check the nZVI particle size and it was observed that >85% of nZVI particles were passed through the filter based on total iron measurement, indicating particle size of nZVI particles were observed in a monitoring well located 5 feet downgradient from

  6. Groundwater dependence of coastal lagoons: The case of La Pletera salt marshes (NE Catalonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menció, A.; Casamitjana, X.; Mas-Pla, J.; Coll, N.; Compte, J.; Martinoy, M.; Pascual, J.; Quintana, X. D.

    2017-09-01

    Coastal wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems of the world, playing an important role in coastal defense and wildlife conservation. These ecosystems, however, are usually affected by human activities, which may cause a loss and degradation of their ecological status, a decline of their biodiversity, an alteration of their ecological functioning, and a limitation of their ecosystem services. La Pletera salt marshes (NE Spain) are located in a region mainly dominated by agriculture and tourism activities. Part of these wetlands and lagoons has been affected by an incomplete construction of an urban development and in this moment is the focus of a Life+ project, whose aim is to restore this protected area. Several studies have analyzed the role of hydrological regime in nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton in this area, however, the role of groundwater was never considered as a relevant factor in the lagoon dynamics, and its influence is still unknown. In this study, the hydrogeological dynamics in La Pletera salt marshes has been analyzed, as a basis to set sustainable management guidelines for this area. In order to determine their dependence on groundwater resources, monthly hydrochemical (with major ions and nutrients) and isotopic (δ18OH2O and δD) campaigns have been conducted, from November 2014 to October 2015. In particular, groundwater from six wells, surface water from two nearby streams and three permanent lagoons, and sea water was considered in these surveys. Taking into account the meteorological data and the water levels in the lagoons, the General Lake Model has been conducted to determine, not only evaporation and rainfall occurring in the lagoons, but also the total inflows and outflows. In addition, the Gonfiantini isotopic model, together with equilibrium chemical-speciation/mass transfer models, has been used to analyze the evaporation and the physicochemical processes affecting the lagoons. Results show that during the dry

  7. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  8. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division

    2015-11-30

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  9. Groundwater quality in an abandoned metal extraction site: the case study of Campello Monti (NW Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neha; Lasagna, Manuela; Antonella Dino, Giovanna; De Luca, Domenico Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Extractive activities present threat to natural water systems and their effects are observed even after the cessation of activities. The harmful effects of extractive activities such as deterioration of water sources by low quality waters or by allowing leaching of metals into groundwater makes it necessary to carry out careful, scientific and comprehensive studies on this subject. Consequently, the same problem statement was chosen as part of a PhD research Project. The PhD research is part of REMEDIATE project (A Marie Sklodowska-Curie Action Initial Training Network for Improved decision making in contaminated land site investigation and risk assessment, Grant Agreement No. 643087). The current work thus points out on the contamination of groundwater sources due to past mining activities in the area. Contaminated groundwater may act as possible contamination source to surface water also. The impacts on water systems connected to mining activities depend on the ore type, metal being extracted, exploitation method, ore processing, pollution control efforts, geochemical and hydrogeochemical conditions of water and surroundings. To evaluate the effects posed by past metal extracting activities the study was carried out at an abandoned site used for extracting nickel in Campello Monti (Valstrona municipality, Piedmont region, Italy). Campello Monti is located in basement of Southern Italian Alps in the Ivrea Verbano Zone. The area is composed of mafic rocks intruded by mantle periodite. The mafic formation consists of peridotites, pyroxenites, gabbros, anorthosites, gabbro-norite, gabbro-diorite and diorite. Mines were used for nickel exploitation from 9th Century and continued until 1940s. The long history of nickel extraction has left the waste contaminated with Ni and Co in the mountains alongwith tunnels used for carrying out metal extracting activities. The area around the site is used for housing, shows the presence of domestic animals and has Strona creek

  10. Effect of groundwater source heat pump system on ground temperature field%地下水地源热泵系统应用对地温场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧玲; 王文峰; 王峰; 孙保卫

    2011-01-01

    Ground water source heat pump (GWHP) system is used in the test field.The influence of GWHP on regional geothermal field is analyzed based on the temperature of groundwater which is continuously monitored during the running course of the system.It is found that groundwater temperature of the area around pumping and recharge wells has a significant change in this process.Injection water will be stored in the aquifer with anomalous edge lens.The extreme values of temperature appear in the middle of the aquifer.The amplitude of variation and the area of influence for an aquifuge are smaller than for an aquifer.Because of the thermal cumulative effect, gathering of hot and cold water body around the water - bearing stratum and the aquifuge will occur after a running circle of the system, even if it is a load balance.%通过建立地下水地源热泵系统试验场,运行热泵系统,并进行地下水温度连续监测,分析应用地下水地源热泵系统对地温场的影响.抽水井与回灌井之间以及回灌井附近的地下水温度随系统运行明显变化.系统运行后,回灌水体将以不规则边缘的透镜体贮存于含水层中,以回灌井为中心向外围扩展,水温最低或最高点位于含水层中部.粘性土相对隔水层的温度变化幅度、影响范围均小于含水层.由于热量的累积效应,即使是冷热负荷均衡的热泵系统,运行一个采暖、制冷周期后也将在热源井附近的抽、灌水含水层以及相邻的隔水层中形成冷量或热量的小范围聚积.

  11. Analysis of groundwater mining in two carbonate aquifers in Sierra de Estepa (SE Spain) based on hydrodynamic and hydrochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Miguel; Moral, Francisco; Cruz-Sanjulián, José Javier; Rubio, Juan Carlos

    2009-11-01

    The carbonate aquifers of Lora and Mingo form part of the hydrogeological unit of Sierra de Estepa (SE Spain). By means of time series analysis and a 1D numerical groundwater model, groundwater exploitation was quantified and the mean annual recharge in both systems was estimated (2001-2004). During this period, the Lora and Mingo aquifers received an average groundwater recharge of 0.29 × 106 m3/year and 0.14 × 106 m3/year, respectively, whereas an average of 0.34 × 106 m3/year and 0.21 × 106 m3/year, respectively, was extracted. These conditions led to a conspicuous lowering of the water table in both systems. In addition, the analysis of the evolution of the main hydrogeochemical parameters of the groundwater showed that the increased pumping rates produced an increase in total dissolved solids, and chloride and sodium ions in both aquifers. In the case of the Lora aquifer, the only ion that presented decreased levels was nitrate. The results show that groundwater pumping in both aquifers should not exceed the mean annual recharge of 0.29 × 106 m3/year and 0.14 × 106 m3/year in the Lora and Mingo aquifers, respectively. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to reduce pumping rates to below these values in order to restore piezometric levels and improve groundwater quality for different uses in the future.

  12. Infrastructure design integration to optimize structures and minimize groundwater impacts. Case of a bottom slab and groundwater by-pass integration in La Sagrera railway station, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano Juan, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñè, Enric; Pujades, Estanislao; Velasco, Violeta; Criollo, Rotman; Jurado, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Underground constructions search the most efficient solutions to increase safety, reduce impacts in both underground construction (such as bottom slab water pressures) and groundwater (such as groundwater barrier effect), reduce future maintenance processes and ensure that everything is implemented by the minimum cost. Even being all the previous solutions directly related to groundwater, independent solutions are usually designed to independently deal with each problem. This paper shows how with a groundwater by-pass design that enables the groundwater flow through the structure it is possible to provide an homogeneous distribution of the water pressures under the bottom slab and reduce the barrier effect produced by the structure. The new integrated design has been applied to the largest infrastructure of Barcelona: La Sagrera railway station. Through a hydrogeological model has been possible to test the project and the integrated designs in three different scenarios. This new solution resolves the barrier effect produced by the structure and optimizes the bottom slab, reducing considerably the costs and increasing safety during the construction phase.

  13. Optimum Location of Pumping and Injection Wells of Groundwater Heat Exchange System Using Numerical Modeling of Water and Heat Transport%应用水热运移数值模拟优化地下水源热泵系统抽灌井布局

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳孟贵; 汤庆佳; 栗现文

    2012-01-01

    合理布局抽水井和回灌井是地下水源热泵系统长期有效运行的关键因素.以郑州市郑东新区为例,利用HST3D软件建立水热运移数值模型,优化设计地下水源热泵系统抽灌水井布局,预测地下水源热泵系统长期运行后对含水层的水热影响.结果表明:介质比热容及渗透率分别对含水层温度及水位影响显著,是较敏感的参数.方案3(3个回灌井垂直天然流向分布且位于抽水井下游)为最佳布井方式.抽灌量900,1200,1500及2000m3/d所对应的合理布井间距分别为50,65,70及75m.相应布井方案的水源热泵系统运行20 a,对含水层温度场的影响仅限于200 m×200m的范围,抽水井温度变化小于1℃.%Rational location of pumping and injection wells is a key for long-term efficient operation of a groundwater heat exchange system. Numerical modeling of groundwater and heat transport in Zhengdong New District of Zhengzhou was established to optimally locate the pumping and injection wells of groundw-ater heat exchange system, and to forecast the influence of long term operation of groundwater heat exchange system on flow and heat in aquifers. It is concluded that specific heat capacity and permeability are sensitive parameter and their changes will significantly impact on heat and head in aquifers respectively. Scheme 3 (three injection well vertical to natural flow direction and downwards the pumping well) is an optimized location of the wells. Rational distances between pumping and injection wells for the pumping/ injection rates of 900, 1 200, 1 500 and 2 000 m3/d are 50, 65, 70 and 75 m respectively. The influence of the groundwater heat exchange system that wells are located as scheme 3 is limited to the range of 200 m× 200 m after 20 year operation and the change of temperature in the pumping well is fewer than 1℃.

  14. Groundwater quality analysis using multivariate statistical techniques (case study: Fars province, Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshadi, Masoud; Ghafourian, Amir

    2016-07-01

    This research investigated the quality of groundwater of 298 wells during 10 years, in Fars province, southern Iran, to survey spatial variation of groundwater quality and also major sources of hydro-chemical components for drinking and agricultural uses. To classify the sampling stations in each year, hierarchical cluster analysis, using the Euclidean distances and "Ward" method, was used. According to the results of cluster analysis, there were three quality groups in groundwater of the research area: first group of 170 wells with type of Ca-HCO3, second group of 98 wells with type of Ca-HCO3, and third group of 30 wells with type of Na-Cl. Hydro-chemical parameters were increased from the first to the third group, and on the basis of Schoeller and USSL diagrams, the water of wells of the third group was considered unsuitable for irrigation and drinking. Principal component (PC) analysis and factor analysis reduced the complex and voluminous data matrix into three main components, accounting for more than 80 % of the total variance. The first PC contained TDS, EC, TH, Na(+), Cl(-), Mg(2+), SO4 (2-), Ca(2+), and SAR parameters. Therefore, the first dominant factor was salinity. In PC2, HCO3 and pH were the dominant parameters, which may indicate weathering of silicate minerals. The PC3 contained high loadings for NO2 (2-) and NO3 (-). This factor indicates anthropogenic contaminants that may be caused by improper disposal of domestic wastes or the use of chemical fertilizers in agriculture and leaching of them.

  15. Groundwater flow model management and case studies in Emilia-Romagna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Chahoud

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of groundwater modeling to support the planning and management of water resources is a possible goal of a long and detailed course of study and research. The present work concerns some applications carried out within the aquifers of the Emilia-Romagna plain in northern Italy. The main features of the developed and available mathematical models are reported as well as the geological and hydrogeological description of the analyzed aquifers. The main operational choices that have characterized the implementation of all models and their continuous development and updating are discussed. Activity has been focused to maintain active the data stream between the models to improve their functionality along with time to give a basis for models management. Models have been used in different applications which indicate the potential for their use with targeted objectives of planning and management. Two examples at two different scales are given: the first shows the application to the entire aquifer of the Emilia-Romagna region, which has been able to adapt simulations to new groundwater bodies defined in accordance with 2000/60/EC directive, the current regulatory framework for the planning of water resources. This framework provides for the establishment of programs of measures whose level of effectiveness can be estimated with the support of models. The second concerns a more detailed scale model in reference to a specific evaluation of feasibility of an intervention of artificial recharge. The management approach used here is the result of over 10 years development and application and now allows to apply numerical models in a role of systematic service in support of the institutions involved in planning and management of groundwater resources.

  16. Production of biomass by Spirulina at different groundwater type. Case of Ouargla-Southeast Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggaï, Ali; Dadamoussa, Belkheir; Djaghoubi, Afaf; Bissati, Samia

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Spirulina platensis was cultivated to estimate the biomass production with different groundwater type in Ouargla. Growth experiments were undertaken in flasks under shelter in outdoor condition. For this, the temperature, pH and salinity value was recorded between two days of growth. Biomass concentration in the culture media was calculated by measuring the DO625. The combination of the Mioplocen water with the nutriments gave the highest values of biomass concentration with avenge of 1.78 ±0.91g/l. All the three-type water supported the growth of Spirulina that appeared as good as a culture media.

  17. 上海地区地下水源热泵技术应用实例研究%The application of groundwater source heat pump technology in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛佳; 陈敏; 乔坚强

    2016-01-01

    A groundwater heat pump is a new method of developing and utilizing shal ow geothermal energy. It has the advantages of high efifciency, energy savings, and environmental beneifts. There is a wide range of applicability, and its market is broad. As there is an imbalance between the supply and demand of energy, it is very necessary to develop and utilize the ground water heat pump technology in Shanghai. In this study, research on the application of this technology in the Shanghai area further veriifes the optimal design (such as the use of a 100%closed recharge, reasonable wel spacing, and other measures), ensures that the ground water heat pump system has a smal and control able effect on the geological environment, and shows that the technology has signiifcant economic and environmental beneifts.%地下水源热泵是一种新兴的浅层地热能开发利用方式,可将不能被直接利用的低品位地热能提升为可利用的能源,并具有高效节能、环境效益显著、适用范围较广、市场前景广阔等优点,对于能源供需矛盾突出的上海,开发利用地下水源热泵技术十分必要。本文通过上海地区地下水源热泵技术应用实例研究,进一步验证通过优化设计(如采用全封闭100%回灌、合理的井间距等措施),可使地下水源热泵系统对地质环境影响微小、可控,且经济环境效益显著。

  18. Using communication research to gather stakeholder preferences to improve groundwater management models: a South Texas case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Uddamer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a compelling need to ensure that the points of view and preferences of stakeholders are fully considered and incorporated into natural resources management strategies. Stakeholders include a diverse group of individuals in several sectors that have an interest in how natural resources are managed. Typically, stakeholders with an interest in groundwater resources include groups who could be affected by the manner in which the resource is managed (e.g., farmers who need water for irrigation; municipalities and individuals who need drinking water, agencies and organizations that want to maintain in-stream flows to support ecosystems, etc. Refugio County in South Texas provides an interesting case study since several groups of water users in the region are working with researchers at Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK to develop decision-support models that incorporate stakeholder concerns.The focus of this paper is to provide a series of arguments and approaches about the ways in which stakeholder issues have recently been incorporated into environmental models, to briefly describe some of the TAMUK efforts to develop groundwater models that incorporate stakeholder inputs, and to present and discuss a method in which communication research can be used to obtain stakeholder preferences input into modeling efforts.

  19. Sustainable conjunctive use of groundwater for additional irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, N.

    2014-01-01

    Currently millions of private wells in the Punjab are pumping groundwater as an additional source for irrigation to compensate for irregular surface water supply. Since the 1990s, most of them are skimming wells that aim to reduce the salinity of the pumped groundwater. However, salinization continu

  20. Tracing man's impact on groundwater dependent ecosystem using geochemical an isotope tools combined with 3D flow and transport modeling: case study from southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Anna; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Jench, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Thorough understanding of the link between terrestrial ecosystems and underlying groundwater reservoirs is an important element of sustainable management of groundwater resources in the light of ever growing anthropogenic pressure on groundwater reserves, both with respect to quantity and quality of this vital resource. While association of terrestrial ecosystems with surface water (rivers, streams, lakes, etc.) is visible and recognized, their link to underground components of the hydrological cycle is often forgotten and not appreciated. The presented study was aimed at investigating possible adverse effects of intensive exploitation of porous sandy aquifer on groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) consisting of a valuable forest stand and associated wetlands. The Bogucice Sands aquifer and the associated GDTE (Niepolomice Forest) are located in the south of Poland. The principal economic role of the aquifer, consisting of two water-bearing strata is to provide potable water for public and private users. Eastern part of the shallow phreatic aquifer is occupied by Niepolomice Forest. The Niepolomice Forest is a lowland forest covering around 110 km2. It is protected as a Natura 2000 Special Protection Area "Puszcza Niepołomicka" (PLB120002) which supports bird populations of European importance. Additionally, a fen in the western part of the forest comprises a separate Natura 2000 area "Torfowisko Wielkie Bloto" (PLH120080), a significant habitat of endangered butterfly species associated with wet meadows. Dependence of the Niepolomice Forest stands on groundwater is enhanced by low available water capacity and low capillary rise of soils. Groundwater conditions in the Niepolomice Forest, including Wielkie Bloto fen have been affected by meliorations carried out mostly after the Second World War and by forest management. In September 2009 a cluster of new pumping wells (Wola Batorska well-field) has been set up close to the northern boundary of

  1. Groundwater in steppe environments: "El Hito" Lagoon wetland as a case of study (Cuenca; Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Merlín, A.; Martínez-Pérez, S.; Molina-Navarro, E.

    2012-04-01

    El Hito Lagoon wetland, located in the interfluve of the upper basins of the Cigüela and Záncara rivers (Guadiana Basin, central Spain), configures an important element of geo-environmental heritage of Castilla-LaMancha (Natural Reserve), as well as being an area recognized as Ramsar Site and integrated in the Natura 2000 Network. It has an extension around 290 ha in the periods of maximum flooding and it is embedded in an endorheic basin of 42 Km2. The area that includes it has an arid appearance in a landscape dominated by extensive agriculture, being catalogued as "without aquifers" under its unfavorable geo-hydrological substrate. Thereby, the manifestation of the wetland has been attributed to the simple accumulation of precipitation water in the rainy periods. However, studies to date show the contribution of groundwater to the dynamics of this geo-system, showing how the lake basin behaves itself like a diffuse discharge area of groundwater flow to the endorheic in which it is located. This paper shows the most relevant data to understand the functioning of this wetland of great scientific and environmental importance, as it support interesting halophytic plant communities as well as large number of waterflow and steppe birds.

  2. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Bierkens, Marc; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of sea level rise and increase in extreme weather conditions has led to a new focus on coastal defense in the Netherlands. As an innovative solution for coastal erosion a mega-nourishment named the Sand Motor (or Sand Engine) has been constructed at the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents; keeping the coastal defense structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. The large size and position of the Sand Motor might lead to a substantial increase of fresh ground water resources. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied. The preliminary model calculations show that in a period of 20 years volume of fresh water gradually increases to ca. 12 Mm3. In the nearby dune area 7-8 Mm3 is abstracted yearly, therefore the first results are promising in increasing fresh groundwater resources. More model calculations will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of the change in the fresh, brackish and salt water distribution.

  3. Distribution of groundwater nitrate contamination in GIS environment: A case study, Sonqor plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parasto Setareh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nitrate is a pollutant of groundwater resources which can results health risks such as methemoglobinemia and formation of nitrosamine compounds in higher concentration limits. The present study was aimed to determine the nitrite level, causes of pollution and zonation of nitrite concentration in drinking water resources in the villages of Sonqor. Methods: In this descriptive-analytrical study, 73 samples of all groundwater resources of Sonqor plain were taken in ,high water (March 2010 and low water (September 2011 periods. Water nitrate levels were then determined by spectrophotometry. Results were compared by national standards and analyzed by SPSS and Arcview GIS 9.3 software. Finally, the concentration distribution mapping was carried out in GIS environment and the factors affecting nitrite changes were analyzed. Results: nitrate concentration of water resources of Sonqor plain was fluctuating at 3.09-88.5 mg per liter.In one station, nitrite concentrations in the high (88.5 mg/liter and low (71.4 mg/liter water seasons were higher than the maximum limit. Based on the maps, a relatively high concentration of nitrite was observed in the Eastern and Southeastern regions. Conclusion: The findings indicated a reverse correlation between nitrite concentration changes and changes of static surface depth. Low thickness of alluvium, location of wells in the downstream farmlands, farming condition of the region, nitrate leaching from agricultural soils and wide application of nitrogen fertilizers in agriculture were considered as the causes of the pollution in one station.

  4. Assessment of groundwater contamination by landfill leachate: a case in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-López, Jaime A; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Lázaro-Mancilla, Octavio; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepción; Garrido, Miguel Martín-Loeches

    2008-01-01

    In México, uncontrolled landfills or open-dumps are regularly used as "sanitary landfills". Interactions between landfills/open-dumps and shallow unconfined aquifers have been widely documented. Therefore, evidence showing the occurrence of aquifer contamination may encourage Mexican decision makers to enforce environmental regulations. Traditional methods such as chemical analysis of groundwater, hydrological descriptions, and geophysical studies including vertical electrical sounding (VES) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) were used for the identification and delineation of a contaminant plume in a shallow aquifer. The Guadalupe Victoria landfill located in Mexicali is used as a model study site. This landfill has a shallow aquifer of approximately 1m deep and constituted by silty sandy soil that may favor the transport of landfill leachate. Geophysical studies show a landfill leachate contaminant plume that extends for 20 and 40 m from the SE and NW edges of the landfill, respectively. However, the zone of the leachate's influence stretches for approximately 80 m on both sides of the landfill. Geochemical data corroborates the effects of landfill leachate on groundwater.

  5. Contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil, and evaluation of selected ground-water pumping alternatives in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Clark, Jeffrey S.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical manufacturing, munitions filling, and other military-support activities have resulted in the contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and trichloroethylene, are widespread ground-water contaminants in two aquifers that are composed of unconsolidated sand and gravel. Distribution and fate of chlorinated organic compounds in the ground water has been affected by the movement and dissolution of solvents in their dense immiscible phase and by microbial degradation under anaerobic conditions. Detection of volatile organic contaminants in adjacent surface water indicates that shallow contaminated ground water discharges to surface water. Semivolatile organic compounds, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are the most prevalent organic contaminants in soils. Various trace elements, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc, were found in elevated concentrations in ground water, surface water, and soil. Simulations with a ground-water-flow model and particle tracker postprocessor show that, without remedial pumpage, the contaminants will eventually migrate to Canal Creek and Gunpowder River. Simulations indicate that remedial pumpage of 2.0 million gallons per day from existing wells is needed to capture all particles originating in the contaminant plumes. Simulated pumpage from offsite wells screened in a lower confined aquifer does not affect the flow of contaminated ground water in the Canal Creek area.

  6. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1981-01-01

    Centrifugal Pumps describes the whole range of the centrifugal pump (mixed flow and axial flow pumps are dealt with more briefly), with emphasis on the development of the boiler feed pump. Organized into 46 chapters, this book discusses the general hydrodynamic principles, performance, dimensions, type number, flow, and efficiency of centrifugal pumps. This text also explains the pumps performance; entry conditions and cavitation; speed and dimensions for a given duty; and losses. Some chapters further describe centrifugal pump mechanical design, installation, monitoring, and maintenance. The

  7. Assessing TNT and DNT groundwater contamination by compound-specific isotope analysis and 3H-3He groundwater dating: a case study in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Helena I F; Fernandes, Judite; Berg, Michael; Schwarzenbach, René P; Kipfer, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) originating from 50 years of explosives production have heavily contaminated two stacked aquifers in the vicinity of Lisboa, Portugal. To assess if these poly-nitroaromatic compounds (P-NACs) are being degraded in the subsurface, tracer-based groundwater dating techniques combined with compound-specific isotope analyses (CSIA) were applied. The groundwater residence times were distinctly different in the two aerobic aquifers, as determined by the tritium ((3)H)-(3)He method. In the contaminated zones, the upper aquifer exhibited groundwater ages of 25 years, whereas the lower (presumably confined) aquifer contained hardly any tritium which indicates water ages >55 years. P-NACs-containing waste waters are known to have leaked into the upper, unconfined aquifer. However, P-NACs were present in both aquifers in high concentrations (up to 33000 microg L(-1) TNT), which implies a hydraulic connection, although tritium concentrations and chemical data suggest two separated aquifers. Based on the (3)H-(3)He groundwater dating and the presence of very high P-NAC concentrations, the contamination of the lower aquifer must have happened during the early stage of the explosive production, i.e. >50 years ago. Despite this 'old' contamination, TNT and DNT have not been transformed until to date as is demonstrated by the negligible changes in their carbon isotopic signatures (delta(13)C). Thus, P-NACs are very recalcitrant to degradation at the investigated site. If the aquifers remain aerobic, TNT and DNT are expected to persist in the subsurface for many decades to centuries. The presented approach of assessing time scales of natural attenuation at the field scale by the combination of CSIA and (3)H-(3)He water dating has the potential to be applied to any other groundwater contaminants, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons, gasoline components, heterocyclic carbenes, or polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Aquifer-Circulating Water Curtain Cultivation System To Recover Groundwater Level And Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Ko, K.; Chon, C.; Oh, S.

    2011-12-01

    tests revealed that the well is producible enough for 2,000 square meters green house and that highly permeable fracture zone around 20 m deep is well connected between the wells. Circulating operation kept the groundwater level 3 m higher than that in case of conventional operation. The recharge rate of the splashed water into the injection well was 43% resulting in recharging 4,750 cubic meters of water during winter season. The relation between temperatures of air, recovered water, injection well and observation well is quite linear whereas temperature in pumping well remains fairly constant which means the cooled groundwater temperature was almost recovered during transport from injection well to pumping well. Finally, it is found that the newly developed aquifer circulating water curtain cultivation system is effective in recovering groundwater level and temperature and good for sustainable energy saving cultivation system for winter time.

  9. Abacus for the determination of the groundwater evaporation in arid areas. Case of the region of Ouargla-Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fergougui, Myriam Marie; Boutoutaou, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    One of the possible remedies to control the inputs of salts toward the surface would be by diminishing the groundwater; because areas set on values in arid zones of the region of Ouargla are based upon excessively mineralized groundwater whose level is near the ground surface (0 to 1.5 m). The improvement and stabilization of yields of any cultural practices in these areas can only take place if the salty groundwater is maintained (drained) to a depth of 1.6m. The results of work carried on the determination of the groundwater evaporation in Ouargla show that the evaporation essentially depends on: The climate that reigns above the ground of the groundwater situated on the band from 0 to 0.6 m. The climate and soil texture according the groundwater located in the layer from 0.6 to 1.6 m. The depth of the groundwater when this latter is located beyond 1.6 m.

  10. Use of geochemical, isotopic, and age tracer data to develop models of groundwater flow: A case study of Gafsa mining basin-Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Younes; Ahmadi, Riadh; Demdoum, Abdeslam; Bouri, Salem; Gargouri, Imed; Ben Dhia, Hamed; Al-Gamal, Samir; Laouar, Rabah; Choura, Abedjabar

    2014-12-01

    Hydro-(major and trace elements: Cd, F and Sr), isotope (18O, 2H, 3H and 13C) geochemistry and radiogenic carbon (14C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were used to investigate the sources of groundwater contamination and the hydrodynamic functioning of the multilayer aquifer system in the mining Gafsa basin (Southwestern Tunisia). The groundwater of the study area is subject to intense exploitation to accommodate all the water demands of this arid area. The Gafsa basin contains a multi-layered aquifer with four principal levels: Upper Zebbag (Cenomanian-Turonian), Abiod (Campanien-Maastrichian), Beglia (Miocene) and Segui (Plio-Quaternary) Formations. The hydrogeology of this system is largely affected by tectonics (Gafsa-Tebessa, Sehib, Negrine-Tozeur, Tabeddit and Metlaoui faults…). The groundwater of these aquifers undergoes a significant decline in water level (≈0.5 m y-1), increasing salinity (TDS increase from 400 to 800-6000 mg l-1: generally, TDS increases from the mountainous regions towards the discharge area) due to a long time of aridity, irregular rainfall and overexploitation (irrigation and industrial activities). Groundwater pumped from the semi-confined Complex Terminal (C.T) aquifers (Cretaceous and Mio-Plio-Quaternary: MPQ) and from the confined Continental Intercalaire (C.I) aquifers is an important production factor in irrigated oases agriculture and phosphate washing in Southwestern Tunisia. A rise in the groundwater salinity has been observed as a consequence of increasing abstraction from the aquifer during the last few decades. The salinization phenomena in the region are complex. Several possible causes for salinization exist: (1) the upwelling of saline and "fossil" water from the underlying, confined "C.I" aquifer; (2) as well as the backflow of agricultural drainage water; (3) phosphate and domestic wastewater; (4) brine intrusion from the salt lake (Sebkha/Garaat); (5) evaporate meteoric water dams (El Khangua and El Oude

  11. Central model predictive control of a group of domestic heat pumps, case study for a small district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van R.P.; Fink, J.; Smit, G.J.M.; Helfert, Markus; Krempels, Karl-Heinz; Donnellan, Brian; Klein, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate optimal control of a group of heat pumps. Each heat pump provides space heating and domestic hot water to a single household. Besides a heat pump, each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space heating. The paper describes models and

  12. Central model predictive control of a group of domestic heat pumps, case study for a small district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Helfert, Markus; Krempels, Karl-Heinz; Donnellan, Brian; Klein, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate optimal control of a group of heat pumps. Each heat pump provides space heating and domestic hot water to a single household. Besides a heat pump, each house has a buffer for domestic hot water and a floor heating system for space heating. The paper describes models and

  13. Pumping life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg; Dach, Ingrid; Hoffmann, Robert Daniel

    2012-01-01

    of membrane proteins: P-type ATPase pumps. This article takes the reader on a tour from Aarhus to Copenhagen, from bacteria to plants and humans, and from ions over protein structures to diseases caused by malfunctioning pump proteins. The magazine Nature once titled work published from PUMPKIN ‘Pumping ions......’. Here we illustrate that the pumping of ions means nothing less than the pumping of life....

  14. Pollution of soil and groundwater from infiltration of highly contaminated stormwater - a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, P.S.; Häfliger, M.; Ochs, M.

    1997-01-01

    A surface and a sub-surface infiltration system that received runoff water from trafficked roads for several decades was dug up and the contamination with heavy metals, PAH and AOX was investigated. Most measured solid phase concentrations exceeded background concentrations in nearby surface soils...... and subsurface sediments and some even exceeded guidelines fixed to preserve the fertility of soil. However, the contamination decreased rapidly with depth. None of the measured metal concentrations in simulated soil solutions exceeded defined drinking water quality standards. Surprisingly, the surface...... and the sub-surface infiltration system seemed to be equally good at retaining pollution. This indicates that the runoff sludge found in such infiltration systems plays an important role both as a source and a sorbent for stormwater contaminants. The study does not point at a considerable risk for groundwater...

  15. Provenance of buried esker groundwater: the case of Vars-Winchester esker aquifer, Eastern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauriol, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    An innovative mode of groundwater recharge to a buried esker aquifer is considered. The current conceptual model affords a natural safeguard to underlying aquifers from the overlying muds. A hypothesis of groundwater recharge to a buried esker aquifer via preferential pathways across its overlying muds is tested here by heuristic numerical one-dimensional and two-dimensional modeling simulations. The hypothesis has been tested against two other conventionally accepted scenarios involving: (1) distal esker outcrop areas and (2) remote shallow-bedrock recharge areas. The main evidence comes from documented recharge pressure pulses in the overlying mud aquitard and in the underlying esker hydraulic-head time series for the Vars-Winchester esker aquifer in Eastern Ontario, Canada. These perturbations to the potentiometric surface are believed to be the aquifer response to recharge events. The migration rate of these pressure pulses is directly related to the hydraulic diffusivity of the formation. The measured response time and response amplitude between singular radar precipitation events and well hydrographs constituted the heuristic model calibration targets. The main evidence also includes mud-layering deformation (water escape features) which was observed in seismic surveys of the over-esker muds. These disturbed stratigraphic elements provide a realistic mechanism for migrating water to transit through the muds. The effective hydraulic conductivities of these preferential pathways in the muds were estimated to be between 2 × 10-6 and 7 × 10-6 m/s. The implications of these findings relate to the alleged natural safeguard of these overlying muds.

  16. Combining situated Cognitive Engineering with a novel testing method in a case study comparing two infusion pump interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittker, R; Schmettow, M; Verhoeven, F; Schraagen, J M C

    2016-07-01

    We validated the usability of a new infusion pump interface designed with a situated Cognitive Engineering approach by comparing it to a reference interface using a novel testing method employing repeated measurements and process measures, in addition to traditional outcome measures. The sample consisted of 25 nurses who performed eight critical tasks three times. Performance measures consisted of number and type of errors, deviations from a pre-established normative path solution, task completion times, number of keystrokes, mental effort and preferences in use. Results showed that interaction with the new interface resulted in 18% fewer errors, 90% fewer normative path deviations, 42% lower task completion times, 40% fewer keystrokes, 39% lower mental effort and 76% more subjective preferences in use. These outcomes suggest that within the scope of this case study, combining the situated Cognitive Engineering approach with a novel testing method addresses various shortcomings of earlier testing methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  17. A feasibility study to estimate minimum surface-casing depths of oil and gas wells to prevent ground-water contamination in four areas of western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, T.F.; Squillace, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic data were evaluated from four areas of western Pennsylvania to estimate the minimum depth of well surface casing needed to prevent contamination of most of the fresh ground-water resources by oil and gas wells. The areas are representative of the different types of oil and gas activities and of the ground-water hydrology of most sections of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in western Pennsylvania. Approximate delineation of the base of the fresh ground-water system was attempted by interpreting the following hydrologic data: (1) reports of freshwater and saltwater in oil and gas well-completion reports, (2) water well-completion reports, (3) geophysical logs, and (4) chemical analyses of well water. Because of the poor quality and scarcity of ground-water data, the altitude of the base of the fresh ground-water system in the four study areas cannot be accurately delineated. Consequently, minimum surface-casing depths for oil and gas wells cannot be estimated with confidence. Conscientious and reliable reporting of freshwater and saltwater during drilling of oil and gas wells would expand the existing data base. Reporting of field specific conductance of ground water would greatly enhance the value of the reports of ground water in oil and gas well-completion records. Water-bearing zones in bedrock are controlled mostly by the presence of secondary openings. The vertical and horizontal discontinuity of secondary openings may be responsible, in part, for large differences in altitudes of freshwater zones noted on completion records of adjacent oil and gas wells. In upland and hilltop topographies, maximum depths of fresh ground water are reported from several hundred feet below land surface to slightly more than 1,000 feet, but the few deep reports are not substantiated by results of laboratory analyses of dissolved-solids concentrations. Past and present drillers for shallow oil and gas wells commonly install surface casing to below the

  18. CFD simulation and verification of heat exchanger characteristic for single well cycling groundwater heat pump%单井循环地下水源热泵换热特性CFD模拟与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋伟; 倪龙; 姚杨

    2015-01-01

    针对单井循环地下换热系统CFD模拟研究的不足,建立了该系统多区域耦合的CFD模型用于研究其地下水流动和换热特性。结果表明,循环单井、抽灌同井和填砾抽灌同井CFD模型的抽水温度和含水层特征点温度模拟结果均与试验测试结果吻合较好,3种热源井25 min的累计取热量相对误差分别为12.1%、3.0%和8.2%。所建立的3种热源井CFD模型可以用于分析和预测实际单井循环地下换热系统中热源井特性、含水层流场和温度场的变化情况,并能提供较为准确的模拟数据。%Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are considered as an ideal approach to heat and cool building, due to their attractive advantages of high efficiency, low carbon emission and using renewable energy instead of electricity for heating and cooling. Many projects have been applied in residential and commercial buildings successfully. Single well groundwater heat pump (SWGWHP) systems are new member of GSHP system, which become increasingly popular for use because of their economic advantages. In general, SWGWHP systems included three different variations, i.e. standing column well (SCW) system, pumping & recharging well (PRW) system, and pumping & recharging well filled with gravel (PRWFG) system. Although there are some theoretical and experimental researches on SWGWHP systems, there are not many researches on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation about flow and thermal performance in these systems. CFD are well known for their capability to carry out in-depth analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer and several other related issues. They provide numerical solutions of partial differential equations governing fluid flow and heat transfer in a discretized form. CFD employs a very simple principle of resolving the entire system in small cells or grids and applying governing equations on these discrete elements to find numerical solutions regarding

  19. Challenges and Opportunities of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pumps: Two Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Heiba, Ahmad [ORNL; Mahderekal, Dr. Isaac [Intellichoice Energy, Boulder City, Nevada; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Gas engine driven heat pumps (GHP) currently hold a small market share. This share is considerably smaller than what the full potential of GHP technology can realize. Of the main benefits of the GHP technology is their better primary energy utilization mainly due to the ability to recover the engine heat. However, development and market penetration of GHP technology have been challenged by various market and technical barriers. The main barriers are the high initial cost, low awareness of the technology, and poor perception. On the other hand, several opportunities arise that the GHP technology can take advantage of to increase its market share. The most direct opportunity is the abundance of cheap natural gas. This translates directly into monetary savings and higher ROI. GHPs offer the advantage of reducing the peak demand by 80% compared to electric counterpart. From the point of view of utilities, this eliminates the need for lower-efficiency peaking power plants and over-expansion only to cover maximum peak times. From the point of view of renewable customers, GHPs eliminate the need to buy power from the grid at a high price. This is especially important in hot climates with high cooling loads. When built and operated as distributed generation, GHPs can improve the reliability of power delivery to consumers. The paper discusses the challenges and opportunities as seen during the development and commercialization of two different GHP products; a 10-ton packaged unit and 5-ton split unit.

  20. Two proposals for pumping calculations of non–newtonian fluids, water treatment plants disposal sludges case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gardea–Villegas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two ways to calculate the pumping power of non Newtonian fluids and especially yield pseudoplastics which are the kind of disposal fluids from Water Treatment Plants. Fluids called sludges. The proposals included here, are based in methods suggested by Levenspiel (1986 applicable to determine the performance of Bingham plastics and pseudoplastic fluids using a graphical approximation of the rheological behavior of these materials. This approach has the advantage that is appropriate to any kind of regime. Otherwise, Levenspiel underlines, that there is not yet a chart who relates the roughness coefficient with the Reynolds number for general plastics, so it is not possible by now to calculate the yield pseudoplastic fluid. Its calculation is the aim of this study. Levenspiel proposes an approach subject to the assessment of the project manager, and will therefore entail personal observations, with the limitations that this can cause. The results obtained by both propositions, are very similar. This is part of a doctorate study done by the author under the direction of Dr. Rafael B. Carmona in the Faculty of Engineering of the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

  1. Building America Case Study: Occupant Comfort from a Mini-Split Heat Pump, San Antonio, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-03

    IBACOS worked with builder Imagine Homes to evaluate the performance of an occupied new construction test house following construction of the house in the hot, humid climate of San Antonio, Texas. The project measures the effectiveness of a space conditioning strategy using a multihead mini-split heat pump (MSHP) system in a reduced-load home to achieve acceptable comfort levels (temperature and humidity) and energy performance. IBACOS collected long-term data and analyzed the energy consumption and comfort conditions of the occupied house after one year of operation. Although measured results indicate that the test system provides comfort both inside and outside the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 range, the occupants of the house claimed both adequate comfort and appreciation of the ease of use and flexibility of the installed MSHP system. IBACOS also assisted the builder to evaluate design and specification changes necessary to comply with Zero Energy Ready Home, but the builder chose to not move forward with it because of concerns about the 'solar ready' requirements of the program.

  2. Design and Use of a Proton Pump Inhibitor Case to Integrate Physiology, Pharmacology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of drugs to integrate basic and clinical sciences is frequently used in a lecture format, but the availability of alternative pedagogical approaches that address higher-order learning are not widely available. The use of case studies and case-based projects to reinforce lectures can help link basic and clinical disciplines and promote…

  3. Design and Use of a Proton Pump Inhibitor Case to Integrate Physiology, Pharmacology, and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of drugs to integrate basic and clinical sciences is frequently used in a lecture format, but the availability of alternative pedagogical approaches that address higher-order learning are not widely available. The use of case studies and case-based projects to reinforce lectures can help link basic and clinical disciplines and promote…

  4. Hydrogeologic-structure and groundwater-movement imaging in tideland using electrical sounding resistivity: a case study on the Ariake Sea coast, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misonou, Toshiharu; Asaue, Hisafumi; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Matsukuma, Yuta; Koike, Katsuaki; Shimada, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Groundwater flow exerts a crucial control on the boundary between the sea and freshwater and is thus a key factor for preserving groundwater resources and preventing seawater intrusion in coastal areas. Although it is highly probable that geological faults in coastal areas affect groundwater flow patterns, the effect has not been described yet in detail. This study is aimed at detecting and imaging groundwater flow and its temporal change around a fault in a coastal area through resistivity and chargeability distributions using electrical sounding. The Okoshiki area in central Kyushu, southwest Japan, was selected as a case study area, because of the presence of Kamiouda Fault. The measurements were conducted along six lines of both parallel and perpendicular orientations to the coastline. A feature suggesting a fault zone was evident on two lines. Through the temporal change of resistivity, movement and mixing processes of the seawater and freshwater during the ebb, low and flood tides were interpreted. A conceptual model of the processes was constructed in which a fault zone and the configuration of bedrock are dominant elements by acting as a selective path and a barrier to the groundwater flow, respectively.

  5. Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction: A Case Study of Embankment Dam Safety Assessment in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdos, F.; Dargahi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Seepage, when excessive and unimpeded, can cause embankment dam failure. Such failures are often initiated by internal erosion and piping. Modelling these phenomena in embankment dams, accounting for the groundwater-surface water interactions, is crucial when performing dam safety assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of modelling seepage flows in multi-region dams using a finite element based multi-physics model. The model was applied to the Trängslet dam, the largest dam in Sweden. The objectives were to analyze the characteristics of both the flow and the surface-ground water interactions occurring in the dam, including: i) the saturated and unsaturated laminar flow regimes within the dam body, ii) the non-linear through-flow in the dam shoulders' coarse material, iii) the influence of the surface waves in the reservoir on the seepage flow by coupling the physics to a hydrodynamic interface, and iv) the influence of a conceptual "erosion tunnel" on the seepage flow and its interaction with the surface water flow by coupling the physics to a CFD interface. The focus of the study was on the influence of the transient water head boundary condition, surface waves and the internal erosion tunnel on the location of the phreatic line and the seepage flow rate. The simulated seepage flow of the dam in its original condition tallied with the monitoring measurements (40-70 l/s). The main feature found was the relatively high position of the phreatic line, which could compromise the stability of the dam. The combination of the seepage model with the reservoir hydrodynamics indicated a negligible influence of the surface waves on seepage flow. Results from the combination of the seepage model with fluid dynamics indicated that a conceptual "erosion tunnel" placed within the dam, even as high as in the unsaturated zone, significantly affects the phreatic line's position. This also causes the seepage flow to increase by several orders of

  6. How should an infected perinephric haematoma be drained in a tetraplegic patient with baclofen pump implanted in the abdominal wall? – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt John WH

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a case to illustrate controversies in percutaneous drainage of infected, perinephric haematoma in a tetraplegic patient, who had implantation of baclofen pump in anterior abdominal wall on the same side as perinephric haematoma. Case presentation A 56-year-old male with C-4 tetraplegia had undergone implantation of programmable pump in the anterior abdominal wall for intrathecal infusion of baclofen to control spasticity. He developed perinephric haematoma while he was taking warfarin as prophylactic for deep vein thrombosis. Perinephric haematoma became infected with a resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and required percutaneous drainage. Positioning this patient on his abdomen without anaesthesia, for insertion of a catheter from behind, was not a realistic option. Administration of general anaesthesia in this patient in the radiology department would have been hazardous. Results and Conclusion Percutaneous drainage was carried out by anterior approach under propofol sedation. The site of entry of percutaneous catheter was close to cephalic end of baclofen pump. By carrying out drainage from anterior approach, and by keeping this catheter for ten weeks, we took a risk of causing infection of the baclofen pump site, and baclofen pump with a resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The alternative method would have been to anaesthetise the patient and position him prone for percutaneous drainage of perinephric collection from behind. This would have ensured that the drainage track was far away from the baclofen pump with minimal risk of infection of baclofen pump, but at the cost of incurring respiratory complications in a tetraplegic subject.

  7. Large-scale groundwater modeling using global datasets: a test case for the Rhine-Meuse basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Sutanudjaja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current generation of large-scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component. Large-scale groundwater models, involving aquifers and basins of multiple countries, are still rare mainly due to a lack of hydro-geological data which are usually only available in developed countries. In this study, we propose a novel approach to construct large-scale groundwater models by using global datasets that are readily available. As the test-bed, we use the combined Rhine-Meuse basin that contains groundwater head data used to verify the model output. We start by building a distributed land surface model (30 arc-second resolution to estimate groundwater recharge and river discharge. Subsequently, a MODFLOW transient groundwater model is built and forced by the recharge and surface water levels calculated by the land surface model. Results are promising despite the fact that we still use an offline procedure to couple the land surface and MODFLOW groundwater models (i.e. the simulations of both models are separately performed. The simulated river discharges compare well to the observations. Moreover, based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run several groundwater model scenarios with various hydro-geological parameter settings, we observe that the model can reasonably well reproduce the observed groundwater head time series. However, we note that there are still some limitations in the current approach, specifically because the offline-coupling technique simplifies the dynamic feedbacks between surface water levels and groundwater heads, and between soil moisture states and groundwater heads. Also the current sensitivity analysis ignores the uncertainty of the land surface model output. Despite these limitations, we argue that the results of the current model show a promise for large-scale groundwater modeling practices, including for data-poor environments and at the global scale.

  8. The contribution of geology and groundwater studies to city-scale ground heat network strategies: A case study from Cardiff, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, David; Farr, Gareth; Patton, Ashley; Kendall, Rhian; James, Laura; Abesser, Corinna; Busby, Jonathan; Schofield, David; White, Debbie; Gooddy, Daren; James, David; Williams, Bernie; Tucker, David; Knowles, Steve; Harcombe, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    The development of integrated heat network strategies involving exploitation of the shallow subsurface requires knowledge of ground conditions at the feasibility stage, and throughout the life of the system. We describe an approach to the assessment of ground constraints and energy opportunities in data-rich urban areas. Geological and hydrogeological investigations have formed a core component of the strategy development for sustainable thermal use of the subsurface in Cardiff, UK. We present findings from a 12 month project titled 'Ground Heat Network at a City Scale', which was co-funded by NERC/BGS and the UK Government through the InnovateUK Energy Catalyst grant in 2015-16. The project examined the technical feasibility of extracting low grade waste heat from a shallow gravel aquifer using a cluster of open loop ground source heat pumps. Heat demand mapping was carried out separately. The ground condition assessment approach involved the following steps: (1) city-wide baseline groundwater temperature mapping in 2014 with seasonal monitoring for at least 12 months prior to heat pump installation (Patton et al 2015); (2) desk top and field-based investigation of the aquifer system to determine groundwater levels, likely flow directions, sustainable pumping yields, water chemistry, and boundary conditions; (3) creation of a 3D geological framework model with physical property testing and model attribution; (4) use steps 1-3 to develop conceptual ground models and production of maps and GIS data layers to support scenario planning, and initial heat network concept designs; (5) heat flow modelling in FEFLOW software to analyse sustainability and predict potential thermal breakthrough in higher risk areas; (6) installation of a shallow open loop GSHP research observatory with real-time monitoring of groundwater bodies to provide data for heat flow model validation and feedback for system control. In conclusion, early ground condition modelling and subsurface

  9. Long-term pumping test to study the impact of an open-loop geothermal system on seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer: the case study of Bari (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementina Caputo, Maria; Masciale, Rita; Masciopinto, Costantino; De Carlo, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    The high cost and scarcity of fossil fuels have promoted the increased use of natural heat for a number of direct applications. Just as for fossil fuels, the exploitation of geothermal energy should consider its environmental impact and sustainability. Particular attention deserves the so-called open loop geothermal groundwater heat pump (GWHP) system, which uses groundwater as geothermal fluid. From an economic point of view, the implementation of this kind of geothermal system is particularly attractive in coastal areas, which have generally shallow aquifers. Anyway the potential problem of seawater intrusion has led to laws that restrict the use of groundwater. The scarcity of freshwater could be a major impediment for the utilization of geothermal resources. In this study a new methodology has been proposed. It was based on an experimental approach to characterize a coastal area in order to exploit the low-enthalpy geothermal resource. The coastal karst and fractured aquifer near Bari, in Southern Italy, was selected for this purpose. For the purpose of investigating the influence of an open-loop GWHP system on the seawater intrusion, a long-term pumping test was performed. The test simulated the effects of a prolonged withdrawal on the chemical-physical groundwater characteristics of the studied aquifer portion. The duration of the test was programmed in 16 days, and it was performed with a constant pumping flowrate of 50 m3/h. The extracted water was outflowed into an adjacent artificial channel, by means of a piping system. Water depth, temperature and electrical conductivity of the pumped water were monitored for 37 days, including also some days before and after the pumping duration. The monitored parameters, collected in the pumping and in five observation wells placed 160 m down-gradient with respect to the groundwater flow direction, have been used to estimate different scenarios of the impact of the GWHP system on the seawater intrusion by mean of a

  10. Land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction and building damage level assessment-a case study of Datun,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi-yan; LIU Gang-jun; MENG Lei; FU Er-jiang; ZHANG Hai-rong; ZHANG Ke-fei

    2008-01-01

    As in many parts of the world, long-term excessive extraction of groundwater has caused significant land-surface subsidence in the residential areas of Datun coal mining district in East China. The recorded maximum level of subsidence in the area since 1976 to 2006 is 863 mm, and the area with an accumulative subsidence more than 200 mm has reached 33.1 km2 by the end of 2006. Over ten cases of building crack due to ground subsidence have already been observed. Spatial variation in ground subsidence often leads to a corresponding pattern of ground deformation. Buildings and underground infrastructures have been under a higher risk of damage in locations with greater differential ground deformation. Governmental guideline in China classifies building damages into four different levels, based on the observable measures such as the width of wall crack, the degree of door and window deformation, the degree of wall inclination and the degree of structural destruction. Building damage level (BDL) is estimated by means of ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient and curvature. Ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient has shown that the areas of BDL Ⅲ and BDL Ⅱ sites account for about 0.013 km2 and 0.284km2 respectively in 2006, and the predicted areas of BDL (define this first) Ⅲ and Ⅱ sites will be about 0.029 km2 and 0.423 km2respectively by 2010. The situation is getting worse as subsidence continues. That calls for effective strategies for subsidence mitigation and damage reduction, in terms of sustainable groundwater extraction, enhanced monitoring and the establishment of early warning systems.

  11. Complex Controls on Groundwater Quality in Growing Mid-sized Cities: A Case Study Focused on Nitrate and Emerging Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohr, C. A.; Godsey, S.; Welhan, J. A.; Larson, D. M.; Lohse, K. A.; Finney, B.; Derryberry, D.

    2015-12-01

    Many regions rely on quality groundwater to support urban growth. Groundwater quality often responds in a complex manner to stressors such as land use change, climate change, or policy decisions. Urban growth patterns in mid-sized cities, especially ones that are growing urban centers in water-limited regions in the western US, control and are controlled by water availability and its quality. We present a case study from southeastern Idaho where urban growth over the past 20 years has included significant ex-urban expansion of houses that rely on septic systems rather than city sewer lines for their wastewater treatment. Septic systems are designed to mitigate some contaminants, but not others. In particular, nitrates and emerging contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, are not removed by most septic systems. Thus, even well-maintained septic systems at sufficiently high densities can impact down gradient water quality. Here we present patterns of nitrate concentrations over the period from 1985-2015 from the Lower Portneuf River Valley in southeastern Idaho. Concentrations vary from 0.03 to 27.09 nitrate-nitrogen mg/L, with average values increasing significantly over the 30 year time period from 3.15 +/- 0.065 to 3.57 +/- 0.43 mg/L. We examine temporal changes in locations of nitrate hotspots, and present pilot data on emerging contaminants of concern. Initial results suggest that high nitrate levels are generally associated with higher septic densities, but that this pattern is influenced by legacy agricultural uses and strongly controlled by underlying aquifer properties. Future work will include more detailed hydrological modeling to predict changes in hotspot locations under potential climate change scenarios.

  12. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, S.; Bierkens, M. F.; Oude Essink, G.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal regions around the world climate change will lead to a sea level rise and an increase in extreme weather conditions. This prospect has resulted in a new focus on coastal protection in the Netherlands, resulting in the initiation of an innovative coastal defence project called the Sand Motor. In this project a large body of sand or so-called mega-nourishment has been constructed along the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents. Keeping the coastal defence structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. Because of the large size of the body of sand (21.5 million m3) and the position at the coastline and near coastal dunes, the Sand Motor might cause a substantial increase of the fresh water availability by increasing the volume fresh water lens underneath the dunes. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied.

  13. Geoelectrical investigation for the assessment of groundwater conditions: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nakhaei

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrical resistivity survey involving Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES was carried out in the Shooro Basin in Southeast Iran in order to study groundwater conditions such as depth, thickness and aquifer boundaries. Vertical electrical soundings by Schlumberger array were conducted in this area. The resistivity Schlumberger soundings which have a maximum current electrode spacing (AB ranging from 200 m to 600 m were carried out at 207 positions in 19 profiles. Interpretation of these soundings indicates the presence of an alluvial aquifer. This aquifer is divided into eastern and western parts by the Shooro River, which comprises a variable thickness and resistivity of deposits. The average permeability coefficient and resistivity in the western part, especially southwest is higher than the eastern part of the aquifer. Therefore, it seems that Shooro River follows a fault zone in the region. The high resistivity of west part is due to the water quality and the existence of alluvial fan with coarse grain materials. Low aquifer resistivities in the east are associated with finer materials and also brackish water infiltration from the adjacent basin mainly in the central part of the aquifer. Furthermore, zones with high yield potential have been determined in this research based on the resistivity data.

  14. Cellulosic biofuels from crop residue and groundwater extraction in the US Plains: the case of Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesmero, Juan P

    2014-11-01

    This study develops a model of crop residue (i.e. stover) supply and derived demand for irrigation water accounting for non-linear effects of soil organic matter on soil's water holding capacity. The model is calibrated for typical conditions in central Nebraska, United States, and identifies potential interactions between water and biofuel policies. The price offered for feedstock by a cost-minimizing plant facing that stover supply response is calculated. Results indicate that as biofuel production volumes increase, soil carbon depletion per unit of biofuel produced decreases. Consumption of groundwater per unit of biofuel produced first decreases and then increases (after a threshold of 363 dam(3) of biofuels per year) due to plants' increased reliance on the extensive margin for additional biomass. The analysis reveals a tension between biofuel and water policies. As biofuel production raises the economic benefits of relaxing water conservation policies (measured by the "shadow price" of water) increase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-08

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  16. Building America Case Study: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, E. Weitzel

    2017-03-01

    Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16-month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

  17. Champagne Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  18. Detection of pump degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  19. Development and Testing of Active Groundwater Samplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Bertel; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Lars Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    on numerical modelling and controlled laboratory experiments. Active groundwater sampling techniques can be used for remedial pumping optimization and in obtaining hydraulic data and represent a fast operational and reliable sampling tool, also under heterogeneous and low permeability conditions.......Active groundwater sampling techniques are methods where the aquifer is flushed by pumping. The methods developed and tested represent non-dedicated methods for use in existing water wells. This paper describes two different sampling techniques: the Separation Pumping Technique (SP) and the Packer...

  20. Magnetocaloric pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  1. Features of spatiotemporal groundwater head variation using independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chin-Tsai; Chang, Liang-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chen, You-Cheng

    2017-04-01

    The effect of external stimuli on a groundwater system can be understood by examining the features of spatiotemporal head variations. However, the head variations caused by various external stimuli are mixed signals. To identify the stimuli features of head variations, we propose a systematic approach based on independent component analysis (ICA), frequency analysis, cross-correlation analysis, well-selection strategy, and hourly average head analysis. We also removed the head variations caused by regional stimuli (e.g., rainfall and river stage) from the original head variations of all the wells to better characterize the local stimuli features (e.g., pumping and tide). In the synthetic case study, the derived independent component (IC) features are more consistent with the features of the given recharge and pumping than the features derived from principle component analysis. In a real case study, the ICs associated with regional stimuli highly correlated with field observations, and the effect of regional stimuli on the head variation of all the wells was quantified. In addition, the tide, agricultural, industrial, and spring pumping features were characterized. Therefore, the developed method can facilitate understanding of the features of the spatiotemporal head variation and quantification of the effects of external stimuli on a groundwater system.

  2. Anthropization of groundwater resources in the Mediterranean region: processes and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Christian; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Remini, Boualem

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive overview is provided of processes and challenges related to Mediterranean groundwater resources and associated changes in recent decades. While most studies are focused thematically and/or geographically, this paper addresses different stages of groundwater exploitation in the region and their consequences. Examples emphasize the complex interactions between the physical and social dimensions of uses and evolution of groundwater. In natural conditions, Mediterranean groundwater resources represent a wide range of hydrogeological contexts, recharge conditions and rates of exploitation. They have been actively exploited for millennia but their pseudo-natural regimes have been considerably modified in the last 50 years, especially to satisfy agricultural demand (80% of total water consumption in North Africa), as well as for tourism and coastal cities. Climate variability affects groundwater dynamics but the various forms of anthropization are more important drivers of hydrological change, including changes in land use and vegetation, hydraulic works, and intense pumpings. These changes affect both the quantity and quality of groundwater at different scales, and modify the nature of hydrogeological processes, their location, timing, and intensity. The frequent cases of drastic overexploitation illustrate the fragility of Mediterranean groundwater resources and the limits of present forms of management. There is no easy way to maintain or recover sustainability, which is often threatened by short-term interests. To achieve this goal, a significant improvement in hydrogeological knowledge and closer collaboration between the various disciplines of water sciences are indispensable.

  3. Anthropization of groundwater resources in the Mediterranean region: processes and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Christian; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio; Remini, Boualem

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive overview is provided of processes and challenges related to Mediterranean groundwater resources and associated changes in recent decades. While most studies are focused thematically and/or geographically, this paper addresses different stages of groundwater exploitation in the region and their consequences. Examples emphasize the complex interactions between the physical and social dimensions of uses and evolution of groundwater. In natural conditions, Mediterranean groundwater resources represent a wide range of hydrogeological contexts, recharge conditions and rates of exploitation. They have been actively exploited for millennia but their pseudo-natural regimes have been considerably modified in the last 50 years, especially to satisfy agricultural demand (80% of total water consumption in North Africa), as well as for tourism and coastal cities. Climate variability affects groundwater dynamics but the various forms of anthropization are more important drivers of hydrological change, including changes in land use and vegetation, hydraulic works, and intense pumpings. These changes affect both the quantity and quality of groundwater at different scales, and modify the nature of hydrogeological processes, their location, timing, and intensity. The frequent cases of drastic overexploitation illustrate the fragility of Mediterranean groundwater resources and the limits of present forms of management. There is no easy way to maintain or recover sustainability, which is often threatened by short-term interests. To achieve this goal, a significant improvement in hydrogeological knowledge and closer collaboration between the various disciplines of water sciences are indispensable.

  4. Assessment of Long-Term Evolution of Groundwater Hydrochemical Characteristics Using Multiple Approaches: A Case Study in Cangzhou, Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water shortage is severe in the North China Plain (NCP. In addition to a deficiency of water resources, deterioration of groundwater quality should be of great concern. In this study, hydrogeological analysis was conducted in combination with principal component analysis, correlation analysis and the co-kriging method to identify factors controlling the content of major ions and total dissolved solids (TDS in areal shallow and deep groundwater and to assess groundwater evolution in Cangzhou, China. The results suggested that groundwater quality degradation occurred and developed in the study area, as indicated by increasing concentrations of major ions, TDS and hardness in both shallow and deep groundwater. In shallow groundwater, whose hydrochemical water types changed from HCO3–Ca.Na.Mg and HCO3.Cl–Na in the west (Zone II to Cl.SO4–Na and Cl–Na in the east (Zone III. Areas with TDS concentrations between 1500 and 2000 mg/L occupied 79.76% of the total in the 1980s, while areas with a TDS concentration ranging from 2500 to 3000 mg/L comprised 59.11% of the total in the 2010s. In deep groundwater, the area with TDS over 1000 mg/L expanded from 5366.39 km2 in the 1960s to 7183.52 km2 in the 2010s. Natural processes (water-rock interactions and anthropogenic activities (groundwater exploitation were the dominant factors controlling the major ions’ content in local groundwater. Dissolution of dolomite, calcite, feldspar and gypsum were the primary sources of major ions in groundwater, and the ion exchange reaction had a strong effect on the cation content, especially for deep groundwater.

  5. Assessment of groundwater quality using DEA and AHP: a case study in the Sereflikochisar region in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavurmaci, Murat; Üstün, A Korkut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of groundwater quality in Sereflikochisar Basin, in the Central Anatolian region of Turkey using different hydrochemical, statistical, and geostatistical methods. A total of 51 groundwater samples were collected from the observation wells in the study area to evaluate the characteristics of the groundwater quality. As a relatively simple and practical method, a groundwater quality index (GWQI) was developed to evaluate the overall groundwater quality. In this process, complex decision-making techniques such as analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) were used. Based on these models, two new indices (A-GWQI and D-GWQI) were proposed. According to the D-GWQI score (from 0.6 to 1), water quality was classified in four categories as unsuitable (0.6–0.7), permissible (0.7–0.8), good (0.8–0.9), and excellent (0.9–1). The spatial distribution maps of the groundwater quality were created using the Kriging method. For each map, seven different semivariogram models were tested and the best-fitted model was chosen based on their root mean square standardized error. These maps showed that the areas with high groundwater quality were in the eastern and southern parts of the study area where the D-GWQI scores were greater than 0.8. Depending on the distance from the Salt Lake, the characteristics of groundwater changed from NaCl to NaHCO3 and CaHCO3 facies. This study shows how to determine the spatial distribution of the groundwater quality and identify the impact of salt lakes on the groundwater quality in inland aquifers. The findings of this study can be applied to ensure the quality of groundwater used for drinking and irrigation purposes in the study area.

  6. Health Risk Assessment for Uranium in Groundwater - An Integrated Case Study Based on Hydrogeological Characterization and Dose Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M. R.; Veiga, L. H.; Py, D. A., Jr.; Fernandes, H. M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium mining and milling facilities of Caetité (URA) is the only active uranium production center in Brazil. Operations take place at a very sensitive semi-arid region in the country where water resources are very scarce. Therefore, any contamination of the existing water bodies may trigger critical consequences to local communities because their sustainability is closely related to the availability of the groundwater resources. Due to the existence of several uranium anomalies in the region, groundwater can present radionuclide concentrations above the world average. The radiological risk associated to the ingestion of these waters have been questioned by members of the local communities, NGO’s and even regulatory bodies that suspected that the observed levels of radionuclide concentrations (specially Unat) could be related to the uranium mining and milling operations. Regardless the origin of these concentrations the fear that undesired health effects were taking place (e.g. increase in cancer incidence) remain despite the fact that no evidence - based on epidemiological studies - is available. This paper intends to present the connections between the local hydrogeology and the radiological characterization of groundwater in the neighboring areas of the uranium production center to understand the implications to the human health risk due to the ingestion of groundwater. The risk assessment was performed, taking into account the radiological and the toxicological risks. Samples from 12 wells have been collected and determinations of Unat, Thnat, 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb were performed. The radiation-related risks were estimated for adults and children by the calculation of the annual effective doses. The potential non-carcinogenic effects due to the ingestion of uranium were evaluated by the estimation of the hazard index (HI). Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the uncertainty associated with these estimates, i.e. the 95% confidence interval

  7. Geospatial modelling for groundwater quality mapping: a case study of Rupnagar district, Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Kaur, A.; Litoria, P.; Pateriya, B.

    2014-11-01

    Over period of time, the water usage and management is under stress for various reasons including pollution in both surface and subsurface. The groundwater quality decreases due to the solid waste from urban and industrial nodes, rapid use of insecticides and pesticides in agricultural practices. In this study, ground water quality maps for Rupnagar district of Punjab has been prepared using geospatial interpolation technique through Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) approach. IDW technique has been used for major ground water quality parameters observed from the field samples like Arsenic, Hardness, pH, Iron, Fluoride, TDS, and Sulphate. To assess the ground water quality of the Rupnagar district, total 280 numbers of samples from various sources of tubewells for both pre and post monsoon have collected. Out of which, 80 to 113 samples found Iron with non potable limits ranging 0.3-1.1mg/l and 0.3-1.02mg/l according to BIS standard for both the seasons respectively. Chamkaur Sahib, Rupnagar, Morinda blocks have been found non potable limit of iron in both pre & post-monsoon. 11 to 52 samples in this region have sulphate with permissible limits in both the season ranging 200-400mg/l and 201-400mg/l. But arsenic had acceptable limit in both the season. Various parameters-wise ground water quality map is generated using the range values of drinking water quality to know the distribution of different parameters and diversification in the concentration of different elements. These maps are very much needful for human being to expand awareness among the people to maintain the Cleanness of water at their highest quality and purity levels to achieve a healthy life.

  8. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  9. [Comparative analysis of two different methods for risk assessment of groundwater pollution: a case study in Beijing plain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-na; He, Jiang-tao; Ma, Wen-jie; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater contamination risk assessment has important meaning to groundwater contamination prevention planning and groundwater exploitation potentiality. Recently, UN assessment system and WP assessment system have become the focuses of international research. In both systems, the assessment framework and indices were drawn from five aspects: intrinsic vulnerability, aquifer storage, groundwater quality, groundwater resource protection zone and contamination load. But, the five factors were built up in different ways. In order to expound the difference between the UN and WP assessment systems, and explain the main reasons, the UN and WP assessment systems were applied to Beijing Plain, China. The maps constructed from the UN and WP risk assessment systems were compared. The results showed that both kinds of groundwater contamination risk assessment maps were in accordance with the actual conditions and were similar in spatial distribution trends. However, there was quite significant different in the coverage area at the same level. It also revealed that during the system construction process, the structural hierarchy, relevant overlaying principles and classification method might have effects on the groundwater contamination risk assessment map. UN assessment system and WP assessment system were both suitable for groundwater contamination risk assessment of the plain, however, their emphasis was different.

  10. Spatial dimensions of land administration and user rights over groundwater: Case study of Kerala, India vs. Coca Cola

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghawana, T.; Hespanha, J.P.; Zevenbergen, J.A.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Supporting the management of rights related to groundwater based on input from hydrogeology software is contributing to bridging the gap between the technical and administrative aspects of groundwater management. The research reported herein is focused on a specific example (or ‘use case’ in UML ter

  11. Groundwater renewable resources in karst areas, the case of the Kleśnica River basin (Sudety Mountains, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olichwer, Tomasz; Otrębski, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    The karst-fractured medium constitutes a considerable groundwater capacity, as shown on the example of the Kleśnica River basin. The paleozoic crystalline limestones in the research area are good collectors of the groundwater. The Kleśnica River basin, one of the largest crystalline limestone lens, is situated in the Sudety Mountains. Groundwater renewable resources were distinguished with the use of hydrological methods, on the basis of hydrometric measurements of the flow discharge of the Kleśnica River during the low-flow period (2009-2010). The mean module of the groundwater runoff equals 20.79 dm3/s*km2, and includes the study of the river catchments areas with extremely high groundwater runoff. The groundwater renewable resources in the Kleśnica River basin are almost twice higher than in the neighbouring river basins (the Kamienica and Morawka River basins), in which there are no significant outcrops of carbonate rocks. These considerable renewable resources also provide a high runoff in the spring, 7.98 dm3/s*km2. The high values of the runoffs indicate, that the groundwater is coming from the regional circulation system and, on a smaller scale, from the local system. The groundwater from both systems flows into the fractured system through the karst of carbonate massif rocks and their weathering fringes.

  12. Point bars as stratigraphic traps for arsenic contamination in groundwater: Case study of the Ganges River, Bihar, India (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, M.E.; Bhatt, A.G.; Bruining, J.; Bose, N.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater causes a wide-spread, serious health risk affecting millions of people worldwide. Focus of the research is the floodplain of the Ganges River in the State of Bihar (India) where groundwater is the principal source of drinking water and irrigation, and where the

  13. Point bars as stratigraphic traps for arsenic contamination in groundwater: Case study of the Ganges River, Bihar, India (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, M.E.; Bhatt, A.G.; Bruining, J.; Bose, N.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater causes a wide-spread, serious health risk affecting millions of people worldwide. Focus of the research is the floodplain of the Ganges River in the State of Bihar (India) where groundwater is the principal source of drinking water and irrigation, and where the level

  14. Mixing of groundwaters with uncertain end-members: Case study in the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan aquifer, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Casique, E.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater geochemical data from the northern portion of the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan Valley, in the state of Morelos, Mexico, are analyzed to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the region. The geochemical data suggest that the chemical composition of groundwater is the result of a mixing p

  15. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling the high fluoride concentration in groundwater: a case study at the Boden block area, Orissa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, R K; Swain, S K; Mishra, Sulagna; Sharma, Prachi; Patnaik, Tanushree; Singh, V K; Dehury, B N; Jha, Usha; Patel, R K

    2012-05-01

    The present investigation reports the assessment of hydrochemical/geochemical processes controlling the concentration of fluoride in groundwater of a village in India (Boden block, Orissa). Boden block is one of the severely affected fluoride-contaminated areas in the state of Orissa (India). The sampling and subsequent analysis of water samples of the study area was carried out following standard prescribed methods. The results of the analysis indicate that 36.60% groundwater F(-) concentration exceeds the limit prescribed by the World Health Organization for drinking water. The rock interaction with groundwater containing high concentration of HCO(3)(-) and Na(+) at a higher pH value of the medium could be one of the important reasons for the release of F(-) from the aquatic matrix into groundwater. Geochemical classification of groundwater based on Chadha rectangular diagram shows that most of the groundwater samples having fluoride concentration more than 1.5 mg L(-1) belongs to the Na-K-HCO(3) type. The saturation index values evaluated for the groundwater of the study area indicated that it is oversaturated with respect to calcite, whereas the same is undersaturated with respect to fluorite content. The deficiency of calcium ion concentration in the groundwater from calcite precipitation favors fluorite dissolution leading to excess of fluoride concentration. The risk index was calculated as a function of fluoride level in drinking water and morbidity of fluorosis categorizes high risk for villages of Amera and Karlakote panchayat of Boden block.

  16. A numerical study of the effect of groundwater on spiral coil energy piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Kyun; Lee, Youngmin

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to investigate effects of groundwater on the thermal performance of the geothermal energy pile. Energy piles, a part of the closed-loop geothermal heat pump systems, are used to exchange heat between the ground and the heat pump. A heat-carrying fluid circulates the ground through a coiled pipe installed in pile foundations. The COMSOL multiphysics was used as a simulator, which can solve the equations for the temperature and fluid flow in the pipe system, as well as those in the ground. Water temperatures at the pipe outlet after 90-day injection of warm water (30℃) were calculated from following cases: (1) one energy pile installed at the fully saturated medium with regional groundwater flow (100 m/year), (2) one energy pile installed at the partially saturated medium (water table is located 13.5 m below the ground surface) with regional groundwater flow (1,000 m/year), (3) one energy pile installed at the fully saturated medium with no regional groundwater flow, (4) one energy pile installed at the partially saturated medium with no regional groundwater flow, (5), (6), (7) four energy piles (distance between energy piles is 10, 5 ,2 m) installed at the fully saturated medium with regional groundwater flow, and (8), (9), (10) four energy piles installed at the partially saturated medium with regional groundwater flow. The outlet temperature of each case is (1) 28.11℃, (2) 28.84℃, (3) 28.97℃, (4) 29.09℃, (5) 28.19℃ (mean value), (6) 28.24℃ (mean value), (7) 28.33℃ (mean value), (8) 28.84℃ (mean value), (9) 28.90℃ (mean value), and (10) 29.10℃ (mean value), respectively. The thermal power ratio of the energy pile of each case (standard case is case 1) is (1) 0%, (2) -46%, (3) -39%, (4) -52%, (5) -4%, (6) -7%, (7) -12%, (8) -39%, (9) -42%, and (10) -53%, respectively. Numerical results show that the performance of the energy pile installed at the fully saturated medium with regional groundwater flow (case 1

  17. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  18. Groundwater regime and calculation of yield response in North China Plain: a case study of Luancheng County in Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The groundwater table has been declining at a rate of 0.65 m/yr in Luancheng County since large scale groundwater extraction carried out in the 1960s. The drop of precipitation, substantial increase in agricultural output, variations of crop planting structure and construction of water conservancy projects in the headwater area all tie up with the decline of the groundwater table. On the basis of analyzing the hydrogeological conditions and the water resources utilization of Luancheng County, a three-dimensional groundwater flow model was developed to simulate the county's groundwater flow through finite-difference method using Visual Modflow software. We divide the research field into four parts after analyzing the hydrogeological condition. Based on parameter calibration and adjustment using measured data, the hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were simulated. Using the calibrated model, we analyze the agricultural water saving potentiality and its influence on the groundwater. The results are as follows: (1) if we decrease the amount of water extracted by 0.14× 108 m3, the average groundwater table of the five observation wells in December will rise by 0.33 m; (2) if we decrease the water by 0.29×10s m3, the average groundwater table of the five observation wells in December will rise by 0.64 m; and (3) if we increase the water by 0.29× 108 m3, the average groundwater table of the five observation wells in December will decline by 0.45 m. So we can draw a conclusion that controlling the agricultural water use is an important way to prevent the decline of groundwater table.

  19. New Approach For Prediction Groundwater Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to quantify groundwater depletion involve water balance and satellite gravity. However, the water balance technique includes uncertain estimation of parameters such as evapotranspiration and runoff. The satellite method consumes time and effort. The work reported in this paper proposes using failure theory in a novel way to predict groundwater saturated thickness depletion. An important issue in the failure theory proposed is to determine the failure point (depletion case). The proposed technique uses depth of water as the net result of recharge/discharge processes in the aquifer to calculate remaining saturated thickness resulting from the applied pumping rates in an area to evaluate the groundwater depletion. Two parameters, the Weibull function and Bayes analysis were used to model and analyze collected data from 1962 to 2009. The proposed methodology was tested in a nonrenewable aquifer, with no recharge. Consequently, the continuous decline in water depth has been the main criterion used to estimate the depletion. The value of the proposed approach is to predict the probable effect of the current applied pumping rates on the saturated thickness based on the remaining saturated thickness data. The limitation of the suggested approach is that it assumes the applied management practices are constant during the prediction period. The study predicted that after 300 years there would be an 80% probability of the saturated aquifer which would be expected to be depleted. Lifetime or failure theory can give a simple alternative way to predict the remaining saturated thickness depletion with no time-consuming processes such as the sophisticated software required.

  20. Groundwater and geothermal: urban district heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounts, R.; Frazier, A.; Wood, E.; Pyles, O.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes how several cities use groundwater and geothermal energy in district heating systems. It begins with groundwater, introducing the basic technology and techniques of development, and describing two case studies of cities with groundwater-based district heating systems. The second half of the report consists of three case studies of cities with district heating systems using higher temperature geothermal resources.

  1. 冠状动脉内膜剥脱并冠状动脉搭桥术36例临床分析%Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting after off-pump coronary endarterectomy in 36 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 王平凡; 梁志强; 朱汝军; 何发明; 郑向阳; 李峰; 崔聪

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the experience and feasibility of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (off-pump CABG) after off-pump coronary endarterectomy (CE) for patients with diffused coronary.Methods From January 2001 to July 2011,with diffused coronary artery disease underwent CE without cardiopulmonary bypass and off-pump CABG.Forty endarterectomies were performed in 36 patients totally which included 23 cases in left anterior descending artery(LAD),1 case in obtuse marginal branch and 12 cases in right coronary artery.There were 23 cases left IMA,2 cases radial,arteries,others were great saphenous veins.Results Thirty-six patients discharged uneventfully,noangina re-occurrence.Conclusion CE and bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass is technically feasible and can be performed safely in patients with difused coronary arery disease with increased completeness of myocardial revascularization.%目的 总结冠状动脉搭桥需同期行冠状动脉内膜剥脱以重建心肌血运的临床经验及可行性.方法 回顾性分析河南省胸科医院心血管外科2001年1月至2011年7月收治的36例冠状动脉慢性闭塞患者的临床资料,在外科治疗中发现闭塞冠状动脉远端内膜弥漫增厚,管腔细,遂先行内膜剥脱术,再行冠状动脉搭桥术,以保证该冠脉的血运重建.36例共完成40支冠状动脉内膜剥脱,其中前降支23例,右冠状动脉12例,钝缘支1例.应用左乳内动脉22例,桡动脉2例,余均为大隐静脉.结果 36例患者均痊愈出院,生命体征稳定,中远期效果满意,无心绞痛发作.结论 对冠状动脉闭塞合并远端弥漫增厚的患者先行内膜剥脱术,再行冠状动脉搭桥术,可明显提高再血管化程度,是治疗弥漫冠状动脉病变的有效方法.

  2. Responses of submarine groundwater to silty-sand coast reclamation: A case study in south of Laizhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Gao, Maosheng; Tang, Zhonghua; Hou, Guohua; Guo, Fei

    2016-11-01

    Coastal reclamation can result in considerable changes in the quality and quantity of submarine groundwater at the land/sea interface. In this study, submarine groundwater monitoring wells and water samples were designed and implemented to get data of groundwater level, electrical conductivity, temperature, and hydrochemistry data to examine the responses of silty-sand submarine groundwater in different sedimentary strata to reclamation in south of Laizhou Bay. The submarine groundwater is mainly saline water and its salinity in the deep aquifer is higher than that of seawater and close to brine. It was formed in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. Drilling core data indicates that there is a stratigraphic boundary at a depth of 18.58 m, with Holocene strata above, and Late Pleistocene strata below, this level. Continuous electrical conductivity data indicates that the submarine groundwater properties are stratigraphically distributed in this study area. And there is an interface at a depth of 38 m. Above the 38 m depth, the water quantity of submarine ground-saline water is freshening. The major ions showed a tendency to change continually above 25 m, but the tended to stabilize below 25 m depth. Freshwater is the major recharge source in the upper section of the Holocene strata, between the surface and 8.00 m depth, and the hydrochemical type has changed from Clsbnd Na to Cl·HCO3sbnd Na. In the lower section of Holocene strata (8.00-23.00 m) and upper section of late Late Pleistocene strata (23.00-38.00 m), groundwater is influenced by seawater and groundwater of upper aquifer. The freshwater, seawater, and groundwater recharge in the upper aquifer has no influence on the groundwater in the section below the late Late Pleistocene (between 38.00 and 49.15 m) and the early Late Pleistocene strata (between 49.15 and 75.00 m). The filling layer, added in the coastal reclamation project, is comprised of clayey silt and fine sand, and its high porosity means that it is

  3. Discussion of Preventive Gear Pump Casing Scaping%防止齿轮油泵刮壳方法的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐卫平; 梁智忠

    2011-01-01

    The reasons of casing scraping of gear pump were analyzed based on stress analysis. The problem of radial direction casing scraping was solved by using offset method of moving one gear and the offset formulas were given. The method of improving lubricating condition for pump cover was adopted to avoid axial casing scraping. This method has been used on trial at the work site with very good effect.%从受力分析角度出发分析齿轮油泵刮壳的原因.采用使齿轮偏移一个量的方法解决径向刮壳问题并给出偏移量的计算公式,采用改善泵盖润滑条件的方法避免轴向刮壳.该方法已在工地上试用,效果很好.

  4. Multi-tracer investigation of river and groundwater interactions: a case study in Nalenggele River basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Su, Xiaosi; Dai, Zhenxue; Yang, Fengtian; Zhu, Pucheng; Huang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Environmental tracers (such as major ions, stable and radiogenic isotopes, and heat) monitored in natural waters provide valuable information for understanding the processes of river-groundwater interactions in arid areas. An integrated framework is presented for interpreting multi-tracer data (major ions, stable isotopes (2H, 18O), the radioactive isotope 222Rn, and heat) for delineating the river-groundwater interactions in Nalenggele River basin, northwest China. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were undertaken to estimate the bidirectional water exchange associated with small-scale interactions between groundwater and surface water. Along the river stretch, groundwater and river water exchange readily. From the high mountain zone to the alluvial fan, groundwater discharge to the river is detected by tracer methods and end-member mixing models, but the river has also been identified as a losing river using discharge measurements, i.e. discharge is bidirectional. On the delta-front of the alluvial fan and in the alluvial plain, in the downstream area, the characteristics of total dissolved solids values, 222Rn concentrations and δ18O values in the surface water, and patterns derived from a heat-tracing method, indicate that groundwater discharges into the river. With the environmental tracers, the processes of river-groundwater interaction have been identified in detail for better understanding of overall hydrogeological processes and of the impacts on water allocation policies.

  5. Investigation of discharge-area groundwaters for recharge source characterization on different scales: the case of Jinan in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiale; Jin, Menggui; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Dele; Kang, Fengxin; Jia, Baojie

    2016-05-01

    Discharge-area groundwater in Jinan, a typical karst region in northern China, was investigated by studying both the hydrological and chemical processes evolving from the recharge in mountainous terrains to the karst-spring outflows in the metropolitan area. Large-scale exploitation of karst groundwater has led to a disturbing trend in the ever-decreasing spring outflow rates and groundwater level. There is insufficient information about the Jinan karst aquifers, which provide the main water sources to meet human demand and to sustain spring outflow. The coupling of hydrological and chemical processes quantifies the flow system through aqueous chemistry characterization of the water sources. This approach is used to study the groundwater flow discharges in different locations and geological settings. The potentiometric data indicated limited vertical connectivity between distinct hydrogeological units and alteration of the recharge regime by the faults and by artificial exploitation. Shallow groundwater primarily belongs to the local flow system, with high nitrate concentration and enriched stable isotopic contents. Thermal groundwater has high concentrations of chloride and total dissolved solids, derived from a regional flow system with the highest recharge altitudes and long residence time. Non-thermal karst water may be attributed to the intermediate flow system, with uniform HCO3-Ca(Mg) facies and low nitrate concentration. This work highlighted discharge as a fingerprint of groundwater flow conditions and provides a better insight into the hydrogeological system.

  6. Rational allocation of water resources based on ecological groundwater levels:a case study in Jinghui Irrigation District in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Zhou, W. B.; Dong, Q. G.; Liu, B. Y.; Ma, C.

    2016-08-01

    Aimed at the hydrogeological environmental problems caused by over-exploitation and unreasonable utilization of water resources in Jinghui Irrigation District, this paper discusses the ecological groundwater level of the study area and establishes a three-layer optimal allocation model of water resources based on the theory of large scale systems. Then, the genetic algorithm method was employed to optimize the model and obtain the optimal allocation of crop irrigation schedule and water resources under the condition of a 75% assurance rate. Finally, the numerical simulation model of the groundwater was applied to analyze the balance of the groundwater on the basis of the optimal allocation scheme. The results show that the upper limitation of the ecological groundwater in Jinghui Irrigation District ranged from 1.8m to 4.2m, while the lower limitation level ranged from 8m to 28m. By 2020, the condition of the groundwater imbalance that results from adopting the optimal allocation scheme will be much better than that caused by current water utilization scheme. With the exception of only a few areas, the groundwater level in most parts of Jinghui Irrigation District will not exceed the lower limitation of ecological groundwater level.

  7. Evaluation of Flow-Induced Dynamic Stress and Vibration of Volute Casing for a Large-Scale Double-Suction Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient analysis was carried out to investigate the dynamic stress and vibration of volute casing for a large double-suction centrifugal pump by using the transient fluid-structure interaction theory. The flow pulsations at flow rate ranging from 60% to 100% of the nominal flow rate (Qd were taken as the boundary conditions for FEM analysis of the pump volute casing structure. The results revealed that, for all operating conditions, the maximum stress located at the volute tongue region, whereas the maximum vibration displacement happened close to the shaft hole region. It was also found that the blade passing frequency and its harmonics were dominant in the variations of dynamic stress and vibration displacement. The amplitude of the dominant frequency for the maximum stress detected at 0.6 Qd was 1.14 times that at Qd, lower than the related difference observed for pressure fluctuations (3.23 times. This study provides an effective method to quantify the flow-induced structural dynamic characteristics for a large-scale double-suction pump. It can be used to direct the hydraulic and structural design and stable operation, as well as fatigue life prediction for large-scale pumps.

  8. Hydrogeochemical features of surface water and groundwater contaminated with acid mine drainage (AMD) in coal mining areas: a case study in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) were investigated in surface waters (Laranjinha River and Ribeirão das Pedras stream) and groundwaters from a coal mining area sampled in two different seasons at Figueira city, Paraná State, Brazil. The spatial data distribution indicated that the acid effluents favor the chemical elements leaching and transport from the tailings pile into the superficial water bodies or aquifers, modifying their quality. The acid groundwaters in both sampling periods (dry: pH 2.94-6.04; rainy: pH 3.25-6.63) were probably due to the AMD generation and infiltration, after the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Such acid effluents cause an increase of the solubilization rate of metals, mainly iron and aluminum, contributing to both groundwater and surface water contamination. Sulfate in high levels is a result of waters' pollution due to AMD. In some cases, high sulfate and low iron contents, associated with less acidic pH values, could indicate that AMD, previously generated, is nowadays being neutralized. The chemistry of the waters affected by AMD is controlled by the pH, sulfide minerals' oxidation, oxygen, iron content, and microbial activity. It is also influenced by seasonal variations that allow the occurrence of dissolution processes and the concentration of some chemical elements. Under the perspective of the waters' quality evaluation, the parameters such as conductivity, dissolved sodium, and sulfate concentrations acted as AMD indicators of groundwaters and surface waters affected by acid effluents.

  9. Assessing the `wicked problems' associated with the quality of groundwater used in irrigation: a case study from the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Brian; Wei, Yong Ping

    2012-08-01

    Studies on the quality of groundwater have moved beyond the physical realm of contamination and purification, towards the economic concerns of choice and the management of the problem. With these approaches the complex biophysical processes are assessed from the users' perspective and the policy outcomes that could be used to resolve the problems of groundwater contamination are evaluated. However, in a set of unrelated studies, it has been found that attempts by governments to resolve the problems of groundwater contamination in agriculture have a poor record of success. This could be because the problem is too extensive and diverse to handle or it could be a case of poor policy selection. Taking an example from the North China Plain to illustrate some of the major issues raised in this study, it is concluded that the problem itself is unresolvable on a large scale. In other words, groundwater contamination can be defined as a `wicked problem', i.e. unresolvable by applying pure science, closely linked with social issues, and for which there are no optimal solutions. In this situation, the best solution is possibly to encourage farmers to live with and handle the problem as they best see fit.

  10. Tracing of submarine groundwater discharge in the Siberian Arctic coastal zone: the case study in the Buor-Khaya Bay, Laptev Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, A. N.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Rutgers van der Loeff, M.; Salyuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    That is suggested and widely accepted that a significant portion of the Great Siberian Rivers discharge comes to the Arctic ocean via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). However, that statement was never proofed by observations. When groundwater discharges from the coastal aquifer to the ocean, the radium isotopes are transported with the groundwater, and they can be measured to trace and quantify SGD, and the flux of constituents associated with SGD. The primary goal of this study is to use radium isotopes to proof that SGD is existing in the Laptev Sea coastal zone close to the Lena River delta, which supposed to be characterized by continuous permafrost with thickness up to 600-800m. If so, we supposed to quantify methane fluxes to the coastal ocean through SGD. Discrete seawater, and Lena river water samples were collected from different horizons from the holes made in fast ice using submerged pump and Niskin bottle in the western part of Buor- Khaya Bay in March-April 2014 and 2015. We identified and traced SGD using short-lived radium (224Ra and 223Ra) and radon (222Rn) isotopes in complex with geophysical (electromagnetic technique) , geological (sediment core results from 16 boreholes), hydrological (temperature, salinity), and hydrochemical (total alkalinity, dissolved methane and oxygen) data. It was found that the SGD is controlled by the processes associated with changing state of the subsea permafrost. Thus, this technique can give an unique information about the location of SGD "leakage" sites across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, which represents > 80% of subsea permafrost existing in the entire Arctic ocean.

  11. 郑州市地下水源热泵适宜区浅层地热能资源量评价%The Shallow Geothermal Energy Resource Evaluation on the Suitable Area of Groundwater Source Heat Pump in Zhengzhou City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田良河; 闫震鹏; 刘新号

    2011-01-01

    By numerical simulation, we determine the best distance between wells of the groundwater source heat pump in Zhengzhou City, and evaluate the shallow geothermal energy resource in the suitable areas. It can provide important basis for urban development and utilization of shallow geothermal energy in Zhengzhou City.%采用数值模拟法确定了郑州市地下水源热泵适宜区最佳井间距,评价了郑州市地下水源热泵适宜区浅层地热能资源。

  12. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability to pollution of a wetland watershed : the case study of the Oualidia-Sidi Moussa wetland, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility of wetlands to continental pollution is closely related to the vulnerability of their surface and sub-surface watersheds. Therefore, to help manage wetlands, especially those fed by groundwater, it can be useful to assess the vulnerability of their aquifers. This approach is illustrated by the case study of the wetland of Oualidia-Sidi Moussa. Firstly, the hydrogeological basin of the wetland was identified. Vulnerability mapping was then performed using the specific Suscep...

  13. Implication of Groundwater Resources Utilization in Mountainous Region for Slopeland Disaster Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Chao; Hsu, Shih-Meng; Lo, Hung-Chieh

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, groundwater resources from mountainous regions have been considered as an alternative water resource in Taiwan. According to previous research outcomes (Hsu, 2011), such a groundwater resource is capable of providing stable and high quality water resources. Additionally, another advantage of using the water resources is attributed to the contribution of slopeland disaster prevention. While pumping groundwater as water resources in hilly areas (e.g., at landslide-prone sites), pore-water pressures can be dropped, which can result in stabilizing landslide-prone slopes. However, the benefit to slope stability by using groundwater resources needs to be quantified. The purpose of this study is to investigate groundwater potential of a deep-seated landslide site first, and then to evaluate variations of slope stability by changing well pumping rate conditions. In this paper, the Baolong landslide site located at the Jiasian district of Kaohsiung city in Southern Taiwan has been selected as a case study. Hydrogeological investigation for the landslide site was conducted to clarify the complexity of field characteristics and to establish a precise conceptual model for simulation. The investigation content includes surficial geology investigation, borehole drilling (6 drilling boreholes and 350 meters drilling length in total), 45 m pumping well construction, borehole hydrogeological tests (borehole televiewer, caliper, borehole electrical logging, sonic logging, flowmeter measurement, pumping test, and double packer test), and laboratory tests from rock core samples (physical properties test of soil and rocks, triaxial permeability test of soil, porosity determination test using helium, and gas permeability test). Based on the aforementioned investigation results, a hydrogeological conceptual model for the Baolong landslide site was constructed, and a 2D slope stability model coupled with transient seepage flow model was used for numerical simulation to

  14. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Gülich, Johann Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book gives an unparalleled, up-to-date, in-depth treatment of all kinds of flow phenomena encountered in centrifugal pumps including the complex interactions of fluid flow with vibrations and wear of materials. The scope includes all aspects of hydraulic design, 3D-flow phenomena and partload operation, cavitation, numerical flow calculations, hydraulic forces, pressure pulsations, noise, pump vibrations (notably bearing housing vibration diagnostics and remedies), pipe vibrations, pump characteristics and pump operation, design of intake structures, the effects of highly viscous flows, pumping of gas-liquid mixtures, hydraulic transport of solids, fatigue damage to impellers or diffusers, material selection under the aspects of fatigue, corrosion, erosion-corrosion or hydro-abrasive wear, pump selection, and hydraulic quality criteria. As a novelty, the 3rd ed. brings a fully analytical design method for radial impellers, which eliminates the arbitrary choices inherent to former design procedures. The d...

  15. Origin and assessment of groundwater pollution and associated health risk: a case study in an industrial park, northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiyue; Wu, Jianhua; Qian, Hui; Lyu, Xinsheng; Liu, Hongwei

    2014-08-01

    Groundwater quality which relates closely to human health has become as important as its quantity due to the demand for safe water. In the present study, an entropy-weighted fuzzy water quality index (WQI) has been proposed for performing groundwater quality assessment in and around an industrial park, northwest China, where domestic water requirements are solely met by groundwater. The human health risk was assessed with the model recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the sources of major ions and main contaminants were also analyzed. The study shows that groundwater in the study area has been contaminated conjunctively by natural processes and industrial and agricultural activities. Nitrate, manganese (Mn), fluoride, total dissolved solids, total hardness and sulfate are major contaminants influencing groundwater quality. Nitrate and heavy metals such as Mn are mainly affected by human agricultural activities and industrial production, while other contaminants are mainly originated from mineral weathering and water-rock interactions. The results of water quality assessment suggest that half of the groundwater samples collected are of medium quality thus require pretreatment before human consumption. The mean health risk caused by the consumption of contaminated groundwater in the area is 8.42 × 10(-5) per year which surpasses the maximum acceptable level (5 × 10(-5) per year) recommended by the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. The entropy-weighted fuzzy WQI proposed in this study can not only assign proper weights to parameters but also treat uncertainties associated with water quality classification. This study will be of interest to international environmentalists and hydrogeologists. It will also be useful in regional groundwater management and protection.

  16. Estimation of actual irrigation amount and its impact on groundwater depletion: A case study in the Hebei Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolong; Shi, Liangsheng; Zeng, Jicai; Yang, Jinzhong; Zha, Yuanyuan; Yao, Yunjun; Cao, Guoliang

    2016-12-01

    Irrigation water is an important but missing hydrological cycle component in the region with intensive agricultural irrigation, due to the lack of monitoring facilities. The Hebei Plain, suffering the most severe groundwater depletion in China for agriculture production, provides an ideal background to study historical agricultural water consumption and its dependence on groundwater exploitation. This paper investigated the method of retrieving the spatial-temporal irrigation amount from multiple data sets of different sources and different scales. Comprehensive data including 21 years of satellite-based data, ground-based data, and four years of tracer experiment data are synthesized to implement the soil water balance. We proposed a modified soil water balance framework by relying on as much as possible of easily available data. Our results showed that the multi-mean annual irrigation amount in the Hebei Plain is 317 mm, and mean irrigation-to-evapotranspiration ratio reaches 50.8% in recent two decades. Moreover, the precipitation distribution, plant structure, and agricultural intensity result in significantly spatiotemporal variation in irrigation and irrigation-to-evapotranspiration ratio, while however has not been addressed by previous studies. Deep percolation, ignored by many soil water balance models, was shown to be unneglectable. The estimated actual irrigation amount, together with groundwater level data, are valuable to obtain a further understanding on groundwater depletion. The diverse groundwater depletion situation in the Hebei Plain indicated the importance of recognizing the groundwater utilization patterns at a smaller scale in the regional-scale groundwater resources management. This work showed the feasibility of estimating the irrigation amount using simultaneously different types of data and revealed the spatiotemporal characteristics of agriculture water consumption and associated groundwater depletion in the Hebei Plain.

  17. Impact of Rainfall, Land-Cover and Population Growth on Groundwater - A Case Study From Karnataka State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, R. K.; Chinnapa Reddy, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent trends in climate, land-use pattern and population has affected almost every portable water resources in the world. Due to depleting surface water and untimely distribution of precipitation, the demand to use groundwater has increased considerably. Further recent studies have shown that the groundwater stress is more in developing countries like India. This study focuses on understanding the impacts of three major factors (i.e., rainfall, land-cover and population growth) effecting the groundwater levels. For this purpose, the correlation between the trends in groundwater time series is compared with trends in rainfall, land-cover and population growth. To detect the trends in time series, two statistical methods namely, least square method and Mann-Kendall method, are adopted. The results were analyzed based on the measurements from 1800 observation wells in the Karnataka state, India. The data is obtained for a total of 9 year time period ranging from 2005 to 2013. A gridded precipitation data of 0.5o× 0.5o over the entire region is used. The change in land-cover and population data was approximately obtained from the local governing bodies. The early results show significant correlation between rainfall and groundwater time series trends. The outcomes will assess the vulnerability of groundwater levels under changing physical and hydroclimatic conditions, especially under climate change.

  18. IgG particle formation during filling pump operation: a case study of heterogeneous nucleation on stainless steel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Anil K; Randolph, Theodore W; Dong, Aichun; Maloney, Kevin M; Hitscherich, Carl; Carpenter, John F

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated factors associated with vial filling with a positive displacement piston pump leading to formation of protein particles in a formulation of an IgG. We hypothesized that nanoparticles shed from the pump's solution-contact surfaces nucleated protein aggregation and particle formation. Vials of IgG formulation filled at a clinical manufacturing site contained a few visible particles and about 100,000 particles (1.5-3 microm) per mL. In laboratory studies with the same model (National Instruments FUS-10) of pump, pumping of 20 mg/mL IgG formulation resulted in about 300,000 particles (1.5-3 microm) per mL. Pumping of protein-free formulation resulted in 13,000 particles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. More than 99% of the particles were 0.25-0.95 microm in size. Mixing of protein-free pumped solution with an equal volume of 40 mg/mL IgG resulted in 300,000 particles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. Also, mixing IgG formulation with 30,000/mL stainless steel nanoparticles resulted in formation of 30,000 protein microparticles (1.5-15 microm) per mL. Infrared spectroscopy showed that secondary structure of IgG in microparticles formed by pumping or mixing with steel nanoparticles was minimally perturbed. Our results document that nanoparticles of foreign materials shed by pumps can serve as heterogeneous nuclei for formation of protein microparticles.

  19. Data-driven methods to improve baseflow prediction of a regional groundwater model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianfang; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-12-01

    Physically-based models of groundwater flow are powerful tools for water resources assessment under varying hydrologic, climate and human development conditions. One of the most important topics of investigation is how these conditions will affect the discharge of groundwater to rivers and streams (i.e. baseflow). Groundwater flow models are based upon discretized solution of mass balance equations, and contain important hydrogeological parameters that vary in space and cannot be measured. Common practice is to use least squares regression to estimate parameters and to infer prediction and associated uncertainty. Nevertheless, the unavoidable uncertainty associated with physically-based groundwater models often results in both aleatoric and epistemic model calibration errors, thus violating a key assumption for regression-based parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification. We present a complementary data-driven modeling and uncertainty quantification (DDM-UQ) framework to improve predictive accuracy of physically-based groundwater models and to provide more robust prediction intervals. First, we develop data-driven models (DDMs) based on statistical learning techniques to correct the bias of the calibrated groundwater model. Second, we characterize the aleatoric component of groundwater model residual using both parametric and non-parametric distribution estimation methods. We test the complementary data-driven framework on a real-world case study of the Republican River Basin, where a regional groundwater flow model was developed to assess the impact of groundwater pumping for irrigation. Compared to using only the flow model, DDM-UQ provides more accurate monthly baseflow predictions. In addition, DDM-UQ yields prediction intervals with coverage probability consistent with validation data. The DDM-UQ framework is computationally efficient and is expected to be applicable to many geoscience models for which model structural error is not negligible.

  20. Salinity mapping of coastal groundwater aquifers using hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods: a case study from north Kelantan, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, A. R.; Haryono, A.; Hamzah, U.; Rafek, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Integrated hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods were used to study the salinity of groundwater aquifers along the coastal area of north Kelantan. For the hydrogeochemical investigation, analysis of major ion contents of the groundwater was conducted, and other chemical parameters such as pH and total dissolved solids were also determined. For the geophysical study, both geoelectrical resistivity soundings and reflection seismic surveys were conducted to determine the characteristics of the subsurface and groundwater contained within the aquifers. The pH values range from 6.2 to 6.8, indicating that the groundwater in the study area is slightly acidic. Low content of chloride suggests that the groundwater in the first aquifer is fresh, with an average concentration of about 15.8 mg/l and high geoelectrical resistivity (>45 ohm m). On the other hand, the groundwater in the second aquifer is brackish, with chloride concentration ranging from 500 mg/l to 3,600 mg/l and very low geoelectrical resistivity (1,000 mg/l). The groundwater in the third aquifer is fresh, with chloride concentrations generally ranging from 2 mg/l to 210 mg/l and geoelectrical resistivity of greater than 45 ohm m. Fresh and saltwater interface in the first aquifer is generally located directly in the area of the coast, but, for the second aquifer, both hydrogeochemical and geoelectrical resistivity results indicate that the fresh water and saltwater interface is located as far as 6 km from the beach. The considerable chloride ion content initially suggests that the salinity of the groundwater in the second aquifer is probably caused by the intrusion of seawater. However, continuous monitoring of the chloride content of the second aquifer indicated no significant changes with time, from which it can be inferred that the salinity of the groundwater is not affected by seasonal seawater intrusion. Schoeller diagrams illustrate that sulphate concentrations of the groundwater of the second aquifer

  1. The Present Situation and Countermeasures of Groundwater Contamination in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shindo, Shizuo; Tang, Changyuan

    1997-01-01

    [ABSTRACT] Since 1982, thousands of groundwater pollution cases have been found in Japan. In order to improve the groundwater quality, Japan has developed strategies for protection of groundwater. In this paper, authors try to explain the present of groundwater use, groundwater pollution and remediation methods in Japan. From the results shown in this paper, it can be found that groundwater pollution problem has become very serious in Japan. Even many efforts have been made to improve the sit...

  2. Recharge Area on the Slopes of Volcano Based on Geological Setting, Content of Deuterium and Oxygen Isotopes of Groundwater Chemistry: Case Study on the Slopes of Salak Mountain, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendarmawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian is huge areas that have the highest precipitation in the world, therefore water deficit of groundwater is often happened at anywhere. This study was related to determination of recharge area with approached by combining geological setting, stable isotopes and chemical content of groundwater. Case study was carried out at surrounding the Cicurug area, Sukabumi Prefecture, West Java Province. The area is the slopes of Salak Mountain that have elevation of 400 until 1,200 m mean sea level (msl. While, much groundwater supplies industry activities on elevation 450-500 m msl. Based on data and result analysis of the studies, the recharge areas was not around peak of mountain or near, but water infiltrated on elevation of 700-800 m msl for groundwater exploited by industries. Therefore, the accurate determination of recharge area becomes a key for the groundwater sustainability.

  3. Modelling ground rupture due to groundwater withdrawal: applications to test cases in China and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, A.; Teatini, P.; Janna, C.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Ye, S.; Carreón-Freyre, D.

    2015-11-01

    The stress variation induced by aquifer overdraft in sedimentary basins with shallow bedrock may cause rupture in the form of pre-existing fault activation or earth fissure generation. The process is causing major detrimental effects on a many areas in China and Mexico. Ruptures yield discontinuity in both displacement and stress field that classic continuous finite element (FE) models cannot address. Interface finite elements (IE), typically used in contact mechanics, may be of great help and are implemented herein to simulate the fault geomechanical behaviour. Two main approaches, i.e. Penalty and Lagrangian, are developed to enforce the contact condition on the element interface. The incorporation of IE incorporation into a three-dimensional (3-D) FE geomechanical simulator shows that the Lagrangian approach is numerically more robust and stable than the Penalty, thus providing more reliable solutions. Furthermore, the use of a Newton-Raphson scheme to deal with the non-linear elasto-plastic fault behaviour allows for quadratic convergence. The FE - IE model is applied to investigate the likely ground rupture in realistic 3-D geologic settings. The case studies are representative of the City of Wuxi in the Jiangsu Province (China), and of the City of Queretaro, Mexico, where significant land subsidence has been accompanied by the generation of several earth fissures jeopardizing the stability and integrity of the overland structures and infrastructure.

  4. Advantages of 3D FEM numerical modeling over 2D, analyzed in a case study of transient thermal-hydraulic groundwater utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsluger, Martin; Götzl, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    In general most aquifers have a much larger lateral extent than vertical. This fact leads to the application of the Dupuit-Forchheimer assumptions to many groundwater problems, whereas a two dimensional simulation is considered sufficient. By coupling transient fluid flow modeling with heat transport the 2D aquifer approximation is in many cases insufficient as it does not consider effects of the subjacent and overlying aquitards on heat propagation as well as the impact of surface climatic effects on shallow aquifers. A shallow Holocene aquifer in Vienna served as a case study to compare different modeling approaches in two and three dimensions in order to predict the performance and impact of a thermal aquifer utilization for heating (1.3 GWh) and cooling (1.4 GWh) of a communal building. With the assumption of a 6 doublets well field, the comparison was realized in three steps: At first a two dimensional model for unconfined flow was set up, assuming a varying hydraulic conductivity as well as a varying top and bottom elevation of the aquifer (gross - thickness). The model area was chosen along constant hydraulic head at steady state conditions. A second model was made by mapping solely the aquifer in three dimensions using the same subdomain and boundary conditions as defined in step one. The third model consists of a complete three dimensional geological build-up including the aquifer as well as the overlying and subjacent layers and additionally an annually variable climatic boundary condition at the surface. The latter was calibrated with measured water temperature at a nearby water gauge. For all three models the same annual operating mode of the 6 hydraulic doublets was assumed. Furthermore a limited maximal groundwater temperature at a range between 8 and 18 °C as well as a constrained well flow rate has been given. Finally a descriptive comparison of the three models concerning the extracted thermal power, drawdown, temperature distribution and Darcy

  5. An assessment of groundwater quality for agricultural use: a case study from solid waste disposal site SE of Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. G. Sayyed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater pollution around the improperly constructed landfill areas of the growing cities has always been in the rising trend and hence its effects on the environment warrant a thorough monitoring. The seasonal variations in the quality of groundwater from the dug wells surrounding the solid waste disposal site from the SE of Pune city (India has been assessed by calculating the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR. The results indicate that the groundwater from the wells nearing the waste disposal site show consistent increase in the pollution from monsoon to summer through winter. The study further demonstrates that the wells near the site are severely polluted and the source is mainly the leachates emerging out of the decaying solid wastes. The recurrent addition of the solid waste in the dump site in the coming years would result in further exponential deterioration of the groundwater quality of the dug wells from the area and hence adequate steps are urgently needed to prevent further aggravation of the problem. Based upon the SAR values it is evident that most of the wells from the Hadapsar area have excellent groundwater for irrigation throughout the year; from Manjari area it is excellent to good; the Fursungi area has sub-equal proportions of excellent, good and fair groundwater, while in Mantarwadi, although most of the wells have excellent to good water, few wells have fair to poor quality water for irrigation purpose. In Uruli-Devachi about 50% wells have poor quality of water and hence can not be used for irrigation. Hence this study strongly suggests that most of the abstracted groundwater samples from the study area were suitable for irrigation except from Uruli Devachi area.

  6. Hydrogeochemical assessment of arsenic in groundwater and its policy implication: a case study in Terai Basin, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, J. K.; Upreti, B. N.; Kansakar, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    Arsenic contamination at levels above the WHO guideline (10 ìg/l) in groundwater is a worldwide problem due to its detrimental effects on health and now known to be a problem also in the Terai Basin of Nepal, posing a serious threat to more than 10 million people. The distribution of arsenic in the basin, however, is patchy. The study emphasizes on the three different types of research into an interdisciplinary package that can be immediately useful to government agencies in Nepal trying to deal with groundwater contamination. They are: hydrogeological assessment of water sources and flow, geochemical analysis of groundwater, and assessment of practical public policy. Basic geochemical analysis gives the abundance and distribution of arsenic along with other physico-chemical parameters of groundwater, whereas, the hydrogeological assessment as an integral part of this study that assist in determining process of mobilization or attenuation of arsenic. Arsenic levels and other key parameters mainly pH, electrical conductivity, chemical oxygen demand, iron, and biological parameter as E-coli were observed at the various locations with different transmissivity values. The study suggests that the flushing rate of an aquifer plays an important role in arsenic content. High flushing rates of an aquifer lead to low levels of arsenic, however the mechanism of this process is still under study. Transmissivity the property of an aquifer that measures the rate at which ground water moves horizontally through a unit is the main factor for controlling flushing. Concentration maps overlaying the base transmissivity map reveals relation of groundwater movement and arsenic concentration. Understanding the relationship between groundwater movement and arsenic content helps planners protect uncontaminated aquifers from future contamination. Also assessment of public policy related to groundwater has identified important changes needed in the existing policy.

  7. Guidelines for selecting codes for ground-water transport modeling of low-level waste burial sites. Volume 2. Special test cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1985-08-01

    This document was written for the National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide guidance for managers and site operators who need to select ground-water transport codes for assessing shallow-land burial site performance. The guidance given in this report also serves the needs of applications-oriented users who work under the direction of a manager or site operator. The guidelines are published in two volumes designed to support the needs of users having different technical backgrounds. An executive summary, published separately, gives managers and site operators an overview of the main guideline report. Volume 1, titled ''Guideline Approach,'' consists of Chapters 1 through 5 and a glossary. Chapters 2 through 5 provide the more detailed discussions about the code selection approach. This volume, Volume 2, consists of four appendices reporting on the technical evaluation test cases designed to help verify the accuracy of ground-water transport codes. 20 refs.

  8. Evaluation of groundwater-surface water interaction through groundwater modelling: simulation of the effects of removal of a dam along a river at a contaminated site in Northern France

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Remonti, Michele; Mori, Piero

    .... The scope of the work was the optimisation of the existing groundwater pump and treat system and the prediction of possible effects on groundwater circulation after the future removal of a dam located along the river...

  9. Ferroelectric Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  10. Evaluation of groundwater suitability for domestic, irrigational, and industrial purposes: a case study from Thirumanimuttar river basin, Tamilnadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthavigar, M; Srinivasamoorthy, K; Prasanna, M V

    2012-01-01

    The Thirumanimuttar sub-basin forms an important groundwater province in south India, facing serious deficiency in both quality and quantity of groundwater due to increased demand associated with rapid population explosion, agricultural growth and industrial activities. A total of 194 groundwater samples were collected and 15 water quality parameters were analyzed using standard procedures. Na( + ), Cl( - ), Ca(2 + ), HCO(-)(3), Mg(2 + ) and SO(2-)(4) concentration ions are more dominant in both seasons. The total dissolved solids and electrical conductivity was observed good correlation with Na( + ), Cl( - ), HCO(-)(3), Ca(2 + ), Mg(2 + ), Cl( - ), PO(3-)(4) and NO(-)(3) ions indicating dominance of plagioclase feldspar weathering, anthropogenic input and over drafting of groundwater irrespective of seasons. The Hill-Piper diagram indicates alkaline earths exceed the alkalis, an increase of weak acids was noted during both the seasons. For assessing the groundwater for irrigation suitability parameters like total hardness, sodium adsorption ratio, residual sodium carbonate (RSC), permeability index, and sodium percentage are also calculated. Permanent hardness was noted in higher during both the seasons due to discharge of untreated effluents and ion exchange process. The RSC indicates 56% of the samples are not suitable for irrigation purposes in both seasons, if continuously used will affect the crop yield. From the results, nearly 72% of the samples are not suitable for irrigation.

  11. Deduction of groundwater flow regime in a basaltic aquifer using geochemical and isotopic data: The Golan Heights, Israel case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafny, Elad; Burg, Avi; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2006-11-01

    SummaryGroundwater flow-paths through shallow-perch and deep-regional basaltic aquifers at the Golan Heights, Israel, are reconstructed by using groundwater chemical and isotopic compositions. Groundwater chemical composition, which changes gradually along flow-paths due to mineral dissolution and water-rock interaction, is used to distinguish between shallow-perched and deep-regional aquifers. Groundwater replenishment areas of several springs are identified based on the regional depletion in rainwater δ18O values as a function of elevation (-0.25‰ per 100 m). Tritium concentrations assist in distinguishing between pre-bomb and post-bomb recharged rainwater. It was found that waters emerging through the larger springs are lower in δ18O than surrounding meteoric water and poor in tritium; thus, they are inferred to originate in high-elevation regions up to 20 km away from their discharge points and at least several decades ago. These results verify the numerically simulated groundwater flow field proposed in a previous study, which considered the geological configuration, water mass balance and hydraulic head spatial distribution.

  12. Using radon-222 for tracing groundwater discharge into an open-pit lignite mining lake--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Axel; Schubert, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater discharge into an open pit lignite mining lake was investigated using radon-222 as a naturally occurring environmental tracer. The chosen study site was a meromictic lake, i.e., a water body that is divided horizontally into two separate layers--the upper mixolimnion (with seasonal mixing) and the lower monimolimnion (without seasonal mixing). For the estimation of groundwater discharge rates into the lake, a simple box model including all radon sinks and sources related to each layer was applied. Two field investigations were performed. During the October campaign, the total groundwater discharge into the lake was found to be 18.9 and 0.7 m(3) d(-1) for the mixolimnion and monimolimnion, respectively. During the December campaign, the groundwater discharge into the mixolimnion was 15.0 m(3) d(-1), whereas no discharge at all was observed into the monimolimnion. Based on the given water volumes, the residence time of lake water was 5.3 years for the monimolimnion and varies between 0.9 and 1.1 years for the mixolimnion. The investigation confirmed radon to be a useful environmental tracer for groundwater and surface water interactions in meromictic lake environments.

  13. GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION IN PROTON PUMP INHIBITOR ERA: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF FIFTY CASES IN TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastric Outlet Obstruction implies complete or incomplete obstruction of the distal stomach pylorus or proximal duodenum. (1 Gastric outlet obstruction poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to general surgeons practicing in resource-limited countries. There is no sufficient data on this subject in our setting. Studies throughout the world shows drastic reduction in peptic ulcer disease (PUD after Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI era. (1 This study was undertaken to highlight the etiology and treatment of Duodenal Ulcer (DU and its most important complication, gastric outlet obstruction in Tertiary Hospital in South India. This study was done in SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Chennai, where in for all Gastric Ulcer (GU and Duodenal Ulcer (DU patients, eradication of H. Pylori has become a standard treatment. Surgical treatment is required for complications of peptic ulcer disease. (1 The aim of the study are two: first to analyze sex and age distribution of GU and DU and second to study the various types of management. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study on PUD and Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO is based on a study of 50 cases that were admitted in SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre during the period of October 2014 to September 2015. The patients were evaluated by routine investigations like upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and ultrasonography of the abdomen. Barium meal and CECT abdomen in selected cases. All cases were taken up for curative/palliative surgery and operated depending upon the causes. All patients with a clinical diagnosis of gastric outlet obstruction were included after informed consent for the study, consecutively enrolled into the study. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 17.0. RESULTS In 37 cases, carcinoma of antrum with gastric outlet obstruction was found. Males are 25 (68% and females are 12 in numbers (32%. In 12 cases of chronic duodenal

  14. Isotopes and groundwater management strategies under semi-arid area: case of the Souss upstream basin (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouragba, L; Mudry, J; Bouchaou, L; Hsissou, Y; Krimissa, M; Tagma, T; Michelot, J L

    2011-07-01

    This study concerns the Souss upstream basin. The objective is to investigate the characteristics of surface water and groundwater, to assess the impact of artificial recharge as reinforcement of the natural replenishment and assess the renewal of groundwater under semi-arid area. Two major water types are observed: (i) surface waters and upstream springs (least mineralized) and (ii) all groundwater samples (prevailing calcium and magnesium bicarbonate water type). Water isotopes show a low evaporation of precipitations during infiltration. Impoverishment in heavy isotopes is the characteristic of mountain rainfalls, or of a climate colder and wetter than present. Carbon-14 activities (34-94 pmc) indicate a long residence time. The artificial recharge is low compared to the reservoir volume, due to which the renewal rate is also low.

  15. Technical note: Application of artificial neural networks in groundwater table forecasting - a case study in a Singapore swamp forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yabin; Wendi, Dadiyorto; Eon Kim, Dong; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of groundwater table is important for the efficient management of groundwater resources. Despite being the most widely used tools for depicting the hydrological regime, numerical models suffer from formidable constraints, such as extensive data demanding, high computational cost, and inevitable parameter uncertainty. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), in contrast, can make predictions on the basis of more easily accessible variables, rather than requiring explicit characterization of the physical systems and prior knowledge of the physical parameters. This study applies ANN to predict the groundwater table in a freshwater swamp forest of Singapore. The inputs to the network are solely the surrounding reservoir levels and rainfall. The results reveal that ANN is able to produce an accurate forecast with a leading time of 1 day, whereas the performance decreases when leading time increases to 3 and 7 days.

  16. Promoting local management in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, Frank

    2006-03-01

    There is a strong case for making greater effort to promote local groundwater management—in addition to other measures that regulate groundwater use. Though scattered, there are several examples—from India, Pakistan, Yemen and Egypt—where groundwater users effectively self-imposed restrictions on the use of groundwater. There are a number of recurrent themes in such spontaneously-developed examples of local regulation: the importance of not excluding potential users; the importance of simple, low transaction cost rules; the power of correct and accessible hydrogeological information; the possibility of making more use of demand and supply management strategies; and the important supportive role of local governments. The case is made, using examples, for actively promoting local groundwater management as an important element in balancing groundwater uses. Two programmes for promoting local groundwater management in South India are described—one focussing on participatory hydrological monitoring, and one focussing on micro-resource planning and training. In both cases the response was very positive and the conclusion is that promoting local groundwater regulation is not difficult, costly or sensitive and can reach the necessary scale quickly.

  17. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  18. Dating of young groundwater using tritium and gaseous tracers (SF6, SF5CF3, CFC-12, H-1301): case study from southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Bartyzel, Jakub; Dulinski, Marek; Kuc, Tadeusz; Sliwka, Ireneusz; Mochalski, Pawel; Kania, Jaroslaw; Witczak, Stanislaw

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater is an important source of potable water in many countries. While it covers ca. 50% of the global drinking water needs, in Europe this share is even higher, reaching approximately 70%. Nowadays, this strategic resource is at risk due to anthropogenic pollutants of various nature entering shallow aquifers. Proper management of groundwater resources requires thorough understanding of groundwater dynamics on time scales characteristic for the history of pollutant input to groundwater. The bomb-tritium has been used for several decades now as a tracer of choice to detect recent recharge and to quantify groundwater residence times on time scales extending from several years to several decades. The lumped-parameter modeling was the most often employed approach in this context. Since nowadays atmospheric concentrations of tritium are approaching natural levels in most parts of the world, the usage of this tracer has become more problematic. Therefore, there is a growing interest in alternative indicators of groundwater age in shallow aquifers. Anthropogenic trace gases present in the atmosphere, such as freons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), have been applied in numerous case studies as substitutes of tritium. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study aimed at quantifying mean residence time of groundwater in the recharge area of porous sandy aquifer system located in the southern Poland. The principal economic role of the aquifer, consisting of two water-bearing strata, is to provide potable water for public and private users. The yield of the aquifer is insufficient to meet all the needs and, as a consequence, licensing conflicts arise between water supply companies and industry on the amount of water available for safe exploitation. To quantify residence time distribution (RTD) functions of water parcels arriving at the production wells located in the recharge area of the aquifer, tritium along with several gaseous tracers

  19. USING THE HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT TOOLBOX TO FACILITATE PROCUREMENT: THE CASE OF SMART PUMPS IN A CANADIAN HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the experience of a Canadian hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) unit that performed the traditional functions of the HTA process along with many other activities to facilitate the choice of smart pumps. A rapid literature review was initiated, but little evidence was found. Moreover, the evidence provided was too far from our hospital context. To help our decision makers, we offered them a list of various services based on the skills of our HTA unit staff. To involve our HTA unit in the choice of the new smart pumps led to a strong collaboration between hospital services. After a rapid review on smart pumps, we proceeded to establish the clinical needs, followed by an evaluation of technical features. To ascertain clinical needs, we participated in the establishment of a conformity list for the tender, a failure and mode-effect analysis, an audit on the use of actual smart pumps, and simulation exercises with nurses and doctors to evaluate the ease of use and ergonomics. With regard to technical tests, these were mainly conducted to identify potential dysfunction and to assess the efficiency of the pump. This experience with smart pumps was useful for evidence-based procurement and led to the formulation of a nine-step process to guide future work. HTA units and agencies are faced with rapid development of new technologies that may not be supported by sufficient amount of pertinent published evidence. Under these circumstances, approaches other than evidence-based selection might provide useful information. Because these activities may be different from those related to classic HTA, this widens the scope of what can be done in HTA to support decision making.

  20. Spatial Dynamic Optimization of Groundwater Use with Ecological Standards for Instream Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, N.; Han, J.; Speir, C.

    2011-12-01

    Instream flow requirements for protected species in arid and semi-arid regions have created the need to reduce groundwater use adjacent to streams. We present an integrated hydrologic-economic model that optimizes agricultural groundwater use next to streams with flow standards. Policies to meet instream flow standards should aim to minimize the welfare losses to irrigated agriculture due to reduced pumping. Previous economic studies have proposed spatially targeted water allocations between groundwater irrigators and instream demands. However, these studies focused on meeting aggregate instream flow goals on a seasonal or yearly basis rather than meeting them on a continuous basis. Temporally aggregated goals ignore important intra-seasonal hydrologic effects and may not provide sufficient habitat quality for species of concern. We present an optimization model that solves for groundwater pumping allocations across space in a stream-aquifer system with instream flow goals that must be met on a daily basis. We combine an analytical model of stream depletion with a farm profit maximization model that includes cumulative crop yield damages from water stress. The objective is the minimization of agricultural losses from reduced groundwater use while minimum instream flow requirements for ecological needs are met on a daily basis. As a case study, we apply our model to the Scott River Basin in northern California. This is a region where stream depletion resulting from extensive irrigation has degraded habitat for Coho salmon, a species protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Our results indicate the importance of considering the lag between the time at which pumping occurs and the time at which stream depletion related to that pumping occurs. In general, we find that wells located farther from the stream should be allocated more water in most hydrologic scenarios. However, we also find that the spatial and temporal distribution of optimal groundwater pumping

  1. Using Discrete Element Method to Simulate Influence of Vertical Joints and Upward Groundwater on The Stability of Dip Slope: A Case Study on Formosa Freeway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, An; Hsieh, Pei-Chen; Wu, Liang-Chun; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake and rainfall weakening potential sliding surface are common causes of dip slope failure. But in recent years, certain dip slopes failure, for example dip slope sliding without rain on the roadside of Formosa Freeway in northern Taiwan, are caused by uplift groundwater in vertical joints eventually weakening the potential sliding surface. The mechanism of sliding failure should be analyzed in more detail. Furthermore, prestress dissipating in anchors causing dip slope failure is also considered in this study. In this study, conceptual model is simplified from the case of Formosa Freeway in northern Taiwan and the main control factors including angle of slope, stratum, attitude of joints. In addition, drilling data, such as hydraulic conductivity, strength, friction angle and cohesion, are utilized to discuss mechanism and dominant factors of dip slope failure caused by uplift groundwater in vertical joints. UDEC(Universal Distinct Element Code) which is particularly well suited to problems involving jointed media and has been used extensively in stability analysis of jointed rock slopes is utilized in this study. The influence of external factors such as groundwater pressure on block sliding and deformation can also be simulated in UDEC. When the results from numerical simulation fit the condition of slope failure on the roadside of Formosa Freeway, the influence of prestress dissipating in anchors on slope stability is considered subsequently. Finally, simulation results by UDEC are compared with previous research results by FLAC, and discuss the difference between each other.

  2. Simulation of Reclaimed-Water Injection and Pumping Scenarios and Particle-Tracking Analysis near Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkewich, Matthew D.; Campbell, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of injecting reclaimed water into the Middendorf aquifer beneath Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, was simulated using a groundwater-flow model of the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province of South Carolina and parts of Georgia and North Carolina. Reclaimed water, also known as recycled water, is wastewater or stormwater that has been treated to an appropriate level so that the water can be reused. The scenarios were simulated to evaluate potential changes in groundwater flow and groundwater-level conditions caused by injecting reclaimed water into the Middendorf aquifer. Simulations included a Base Case and two injection scenarios. Maximum pumping rates were simulated as 6.65, 8.50, and 10.5 million gallons per day for the Base Case, Scenario 1, and Scenario 2, respectively. The Base Case simulation represents a non-injection estimate of the year 2050 groundwater levels for comparison purposes for the two injection scenarios. For Scenarios 1 and 2, the simulated injection of reclaimed water at 3 million gallons per day begins in 2012 and continues through 2050. The flow paths and time of travel for the injected reclaimed water were simulated using particle-tracking analysis. The simulations indicated a general decline of groundwater altitudes in the Middendorf aquifer in the Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, area between 2004 and 2050 for the Base Case and two injection scenarios. For the Base Case, groundwater altitudes generally declined about 90 feet from the 2004 groundwater levels. For Scenarios 1 and 2, although groundwater altitudes initially increased in the Mount Pleasant area because of the simulated injection, these higher groundwater levels declined as Mount Pleasant Waterworks pumping increased over time. When compared to the Base Case simulation, 2050 groundwater altitudes for Scenario 1 are between 15 feet lower to 23 feet higher for production wells, between 41 and 77 feet higher for the injection wells, and between 9 and 23 feet higher for

  3. SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

    2013-09-30

    scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In this case the ''booster pump'' is an Adixen Molecular Drag Pump (MDP 5011) and the backing pump is an Edwards (nXDS15iC) scroll pump. Various configurations of the two pumps and associated lengths of 3/4 inch tubing (0 feet to 300 feet) were used in combination with hydrogen and nitrogen flow rates ranging from 25-400 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) to determine whether the proposed pump configuration meets the design criteria for SHINE. The results of this study indicate that even under the most severe conditions (300 feet of tubing and 400 sccm flow rate) the Adixen 5011 MDP can serve as a booster pump to transport gases from the accelerator (NDAS) to the TPS. The Target Gas Receiving System pump (Edwards nXDS15iC) located approximately 300 feet from the accelerator can effectively back the Adixen MDP. The molecular drag pump was able to maintain its full rotational speed even when the flow rate was 400 sccm hydrogen or nitrogen and 300 feet of tubing was installed between the drag pump and the Edwards scroll pump. In addition to maintaining adequate rotation, the pressure in the system was maintained below the target pressure of 30 torr for all flow rates, lengths of tubing, and process gases. This configuration is therefore adequate to meet the SHINE design requirements in terms of flow and pressure.

  4. Penis Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... claim that they can be used to increase penis size, but there's no evidence that they work for ... circumstances, using a penis pump might help your penis maintain its natural size and shape after prostate surgery or if you ...

  5. Smart Markets for Transferable Pumping Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, N.; Young, R.

    2016-12-01

    While no national policy on groundwater use exists in the United States, local groundwater management is emerging across the country in response to concerns and conflicts over declining well yields, land subsidence, and the depletion of hydrologically connected surface waters. Management strategies include well drilling moratoria, pumping restrictions, and restrictions on the expansion of irrigated land. To provide flexibility to groundwater users, local regulatory authorities increasingly have begun to allow the transfer of groundwater rights as a cost-effective management tool. Markets can be a versatile risk management tool, helping communities to cope with scarcity, to meet goals for sustainability, and to grow resilient local economies. For example, active groundwater rights transfers exist in the High Plains region of the United States. Yet, several barriers to trade exist: high search costs for interested parties, complicated requirements for regulatory compliance, and reluctance to share sensitive financial information. Additionally, groundwater pumping leads to several kinds of spatial and intertemporal externalities such as stream depletion. Indeed, groundwater management schemes that reallocate water between alternate pumping locations are often explicitly designed to change the distribution and magnitude of pumping externalities. Reallocation may be designed to minimize unwanted impacts on third parties or to encourage trades that reduce the magnitude of externalities. We discuss how smart markets can deal with complex biophysical constraints while also encouraging active trading, therefore ensuring local goals for aquifer sustainability while growing local economies. Smart markets address these issues by providing a centralized hub for trading, automating the process of regulatory compliance by only matching buyers and sellers eligible to trade as specified in the regulations, and maintaining anonymous, confidential bidding.

  6. A peculiar case of coastal springs and geogenic saline groundwater: the Santa Cesarea Terme thermal springs (Southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Polemio; P. P. Limoni; Liotta, D; Palladino, G; Santaloia, F.; Zuffianò, L.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate aquifers, located in foreland tectonic settings, could represent important thermal water resources outside the volcanic areas, supplying spas or geothermal installations. Thermal springs constitute the discharge areas of deep marine and continental groundwaters flowing within these carbonate aquifers whose hydraulic conductivity and the relevant geothermal fluid migration are strictly controlled by both the discontinuity network and the karst processes involving the foreland environ...

  7. Groundwater recharge estimation in semi-arid zone: a study case from the region of Djelfa (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Rahmani, S. E.; Chibane, Brahim; Boucefiène, Abdelkader

    2017-09-01

    Deficiency of surface water resources in semi-arid area makes the groundwater the most preferred resource to assure population increased needs. In this research we are going to quantify the rate of groundwater recharge using new hybrid model tack in interest the annual rainfall and the average annual temperature and the geological characteristics of the area. This hybrid model was tested and calibrated using a chemical tracer method called Chloride mass balance method (CMB). This hybrid model is a combination between general hydrogeological model and a hydrological model. We have tested this model in an aquifer complex in the region of Djelfa (Algeria). Performance of this model was verified by five criteria [Nash, mean absolute error (MAE), Root mean square error (RMSE), the coefficient of determination and the arithmetic mean error (AME)]. These new approximations facilitate the groundwater management in semi-arid areas; this model is a perfection and amelioration of the model developed by Chibane et al. This model gives a very interesting result, with low uncertainty. A new recharge class diagram was established by our model to get rapidly and quickly the groundwater recharge value for any area in semi-arid region, using temperature and rainfall.

  8. Spin-pumping and spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) at transition metal interfaces: case of (Co/Pt) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffres, Henri; George, Jean-Marie; Laczowski, Piotr; Reyren, Nicolas; Vila, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Spintronic phenomena are made possible via the diffusion of spin-currents or the generation of spin-accumulation. Spinorbitronics uses the electronic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and emerges as a new route to create spin-currents in the transverse direction of the charge flow. This is made possible via the intrinsic spin Hall conduction (SHE) of heavy metals or extrinsic spin-Hall effect of metallic alloys. SHE borrows its concept from the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) where the relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) promotes an asymmetric deflection of the spin-current. SHE is now at the base of magnetization commutation and domain wall moving via spin-orbit torque (SOT) and spin-transfer torque operations in the FMR regime. However, the exact anatomy of SOT at spin-orbit active interfaces like Co/Pt is still missing. In the case of Pt, recent studies have put forward the major role played by i) the spin-memory loss (SML) and the electronic transparency at 3d/5d interfaces and ii) the inhomogeneity of the conductivity in the current-in-plane (CIP) geometry to explain the discrepancy in the SHE. Ingredients to consider then are the profiles of both the conductivity and spin-current across the multilayers and spin-transmission. In this talk, we will present robust SMR measurements observed on NiCo/Pt multilayer stacks characterized by a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). The SMR occurs for both in-plane magnetization rotation or from nominal out-of-plane to the in-plane direction transverse to the current flow. This clearly departs from standard AMR or pure interfacial anisotropic-AMR symmetries. We analyze in large details our SMR signals for the whole series of samples owing to two main guidelines: i) we consider the exact conductivity profile across the multilayers, in particular near the Co/Pt interface, via the Camley-Barnas approach and ii) we derive the spin current profile generated by SHE along the perpendicular direction responsible for SMR. We consider

  9. Integration of 100% heat pumps and electric vehicles in the low voltage distribution network: A Danish case story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Nan; You, Shi; Segerberg, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The existing electricity infrastructure may to a great extent limit a high penetration of micro-sized Distributed Energy Rescores (DERs), due to physical bottlenecks, e.g. load capacities of cables and transformers and voltage limitations. In this study, integration impacts of heat pumps (HPs...

  10. Use of geochemical and isotope tracers to assess groundwater dependency of a terrestrial ecosystem: case study from southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Anna J.; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at better understanding of the functioning of groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) located in the south of Poland. The studied GDTE consists of a valuable forest stand (Niepolomice Forest) and associated wetland (Wielkie Bloto fen). It relies not only on shallow, unconfined aquifer but indirectly also on groundwater originating from the deeper confined aquifer, underlying the Quaternary cover and separated from it by an aquitard of variable thickness. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the contribution of groundwater to the water balance of the studied GDTE and thereby assess the potential risk to this system associated with intense exploitation of the deeper aquifer. The Wielkie Błoto fen area and the adjacent parts of Niepolomice Forest are drained by the Dluga Woda stream with 8.2 km2 of gauged catchment area. Hydrometric measurements, carried out on the Dluga Woda stream over two-year period (August 2011 - August 2013) were supplemented by chemical and isotope analyses of stream water, monitored on monthly basis. Physico-chemical parameters of the stream water (SEC, pH, Na content, Na/Cl molar ratio) and isotope tracers (deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium) were used to quantify the expected contribution of groundwater seepage from the deeper aquifer to the water balance of the Dluga Woda catchment. The mean transit time of water through the catchment, derived from temporal variations of δ18O and tritium content in the Dluga Woda stream, was in the order of three months. This fast component of the total discharge of Dluga Woda stream is associated surface runoff and groundwater flow paths through the Quaternary cover. The slow component devoid of tritium and probably originated from the deeper Neogene aquifer is equal to approximately 30% of the total discharge. The relationships between the physico-chemical parameters of the stream water and the flow rate of Dluga Woda clearly indicate that the monitored

  11. Modelling regional transport of pesticide residues in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Beltman, W.H.J.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Matser, A.M.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    1996-01-01

    The movement of pesticides through soil and groundwater to pumping wells for drinking-water supply was modelled. Most of the retardation and transformation occurs when a pesticide moves through the unsaturated zone. Computed leaching to groundwater increased when soil heterogeneity was taken into

  12. SR-Site - sulphide content in the groundwater at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullborg, E-L (Terralogica (Sweden)); Smellie, J (Conterra (Sweden)); Nilsson, A-Ch (Geosigma (Sweden)); Gimeno, M J; Auque, LF (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain)); Bruchert, V (Stockholms Universitet (Sweden)); Molinero, J (Amphos21 (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    during the monitoring phase. When both CCC and monitoring values are available from one borehole section two values are used, one representing each of the sampling methods. When time series are measured in the monitoring sections, in most cases the sulphide values are higher in the downhole tubing and in the borehole section compared with groundwater from the surrounding fractures. The routinely carried out removal of five borehole section water volumes prior to monitoring are in most cases inadequate to obtain representative samples from the bedrock fractures, i.e. without elevated sulphide due to contamination from the initial stagnant water from the borehole section. It is, however, assumed that the two groundwater samples from the same water conducting structures, i.e. the sample from the monitoring and the sample from the CCC sampling, the latter usually showing lower sulphide, spans the interval of representative sulphide values in the formation water. For most of the CCC and monitoring sections the last sample in the time series is suggested as representing the 'best possible' value. It is worth noting that the plug flow calculations have proven to be very useful in order to judge the water volumes needed to be pumped at each monitored section before obtaining a sample sufficiently representative of the fracture groundwater. Practically all sulphide concentrations at Forsmark are <= 0.013 mmol/L (approx0.4 mg/L). There is, however, a probability that for some deposition location in the repository the surrounding groundwaters may have sulphide concentrations as high as 0.12 mmol/L (approx4 mg/L). In order to estimate canister corrosion rates in the SR-Site during a full glacial cycle, it is recommended that the observed distribution of sulphide in groundwaters at Forsmark during the present temperate conditions should be used. Furthermore, it should be noted that the present sulphide concentrations have been sampled after a recent period of possible

  13. Integrating urban recharge uncertainty into standard groundwater modeling practice: A case study on water main break predictions for the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Austin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, K.; Teasley, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater models serve as integral tools for understanding flow processes and informing stakeholders and policy makers in management decisions. Historically, these models tended towards a deterministic nature, relying on historical data to predict and inform future decisions based on model outputs. This research works towards developing a stochastic method of modeling recharge inputs from pipe main break predictions in an existing groundwater model, which subsequently generates desired outputs incorporating future uncertainty rather than deterministic data. The case study for this research is the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer near Austin, Texas. Researchers and water resource professionals have modeled the Edwards Aquifer for decades due to its high water quality, fragile ecosystem, and stakeholder interest. The original case study and model that this research is built upon was developed as a co-design problem with regional stakeholders and the model outcomes are generated specifically for communication with policy makers and managers. Recently, research in the Barton Springs segment demonstrated a significant contribution of urban, or anthropogenic, recharge to the aquifer, particularly during dry period, using deterministic data sets. Due to social and ecological importance of urban water loss to recharge, this study develops an evaluation method to help predicted pipe breaks and their related recharge contribution within the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer. To benefit groundwater management decision processes, the performance measures captured in the model results, such as springflow, head levels, storage, and others, were determined by previous work in elicitation of problem framing to determine stakeholder interests and concerns. The results of the previous deterministic model and the stochastic model are compared to determine gains to stakeholder knowledge through the additional modeling

  14. Off-Pump Triple Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in a Patient with Situs Inversus Totalis: Case Presentation and a Brief Review of the Brazilian and the International Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigyo, Carlos Junior Toshiyuki; Batalini, Felipe; Murakami, Alexandre Noboru; Teruya, Rogério Toshio; Gregori Júnior, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with situs inversus totalis underwent a successful off-pump three-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged 8 days later. At 9-month follow-up a coronary computed tomography angiography confirmed the viability of all of the grafts, and one year after the operation the patient remained asymptomatic. It comprises the fifth Brazilian case of a coronary surgery in a patient with situs inversus totalis and the first one of the country of a coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of the cardiopulmonary bypass in this condition. PMID:27556323

  15. Proton pump inhibitor use and fracture risk - effect modification by histamine H1 receptor blockade. Observational case-control study using National Prescription Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Vestergaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It remains unknown why proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use may be associated with risk of osteoporotic fractures; evidence of direct effects on calcium absorption or on the osteoclast in humans is weak or absent. However, the ensuing increased gastrin levels may cause histamine production through...... hypertrophy of gastric enterochromaffin like cells, which could lead to bone loss. We speculated that H1 receptor antagonists (H1RA) used for allergies would then reduce the effect of PPI on bone. We therefore conducted a register-based case-control study comprising 124,655 patients with hospital treated...

  16. KRIGING METHOD OF STUDY OF THE GROUNDWATER QUALITY USED FOR IRRIGATION - CASE OF WADI DJENDJEN PLAIN (NORTH-EAST ALGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boufekane

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater of wadi Djendjen plain (Jijel, North-East Algeria have always been used as drinking water supply in the cities and the irrigation of agricultural lands.¶ This confers this aquifer, which has already been the subject of numerous hydrogeological studies, a particular interest in terms of qualitative and quantitative monitoring. Its exploitation is today encountering excessive salinity problems, evidenced by measurements of the electrical conductivity of the water and the alkalinisation of soils.¶ This degradation of the environment results, among others, from ion exchange which involves cations (sodium, calcium and magnesium, water / clay interaction as reflected by the sodium absorption ratio (SAR.¶Analyses on samples of groundwater destined for irrigation and the application of a geostatistical approach have enabled to map the most affected zones by this phenomenon.¶

  17. Building America Case Study: Indoor Heat Pump Water Heaters During Summer in a Hot-Dry Climate, Redding, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Hoeschele, M. Seitzler

    2017-06-01

    Heat pump water heaters offer a significant opportunity to improve water heating performance for the over 40% of U.S. households that heat domestic hot water using electric resistance storage water heaters. Numerous field studies have also been completed documenting performance in a variety of climates and applications. More recent evaluation efforts have focused attention on the performance of May through September 2014, with ongoing winter monitoring being sponsored by California utility partners.

  18. Evaluation of groundwater vulnerability in El-Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, using modelling and GIS techniques: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, M. H.; El Osta, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The Nubian Sandstone Aquifer (NSSA) is the main groundwater resource of the El-Bahariya Oasis, which is located in the middle of the Western Desert of Egypt. This aquifer is composed mainly of continental clastic sediments of sandstone with shale and clay intercalations of saturated thickness ranging between 100 and 1500 m. Vulnerability assessment to delineate areas that are more susceptible to contamination from anthropogenic sources has become an important element for sustainable resources management and land use planning. Accordingly, this research aims to estimate the vulnerability of NSSA by applying the DRASTIC model as well as utilising sensitivity analyses to evaluate the relative importance of the model parameters for aquifer vulnerability in the study area. The main objective is to demonstrate the combined use of the DRASTIC and the GIS techniques as an effective method for groundwater pollution risk assessment, and mapping the areas that are prone to deterioration of groundwater quality and quantity. Based on DRASTIC index (DI) values, a groundwater vulnerability map was produced using the GIS. The aquifer analysis in the study area highlighted the following key points: the northeastern and western parts of the NSSA were dominated by `High' vulnerability classes while the northwestern and southeastern parts were characterised by `Medium' vulnerability classes. The elevated central part of the study area displayed `Low' aquifer vulnerability. The vulnerability map shows a relatively greater risk imposed on the northeastern part of the NSSA due to the larger pollution potential of intensive vegetable cultivation. Depth-to-water, topography and hydraulic conductivity parameters were found to be more effective in assessing aquifer vulnerability.

  19. Evaluation of groundwater vulnerability in El-Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, using modelling and GIS techniques: A case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Masoud; M M El Osta

    2016-08-01

    The Nubian Sandstone Aquifer (NSSA) is the main groundwater resource of the El-Bahariya Oasis, which is located in the middle of the Western Desert of Egypt. This aquifer is composed mainly of continental clastic sediments of sandstone with shale and clay intercalations of saturated thickness ranging between 100 and 1500 m. Vulnerability assessment to delineate areas that are more susceptible to contamination from anthropogenic sources has become an important element for sustainable resources management and land use planning. Accordingly, this research aims to estimate the vulnerability of NSSA by applying the DRASTIC model as well as utilising sensitivity analyses to evaluate the relative importance of the model parameters for aquifer vulnerability in the study area. The main objective is to demonstrate the combined use of the DRASTIC and the GIS techniques as an effective method for groundwater pollution risk assessment, and mapping the areas that are prone to deterioration of groundwater quality and quantity. Based on DRASTIC index (DI) values, a groundwater vulnerability map was produced usingthe GIS. The aquifer analysis in the study area highlighted the following key points: the northeastern and western parts of the NSSA were dominated by ‘High’ vulnerability classes while the northwestern and southeastern parts were characterised by ‘Medium’ vulnerability classes. The elevated central partof the study area displayed ‘Low’ aquifer vulnerability. The vulnerability map shows a relatively greater risk imposed on the northeastern part of the NSSA due to the larger pollution potential of intensive vegetable cultivation. Depth-to-water, topography and hydraulic conductivity parameters were found to be more effective in assessing aquifer vulnerability.

  20. Application of groundwater thresholds for trace elements on percolation water: a case study on percolation water from Northern German lowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbersen, L; Duijnisveld, W H M; Utermann, J; Gäbler, H-E; Kuhnt, G; Böttcher, J

    2012-01-01

    The German insignificance thresholds (GFS) for groundwater, derived with an added risk approach, will soon be adopted as trigger values for percolation water entering groundwater. The physicochemical properties of the vadose zone differ considerably from those of groundwater, which may lead to difficulties in the applicability of groundwater-derived GFS to percolation water. To test the applicability of the GFS to percolation water regarding the concentration level and the field-scale variability, 46 sites in Northern Germany were sampled, including arable land, grassland, and forest, situated on three spatially dominant parent materials: sand, glacial loam, and loess. Concentrations of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, Zn, and F were analyzed in percolation water from the transition between the unsaturated to the saturated zone. We compared median and 90th percentile values of the background concentrations with the GFS. In more than 10% of all samples, background concentrations of Cd, Co, Ni, V, or Zn exceeded the GFS. We evaluated the applicability of the GFS on field-scale medians of background concentrations taking field-scale interquartile distance and the bootstrap percentile confidence interval of the field scale median of trace element background concentrations into consideration. Statements about exceedance or nonexceedance of GFS values could only be made with acceptable statistical uncertainty (α ≤ 0.1) when operational median concentrations were about one third higher or lower than the corresponding GFS. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Integrated socio-hydrogeological approach to tackle nitrate contamination in groundwater resources. The case of Grombalia Basin (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, V; Sacchi, E; Kammoun, S; Tringali, C; Trabelsi, R; Zouari, K; Daniele, S

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate contamination still remains one of the main groundwater quality issues in several aquifers worldwide, despite the perduring efforts of the international scientific community to effectively tackle this problem. The classical hydrogeological and isotopic investigations are obviously of paramount importance for the characterization of contaminant sources, but are clearly not sufficient for the correct and long-term protection of groundwater resources. This paper aims at demonstrating the effectiveness of the socio-hydrogeological approach as the best tool to tackle groundwater quality issues, while contributing bridging the gap between science and society. An integrated survey, including land use, hydrochemical (physicochemical parameters and major ions) and isotopic (δ(15)NNO3 and δ(18)ONO3) analyses, coupled to capacity building and participatory activities was carried out to correctly attribute the nitrate origin in groundwater from the Grombalia Basin (North Tunisia), a region where only synthetic fertilizers have been generally identified as the main source of such pollution. Results demonstrates that the basin is characterized by high nitrate concentrations, often exceeding the statutory limits for drinking water, in both the shallow and deep aquifers, whereas sources are associated to both agricultural and urban activities. The public participation of local actors proved to be a fundamental element for the development of the hydrogeological investigation, as it permitted to obtain relevant information to support data interpretation, and eventually guaranteed the correct assessment of contaminant sources in the studied area. In addition, such activity, if adequately transferred to regulators, will ensure the effective adoption of management practices based on the research outcomes and tailored on the real needs of the local population, proving the added value to include it in any integrated investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Estimating the benefits of land imagery in environmental applications: a case study in nonpoint source pollution of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, Richard L.; Forney, William M.; Raunikar, Ronald P.; Mishra, Shruti K.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Maccauley, Molly K.

    2012-01-01

    Moderate-resolution land imagery (MRLI) is crucial to a more complete assessment of the cumulative, landscape-level effect of agricultural land use and land cover on environmental quality. If this improved assessment yields a net social benefit, then that benefit reflects the value of information (VOI) from MRLI. Environmental quality and the capacity to provide ecosystem services evolve because of human actions, changing natural conditions, and their interaction with natural physical processes. The human actions, in turn, are constrained and redirected by many institutions and regulations such as agricultural, energy, and environmental policies. We present a general framework for bringing together sociologic, biologic, physical, hydrologic, and geologic processes at meaningful scales to interpret environmental implications of MRLI applications. We set out a specific application using MRLI observations to identify crop planting patterns and thus estimate surface management activities that influence groundwater resources over a regional landscape. We tailor the application to the characteristics of nonpoint source groundwater pollution hazards in Iowa to illustrate a general framework in a land use-hydrologic-economic system. In the example, MRLI VOI derives from reducing the risk of both losses to agricultural production and damage to human health and other consequences of contaminated groundwater.

  3. Village environs as source of nitrate contamination in groundwater: a case study in basaltic geo-environment in central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D V; Nagabhushanam, P; Peters, Edward

    2011-03-01

    Nitrate is one of the common contaminants in the present day groundwaters resulting from increased population associated with poor sanitary conditions in the habitat area and increased agricultural activity. The hydrochemical measurements on water samples from a virgin watershed, situated in the basaltic geo-environment, have become necessary as the groundwater is the only source of drinking water for the villagers of the area. High preferential recharge conditions prevail in the area due to fractures in the solid basaltic lava flows. Instead of dilution due to fresh recharge, the post-monsoon hydrochemical concentrations in the groundwater are observed to have increased probably due to fast migration of pollutants to the aquifer through preferential recharge. As a result, the deep aquifer waters are more contaminated with hazardous nitrate than the shallow waters. Further, the village environ wells are more polluted with nitrate than the agriculture areas which could be attributed to the unhygienic sanitary conditions and livestock waste dump pits in the villages. This study suggests proper management of the sewage system and creation of suitable dump yard for the livestock and household waste to minimize the level of nitrate pollution in the well waters of village environs.

  4. Assessment of groundwater quality for irrigation: a case study from Bandalamottu lead mining area, Guntur District, Andhra Pradesh, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, A.; Sunil Kumar, K.; Thejaswi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Quality of water resources in the Bandalamottu area of Guntur District of Andhra Pradesh in South India is facing a serious challenge due to Pb mining. Therefore, 40 groundwater samples were collected from this area to assess their hydrogeochemistry and suitability for irrigation purposes. The groundwater samples were analyzed for distribution of chemical elements Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, HCO3 -, CO3 2-, F-, Cl-, and SO4 2-. It also includes pH, electrical conductivity, total hardness, non-carbonate hardness and total alkalinity. The parameters, such as sodium absorption ratio (SAR), adjusted SAR, sodium percentage, potential salinity, residual sodium carbonate, non-carbonate hardness, Kelly's ratio, magnesium ratio, permeability index, indices of base exchange (IBE) and Gibbs ratio were also calculated. The major hydrochemical facieses were Ca-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3 and Ca-Mg-Cl types. The result of saturation index calculated by Visual MINTEQ software combined with Gibbs diagram and IBE findings indicate that, dolomite and calcite dissolution and reverse ion exchange can be a major process controlling the water chemistry in the study area. The results also showed that the salinity (85 %, C3 class) and alkalinity due to high concentration of HCO3 - and CO3 - and low Ca:Mg molar ratio (97.5 %, <1), are the major problems with water for irrigation usage. As a result, the quality of the groundwater is not suitable for sustainable crop production and soil health without appropriate remediation.

  5. Estimating the hydrogeological parameters of an unconfined aquifer with the time-lapse resistivity-imaging method during pumping tests: Case studies at the Pengtsuo and Dajou sites, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ping-Yu; Chang, Lian-Cheng; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Wen-Fu

    2017-09-01

    We conducted time-lapse resistivity imaging during pumping tests at the Pengtsuo and Dajou test sites in Taiwan in order to examine the feasibility of estimating hydrogeological parameters with resistivity variations. Core logs reveal that the subsurface consists mainly of at least 100-m-thick gravel and sand at the two test sites. The resistivity differences between the pumping stages and pre-pumping background are well correlated to water level changes that are due to the dewatering of pumping activity. Therefore, it is possible to use the geometry of resistivity anomalies to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer using the distance-drawdown equation for pumping tests in unsaturated aquifers. For each site, we used the contours of resistivity variations and recorded water levels in the pumping well to depict the bottom of the drawdown cone. The estimated hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, respectively, are 1.33 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.12 at the Pengtsuo site, and are 2.50 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.22 at the Dajou site. These values are consistent with the parameters that engineers from Taiwan Sugar Company calculated previously regarding groundwater-level variations in multiple wells (9.65 × 10- 5 m/s and 0.13 at Pengtsuo, and 1.00 × 10- 3 m/s and 0.19 at Dajou). This consistency suggests that resistivity imaging can perhaps serve as an alternative way to yield information about hydrogeological parameters.

  6. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  7. groundwater contribution to crop water requirement groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Groundwater, water table, capillary rise, soil type, waterleaf, ... GROUNDWATER CONTRIBUTION TO WATERLEAF (TALINUM TRIANGULARE) IN OXISOLS, I. J. ... Nutritionally, ... information to facilitate increased crop production,.

  8. Water Quality Pollution Indices to Assess the Heavy Metal Contamination, Case Study: Groundwater Resources of Asadabad Plain In 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Sobhan Ardakani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Due to the increasing pollution of water resources, tow documented methods: the Heavy metal potential index (HPI and the Heavy metal evaluation index (HEI were evaluated for their suitability for contamination monitoring of heavy metals (As, Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu contamination in groundwater resources of Asadabad Plain during spring and summer in 2012. Materials & Methods: In this analytical observational study, concentrations of heavy metals have been evaluated at 30 important groundwater sampling stations. For this purpose, collect samples in pre-cleaned, acid-soaked polyethylene bottles. Add 2 mL conc HNO3/L sample and mix well. Cap tightly and store in refrigerator until ready for analysis. Metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma- optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. Results: The results showed that mean concentrations of As, Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in groundwater samples in spring season were 52.53±13.62, 15.51±23.45, 10.10±2.80, 4.48±1.80 and 8.63±10.87 μg l−1, respectively and in summer season were 57.60±16.90, 14.99±17.66, 9.28±2.46, 4.57±1.73 and 10.45±10.30 μg l−1, respectively. Therefore the mean values of indices in samples from spring and summer seasons were 25.61 and 27.28 respectively for HPI and were 9.29 and 8.88 respectively for HEI, and indicates low contamination levels. Comparing the mean concentrations of the evaluated metals with WHO permissible limits showed a significant difference (P<0.05. Thus, the mean concentrations of the metals were significantly lower than the permissible limits. Conclusions: Despite of the heavy metal pollution of the groundwater resources in Asadabad Plain is lower than WHO permissible limits, but the irregular and long-term usage of agricultural inputs, use of wastewater and sewage sludge in agriculture, over use of organic fertilizers and establishment of pollutant industries can threaten the groundwater resources of this

  9. Evaluation of groundwater quality in rural-areas of northern Malawi: Case of Zombwe Extension Planning Area in Mzimba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidya, Russel C. G.; Matamula, Swithern; Nakoma, Oliver; Chawinga, Charles B. J.

    2016-06-01

    Many people in in the Sub-Saharan region rely on groundwater for drinking and other household uses. Despite this significance, information on the chemical composition of the water in the boreholes and emperical data on groundwater quality is limited in some rural areas of Malawi. This study was conducted to evaluate the physico-chemical quality of water from boreholes (n = 20) in Zombwe Extension Planning Area (EPA), Mzimba in Northern Malawi to ascertain their safety. Desktop studies and participatory approaches were employed to assess the socio-economic activities and water supply regime in the study areas. The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity (EC), turbidity, water temperature, nitrate (NO3-), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), fluoride (F-), and sulphate (SO42-). In-situ and laboratory analyses were carried out using portable meters and standard procedures. The results were compared with national (Malawi Bureau of Standards - MBS) and international standards (World Health Organization - WHO) for drinking water. The following ranges were obtained: pH (6.00-7.80), EC (437-3128 μS/cm), turbidity (0.10-5.80 NTU), water temperature (27.0-30.60 °C), NO3- (0.30-30.00 mg/L), F- (0.10-8.10 mg/L), Mg (31.00-91.00 mg/L), Ca (20.00-197.10 mg/L), SO42- (10.20-190 mg/L), Fe (0.10-3.60 mg/L) and Zn (0.00-5.10 mg/L). Generally, some parameters tested at several sites (>80%, n = 20) complied with both MBS and WHO limits. No significant differences (p > 0.05) was observed for most parameters (>65%, n = 11). Groundwater contamination was not significant in the area despite some parameters like F-, Ca and SO42- showing higher levels at other sites. Some sites registered very hard water (244.60-757.80 mg/L CaCO3) probably due to mineralization influenced by underground rock material. Further studies are needed to ascertain the groundwater quality of other parameters (like F-, and SO42-) which registered higher levels at some sites. Routine monitoring of the

  10. Performance Assessment for Pump-and-Treat Closure or Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Christian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Becker, Dave J. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental and Munitions Center of Expertise, Huntsville, AL (United States); Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nimmons, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    A structured performance assessment approach is useful to evaluate pump-and-treat (P&T) groundwater remediation, which has been applied at numerous sites. Consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Groundwater Road Map, performance assessment during remedy implementation may be needed, and should consider remedy optimization, transition to alternative remedies, or remedy closure. In addition, a recent National Research Council study examined groundwater remediation at complex contaminated sites and concluded that it may be beneficial to evaluate remedy performance and the potential need for transition to alternative approaches at these sites. The intent of this document is to provide a structured approach for assessing P&T performance to support a decision to optimize, transition, or close a P&T remedy. The process presented in this document for gathering information and performing evaluations to support P&T remedy decisions includes use of decision elements to distinguish between potential outcomes of a remedy decision. Case studies are used to augment descriptions of decision elements and to illustrate each type of outcome identified in the performance assessment approach. The document provides references to resources for tools and other guidance relevant to conducting the P&T assessment.

  11. Groundwater and Surface Water Availability via a Joint Simulation with a Double Control of Water Quantity and Ecologically Ideal Shallow Groundwater Depth: A Case Study on the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihua Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint assessment of groundwater-surface water resources can help develop sustainable regional water management plans for intensive agriculture. In this study, we estimated allowable groundwater and surface water quantities using a water balance model, WetSpass-GMS, for the Sanjiang Plain (10.9 × 104 km2, one of the most important grain production bases in China. We then applied a double control based on the groundwater availability and the concept of an ecologically ideal shallow groundwater depth (EISGD to three different water use scenarios: (A continuation of the current water use management; (B maximal use of water resources under a double control; and (C irrigation of 266.7 × 104 hectares that are suitable for rice cultivation. We found an annual allowable surface water quantity of 4.71 billion cubic meters for the region and an annual exploitable groundwater quantity of 4.65 billion cubic meters under full consideration of water requirements, i.e., sustaining river base flow, necessary riverine sediment transport, and ecological water supplies for wetlands and reservoirs. Our simulation results showed that for Scenario A, groundwater level in the region would continue falling, and that the groundwater levels in wet, normal and dry years would drop below the EISGD level in 2028, 2023 and 2019, respectively. For Scenario B, groundwater and surface water would be able to support rice paddies of 219.7 × 104 hectares, 212.7 × 104 hectares, and 209.3 × 104 hectares during wet, normal and dry years, respectively. For Scenario C, future demands on groundwater and surface water under wet, dry and normal years would all exceed their allowable supplies. Overall, this study indicates that integrated management plans promoting an increase of surface water use and a reduction in irrigation with groundwater should be developed for sustainable agriculture and ecological preservation on the Sanjiang Plain.

  12. MODFLOW-NWT model used to assess groundwater availability in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system from Long Island, New York to North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A three-dimensional, groundwater flow model was developed with the numerical code MODFLOW-NWT to represent changes in groundwater pumping and aquifer recharge in the...

  13. Pumps; Pumpen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Praktische Energiekunde e.V., Muenchen (Germany). Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft; Hellriegel, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Praktische Energiekunde e.V., Muenchen (Germany). Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft; Pfitzner, G. [Gesellschaft fuer Praktische Energiekunde e.V., Muenchen (Germany). Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft

    1994-11-01

    The technical features of commercial pump types are described with regard to their technical, energy-related and economic parameters, and characteristic data are presented in the form of data sheets. This is to provide a basis for a comparative assessment of different technologies and technical variants. The chapter `System specifications` describes the various fields of application of pumps and the resulting specific requirements. The design and function of the different pump types are described in `Technical description`. `System and plant description dscribes the design and adaptation of pumps, i.e. the adaptation of the plant data to the system requirements. `Data compilation` provides a survey of the types and systematics of the compiled data as well as a decision aid for selecting the pumps best suited to the various applications. The `Data sheet` section describes the structure and handling of the data sheets as well as the data contained therein. The data sheets are contained in the apapendix of this report. The section `General analysis` compares typical technical, energy-related and economic characteristics of the different pump types. This is to enable a rough comparison of pump types and to facilitate decisions. The chapter `Example` illustrates the use of the data sheets by means of a selected example. (orig./GL) [Deutsch] Die vorliegende Arbeit hat zum Ziel, Technik seriengefertigter und marktgaengiger Pumpen in typisierter Form hinsichtlich ihrer technischen, energetischen und wirtschaftlichen Parameter zu beschreiben und ihre charakteristischen Kennwerte in Datenblaettern abzubilden. Damit wird ein grundlegendes Instrument fuer die vergleichende Beurteilung unterschiedlicher Techniken bzw. Technikvarianten hinsichtlich energetischer und wirtschaftlicher Kriterien geschaffen. Im Abschnitt `Systemanforderungen` erfolgt die Beschreibung der einzelnen Anwendungsbereiche fuer Pumpen mit den speziellen daraus resultierenden Anforderungen. Der Aufbau und

  14. Efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint disorder. Correlation between arthrographic findings using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use and mouth opening distance in 20 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Kazuya; Uehara, Tamotsu; Arai, Yoshinori; Kashima, Masahiro; Tsukimura, Naoki; Honda, Masahiko; Iwai, Kazuo; Terakado, Masaaki; Shinoda, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pumping manipulation treatment for closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder using limited cone beam X-ray CT for dental use. The subjects were 20 patients with TMJ closed lock. Arthrography and pumping manipulation treatment were performed, and the correlation between maximal mouth opening and arthrographic findings was examined. Arthrography showed 16 cases of anterior disk displacement, and 4 cases of sideways displacement. Disk configuration showed 15 abnormal cases and 3 cases of disk perforation. Before treatment, mouth opening distance was 24.2 mm and 1 week after treatment it was 34.4 mm. After 3 months this had improved significantly to 41.0 mm. Comparison of mouth opening distance with arthrographic findings showed that disk perforation was significantly different after 3 months. These results suggest that pumping manipulation treatment might be useful in patients with TMJ closed lock without internal derangement or disk perforation. (author)

  15. Security risk of medical devices in IT networks: the case of an infusion and infusion syringe pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackmuß, Jenny; Möller, Thomas; Pommerien, Wilfried; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, wearable and implantable medical devices are being increasingly deployed to improve diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy for various medical conditions. Compared to other types of electronics and computing systems, security attacks on these medical devices have extreme consequences and must be carefully analyzed and prevented with strongest efforts. Often, the security vulnerabilities of such systems are not well understood or underestimated. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate security attacks that can easily be done in the laboratory on a popular infusion pump on the market, and also propose defenses against such attacks.

  16. Development and application of a comprehensive simulation model to evaluate impacts of watershed structures and irrigation water use on streamflow and groundwater: The case of Wet Walnut Creek Watershed, Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramireddygari, S.R.; Sophocleous, M.A.; Koelliker, J.K.; Perkins, S.P.; Govindaraju, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive modeling study of surface and groundwater systems, including stream-aquifer interactions, for the Wet Walnut Creek Watershed in west-central Kansas. The main objective of this study was to assess the impacts of watershed structures and irrigation water use on streamflow and groundwater levels, which in turn affect availability of water for the Cheyenne Bottoms Wildlife Refuge Management area. The surface-water flow model, POTYLDR, and the groundwater flow model, MODFLOW, were combined into an integrated, watershed-scale, continuous simulation model. Major revisions and enhancements were made to the POTYLDR and MODFLOW models for simulating the detailed hydrologic budget for the Wet Walnut Creek Watershed. The computer simulation model was calibrated and verified using historical streamflow records (at Albert and Nekoma gaging stations), reported irrigation water use, observed water-level elevations in watershed structure pools, and groundwater levels in the alluvial aquifer system. To assess the impact of watershed structures and irrigation water use on streamflow and groundwater levels, a number of hypothetical management scenarios were simulated under various operational criteria for watershed structures and different annual limits on water use for irrigation. A standard 'base case' was defined to allow comparative analysis of the results of different scenarios. The simulated streamflows showed that watershed structures decrease both streamflows and groundwater levels in the watershed. The amount of water used for irrigation has a substantial effect on the total simulated streamflow and groundwater levels, indicating that irrigation is a major budget item for managing water resources in the watershed. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.This paper presents the results of a comprehensive modeling study of surface and groundwater systems, including stream-aquifer interactions, for the Wet Walnut Creek Watershed in west

  17. Groundwater Pollution from Underground Coal Gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In situ coal gasification poses a potential environmental risk to groundwater pollution although it depends mainly on local hydrogeological conditions.In our investigation, the possible processes of groundwater pollution originating from underground coal gasification (UCG) were analyzed.Typical pollutants were identified and pollution control measures are proposed.Groundwater pollution is caused by the diffusion and penetration of contaminants generated by underground gasification processes towards surrounding strata and the possible leaching of underground residue by natural groundwater flow after gasification.Typical organic pollutants include phenols, benzene, minor components such as PAHs and heterocyclics.Inorganic pollutants involve cations and anions.The natural groundwater flow after gasification through the seam is attributable to the migration of contaminants, which can be predicted by mathematical modeling.The extent and concentration of the groundwater pollution plume depend primarily on groundwater flow velocity, the degree of dispersion and the adsorption and reactions of the various contaminants.The adsorption function of coal and surrounding strata make a big contribution to the decrease of the contaminants over time and with the distance from the burn cavity.Possible pollution control measures regarding UCG include identifying a permanently, unsuitable zone, setting a hydraulic barrier and pumping contaminated water out for surface disposal.Mitigation measures during gasification processes and groundwater remediation after gasification are also proposed.

  18. Assessing potential impacts of a wastewater rapid infiltration basin system on groundwater quality: a delaware case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, A S; Sims, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Rapid infiltration basin systems (RIBS) are receiving increased interest for domestic wastewater disposal in rural areas. They rely on natural treatment processes to filter pollutants and use extremely high effluent loading rates, much greater than natural precipitation, applied to a small geographic area instead of disposal to surface water. Concerns exist today that adopting RIBS in areas with shallow groundwater and sandy soils may increase ground and surface water pollution. We conducted a field study of RIBS effects on N and P concentrations in soils and groundwater at Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware, where a RIBS designed and operated following USEPA guidance has been used for >25 yr. Site and wastewater characteristics (water table of 8 m, Fe- and Al-oxide coatings on soils, organic-rich effluent) were favorable for denitrification and P sorption; however, we found high P saturation, reduced soil P sorption capacity, and significant total P accumulation at depths >1.5 m, factors that could lead to dissolved P leaching. Very low soil inorganic N levels suggest that wastewater N was converted rapidly to NO-N and leached from the RIBS. Extensive groundwater monitoring supported these concerns and showed rapid offsite transport of N and P at concentrations similar to the effluent. Results suggest that high hydraulic loads and preferential flow led to flow velocities that were too large, and contact times between effluent and soils that were too short, for effective N and P attenuation processes. These findings indicate the need for better site characterization and facility designs to reduce and monitor contaminant loss from RIBS in similar settings. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Assessment of groundwater quality for drinking and irrigation: the case study of Teiman-Oyarifa Community, Ga East Municipality, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ackah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of groundwater quality for drinking and agricultural purposes was assessed in a predominantly farming and sprawling settlement in the Ga East Municipality (Ghana. Various water quality parameters were determined to assess groundwater quality of 16 wells in Teiman-Oyarifa community. Standard methods for physicochemical determinations were employed. Hand-dug wells, boreholes and pipe borne water samples were collected within the locality and analysed. Results showed the temperature range of 19.5 oC-26.7 oC, pH range of 4-7.4, conductivity range of 214-2830 uS/cm, total dissolved solids, 110-1384 mg/L, bicarbonate, 8.53-287.7mg/L, chloride, 28.41-813.8 mg/L, Flouride, below detection limit -0.4667mg/L, Nitrate 1.9-4625 mg/L, sulphate, 16.35-149.88mg/L. Results of analysis carried out using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry showed metal concentrations of Fe ranging from 0.212-3.396 mg/L, Mn 0.01-0.1 mg/L, Ca 0.39-9.97 mg/L. The ionic dominance for the major cations and the anions respectively were in these order; Na+ >K+ >Mg+ >Ca+ and Cl- >HCO3- >SO4- >NO3 -. Most of the samples analyzed were within the Guidelines set by both national and international bodies for drinking water. Most of the groundwater samples fell in the US Salinity Laboratory Classification of C2-S1(medium salinity-low SAR.

  20. Detecting and predicting the impact of land use changes on groundwater quality, a case study in Northern Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhy Narany, Tahoora; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Sefie, Anuar; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-12-01

    The conversions of forests and grass land to urban and farmland has exerted significant changes on terrestrial ecosystems. However, quantifying how these changes can affect the quality of water resources is still a challenge for hydrologists. Nitrate concentrations can be applied as an indicator to trace the link between land use changes and groundwater quality due to their solubility and easy transport from their source to the groundwater. In this study, 25year records (from 1989 to 2014) of nitrate concentrations are applied to show the impact of land use changes on the quality of groundwater in Northern Kelantan, Malaysia, where large scale deforestation in recent decades has occurred. The results from the integration of time series analysis and geospatial modelling revealed that nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations significantly increased with approximately 8.1% and 3.89% annually in agricultural and residential wells, respectively, over 25years. In 1989 only 1% of the total area had a nitrate value greater than 10mg/L; and this value increased sharply to 48% by 2014. The significant increase in nitrate was only observed in a shallow aquifer with a 3.74% annual nitrate increase. Based on the result of the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model the nitrate contamination is expected to continue to rise by about 2.64% and 3.9% annually until 2030 in agricultural and residential areas. The present study develops techniques for detecting and predicting the impact of land use changes on environmental parameters as an essential step in land and water resource management strategy development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatially distributed modelling of surface water-groundwater exchanges during overbank flood events - a case study at the Garonne River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Jannin, Léonard; Brito, David; Sun, Xiaoling; Jauch, Eduardo; Neves, Ramiro; Sauvage, Sabine; Sánchez-Pérez, José-Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Exchanges between surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) are of considerable importance to floodplain ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. Flood events in particular are important for riparian water budget and element exchanges and processing. However SW-GW exchanges present complex spatial and temporal patterns and modelling can provide useful knowledge about the processes involved at the scale of the reach and its adjacent floodplain. This study used a physically-based, spatially-distributed modelling approach for studying SW-GW exchanges. The modelling in this study is based on the MOHID Land model, combining the modelling of surface water flow in 2D with the Saint-Venant equation and the modelling of unsaturated groundwater flow in 3D with the Richards' equation. Overbank flow during floods was also integrated, as well as water exchanges between the two domains across the entire floodplain. Conservative transport simulations were also performed to study and validate the simulation of the mixing between surface water and groundwater. The model was applied to the well-monitored study site of Monbéqui (6.6 km²) in the Garonne floodplain (south-west France) for a five-month period and was able to represent the hydrology of the study area. Infiltration (SW to GW) and exfiltration (SW to GW) were characterised over the five-month period. Results showed that infiltration and exfiltration exhibited strong spatiotemporal variations, and infiltration from overbank flow accounted for 88% of the total simulated infiltration, corresponding to large flood periods. The results confirmed that overbank flood events played a determinant role in floodplain water budget and SW-GW exchanges compared to smaller (below bankfull) flood events. The impact of floods on water budget appeared to be similar for flood events exceeding a threshold corresponding to the five-year return period event due to the study area's topography. Simulation of overbank flow during flood events was an

  2. Modeling the Factors Impacting Pesticide Concentrations in Groundwater Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Binning, Philip J; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul L

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of pumping, hydrogeology, and pesticide characteristics on pesticide concentrations in production wells using a reactive transport model in two conceptual hydrogeologic systems; a layered aquifer with and without a stream present. The pumping rate can significantly affect the pesticide breakthrough time and maximum concentration at the well. The effect of the pumping rate on the pesticide concentration depends on the hydrogeology of the aquifer; in a layered aquifer, a high pumping rate resulted in a considerably different breakthrough than a low pumping rate, while in an aquifer with a stream the effect of the pumping rate was insignificant. Pesticide application history and properties have also a great impact on the effect of the pumping rate on the concentration at the well. The findings of the study show that variable pumping rates can generate temporal variability in the concentration at the well, which helps understanding the results of groundwater monitoring programs. The results are used to provide guidance on the design of pumping and regulatory changes for the long-term supply of safe groundwater. The fate of selected pesticides is examined, for example, if the application of bentazone in a region with a layered aquifer stops today, the concentration at the well can continue to increase for 20 years if a low pumping rate is applied. This study concludes that because of the rapid response of the pesticide concentration at the drinking water well due to changes in pumping, wellhead management is important for managing pesticide concentrations.

  3. Types of Breast Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Consumer Products Breast Pumps Types of Breast Pumps Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... used for feeding a baby. Types of Breast Pumps There are three basic types of breast pumps: ...

  4. Evaluation of Groundwater Renewability in the Henan Plains, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W.; Shi, X.

    2011-12-01

    The sustainability of groundwater resources in the Henan Plains, located in the eastern portion of central China, has been threatened by both increasing industrial and agricultural pumping and periods of drought occurring since the 1990s. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve water resources management in the Henan Plains. However, the recharge and annual renewal rate are very difficult to calculate when based only on traditional hydrogeological methods because of inadequate hydrometeorologic data. In this study, tritium concentrations in groundwater and reconstructed 3H concentration time series from 1953~2009 in precipitation were used to determine the annual groundwater renewal rate. The 3H concentrations mostly range from 2.91 to 40.30 TU in the shallow groundwater with a mean 3H concentration of 19.13TU, which suggests that the shallow groundwater is recharged from modern precipitation after 1953 in the study area. Three exceptionally low 3H concentration(less than 1TU) wells were sampled in Xinxiang, Puyang and Zhengyang which indicates that those wells contain deep old groundwater recharge before 1953 as a result of over-pumping. High renewal rates (more than 4%/a) of groundwater are located mainly in the recharge area such as along the Yellow River and in the pediments of Taihang Mountain, Songqi Mountain, Funiu Mountain, Dabie Mountain, where the groundwater extraction volume could be increased. Moderate renewal rates (2%/a~3%/a) of groundwater are mainly in the runoff area where the groundwater extraction volume can be kept at current levels. Low renewal rates (1%/a~2%/a) of groundwater are located mainly in the discharge areas in the eastern regions of Nanle, Puyang, Shangqiu, Luyi where the groundwater extraction volume should be reduced. The lowest renewal rates of (less than 1%/a) groundwater are in Puyang, Xinxiang, Zhengyang and Xixian, where the groundwater extraction volume should be restricted.

  5. Joint assimilation of piezometric heads and groundwater temperatures for improved modelling of river-aquifer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Wolfgang; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Measured groundwater temperatures close to streams contain valuable information for the assessment of mass transfer rates between river and aquifer and the hydraulic properties around a streambed. For groundwater management close to rivers, the characterization of these hydraulic properties is of special interest because exchange fluxes between river and aquifer influence the sustainability of groundwater abstraction and the quality of pumped drinking water. Additionally, it can be important for groundwater management to gain reliable predictions of groundwater temperatures, e.g. in order to regulate the temperature of extracted drinking water. Data assimilation techniques, like the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), provide a flexible stochastic framework to merge model simulations with different types of measurement data in order to enhance the (real-time) prediction of groundwater states and to improve the estimation of uncertain hydraulic subsurface parameters. EnKF has already been used for managed river-aquifer systems to improve the prediction of groundwater levels and the estimation of hydraulic parameters by the assimilation of measured piezometric head data. As temperature data can provide additional information on stream-aquifer exchange it is investigated whether this information further constrains states, fluxes and parameters of the river-groundwater system. For this purpose, we performed data assimilation experiments with two different model setups: (i) a simple synthetic model of a river-aquifer system where the parameters and simulation conditions were perfectly known (ii) a more complex model of the Limmat aquifer in Zurich where real-world data were assimilated. Results for the synthetic case suggest that a joint assimilation of piezometric heads and groundwater temperatures together with up