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Sample records for groundwater plume west

  1. Characterization of redox conditions in groundwater contaminant plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwarth, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behaviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...... dubious, if not erroneous. Several other approaches have been used in addressing redox conditions in pollution plumes: redox-sensitive compounds in groundwater samples, hydrogen concentrations in groundwater, concentrations of volatile fatty acids in groundwater, sediment characteristics and microbial...... cases have been reported. No standardised or generally accepted approach exists. Slow electrode kinetics and the common lack of internal equilibrium of redox processes in pollution plumes make, with a few exceptions, direct electrochemical measurement and rigorous interpretation of redox potentials...

  2. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  3. 76 FR 2112 - Peach Orchard Road Groundwater Plume Site, Augusta, Richmond County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... AGENCY Peach Orchard Road Groundwater Plume Site, Augusta, Richmond County, GA; Notice of Settlement... costs concerning the Peach Orchard Road Groundwater Plume Site located in Augusta, Richmond County... Site name Peach Orchard Road Groundwater Plume Superfund Site by one of the following methods: http...

  4. West Antarctic Mantle Plume Hypothesis and Basal Water Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivins, Erik; Seroussi, Helene; Wiens, Doug; Bondzio, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    The hypothesis of a deep mantle plume that manifests Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism and present-day seismicity in West Antarctica has been speculated for more than 30 years. Recent seismic images support the plume hypothesis as the cause of Marie Byrd Land (MBL) volcanism and geophysical structure [ Lloyd et al., 2015; Ramirez et al., 2016]. Mantle plumes can more that double the geothermal heat flux, qGHF, above nominal continental values at their axial peak position and raise qGHF in the surrounding plume head to 60 mW/m2 or higher. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of in-situ basal ice sheet data that sample the heat flux. Consequently, we examine a realistic distribution of heat flux associated with a late-Cenozoic mantle plume in West Antarctica and explore its impact on thermal and melt conditions near the ice sheet base. The solid Earth model assumes a parameterized deep mantle plume and head. The 3-D ice flow model includes an enthalpy framework and full-Stokes stress balance. Both the putative plume location and extent are uncertain. Therefore, we perform broadly scoped experiments to characterize plume related basal conditions. The experiments show that mantle plumes have an important local impact on the ice sheet, with basal melting rates reaching several centimeters per year directly above the hotspot. The downstream active lake system of Whillans Ice Stream suggests a rift-related source of anomalous mantle heat. However, the lack of lake and stream activity in MBL suggests a relatively weak plume: one that delivers less flux by 35% below the heat flux to the crustal surface at the site of the Yellowstone hotspot [e.g., DeNosaquo et al., 2009], with peak value no higher than about 145 mW/m2.

  5. Mapping organic contaminant plumes in groundwater using spontaneous potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Sarah

    Increased water demands have raised awareness of its importance. One of the challenges facing water resource management is dealing with contaminated groundwater; delineating, characterizing and remediating it. In the last decade, spontaneous potentials have been proposed as a method for delineating degrading organic contaminant plumes in groundwater. A hypothesis proposed that the redox potential gradient due to degradation of contaminants generated an electrical potential gradient that could be measured at the ground surface. This research was undertaken to better understand this phenomenon and find under what conditions it occurs. Spontaneous potentials are electrical potentials generated by three sources that act simultaneously: electrokinetic, thermoelectric and electrochemical sources. Over contaminant plumes electrochemical sources are those of interest. Thermoelectric sources are negligible unless in geothermal areas, but we hypothesized that electrokinetic potentials could be impacted by contaminants altering sediment surface properties. We built and calibrated a laboratory apparatus to make measurements that allowed us to calculate streaming current coupling coefficients. We tested sediment from hydrocarbon impacted sites with clean and hydrocarbon polluted groundwater and found a measurable though inconsistent effect. Moreover, numerical modelling was used to demonstrate that the impact of these changes on field measurements was negligible. Spontaneous potential surveys were conducted on two field sites with well characterized degrading hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater. We did not find a correlation between redox conditions and spontaneous potential, even after the electrical measurements were corrected for anthropogenic noise. In order to determine why the expected signal was not seen, we undertook numerical modelling based on coupled fluxes using two hypothesized types of current: redox and diffusion currents. The only scenarios that produced

  6. Detecting leachate plumes and groundwater pollution at Ruseifa municipal landfill utilizing VLF-EM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarazi, E.; Abu Rajab, J.; Al-Naqa, A.; El-Waheidi, M.

    2008-09-01

    A Very Low Frequency-Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) survey was carried out in two sites of domestic waste of old and recent landfills. The landfill structures lie on a major highly fractured limestone aquifer of shallow groundwater less than 30 m, which is considered as the main source of fresh water in Amman-Zarqa region. A total of 18 VLF-EM profiles were conducted with length ranges between 250 and 1500 m. Hydrochemical and biochemical analysis of water samples, taken from wells in the region, has also been conducted. The integrated results of previous DC resistivity method of the same study area and the outcomes of the 2-D tipper inversion of VLF-EM data proved the efficiency of this method in locating shallow and deep leachate plume with resistivity less than 20 Ω m, and enabling the mapping of anomalous bodies and their extensions down to 40 m depth. The sign of groundwater contamination was noticed in many surrounding wells resulting in the high number of fecal coliform bacteria and total coliform bacteria and the increase in inorganic parameters such as chloride (Cl). The pollution of groundwater wells in the landfill area is attributed to the leachate bodies which flow through the upper part of Wadi Es Sir (A7) or Amman-Wadi Es Sir Aquifer (B2/A7). Furthermore, several structural features were detected and the direction of local groundwater movement has been determined. The structural features have been found to have critical effects on the flowing of leachate plume towards north-northeast and west-southwest of the potable aquifer in the area.

  7. Vapor intrusion from entrapped NAPL sources and groundwater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Christ, John; Petri, Bejamin; Sauck, Carolyn; Cihan, Abdullah

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are commonly found entrapped as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the soil pores or dissolved in groundwater at industrial waste sites and refineries. Vapors emitted from these contaminant sources readily disperse into the atmosphere, into air-filled void spaces within the soil, and migrate below surface structures, leading to the intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor air through basements and other underground structures. This process referred to as vapor intrusion (VI) represents a potential threat to human health, and is a possible exposure pathway of concern to regulatory agencies. To assess whether this exposure pathway is present, remediation project managers often rely in part on highly simplified screening level models that do not take into consideration the complex flow dynamics controlled by subsurface heterogeneities and soil moisture conditions affected by the mass and heat flux boundary conditions at the land/atmospheric interface. A research study is under way to obtain an improved understanding of the processes and mechanisms controlling vapor generation from entrapped NAPL sources and groundwater plumes, their subsequent migration through the subsurface, and their attenuation in naturally heterogeneous vadose zones under various natural physical, climatic, and geochemical conditions. Experiments conducted at multiple scales will be integrated with analytical and numerical modeling and field data to test and validate existing VI theories and models. A set of preliminary experiments where the fundamental process of vapor generation from entrapped NAPL sources and dissolved plumes under fluctuating water were investigated in small cells and two-dimensional test tanks. In another task, intermediate scale experiments were conducted to generate quantitative data on how the heat and mass flux boundary conditions control the development of dynamic VI pathways. The data from the small cell and tank experiments were

  8. Radionuclide inventories for the F- and H-area seepage basin groundwater plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiergesell, Robert A [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kubilius, Walter P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    Within the General Separations Areas (GSA) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), significant inventories of radionuclides exist within two major groundwater contamination plumes that are emanating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. These radionuclides are moving slowly with groundwater migration, albeit more slowly due to interaction with the soil and aquifer matrix material. The purpose of this investigation is to quantify the activity of radionuclides associated with the pore water component of the groundwater plumes. The scope of this effort included evaluation of all groundwater sample analyses obtained from the wells that have been established by the Environmental Compliance & Area Completion Projects (EC&ACP) Department at SRS to monitor groundwater contamination emanating from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins. Using this data, generalized groundwater plume maps for the radionuclides that occur in elevated concentrations (Am-241, Cm-243/244, Cs-137, I-129, Ni-63, Ra-226/228, Sr-90, Tc-99, U-233/234, U-235 and U-238) were generated and utilized to calculate both the volume of contaminated groundwater and the representative concentration of each radionuclide associated with different plume concentration zones.

  9. Non-intrusive characterization methods for wastewater-affected groundwater plumes discharging to an alpine lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, James W; Robillard, Jasen M; Watson, Susan B; Hayashi, Masaki

    2009-02-01

    Streams and lakes in rocky environments are especially susceptible to nutrient loading from wastewater-affected groundwater plumes. However, the use of invasive techniques such as drilling wells, installing piezometers or seepage meters, to detect and characterize these plumes can be prohibitive. In this work, we report on the use of four non-intrusive methods for this purpose at a site in the Rocky Mountains. The methods included non-invasive geophysical surveys of subsurface electrical conductivity (EC), in-situ EC measurement of discharging groundwater at the lake-sediment interface, shoreline water sampling and nutrient analysis, and shoreline periphyton sampling and analysis of biomass and taxa relative abundance. The geophysical surveys were able to detect and delineate two high-EC plumes, with capacitively coupled ERI (OhmMapper) providing detailed two-dimensional images. In situ measurements at the suspected discharge locations confirmed the presence of high-EC water in the two plumes and corroborated their spatial extent. The nutrient and periphyton results showed that only one of the two high-EC plumes posed a current eutrophication threat, with elevated nitrogen and phosphorus levels, high localized periphyton biomass and major shifts in taxonomic composition to taxa that are commonly associated with anthropogenic nutrient loading. This study highlights the need to use non-intrusive methods in combination, with geophysical and water EC-based methods used for initial detection of wastewater-affected groundwater plumes, and nutrient or periphyton sampling used to characterize their ecological effects.

  10. Microbial reduction of sulfate injected to gas condensate plumes in cold groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Armstrong, James; Mayer, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Despite a rapid expansion over the past decade in the reliance on intrinsic bioremediation to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater, significant research gaps remain. Although it has been demonstrated that bacterial sulfate reduction can be a key electron accepting process in many petroleum plumes, little is known about the rate of this reduction process in plumes derived from crude oil and gas condensates at cold-climate sites (mean temperature study, sulfate was injected into groundwater contaminated by gas condensate plumes at two petroleum sites in Alberta, Canada to enhance in-situ bioremediation. In both cases the groundwater near the water table had low temperature (6-9 °C). Monitoring data had provided strong evidence that bacterial sulfate reduction was a key terminal electron accepting process (TEAP) in the natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons at these sites. At each site, water with approximately 2000 mg/L sulfate and a bromide tracer was injected into a low-sulfate zone within a condensate-contaminant plume. Monitoring data collected over several months yielded conservative estimates for sulfate reduction rates based on zero-order kinetics (4-6 mg/L per day) or first-order kinetics (0.003 and 0.01 day - 1 ). These results favor the applicability of in-situ bioremediation techniques in this region, under natural conditions or with enhancement via sulfate injection.

  11. Forensic investigation of a chromium(VI) groundwater plume in Thiva, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotakis, I. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Dermatas, D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Vatseris, C. [Intergeo-Environmental Technology Ltd., Thessaloniki (Greece); Chrysochoou, M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Papassiopi, N. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Xenidis, A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece); Vaxevanidou, K. [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Zografou (Greece)

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a forensic investigation with the aim of decoupling the contribution of geogenic and anthropogenic Cr(VI) sources in the wider area of Thiva. Groundwater and topsoil samples were collected from two Cr(VI) groundwater plumes of 160 μg/L and 75 μg/L. A series of evidence support the view that the origin of Cr(VI) detected in groundwater is mainly geogenic. These are: (a) the presence of Cr in topsoil of the wider area, (b) the moderate Cr(VI) groundwater concentrations, (c) the high Ni levels within the Cr(VI) plumes, (d) the predominance of Mn(IV), which is a prerequisite for Cr(III) oxidation to Cr(VI), and (e) the absence of co-contaminants. This study also revealed that, although both Cr(VI) plumes are clearly of geogenic origin, the plume with the elevated Cr(VI) values, in the north of Thiva town, exhibits also an anthropogenic component, which can potentially be attributed to the alkaline environment associated with the old uncontrolled landfill of Thiva and the industrial cluster located in this area.

  12. North-West Iowa Groundwater Vulnerability Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The regions on this map represent areas with similar hydro-geologic characteristics thought to represent similar potentials for contamination of groundwater and/or...

  13. South-West Iowa Groundwater Vulnerability Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The regions on this map represent areas with similar hydro- geologic characteristics thought to represent similar potentials for contamination of groundwater and/or...

  14. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and that are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 µg/L or 0.126 µmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influences plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences

  15. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of residual, contaminant U; the rates of current kinetic processes (both biotic and abiotic) influencing U(VI) solid-liquid distribution; the presence of detrital organic matter and the resulting spatial heterogeneity in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The comparative analysis of these sites provides important guidance to the characterization, understanding, modeling, and remediation

  16. Mercury speciation and mobilization in a wastewater-contaminated groundwater plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborg, Carl H.; Kent, Doug B.; Swarr, Gretchen J.; Munson, Kathleen M.; Kading, Tristan; O'Connor, Alison E.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Wiatrowski, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the concentration and speciation of mercury (Hg) in groundwater down-gradient from the site of wastewater infiltration beds operated by the Massachusetts Military Reservation, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Total mercury concentrations in oxic, mildly acidic, uncontaminated groundwater are 0.5–1 pM, and aquifer sediments have 0.5–1 ppb mercury. The plume of impacted groundwater created by the wastewater disposal is still evident, although inputs ceased in 1995, as indicated by anoxia extending at least 3 km down-gradient from the disposal site. Solutes indicative of a progression of anaerobic metabolisms are observed vertically and horizontally within the plume, with elevated nitrate concentrations and nitrate reduction surrounding a region with elevated iron concentrations indicating iron reduction. Mercury concentrations up to 800 pM were observed in shallow groundwater directly under the former infiltration beds, but concentrations decreased with depth and with distance down-gradient. Mercury speciation showed significant connections to the redox and metabolic state of the groundwater, with relatively little methylated Hg within the iron reducing sector of the plume, and dominance of this form within the higher nitrate/ammonium zone. Furthermore, substantial reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0 within the core of the anoxic zone was observed when iron reduction was evident. These trends not only provide insight into the biogeochemical factors controlling the interplay of Hg species in natural waters, but also support hypotheses that anoxia and eutrophication in groundwater facilitate the mobilization of natural and anthropogenic Hg from watersheds/aquifers, which can be transported down-gradient to freshwaters and the coastal zone.

  17. Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions as a Critical Component of Uranium Plume Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. H.; Christensen, J. N.; Hobson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Residual contamination of soils, sediments and groundwater by uranium milling operations presents a lingering problem at former mill sites throughout the upper Colorado River Basin in the western USA. Remedial strategies predicated upon natural flushing by low uranium recharge waters have frequently failed to achieve target concentrations set by national and state regulators. Flushing times of tens of years have often yielded negligible decreases in groundwater uranium concentrations, with extrapolated trends suggesting multiple decades or longer may be required to achieve regulatory goals. The U.S. Department of Energy's Rifle, Colorado field site serves as a natural laboratory for investigating the underlying causes for uranium plume persistence, with recent studies there highlighting the important role that surface water-groundwater interactions play in sustaining uranium delivery to the aquifer. Annual snowmelt-driven increases in Colorado River discharge induce 1-2 m excursions in groundwater elevation at the Rifle site, which enables residual tailings-contaminated materials (so-called Supplemental Standards) to become hydrologically connected to the aquifer for short periods of time during peak discharge. The episodic contact between shallow groundwater and residual contamination leads to abrupt 20-fold increases in groundwater uranium concentration, which serve to seasonally replenish the plume given the location of the Supplemental Standards along the upgradient edge of the aquifer. Uranium isotope composition changes abruptly as uranium concentrations increase reflecting the contribution of a temporally distinct contaminant reservoir. The release of uranium serves to potentially replenish organic matter rich sediments located within the alluvial aquifer at downstream locations, which have been postulated to serve as a parallel contributor to plume persistence following the uptake, immobilization, and slow re-oxidation of uranium.

  18. The Biogeochemistry of Contaminant Groundwater Plumes Arising from Waste Disposal Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    and the heterogeneity of the source may create a variable leaching pattern and maybe also multiple plumes; and (4) significant natural attenuation of xenobiotic organic compounds occurs, but the complexity of leachate plumes with respect to compounds (inorganic and xenobiotic organic compounds) and biogeochemical...... leachate with a high content of dissolved organic carbon, salts, and ammonium, as well as specific organic compounds and metals is released from the waste for decades or centuries. Landfill leachate plume hosts a variety of biogeochemical processes, which is the key to understand the significant potential......Landfills with solid waste are abundant sources of groundwater pollution all over the world. Old uncontrolled municipal landfills are often large, heterogeneous sources with demolition waste, minor fractions of commercial or industrial waste, and organic waste from households. Strongly anaerobic...

  19. Natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in a cold climate fuel plume in groundwater, northern Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickerton, G.; Van Stempvoort, D.; Millar, K. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    There is currently little published information on the role that anaerobic microorganisms can play in the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in groundwater at cold temperatures. This paper discusses a detailed field investigation conducted to determine the significance of intrinsic bioremediation at a diesel fuel plume in an aquifer located on a tank farm in Moose Factory, Ontario. Several lines of evidence were used: historic and spatial trends of contaminant concentrations; patterns of geochemical indicators in the groundwater consistent with the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons; and relevant microbial analyses. A network of 19 existing monitoring wells was used, with an additional 19 wells installed to fill in information gaps. Samples were placed on ice and stored prior to analyses. Probes with data loggers were installed to monitor water levels and temperatures. Total hydrocarbons were extracted in dichloromethane and analyzed. Results of the hydrocarbon plume, BTEX distribution, geochemical indicators as well as microbial analyses were discussed. Analysis indicated that the plume was stable, contrary to previous findings. Results indicated that natural attenuation has been effective for treating the existing plume. This finding expands the possible treatment technologies and management strategies available for remediation of dissolved phase contamination at this cold climate site, which is not considered a hindrance to intrinsic bioremediation. It was suggested that technologies based on enhancing biodegradation may be considered for application at this and similar cold climate sites. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  20. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 1. Groundwater flow and plume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, D. S.; Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Sudicky, E. A.

    1983-05-01

    A landfill-derived contaminant plume with a maximum width of ˜600 m, a length of ˜700 m and a maximum depth of 20 m in an unconfined sand aquifer was delineated by means of a monitoring network that includes standpipe piezometers, multilevel point-samplers and bundle-piezometers. The extent of detectable contamination caused by the landfill, which began operation in 1940 and which became inactive in 1976, was determined from the distributions of chloride, sulfate and electrical conductance in the sand aquifer, all of which have levels in the leachate that are greatly above those in uncontaminated groundwater. The maximum temperature of groundwater in the zone of contamination beneath the landfill is 12°C, which is 4-5°C above background. The thermal plume in the aquifer extends ˜150 m downgradient from the centre of the landfill. A slight transient water-table mound exists beneath the landfill in the late spring and summer in response to snowmelt and heavy rainfall. Beneath the landfill, the zone of leachate contamination extends to the bottom of the aquifer, apparently because of transient downward components of hydraulic gradient caused by the water-table mound and possibly because of the higher density and lower viscosity of the contaminated water. Values of hydraulic conductivity, which show variations due to local heterogeneity, were obtained from slug tests of piezometers, from pumping tests and from laboratory tests. Because of the inherent uncertainty in the aquifer parameter values, the 38-yr. frontal position of the plume calculated using the Darcy equation with the assumption of plug flow can differ from the observed frontal position by many hundreds of metres, although the use of mean parameter values produces a close agreement. The width of the plume is large relative to the width of the landfill and can be accounted for primarily by variable periods of lateral east- and westward flow caused by changes in water-table configuration due to the

  1. Heterogeneous hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharging to an urban river reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana G; Rivett, Michael O; Roche, Rachel S; Durrant Neé Cleverly, Megan; Walker, Caroline; Tellam, John H

    2015-02-01

    The typically elevated natural attenuation capacity of riverbed-hyporheic zones is expected to decrease chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) groundwater plume discharges to river receptors through dechlorination reactions. The aim of this study was to assess physico-chemical processes controlling field-scale variation in riverbed-hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharge to an urban river reach. The 50-m long pool-riffle-glide reach of the River Tame in Birmingham (UK) studied is a heterogeneous high energy river environment. The shallow riverbed was instrumented with a detailed network of multilevel samplers. Freeze coring revealed a geologically heterogeneous and poorly sorted riverbed. A chlorine number reduction approach provided a quantitative indicator of CHC dechlorination. Three sub-reaches of contrasting behaviour were identified. Greatest dechlorination occurred in the riffle sub-reach that was characterised by hyporheic zone flows, moderate sulphate concentrations and pH, anaerobic conditions, low iron, but elevated manganese concentrations with evidence of sulphate reduction. Transient hyporheic zone flows allowing input to varying riverbed depths of organic matter are anticipated to be a key control. The glide sub-reach displayed negligible dechlorination attributed to the predominant groundwater baseflow discharge condition, absence of hyporheic zone, transition to more oxic conditions and elevated sulphate concentrations expected to locally inhibit dechlorination. The tail-of-pool-riffle sub-reach exhibited patchy dechlorination that was attributed to sub-reach complexities including significant flow bypass of a low permeability, high organic matter, silty unit of high dechlorination potential. A process-based conceptual model of reach-scale dechlorination variability was developed. Key findings of practitioner relevance were: riverbed-hyporheic zone CHC dechlorination may provide only a partial, somewhat patchy barrier to CHC

  2. Groundwater redox conditions and conductivity in a contaminant plume from geoelectrical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naudet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of the electrical conductivity and of the redox potential of the groundwater is important in delineating the shape of a contaminant plume. A map of redox potential in an aquifer is indicative of biodegradation of organic matter and of concentrations of redox-active components; a map of electrical conductivity provides information on the mineralisation of the groundwater. Both maps can be used to optimise the position of pumping wells for remediation. The self-potential method (SP and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT have been applied to the contaminant plume associated with the Entressen landfill in south-east France. The self-potential depends on groundwater flow (electrokinetic contribution and redox conditions ('electro-redox' contribution. Using the variation of the piezometric head in the aquifer, the electrokinetic contribution is removed from the SP signals. A good linear correlation (R2=0.85 is obtained between the residual SP data and the redox potential values measured in monitoring wells. This relationship is used to draw a redox potential map of the overall contaminated site. The electrical conductivity of the subsoil is obtained from 3D-ERT analysis. A good linear correlation (R2=0.91 is observed between the electrical conductivity of the aquifer determined from the 3D-ERT image and the conductivity of the groundwater measured in boreholes. This indicates that the formation factor is nearly homogeneous in the shallow aquifer at the scale of the ERT. From this correlation, a map of the pore water conductivity of the aquifer is obtained. Keywords: self-potential, redox potential, electrical resistivity tomography, fluid conductivity, contaminant plume

  3. Groundwater contaminant plume maps and volumes, 100-K and 100-N Areas, Hanford Site, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth H.

    2016-09-27

    This study provides an independent estimate of the areal and volumetric extent of groundwater contaminant plumes which are affected by waste disposal in the 100-K and 100-N Areas (study area) along the Columbia River Corridor of the Hanford Site. The Hanford Natural Resource Trustee Council requested that the U.S. Geological Survey perform this interpolation to assess the accuracy of delineations previously conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in order to assure that the Natural Resource Damage Assessment could rely on these analyses. This study is based on previously existing chemical (or radionuclide) sampling and analysis data downloaded from publicly available Hanford Site Internet sources, geostatistically selected and interpreted as representative of current (from 2009 through part of 2012) but average conditions for groundwater contamination in the study area. The study is limited in scope to five contaminants—hexavalent chromium, tritium, nitrate, strontium-90, and carbon-14, all detected at concentrations greater than regulatory limits in the past.All recent analytical concentrations (or activities) for each contaminant, adjusted for radioactive decay, non-detections, and co-located wells, were converted to log-normal distributions and these transformed values were averaged for each well location. The log-normally linearized well averages were spatially interpolated on a 50 × 50-meter (m) grid extending across the combined 100-N and 100-K Areas study area but limited to avoid unrepresentative extrapolation, using the minimum curvature geostatistical interpolation method provided by SURFER®data analysis software. Plume extents were interpreted by interpolating the log-normally transformed data, again using SURFER®, along lines of equal contaminant concentration at an appropriate established regulatory concentration . Total areas for each plume were calculated as an indicator of relative environmental damage. These plume

  4. Groundwater quality in West Virginia, 1993-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Kozar, Mark D.; White, Jeremy S.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 42 percent of all West Virginians rely on groundwater for their domestic water supply. However, prior to 2008, the quality of the West Virginia’s groundwater resource was largely unknown. The need for a statewide assessment of groundwater quality prompted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP), Division of Water and Waste Management, to develop an ambient groundwater-quality monitoring program. The USGS West Virginia Water Science Center sampled 300 wells, of which 80 percent were public-supply wells, over a 10-year period, 1999–2008. Sites for this statewide ambient groundwater-quality monitoring program were selected to provide wide areal coverage and to represent a variety of environmental settings. The resulting 300 samples were supplemented with data from a related monitoring network of 24 wells and springs. All samples were analyzed for field measurements (water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen), major ions, trace elements, nutrients, volatile organic compounds, fecal indicator bacteria, and radon-222. Sub-sets of samples were analyzed for pesticides or semi-volatile organic compounds; site selection was based on local land use. Samples were grouped for comparison by geologic age of the aquifer, Groups included Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Pennsylvanian, Permian, and Quaternary aquifers. A comparison of samples indicated that geologic age of the aquifer was the largest contributor to variability in groundwater quality. This study did not attempt to characterize drinking water provided through public water systems. All samples were of raw, untreated groundwater. Drinking-water criteria apply to water that is served to the public, not to raw water. However, drinking water criteria, including U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL), non-enforceable secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL

  5. Discovery, interception, and treatment of a groundwater plume: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

    1996-06-01

    A radiological groundwater plume was discovered to be discharging into a surface stream and portions of the storm drain network at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A CERCLA removal action was initiated to address the discharges. The plume was found to be migrating 65 degrees oblique to the overall hydraulic gradient and was identified only after historic data were analyzed and field tests were performed under the working hypothesis of stratabound flow and transport. A detailed geologic and hydrologic analysis was performed that accurately predicted the 3-dimensional plume configuration from a single point datum where significantly elevated contaminant levels were found in a bedrock core hole. Subsequent sampling found that direct discharges of contamination existed in the stream only in the location of the predicted stratum. The affected storm drain outfall discharges were suspected to be the major contributors to {sup 90}Sr surface water risk from ORNL. Thus, the selected removal action focused on eliminating the known seepage to the storm drain network. Intercept system operations reduced the total surface water {sup 90}Sr flux by about 90%. Ongoing investigations seek to identify the source of the plume with the hope that the intercept system may eventually be deactivated. However, the efficiency of the system exceeded expectations and demonstrated that a good understanding of the hydrodynamics is a prerequisite to success. The relatively trouble free operation of the system also indicates that simple technologies can serve as effective measures to address immediate problems.

  6. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  7. Review of quantitative surveys of the length and stability of MTBE, TBA, and benzene plumes in groundwater at UST sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, John A; Kamath, Roopa; Walker, Kenneth L; McHugh, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the length and stability condition of groundwater plumes of benzene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been compiled from thousands of underground storage tank (UST) sites in the United States where gasoline fuel releases have occurred. This paper presents a review and summary of 13 published scientific surveys, of which 10 address benzene and/or MTBE plumes only, and 3 address benzene, MTBE, and TBA plumes. These data show the observed lengths of benzene and MTBE plumes to be relatively consistent among various regions and hydrogeologic settings, with median lengths at a delineation limit of 10 µg/L falling into relatively narrow ranges from 101 to 185 feet for benzene and 110 to 178 feet for MTBE. The observed statistical distributions of MTBE and benzene plumes show the two plume types to be of comparable lengths, with 90th percentile MTBE plume lengths moderately exceeding benzene plume lengths by 16% at a 10-µg/L delineation limit (400 feet vs. 345 feet) and 25% at a 5-µg/L delineation limit (530 feet vs. 425 feet). Stability analyses for benzene and MTBE plumes found 94 and 93% of these plumes, respectively, to be in a nonexpanding condition, and over 91% of individual monitoring wells to exhibit nonincreasing concentration trends. Three published studies addressing TBA found TBA plumes to be of comparable length to MTBE and benzene plumes, with 86% of wells in one study showing nonincreasing concentration trends.

  8. Semi-Passive Oxidation-Based Approaches for Control of Large, Dilute Groundwater Plumes of Chlorinated Ethylenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Based Approaches for Control of Large, Dilute Groundwater Plumes of Chlorinated Ethylenes 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Numerous studies have reported that chemical oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes in aqueous solution is rapid (e.g. Yan and Schwartz, 1998; Huang et al

  9. Persistence of a Groundwater Contaminant Plume after Hydraulic Source Containment at a Chlorinated-Solvent Contaminated Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, D. E.; Plaschke, M.; Carroll, K. C.; Brinker, F.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic containment is one approach available for management of source zones contaminated by chlorinated solvents and other organic liquids. The objective of this study was to characterize the behavior of a groundwater contaminant plume containing TCE and other organic contaminants after implementation of a source-containment operation at a site in Arizona. The plume is approximately 600 m long and 250 m wide, and it resides in a quasi three-layer system comprising a sand/gravel unit bounded on the top and bottom by relatively thick silty clayey layers. The system was monitored for 60 months beginning at start-up in 2007 to measure the change in contaminant concentrations within the plume, the change in plume area, the mass of contaminant removed, and the integrated contaminant mass discharge. Operation of two source-control wells appears to have established containment of the source area, which has resulted in isolation of the source from the contaminant plume. Concentrations of trichloroethene in groundwater pumped from the plume extraction wells have declined over the course of operation, as have concentrations for groundwater sampled from 45 monitoring wells located within the plume. The total contaminant mass discharge associated with operation of the plume extraction wells peaked at 0.23 kg/d, decreased significantly within one year, and thereafter began an asymptotic decline to a current value of approximately 0.03 kg/d. Despite an 87% reduction in contaminant mass and a comparable 87% reduction in contaminant mass discharge, the spatial area encompassed by the plume has decreased by only approximately 50%. This is much less than would be anticipated based on ideal flushing and mass-removal behavior. Trichloroethene concentrations in groundwater sampled from monitoring wells screened in the clayey units showed a composite decrease of less than 50%, compared to a ~90% reduction for the wells screened in the sand/gravel unit. This observation suggests that

  10. The Biogeochemistry of Contaminant Groundwater Plumes Arising from Waste Disposal Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Landfills with solid waste are abundant sources of groundwater pollution all over the world. Old uncontrolled municipal landfills are often large, heterogeneous sources with demolition waste, minor fractions of commercial or industrial waste, and organic waste from households. Strongly anaerobic...... leachate with a high content of dissolved organic carbon, salts, and ammonium, as well as specific organic compounds and metals is released from the waste for decades or centuries. Landfill leachate plume hosts a variety of biogeochemical processes, which is the key to understand the significant potential...... at landfill sites. Finally, the potential chemical or ecological impact from landfills located in former wetlands or near surface water bodies may deserve attention in future studies....

  11. Study of the mixing and ageing of polluted plumes from major West Africa cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocquer, Flore; Mari, Céline; Leriche, Maud; Dacciwa Team

    2017-04-01

    Massive economic and population growth, fast urbanization in megacities along the Guinea Coast, would triple anthropogenic emissions by 2030 (Knippertz et al., 2015). Impacts of the rapid increase of atmospheric pollutants on weather and climate in this region are largely unstudied due to a lack of observations. The DACCIWA (Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa) project carried out an important airborne measurements campaign in June-July 2016 together with ground-based observations in urban and remote sites. Urban and industrial, biogenic dominated environment, dust and biomass burning air masses, ship plumes and flaring emissions were sampled successfully. The goal of this work is to investigate the transport and ageing of anthropogenic emissions from major West African megacities during boreal summer. For this purpose, the coupled atmosphere-chemistry mesoscale model Méso-NH was run at kilometric scale and results were compared with in-situ meteorological and chemical data. The study focuses on 06-07-08 July 2016. Three research aircrafts operated over the coastal region sampling downwind pollution from Lomé and Accra and biogenic emissions further inland. Preliminary simulation results will be presented to understand the mixing between and ageing of cities plumes during the post-onset period of the campaign.

  12. Issues of Sustainability of Coastal Groundwater Resources: Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Mullen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The largest city in Benin, West Africa (Cotonou, is reliant upon groundwater for its public water supply. This groundwater is derived from the Godomey well field which is located approximately 5 Km north of the coast of the Atlantic Ocean and in close proximity to Lake Nokoue—a shallow lake containing water with elevated concentration of chloride and other elements. Historical data indicate increased chloride concentration in a number of wells nearest to the lake, with unknown contribution from groundwater encroachment from the coastal area. Hence, there is substantial interest in better characterizing this groundwater system for the purpose of determining appropriate management practices and degree of sustainability. Among the efforts attempted to date are a series of numerical models ranging from assessment of flow to a recent effort to include density-dependent transport from the lake. In addition, substantial field characterization has been pursued including assessment of shallow water chemistry along the region of the coastal lagoon and border of the lake, characterization of hydraulic response to pumpage in the aquifer system, estimation of the distribution of electrical resistivity with depth along the coastal lagoons, and installation of multi-level piezometers at seven locations in the lake. When integrated across methods, these numerical and field results indicate that the lake remains a primary concern in terms of a source of salinity in the aquifer. Further, the coastal region appears to be more complex than previously suggested and may represent a future source of salt-water encroachment as suggested by current presence of saline waters at relatively shallow depths along the coast. Finally, hydraulic testing suggests that both natural and pumping-based fluctuations in water levels are present in this system. Substantial additional characterization and modeling efforts may provide a significantly greater understanding of the

  13. Estimating groundwater exchange with lakes: 2. Calibration of a three-dimensional, solute transport model to a stable isotope plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Anderson, Mary P.; Bowser, Carl J.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model was calibrated to a plume of water described by measurements of δ18O and used to calculate groundwater inflow and outflow rates at a lake in northern Wisconsin. The flow model was calibrated to observed hydraulic gradients and estimated recharge rates. Calibration of the solute transport submodel to the configuration of a stable isotope (18O) plume in the contiguous aquifer on the downgradient side of the lake provides additional data to constrain the model. A good match between observed and simulated temporal variations in plume configuration indicates that the model closely simulated the dynamics of the real system. The model provides information on natural variations of rates of groundwater inflow, lake water outflow, and recharge to the water table. Inflow and outflow estimates compare favorably with estimates derived by the isotope mass balance method (Krabbenhoft et al., this issue). Model simulations agree with field observations that show groundwater inflow rates are more sensitive to seasonal variations in recharge than outflow.

  14. Groundwater nitrate pollution in Souss-Massa basin (south-west ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    impacted groundwater supply and quality. ... the junction of these two mountain chains and to the West by the .... Center of Energy, Sciences and Nuclear Techniques of Morocco. .... dismisses manuring, agricultural waste and soil's natural.

  15. Investigating In-Situ Mass Transfer Processes in a Groundwater U Plume Influenced by Groundwater-River Hydrologic and Geochemical Coupling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is a DOE/BER-supported experimental and monitoring facility focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes (hanfordifc@pnl.gov). It is located within the footprint of a historic uranium (U) waste disposal pond that overlies a contaminated vadose zone and a 1 km+ groundwater U plume. The plume is under a regulatory clean-up mandate. The site is in hydraulic connectivity with the Columbia River that is located approximately 300 m distant. Dramatic seasonal variations in Columbia River stage cause 2m+ variations in water table and associated changes in groundwater flow directions and composition that are believed to recharge contaminant U to the plume through lower vadose zone pumping. The 60 m triangular shaped facility contains 37 monitoring wells equipped with down-hole electrical resistance tomography electrode and thermistor arrays, pressure transducers for continual water level monitoring, and specific conductance electrodes. Well spacings allow cross-hole geophysical interrogation and dynamic plume monitoring. Various geophysical and hydrologic field characterizations were performed during and after well installation, and retrieved sediments are being subjected to a hierarchal laboratory characterization process to support geostatistical models of hydrologic properties, U(VI) distribution and speciation, and equilibrium and kinetic reaction parameters for robust but tractable field-scale reactive transport calculations. Three large scale (10,000 gal+), non-reactive tracer experiments have been performed to evaluate groundwater flowpaths and velocities, facies scale mass transfer, and subsurface heterogeneity effects under different hydrologic conditions (e.g., flow vectors toward or away from the river). A passive monitoring experiment was completed during spring and summer of 2009 that documents spatially variable U(VI) release and plume recharge from the contaminated lower vadose zone during

  16. Distributional patterns of arsenic concentrations in contaminant plumes offer clues to the source of arsenic in groundwater at landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    The distributional pattern of dissolved arsenic concentrations from landfill plumes can provide clues to the source of arsenic contamination. Under simple idealized conditions, arsenic concentrations along flow paths in aquifers proximal to a landfill will decrease under anthropogenic sources but potentially increase under in situ sources. This paper presents several conceptual distributional patterns of arsenic in groundwater based on the arsenic source under idealized conditions. An example of advanced subsurface mapping of dissolved arsenic with geophysical surveys, chemical monitoring, and redox fingerprinting is presented for a landfill site in New Hampshire with a complex flow pattern. Tools to assist in the mapping of arsenic in groundwater ultimately provide information on the source of contamination. Once an understanding of the arsenic contamination is achieved, appropriate remedial strategies can then be formulated.

  17. The X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility: A field-scale test of trichloroethylene dechlorination using iron filings for the X-120/X-749 groundwater plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.; West, O.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Korte, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents by zero-valence iron has recently become the subject of intensive research and development as a potentially cost-effective, passive treatment for contaminated groundwater through reactive barriers. Because of its successful application in the laboratory and other field sites, the X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility (GTF) was constructed to evaluate reactive barrier technology for remediating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The X-625 GTF was built to fulfill the following technical objectives: (1) to test reactive barrier materials (e.g., iron filings) under realistic groundwater conditions for long term applications, (2) to obtain rates at which TCE degrades and to determine by-products for the reactive barrier materials tested, and (3) to clean up the TCE-contaminated water in the X-120 plume. The X-625 is providing important field-scale and long-term for the evaluation and design of reactive barriers at PORTS. The X-625 GTS is a unique facility not only because it is where site remediation is being performed, but it is also where research scientists and process engineers can test other promising reactive barrier materials. In addition, the data collected from X-625 GTF can be used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of replacing the activated carbon units in the pump-and-treat facilities at PORTS.

  18. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

  19. A plan for study of hexavalent chromium, CR(VI) in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Groover, Krishangi

    2016-01-22

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Hinkley compressor station, in the Mojave Desert 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles, is used to compress natural gas as it is transported through a pipeline from Texas to California. Between 1952 and 1964, cooling water used at the compressor station was treated with a compound containing chromium to prevent corrosion. After cooling, the wastewater was discharged to unlined ponds, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2013). Since 1964, cooling-water management practices have been used that do not contribute chromium to groundwater.In 2007, a PG&E study of the natural background concentrations of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater estimated average concentrations in the Hinkley area to be 1.2 micrograms per liter (μg/L), with a 95-percent upper-confidence limit of 3.1 μg/L (CH2M-Hill, 2007). The 3.1 μg/L upper-confidence limit was adopted by the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) as the maximum background concentration used to map the plume extent. In response to criticism of the study’s methodology, and an increase in the mapped extent of the plume between 2008 and 2011, the Lahontan RWQCB (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2012) agreed that the 2007 PG&E background-concentration study be updated.The purpose of the updated background study is to evaluate the presence of natural and man-made Cr(VI) near Hinkley, Calif. The study also is to estimate natural background Cr(VI) concentrations in the aquifer upgradient and downgradient from the mapped Cr(VI) contamination plume, as well as in the plume and near its margins. The study was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with a technical working group (TWG) composed of community members, the Independent Review Panel (IRP) Manager (Project Navigator, Ltd.), the Lahontan RWQCB, PG&E, and consultants for PG&E.&E.

  20. Helping Students make the transition from novice learner of ground-water concepts to expert using the Plume Busters software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, P.A.; Bohling, G.; Thompson, K.W.; Townsend, M.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental and earth science students are novice learners and lack the experience needed to rise to the level of expert. To address this problem we have developed the prototype Plume Busters?? software as a capstone educational experience, in which students take on the role of an environmental consultant. Following a pipeline spill, the environmental consultant is hired by the pipeline owner to locate the resulting plume created by spill and remediate the contaminated aquifer at minimum monetary and time cost. The contamination must be removed from the aquifer before it reaches the river and eventually a downstream public water supply. The software consists of an interactive Java application and accompanying HTML linked pages. The application simulates movement of a plume from a pipeline break throug h a shallow alluvial aquifer towards the river. The accompanying web pages establish the simulated contamination scenario and provide students with background material on ground-water flow and transport principles. To make the role-play more realistic, the student must consider cost and time when making decisions about siting observation wells and wells for the pump-and-treat remediation system.

  1. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  2. Influence of volcanic history on groundwater patterns on the west slope of the Oregon High Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Jefferson; G. Grant; T. Rose

    2006-01-01

    Spring systems on the west slope of the Oregon High Cascades exhibit complex relationships among modern topography, lava flow geometries, and groundwater flow patterns. Seven cold springs were continuously monitored for discharge and temperature in the 2004 water year, and they were periodically sampled for ?18O, ?D, tritium, and dissolved noble gases. Anomalously high...

  3. Oxygen, hydrogen, and helium isotopes for investigating groundwater systems of the Cape Verde Islands, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, K.D.; Gingerich, S.B.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotopes (??18O, ??2H), tritium (3H), and helium isotopes (3He, 4He) were used for evaluating groundwater recharge sources, flow paths, and residence times of three watersheds in the Cape Verde Islands (West Africa). Stable isotopes indicate the predominance of high-elevation precipitation that undergoes little evaporation prior to groundwater recharge. In contrast to other active oceanic hotspots, environmental tracers show that deep geothermal circulation does not strongly affect groundwater. Low tritium concentrations at seven groundwater sites indicate groundwater residence times of more than 50 years. Higher tritium values at other sites suggest some recent recharge. High 4He and 3He/4He ratios precluded 3H/3He dating at six sites. These high 3He/4He ratios (R/Ra values of up to 8.3) are consistent with reported mantle derived helium of oceanic island basalts in Cape Verde and provided end-member constraints for improved dating at seven other locations. Tritium and 3H/3He dating shows that S??o Nicolau Island's Ribeira Faj?? Basin has groundwater residence times of more than 50 years, whereas Fogo Island's Mosteiros Basin and Santo Ant??o Island's Ribeira Paul Basin contain a mixture of young and old groundwater. Young ages at selected sites within these two basins indicate local recharge and potential groundwater susceptibility to surface contamination and/or salt-water intrusion. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  4. Interaction of Rahaliya-Ekhedhur groundwater with the aquifer rock, West Razzaza Lake, Central Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbas, Moutaz A.

    2016-09-01

    The groundwater of Dammam aquifer in Rahaliya-Ekhedhur area, West Razzaza, Iraq, was studied to identify the main hydrogeochemical processes and the groundwater-rock interaction. The results indicated that Na+ and SO4 2- are the dominant ions in the groundwater. The average contribution of cations in the aquifer is Na+ + K+ (24.7 %), Ca2+ (13.9 %), and Mg2+ (11.4 %), while anions contribution is SO4 2- (23.0 %), Cl- (20.7 %), and HCO3 - (6.3 %). The groundwater characterized by neutral to slightly alkaline hard water, excessively mineralized, and slightly brackish water type. Rock-water interaction processes are identified to include dissolution of carbonates, sulfates, halite, and clay minerals, leaching, and cation exchanges, with little impact of evaporation.

  5. Integrated assessment of groundwater resources in the Ouémé basin, Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, R.; Sonneveld, B. G. J. S.; Götzinger, J.; Keyzer, M. A.; Pande, S.; Printz, A.; Gaiser, T.

    An integrated assessment of groundwater resources in Benin, West Africa was performed within the framework of the EC-funded research project RIVERTWIN ( www.rivertwin.org). The assessment included a spatial analysis of groundwater relevant parameters taken from more than 4000 wells stored in a countrywide water database (BDI - Banque des Données Intégrée) and an estimation of the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge using a modified version of the hydrological model HBV. Additionally, a socio-economic assessment of the impacts of groundwater availability and accessibility on national health issues as well as an assessment of groundwater development costs was carried out. The analysis revealed particularly unfavourable conditions for groundwater use in the northern part of the country where groundwater recharge during the wet season does not lead to the formation of persistent groundwater storage in its shallow, unconfined aquifers. Poor storage capacity and hydraulic properties of the deeper fractured aquifers additionally limit the capacity of individual wells to capture groundwater recharge. Including climate change scenarios forecasting less precipitation (generated from global climate models (GCM) based on IPCC scenarios) indicates that the situation in water scarce regions will worsen, as recharge volumes lessen and occur over a shorter time period. Drilling more wells may be a limited option to capture larger portions of the recharge, since the capture zone and therefore the regional influence of existing wells is rather small. In the south, deeper confined aquifers guarantee better and more reliable yields, yet the lack of long-term monitoring and groundwater age data does not allow an appraisal of the limits of the sustainable use of these aquifers. Finally, it has been shown that access to suitable aquifers and diarrhea prevalence are spatially correlated. Access to groundwater is thereby not only a function of aquifer suitability

  6. Multi-component reactive transport modeling of natural attenuation of an acid groundwater plume at a uranium mill tailings site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Hu, Fang Q.; Burden, David S.

    2001-11-01

    Natural attenuation of an acidic plume in the aquifer underneath a uranium mill tailings pond in Wyoming, USA was simulated using the multi-component reactive transport code PHREEQC. A one-dimensional model was constructed for the site and the model included advective-dispersive transport, aqueous speciation of 11 components, and precipitation-dissolution of six minerals. Transport simulation was performed for a reclamation scenario in which the source of acidic seepage will be terminated after 5 years and the plume will then be flushed by uncontaminated upgradient groundwater. Simulations show that successive pH buffer reactions with calcite, Al(OH) 3(a), and Fe(OH) 3(a) create distinct geochemical zones and most reactions occur at the boundaries of geochemical zones. The complex interplay of physical transport processes and chemical reactions produce multiple concentration waves. For SO 42- transport, the concentration waves are related to advection-dispersion, and gypsum precipitation and dissolution. Wave speeds from numerical simulations compare well to an analytical solution for wave propagation.

  7. Hydrochemical and microbiological quality of groundwater in West Thrace Region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özler, H. Murat; Aydın, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to do a preliminary assessment of the hydrochemical and microbial groundwater quality of the West Thrace region. Forty samples of groundwater collected from Edirne (Site 1) to Gelibolu (Site 2) were assessed for their suitability for human consumption. As3- was non-detectable in all the groundwater and Zn2+, Pb2+, F-, Cu2+, NH{4/+}, Cn- PO{4/3-} and Cl- were all below their respective European Union drinking water directive (EU-DWD) and Turkish food codex-drinking water directive (TFC-DWD). Maximum Acceptable Concentrations (MAC) Ni2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ levels were detected in upper maximum acceptable concentrations 77.5, 42.5, 35.0, 50.0, 50.0, and 32.5% of the groundwater samples, respectively. However, in terms of Cr3+, Ni2+ and Pb2+, the differences between groundwaters of Sites 1 and 2 were significant ( p Enterococcus spp., Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus spp. and P. aeruginosa were detected in 25, 17.5, 15, 47.5, 15, 27.5, and 15% of the groundwater samples, respectively. Furthermore, heavy metals and trace elements were found after chemical analyzes in most samples. The pollution of groundwater come from a variety of sources, Meric and Ergene rivers, including land application of agricultural chemicals and organics wastes, infiltration of irrigation water, septic tanks, and infiltration of effluent from sewage treatment plants, pits, lagoons and ponds used storage.

  8. The Biogeochemistry of Contaminant Groundwater Plumes Arising from Waste Disposal Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    for natural attenuation of specific organic contaminants in a leachate plume. The complexity of this system is exemplified with the presentation of two comprehensive field studies at the Norman Landfill (United States) and the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark). The key findings from these integrated studies...... and the literature are the following: (1) Local hydrogeological conditions in the landfill area may affect the spreading of the contaminants; (2) investigations of landfill leachate plumes in geologic settings with clayey till deposits and fractured consolidated sediments are lacking; (3) the size of the landfill...... processes may be an obstacle for the implementation of natural attenuation as a remedy. These findings highlight that demonstration of natural attenuation in terms of contaminant mass reduction at the field scale is difficult. However, very few alternatives to natural attenuation exist for remediation...

  9. Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvent Ground-Water Plumes Discharging into Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    ground water in highly saline wetlands (Swanson et al., 1984), and the distribution of marsh marigold (Caltha palustris L.) has been used to map...seeps and springs next to a lake and in wetlands in Minnesota (Rosenberry et al., 2000). Marsh marigold favors ground-water discharge areas across the

  10. Modelling the effects of climate and land cover change on groundwater recharge in south-west Western Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawes, W; Ali, R; Varma, S; Emelyanova, I; Hodgson, G; McFarlane, D

    2012-01-01

      The groundwater resource contained within the sandy aquifers of the Swan Coastal Plain, south-west Western Australia, provides approximately 60 percent of the drinking water for the metropolitan population of Perth...

  11. A Modified DRASTIC Approach to Shallow Groundwater Vulnerability in the West Lake Watershed in Hangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The quality of shallow groundwater in the West Lake watershed was investigated from March to July 2000. Integrating with Blackland GRASS GIS system, the DRASTIC model was used to compile the groundwater vulnerability map. A land use factor was added to the DRASTIC model and the modified model (LDRASTIC) increased the accuracy of prediction from 26.9% to 51.3%. The vulnerability map showed that the lowly, moderately and highly susceptible area predicted occupied about 11.6%, 70.9% and 17.5% of the whole watershed, respectively. Compared with the observed values of nitrate and electric conductivity, the LDRASTIC index improved the Pearson correlation coefficients from -0.010 to 0.237 and 0.380 to 0.503;both the improved coefficients were significant at the 0.01 level. The modified DRASTIC analysis showed a great potential as a screening tool for policy decision-making in groundwater management.``

  12. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  13. Interannual to multidecadal climate forcings on groundwater resources of the U.S. West Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Elzie M; Gurdak, Jason J.; Dickinson, Jesse; Ferre, T.P.A; Corona, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Study regionThe U.S. West Coast, including the Pacific Northwest and California Coastal Basins aquifer systems.Study focusGroundwater response to interannual to multidecadal climate variability has important implications for security within the water–energy–food nexus. Here we use Singular Spectrum Analysis to quantify the teleconnections between AMO, PDO, ENSO, and PNA and precipitation and groundwater level fluctuations. The computer program DAMP was used to provide insight on the influence of soil texture, depth to water, and mean and period of a surface infiltration flux on the damping of climate signals in the vadose zone.New hydrological insights for the regionWe find that PDO, ENSO, and PNA have significant influence on precipitation and groundwater fluctuations across a north-south gradient of the West Coast, but the lower frequency climate modes (PDO) have a greater influence on hydrologic patterns than higher frequency climate modes (ENSO and PNA). Low frequency signals tend to be preserved better in groundwater fluctuations than high frequency signals, which is a function of the degree of damping of surface variable fluxes related to soil texture, depth to water, mean and period of the infiltration flux. The teleconnection patterns that exist in surface hydrologic processes are not necessarily the same as those preserved in subsurface processes, which are affected by damping of some climate variability signals within infiltrating water.

  14. The potential for groundwater contamination along basin margins in the arid west: Alluvial fans and lake features

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Calvin G.; Oaks, Robert Q.; Peter T. Kolesar; Fisk, Edward P.

    1981-01-01

    Many towns of the arid west were built upon alluvial fans and upon sites underlain by Pleistocene lake deposits. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impact of these activities of man upon groundwater quality within these geological features. Emphasis was placed on shallow groundwater quality after it was determined that deep groundwater is rarely contaminated at such sites. A reconnaissance of...

  15. Changes in ground-water quality in the Canal Creek Aquifer between 1995 and 2000-2001, West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Daniel J.; Fleck, William B.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1917, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland has been the primary chemical-warfare research and development center for the U.S. Army. Ground-water contamination has been documented in the Canal Creek aquifer because of past disposal of chemical and ordnance manufacturing waste. Comprehensive sampling for volatile organic compounds in ground water by the U.S. Geological Survey in the West Branch Canal Creek area was done in June?October 1995 and June?August 2000. The purpose of this report is (1) to compare volatile organic compound concentrations and determine changes in the ground-water contaminant plumes along two cross sections between 1995 and 2000, and (2) to incorporate data from new piezometers sampled in spring 2001 into the plume descriptions. Along the southern cross section, total concentrations of volatile organic compounds in 1995 were determined to be highest in the landfill area east of the wetland (5,200 micrograms per liter), and concentrations were next highest deep in the aquifer near the center of the wetland (3,300 micrograms per liter at 35 feet below land surface). When new piezometers were sampled in 2001, higher carbon tetrachloride and chloroform concentrations (2,000 and 2,900 micrograms per liter) were detected deep in the aquifer 38 feet below land surface, west of the 1995 sampling. A deep area in the aquifer close to the eastern edge of the wetland and a shallow area just east of the creek channel showed declines in total volatile organic compound concentrations of more than 25 percent, whereas between those two areas, con-centrations generally showed an increase of greater than 25 percent between 1995 and 2000. Along the northern cross section, total concentrations of volatile organic compounds in ground water in both 1995 and 2000 were determined to be highest (greater than 2,000 micrograms per liter) in piezometers located on the east side of the section, farthest from the creek channel, and concentrations were progressively lower

  16. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Baseline review of three groundwater plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry; et al.

    2002-09-26

    During the closeout session, members of the technical assistance team conveyed to the site how impressed they were at the thoroughness of the site's investigation and attempts at remediation. Team members were uniformly pleased at the skilled detection work to identify sources, make quick remediation decisions, and change course when a strategy did not work well. The technical assistance team also noted that, to their knowledge, this is the only DOE site at which a world-class scientist has had primary responsibility for the environmental restoration activities. This has undoubtedly contributed to the successes observed and DOE should take careful note. The following overall recommendations were agreed upon: (1) The site has done a phenomenal job of characterization and identifying and removing source terms. (2) Technologies selected to date are appropriate and high impact, e.g. collection trenches are an effective remedial strategy for this complicated geology. The site should continue using technology that is adapted to the site's unique geology, such as the collection trenches. (3) The site should develop a better way to determine the basis of cleanup for all sites. (4) The sentinel well system should be evaluated and modified, if needed, to assure that the sentinel wells provide coverage to the current site boundary. Potential modifications could include installation, abandonment or relocation of wells based on the large amount of data collected since the original sentinel well system was designed. (5) Modeling to assist in remedial design and communication should continue. (6) The site should develop a plan to ensure institutional memory. (7) The most likely possibility for improving closure to 2006 is by removing the residual source of the Old Town plume and establishing the efficacy of remediation for the 51/64 plume.

  17. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the

  18. Groundwater quality in Imphal West district, Manipur, India, with multivariate statistical analysis of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Elangbam J K; Gupta, Abhik; Singh, N R

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze the groundwater quality of Imphal West district, Manipur, India, and assess its suitability for drinking, domestic, and agricultural use. Eighteen physico-chemical variables were analyzed in groundwater from 30 different hand-operated tube wells in urban, suburban, and rural areas in two seasons. The data were subjected to uni-, bi-, and multivariate statistical analysis, the latter comprising cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA), and factor analysis (FA). Arsenic concentrations exceed the Indian standard in 23.3% and the WHO limit in 73.3% of the groundwater sources with only 26.7% in the acceptable range. Several variables like iron, chloride, sodium, sulfate, total dissolved solids, and turbidity are also beyond their desirable limits for drinking water in a number of sites. Sodium concentrations and sodium absorption ratio (SAR) are both high to render the water from the majority of the sources unsuitable for agricultural use. Multivariate statistical techniques, especially varimax rotation of PCA data helped to bring to focus the hidden yet important variables and understand their roles in influencing groundwater quality. Widespread arsenic contamination and high sodium concentration of groundwater pose formidable constraints towards its exploitation for drinking and other domestic and agricultural use in the study area, although urban anthropogenic impacts are not yet pronounced.

  19. Factors controlling groundwater hydrogeochemistry in the area west of Tahta, Sohag, Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, Mostafa; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed A.

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality suffers from various degradation mechanisms such as extensive urbanization, agricultural and industrial activities in many developing countries. This study was carried out to identify the factors responsible for the change in the hydrogeochemistry of groundwater in the area west of Tahta, Sohag, Upper Egypt. The Piper diagrams show the predominance of Na-Cl (75%) with minor Ca-Na-HCO3 and Ca-Cl water-types. The equiline diagrams and ionic ratios show the dominance of Ca2+ + Mg2+ over Na+ + K+ and HCO3- + SO42- over Cl- suggesting silicate minerals dissolution and reverse ion exchange reactions Results of Gibb's diagram revealed that the chemical budget of the groundwater in this area is mainly derived from water-rock interaction and evaporation-crystallization dominances. The R-mode factor analysis applied to quantify the chemical characteristics of groundwater and the anthropogenic impacts that affect groundwater quality, revealed that the Pliocene clays are the major sources of Cl- and Na+ in the groundwater due to silicate minerals dissolution and ion exchange reactions and, Ca2+ and Mg2+ are mainly from dissolution of carbonates and silicate minerals abundant in the Pleistocene Qena Formation lithologies. Higher concentration of SO42- at the newly reclaimed lands may be due to the effect of rainfall, addition of potassium sulfates fertilizers to the agricultural soils and gypsum-anhydrite dissolution. The results of this study suggest that the R-mode factor analysis combined with the geological-hydrogeological analyses of the aquifer is useful in recognizing the geochemical trends and identifying the anthropogenic sources affecting the groundwater quality.

  20. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget of the Kitsap Peninsula, west-central Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater-flow system on the Kitsap Peninsula, and includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework, groundwater recharge and discharge, groundwater levels and flow directions, seasonal groundwater-level fluctuations, interactions between aquifers and the surface‑water system, and a water budget. The Kitsap Peninsula is in the Puget Sound lowland of west-central Washington, is bounded by Puget Sound on the east and by Hood Canal on the west, and covers an area of about 575 square miles. The peninsula encompasses all of Kitsap County, the part of Mason County north of Hood Canal, and part of Pierce County west of Puget Sound. The peninsula is surrounded by saltwater and the hydrologic setting is similar to that of an island. The study area is underlain by a thick sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and volcanic bedrock units that crop out in the central part of the study area. Geologic units were grouped into 12 hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers, confining units, and an underlying bedrock unit. A surficial hydrogeologic unit map was developed and used with well information from 2,116 drillers’ logs to construct 6 hydrogeologic sections and unit extent and thickness maps. Unconsolidated aquifers typically consist of moderately to well-sorted alluvial and glacial outwash deposits of sand, gravel, and cobbles, with minor lenses of silt and clay. These units often are discontinuous or isolated bodies and are of highly variable thickness. Unconfined conditions occur in areas where aquifer units are at land surface; however, much of the study area is mantled by glacial till, and confined aquifer conditions are common. Groundwater in the unconsolidated aquifers generally flows radially off the peninsula in the direction of Puget Sound and Hood Canal. These generalized flow patterns likely are complicated by the presence of low

  1. Groundwater recharge and flow on Montserrat, West Indies: Insights from groundwater dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioch Hemmings

    2015-09-01

    New hydrological insights: δ2H and δ18O analysis indicates uniform recharge elevations for groundwaters on Montserrat. CFC-11 and CFC-12 analysis reveals age differences between isotopically similar, high elevation springs and low elevation aquifer waters. Low CFC concentrations within a confined low elevation aquifer suggest water ages of ∼45 years. High CFC concentrations in the northern and western springs are explained by rapid infiltration of cool (high CFC concentration rainfall into saturated compartments, with flow through the vadose zone to the phreatic zone dominated by compartment flow. Lower CFC concentrations in a number of aligned warmer springs suggest a contribution from older, warmer waters from depth. Temperatures and CFC concentrations indicate older component supply rates of up to 8 L/s to the highest yielding spring on Centre Hills, with contributions of up to 75% in the warmest spring waters.

  2. Groundwater arsenic contamination in Burkina Faso, West Africa: Predicting and verifying regions at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretzler, Anja; Lalanne, Franck; Nikiema, Julien; Podgorski, Joel; Pfenninger, Numa; Berg, Michael; Schirmer, Mario

    2017-04-15

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater from crystalline basement rocks in West Africa has only been documented in isolated areas and presents a serious health threat in a region already facing multiple challenges related to water quality and scarcity. We present a comprehensive dataset of arsenic concentrations from drinking water wells in rural Burkina Faso (n=1498), of which 14.6% are above 10μg/L. Included in this dataset are 269 new samples from regions where no published water quality data existed. We used multivariate logistic regression with arsenic measurements as calibration data and maps of geology and mineral deposits as independent predictor variables to create arsenic prediction models at concentration thresholds of 5, 10 and 50μg/L. These hazard maps delineate areas vulnerable to groundwater arsenic contamination in Burkina Faso. Bedrock composed of schists and volcanic rocks of the Birimian formation, potentially harbouring arsenic-containing sulphide minerals, has the highest probability of yielding groundwater arsenic concentrations >10μg/L. Combined with population density estimates, the arsenic prediction models indicate that ~560,000 people are potentially exposed to arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Burkina Faso. The same arsenic-bearing geological formations that are positive predictors for elevated arsenic concentrations in Burkina Faso also exist in neighbouring countries such as Mali, Ghana and Ivory Coast. This study's results are thus of transboundary relevance and can act as a trigger for targeted water quality surveys and mitigation efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CO2 driven weathering vs plume driven weathering as inferred from the groundwater of a persistently degassing basaltic volcano: Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Marcello; D'Alessandro, Walter

    2016-04-01

    At Mt. Etna the presence of a persistent volcanic plume provides large amounts of volcanogenic elements to the bulk deposition along its flanks. The volcanic plume consists of solid particles, acidic droplets and gaseous species. After H2O and CO2, S, Cl and F represent the most abundant volatile elements emitted as gaseous species from the craters. During rain events acidic gases interact rapidly with droplets lowering the pH of rain. This process favors the dissolution and dissociation of the most acidic gases. Under these conditions, the chemical weathering of volcanic rocks and ashes is promoted by the acid rain during its infiltration. Subsequently during groundwater circulation, chemical weathering of volcanic rocks is also driven by the huge amount of deep magmatic carbon dioxide (CO2) coming up through the volcanic edifice and dissolving in the water. These two different weathering steps occur under very different conditions. The former occurs in a highly acidic environment (pH carbonic acid (H2CO3) after the hydration of CO2. The relative contributions of plume-derived elements/weathering and CO2-driven weathering has been computed for each element. In addition, the comparison between the chemical compositions of the bulk deposition and of groundwater provides a new understanding about the mobility of volatile elements. Other processes such as ion exchange, iddingsite formation, and carbonate precipitation can also play roles, but only to minor extents. The proposed approach has revealed that the persistent plume strongly affects the chemical composition of groundwater at Mt. Etna and probably also at other volcanoes characterized by huge open-conduit degassing activity.

  4. Hydrogeologic Setting and Ground-Water Flow in the Leetown Area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; Weary, David J.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2007-01-01

    The Leetown Science Center is a research facility operated by the U.S. Geological Survey that occupies approximately 455-acres near Kearneysville, Jefferson County, West Virginia. Aquatic and fish research conducted at the Center requires adequate supplies of high-quality, cold ground water. Three large springs and three production wells currently (in 2006) supply water to the Center. The recent construction of a second research facility (National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture) operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and co-located on Center property has placed additional demands on available water resources in the area. A three-dimensional steady-state finite-difference ground-water flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the Leetown area and was used to assess the availability of ground water to sustain current and anticipated future demands. The model also was developed to test a conceptual model of ground-water flow in the complex karst aquifer system in the Leetown area. Due to the complexity of the karst aquifer system, a multidisciplinary research study was required to define the hydrogeologic setting. Geologic mapping, surface- and borehole-geophysical surveys, stream base-flow surveys, and aquifer tests were conducted to provide the hydrogeologic data necessary to develop and calibrate the model. It would not have been possible to develop a numerical model of the study area without the intensive data collection and methods developments components of the larger, more comprehensive hydrogeologic investigation. Results of geologic mapping and surface-geophysical surveys verified the presence of several prominent thrust faults and identified additional faults and other complex geologic structures (including overturned anticlines and synclines) in the area. These geologic structures are known to control ground-water flow in the region. Results of this study indicate that cross-strike faults and fracture zones are major

  5. Groundwater-quality data for a treated-wastewater plume near the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Ashumet Valley, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Barber, Larry B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Hart, Charles P.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Parsons, Luke A.

    2012-01-01

    A plume of contaminated groundwater extends from former disposal beds at the Massachusetts Military Reservation's wastewater-treatment plant toward Ashumet Pond, coastal ponds, and Vineyard Sound, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Treated sewage-derived wastewater was discharged to the rapid-infiltration beds for nearly 60 years before the disposal site was moved to a different location in December 1995. Water-quality samples were collected from monitoring wells, multilevel samplers, and profile borings to characterize the nature and extent of the contaminated groundwater and to observe the water-quality changes after the wastewater disposal ceased. Data are presented here for water samples collected in 2007 from 394 wells (at 121 well-cluster locations) and 780 multilevel-sampler ports (at 42 locations) and in 2006-08 at 306 depth intervals in profile borings (at 20 locations) in and near the treated-wastewater plume. Analyses of these water samples for field parameters (specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen and phosphate concentrations, and alkalinity); absorbance of ultraviolet/visible light; and concentrations of nitrous oxide, dissolved organic carbon, methylene blue active substances, selected anions and nutrients, including nitrate and ammonium, and selected inorganic solutes, including cations, anions, and minor elements, are presented in tabular format. The natural restoration of the sand and gravel aquifer after removal of the treated-wastewater source, along with interpretations of the water quality in the treated-wastewater plume, have been documented in several published reports that are listed in the references.

  6. Hydrogeology, groundwater flow, and groundwater quality of an abandoned underground coal-mine aquifer, Elkhorn Area, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Britton, James Q.; Blake, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    The Pocahontas No. 3 coal seam in southern West Virginia has been extensively mined by underground methods since the 1880’s. An extensive network of abandoned mine entries in the Pocahontas No. 3 has since filled with good-quality water, which is pumped from wells or springs discharging from mine portals (adits), and used as a source of water for public supplies. This report presents results of a three-year investigation of the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and groundwater flow processes within abandoned underground coal mines used as a source of water for public supply in the Elkhorn area, McDowell County, West Virginia. This study focused on large (> 500 gallon per minute) discharges from the abandoned mines used as public supplies near Elkhorn, West Virginia. Median recharge calculated from base-flow recession of streamflow at Johns Knob Branch and 12 other streamflow gaging stations in McDowell County was 9.1 inches per year. Using drainage area versus mean streamflow relationships from mined and unmined watersheds in McDowell County, the subsurface area along dip of the Pocahontas No. 3 coal-mine aquifer contributing flow to the Turkey Gap mine discharge was determined to be 7.62 square miles (mi2), almost 10 times larger than the 0.81 mi2 surface watershed. Results of this investigation indicate that groundwater flows down dip beneath surface drainage divides from areas up to six miles east in the adjacent Bluestone River watershed. A conceptual model was developed that consisted of a stacked sequence of perched aquifers, controlled by stress-relief and subsidence fractures, overlying a highly permeable abandoned underground coal-mine aquifer, capable of substantial interbasin transfer of water. Groundwater-flow directions are controlled by the dip of the Pocahontas No. 3 coal seam, the geometry of abandoned mine workings, and location of unmined barriers within that seam, rather than surface topography. Seven boreholes were drilled to intersect

  7. Movement of a tritium plume in shallow groundwater at a legacy low-level radioactive waste disposal site in eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C E; Cendón, D I; Harrison, J J; Hankin, S I; Johansen, M P; Payne, T E; Vine, M; Collins, R N; Hoffmann, E L; Loosz, T

    2011-10-01

    Between 1960 and 1968 low-level radioactive waste was buried in a series of shallow trenches near the Lucas Heights facility, south of Sydney, Australia. Groundwater monitoring carried out since the mid 1970s indicates that with the exception of tritium, no radioactivity above typical background levels has been detected outside the immediate vicinity of the trenches. The maximum tritium level detected in ground water was 390 kBq/L and the median value was 5400 Bq/L, decay corrected to the time of disposal. Since 1968, a plume of tritiated water has migrated from the disposal trenches and extends at least 100 m from the source area. Tritium in rainfall is negligible, however leachate from an adjacent and fill represents a significant additional tritium source. Study data indicate variation in concentration levels and plume distribution in response to wet and dry climatic periods and have been used to determine pathways for tritium migration through the subsurface.

  8. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system of the Kitsap Peninsula, west-central Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2016-05-05

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to improve understanding of water resources on the Kitsap Peninsula. The Kitsap Peninsula is in the Puget Sound lowland of west-central Washington, is bounded by Puget Sound on the east and by Hood Canal on the west, and covers an area of about 575 square miles. The peninsula encompasses all of Kitsap County, Mason County north of Hood Canal, and part of Pierce County west of Puget Sound. The peninsula is surrounded by saltwater, and the hydrologic setting is similar to that of an island. The study area is underlain by a thick sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and volcanic bedrock units that crop out in the central part of the study area. Twelve hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers, confining units, and an underlying bedrock unit form the basis of the groundwater-flow model.Groundwater flow on the Kitsap Peninsula was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW‑NWT. The finite difference model grid comprises 536 rows, 362 columns, and 14 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 500 by 500 feet, and the model contains a total of 1,227,772 active cells. Groundwater flow was simulated for transient conditions. Transient conditions were simulated for January 1985–December 2012 using annual stress periods for 1985–2004 and monthly stress periods for 2005–2012. During model calibration, variables were adjusted within probable ranges to minimize differences between measured and simulated groundwater levels and stream baseflows. As calibrated to transient conditions, the model has a standard deviation for heads and flows of 47.04 feet and 2.46 cubic feet per second, respectively.Simulated inflow to the model area for the 2005–2012 period from precipitation and secondary recharge was 585,323 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) (93 percent of total simulated inflow ignoring changes in storage), and simulated inflow from stream and lake leakage was 43

  9. Evaluating the suitability of groundwater for irrigational purposes in some selected districts of the Upper West region of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, Musah; Aidoo, Felix; Hayford, Michael Saah; Adomako, Dickson; Asare, Enoch

    2015-03-01

    Groundwater is a very important asset to the people of the Upper West region of the Ghana where majority of them are farmers. Groundwater serves as the most reliable source of water for their domestic and agricultural activities. This study was aimed at assessing the suitability of groundwater for irrigational purposes in some selected communities of five districts where farming activities are very intensive. Twenty-three groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major anions and cations. Physicochemical parameters such as electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) were also measured. From the results of the analyses and measurements, the suitability of the groundwater for irrigation were evaluated based on the TDS, EC, percentage sodium (%Na), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), permeability index (PI), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR), Kelly's ratio (KR) and chloro-alkaline Indices (CAI). US salinity laboratory diagram and Wilcox diagrams were also applied. The EC results show that the groundwater in the study area can be classified as none and slight to moderate. According to the US salinity diagram, groundwater in the study area falls within the low salinity-low sodium hazard and medium salinity-low sodium hazard class. The %Na and the resulting Wilcox diagram also classify the groundwater as excellent to good and good to permissible. The groundwater in the study area is generally good for irrigation purposes. However, there are few instances which are problematic and would require special irrigation methods.

  10. Evaluating the suitability of groundwater for irrigational purposes in some selected districts of the Upper West region of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, Musah; Aidoo, Felix; Hayford, Michael Saah; Adomako, Dickson; Asare, Enoch

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater is a very important asset to the people of the Upper West region of the Ghana where majority of them are farmers. Groundwater serves as the most reliable source of water for their domestic and agricultural activities. This study was aimed at assessing the suitability of groundwater for irrigational purposes in some selected communities of five districts where farming activities are very intensive. Twenty-three groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major anions and cations. Physicochemical parameters such as electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS) were also measured. From the results of the analyses and measurements, the suitability of the groundwater for irrigation were evaluated based on the TDS, EC, percentage sodium (%Na), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), permeability index (PI), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR), Kelly's ratio (KR) and chloro-alkaline Indices (CAI). US salinity laboratory diagram and Wilcox diagrams were also applied. The EC results show that the groundwater in the study area can be classified as none and slight to moderate. According to the US salinity diagram, groundwater in the study area falls within the low salinity-low sodium hazard and medium salinity-low sodium hazard class. The %Na and the resulting Wilcox diagram also classify the groundwater as excellent to good and good to permissible. The groundwater in the study area is generally good for irrigation purposes. However, there are few instances which are problematic and would require special irrigation methods.

  11. Assessment of metal contamination in groundwater and soils in the Ahangaran mining district, west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Behzad; Mehrabani, Shiva; Rafiei, Behrouz; Yaghoubi, Behrouz

    2015-12-01

    In this study, 28 groundwater and 13 soil samples from Ahangaran mining district in Hamedan Province, west of Iran were collected to evaluate the level of contamination. Average concentrations of As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb, and Ni in groundwater samples were 1.39, 3.73, 2.18, 9.37, 2.35, 4.44, and 5.50 μg/L (wet season), and 11.64, 4.92, 4.32, 14.77, 5.43, 4.12, and 0.98 μg/L (dry season), respectively. Results of groundwater samples analysis showed that the average of analyzed metals in the wet and dry seasons were below the permissible limits, except As in the dry season which displays concentrations that exceed US EPA water quality criteria recommended for drinking water. Also, the heavy metal pollution index (HPI) values in each sampling station were less than the critical index limit and were suitable for drinking. Factor analysis revealed that variables influential to groundwater quality in one season may not be as important in another season. Average concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn in soil samples were 2.61, 31.44, 0.51, 55.90, 1284.9, 21.26, and 156.04 mg kg(-1), respectively. The results of the geoaccumulation index (I geo) showed the following decreasing order: Pb > Zn > Cu > As > Sb > Cd > Ag. Potential ecological risk index (RI) suggests that the contamination in the investigated area is moderate to very high risk and the ranking of the contaminants in decreasing order is Ag > Sb > Pb > Cd > As > Cu > Zn.

  12. Assessment of groundwater quality from Bankura I and II Blocks, Bankura District, West Bengal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S. K.; Das, Shreya

    2017-02-01

    Hydrochemical evaluation of groundwater has been conducted in Bankura I and II Blocks to analyze and determining groundwater quality in the area. Thirty-six groundwater samples were analyzed for their physical and chemical properties using standard laboratory methods. The constituents have the following ranges in the water: pH 6.4-8.6, electrical conductivity 80-1900 μS/cm, total hardness 30-730 mg/l, TDS 48-1001 mg/l, Ca2+ 4.2-222.6 mg/l, Na+ 2.33-103.33 mg/l, Mg2+ 1.56-115.36 mg/l, K+ 0.67-14 mg/l and Fe BDL-2.53 mg/l, HCO3^{ - } 48.8-1000.4 mg/l, Cl- 5.6-459.86 mg/l and SO4^{ = } BDL-99.03 mg/l. Results also show that bicarbonate ions ( HCO3^{ - } ) dominate the other anions (Cl- and SO4^{2 - } ). Sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), soluble sodium percentage (SSP), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR), total hardness (TH), and permeability index (PI) were calculated as derived parameters, to investigate the ionic toxicity. Concerned chemical parameters when plotted in the U.S. Salinity diagram indicate that waters are of C1-S1, C2-S1 and C3-S1 types, i.e., low salinity and low sodium which is good for irrigation. The values of Sodium Adsorption Ratio indicate that the groundwater of the area falls under the category of low sodium hazard. So, there is neither salinity nor toxicity problem of irrigation water, and hence the ground water can safely be used for long-term irrigation. The chemical parameters when plotted in Piper's trilinear diagram are found to concentrate in the central and west central part of the diamond-shaped field. Based on the analytical results, groundwater in the area is found to be generally fresh and hard to very hard. The abundance of the major ions is as follows: HCO3 > Cl > SO4 and Ca > Na > Mg > K > Fe. Results also show that bicarbonate ions ( HCO3^{ - } ) dominate the other anions (Cl- and SO4^{2 - } ). According to Gibbs diagrams samples fall in the rock dominance field and the chemical quality of

  13. Surface-Water and Groundwater Interactions along the Withlacoochee River, West-Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommer, J.T.; Yobbi, D.K.; McBride, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    A study of the Withlacoochee River watershed in west-central Florida was conducted from October 2003 to March 2007 to gain a better understanding of the hydrology and surface-water and groundwater interactions along the river. The Withlacoochee River originates in the Green Swamp area in north-central Polk County and flows northerly through seven counties, emptying into the Gulf of Mexico. This study includes only the part of the watershed located between the headwaters in the Green Swamp and the U.S. Geological Survey gaging station near Holder, Florida. The Withlacoochee River within the study area is about 108 miles long and drains about 1,820 square miles. The Withlacoochee River watershed is underlain by thick sequences of carbonate rock that are covered by thin surficial deposits of unconsolidated sand and sandy clay. The clay layer is breached in many places because of the karst nature of the underlying limestone, and the degree of confinement between the Upper Florida aquifer and the surficial aquifer is highly variable throughout the watershed. The potential for movement of water from the surface or shallow deposits to deeper deposits, or from deeper deposits to the shallow deposits, exists throughout the Withlacoochee River watershed. Water levels were higher in deeper Upper Floridan aquifer wells than in shallow Upper Floridan aquifer wells or surficial aquifer wells at 11 of 19 paired or nested well sites, indicating potential for discharge to the surface-water system. Water levels were higher in shallow Upper Floridan aquifer or surficial aquifer wells than in deeper Upper Floridan aquifer wells at five other sites, indicating potential for recharge to the deeper Upper Floridan aquifer. Water levels in the surficial aquifer and Upper Floridan aquifer wells at the remaining three sites were virtually the same, indicating little or no confinement at the sites. Potentiometric-surface maps of the Upper Floridan aquifer indicate the pattern of groundwater

  14. Efficacy of controlled-release KMnO4 (CRP) for controlling dissolved TCE plume in groundwater: a large flow-tank study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Sun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Ki Churl; Kim, Yang Bin; Schwartz, Franklin W; Lee, Eung Seok; Woo, Nam Chil; Lee, Myoung Ki

    2009-02-01

    A well-based, reactive barrier system using controlled-release potassium permanganate (CRP system) was recently developed as a long-term treatment option for dilute plumes of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. In this study, we performed large-scale (L x W x D = 8 m x 4 m x 2 m) flow-tank experiments to examine remedial efficacy of the CRP system. A total of 110 CRP rods (OD x L=5 cm x 150 cm) were used to construct a well-based CRP system (L x W x D = 3 m x 4 m x 1.5 m) comprising three discrete barriers installed at 1-m interval downstream. Natural sands having oxidant demand of 3.7 g MnO(4)(-)kg(-1) for 500 mg L(-1)MnO(4)(-) were used as porous media. After MnO(4)(-) concentrations were somewhat stabilized (0.5-6.0 mg L(-1)), trichloroethylene (TCE) plume was flowed through the flow-tank for 53 d by supplying 1.19 m(3)d(-1) of TCE solution. Mean initial TCE concentrations were 87 microg L(-1) for first 20 d and 172 microg L(-1) for the next 33 d. During TCE treatment, flow velocity (0.60md(-1)), pH (7.0-8.2), and concentrations of dissolved metals ([Al]=0.7 mg L(-1), [Fe]=0.01 mg L(-1)) showed little variations. The MnO(2)(s) contents in the sandy media measured after the TCE treatment ranged from 21 to 26 mg kg(-1), slightly increased from mean baseline value of 17 mg kg(-1). Strengths of the TCE plume considerably diminished by the CRP system. For the 87 microg L(-1) plume, TCE concentrations decreased by 38% (53), 67% (29), and 74% (23 microg L(-1)) after 1st, 2nd, and 3rd barriers, respectively. For the 172 microg L(-1) plume, TCE concentrations decreased by 27% (125), 46% (93), and 65% (61 microg L(-1)) after 1st, 2nd, and 3rd barriers, respectively. Incomplete destruction of TCE plume was attributed to the lack of lateral dispersion in the unpumped well-based barrier system. Development of delivery systems that can facilitate lateral spreading and mixing of permanganate with contaminant plume is warranted.

  15. Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. The palaeosol model of arsenic pollution of groundwater tested along a 32 km traverse across West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M A; McArthur, J M; Sikdar, P K

    2012-08-01

    The distribution of As-pollution in groundwater of the deltaic aquifers of south-eastern Asia may be controlled by the subsurface distribution of palaeo-channel sediments (As-polluted groundwaters) and palaeo-interfluvial sediments (As-free groundwaters). To test this idea, termed the palaeosol model of As-pollution, we drilled 10 sites, analysed groundwater from 249 shallow wells (screened pollution in a further 531 wells. Our work was conducted along a 32-km traverse running W to E across southern West Bengal, India. At seven drill sites we logged a palaeo-interfluvial sequence, which occurs as three distinct units that together occupy 20 km of the traverse. These palaeo-interfluvial sequences yield As-free groundwaters from brown sands at depthpolluted groundwater in grey sands. Our findings confirm the predictions of the palaeosol model of As-pollution. We show again that well-colour can be used both to successfully predict the degree of As-pollution in groundwater, and to locate regions of buried palaeo-interfluve that will yield As-free groundwater for the foreseeable future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Arsenic contamination in shallow groundwater and agricultural soil of Chakdaha Block, West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika eShrivastava

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The study area comes in one of the eight districts of West Bengal where groundwater contains arsenic above the prescribed limit by WHO (10μg/l. Each day groundwater is being withdrawn by the village people for the fulfillment of their basic needs and for agricultural purposes. With the groundwater along with high concentration of arsenic (As, many other heavy metals are also getting introduced in the environment. In the areas with a long history of use of such groundwater, the agricultural lands have been affected severely. The extent of contamination has increased to a level where the crops grown in those lands are becoming a major source for arsenic and other heavy metals poisoning and subsequently transfer to different trophic levels. Based on this concern a somewhat detailed study was carried out to obtain an idea about the magnitude of soil and water contamination in the area. The mean concentrations (mg/kg of As (9.67, Fe (9275.58, Mn (190.04, Cu (26.53 and Zn (36.04 in the control land soils were found within the normal range. Whereas the mean As (54.40, Fe (15745.50, Mn (307.90, Cu (69.33 and Zn (44.56 were found to be in higher, mainly arsenic which is at an alarming point. In case of water samples, the pond water was having the mean concentration (μg/l of As (32.63, Fe (57.21, Mn (30.25, Cu (0.82. Whereas in case of shallow groundwater there was more increase in the case of As (76.43, Fe (5493.22, Mn (253.63, and Cu (1.825. It was also observed that Zn although present in soil samples, it was below detection limits in case of water samples. The As concentration in soil and water showed a positive correlation. Also the correlation analyses between soil arsenic and other heavy metals shows a positive co-relation with all of them.

  18. Groundwater lowering and stream incision rates in the Central Appalachian Mountains of West Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Springer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface channel incision rates are of broad geomorphological interest because they set the boundary conditions for landscape change by affecting changes in local relief and hillslope angles. We report groundwater table lowering rates associated with subsurface Buckeye Creek and the surface channel of Spring Creek in southeastern West Virginia, USA. The mountainous watersheds have drainage areas of 14 km2 and 171 km2, respectively. The lowering rates are derived from U/Th-dating of stalagmites and the paleomagnetostratigraphy of clastic sediments in Buckeye Creek Cave. The oldest stalagmites have a minimum age of 0.54 Ma and we use a minimum age of 0.778 Ma for clastic cave sediments deposited during a period of reversed magnetic polarity. The water table at Buckeye Creek has lowered at a rate of ≤40 m Ma-1. Based on the relative elevations of Buckeye and Spring creeks, the water table at Spring Creek has lowered at a rate of ≤47 m Ma-1. These values are consistent with previously published rates obtained from caves in the region, although those rates were reported as surface channel incision rates, based on the assumption local groundwaters drained to the surface channel of interest. However, the rates we report are almost certainly not simple bedrock incision rates because of autogenic processes within the cave and surrounding, well-developed fluviokarst. Caveats aside, incision rates of ≤47 m Ma-1 now appear typical of landscapes of the Appalachian Mountains and Plateau.

  19. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and

  20. Integrated geophysical application to investigate groundwater potentiality of the shallow Nubian aquifer at northern Kharga, West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Abdellatif; Soliman, Mamdouh; Moussa, Salah; Massoud, Usama; ElNabi, Sami Abd; Attia, Magdy

    2016-06-01

    Continuous evaluation of groundwater aquifers in the basin of Kharga Oasis is very important. Groundwater in Kharga Oasis represents the major factor for the development plans of this area as it is the sole source for water supplies required for drinking and irrigation purposes. This study is concerned by analyzing the groundwater potentiality of the shallow aquifer at the northern part of Kharga basin by integrated application of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) and Time domain Electromagnetic (TEM) techniques. The VES data were measured at 28 points arranged along a north-south trending line by applying Schlumberger array with a maximum current-electrode spacing (AB) of 1000 m. The TEM data were measured at 167 points arranged along 11 east-west trending lines by using a single square loop with 50 m loop-side length. The VES and TEM data have been individually inverted, where the VES models were used as initial models for TEM data inversion. The final models were used for construction of 17 geoelectrical sections and 5 contour maps describing subsurface water-bearing layers at the investigated area. Correlation of the obtained models with geologic, hydrogeologic and borehole information indicates that the shallow aquifer comprises two zones (A-up) and (B-down) separated by a highly conductive shale layer. The upper zone (A) is composed of fine to medium sand with thin clay intercalations. It exhibits low to moderate resistivities. This zone was detected at depth values ranging from 10 to 70 m below ground surface (bgs) and shows a thickness of 25-90 m. The lower zone (B) exhibits moderate to high resistivity values with expected good water quality. The upper surface of zone B was detected at 60-165 m depth.

  1. Modelling the effects of climate and land cover change on groundwater recharge in south-west Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, W.; Ali, R.; Varma, S.; Emelyanova, I.; Hodgson, G.; McFarlane, D.

    2012-05-01

    The groundwater resource contained within the sandy aquifers of the Swan Coastal Plain, south west Western Australia, provides approximately 60% of the drinking water for the metropolitan population of Perth. Rainfall decline over the past three decades coupled with increasing water demand from a growing population has resulted in falling dam storage and groundwater levels. Projected future changes in climate across south-west Western Australia consistently show a decline in annual rainfall of between 5 and 15%. There is expected to be a continuing reduction of diffuse recharge across the Swan Coastal Plain. This study aims to quantify the change in groundwater recharge in response to a range of future climate and land cover patterns across south-west Western Australia. Modelling the impact on the groundwater resource of potential climate change was achieved with a dynamically linked unsaturated/saturated groundwater model. A Vertical Flux Manager was used in the unsaturated zone to estimate groundwater recharge using a variety of simple and complex models based on land cover type (e.g. native trees, plantation, cropping, urban, wetland), soil type, and taking into account the groundwater depth. These recharge estimates were accumulated on a daily basis for both observed and projected climate scenarios and used in a MODFLOW simulation with monthly stress periods. In the area centred on the city of Perth, Western Australia, the patterns of recharge change and groundwater level change are not consistent spatially, or consistently downward. In the Dandaragan Plateau to the north-east of Perth there has been groundwater level rise since the 1970s associated with land clearing, and with rainfall projected to reduce the least in this area the groundwater levels are estimated to continue to rise. Along the coastal zone north of Perth there is an interaction between projected rainfall decline and legislated removal to pine forests. This results in areas of increasing

  2. Modelling the effects of climate and land cover change on groundwater recharge in south-west Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dawes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater resource contained within the sandy aquifers of the Swan Coastal Plain, south west Western Australia, provides approximately 60% of the drinking water for the metropolitan population of Perth. Rainfall decline over the past three decades coupled with increasing water demand from a growing population has resulted in falling dam storage and groundwater levels. Projected future changes in climate across south-west Western Australia consistently show a decline in annual rainfall of between 5 and 15%. There is expected to be a continuing reduction of diffuse recharge across the Swan Coastal Plain. This study aims to quantify the change in groundwater recharge in response to a range of future climate and land cover patterns across south-west Western Australia.

    Modelling the impact on the groundwater resource of potential climate change was achieved with a dynamically linked unsaturated/saturated groundwater model. A Vertical Flux Manager was used in the unsaturated zone to estimate groundwater recharge using a variety of simple and complex models based on land cover type (e.g. native trees, plantation, cropping, urban, wetland, soil type, and taking into account the groundwater depth. These recharge estimates were accumulated on a daily basis for both observed and projected climate scenarios and used in a MODFLOW simulation with monthly stress periods.

    In the area centred on the city of Perth, Western Australia, the patterns of recharge change and groundwater level change are not consistent spatially, or consistently downward. In the Dandaragan Plateau to the north-east of Perth there has been groundwater level rise since the 1970s associated with land clearing, and with rainfall projected to reduce the least in this area the groundwater levels are estimated to continue to rise. Along the coastal zone north of Perth there is an interaction between projected rainfall decline and legislated removal to pine forests. This

  3. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel.

  4. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity

  5. Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, R. L.; Lawrence, B. L.

    2011-06-09

    The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD2 and the ERDF Amended ROD (EPA 1999). The overall objective of the groundwater monitoring program is to determine whether ERDF has impacted the groundwater. This objective is complicated by the fact that the ERDF is situated downgradient of the numerous groundwater contamination plumes originating from the 200 West Area.

  6. Thermal-Plume fibre Optic Tracking (T-POT test for flow velocity measurement in groundwater boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Read

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop an approach for measuring in-well fluid velocities using point electrical heating combined with spatially and temporally continuous temperature monitoring using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS. The method uses a point heater to warm a discrete volume of water. The rate of advection of this plume, once the heating is stopped, equates to the average flow velocity in the well. We conducted Thermal-Plume fibre Optic Tracking (T-POT tests in a borehole in a fractured rock aquifer with the heater at the same depth and multiple pumping rates. Tracking of the thermal plume peak allowed the spatially varying velocity to be estimated up to 50 m downstream from the heating point, depending on the pumping rate. The T-POT technique can be used to estimate the velocity throughout long intervals provided that thermal dilution due to inflows, dispersion, or cooling by conduction do not render the thermal pulse unresolvable with DTS. A complete flow log may be obtained by deploying the heater at multiple depths, or with multiple point heaters.

  7. Hydrogeologic framework and occurrence, movement, and chemical characterization of groundwater in Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Jena M.; Garcia, C. Amanda; Rosen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Dixie Valley, a primarily undeveloped basin in west-central Nevada, is being considered for groundwater exportation. Proposed pumping would occur from the basin-fill aquifer. In response to proposed exportation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and Churchill County, conducted a study to improve the understanding of groundwater resources in Dixie Valley. The objective of this report is to characterize the hydrogeologic framework, the occurrence and movement of groundwater, the general water quality of the basin-fill aquifer, and the potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers in Dixie Valley. Various types of geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical data were compiled from previous studies and collected in support of this study. Hydrogeologic units in Dixie Valley were defined to characterize rocks and sediments with similar lithologies and hydraulic properties influencing groundwater flow. Hydraulic properties of the basin-fill deposits were characterized by transmissivity estimated from aquifer tests and specific-capacity tests. Groundwater-level measurements and hydrogeologic-unit data were combined to create a potentiometric surface map and to characterize groundwater occurrence and movement. Subsurface inflow from adjacent valleys into Dixie Valley through the basin-fill aquifer was evaluated using hydraulic gradients and Darcy flux computations. The chemical signature and groundwater quality of the Dixie Valley basin-fill aquifer, and potential mixing between basin-fill and geothermal aquifers, were evaluated using chemical data collected from wells and springs during the current study and from previous investigations. Dixie Valley is the terminus of the Dixie Valley flow system, which includes Pleasant, Jersey, Fairview, Stingaree, Cowkick, and Eastgate Valleys. The freshwater aquifer in the study area is composed of unconsolidated basin-fill deposits of Quaternary age. The basin-fill hydrogeologic unit

  8. Draft Technical Protocol for Characterizing Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvent Ground-Water Plumes Discharging into Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    others, 1984), and the distribution of marsh marigold (Caltha palustris L.) has been used to map seeps and springs next to a lake and in wetlands in...Minnesota (Rosenberry, 2000). Marsh marigold preferentially grows in ground-water discharge areas across the upper Midwest states and south central

  9. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  10. Groundwater quality assessment in the urban-west region of Zanzibar Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abdul A J; Rahman, Ibrahim Abdul; Lim, Lee H

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights the levels of anions (nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, bromide, chloride, and fluoride) and cations (potassium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium) in selected springs and groundwater sources in the urban-west region of Zanzibar Island. The levels of total dissolved solids (TDS) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) were also studied. Thirty water samples were collected in December 2012 from various types of water sources, which included closed hand-dug wells (CHDW), open hand-dug wells (OHDW), springwater (SW), public bore wells (PBW), and bore wells owned by private individuals (BWP), and analyzed after filtration and sometimes dilution. The cations were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The anions were analyzed by chemically suppressed ion chromatography (IC). The ranges of the levels of the investigated parameters were as follows: Na 13.68-3,656 mg L(-1), K 2.66-583 mg L(-1), Mg 0.63-131.10 mg L(-1), Ca 16.79-189.9 mg L(-1), Cl(-) 8.61-4,340.97 mg L(-1), F(-) 0-1.02 mg L(-1), Br(-) 0-10.88 mg L(-1), NO₃(-) 0.18-342.4 mg L(-1), NO₂(-) 0-1.39, SO₄(2-) 4.43-534.02 mg L(-1), TDS 7-6,380 mg L(-1), and SAR 0.63-50. Except fluoride, most of the studied parameters in the water samples had concentrations beyond the permissible limits of the World Health Organization (WHO). The elevated concentrations are a result of seepage of contaminated water from on-site septic tanks, pit latrines, landfill leachates, fertilizer applications, and domestic effluents. These results should alert domestic water stakeholders in Zanzibar to the urgent task of initiating a quick mitigation response to control these alarming water risks.

  11. Groundwater response to serial stream stage fluctuations in shallow unconfined alluvial aquifers along a regulated stream (West Virginia, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Madan; Donovan, Joseph J.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater response to stream stage fluctuations was studied in two unconfined alluvial aquifers using a year-long time series of stream stages from two pools along a regulated stream in West Virginia, USA. The purpose was to analyze spatial and temporal variations in groundwater/surface-water interaction and to estimate induced infiltration rate and cumulative bank storage during an annual cycle of stream stage fluctuation. A convolution-integral method was used to simulate aquifer head at different distances from the stream caused by stream stage fluctuations and to estimate fluxes across the stream-aquifer boundary. Aquifer diffusivities were estimated by wiggle-matching time and amplitude of modeled response to multiple observed storm events. The peak lag time between observed stream and aquifer stage peaks ranged between 14 and 95 hour. Transient modeled diffusivity ranged from 1,000 to 7,500 m2/day and deviated from the measured and calculated single-peak stage-ratio diffusivity by 14-82 %. Stream stage fluctuation displayed more primary control over groundwater levels than recharge, especially during high-flow periods. Dam operations locally altered groundwater flow paths and velocity. The aquifer is more prone to surface-water control in the upper reaches of the pools where stream stage fluctuations are more pronounced than in the lower reaches. This method could be a useful tool for quick assessment of induced infiltration rate and bank storage related to contamination investigations or well-field management.

  12. Evaluation of Vertical Electrical Sounding Method for Groundwater Development in Basement Complex Terrain of West-Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Olawuyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES method of groundwater development in the Basement Complex terrain of West Central Nigeria. It was aimed at verifying the reliability of VES in differentiating lithologies, predicting the depth to basement and probably, aquifer in groundwater development. In doing this, the Schlumberger electrode configuration was employed in the surveys while partial curve matching and computer iteration techniques were used to interpret the curves obtained. In all, seventy three VES were carried out and fourteen boreholes constructed. Comparison was made between the predicted depth to basement from VES and the actual depth from the drilling log. A linear relationship between the actual depth and that predicted by VES was established with coefficient of determination of 0.94 confirming the reliability of the VES method. None of the boreholes drilled was abortive.

  13. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  14. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  15. Groundwater impact assessment for the 216-U-17 Crib, 200 West Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidel, S.P.; Johnson, V.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1993-06-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact to groundwater from discharge of process condensate to the ground at the 216-U-17 Crib. The assessment considers impacts associated with moisture movement through soil beneath the crib and the potential transport of contaminants to the groundwater.

  16. Groundwater Resources of Ribeira Paul Basin, Island of Santo Antao, Cape Verde, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater resources in Cape Verde provide water for agriculture, industry, and human consumption. These resources are limited and susceptible to contamination. Additional groundwater resources are needed for continued agricultural development, particularly during times of drought, but increased use and (or) climatic change may have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of freshwater available. In volcanic island aquifers such as those of Cape Verde, a lens of fresh groundwater typically ?floats? upon a layer of brackish water at the freshwater/saltwater boundary, and increased pumping may cause salt water intrusion or other contamination. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study assessed baseline groundwater conditions in watersheds on three islands of Cape Verde to provide the scientific basis for sustainably developing water resources and minimizing future groundwater depletion and contamination.

  17. Groundwater Resources of Ribeira Faja Basin, Island of Sao Nicolau, Cape Verde, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Plummer, L. Niel; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater resources in Cape Verde provide water for agriculture, industry, and human consumption. These resources are limited and susceptible to contamination. Additional groundwater resources are needed for continued agricultural development, particularly during times of drought, but increased use and (or) climatic change may have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of freshwater available. In volcanic island aquifers such as those of Cape Verde, a lens of fresh groundwater typically ?floats? upon a layer of brackish water at the freshwater/saltwater boundary, and increased pumping may cause salt water intrusion or other contamination. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study assessed baseline groundwater conditions in watersheds on three islands of Cape Verde to provide the scientific basis for sustainably developing water resources and minimizing future groundwater depletion and contamination.

  18. Groundwater Resources of Mosteiros Basin, Island of Fogo, Cape Verde, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Plummer, L. Niel; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater resources in Cape Verde provide water for agriculture, industry, and human consumption. These resources are limited and susceptible to contamination. Additional groundwater resources are needed for continued agricultural development, particularly during times of drought, but increased use and (or) climatic change may have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of freshwater available. In volcanic island aquifers such as those of Cape Verde, a lens of fresh groundwater typically ?floats? upon a layer of brackish water at the freshwater/saltwater boundary, and increased pumping may cause salt water intrusion or other contamination. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study assessed baseline groundwater conditions in watersheds on three islands of Cape Verde to provide the scientific basis for sustainably developing water resources and minimizing future groundwater depletion and contamination.

  19. Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler D.; Everett, Rhett; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with

  20. Geochemical appraisal of fluoride-laden groundwater in Suri I and II blocks, Birbhum district, West Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shreya; Nag, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The present study has been carried out covering two blocks—Suri I and II in Birbhum district, West Bengal, India. The evaluation focuses on occurrence, distribution and geochemistry in 26 water samples collected from borewells spread across the entire study area homogeneously. Quantitative chemical analysis of groundwater samples collected from the present study area has shown that samples from two locations—Gangta and Dhalla contain fluoride greater than the permissible limit prescribed by WHO during both post-monsoon and pre-monsoon sampling sessions. Significant factor controlling geochemistry of groundwater has been identified to be rock-water interaction processes during both sampling sessions based on the results of Gibb's diagrams. Geochemical modeling studies have revealed that fluorite (CaF2) is, indeed, present as a significant fluoride-bearing mineral in the groundwaters of this study area. Calcite or CaCO3 is one of the most common minerals with which fluorite remains associated, and saturation index calculations have revealed that the calcite-fluorite geochemistry is the dominant factor controlling fluoride concentration in this area during both post- and pre-monsoon. High fluoride waters have also been found to be of `bicarbonate' type showing increase of sodium in water with decrease of calcium.

  1. Hydrological challenges to groundwater trading: Lessons from south-west Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurray, James H.; Roberts, E. J.; Pannell, David J.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryPerth, Western Australia (pop. 1.6 m) derives 60% of its public water supply from the Gnangara groundwater system (GGS). Horticulture, domestic self-supply, and municipal parks are other major consumers of GGS groundwater. The system supports important wetlands and groundwater-dependent ecosystems. Underlying approximately 2200 km 2 of the Swan Coastal Plain, the GGS comprises several aquifer levels with partial interconnectivity. Supplies of GGS groundwater are under unprecedented stress, due to reduced recharge and increases in extraction. Stored reserves in the superficial aquifer fell by 700 GL between 1979 and 2008. Over a similar period, annual extraction for public supply increased by more than 350% from the system overall. Some management areas are over-allocated by as much as 69%. One potential policy response is a trading scheme for groundwater use. There has been only limited trading between GGS irrigators. Design and implementation of a robust groundwater trading scheme faces hydrological and/or hydro-economic challenges, among others. Groundwater trading involves transfers of the right to extract water. The resulting potential for spatial (and temporal) redistribution of the impacts of extraction requires management. Impacts at the respective selling and buying locations may differ in scale and nature. Negative externalities from groundwater trading may be uncertain as well as not monetarily compensable. An ideal groundwater trading scheme would ensure that marginal costs from trades do not exceed marginal benefits, incorporating future effects and impacts on third-parties. If this condition could be met, all transactions would result in constant or improved overall welfare. This paper examines issues that could reduce public welfare if groundwater trading is not subject to well-designed governance arrangements that are appropriate to meeting the above condition. It also outlines some opportunities to address key risks within the design of a

  2. Groundwater assessment in Salboni Block, West Bengal (India) using remote sensing, geographical information system and multi-criteria decision analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Madan K.; Chowdary, V. M.; Chowdhury, Alivia

    2010-11-01

    An approach is presented for the evaluation of groundwater potential using remote sensing, geographic information system, geoelectrical, and multi-criteria decision analysis techniques. The approach divides the available hydrologic and hydrogeologic data into two groups, exogenous (hydrologic) and endogenous (subsurface). A case study in Salboni Block, West Bengal (India), uses six thematic layers of exogenous parameters and four thematic layers of endogenous parameters. These thematic layers and their features were assigned suitable weights which were normalized by analytic hierarchy process and eigenvector techniques. The layers were then integrated using ArcGIS software to generate two groundwater potential maps. The hydrologic parameters-based groundwater potential zone map indicated that the `good' groundwater potential zone covers 27.14% of the area, the `moderate' zone 45.33%, and the `poor' zone 27.53%. A comparison of this map with the groundwater potential map based on subsurface parameters revealed that the hydrologic parameters-based map accurately delineates groundwater potential zones in about 59% of the area, and hence it is dependable to a certain extent. More than 80% of the study area has moderate-to-poor groundwater potential, which necessitates efficient groundwater management for long-term water security. Overall, the integrated technique is useful for the assessment of groundwater resources at a basin or sub-basin scale.

  3. Riparian forest and permanent groundwater: a key coupling for balancing the hillslope water budget in Sudanian West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Forests are thought to play an important role in the regional dynamics of the West African monsoon, through their capacity to extract water from permanent aquifers located deep in the soil and pump it into the atmosphere even during the dry season. This is especially true for riparian forests located at the bottom of the hillslopes. This coupling between the riparian forests and the permanent aquifers is investigated, looking for quantifying its contribution to the catchment water balance. To this end, use is made of the observations available from a comprehensively instrumented hillslope through the framework of the AMMA-CATCH (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis – Coupling the Tropical Atmosphere and the Hydrological Cycle observing system. Attention is paid to measurements of actual evapotranspiration, soil moisture and deep groundwater level. A vertical 2-D approach is followed using the physically-based Hydrus 2-D model in order to simulate the hillslope hydrodynamics, the model being calibrated and evaluated through a multi-criteria approach. The model correctly simulates the hydrodynamics of the hillslope as far as soil moisture dynamics, deep groundwater fluctuation and actual evapotranspiration dynamics are concerned. In particular, the model is able to reproduce the observed hydraulic disconnection between the deep permanent groundwater table and the river. A virtual experiment shows that the riparian forest depletes the deep groundwater table level through transpiration occurring throughout the year so that the permanent aquifer and the river are not connected. Moreover the riparian forest and the deep groundwater table form a coupled transpiration system: the riparian forest transpiration is due to the water redistribution at the hillslope scale feeding the deep groundwater through lateral saturated flow. The annual cycle of the transpiration origin is also quantified. The riparian forest which covers only 5% of the

  4. Assessment of hydrogeologic terrains, well-construction characteristics, groundwater hydraulics, and water-quality and microbial data for determination of surface-water-influenced groundwater supplies in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Mark D.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    2016-08-30

    In January 2014, a storage tank leaked, spilling a large quantity of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol into the Elk River in West Virginia and contaminating the water supply for more than 300,000 people. In response, the West Virginia Legislature passed Senate Bill 373, which requires the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) to assess the susceptibility and vulnerability of public surface-water-influenced groundwater supply sources (SWIGS) and surface-water intakes statewide. In response to this mandate for reassessing SWIGS statewide, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the WVDHHR, Bureau of Public Health, Office of Environmental Health Services, compiled available data and summarized the results of previous groundwater studies to provide the WVDHHR with data that could be used as part of the process for assessing and determining SWIGS.

  5. Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada, March 2009-September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Huntington, Jena M; Buto, Susan G.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue; Andraski, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    With increasing population growth and land-use change, urban communities in the desert Southwest are progressively looking toward remote basins to supplement existing water supplies. Pending applications by Churchill County for groundwater appropriations from Dixie Valley, Nevada, a primarily undeveloped basin east of the Carson Desert, have prompted a reevaluation of the quantity of naturally discharging groundwater. The objective of this study was to develop a revised, independent estimate of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (ETg) from Dixie Valley using a combination of eddy-covariance evapotranspiration (ET) measurements and multispectral satellite imagery. Mean annual ETg was estimated during water years 2010 and 2011 at four eddy-covariance sites. Two sites were in phreatophytic shrubland dominated by greasewood, and two sites were on a playa. Estimates of total ET and ETg were supported with vegetation cover mapping, soil physics considerations, water‑level measurements from wells, and isotopic water sourcing analyses to allow partitioning of ETg into evaporation and transpiration components. Site-based ETg estimates were scaled to the basin level by combining remotely sensed imagery with field reconnaissance. Enhanced vegetation index and brightness temperature data were compared with mapped vegetation cover to partition Dixie Valley into five discharging ET units and compute basin-scale ETg. Evapotranspiration units were defined within a delineated groundwater discharge area and were partitioned as (1) playa lake, (2) playa, (3) sparse shrubland, (4) moderate-to-dense shrubland, and (5) grassland.

  6. Ground-water and surface-water quality data for the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Tracey A.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents ground-water and surface-water quality data from samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from November 1999 through May 2001 at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The report also provides a description of the sampling and analytical methods that were used to collect and analyze the samples, and includes an evaluation of the quality-assurance data. The ground-water sampling network included two 4-inch wells, two 2-inch wells, sixteen 1-inch piezometers, one hundred thirteen 0.75-inch piezometers, two 0.25-inch flexible-tubing piezo-meters, twenty-seven 0.25-inch piezometers, and forty-two multi-level monitoring system depths at six sites. Ground-water profiler samples were collected from nine sites at 34 depths. In addition, passive-diffusion-bag samplers were deployed at four sites, and porous-membrane sampling devices were installed in the upper sediment at five sites. Surface-water samples were collected from 20 sites. Samples were collected from wells and 0.75-inch piezometers for measurement of field parameters and reduction-oxidation constituents, and analysis of inorganic and organic constituents, during three sampling events in March?April and June?August 2000, and May 2001. Surface-water samples were collected from November 1999 through September 2000 during five sampling events for analysis of organic constituents. Ground-water profiler samples were collected in April?May 2000, and analyzed for field measure-ments, reduction-oxidation constituents, and inorganic constituents and organic constituents. Passive-diffusion-bag samplers were installed in September 2000, and samples were analyzed for organic constituents. Multi-level monitoring system samples were collected and analyzed for field measurements and reduction-oxidation con-stituents, inorganic constituents, and organic con-stituents in March?April and June?August 2000. Field measurements and organic constituents were collected from 0.25-inch

  7. Focus on CSIR research in water resources: Groundwater resistivity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Colvin, C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available group to characterise the subsurface. This includes delineating drilling positions for water supply pur- poses (changes in both porosity and water saturation); defining pollution plumes around waste sites (changes in salinity of the groundwater... on the research project into aquifer dependant ecosystems in South Africa. The Langebaan Lagoon, West Coast National Park, has been classified as a wetland of international importance in terms of the Ramsar Convention because of its diverse bird life...

  8. Size-fractionation of groundwater arsenic in alluvial aquifers of West Bengal, India: the role of organic and inorganic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Chatterjee, Debashis; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2014-01-15

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Fe mineral phases are known to influence the mobility of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Arsenic can be associated with colloidal particles containing organic matter and Fe. Currently, no data is available on the dissolved phase/colloidal association of As in groundwater of alluvial aquifers in West Bengal, India. This study investigated the fractional distribution of As (and other metals/metalloids) among the particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases in groundwater to decipher controlling behavior of organic and inorganic colloids on As mobility. The result shows that 83-94% of As remained in the 'truly dissolved' phases (i.e., 0.05 μm size) colloidal particles, which indicates the close association of As with larger Fe-rich inorganic colloids. In smaller (i.e., <0.05 μm size) colloidal particles strong positive correlation is observed between As and DOC (r(2)=0.85), which highlights the close association of As with smaller organic colloids. As(III) is mainly associated with larger inorganic colloids, whereas, As(V) is associated with smaller organic/organometallic colloids. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm the association of As with DOC and Fe mineral phases suggesting the formation of dissolved organo-Fe complexes and colloidal organo-Fe oxide phases. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy further confirms the formation of As-Fe-NOM organometallic colloids, however, a detailed study of these types of colloids in natural waters is necessary to underpin their controlling behavior.

  9. A survey of arsenic, manganese, boron, thorium, and other toxic metals in the groundwater of a West Bengal, India neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Bradshaw, Kelly; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Springston, George; Defelice, Jeffrey; Dustin, Hannah; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2012-07-01

    Around 150 million people are at risk from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in India and Bangladesh. Multiple metal analysis in Bangladesh has found other toxic elements above the World Health Organization (WHO) health-based drinking water guidelines which significantly increases the number of people at risk due to drinking groundwater. In this study, drinking water samples from the Bongaon area (North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India) were analyzed for multiple metal contamination in order to evaluate groundwater quality on the neighbourhood scale. Each sample was analyzed for arsenic (As), boron (B), barium (Ba), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and uranium (U). Arsenic was found above the WHO health-based drinking water guideline in 50% of these tubewells. Mn and B were found at significant concentrations in 19% and 6% of these tubewells, respectively. The maps of As, Mn, and B concentrations suggest that approximately 75% of this area has no safe tubewells. The concentrations of As, Mn, B, and many other toxic elements are independent of each other. The concentrations of Pb and U were not found above WHO health-based drinking water guidelines but they were statistically related to each other (p-value = 0.001). An analysis of selected isotopes in the Uranium, Actinium, and Thorium Radioactive Decay Series revealed the presence of thorium (Th) in 31% of these tubewells. This discovery of Th, which does not have a WHO health-based drinking water guideline, is a potential public health challenge. In sum, the widespread presence and independent distribution of other metals besides As must be taken into consideration for drinking water remediation strategies involving well switching or home-scale water treatment.

  10. Effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes: a case study in Heihe River Basin, north-west of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Yu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As an important component of hydrologic cycle, groundwater is affected by topography, vegetation, climate condition, and anthropogenic activity. Groundwater horizontal convergence and divergence and vertical interaction with soil water result in variations of soil moisture, water and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere, which ultimately influences climate. In this work, a two-dimensional groundwater lateral flow scheme based on groundwater mass equation, is developed and incorporated into the land surface model CLM4.5 to investigate effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes in a river basin. A 30-year simulation with groundwater lateral flow and a control run without the horizontal movement are conducted over Heihe River Basin, north-west China, from 1979 to 2012 using the developed model. Results show that with groundwater lateral flow, equilibrium distribution of groundwater table shows more spatial variability following topography rather than the water balance between local precipitation and evapotranspiration, and are much closer to well observations especially over middle reaches area. Along with shallower groundwater table over piedmont areas in the middle reaches, increased soil moisture is shown which alleviates the underestimation of CLM4.5 at here. Changes in evapotranspiration are occurred and it is mainly controlled by the variation of local surface soil moisture, since water is the major limitation factor of evapotranspiration over this arid area. Besides, groundwater lateral flow can change the distribution of surface runoff by changing the saturated area fraction of each model grid cell. Energy cycle also responds to the changes of hydrological cycle which redistributes the sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the entire basin.

  11. [Groundwater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González De Posada, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of Hydrogeology, the concept and an introductory general typology of groundwater are established. From the perspective of Geotechnical Engineering works, the physical and mathematical equations of the hydraulics of permeable materials, which are implemented, by electric analogical simulation, to two unique cases of global importance, are considered: the bailing during the construction of the dry dock of the "new shipyard of the Bahia de Cádiz" and the waterproofing of the "Hatillo dam" in the Dominican Republic. From a physical fundamental perspective, the theories which are the subset of "analogical physical theories of Fourier type transport" are related, among which the one constituted by the laws of Adolf Fick in physiology occupies a historic role of some relevance. And finally, as a philosophical abstraction of so much useful mathematical process, the one which is called "the Galilean principle of the mathematical design of the Nature" is dealt with.

  12. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-Z-20 Crib, 200 West Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, V.G.

    1993-10-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order ([Tri-Party Agreement] Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharges to the 216-Z-20 Crib on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein extends the initial analysis conducted from 1989 through 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Report. Three primary issues are addressed in response to regulator concerns with the initial analysis: The magnitude and status of the soil column transuranic inventory. Potential interactions of wastewater with carbon tetrachloride from adjacent facilities. Preferential pathways created by unsealed monitoring wells.

  13. Ground-water hydrology of the Punjab region of West Pakistan, with emphasis on problems caused by canal irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, D.W.; Swarzenski, W.V.; Bennett, G.D.

    1967-01-01

    Rising water tables and the salinization of land as the result of canal irrigation threaten the agricultural economy of the Punjab. Since 1954 the Water and Soils Investigation Division of the West Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority has inventoried the water and soils resources of the Punjab and investigated the relations between irrigation activities, the natural hydrologic factors, and the incidence of waterlogging and subsurface-drainage problems. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation, which was carried out under a cooperative agreement between the Government of Pakistan and the U.S. Agency for International Development, and its predecessor, the U.S. International Cooperation Administration. Leakage from the canal systems, some of which have been in operation for more than 100 years, is the principal cause of rising water levels and constitutes the major component of ground-water recharge in the Punjab. Geologic studies have shown that virtually the entire Punjab is underlain to depths of 1,000 feet or more by unconsolidated alluvium, which is saturated to within a few feet of land surface. The alluvium varies in texture from medium sand to silty clay, but sandy sediments predominate. Large capacity wells, yielding 4 cfs or more, can be developed almost everywhere. Ground water occurring within a depth of 500 feet below the surface averages less than 1,000 ppm of dissolved solids throughout approximately two-thirds of the Punjab. It is estimated that the volume of usable ground water in storage in this part of the alluvial aquifer is on the order of 2 billion acre-feet. In the other one-third of the Punjab, total dissolved solids range from 1,000 to about 20,000 ppm. In about one-half of this area (one-sixth of the area of the Punjab) some ground water can be utilized by diluting with surface water from canals. The ground-water reservoir underlying the Punjab is an unexploited resource of enormous economic value. It is recognized

  14. Influence of fresh water, nutrients and DOC in two submarine-groundwater-fed estuaries on the west of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aisling M; Cave, Rachel R

    2012-11-01

    Coastal fresh water sources, which discharge to the sea are expected to be directly influenced by climate change (e.g. increased frequency of extreme weather events). Sea-level rise and changes in rainfall patterns, changes in demand for drinking water and contamination caused by population and land use change, will also have an impact. Coastal waters with submarine groundwater discharge are of particular interest as this fresh water source is very poorly quantified. Two adjacent bays which host shellfish aquaculture sites along the coast of Co. Galway in the west of Ireland have been studied to establish the influence of fresh water inputs on nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in each bay. Neither bay has riverine input and both are underlain by the karst limestone of the Burren and are susceptible to submarine groundwater discharge. Water and suspended matter samples were collected half hourly over 13 h tidal cycles over several seasons. Water samples were analysed for nutrients and DOC, while suspended matter was analysed for organic/inorganic content. Temperature and salinity measurements were recorded during each tidal station by SBE 37 MicroCAT conductivity/temperature sensors. Long-term mooring data were used to track freshwater input for Kinvara and Aughinish Bays and compare it with rainfall data. Results show that Kinvara Bay is much more heavily influenced by fresh water input than Aughinish Bay, and this is a strong source of fixed nitrogen to Kinvara Bay. Only during flood events is there a significant input of inorganic nitrogen from fresh water to Aughinish Bay, such as in late November 2009. Fresh water input does not appear to be a significant source of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) to either bay, but is a source of DOC to both bays. C:N ratios of DOC/DON show a clear distinction between marine and terrestrially derived dissolved organic material.

  15. Long-term groundwater contamination after source removal—The role of sorbed carbon and nitrogen on the rate of reoxygenation of a treated-wastewater plume on Cape Cod, MA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Barber, Larry B.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of groundwater contamination can remain long after a contaminant source has been removed. Documentation of natural aquifer recoveries and empirical tools to predict recovery time frames and associated geochemical changes are generally lacking. This study characterized the long-term natural attenuation of a groundwater contaminant plume in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, after the removal of the treated-wastewater source. Although concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other soluble constituents have decreased substantially in the 15 years since the source was removed, the core of the plume remains anoxic and has sharp redox gradients and elevated concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. Aquifer sediment was collected from near the former disposal site at several points in time and space along a 0.5-km-long transect extending downgradient from the disposal site and analyses of the sediment was correlated with changes in plume composition. Total sediment carbon content was generally low (< 8 to 55.8 μmol (g dry wt)− 1) but was positively correlated with oxygen consumption rates in laboratory incubations, which ranged from 11.6 to 44.7 nmol (g dry wt)− 1 day− 1. Total water extractable organic carbon was < 10–50% of the total carbon content but was the most biodegradable portion of the carbon pool. Carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios in the extracts increased more than 10-fold with time, suggesting that organic carbon degradation and oxygen consumption could become N-limited as the sorbed C and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) pools produced by the degradation separate with time by differential transport. A 1-D model using total degradable organic carbon values was constructed to simulate oxygen consumption and transport and calibrated by using observed temporal changes in oxygen concentrations at selected wells. The simulated travel velocity of the oxygen gradient was 5–13% of the groundwater velocity. This

  16. Contribution of Nutrient-enriched Groundwater to Excessive Algal Growth along a Select Reach of the East Fork Carson River, West-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, N. L.; Pahl, R. A.; Rosen, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    A study during the summers of 2010 and 2012 was conducted to determine if nutrient-enriched groundwater discharge contributed to excessive algal growth observed along a 5,800-foot reach of the East Fork Carson River in Carson Valley, west-central Nevada. Groundwater discharge to the river was determined using flow-net analysis, chloride-mass balance, and differences in measured streamflow. Water samples were collected from the river and shallow groundwater wells located in the river and along the banks for determination of nutrient concentrations and sources; algae samples were collected from the 5,800-foot river reach. Groundwater was found to be discharging to the river from both banks along a 405-foot sub-reach in the middle of the 5,800-foot study reach. High nitrate concentrations (2-3 milligrams per liter as nitrogen) were found in the groundwater along the right bank of the sub-reach. Within this sub-reach, river nitrate loads ranged from 1.3 to 7.9 pounds of nitrogen (N) per day; groundwater nitrate loads were estimated to be 0.07 pounds of N per day. Dissolved orthophosphate river loads ranged from 0.12 to 0.20 pounds of phosphorus (P) per day; groundwater orthophosphate loads were estimated to be 0.005 pounds of P per day. This sub-reach had the highest average algal biomass within the study reach. The data suggest that nutrient rich groundwater discharging to the river may create a favorable microenvironment for periphyton that assimilate available nutrients before the groundwater mixes with overlying river water. The source of nitrate in groundwater is likely anthropogenic as groundwater nitrate concentrations above background concentrations were only found along the right bank of the river adjacent to a housing development. Organic-wastewater compounds detected in groundwater samples collected from wells along the right bank within this sub-reach offer independent support that the elevated nitrate concentrations were human-derived.

  17. Use of major ions to evaluate the hydrogeochemistry of groundwater influenced by reclamation and seawater intrusion, West Nile Delta, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Zenhom El-Said; Osman, Osman M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the groundwater geochemistry in western Nile Delta area as an example of an aquifer influenced by reclamation and seawater intrusion. To conduct this study, 63 groundwater samples and one surface water sample from El Nubaria Canal were collected. To estimate the origin of dissolved ions and the geochemical processes influencing this groundwater, integration between land use change, pedological, hydrogeological, hydrogeochemical, and statistical approaches was considered. Results suggest that the groundwater flow regime changed from northeast and southwest directions around El Nubaria canal before 1966 to northern and northeastern directions due to newly constructed channel network. Soil salinity and mineral contents, seepage from irrigation canal, and seawater intrusion are the main factors controlling the groundwater chemistry. Statistically, the groundwater samples were classified into eight groups, one to four for the deep groundwater and five to eight for the shallow groundwater. The deep groundwater is characterized by two groups of chemicals (SO4-HCO3-Mg-Ca-K and Cl-Na), while the shallow groundwater groups of chemicals are Na-Cl-SO4 and K-HCO3-Ca-Mg. Both shallow groundwater and deep groundwater are mostly saturated with respect to carbonate minerals and undersaturated with respect to chloride minerals. Sulfate minerals are above the saturation limit in the shallow groundwater, but in the deep samples, these minerals are under the saturation limit. Ion exchange, carbonate production, mineral precipitation, and seawater intrusion are the geochemical processes governing the groundwater chemistry in the study area.

  18. Evaluation of the Hanford 200 West Groundwater Treatment System: Fluidized Bed Bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jackson, Dennis G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dickson, John O. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eddy-Dilek, Carol A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-12

    A fluidized bed reactor (FBR) in the 200W water treatment facility at Hanford is removing nitrate from groundwater as part of the overall pump-treat-reinject process. Control of the FBR bed solids has proven challenging, impacting equipment, increasing operations and maintenance (O&M), and limiting the throughput of the facility. In response to the operational challenges, the Department of Energy Richland Office (DOE-RL) commissioned a technical assistance team to facilitate a system engineering evaluation and provide focused support recommendations to the Hanford Team. The DOE Environmental Management (EM) technical assistance process is structured to identify and triage technologies and strategies that address the target problem(s). The process encourages brainstorming and dialog and allows rapid identification and prioritization of possible options. Recognizing that continuous operation of a large-scale FBR is complex, requiring careful attention to system monitoring data and changing conditions, the technical assistance process focused on explicit identification of the available control parameters (“knobs”), how these parameters interact and impact the FBR system, and how these can be adjusted under different scenarios to achieve operational goals. The technical assistance triage process was performed in collaboration with the Hanford team.

  19. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon

  20. Influences of groundwater extraction on the distribution of dissolved As in shallow aquifers of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhardt, Harald; Berner, Zsolt; Freikowski, Dominik; Biswas, Ashis; Winter, Josef; Chatterjee, Debashis; Norra, Stefan

    2013-11-15

    Here we report temporal changes of As concentrations in shallow groundwater of the Bengal Delta Plain (BDP). Observed fluctuations are primarily induced by seasonally occurring groundwater movement, but can also be connected to anthropogenic groundwater extraction. Between December 2009 and July 2010, pronounced variations in the groundwater hydrochemistry were recorded in groundwater samples of a shallow monitoring well tapping the aquifer in 22-25 m depth, where Astot concentrations increased within weeks from 100 to 315 μg L(-1). These trends are attributed to a vertically shift of the hydrochemically stratified water column at the beginning of the monsoon season. This naturally occurring effect can be additionally superimposed by groundwater extraction, as demonstrated on a local scale by an in situ experiment simulating extensive groundwater withdrawal during the dry post-monsoon season. Results of this experiment suggest that groundwater extraction promoted an enduring change within the distribution of dissolved As in the local aquifer. Presented outcomes contribute to the discussion of anthropogenic pumping influences that endanger the limited and yet arsenic-free groundwater resources of the BDP.

  1. Evaluation of baseline ground-water conditions in the Mosteiros, Ribeira Paul, and Ribeira Faja Basins, Republic of Cape Verde, West Africa, 2005-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Earle, John D.; Cederberg, Jay R.; Messer, Mickey M.; Jorgensen, Brent E.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Moura, Miguel A.; Querido, Arrigo; Spencer,; Osorio, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    This report documents current (2005-06) baseline ground-water conditions in three basins within the West African Republic of Cape Verde (Mosteiros on Fogo, Ribeira Paul on Santo Ant?o, and Ribeira Faj? on S?o Nicolau) based on existing data and additional data collected during this study. Ground-water conditions (indicators) include ground-water levels, ground-water recharge altitude, ground-water discharge amounts, ground-water age (residence time), and ground-water quality. These indicators are needed to evaluate (1) long-term changes in ground-water resources or water quality caused by planned ground-water development associated with agricultural projects in these basins, and (2) the feasibility of artificial recharge as a mitigation strategy to offset the potentially declining water levels associated with increased ground-water development. Ground-water levels in all three basins vary from less than a few meters to more than 170 meters below land surface. Continuous recorder and electric tape measurements at three monitoring wells (one per basin) showed variations between August 2005 and June 2006 of as much as 1.8 meters. Few historical water-level data were available for the Mosteiros or Ribeira Paul Basins. Historical records from Ribeira Faj? indicate very large ground-water declines during the 1980s and early 1990s, associated with dewatering of the Galleria Faj? tunnel. More-recent data indicate that ground-water levels in Ribeira Faj? have reached a new equilibrium, remaining fairly constant since the late 1990s. Because of the scarcity of observation wells within each basin, water-level data were combined with other techniques to evaluate ground-water conditions. These techniques include the quantification of ground-water discharge (well withdrawals, spring discharge, seepage to springs, and gallery drainage), field water-quality measurements, and the use of environmental tracers to evaluate sources of aquifer recharge, flow paths, and ground-water

  2. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in southern Bengal Basin: The example of Rajarhat and adjoining areas, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paulami Sahu; P K Sikdar; Surajit Chakraborty

    2016-02-01

    Detailed geochemical analysis of groundwater beneath 1223 km2 area in southern Bengal Basin along with statistical analysis on the chemical data was attempted, to develop a better understanding of the geochemical processes that control the groundwater evolution in the deltaic aquifer of the region. Groundwater is categorized into three types: `excellent', `good' and `poor' and seven hydrochemical facies are assigned to three broad types: `fresh', `mixed' and `brackish' waters. The `fresh' water type dominated with sodium indicates active flushing of the aquifer, whereas chloride-rich `brackish' groundwater represents freshening of modified connate water. The `mixed' type groundwater has possibly evolved due to hydraulic mixing of `fresh' and `brackish' waters. Enrichment of major ions in groundwater is due to weathering of feldspathic and ferro-magnesian minerals by percolating water. The groundwater of Rajarhat New Town (RNT) and adjacent areas in the north and southeast is contaminated with arsenic. Current-pumping may induce more arsenic to flow into the aquifers of RNT and Kolkata cities. Future large-scale pumping of groundwater beneath RNT can modify the hydrological system, which may transport arsenic and low quality water from adjacent aquifers to presently unpolluted aquifer.

  3. Quantifying the Presence and Activity of Aerobic, Vinyl Chloride-Degrading Microorganisms in Dilute Groundwater Plumes by Using Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    to < 0.02 µmol/bottle. The groundwater was amended by addition of stock solutions of KNO3 , KH2PO4, Na2HPO4, and trace element mix (6), giving a pH...Squillace, P. J.; Moran, M. J.; Lapham, W. W.; Price , C. V.; Clawges, R. M.; Zogorski, J. S., Volatile organic compounds in untreated ambient

  4. Impact of the geological structures on the groundwater potential using geophysical techniques in West Bani Mazar area, El Minia - Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Hussein Hosni; Kotb, Adel Diab Mohammed

    2017-06-01

    Establishment of the new agricultural projects in west Bani Mazar area, El Minia, Egypt needs a good knowledge about groundwater. Groundwater serves as the unique source of water supplies in the study area. Vertical Electrical Sounding technique is a convenient tool for groundwater exploration. This technique was utilized to illustrate the geoelectric succession, vertical and spatial extensions of the encountered layers, depth to water bearing layers and the structures affecting these layers. Profiling technique was carried out along a grid pattern using different half current electrode spacings (150 m, 300 m and 500 m) to clarify changes in resistivity values throughout the study area at different depths. Geoelectric layers B1 and B2 of the saturated zone are suitable for groundwater extraction in the study area. The resistivity values of the geoelectric layer B1 decrease towards the West direction, they decrease from 23.0 Ωm to 16.0 Ωm; and its thicknesses increase towards the SE direction from 12.0 m to 18.0 m. Whereas, the resistivity values of the geoelectric layer B2 decrease towards the NW direction from 40.0 Ωm to 26.5 Ωm; and its thicknesses vary from 34.0 m to 40.0 m. The depths to the upper surface of the water bearing layer B1 increase towards the NW direction from 44.0 m to 89.4 m. Based on the results obtained from the Vertical Electrical Soundings, four two-dimensional resistivity imaging profiles were measured at the selected sites. These 2-D resistivity profiles aim to determine depths to the water bearing layers, their thicknesses and the shallow structure. The inverted models of these profiles matched with the geoelectric sequence at these sites. In addition, a normal fault is detected at the northwestern part of the study area. According to the results obtained from this study it is clear that the groundwater in the area under consideration is occurred in the fractured limestone layers that belong to Eocene Age. Resistivity values of the

  5. Methane bioattenuation and implications for explosion risk reduction along the groundwater to soil surface pathway above a plume of dissolved ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Rixey, William G; DeVaull, George E; Stafford, Brent P; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2012-06-05

    Fuel ethanol releases can stimulate methanogenesis in impacted aquifers, which could pose an explosion risk if methane migrates into enclosed spaces where ignitable conditions exist. To assess this potential risk, a flux chamber was emplaced on a pilot-scale aquifer exposed to continuous release (21 months) of an ethanol solution (10% v:v) that was introduced 22.5 cm below the water table. Despite methane concentrations within the ethanol plume reaching saturated levels (20-23 mg/L), the maximum methane concentration reaching the chamber (21 ppm(v)) was far below the lower explosion limit in air (50,000 ppm(v)). The low concentrations of methane observed in the chamber are attributed to methanotrophic activity, which was highest in the capillary fringe. This was indicated by methane degradation assays in microcosms prepared with soil samples from different depths, as well as by PCR measurements of pmoA, which is a widely used functional gene biomarker for methanotrophs. Simulations with the analytical vapor intrusion model "Biovapor" corroborated the low explosion risk associated with ethanol fuel releases under more generic conditions. Model simulations also indicated that depending on site-specific conditions, methane oxidation in the unsaturated zone could deplete the available oxygen and hinder aerobic benzene biodegradation, thus increasing benzene vapor intrusion potential. Overall, this study shows the importance of methanotrophic activity near the water table to attenuate methane generated from dissolved ethanol plumes and reduce its potential to migrate and accumulate at the surface.

  6. Natural contamination with arsenic and other trace elements in groundwater of the Central-West region of Chaco, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes, Patricia S; Buchhamer, Edgar E; Giménez, María C

    2011-01-01

    This study covered the central agricultural region of the Chaco province, which lacks a permanent river networks. However, during the rainy period there is localized groundwater recharge. About 84 groundwater samples were taken during the period April-December 2007. These groundwater samples were collected from two different depths: 62 samples from shallow wells (4 to 20 m) and 24 samples from deep wells (20 to 100 m). Chemical variables were determined: pH, specific conductance, total dissolved solid, hardness, alkalinity, HCO(3)-, CO(3)(2-), SO(4)(2-), Cl-, NO(3)-, NO(2) -, NH(4)+, F-, As((tot)), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The chemical composition of groundwater in the study area is dominantly sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride bicarbonate, comprising more than 60% (52/86) of shallow and deep groundwater samples. Of the 86 analyzed groundwater samples, 88% exceeded the WHO (World Health Organization) and CAA (Código Alimentario Argentino) standards (10 μg/L) for As (arsenic) and 9% exceeded the WHO standard (1.5 mg/L) for F(-).Groundwater highly contaminated with As (max. 1,073 μg/L) and F- (max. 4.2 mg/L) was found in shallow aquifer. The contaminated groundwater is characterized by high pH (max. 8.9), alkalinity (max. HCO(3)- 1,932 mg/L), SO(4)(2-) (max. 11,862 mg/L), Na(+) (max. 3,158 mg/L), Cl(-) (max. 10,493 mg/L) and electric conductivity greater than 33.3 μS/cm. Other associated elements (Ni, Pb, Cu and Zn) are present in low concentrations, except for Fe that in 32% of samples exceeded the guideline value of 0.3 mg/L suggested by the CAA.

  7. Recharge Area on the Slopes of Volcano Based on Geological Setting, Content of Deuterium and Oxygen Isotopes of Groundwater Chemistry: Case Study on the Slopes of Salak Mountain, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendarmawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian is huge areas that have the highest precipitation in the world, therefore water deficit of groundwater is often happened at anywhere. This study was related to determination of recharge area with approached by combining geological setting, stable isotopes and chemical content of groundwater. Case study was carried out at surrounding the Cicurug area, Sukabumi Prefecture, West Java Province. The area is the slopes of Salak Mountain that have elevation of 400 until 1,200 m mean sea level (msl. While, much groundwater supplies industry activities on elevation 450-500 m msl. Based on data and result analysis of the studies, the recharge areas was not around peak of mountain or near, but water infiltrated on elevation of 700-800 m msl for groundwater exploited by industries. Therefore, the accurate determination of recharge area becomes a key for the groundwater sustainability.

  8. Review Team Focused Modeling Analysis of Radial Collector Well Operation on the Hypersaline Groundwater Plume beneath the Turkey Point Site near Homestead, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vail, Lance W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory served as members of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review team for the Florida Power & Light Company’s application for two combined construction permits and operating licenses (combined licenses or COLs) for two proposed new reactor units—Turkey Point Units 6 and 7. The review team evaluated the environmental impacts of the proposed action based on the October 29, 2014 revision of the COL application, including the Environmental Report, responses to requests for additional information, and supplemental information. As part of this effort, team members tasked with assessing the environmental effects of proposed construction and operation of Units 6 and 7 at the Turkey Point site reviewed two separate modeling studies that analyzed the interaction between surface water and groundwater that would be altered by the operation of radial collector wells (RCWs) at the site. To further confirm their understanding of the groundwater hydrodynamics and to consider whether certain actions, proposed after the two earlier modeling studies were completed, would alter the earlier conclusions documented by the review team in their draft environmental impact statement (EIS; NRC 2015), a third modeling analysis was performed. The third modeling analysis is discussed in this report.

  9. Deciphering groundwater quality for irrigation and domestic purposes – a case study in Suri I and II blocks, Birbhum District, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shreya Das; S K Nag

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of the hydrochemical characteristics of water and aquifer hydraulic properties is important for groundwater planning and management in the study area. It is not only the basic need for human existence but also a vital input for all development activities. The present hydro-geochemical study of groundwater samples from the Suri I and II blocks of Birbhum district, West Bengal (23.76°–23.99°N; 87.42°–87.64°E) was carried out to assess their suitability for agricultural, domestic and drinking purposes. For this study, samples were collected from 26 locations during the post-monsoon and pre-monsoon sessions spanning over 2012 and 2013. Groundwater samples were analyzed for their physical and chemical properties using standard laboratory methods. Physical and chemical parameters of groundwater such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cl, HCO3, SO4 and F were determined. Various water quality indices like SAR, SSP, PI, RSC, MAR and KR have been calculated for each water sample to identify the irrigational suitability standard. According to most of these parameters, the groundwater has been found to be well to moderately suitable for irrigation. In the post-monsoon session exceptionally high RSC values for around 80% samples indicate an alkaline hazard to the soil. The ion balance histogram for post-monsoon indicates undesirable ion balance values according to fresh water standards whereas in pre-monsoon, the samples show good ion balance in water. For determination of the drinking suitability standard of groundwater, three parameters have been considered – total hardness (TH), Piper’s trilinear diagram and water quality index study. Groundwater of the present study area has been found to be moderately-hard to hard during both sampling sessions and hence poses no health risk which could arise due to excess consumption of calcium or magnesium. Hydrogeochemical facies in the form of Piper’s trilinear diagram

  10. Deciphering groundwater quality for irrigation and domestic purposes - a case study in Suri I and II blocks, Birbhum District, West Bengal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shreya; Nag, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of the hydrochemical characteristics of water and aquifer hydraulic properties is important for groundwater planning and management in the study area. It is not only the basic need for human existence but also a vital input for all development activities. The present hydro-geochemical study of groundwater samples from the Suri I and II blocks of Birbhum district, West Bengal (23.76 ∘-23.99 ∘N; 87.42 ∘-87.64 ∘E) was carried out to assess their suitability for agricultural, domestic and drinking purposes. For this study, samples were collected from 26 locations during the post-monsoon and pre-monsoon sessions spanning over 2012 and 2013. Groundwater samples were analyzed for their physical and chemical properties using standard laboratory methods. Physical and chemical parameters of groundwater such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cl, HCO3, SO4 and F were determined. Various water quality indices like SAR, SSP, PI, RSC, MAR and KR have been calculated for each water sample to identify the irrigational suitability standard. According to most of these parameters, the groundwater has been found to be well to moderately suitable for irrigation. In the post-monsoon session exceptionally high RSC values for around 80% samples indicate an alkaline hazard to the soil. The ion balance histogram for post-monsoon indicates undesirable ion balance values according to fresh water standards whereas in pre-monsoon, the samples show good ion balance in water. For determination of the drinking suitability standard of groundwater, three parameters have been considered - total hardness (TH), Piper's trilinear diagram and water quality index study. Groundwater of the present study area has been found to be moderately-hard to hard during both sampling sessions and hence poses no health risk which could arise due to excess consumption of calcium or magnesium. Hydrogeochemical facies in the form of Piper's trilinear diagram plot

  11. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  12. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E. [eds.] [and others

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

  13. Application of the rainfall infiltration breakthrough (RIB) model for groundwater recharge estimation in west coastal South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sun, X

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available level fluctuations (WLF) on a monthly basis was proposed in the rainfall infiltration breakthrough (RIB) model for the purpose of groundwater recharge estimation. In this paper, the physical meaning of parameters in the CRD and previous RIB models...

  14. Tracing groundwater with low-level detections of halogenated VOCs in a fractured carbonate-rock aquifer, Leetown Science Center, West Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L. Niel; Sibrell, Philip L.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Hunt, Andrew G.; Schlosser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of low-level concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and estimates of groundwater age interpreted from 3H/3He and SF6 data have led to an improved understanding of groundwater flow, water sources, and transit times in a karstic, fractured, carbonate-rock aquifer at the Leetown Science Center (LSC), West Virginia. The sum of the concentrations of a set of 16 predominant halogenated VOCs (TDVOC) determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detector (GC–ECD) exceeded that possible for air–water equilibrium in 34 of the 47 samples (median TDVOC of 24,800 pg kg−1), indicating that nearly all the water sampled in the vicinity of the LSC has been affected by addition of halogenated VOCs from non-atmospheric source(s). Leakage from a landfill that was closed and sealed nearly 20 a prior to sampling was recognized and traced to areas east of the LSC using low-level detection of tetrachloroethene (PCE), methyl chloride (MeCl), methyl chloroform (MC), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE). Chloroform (CHLF) was the predominant VOC in water from domestic wells surrounding the LSC, and was elevated in groundwater in and near the Fish Health Laboratory at the LSC, where a leak of chlorinated water occurred prior to 2006. The low-level concentrations of halogenated VOCs did not exceed human or aquatic-life health criteria, and were useful in providing an awareness of the intrinsic susceptibility of the fractured karstic groundwater system at the LSC to non-atmospheric anthropogenic inputs. The 3H/3He groundwater ages of spring discharge from the carbonate rocks showed transient behavior, with ages averaging about 2 a in 2004 following a wet climatic period (2003–2004), and ages in the range of 4–7 a in periods of more average precipitation (2008–2009). The SF6 and CFC-12 data indicate older water (model ages of 10s of years or more) in the low-permeability shale of the Martinsburg

  15. Evaluation of regional fracture properties for groundwater development using hydrolithostructural domain approach in variably fractured hard rocks of Purulia district, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas Acharya; Rajesh Prasad; S Chakrabarti

    2014-04-01

    Estimation of geohydrologic properties of fractured aquifers in hard crystalline and/or metamorphosed country rocks is a challenge due to the complex nature of secondary porosity that is caused by differential fracturing. Hydrologic potentiality of such aquifers may be assessed if the geological controls governing the spatial distribution of these fracture systems are computed using a software-based model. As an exemplar, the Precambrian metamorphics exposed in and around the Balarampur town of Purulia district, West Bengal (India) were studied to find out the spatial pattern and consistency of such fracture systems. Surfer and Statistica softwares were used to characterize these rock masses in terms of hydrological, structural and lithological domains. The technique is based on the use of hydraulically significant fracture properties to generate representative modal and coefficient of variance () of fracture datasets of each domain. The is interpreted to obtain the spatial variability of hydraulically significant fracture properties that, in turn, define and identify the corresponding hydrolithostructural domains. The groundwater flow estimated from such a technique is verified with the routine hydrological studies to validate the procedure. It is suggested that the hydrolithostructural domain approach is a useful alternative for evaluation of fracture properties and aquifer potentiality, and development of a regional groundwater model thereof.

  16. Assessment of toxic metals in groundwater and saliva in an arsenic affected area of West Bengal, India: A pilot scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Subhamoy; Kundu, Amit Kumar; Adhikari, Jishnu; Chatterjee, Debankur; Iglesias, Monica; Nriagu, Jerome; Guha Mazumder, Debendra Nath; Shomar, Basem; Chatterjee, Debashis

    2015-10-01

    Communities in many parts of the world are unintentionally exposed to arsenic (As) and other toxic metals through ingestion of local drinking water and foods. The concentrations of individual toxic metals often exceed their guidelines in drinking water but the health risks associated with such multiple-metal exposures have yet to receive much attention. This study examines the co-occurrence of toxic metals in groundwater samples collected from As-rich areas of Nadia district, West Bengal, India. Arsenic in groundwater (range: 12-1064 µg L(-1); mean ± S.D: 329±294 µg L(-1)) was the most important contaminant with concentrations well above the WHO guideline of 10 µg L(-1). Another important toxic metal in the study area was manganese (Mn) with average concentration of 202±153 µg L(-1), range of 18-604 µg L(-1). The average concentrations (µg L(-1)) of other elements in groundwater were: Cr (5.6±5.9), Mo (3.5±2.1), Ni (8.3±8.7), Pb (2.9±1.3), Ba (119±43), Zn (56±40), Se (0.60±0.33), U (0.50±0.74). Saliva collected from the male participants of the area had mean concentrations of 6.3±7.0 µg As L(-1) (0.70-29 µg L(-1)), 5.4±5.5 µg Mn L(-1) (0.69-22 µg L(-1)), 2.6±3.1 µg Ni L(-1) (0.15-13 µg L(-1)), 0.78±1.0µg Cr L(-1) (metals beside As must be monitored in drinking water before implementation of any policies to provide safe water to the affected communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluoride-contaminated groundwater of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India: Interpretation of drinking and irrigation suitability and major geochemical processes using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Asit Kumar; Gupta, Srimanta

    2017-08-01

    The present research work is confined to a rural tract located in the north-western part of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India. Chemical analysis of the groundwater shows the cations is in the order of Na(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) while for anions it is HCO3(─) > Cl(─) > SO4(2─) > NO3(─). The F(─) concentration was found to vary from 0.01 to 18 mg/L in the pre-monsoon and 0.023 to 19 mg/L in post-monsoon period. 86% of samples show low F(─) content (1.2 mg/L) mainly in the central and north-central parts of the study area at a depth of 46 to 98 m. The prime water type is CaHCO3 succeeded by F(─)-rich NaHCO3 and NaCl waters. The suitability analysis reveals that the water at about 81% of the sampling sites is unsuitable for drinking and at 16% of sites unsuitable for irrigation. The alkaline nature of the water and/or elevated concentration of Fe, Mn and F(─) make the water unsuitable for potable purposes while the high F(─) and Na(+) contents delimit the groundwater for irrigation uses. Multivariate statistical analysis suggests that chemical weathering along with ion exchange is the key process, responsible for mobilization of fluoride in groundwater of the study area.

  18. Status of groundwater arsenic contamination in all 17 blocks of Nadia district in the state of West Bengal, India: A 23-year study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Mondal, Debapriya; Das, Bhaskar; Sengupta, Mrinal Kumar; Ahamed, Sad; Hossain, M. Amir; Samal, Alok Chandra; Saha, Kshitish Chandra; Mukherjee, Subhash Chandra; Dutta, Rathindra Nath; Chakraborti, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted in Nadia, one of the nine arsenic (As) affected districts in West Bengal, India to determine the extent and severity of groundwater As contamination and its health effects in particular, dermatological effects and neurological complications. We collected 28,947 hand tube-well water samples from all 17 blocks of Nadia district and analyzed for As by the flow injection-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HG-AAS). We found 51.4% and 17.3% of the tube-wells had As above 10 and 50 μg/L, respectively and observed that groundwater of all 17 blocks contained As above 50 μg/L with maximum observed level of 3200 μg/L. We estimated that about 2.1 million and 0.6 million people could be drinking As contaminated water above 10 and 50 μg/L, respectively, while 0.048 million could be at risk of drinking As-contaminated water above 300 μg/L, the concentration predicted to cause overt arsenical skin lesions. We screened 15,153 villagers from 50 villages and registered 1077 with arsenical skin lesions resulting in a prevalence rate of 7.1%. Analyzing 2671 biological samples (hair, nail and urine), from people with and without arsenical skin symptoms we found 95% of the samples had As above the normal level, indicating many people in Nadia district are sub-clinically affected. Arsenical neuropathy was observed in 33% of 255 arsenicosis patients with 28.2% prevalence for predominant sensory neuropathy and 4.7% for sensorimotor. As groundwater is still the main source of drinking water, targeting low-As aquifers and switching tube-well from unsafe to nearby safe sources are two visible options to obtain safe drinking water.

  19. Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Holger

    2008-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

  20. Effects of residential wastewater treatment systems on ground-water quality in west-central Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dennis C.; Hillier, D.E.; Nickum, Edward; Dorrance, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The use of residential wastewater-treatment systems in Evergreen Meadows, Marshdale, and Herzman Mesa, Colo., has degraded ground-water quality to some extent in each community. Age of community; average lot size; slope of land surface; composition, permeability, and thickness of surficial material; density, size , and orientation of fractures; maintenance of wastewater-treatment systems; and presence of animals are factors possibly contributing to the degradation of ground-water quality. When compared with effluent from aeration-treatment tanks, effluent fom septic-treatment tanks is characterized by greater biochemical oxygen demand and greater concentrations of detergents. When compared with effluent from septic-treatment tanks, effluent from aeration-treatment tanks is characterized by greater concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, and dissolved solids. (USGS)

  1. An investigation of submarine groundwater-borne nutrient fluxes to the west Florida shelf and recurrent harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-shelf, water-column mass balance of radon-222 (222Rn) provided estimates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), which were then used to quantify benthic nutrient fluxes. Surface water and groundwater were collected along a shore-normal transect that extended from Tampa Bay, Florida, across the Pinellas County peninsula, to the 10-m isobath in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were analyzed for 222Rn and radium-223,224,226 (223,224,226Ra) activities as well as inorganic and organic nutrients. Cross-shore gradients of 222Rn and 223,224,226Ra activities indicate a nearshore source for these isotopes, which mixes with water characterized by low activities offshore. Radon-based SGD rates vary between 2.5 and 15 cm d-1 proximal to the shoreline and decrease offshore. The source of SGD is largely shallow exchange between surface and pore waters, although deeper groundwater cycling may also be important. Enrichment of total dissolved nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus in pore water combined with SGD rates results in specific nutrient fluxes comparable to or greater than estuarine fluxes from Tampa Bay. The significance of these fluxes to nearshore blooms of Karenia brevis is highlighted by comparison with prescribed nutrient demands for bloom maintenance and growth. Whereas our flux estimates do not indicate SGD and benthic fluxes as the dominant nutrient source to the harmful algal blooms, SGD-derived loads do narrow the deficit between documented nutrient supplies and bloom demands.

  2. Assessment of potential hazards of fluoride contamination in drinking groundwater of an intensively cultivated district in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Manik Chandra; Mandal, Biswapati

    2009-05-01

    We assessed the potential of fluoride (F) contamination in drinking groundwater of an intensively cultivated district in India as a function of its lithology and agricultural activities. Three hundred and eight groundwater samples were collected at different depths from various types of wells and analyzed for pH, EC, NO(3)-N load and F content. A typical litholog was constructed and database on fertilizer and pesticide uses were also recorded for the district. The water samples were almost neutral in reaction and non-saline in nature with low NO(3)-N content (0.02 to 4.56 microg mL(-1)). Fluoride content in water was also low (0.01 to 1.18 microg mL(-1)) with only 2.27% of them exceeding 1.0 microg mL(-1) posing a potential threat of fluorosis. On average, its content varied little spatially and along depth of sampling aquifers because of homogeneity in lithology of the district. The F content in these samples showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.12, P < or = 0.05) with the amount of phosphatic fertilizer (single super phosphate) used for agriculture but no such relation either with the anthropogenic activities of pesticide use or NO(3)-N content, pH and EC values of the samples was found. The results suggest that the use of phosphatic fertilizer may have some role to play in F enrichment of groundwater.

  3. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF PLUME DIVING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  5. Impact of agriculture and land use on nitrate contamination in groundwater and running waters in central-west Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawniczak, Agnieszka Ewa; Zbierska, Janina; Nowak, Bogumił; Achtenberg, Krzysztof; Grześkowiak, Artur; Kanas, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Protected areas due to their long-term protection are expected to be characterized by good water quality. However, in catchments where arable fields dominate, the impact of agriculture on water pollution is still problematic. In Poland, recently, the fertilization level has decreased, mostly for economic reasons. However, this applies primarily to phosphorus and potassium. In order to evaluate the impact of agriculture on water quality in a protected area with a high proportion of arable fields in the aspect of level and type of fertilization, complex monitoring has been applied. The present study was carried out in Wielkopolska National Park and its buffer zone, which are protected under Natura 2000 as Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protection Areas. The aim of the study were (1) to assess the impact of agriculture, with special attention on fertilization, on groundwater, and running water quality and (2) to designate priority areas for implementing nitrogen reduction measures in special attention on protected areas. In our study, high nitrogen concentrations in groundwater and surface waters were detected in the agricultural catchments. The results demonstrate that in the watersheds dominated by arable fields, high nitrogen concentrations in groundwater were measured in comparison to forestry catchments, where high ammonium concentrations were observed. The highest nitrogen concentrations were noted in spring after winter freezing, with a small cover of vegetation, and in the areas with a high level of nitrogen application. In the studied areas, both in the park and its buffer zone, unfavorable N:P and N:K ratios in supplied nutrients were detected. Severe shortage of phosphorus and potassium in applied fertilizers is one of the major factors causing leaching of nitrogen due to limited possibilities of its consumption by plants.

  6. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry and quality of surface water and groundwater in the vicinity of Lake Monoun, West Cameroon: approach from multivariate statistical analysis and stable isotopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtchueng, Brice T; Fantong, Wilson Y; Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Tiodjio, Rosine E; Takounjou, Alain F; Ndam Ngoupayou, Jules R; Kusakabe, Minoru; Zhang, Jing; Ohba, Takeshi; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph V; Ueda, Akira

    2016-09-01

    With the use of conventional hydrogeochemical techniques, multivariate statistical analysis, and stable isotope approaches, this paper investigates for the first time surface water and groundwater from the surrounding areas of Lake Monoun (LM), West Cameroon. The results reveal that waters are generally slightly acidic to neutral. The relative abundance of major dissolved species are Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+) for cations and HCO3 (-) ≫ NO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-) for anions. The main water type is Ca-Mg-HCO3. Observed salinity is related to water-rock interaction, ion exchange process, and anthropogenic activities. Nitrate and chloride have been identified as the most common pollutants. These pollutants are attributed to the chlorination of wells and leaching from pit latrines and refuse dumps. The stable isotopic compositions in the investigated water sources suggest evidence of evaporation before recharge. Four major groups of waters were identified by salinity and NO3 concentrations using the Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Consistent with the isotopic results, group 1 represents fresh unpolluted water occurring near the recharge zone in the general flow regime; groups 2 and 3 are mixed water whose composition is controlled by both weathering of rock-forming minerals and anthropogenic activities; group 4 represents water under high vulnerability of anthropogenic pollution. Moreover, the isotopic results and the HCA showed that the CO2-rich bottom water of LM belongs to an isolated hydrological system within the Foumbot plain. Except for some springs, groundwater water in the area is inappropriate for drinking and domestic purposes but good to excellent for irrigation.

  8. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in the vicinity of Gunnison and Crested Butte, West-central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrologic data was collected in the Gunnison-Crested Butte area , Colo., to determine the availability and chemical quality of groundwater. Parts of the area have undergone rapid population growth in recent years due to an increase of winter sports activities. This rapid growth has resulted in a demand for additional domestic, recreational, and municipal water supplies. Maximum yields of 100 gallons per minute are available from wells completed in the alluvial aquifers while as much as 60 gallons per minute may be obtained from wells completed in the Dakota and Entrada Sandstones. Yields from other aquifers generally are less than 25 gallons per minute. Calcium magnesium bicarbonate water is the predominant water type in the study area. Dissolved solids concentrations ranged from 30 to 829 milligrams per liter and hardness ranged from 18 to 400 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

  9. Baseline groundwater quality in national park units within the Marcellus and Utica Shale gas plays, New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, David A.V.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from 15 production wells and 1 spring at 9 national park units in New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia in July and August 2011 and analyzed to characterize the quality of these water supplies. The sample sites generally were selected to represent areas of potential effects on water quality by drilling and development of gas wells in Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale areas of the northeastern United States. The groundwater samples were analyzed for 53 constituents, including nutrients, major inorganic constituents, trace elements, chemical oxygen demand, radioactivity, and dissolved gases, including methane and radon-222. Results indicated that the groundwater used for water supply at the selected national park units is generally of acceptable quality, although concentrations of some constituents exceeded at least one drinking-water guideline at several wells. Nine analytes were detected in concentrations that exceeded Federal drinking-water standards, mostly secondary standards that define aesthetic properties of water, such as taste and odor. One sample had an arsenic concentration that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L). The pH, which is a measure of acidity (hydrogen ion activity), ranged from 4.8 to 8.4, and in 5 of the 16 samples, the pH values were outside the accepted U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) range of 6.5 to 8.5. The concentration of total dissolved solids exceeded the SMCL of 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L) at four sites. The sulfate concentration exceeded the SMCL of 250 mg/L concentration in one sample, and the fluoride concentration exceeded the SMCL of 2 mg/L in one sample. Sodium concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water health advisory of 60 mg/L at four sites. Iron concentrations exceeded the SMCL of 300 μg/L in two samples, and manganese

  10. Groundwater arsenic contamination in one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India: Status, distribution, health effects and factors responsible for arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Tarit

    2010-11-01

    A somewhat detailed study was carried out in Gaighata, one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India, to determine the degree of groundwater contamination with arsenic, its depth wise distribution, correlation with iron, arsenical health effects to the inhabitants and the factors responsible for arsenic poisoning. Groundwater in all the 107 mouzas over 13 gram-panchayets in Gaighata block contains arsenic above 0.01mgl(-1) and in 91 mouzas, arsenic concentration has been found above 0.05mgl(-1). About 59.2 and 40.3% of the tubewell water samples contain arsenic above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1), respectively. The approximate population drinking arsenic-contaminated water above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1) are 106,560 and 72,540, respectively. The tubewells that were installed within the depth range of 15.4-30.3m are mostly arsenic-contaminated. Even the shallow groundwater level (7.87-15.1m) is arsenic-contaminated. Both arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater gradually increase from lower depth to higher depth up to 39.4m, and then decrease with increasing depth. About 58% of the deep tubewell water samples (depth range 122-182m, n=31) contain arsenic ≥0.05mgl(-1). About 72% of the arsenic-contaminated deep tubewells (n=18) were safe when surveyed first time. But within a span of 2-5 years, they became contaminated with arsenic. The linear regression shows direct correlation between arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater (r(2)=0.8114, parsenic from water by an adult male and female in the surveyed areas are 11.7 and 13.1μg/kg body wt./day, respectively and these values are higher than the WHO recommended PTDI value of inorganic arsenic (2.1μg/kg body wt./day). Mean arsenic concentrations in urine, hair and nail samples, collected from the inhabitants of Gutri mouza are higher than their normal level and the values are 292μgl(-1) (range: 8.35-1024μg l(-1), n=193), 2.50mgkg(-1) (range: 0.17-5.99mgkg(-1), n=132), and 6.05mgkg(-1) (range: 0

  11. Results of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in April 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-05

    constrain the existing contaminant plume. (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,b) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006c), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for the main body of the groundwater plume, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006); the KDHE later noted, however (KDHE 2007a), that this and other technologies might represent viable remedial options in the event of further downgradient migration of the plume toward the intermittent creek. In February 2007, the CCC/USDA presented preliminary analyses of (1) the AS-SVE remedial alternative, incorporating the use of LDBs, and (2) the risks to human health and the environment posed by the observed carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater (Argonne 2007a). The results of these analyses demonstrated the following: (1) Neither groundwater extraction nor AS-SVE in LDBs represents a practical approach for effective remediation of the groundwater contamination at Everest (near the Nigh property). (2) Periodic sampling and analyses for VOCs conducted by the CCC/USDA documented that the areal extent and range of carbon tetrachloride concentrations detected in the groundwater plume at Everest had changed relatively little from 2000 to 2006. (3) Estimates of groundwater flow and contaminant migration times, based on the hydrogeologic properties of the groundwater flow system identified at Everest (Argonne 2003, 2006b,c), indicated that, at minimum, approximately 4 years would be required for the carbon tetrachloride plume (in the subsurface) to reach the vicinity of the intermittent creek directly west of the Nigh property, and more than 20 years would be required for the contamination to reach the identified groundwater discharge area southwest of the Nigh property. (4) The existing (January-March 2006) plume

  12. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.J. [and others

    1999-03-24

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous

  13. Hydrology, Water Quality, and Surface- and Ground-Water Interactions in the Upper Hillsborough River Watershed, West-Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommer, J.T.; Sacks, L.A.; Kuniansky, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    A study of the Hillsborough River watershed was conducted between October 1999 through September 2003 to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and interaction between the surface and ground water in the highly karstic uppermost part of the watershed. Information such as locations of ground-water recharge and discharge, depth of the flow system interacting with the stream, and water quality in the watershed can aid in prudent water-management decisions. The upper Hillsborough River watershed covers a 220-square-mile area upstream from Hillsborough River State Park where the watershed is relatively undeveloped. The watershed contains a second order magnitude spring, many karst features, poorly drained swamps, marshes, upland flatwoods, and ridge areas. The upper Hillsborough River watershed is subdivided into two major subbasins, namely, the upper Hillsborough River subbasin, and the Blackwater Creek subbasin. The Blackwater Creek subbasin includes the Itchepackesassa Creek subbasin, which in turn includes the East Canal subbasin. The upper Hillsborough River watershed is underlain by thick sequences of carbonate rock that are covered by thin surficial deposits of unconsolidated sand and sandy clay. The clay layer is breached in many places because of the karst nature of the underlying limestone, and the highly variable degree of confinement between the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers throughout the watershed. Potentiometric-surface maps indicate good hydraulic connection between the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Hillsborough River, and a poorer connection with Blackwater and Itchepackesassa Creeks. Similar water level elevations and fluctuations in the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers at paired wells also indicate good hydraulic connection. Calcium was the dominant ion in ground water from all wells sampled in the watershed. Nitrate concentrations were near or below the detection limit in all except two wells that may have been affected by

  14. Ground-water quality in the West Salt River Valley, Arizona, 1996-98: relations to hydrogeology, water use, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Robert J.; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed ground-water samples in the West Salt River Valley from 64 existing wells selected by a stratified-random procedure. Samples from an areally distributed group of 35 of these wells were used to characterize overall ground-water quality in the basin-fill aquifer. Analytes included the principal inorganic constituents, trace constituents, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Additional analytes were tritium, radon, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Analyses of replicate samples and blank samples provided evidence that the analyses of the ground-water samples were adequate for interpretation. The median concentration of dissolved solids in samples from the 35 wells was 560 milligrams per liter, which exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water. Eleven of the 35 samples had a nitrate concentration (as nitrogen) that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water of 10 milligrams per liter. Pesticides were detected in eight samples; concentrations were below the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Deethylatrazine was most commonly detected. The pesticides were detected in samples from wells in agricultural or urban areas that have been irrigated. Concentrations of all trace constituents, except arsenic, were less than the Maximum Contaminant Levels. The concentration of arsenic exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level of 50 micrograms per liter in two samples. Nine monitoring wells were constructed in an area near Buckeye to assess the effects of agricultural land use on shallow ground water. The median concentration of dissolved solids was 3,340 milligrams per liter in samples collected from these wells in August 1997. The nitrate concentration (as nitrogen) exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (10 milligrams per liter) in samples from eight of the nine monitoring wells in August 1997 and again in

  15. Assessment of the quality of groundwater for drinking purposes in the Upper West and Northern regions of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saana, Sixtus Bieranye Bayaa Martin; Fosu, Samuel Asiedu; Sebiawu, Godfred Etsey; Jackson, Napoleon; Karikari, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Underground water is an important natural resource serving as a reliable source of drinking water for many people worldwide, especially in developing countries. Underground water quality needs to be given a primary research and quality control attention due to possible contamination. This study was therefore designed to determine the physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of borehole water in the Upper West and Northern regions of Ghana. The study was conducted in seven districts in Ghana (including six in the Upper West region and one in the Northern region). The bacterial load of the water samples was determined using standard microbiological methods. Physico-chemical properties including pH, total alkalinity, temperature, turbidity, true colour, total dissolved solids (TDS), electrical conductivity, total hardness, calcium hardness, magnesium hardness, total iron, calcium ion, magnesium ion, chloride ion, fluoride ion, aluminium ion, arsenic, ammonium ions, nitrate and nitrite concentrations were determined. The values obtained were compared with the World Health Organization (WHO) standards for drinking water. The recorded pH, total alkalinity and temperature ranges were 6.14-7.50, 48-240 mg/l and 28.8-32.8 °C, respectively. Furthermore, the mean concentrations of iron, calcium, magnesium, chloride, fluoride, aluminium, arsenic, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite were 0.06, 22.11, 29.84, 13.97, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.01, 2.09 and 0.26 mg/l, respectively. Turbidity, true colour, TDS and electrical conductivity of the water samples ranged from 0.13 to 105 NTU, 5 to 130 HU, 80.1 to 524 mg/l and 131 to 873 µS/cm, respectively. In addition, the mean total hardness value was found to be 178.07 mg/l whereas calcium hardness and magnesium hardness respectively were 55.28 and 122.79 mg/l. Only 14% of the water samples tested positive for faecal coliforms. The study revealed that only a few of the values for the bacteriological and physico-chemical parameters of

  16. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1989-05-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Municipal solid-waste disposal and ground-water quality in a coastal environment, west-central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Mario

    1983-01-01

    Solid waste is defined along with various methods of disposal and the hydrogeologic factors to be considered when locating land-fills is presented. Types of solid waste, composition, and sources are identified. Generation of municipal solid waste in Florida has been estimated at 4.5 pounds per day per person or about 7.8 million tons per year. Leachate is generated when precipitation and ground water percolate through the waste. Gases, mainly carbon dioxide and methane, are also produced. Leachate generally contains high concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic matter. The two typical hydrogeologic conditions in west-central Florida are (1) permeable sand overlying clay and limestone and (2) permeable sand overlying limestone. These conditions are discussed in relation to leachate migration. Factors in landfill site selection are presented and discussed, followed by a discussion on monitoring landfills. Monitoring of landfills includes the drilling of test holes, measuring physical properties of the corings, installation of monitoring wells, and water-quality monitoring. (USGS)

  18. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10

    , was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  19. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  20. Detection of contaminant plumes released from landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenigül, N. B.; Hendsbergen, A. T.; Elfeki, A. M. M.; Dekking, F. M.

    2006-06-01

    Contaminant leaks released from landfills are a significant threat to groundwater quality. The groundwater detection monitoring systems installed in the vicinity of such facilities are vital. In this study the detection probability of a contaminant plume released from a landfill has been investigated by means of both a simulation and an analytical model for both homogeneous and heterogeneous aquifer conditions. The results of the two models are compared for homogeneous aquifer conditions to illustrate the errors that might be encountered with the simulation model. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions contaminant transport is modelled by an analytical model using effective (macro) dispersivities. The results of the analysis show that the simulation model gives the concentration values correctly over most of the plume length for homogeneous aquifer conditions, and that the detection probability of a contaminant plume at given monitoring well locations match quite well. For heterogeneous aquifer conditions the approximating analytical model based on effective (macro) dispersivities yields the average concentration distribution satisfactorily. However, it is insufficient in monitoring system design since the discrepancy between the detection probabilities of contaminant plumes at given monitoring well locations computed by the two models is significant, particularly with high dispersivity and heterogeneity.

  1. The effects of artificial recharge on groundwater levels and water quality in the west hydrogeologic unit of the Warren subbasin, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamos, Christina L.; Martin, Peter; Everett, Rhett; Izbicki, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Between the late 1940s and 1994, groundwater levels in the Warren subbasin, California, declined by as much as 300 feet because pumping exceeded sparse natural recharge. In response, the local water district, Hi-Desert Water District, implemented an artificial-recharge program in early 1995 using imported water from the California State Water Project. Subsequently, the water table rose by as much as 250 feet; however, a study done by the U.S. Geological Survey found that the rising water table entrained high-nitrate septic effluent, which caused nitrate (as nitrogen) concentrations in some wells to increase to more than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter.. A new artificial-recharge site (site 3) was constructed in 2006 and this study, which started in 2004, was done to address concerns about the possible migration of nitrates in the unsaturated zone. The objectives of this study were to: (1) characterize the hydraulic, chemical, and microbiological properties of the unsaturated zone; (2) monitor changes in water levels and water quality in response to the artificial-recharge program at site 3; (3) determine if nitrates from septic effluent infiltrated through the unsaturated zone to the water table; (4) determine the potential for nitrates within the unsaturated zone to mobilize and contaminate the groundwater as the water table rises in response to artificial recharge; and (5) determine the presence and amount of dissolved organic carbon because of its potential to react with disinfection byproducts during the treatment of water for public use. Two monitoring sites were installed and instrumented with heat-dissipation probes, advanced tensiometers, suction-cup lysimeters, and wells so that the arrival and effects of recharging water from the State Water Project through the 250 to 425 foot-thick unsaturated zone and groundwater system could be closely observed. Monitoring site YVUZ-1 was located between two

  2. Recent Site-Wide Transport Modeling Related to the Carbon Tetrachloride Plume at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, C R.

    2005-11-01

    Carbon tetrachloride transport in the unconfined aquifer system at the Hanford Site has been the subject of follow-on studies since the Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program was completed in FY 2002. These scoping analyses were undertaken to provide support for strategic planning and guidance for the more robust modeling needed to obtain a final record of decision (ROD) for the carbon tetrachloride plume in the 200 West Area. This report documents the technical approach and the results of these follow-on, site-wide scale-modeling efforts. The existing site-wide groundwater model was used in this effort. The work extended that performed as part of the ITRD modeling study in which a 200 West Area scale submodel was developed to examine arrival concentrations at an arbitrary boundary between the 200 E and 200 W areas. These scoping analyses extended the analysis to predict the arrival of the carbon tetrachloride plume at the Columbia River. The results of these analyses illustrate the importance of developing field-scale estimates of natural attenuation parameters, abiotic degradation rate and soil/water equilibrium sorption coefficient, for carbon tetrachloride. With these parameters set to zero, carbon tetrachloride concentrations will exceed the compliance limit of 5 ?g/L outside the 200 Area Plateau Waste Management Area, and the aquifer source loading and area of the aquifer affected will continue to grow until arrival rates of carbon tetrachloride equal source release rates, estimated at 33 kg/yr. Results of this scoping analysis show that the natural attenuation parameters are critical in predicting the future movement of carbon tetrachloride from the 200 West Area. Results also show the significant change in predictions between continual source release from the vadose zone and complete source removal.

  3. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands act as natural transition zones between ground water and surface water, characterized by the complex interdependency of hydrology, chemical and physical properties, and biotic effects. Although field and laboratory demonstrations have shown efficient natural attenuation processes in the non-seep wetland areas and stream bottom sediments of West Branch Canal Creek, chlorinated volatile organic compounds are present in a freshwater tidal creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volatile organic compound concentrations in surface water indicate that in some areas of the wetland, preferential flow paths or seeps allow transport of organic compounds from the contaminated sand aquifer to the overlying surface water without undergoing natural attenuation. From 2002 through 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division of the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, characterized preferential ground-water seepage as part of an ongoing investigation of contaminant distribution and natural attenuation processes in wetlands at this site. Seep areas were discrete and spatially consistent during thermal infrared surveys in 2002, 2003, and 2004 throughout West Branch Canal Creek wetlands. In these seep areas, temperature measurements in shallow pore water and sediment more closely resembled those in ground water than those in nearby surface water. Generally, pore water in seep areas contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds had lower methane and greater volatile organic compound concentrations than pore water in non-seep wetland sediments. The volatile organic compounds detected in shallow pore water in seeps were spatially similar to the dominant volatile organic compounds in the underlying Canal Creek aquifer, with both parent and anaerobic daughter compounds detected. Seep locations characterized as focused seeps contained the highest concentrations of chlorinated parent compounds

  4. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  5. Assessment of groundwater potential zones using multi-influencing factor (MIF) and GIS: a case study from Birbhum district, West Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raju; Gupta, Srimanta; Guin, Shirshendu; Kaur, Harjeet

    2017-05-01

    Remote sensing and GIS play a vital role in exploration and assessment of groundwater and has wide application in detection, monitoring, assessment, conservation and various other fields of groundwater-related studies. In this research work, delineation of groundwater potential zone in Birbhum district has been carried out. Various thematic layers viz. geology, geomorphology, soil type, elevation, lineament and fault density, slope, drainage density, land use/land cover, soil texture, and rainfall are digitized and transformed into raster data in ArcGIS 10.3 environment as input factors. Thereafter, multi-influencing factor (MIF) technique is employed where ranks and weights, assigned to each factor are computed statistically. Finally, groundwater potential zones are classified into four categories namely low, medium, high and very high zone. It is observed that 18.41% (836.86 km2) and 34.41% (1563.98 km2) of the study area falls under `low' and `medium' groundwater potential zone, respectively. Approximately 1601.19 km2 area accounting for 35.23% of the study area falls under `high' category and `very high' groundwater potential zone encompasses an area of 542.98 km2 accounting for 11.95% of the total study area. Finally, the model generated groundwater potential zones are validated with reported potential yield data of various wells in the study area. Success and prediction rate curve reveals an accuracy achievement of 83.03 and 78%, respectively. The outcome of the present research work will help the local authorities, researchers, decision makers and planners in formulating better planning and management of groundwater resources in the study area in future perspectives.

  6. Assessment of Carbon Tetrachloride Groundwater Transport in Support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Technology Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cole, Charles R.; Cameron, Richard J.; Johnson, Michael D.; Skeen, Rodney S.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2001-07-13

    Groundwater modeling was performed in support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program. The ITRD program is facilitated by Sandia National Laboratory for the Department of Energy Office of Science and Technology. This report was prepared to document the results of the modeling effort and facilitate discussion of characterization and remediation options for the carbon tetrachloride plume among the ITRD participants. As a first step toward implementation of innovative technologies for remediation of the carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume underlying the 200-West Area, this modeling was performed to provide an indication of the potential impact of the CT source on the compliance boundary approximately 5000 m distant. The primary results of the modeling bracket the amount of CT source that will most likely result in compliance/non-compliance at the boundary and the relative influence of the various modeling parameters.

  7. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  8. Wind-Forced Baroclinic Beta-Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmadani, A.; Maximenko, N. A.; Melnichenko, O.; Schneider, N.; Di Lorenzo, E.

    2011-12-01

    A planetary beta-plume is a classical example of oceanic circulation induced by a localized vorticity source or sink that allows an analytical description in simplistic cases. Its barotropic structure is a zonally-elongated, gyre-like cell governed by the Sverdrup circulation on the beta-plane. The dominant zonal currents, found west of the source/sink, are often referred to as zonal jets. This simple picture describes the depth-integrated flow. Previous studies have investigated beta-plumes in a reduced-gravity framework or using other simple models with a small number of vertical layers, thereby lacking representation of the vertical structure. In addition, most previous studies use a purely linear regime without considering the role of eddies. However, these jets are often associated with strong lateral shear that makes them unstable under increased forcing. The circulation in such a nonlinear regime may involve eddy-mean flow interactions, which modify the time-averaged circulation. Here, the baroclinic structures of linear and nonlinear wind-forced beta-plumes are studied using a continuously-stratified, primitive equation, eddy-permitting ocean model (ROMS). The model is configured in an idealized rectangular domain for the subtropical ocean with a flat bottom. The surface wind forcing is a steady anticyclonic Gaussian wind vortex, which provides a localized vorticity source in the center of the domain. The associated wind stress curl and Ekman pumping comprise downwelling in the vortex center surrounded by a ring of weaker upwelling. Under weak forcing, the simulated steady-state circulation corresponds well with a theoretical linear beta-plume. While its depth-integrated transport exhibits a set of zonal jets, consistent with Sverdrup theory, the baroclinic structure of the plume is remarkably complex. Relatively fast westward decay of the surface currents occurs simultaneously with the deepening of the lower boundary of the plume. This deepening suggests

  9. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the trichloroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were inst...

  10. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the trichloroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were inst...

  11. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  12. POTENTIAL USE OF ACTIVATED CARBON TO RECOVER TC-99 FROM 200 WEST AREA GROUNDWATER AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO MORE EXPENSIVE RESINS HANFORD SITE RICHLAND WASNINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME; ROSSI AJ; TORTOSO AC

    2009-12-03

    Recent treatability testing performed on groundwater at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, has shown that Purolite{reg_sign} A530E resin very effectively removes Tc-99 from groundwater. However, this resin is expensive and cannot be regenerated. In an effort to find a less expensive method for removing Tc-99 from the groundwater, a literature search was performed. The results indicated that activated carbon may be used to recover technetium (as pertechnetate, TCO{sub 4}{sup -}) from groundwater. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used activated carbon in both batch adsorption and column leaching studies. The adsorption study concluded that activated carbon absorbs TCO{sub 4}{sup -} selectively and effectively over a wide range of pH values and from various dilute electrolyte solutions (< 0.01 molarity). The column leaching studies confirmed a high adsorption capacity and selectivity of activated carbon for TCO{sub 4}{sup -}. Since activated carbon is much less expensive than Purolite A530E resin, it has been determined that a more extensive literature search is warranted to determine if recent studies have reached similar conclusions, and, if so, pilot testing of 200-ZP-1 groundwater wi11 likely be implemented. It is possible that less expensive, activated carbon canisters could be used as pre-filters to remove Tc-99, followed by the use of the more expensive Purolite A530E resin as a polishing step.

  13. Biogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry of a landfill leachate plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breukelen, Boris M; Röling, Wilfred F M; Groen, Jacobus; Griffioen, Jasper; van Verseveld, Henk W

    2003-09-01

    The biogeochemical processes were identified which improved the leachate composition in the flow direction of a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, The Netherlands). Groundwater observation wells were placed at specific locations after delineating the leachate plume using geophysical tests to map subsurface conductivity. Redox processes were determined using the distribution of solid and soluble redox species, hydrogen concentrations, concentration of dissolved gases (N(2), Ar, and CH(4)), and stable isotopes (delta15N-NO(3), delta34S-SO(4), delta13C-CH(4), delta2H-CH(4), and delta13C of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively)). The combined application of these techniques improved the redox interpretation considerably. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased downstream in association with increasing delta13C-DOC values confirming the occurrence of degradation. Degradation of DOC was coupled to iron reduction inside the plume, while denitrification could be an important redox process at the top fringe of the plume. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane indicated that methane was formed inside the landfill and not in the plume. Total gas pressure exceeded hydrostatic pressure in the plume, and methane seems subject to degassing. Quantitative proof for DOC degradation under iron-reducing conditions could only be obtained if the geochemical processes cation exchange and precipitation of carbonate minerals (siderite and calcite) were considered and incorporated in an inverse geochemical model of the plume. Simulation of delta13C-DIC confirmed that precipitation of carbonate minerals happened.

  14. Simulation of groundwater flow and interaction of groundwater and surface water on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Fienen, Michael N.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    resulting simulated lake stage and water budgets to stages and water budgets from the calibrated model. Simulated lake water budgets and water level changes illustrate the importance of understanding the position of a lake within the hydrologic system (headwater or downstream), the type of lake (surface-water drainage or seepage lake), and the role of groundwater in dampening the effects of large-scale changes in weather patterns on lake levels. Areas contributing recharge to drinking-water supply wells on the Reservation were delineated using forward particle tracking from the water table to the well. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses were used to produce maps showing the probability of groundwater capture for areas around each well nest. At the Main Pumphouse site near the Village of Lac du Flambeau, most of the area contributing recharge to the wells occurs downgradient from a large wetland between the wells and the wastewater infiltration lagoons. Nonetheless, a small potential for the wells to capture infiltrated wastewater is apparent when considering uncertainty in the model parameter values. At the West Pumphouse wells south of Flambeau Lake, most of the area contributing recharge is between the wells and Tippecanoe Lake. The extent of infiltrated wastewater from two infiltration lagoons was tracked using the groundwater flow model and Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses. Wastewater infiltrated from the lagoons flows predominantly south toward Moss Lake as it integrates with the regional groundwater flow system. The wastewater-plume-extent simulations support the area-contributing-recharge simulations, indicating that there is a possibility, albeit at low probability, that some wastewater could be captured by water-supply wells. Comparison of simulated water-table contours indicate that the lagoons may mound the water table approximately 4 ft, with diminishing levels of mounding outward from the lagoons. Four scenarios, representing potential alternatives for wastewater

  15. Results of groundwater monitoring and vegetation sampling at Everest, Kansas, in 2009 .

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-13

    In April 2008, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the existing network of monitoring points at Everest, Kansas (Argonne 2008). The objective of the 2008 investigation was to monitor the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater previously identified in CCC/USDA site characterization and groundwater sampling studies at Everest in 2000-2006 (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The work at Everest is being undertaken on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The findings of the 2008 investigation were as follows: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders demonstrated a consistent pattern of groundwater flow - and inferred contaminant migration - to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) The range of concentrations and the areal distribution of carbon tetrachloride identified in the groundwater at Everest in April 2008 were generally consistent with previous results. The results of the 2008 sampling (reflecting the period from 2006 to 2008) and the earlier investigations at Everest (representing the period from 2000 to 2006) show that no significant downgradient extension of the carbon tetrachloride plume occurred from 2000 to 2008. (3) The slow contaminant migration indicated by the monitoring data is qualitatively consistent with the low groundwater flow rates in the Everest aquifer unit estimated previously on the basis of site-specific hydraulic testing (Argonne 2006a,b). (4) The April 2008 and earlier sampling results demonstrate that the limits of the plume have been

  16. Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.

    2013-10-01

    We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to

  17. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  18. Redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Downgradient from an old municipal landfill allowing leachate, rich in dissolved organic carbon, to enter a shallow sandy aerobic aquifer, a sequence of redoxe zones is identified from groundwater chemical analysis. Below the landfill, methanogenic conditions prevail, followed by sulfidogenic......, ferrogenic, nitrate-reducing and aerobic environments overa distance of 370 m. This redox zone sequence is consistent with thermodynamical principles and is closely matched by the leachate plume determined by the chloride plume distribution. The redox zone sequence is believed to be key in controlling...

  19. Effects of groundwater levels and headwater wetlands on streamflow in the Charlie Creek basin, Peace River watershed, west-central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.M.; Sacks, L.A.; Hughes, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Charlie Creek basin was studied from April 2004 to December 2005 to better understand how groundwater levels in the underlying aquifers and storage and overflow of water from headwater wetlands preserve the streamflows exiting this least-developed tributary basin of the Peace River watershed. The hydrogeologic framework, physical characteristics, and streamflow were described and quantified for five subbasins of the 330-square mile Charlie Creek basin, allowing the contribution of its headwaters area and tributary subbasins to be separately quantified. A MIKE SHE model simulation of the integrated surface-water and groundwater flow processes in the basin was used to simulate daily streamflow observed over 21 months in 2004 and 2005 at five streamflow stations, and to quantify the monthly and annual water budgets for the five subbasins including the changing amount of water stored in wetlands. Groundwater heads were mapped in Zone 2 of the intermediate aquifer system and in the Upper Floridan aquifer, and were used to interpret the location of artesian head conditions in the Charlie Creek basin and its relation to streamflow. Artesian conditions in the intermediate aquifer system induce upward groundwater flow into the surficial aquifer and help sustain base flow which supplies about two-thirds of the streamflow from the Charlie Creek basin. Seepage measurements confirmed seepage inflow to Charlie Creek during the study period. The upper half of the basin, comprised largely of the Upper Charlie Creek subbasin, has lower runoff potential than the lower basin, more storage of runoff in wetlands, and periodically generates no streamflow. Artesian head conditions in the intermediate aquifer system were widespread in the upper half of the Charlie Creek basin, preventing downward leakage from expansive areas of wetlands and enabling them to act as headwaters to Charlie Creek once their storage requirements were met. Currently, the dynamic balance between wetland

  20. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.

  1. Plumes Do Not Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.; Anderson, D. L.; Foulger, G. R.; Winterer, E. L.

    Hypothetical plumes from the deep mantle are widely assumed to provide an abso- lute hotspot reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly influence magmatic and tectonic evolution of oceans and continents. Many papers on local to global tectonics, magmatism, and geochemistry invoke plumes, and assign to the man- tle whatever properties, dynamics, and composition are needed to enable them. The fixed-plume concept arose from the Emperor-Hawaii seamount-and-island province, the 45 Ma inflection in which was assumed to record a 60-degree change in direction by the Pacific plate. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns show that such a change did not occur. Other Pacific chains once assumed to be syn- chronous with, and Euler-parallel to, Hawaii have proved to be neither. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Rationales for fixed hotspots elsewhere also have become untenable as databases enlarged. Astheno- sphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so buoyant melt does not require a local heat source but, rather, needs a thin roof or crack or tensional setting for egress. MORB and ocean-island basalt (OIB) broadly intergrade in composition, but MORB typically is richer in refractory elements and their radiogenic daughters, whereas OIB commonly is richer in fusible elements and their daughters. MORB and OIB contrasts are required by melt behavior and do not indicate unlike source reservoirs. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts re- act, and thereby lose substance, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assim- ilating subordinate fusibles, with thick, cool lithosphere and crust. There is no need for hypotheses involving chaotic plume behavior or thousands of km of lateral flow of plume material, nor for postulates of SprimitiveT lower mantle contrary to cos- & cedil;mological and thermodynamic considerations. Plume

  2. Where Plumes Live

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  3. Dilution in Transition Zone between Rising Plumes and Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    The papers presents some physical experiments with the dilution of sea outfall plumes with emphasize on the transition zone where the relative fast flowing vertical plume turns to a horizontal surface plume following the slow sea surface currents. The experiments show that a considerable dilution...

  4. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  5. On predicting mantle mushroom plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kheng Tan

    2011-04-01

    Top cooling may produce plunging plumes of diameter of 585 km and at least 195 Myr old. The number of cold plumes is estimated to be 569, which has not been observed by seismic tomography or as cold spots. The cold plunging plumes may overwhelm and entrap some of the hot rising plumes from CMB, so that together they may settle in the transition zone.

  6. Tehran Groundwater Chemical Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M- Shariatpanahi

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Seventy eight wells water sample of Tehran plain were examined to determine r its groundwaters chemical pollution. Tehran s groundwaters are slightly acidic and their total dissolved solids are high and are in the hard water category."nThe nitrate concentration of wells water of west region is less than per¬missible level of W.H.O. standard, whereas, the nitrate concentration of some of the other regions wells exceed W.H.O. standard which is indication of pollution"nwith municipal wastewaters. The concentration of toxic elements Cr, Cd, As, Hg and"ni Pb of some of the west, east and south regions wells of Tehran is more than per¬missible level of W.H.O. standard, whereas, the concentration of Cu, Zn,Mn and detergents is below W.H.O. standard."n1"nIn general, the amount of dissolved materials of Tehran s groundwaters and also"ni the potential of their contamination with nitrate is increased as Tehran s ground-"nwaters move further to the south, and even though, Tehran s groundwaters contamination with toxic elements is limited to the industrial west district, industrial-residential east and south districts, but»with regard to the disposal methods of"nt municipal and industrial wastewaters, if Tehran s groundwaters pollution continues,"nlocal contamination of groundwaters is likely to spread. So that finally their quality changes in such a way that this water source may become unfit for most domestic, industrial and agricultural uses. This survey shows the necessity of collection and treatment of Tehran s wastewaters and Prevention of the disposal of untreated wastewaters into the environment.

  7. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  8. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the tricWoroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were insta...

  9. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER AT AIR FORCE PLANT 4, CARSWELL, TEXAS - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 600 Cottonwood trees were planted over a shallow groundwater plume in an attempt to detoxify the tricWoroethylene (TCE) in a groundwater plume at a former Air Force facility. Two planting techniques were used: rooted stock about two years old, and 18 inch cuttings were insta...

  10. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Sonne, Anne Thobo;

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different...... distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity...... and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration...

  11. Water quality of groundwater and stream base flow in the Marcellus Shale Gas Field of the Monongahela River Basin, West Virginia, 2011-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Kozar, Mark D.; Messinger, Terence; Mulder, Michon L.; Pelak, Adam J.; White, Jeremy S.

    2015-01-01

    The Marcellus Shale gas field underlies portions of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Development of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technology led to extensive development of gas from the Marcellus Shale beginning about 2007. The need to identify and monitor changes in water-quality conditions related to development of the Marcellus Shale gas field prompted the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water and Waste Management, to document water quality for comparison with water quality in samples collected at a future date. The identification of change in water-quality conditions over time is more difficult if baseline water-quality conditions have not been documented.

  12. NW Iberia Shelf Dynamics. Study of the Douro River Plume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Iglesias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available River plumes are one of the most important mechanisms that transport the terrestrial materials to the coast and the ocean. Some examples of those materials are pollutants, essential nutrients, which enhance the phytoplankton productivity or sediments, which settle on the seabed producing modifications on the bathymetry affecting the navigation channels. The mixing between the riverine and the oceanic waters can induce instabilities, which might generate bulges, filaments, and buoyant currents over the continental shelf. Offshore, the buoyant riverine water could form a front with the oceanic waters often related with the occurrence of current-jets, eddies and strong mixing. The study and modelling of the river plumes is a key factor for the complete understanding of sediment transport mechanisms and patterns, and of coastal physics and dynamic processes. On this study the Douro River plume will be simulated. The Douro River is located on the north-west Iberian coast and its daily averaged freshwater discharge can range values from 0 to 13000 m3/s. This variability impacts the formation of the river plumes and its dispersion along the continental shelf. This study builds on the long-term objective of generate a Douro River plume forecasting system as part of the RAIA and RAIA.co projects. Satellite imagery was analyzed showing that the river Douro is one of the main sources of suspended particles, dissolved material and chlorophyll in the NW Iberian Shelf. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS model was selected to reproduce scenarios of plume generation, retention and dispersion. Whit this model, three types of simulations were performed: (i schematic winds simulations with prescribed river flow, wind speed and direction; (ii multi-year climatological simulation, with river flow and temperature change for each month; (iii extreme case simulation, based on the Entre-os-Rios accident situation. The schematic wind case-studies suggest that the

  13. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for recapture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption). Our specific research objectives include: * Elucidation of the mechanisms and rates for the release of sorbed trace metals and their subsequent sequestration by co-precipitation in calcite induced by urea hydrolysis. * Evaluation at the field scale of the influence of

  14. Modelling reaction front formation and oscillatory behaviour in a contaminant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbin, Laura; Fowler, Andrew; Mitchell, Sarah; Winstanley, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater contamination is a concern in all industrialised countries that suffer countless spills and leaks of various contaminants. Often, the contaminated groundwater forms a plume that, under the influences of regional groundwater flow, could eventually migrate to streams or wells. This can have catastrophic consequences for human health and local wildlife. The process known as bioremediation removes pollutants in the contaminated groundwater through bacterial reactions. Microorganisms can transform the contaminant into less harmful metabolic products. It is important to be able to predict whether such bioremediation will be sufficient for the safe clean-up of a plume before it reaches wells or lakes. Borehole data from a contaminant plume which resulted from spillage at a coal carbonisation plant in Mansfield, England is the motivation behind modelling the properties of a contaminant plume. In the upper part of the plume, oxygen is consumed and a nitrate spike forms. Deep inside the plume, nitrate is depleted and oscillations of organic carbon and ammonium concentration profiles are observed. While there are various numerical models that predict the evolution of a contaminant plume, we aim to create a simplified model that captures the fundamental characteristics of the plume while being comparable in accuracy to the detailed numerical models that currently exist. To model the transport of a contaminant, we consider the redox reactions that occur in groundwater systems. These reactions deplete the contaminant while creating zones of dominant terminal electron accepting processes throughout the plume. The contaminant is depleted by a series of terminal electron acceptors, the order of which is typically oxygen, nitrate, manganese, iron, sulphate and carbon dioxide. We describe a reaction front, characteristic of a redox zone, by means of rapid reaction and slow diffusion. This aids in describing the depletion of oxygen in the upper part of the plume. To

  15. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of 90Strontium & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ferris, F. Grant; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, Rick S.

    2004-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as 90Sr are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., 90Sr) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  16. Trace Metals in Groundwater & the Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Strontium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.

    2004-12-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  17. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.

    2005-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center [INTEC] at the Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate (primarily calcite) in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by (a) increasing pH and alkalinity and (b) liberating cations from the aquifer matrix by cation exchange reactions. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced in situ by native urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long term. We are currently conducting field based activities at both the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP), an uncontaminated surrogate site for the strontium-90 contaminated vadose zone at INTEC and at the strontium-90 contaminated aquifer of 100-N area of the Hanford site.

  18. Fate of organic contaminants in the redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Samples from 75 sample locations in a landfill leachate pollution plume reveal a significant disappearance of specific organic compounds (SOC's) within the first 100 m of the plume. Only the herbicide Mecoprop® (MCPP) migrates further. Since sorption and dilution cannot account for the decreasing...... concentrations, degradation is considered to be the governing process. Non-volatile organic carbon shows a corresponding fate probably acting as a substrate for the microbial processes. The first 20 m of the plume are methanogenic/sulfidogenic, judged on the chemistry of the groundwater, followed...

  19. Fate of organic contaminants in the redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Samples from 75 sample locations in a landfill leachate pollution plume reveal a significant disappearance of specific organic compounds (SOC's) within the first 100 m of the plume. Only the herbicide Mecoprop® (MCPP) migrates further. Since sorption and dilution cannot account for the decreasing...... concentrations, degradation is considered to be the governing process. Non-volatile organic carbon shows a corresponding fate probably acting as a substrate for the microbial processes. The first 20 m of the plume are methanogenic/sulfidogenic, judged on the chemistry of the groundwater, followed...

  20. Analysis of the Transformation Path Between Stream Flow and Groundwater from Dingxin to Shaomaying in Hei River, Catchment West China%河西走廊黑河鼎新至哨马营段河水与地下水转化途径分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仵彦卿; 慕富强; 贺益贤; 蓝永超

    2000-01-01

    运用美国GEOMETRCS公司制造的Stratagem EH4电导率成像系统,对黑河鼎新至哨马 营河谷地带进行实地调查发现,此段存在一地堑式断层,为东西走向,古河道沿此断层形成,河流 在此段大部分沿古河道转化为地下水,自西向东流去,在东部板滩井一带(盐碱沼泽地)以垂向蒸发方 式通过地表及植被排泄.古尔乃绿洲的形成与黑河河水通过断层转化成地下水有关.%Water resources system includes the branch sys- tems of rainfall, surface water, and groundwater. Trans- formation between surface water and groundwater flow is an important part in water resources researches. Hei River is located in western Gansu Province, West China. It comes from Qilian Mountains and is one of the largest inland rivers in the arid region of the western China. In spite of multiple transformation between surface water and groundwater flow, river water finally flows into the lower reaches, the eastern Juyanhai and the western Juyanhai lakes. When the assessment of water resources was carried out in Hei River catchment, it is difficult to determine transforming relation between streamflow and groundwater flow. The objectives of the study were to as- certain the transformation path between streamflow and groundwater through geophysical exploration and ana- lyzing the relation between eastern Guernai oasis and Hei River. After a site investigation of underground geological structure by using Stratagem EH4 electric conductivity imaging system in Dingxin-Shaomaying valley of the Hei River downstream, it is discovered that there is a fault zone that strikes east-west. This fault zone may be an ancient riverway. Most of streamflow penetrate to subsurface along this fault zone transforming into groundwater flow. The groundwater flow moves toward the eastern Guernai oasis along this fault zone.Then the groundwater flow discharges in the manner of surface evaporation and vegetation

  1. Baseline groundwater model update for p-area groundwater operable unit, NBN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Amidon, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the development of a numerical groundwater flow and transport model of the hydrogeologic system of the P-Area Reactor Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). The P-Area model provides a tool to aid in understanding the hydrologic and geochemical processes that control the development and migration of the current tritium, tetrachloroethene (PCE), and trichloroethene (TCE) plumes in this region.

  2. A case for mantle plumes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoffrey F. Davies

    2005-01-01

    The existence of at least several plumes in the Earth's mantle can be inferred with few assumptions from well-established observations. As well, thermal mantle plumes can be predicted from well-established and quantified fluid dynamics and a plausible assumption about the Earth's early thermal state. Some additional important observations, especially of flood basalts and rift-related magmatism, have been shown to be plausibly consistent with the physical theory. Recent claims to have detected plumes using seismic tomography may comprise the most direct evidence for plumes, but plume tails are likely to be difficult to resolve definitively and the claims need to be well tested. Although significant questions remain about its viability, the plume hypothesis thus seems to be well worth continued investigation. Nevertheless there are many non-plate-related magmatic phenomena whose association with plumes is unclear or unlikely. Compositional buoyancy has recently been shown potentially to substantially complicate the dynamics of plumes, and this may lead to explanations for a wider range of phenomena, including "headless" hotspot tracks, than purely thermal plumes.

  3. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  4. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  5. Delineation of ground-water contamination using soil-gas analyses near Jackson, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the ground-water resources near Jackson, West Tennessee, was conducted during 1988-89. The study included determination of the occurrence of contaminants in the shallow aquifer using soil-gas analyses in the unsaturated zone. Between 1980 and 1988, an underground fuel-storage tank leaked about 3,000 gallons of unleaded fuel to the water table about 4 feet below land surface. A survey of soil gas using a gas chromatograph equipped with a photoionization detector showed concentrations of volatile organic compounds greater than IO, 000 parts per million near the leak These compounds were detected in an area about 240 feet long and 110 feet wide extending west from the point source. The chromatograms provided two distinct 'fingerprints' of volatile organic compounds. The first revealed the presence of benzene, toluene, andxylenes, which are constituents of unleaded fuel, in addition to other volatile compounds, in soil gas in the area near the leak The second did not reveal any detectable benzene, toluene, or xylenes in the soil-gas samples, but showed the presence of other unidentified volatile organic compounds in soil gas north of the storage tank. The distribution of total concentrations of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone indicated that a second plume about 200 feet long and 90 feet wide was present about 100 feet north of the storage tank The second plume could have been the result of previous activities at this site during the 1950's or earlier. Activities at the site are believed to have included storage of solvents used at the nearby railyard and flushing of tanks containing tar onto a gravel-covered parking area. The delineation of these plumes has shown that soil-gas analyses can be a useful technique for identifying areas of contamination with volatile organic compounds in shallow water-table aquifers and may have broad applications in similar situations where the water table is relatively close to the surface.

  6. Groundwater-level change and evaluation of simulated water levels for irrigated areas in Lahontan Valley, Churchill County, west-central Nevada, 1992 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W.; Buto, Susan G.; Welborn, Toby L.

    2016-09-14

    The acquisition and transfer of water rights to wetland areas of Lahontan Valley, Nevada, has caused concern over the potential effects on shallow aquifer water levels. In 1992, water levels in Lahontan Valley were measured to construct a water-table map of the shallow aquifer prior to the effects of water-right transfers mandated by the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribal Settlement Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-618, 104 Stat. 3289). From 1992 to 2012, approximately 11,810 water-righted acres, or 34,356 acre-feet of water, were acquired and transferred to wetland areas of Lahontan Valley. This report documents changes in water levels measured during the period of water-right transfers and presents an evaluation of five groundwater-flow model scenarios that simulated water-level changes in Lahontan Valley in response to water-right transfers and a reduction in irrigation season length by 50 percent.Water levels measured in 98 wells from 2012 to 2013 were used to construct a water-table map. Water levels in 73 of the 98 wells were compared with water levels measured in 1992 and used to construct a water-level change map. Water-level changes in the 73 wells ranged from -16.2 to 4.1 feet over the 20-year period. Rises in water levels in Lahontan Valley may correspond to annual changes in available irrigation water, increased canal flows after the exceptionally dry and shortened irrigation season of 1992, and the increased conveyance of water rights transferred to Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. Water-level declines generally occurred near the boundary of irrigated areas and may be associated with groundwater pumping, water-right transfers, and inactive surface-water storage reservoirs. The largest water-level declines were in the area near Carson Lake.Groundwater-level response to water-right transfers was evaluated by comparing simulated and observed water-level changes for periods representing water-right transfers and a shortened irrigation season in areas near Fallon

  7. An application of geoelectrical methods for contamination plume recognition in Urbanowice waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycka, Mateusz; Mendecki, Maciej Jan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to detect groundwater pollution and to identify the conditions of soil and groundwater near the Urbanowice landfill site using geoelectrical measurements. Presented measurements are preliminary results from tested site and are beginning of continuous monitoring. Contamination outflows detected by resistivity and IP technique show a good correlation with available hydrological data. Contamination plume were found in Eastern part of survey profil.

  8. TREATABILITY TEST FOR REMOVING TECHNETIUM-99 FROM 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW; TORTOSO AC; ELLIOTT WS; BYRNES ME

    2007-11-29

    The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) is one of two groundwater OUs located within the 200 West groundwater aggregate area of the Hanford Site. The primary risk-driving contaminants within the 200-ZP-1 OU include carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A pump-and-treat system for this OU was initially installed in 1995 to control the 0.002 kg/m{sup 3} (2000 {micro}g/L) contour of the carbon tetrachloride plume. Carbon tetrachloride is removed from groundwater with the assistance of an air-stripping tower. Ten extraction wells and three injection wells operate at a combined rate of approximately 0.017m{sup 3}/s (17.03 L/s). In 2005, groundwater from two of the extraction wells (299-W15-765 and 299-W15-44) began to show concentrations greater than twice the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of Tc-99 (33,309 beq/m{sup 3} or 900 pCi/L). The Tc-99 groundwater concentrations from all ten of the extraction wells when mixed were more than one-half of the MCL and were slowly increasing. If concentrations continued to rise and the water remained untreated for Tc-99, there was concern that the water re-injected into the aquifer could exceed the MCL standard. Multiple treatment technologies were reviewed for selectively removing Tc-99 from the groundwater. Of the treatment technologies, only ion exchange was determined to be highly selective, commercially available, and relatively low in cost. Through research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the ion-exchange resin Purolite{reg_sign} A-530E was found to successfully remove Tc-99 from groundwater, even in the presence of competing anions. For this and other reasons, Purolite{reg_sign} A-530E ion exchange resin was selected for treatability testing. The treatability test required installing resin columns on the discharge lines from extraction wells 299-W15-765 and 299-W15-44. Preliminary test results have concluded that the Purolite{reg_sign} A-530E resin is effective at removing Tc-99 from groundwater to

  9. Pyroxenite in the Galapagos plume source at 65 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, W. T.; Gazel, E.; Vidito, C. A.; Herzberg, C. T.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Alvarado-Induni, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mantle plumes originate from boundary layers below the upper mantle. Their surface expressions as hotspot tracks have been linked to voluminous outpourings of lava in the form of large igneous provinces. The Galapagos hotspot has been active since ~90 Ma and the oldest lavas of its associated submarine ridge have been dated to ~14 Ma, subducting at the Middle America Trench, off Costa Rica. The Galapagos plume head magmatic production is preserved as the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). A series of 15-65 Ma accreted Galapagos paleo-ridges and islands/seamounts are accreted in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and Panama. One of these accreted terranes, the Quepos block on the west coast of Costa Rica is an ancient, ~65 Ma Galapagos island. Olivine phenocrysts from Quepos picrites have elevated Ni and low Ca and Mn and Fe/Mn indicative of a dominant pyroxenite source component while CLIP samples are dominated by a peridotite source. The mantle potential temperature (max) of the plume changed from ~1650 to ~1550 C at 65 Ma. This change correlates with the first appearance of the pyroxenite component and an EMII signature (Northern Galapagos Domain) in the Galapagos plume. A relatively dense pyroxenite component may provide a mechanism for the change in Tp due to its effect on the plume's bouyancy. Alternatively, the pyroxenite component was diluted by high peridotite melt fraction during the massive production of the CLIP.

  10. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fukao; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-01-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam obs...

  11. A Study to ascertain the Optimum Yield from Groundwater Source in the Eastern Part of Kolkata Municipal Corporation Area in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj K. Roy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing stress on fresh water resources due to ever-rising demands and profligateuses as well as growing population and industrial establishment of Kolkata is an issue ofgreat concern. The purpose of this study is to make a quantitative estimate of the availablegroundwater resources in the eastern part of Kolkata for efficient utilization andmanagement of groundwater resources. The methodology involved the investigation,drilling, lowering, collection and analysis of main well and observation wells data andgroundwater quality as well. Based upon the study of lithological logs as also the electricallog, the sub-surface deposition of the assembly pipes have been determined. The resultsindicate that the aquifers are composite and composed of sands and overlying silts/claybeds. Long term Tests pumping indicate that the main well may be capable of a long termdischarge rate of 120 m3/hr restricted at 120 m and 156.65 m. The aquifer parametersfrom the study area are estimated from the analysis of short and long durations pumpingtest data. For the alluvial aquifer, transmissivity of 1491 m2/d, hydraulic conductivity of49.7 m/d and storage coefficient of 0.0064 are recommended found by using differentmethods. Long duration pumping tests have indicated that the maximum drawdown inwater table by 4.89 m may be achievable by radius of influence about 682 m. After theclosure of pumping operation, recuperation test was also carried out in the main wells aswell as also from observation wells. Recovery test was monitored for 20 hrs after closureof pumping. Slope of the residual drawdown from t/t’ indicated aquifer transmissivity of1322 m2/d and therefore hydraulic conductivity of the alluvial sand aquifer is 44 m/dhaving an aquifer thickness of 30 m. The physico-chemical and bacteriological analysis ofgroundwater of two pumping wells were tested and the results showed the groundwatermust be disinfected before supplying to the consumers.

  12. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  13. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects....

  14. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  15. Dexou low pH plume baseline permeable reactive barrier options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2000-06-20

    The current Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) baseline configuration consists of a limestone trench and a granular cast iron trench in series. This report provides information relative to the use of PRB technology for the remediation of the D-Area low pH groundwater plumes.

  16. Application of natural attenuation for the control of petroleum hydrocarbon plume: Mechanisms and effectiveness evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, H. Y.; Hong, A.; Lin, S. L.; Surampalli, R. Y.; Kao, C. M.

    2013-11-01

    The effectiveness and mechanisms of NA were evaluated in the field-scale study.Significant BTEX removal was observed via different intrinsic bioremediation processes.The calculated biodegradation capacity confirmed that NA can effectively contain the plume.BTEX-degrading bacteria appeared in groundwater via PCR/nucleotide sequence analyses.

  17. Integrated characterisation of aquifer heterogeneity and landfill leachate plume migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, L.; Lefebvre, R.; Gloaguen, E.; Paradis, D.

    2009-05-01

    The understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant migration is based on our ability to characterize aquifers and represent these processes with numerical simulators. This understanding is required to efficiently remediate contaminated sites since the failure of remediation actions are often related to an insufficient understanding of aquifer heterogeneity. During the last decades, continuous development of numerical simulators allowed models to better represent complex flow systems. However, conventional hydrogeological characterization methods do not provide the data required to define aquifer heterogeneity. An original hydrogeological characterization approach was used to define aquifer heterogeneity and delineate landfill leachate plumes through the use and integration of varied techniques. The objective of the study is to develop a methodology to integrate hydrogeological, geophysical and geochemical data using geostatistical tools. The characterization program aims to better characterize the aquifer, delineate leachate plumes emitted by a former landfill, and guide a study of the natural attenuation of the plumes. The initial phase of the integrated multidisciplinary aquifer characterization program was carried out in a 12 km2 area of the sub-watershed surrounding the landfill of St-Lambert-de-Lauzon, Québec. In the study area, a 10-m thick sandy unconfined aquifer overlies clayey silt and till layers. In this relatively flat area, natural streams as well as agricultural and forestry drainage networks control groundwater flow. The first phase of the project focused on a regional hydrogeological and geochemical characterization where 5 field methods were combined: 1) surface geophysics (ground penetrating radar and electrical tomography) (GPR); 2) direct-push methods including a) cone penetration tests (CPT), b) soil sampling and c) installation of full- screened observation wells; 3) multilevel measurement of geochemical parameters and groundwater

  18. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  19. Biogeochemistry of landfill leachate plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2001-01-01

    is on dissolved organic matter, xenobiotic organic compounds, inorganic macrocomponents as anions and cations, and heavy metals. Laboratory as well as field investigations are included. This review is an up-date of an earlier comprehensive review. The review shows that most leachate contamination plumes...... the behavior of the contaminants in the plume as the leachate migrates away from the landfill. Diverse microbial communities have been identified in leachate plumes and are believed to be responsible for the redox processes. Dissolved organic C in the leachate, although it appears to be only slowly degradable...

  20. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  1. Temporal evolution of depth-stratified groundwater salinity in municipal wells in the major aquifers in Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Ale, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-15

    We assessed spatial distribution of total dissolved solids (TDS) in shallow (150 m) municipal (domestic and public supply) wells in nine major aquifers in Texas for the 1960s-1970s and 1990s-2000s periods using geochemical data obtained from the Texas Water Development Board. For both time periods, the highest median groundwater TDS concentrations in shallow wells were found in the Ogallala and Pecos Valley aquifers and that in the deep wells were found in the Trinity aquifer. In the Ogallala, Pecos Valley, Seymour and Gulf Coast aquifers, >60% of observations from shallow wells exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for TDS (500 mg L(-1)) in both time periods. In the Trinity aquifer, 72% of deep water quality observations exceeded the SMCL in the 1990s-2000s as compared to 64% observations in the 1960s-1970s. In the Ogallala, Edwards-Trinity (plateau), and Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) aquifers, extent of salinization decreased significantly (paquifers), north central (Trinity-downdip aquifer) and south (southern Gulf Coast aquifer) Texas. In west Texas, mixed cation SO4-Cl facies led to groundwater salinization, as compared to Na-Cl facies in the southern Gulf Coast, and Ca-Na-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 facies transitioning to Na-Cl facies in the Trinity-downdip regions. Groundwater mixing ensuing from cross-formational flow, seepage from saline plumes and playas, evaporative enrichment, and irrigation return flow had led to progressive groundwater salinization in west Texas, as compared to ion-exchange processes in the north-central Texas, and seawater intrusion coupled with salt dissolution and irrigation return flow in the southern Gulf Coast regions.

  2. Field demonstration of rapid turnaround, multilevel groundwater screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingle, A.R. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baker, L. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Long, D.D. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program; Miracle, M. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A combined technology approach to rapidly characterizing source area and downgradient groundwater associated with a past fuel spill has been field tested. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the presence and extent of fuel-related compounds or indications of their biodegradation in groundwater. The distance from the source area to be investigated was established by calculating the potential extent of a plume based only on groundwater flow velocities. To accomplish this objective, commercially available technologies were combined and used to rapidly assess the source area and downgradient groundwater associated with the fuel discharge. The source of contamination that was investigated overlies glacial sand and gravel outwash deposits. Historical data suggest that from 1955 to 1970 as many as 1 to 6 million pi of aviation gasoline (AVGAS) were god at the study area. Although the remedial investigation (RI) for this study area indicated fuel-related groundwater contamination at the source area, fuel-related contamination was not detected in downgradient monitoring wells. Rapid horizontal groundwater velocities and the 24-year time span from the last reported spill farther suggest that a plume of contaminated groundwater could extend several thousand feet downgradient. The lack of contamination downgradient from the source suggests two possibilities: (1) monitoring wells installed during the RI did not intersect the plume or (2) fuel-related compounds had naturally degraded.

  3. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul L.; Sonne, Anne T.; Balbarini, Nicola; Rosenberg, Louise; Binning, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration measurement. The solution was successfully applied to published field data obtained in a large and a small Danish stream and provided valuable information on the risk posed by the groundwater contaminant plumes. The results provided by the dilution and volatilization model are very different to those obtained with existing point source models, with a distributed source leading to a larger mixing length and different concentration field. The dilution model can also provide recommendations for sampling locations and the size of impact zones in streams. This is of interest for regulators, for example when developing guidelines for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

  4. Smoke plumes: Emissions and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan O' Neill; Shawn Urbanski; Scott Goodrick; Sim Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Smoke can manifest itself as a towering plume rising against the clear blue sky-or as a vast swath of thick haze, with fingers that settle into valleys overnight. It comes in many forms and colors, from fluffy and white to thick and black. Smoke plumes can rise high into the atmosphere and travel great distances across oceans and continents. Or smoke can remain close...

  5. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

  6. Movement and fate of detergents in groundwater: a field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Barber, L.B.; LeBlanc, D.

    1986-01-01

    The major cations, anions, and detergents in a plume of contaminated groundwater at Otis Air Base on Cape Cod (Mass., U.S.A.) have moved approximately 3.5 km down gradient from the disposal beds. We hypothesize that the detergents form two distinct plumes, which consist of alkyl benzene sulfonates (ABS) detergents and linear alkyl sulfonates (LAS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (NaLS) detergents. The ABS detergents were deposited from approximately 1940 through 1965, when ABS detergents were banned. From 1965 to the present, LAS and NaLS detergents were in the sewage. The ABS detergents appear to be transported in the aquifer at the same rate as the specific conductance (major cations and anions) and boron, which are currently used as conservative tracers of the plume of contaminated groundwater. There appears to be little or no biological degradation of the ABS detergents in the aquifer, based on their concentration in the plume. On the other hand, the LAS and NaLS detergents have degraded rapidly and have been detected only 0.6 km down gradient. The roleof the detergents in the transport of other organic compounds in the plume is nuclear. There is a separation of the ABS detergent plume and the volatile organic compound plume; however, the time of entry of the detergents and the volatile organic compounds is unknown. Therefore, it is not possible to conclude on the interaction of these two classes of compounds. ?? 1986.

  7. Equatorial spread F fossil plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Ossakow

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Behaviour of equatorial spread F (ESF fossil plumes, i.e., ESF plumes that have stopped rising, is examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. We find that fossil bubbles, plasma density depletions associated with fossil plumes, can persist as high-altitude equatorial depletions even while being "blown" by zonal winds. Corresponding airglow-proxy images of fossil plumes, plots of electron density versus longitude and latitude at a constant altitude of 288 km, are shown to partially "fill in" in most cases, beginning with the highest altitude field lines within the plume. Specifically, field lines upon which the E field has fallen entirely to zero are affected and only the low altitude (≤600 km portion if each field line fills in. This suggests that it should be possible to observe a bubble at high altitude on a field line for which the corresponding airglow image no longer shows a depletion. In all cases ESF plumes stop rising when the flux-tube-integrated ion mass density inside the upper edge of the bubble is equal to that of the nearby background, further supporting the result of Krall et al. (2010b.

  8. Groundwater Pollution from Underground Coal Gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In situ coal gasification poses a potential environmental risk to groundwater pollution although it depends mainly on local hydrogeological conditions.In our investigation, the possible processes of groundwater pollution originating from underground coal gasification (UCG) were analyzed.Typical pollutants were identified and pollution control measures are proposed.Groundwater pollution is caused by the diffusion and penetration of contaminants generated by underground gasification processes towards surrounding strata and the possible leaching of underground residue by natural groundwater flow after gasification.Typical organic pollutants include phenols, benzene, minor components such as PAHs and heterocyclics.Inorganic pollutants involve cations and anions.The natural groundwater flow after gasification through the seam is attributable to the migration of contaminants, which can be predicted by mathematical modeling.The extent and concentration of the groundwater pollution plume depend primarily on groundwater flow velocity, the degree of dispersion and the adsorption and reactions of the various contaminants.The adsorption function of coal and surrounding strata make a big contribution to the decrease of the contaminants over time and with the distance from the burn cavity.Possible pollution control measures regarding UCG include identifying a permanently, unsuitable zone, setting a hydraulic barrier and pumping contaminated water out for surface disposal.Mitigation measures during gasification processes and groundwater remediation after gasification are also proposed.

  9. Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Aleisa C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE Aleisa Bloom, (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) Robert Lyon (bob.lyon@aecom.com), Laurie Stenberg, and Holly Brown (AECOM, Germantown, Maryland, USA) ABSTRACT: Past disposal practices at Dover Air Force Base (AFB), Delaware, created a large solvent plume called Area 6 (about 1 mile long, 2,000 feet wide, and 345 acres). The main contaminants are PCE, TCE, and their degradation products. The remedy is in-situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB). AAB started in 2006 and is focusing on source areas and downgradient plume cores. Direct-push injections occurred in source areas where contamination is typically between 5 and 20 feet below ground surface. Lower concentration dissolved-phased contamination is present downgradient at 35 and 50 feet below ground surface. Here, permanent injection/extraction wells installed in transects perpendicular to the flow of groundwater are used to apply AAB. The AAB substrate is a mix of sodium lactate, emulsified vegetable oil, and nutrients. After eight years, dissolved contaminant mass within the main 80-acre treatment area has been reduced by over 98 percent. This successful application of AAB has stopped the flux of contaminants to the more distal portions of the plume. While more time is needed for effects to be seen in the distal plume, AAB injections will soon cease, and the remedy will transition to natural attenuation. INTRODUCTION Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Science Division (ORNL) and AECOM (formerly URS Corporation) have successfully implemented in situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB) to remediate chlorinated solvent contamination in a large, multi-sourced groundwater plume at Dover Air Force Base (AFB). AAB has resulted in significant reductions of dissolved phase chlorinated solvent concentrations. This plume, called Area 6, was originally over 1 mile in length and over 2,000 feet wide (Figure 1

  10. Characterization of shallow unconsolidated aquifers in West Africa using different hydrogeological data sources as a contribution to the promotion of manual drilling and low cost techniques for groundwater exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussi, Fabio; Fumagalli, Letizia; Bonomi, Tullia; Kane, Cheikh H.; Fava, Francesco; Di Mauro, Biagio; Hamidou, Barry; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Colombo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Manual drilling refers to several drilling methods that rely on human energy to construct a borehole and complete a water supply (Danert, 2015). It can be an effective strategy to increase access to groundwater in low income countries , but manual drilling can be applied only where shallow geological layers are relatively soft and water table is not too deep. It is important therefore to identify those zones where shallow hydrogeological conditions are suitable, investigating the characteristics of shallow porous aquifers. Existing hydrogeological studies are generally focused in the characterization of deep fractures aquifers, more productive and able to ensure water supply for large settlements. Information concerning shallow porous aquifers are limited. This research has been carried out in two different study areas in West Africa (North-Western Senegal and Eastern Guinea). Aim of the research is the characterization of shallow aquifer using different methods and the identification of hydrogeological condition suitable for manual drilling implementation. Three different methods to estimate geometry and hydraulic properties of shallow unconsolidated aquifers have been used: The first method is based on the analysis of stratigraphic data obtained from borehole logs of the national water point database in both countries. The following steps have been implemented on the original information using the software TANGAFRIC, specifically designed for this study: a) identification of most frequent terms used for hydrogeological description in Senegal and Guinea database; b) definition of standard categories and manual codification of data; c) automatic extraction of average distribution of textural classes at different depth intervals in the unconsolidated aquifer; d) estimation of hydraulic parameters using conversion tables between texture and hydraulic conductivity available in the literature. . The second method is based on the interpretation of pump and recovery test

  11. Containment and recovery of a light non-aqueous phase liquid plume at a woodtreating facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouse, D. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Edison, NJ (United States); Powell, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hawthorn, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Weinstock, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Butte, MT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A woodtreating site in Montana used a formulation (product) of 5 percent pentachlorophenol and 95 percent diesel fuel as a carrier liquid to pressure treat lumber. Through years of operations approximately 378,500 liters of this light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) product spilled onto the ground and soaked into the groundwater. A plume of this LNAPL product flowed in a northerly direction toward a stream located approximately 410 meters from the pressure treatment building. A 271-meter long high density polyethylene (HDPE) containment cutoff barrier wall was installed 15 meters from the stream to capture, contain, and prevent the product from migrating off site. This barrier was extended to a depth of 3.7 meters below ground surface and allowed the groundwater to flow beneath it. Ten product recovery wells, each with a dual-phase pumping system, were installed within the plume, and a groundwater model was completed to indicate how the plume would be contained by generating a cone of influence at each recovery well. The model indicated that the recovery wells and cutoff barrier wall would contain the plume and prevent further migration. To date, nearly 3{1/2} year`s later, approximately 106,000 liters of product have been recovered.

  12. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Perchlorate in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Center ORP oxidation-reduction potential P&T pump-and-treat pcrA perchlorate reductase RAO remedial action objective SCM site conceptual... SCM ) should be formulated and then calibrated against local data. Physical conditions of the aquifer, groundwater flow characteristics (e.g., flow...8 disadvantage . Flushing and dilution can reduce concentrations rapidly, but solubility can result in extended plumes with low concentrations that

  13. Numerical Simulation of Extent of Carbon Dioxide Plume Injected in the Gyeongsang Basin, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihm, J.; Park, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    A series of thermo-hydro-chemical numerical simulations was performed to evaluate extent of carbon dioxide plume injected in the Gyeongsang Basin, which is one of the prospective onshore sedimentary basins for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in Korea. The carbon dioxide plume extent is an important factor in estimating storage efficiency and thus storage capacity of carbon dioxide in a storage formation because it represents an actual volume of the storage formation, which is occupied by injected carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide plume extent is also an essential component in risk analysis of geologic storage of carbon dioxide because most of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical responses to carbon dioxide injection occur within it. To evaluate impacts of injection scenarios (i.e., injection rate and period) of carbon dioxide and geological conditions (i.e., thickness and depth) and hydrogeochemical properties (i.e., porosity, intrinsic permeability, salt concentration in groundwater, and volume fraction of chlorite) of a storage formation on the carbon dioxide plume extent, a series of sensitivity tests was also performed. The numerical simulation results show that the carbon dioxide plume extent is significantly affected by such injection scenarios, geological conditions, and hydrogeochemical properties. The carbon dioxide plume extent increases as the injection rate (with a constant injection period) increases, and this trend does not change with time. The carbon dioxide plume extent decreases as the injection period (with a constant total injection amount) increases until about 50 years, while it is not sensitive to the injection period after about 50 years. The carbon dioxide plume extent also decreases as the thickness increases until about 100 years, while it is not sensitive to the thickness after about 100 years. In contrast, the carbon dioxide plume extent decreases as the depth increases, and this trend is intensified with time. On the other hand, the

  14. Ground-water monitoring sites for Carson Valley, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the monitoring sites where water levels were collected and used to develop a spatial ground-water data base in Carson Valley, west-central...

  15. Plumes in stellar convection zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J P

    1999-01-01

    All numerical simulations of compressible convection reveal the presence of strong downwards directed flows. Thanks to helioseismology, such plumes have now been detected also at the top of the solar convection zone, on super- granular scales. Their properties may be crudely described by adopting Taylor's turbulent entrainment hypothesis, whose validity is well established under various conditions. Using this model, one finds that the strong density stratification does not prevent the plumes from traversing the whole convection zone, and that they carry upwards a net energy flux (Rieutord & Zahn 1995). They penetrate to some extent in the adjacent stable region, where they establish a nearly adiabatic stratification. These plumes have a strong impact on the dynamics of stellar convection zones, and they play probably a key role in the dynamo mechanism.

  16. Assessment of diesel contamination in groundwater using electromagnetic induction geophysical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul; Cooper, Jeffrey; Morris, Jeffrey; Urynowicz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Determining hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater is typically accomplished through the installation of extensive monitoring wells. Issues of scale and site heterogeneities tend to introduce errors in delineating the extent of contamination and environmental impact. In this study, electromagnetic induction survey was investigated as an alternative technique for mapping petroleum contaminants in the subsurface. The surveys were conducted at a coal mining site near Gillette, Wyoming, using the EM34-XL ground conductivity meter. Data from this survey were validated with known concentrations of diesel compounds detected in groundwater from the study site. Groundwater data correlated well with the electromagnetic survey data, which was used to generate a site model to identify subsurface diesel plumes. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to use electromagnetic survey techniques for mapping hydrocarbon contamination in groundwater. Results from this study indicate that this geophysical technique can be an effective tool for assessing subsurface petroleum hydrocarbon sources and plumes at contaminated sites.

  17. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Farnsworth, Katherine L.

    2017-02-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world's coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world's smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to better

  18. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world’s coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas  100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world’s smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to

  19. Anaerobic methane oxidation in a landfill-leachate plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Ethan L; Cifuentes, Luis A; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M

    2002-06-01

    The alluvial aquifer adjacent to Norman Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobic processes impacting landfill-leachate contaminated aquifers. We collected groundwaters from a transect of seven multilevel wells ranging in depth from 1.3 to 11 m that were oriented parallel to the flow path. The center of the leachate plume was characterized by (1) high alkalinity and elevated concentrations of total dissolved organic carbon, reduced iron, and methane, and (2) negligible oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Methane concentrations and stable carbon isotope (delta13C) values suggest anaerobic methane oxidation was occurring within the plume and at its margins. Methane delta13C values increased from about -54 per thousand near the source to > -10 per thousand downgradient and at the plume margins. The isotopic fractionation associated with this methane oxidation was -13.6+/-1.0 per thousand. Methane 13C enrichment indicated that 80-90% of the original landfill methane was oxidized over the 210-m transect. First-order rate constants ranged from 0.06 to 0.23 per year, and oxidation rates ranged from 18 to 230 microM/y. Overall, hydrochemical data suggest that a sulfate reducer-methanogen consortium may mediate this methane oxidation. These results demonstrate that natural attenuation through anaerobic methane oxidation can be an important sink for landfill methane in aquifer systems.

  20. Recycled crust in the Galápagos Plume source at 70 Ma: Implications for plume evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, Jarek; Vidito, Christopher; Gazel, Esteban; Herzberg, Claude; Class, Cornelia; Whalen, William; Jicha, Brian; Bizimis, Michael; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2015-09-01

    Galápagos plume-related lavas in the accreted terranes of the Caribbean and along the west coast of Costa Rica and Panama provide evidence on the evolution of the Galápagos mantle plume, specifically its mantle temperature, size and composition of heterogeneities, and dynamics. Here we provide new 40Ar/39Ar ages, major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions, and high-precision olivine analyses for samples from the Quepos terrane (Costa Rica) to closely examine the transitional phase of the Galápagos Plume from Large Igneous Province (LIP) to ocean island basalt (OIB) forming stages. The new ages indicate that the record of Quepos volcanism began at 70 Ma and persisted for 10 Ma. Petrological evidence suggests that the maximum mantle potential temperature (Tp) of the plume changed from ∼1650° to ∼1550 °C between 90-70 Ma. This change correlates with a dominant pyroxenite component in the Galapagos source as indicated by high Ni and Fe/Mn and low Ca olivines relative to those that crystallized in normal peridotite derived melts. The decrease in Tp also correlates with an increase in high-field strength element enrichments, e.g., Nb/Nb*, of the erupted lavas. Radiogenic isotope ratios (Nd-Pb) suggest that the Quepos terrane samples have intermediate (Central Domain) radiogenic signatures. The Galápagos plume at 70 Ma represents elevated pyroxenite melt productivity relative to peridotite in a cooling lithologically heterogeneous mantle.

  1. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.

    1993-01-01

    the source, instantaneous crosswind plume profiles were detected repetitively at high spatial (1.5 m) and temporal (3 sec) intervals by use of a mini LIDAR system. The experiments were accompanied by measurement of the surface-layer mean wind and turbulence quantities by sonic anemometers. On the basis...

  2. Ship exhaust gas plume cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Neele, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exhaust gas plume is an important and sometimes dominating contributor to the infrared signature of ships. Suppression of the infrared ship signatures has been studied by TNO for the Royal Netherlands Navy over considerable time. This study deals with the suppression effects, which can be achiev

  3. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  4. groundwater contribution to crop water requirement groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Keywords: Groundwater, water table, capillary rise, soil type, waterleaf, ... GROUNDWATER CONTRIBUTION TO WATERLEAF (TALINUM TRIANGULARE) IN OXISOLS, I. J. ... Nutritionally, ... information to facilitate increased crop production,.

  5. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  6. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  7. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  8. Natural Biological Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Benzene has been found in subsurface unsaturated soil and groundwater beneath a petro-chemical plant. Although the groundwater contained several mg/L of benzene in the area immediately beneath the source, benzene was not detected in monitoring wells approximately 800m down stream. All kinds of physical processes such as adsorption and advection/dispersion are considered to account for the observed attenuation. The results indicated that the attenuation was primarily due to natural biological processes occurring within the aquifer. The evidence for the natural bioremediation of benzene from the groundwater included: (1) analysis of groundwater chemistry, (2) laboratory studies demonstrating benzene biodegradation in aquifer samples, and (3) computer simulations examining benzene transport. Laboratory experiments indicated that for conditions similar to those in the plume, the aerobic degradation of benzene by the naturally occurring microorganisms in the polluted groundwater samples was quite rapid with a half-life time of from 5 to 15 days. In situ analyses indicated the level of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater was over 2mg/L. Thus, oxygen should not limit the biodegradation. In fact, the benzene was also shown to degrade under anaerobic conditions. The results from the modeling simulations indicate that biodegradation is the dominant process influencing attenuation of the benzene.

  9. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base

  10. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base

  11. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  12. Thermal use of groundwater: International legislation and ecological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnlein, S.; Griebler, C.; Blum, P.; Bayer, P.

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater fulfills various functions for nature, animals and humans. Certainly, groundwater has highest relevance as freshwater resource. Another increasingly important issue - especially considering rising oil and gas prices - is the use of aquifers as renewable energy reservoirs. In view of these two somehow conflictive uses it seems important to define legal regulations and management strategies where exploitation and protection of aquifers is balanced. Thermal use of groundwater with e.g. ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems results in temperature anomalies (cold or heat plumes) in the subsurface. The extension of these temperture plumes has to be known in order to interpret their influence on adjacent geothermal installations. Beside this technological constraint, there exists an ecological one: man made thermal anomalies may have undesirable effects on the groundwater ecosystem. To promote geothermal energy as an economically attractive, sustainable and environmentally friendly energy source, such constraints have to be integrated in regulations, planning and maintenance (Hähnlein et al. 2008a,b). The objective of this study is to review the current legal status of the thermal use of groundwater and to present first results how the ecosystem is influenced. • Legal viewpoint: The international legal situation on thermal groundwater use is very heterogeneous. Nationally and internationally there is no consistent legal situation. Minimum distances between GSHP and temperature limits for heating and cooling the groundwater vary strongly. Until now there are no scientifically based thresholds. And it is also legally unexplained which temperature changes are detrimental. This is due to the fact that there are no ecological and economical parameters established for sustainable groundwater use. • Ecological viewpoint: First results show that temperature changes that arise with the thermal use of groundwater can noticeably influence the composition of

  13. On the great plume debate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaoling Niu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introductory note Geological processes are ultimately consequences of Earth's thermal evolution. Plate tectonic theory, which explains geological phenomena along plate boundaries, elegantly illustrates this concept. For example, the origin of oceanic plates at ocean ridges, the movement and growth of these plates, and their ultimate consumption back into the Earth's deep interior through subduction zones provide an efficient mechanism to cool the earth's mantle, leading to large-scale mantle convection. Mantle plumes, which explain another set of global geological phenomena such as within-plate volcanism, cool the earth's deep interior (probably the Earth's core) and represent another mode of Earth's thermal convection. Plate tectonic theory and mantle plume hypothesis thus complement each other to explain much of the whole picture of Earth processes and phenomena.

  14. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, G.L. [Environmental Resources Management, Inc., Exton, PA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.

  15. Groundwater Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Llamas

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The groundwaters released through springs constituted a basic element for the survival and progressive development of human beings. Man came to learn how to take better advantage of these waters by digging wells, irrigation channels, and galleries. Nevertheless, these activities do not require cooperation nor the collective agreement of relatively large groups of people, as in the case of creating the necessary structures to take advantage of the resources of surfacewaters. The construction and operation of these structures was a powerful factor in the birth of an urban or civil society – the designated water civilizations. The difference between people taking advantage of groundwater, quasi-individually, and those of surface water, where people work in a group, has continued to the present day. Whereas earlier, this difference did not bring about any special problems, the technological advances of this century, especially theturbine pump, have led to a spectacular increase in the use of roundwater. This advance has significantly contributed to reducing hunger in the world and has provided potable water in developing countries. However, the almost generalized lack of planning and control in the exploitation of these groundwaters reflects that they are little or badly understood by the managers of water policy in almost every country. As such, problems have occurred which have often become exaggerated, giving rise to water-myths. These problems, though, should be addressed if the aim is the sustainable usage of surface water as well as groundwater. To counter any misconceptions and to seek solutions to the problems, distinct plans of action can be highlighted: educating the public; fomenting a system of participative management and decisive support for the communities of users of subterranean waters; integrating a sufficient number of experts in hydrology in the various water management organizations;and assuring transparency of the data on

  16. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of groundwater contaminants to human health and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes; Funder, Simon G.

    2010-01-01

    for evaluating the impact of a TCE groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamicsbased decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical......The practical implementation of the European Water Framework Directive has resulted in an increased focus on the groundwater-surface water interaction zone. A gap exists with respect to preliminary assessment methodologies that are capable of evaluating and prioritising point sources...... volatilisation model for the stream. The model is tested on a Danish case study involving a 750 m long TCE groundwater plume discharging into a stream. The initial modelling results indicate that TCE contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations entering surface water systems do not pose a significant risk...

  17. Regional Groundwater Processes and Flow Dynamics from Age Tracer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike K.; Matthews, Abby

    2016-04-01

    Age tracers are now used in New Zealand on regional scales for quantifying the impact and lag time of land use and climate change on the quantity and quality of available groundwater resources within the framework of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2014. Age tracers provide measurable information on the dynamics of groundwater systems and reaction rates (e.g. denitrification), essential for conceptualising the regional groundwater - surface water system and informing the development of land use and groundwater flow and transport models. In the Horizons Region of New Zealand, around 200 wells have tracer data available, including tritium, SF6, CFCs, 2H, 18O, Ar, N2, CH4 and radon. Well depths range from shallower wells in gravel aquifers in the Horowhenua and Tararua districts, and deeper wells in the aquifers between Palmerston North and Wanganui. Most of the groundwater samples around and north of the Manawatu River west of the Tararua ranges are extremely old (>100 years), even from relatively shallow wells, indicating that these groundwaters are relatively disconnected from fresh surface recharge. The groundwater wells in the Horowhenua tap into a considerably younger groundwater reservoir with groundwater mean residence time (MRT) of 10 - 40 years. Groundwater along the eastern side of the Tararua and Ruahine ranges is significantly younger, typically groundwater recharge rates, as deduced from groundwater depth and MRT, are extremely low in the central coastal area, consistent with confined groundwater systems, or with upwelling of old groundwater close to the coast. Very low vertical recharge rates along the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge indicate upwelling groundwater conditions in this area, implying groundwater discharge into the river is more likely here than loss of river water into the groundwater system. High recharge rates observed at several wells in the Horowhenua area and in the area east of the Tararua and

  18. Persistence of artificial sweeteners in a 15-year-old septic system plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W. D.; Van Stempvoort, D. R.; Solomon, D. K.; Homewood, J.; Brown, S. J.; Spoelstra, J.; Schiff, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    SummaryGroundwater contamination from constituents such as NO3-, often occurs where multiple sources are present making source identification difficult. This study examines a suite of major ions and trace organic constituents within a well defined septic system plume in southern Ontario, Canada (Long Point site) for their potential use as wastewater tracers. The septic system has been operating for 20 years servicing a large, seasonal-use campground and tritium/helium age dating indicates that the 200 m long monitored section of the plume is about 15 years old. Four parameters are elevated along the entire length of the plume as follows; the mean electrical conductivity value (EC) in the distal plume zone is 926 μS/cm which is 74% of the mean value below the tile bed, Na+ (14.7 mg/L) is 43%, an artificial sweetener, acesulfame (12.1 μg/L) is 23% and Cl- (71.5 mg/L) is 137%. EC and Cl- appear to be affected by dispersive dilution with overlying background groundwater that has lower EC but has locally higher Cl- as result of the use of a dust suppressant (CaCl2) in the campground. Na+, in addition to advective dilution, could be depleted by weak adsorption. Acesulfame, in addition to the above processes could be influenced by increasing consumer use in recent years. Nonetheless, both Na+ and acesulfame remain elevated throughout the plume by factors of more than 100 and 1000 respectively compared to background levels, and are strong indicators of wastewater impact at this site. EC and Cl- are less useful because their contrast with background values is much less (EC) or because other sources are present (Cl-). Nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, K+) and pathogens (Escherichia coli) do not persist in the distal plume zone and are less useful as wastewater indicators here. The artificial sweetener, acesulfame, has persisted at high concentrations in the Long Point plume for at least 15 years (and this timing agrees with tritium/helium-3 dating) and this compound likely

  19. Relationship between plume and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchkov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between plate- and plume-tectonics is considered in view of the growth and breakdown of supercontinents, active rifting, the formation of passive volcanic-type continental margins, and the origin of time-progressive volcanic chains on oceanic and continental plates. The mantle wind phenomenon is described, as well as its effect on plume morphology and anisotropy of the ambient mantle. The interaction of plumes and mid-ocean ridges is discussed. The principles and problems of plume activity analysis in subduction- and collision-related foldbelts are considered and illustrated with examples.

  20. Multiple Factor Analysis and k-Means Clustering-Based Classification of the DOE Groundwater Contaminant Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faybishenko, B.; Hazen, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    A proper classification of the plume characteristics is critical for selecting the most suitable characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. To perform a statistical analysis of the different groundwater plume characteristics, we used the DOE Groundwater Database, including 221 groundwater plumes located at 60 DOE sites. To classify the plume characteristics, we used a multiple factor analysis (MFA), including a principal component analysis (PCA) of quantitative plume characteristics and a multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) of qualitative plume characteristics. The input parameters used for the statistical analysis are: the presence of eight types of contaminant groups—chlorinated hydrocarbons, fuels, explosives, sulfates, nitrates, metals, tritium, and radioisotopes; a number and associations of contaminant groups; a contamination severity index (based on the association of contaminant groups and complexity of remediation); contaminant mass and plume volumes; groundwater depth and velocities; and climatic conditions. The input variables are also partitioned into the active and supplementary plume characteristics. Statistical results include the evaluation of the correlation matrix between the groups of variables and individual plume characteristics. From the results of the MFA, the first four factors can be used to describe the variability of the basic plume characteristics. The contaminant severity index and the number of contaminant groups provide a major contribution to the 1st factor; the types of contaminant groups and carbon tetrachloride concentrations provide the major contribution to the 2nd factor. The contribution of the supplementary data (climate and plume depth and velocity) is insignificant. The presence of radioactive contaminants is mostly related to the 1st factor; the presence of sulfates, and to a lesser degree the presence of nitrates and metals, is related to the 2nd factor. The strongest relationship is, as expected

  1. Groundwater and security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conti, K.I.; Kukurić, N.; Gupta, J.; Pahl-Wostl, C.; Bhaduri, A.; Gupta, J.

    2016-01-01

    Humans abstract two hundred times more groundwater than oil, annually. Ironically, the role of groundwater in water management and supply is underappreciated, partially due to its invisibility. By conducting a literature survey and investigating groundwater information databases, this chapter answer

  2. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  3. Pulsed Plasma Thruster plume analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K. [Washington Univ., Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Micro-Pulsed Plasma Thrusters ({mu}PPTs) are a promising method for precision attitude control for small spacecraft in formation flying. They create an ionized plasma plume, which may interfere with other spacecraft in the formation. To characterize the ions in the plume, a diagnostic has been built that couples a drift tube with an energy analyzer. The drift tube provides time of flight measurements to determine the exhaust velocity, and the energy analyzer discriminates the ion energies. The energy analyzer measures the current on a collector plate downstream of four grids that repel electrons and ions below a specified energy. The first grid lowers the density of the plasma, therefore increasing Debye length. The second and fourth grids have a negative potential applied to them so they repel the electrons, while the third grid's voltage can be varied to repel lower energy ions. The ion energies can be computed by differentiating the data. Combining the information of the ion energies and their velocities identifies the ion masses in the PPT plume. The PPT used for this diagnostic is the micro-PPT developed for the Dawgstar satellite. This PPT uses 5.2 Joules per pulse and has a 2.3 cm{sup 2} propellant area, a 1.3 cm electrode length, and an estimated thrust of 85 {mu}N [C. Rayburn et al., AIAA-2000-3256]. This paper will describe the development and design of the time of flight/gridded energy analyzer diagnostic and present recent experimental results. (Author)

  4. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  5. Detailed Vertical and Lateral Delineation of Redox Zones in Contaminant Plumes Using Redox-Sensitive Tapes (RST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P.; Oeste, F. D.; Melzer, R.; Martus, P.

    2006-12-01

    Innovative redox-sensitive tapes (RST) have been developed for a detailed vertical and lateral delineation of redox zones in contaminated aquifers. The RST have the potential to become an integral part of a data acquisition strategy for monitored natural attenuation (MNA). The tape material, consists of a 2 cm wide synthetic textile coated with reactive manganese dioxide minerals. The RST are submerged into existing monitoring wells for approximately one month. This time period is sufficient to allow for a reaction of the mineral coating with groundwater. The RST are aimed at investigating four different redox-zones in contaminated aquifers: Mn(II)-oxidizing, Mn(IV)-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing and sulfate-reducing. Two RST case studies are presented. The RST investigations on a coal tar contaminated site allowed for a precise lateral and vertical delineation of the contaminant plume using the existing monitoring well network. The RST investigations on a BTEX contaminated site yielded a good correlation of RST data with hydrochemical data at the wells sampled. In the majority of plume wells located 50 m downstream of the source area and beyond, Mn(IV)-reducing environment appeared to be prevailing. Comparing the RST data with hydrochemical data indicated evidence for the transport of transformation products with groundwater flow. The repeated application of the RST facilitated an assessment of the plume dynamics. No significant seasonal variation with respect to the redox zone distribution was observed within the contaminant plume. However, the assessment of the changes in redox conditions over a time period of 2.5 years showed that the iron-reducing zone is shrinking and the sulfate-reducing zone disappeared completely indicating that the contaminant plume might decrease in the near future. Thus, the application of the RST facilitated an assessment of the plume dynamics on a centimeter-scale without the necessity of pumping and treating contaminated groundwater.

  6. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened w

  7. Geochemical evolution of Mexicali Valley groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makdisi, R.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Thompson, J.M.; Coplen, T.B.; Sanchez R., J.

    1982-08-10

    Isotopic and chemical compositions of Mexicali Valley groundwaters vary widely. Observed variations reflect different water origins, mineral-water reactions, lateral variations of delta facies as well as evaporation. Regional treatment of the groundwater data shows that northern and central regions are a mixture of old and new Colorado River water. Variations in water chemistry result from different groundwaters origins and the effects of lateral delta facies changes. Dissolution of gypsum and precipitation of carbonates, silicates, and phosphates are suggested. The eastern Mesa de San Luis and southern region water originates primarily from the Gila River catchment area. This water is undersaturated with respect to gypsum and carbonates and is oversaturated with respect to silicates. Most of the western groundwaters are a mixture of Colorado River and geothermal waters in the proximity of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. Recharge to the geothermal aquifer is from the west as well as the north and east. Calcite is being precipitated out as the groundwater temperatures rise in response to the geothermal anomaly. Other western groundwaters reflect a dominant mixture of Colorado River water and evaporated lake water. Some Western groundwater samples suggest dilution by local rainwater and/or irrigation water.

  8. Lagrangian analysis of low altitude anthropogenic plume processing across the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The photochemical evolution of an anthropogenic plume from the New-York/Boston region during its transport at low altitudes over the North Atlantic to the European west coast has been studied using a Lagrangian framework. This plume, originally strongly polluted, was sampled by research aircraft just off the North American east coast on 3 successive days, and then 3 days downwind off the west coast of Ireland where another aircraft re-sampled a weakly polluted plume. Changes in trace gas concentrations during transport are reproduced using a photochemical trajectory model including deposition and mixing effects. Chemical and wet deposition processing dominated the evolution of all pollutants in the plume. The mean net photochemical O3 production is estimated to be −5 ppbv/day leading to low O3 by the time the plume reached Europe. Model runs with no wet deposition of HNO3 predicted much lower average net destruction of −1 ppbv/day O3, arising from increased levels of NOx via photolysis of HNO3. This indicates that wet deposition of HNO3 is indirectly responsible for 80% of the net destruction of ozone during plume transport. If the plume had not encountered precipitation, it would have reached Europe with O3 concentrations of up to 80 to 90 ppbv and CO between 120 and 140 ppbv. Photochemical destruction also played a more important role than mixing in the evolution of plume CO due to high levels of O3 and water vapour showing that CO cannot always be used as a tracer for polluted air masses, especially in plumes transported at low altitudes. The results also show that, in this case, an increase in O3/CO slopes can be attributed to photochemical destruction of CO and not to photochemical O3 production as is often assumed.

  9. Distribution of Redox-Sensitive Groundwater Quality Parameters Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Rügge, Kirsten; Pedersen, Jørn K.;

    1995-01-01

    , dinitrogen oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and oxygen in the groundwater samples indicate that methane production, sulfate reduction, iron reduction, manganese reduction, and nitrate reduction take place in the plume. Adjacent to the landfill, methanogenic and sulfatereducing zones were identified, while aerobic......The leachate plume stretching 300 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark) has been characterized in terms of redox-sensitive groundwater quality parameters along two longitudinal transects (285 samples). Variations in the levels of methane, sulfide, iron(ll), manganese(ll), ammonium...

  10. 大庆油田西部地区地下水动态监测网优化设计%Optimal design of groundwater monitoring network in west Daqing oil field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦延军; 宋雷鸣; 刘梅侠; 刘金和

    2001-01-01

    大庆油田地下水动态监测网(用水文地质定性方法建立)历经30多年的开采,需要进行定量优化设计。本次研究采用卡尔曼滤波技术与地下水流系统确定-随机性数值模型相耦合的方法,首先对现有监测网进行质量评价,计算结果表明:监测网在漏斗区(地下水集中开采区)应增加监测孔的数目,调整监测孔的位置。为此,我们拟订了6套12个备选方案,从中选取了由88个监测孔组成的监测网,此监测网无论从监测目标上还是经费上都是最优的。%The groundwater regime observation network of Daqing,qualitatively estabilished by way of Hydro-geologic approach,required a quantitative optimal design after having been operated for over thirty years. By means of combining kalman filter algorithm and deterministic-stochastic numerical model of the groundwater flow system,the reserch estimates the quality of the existing groundwater regime observation network. The calculation vesults indicate that the numbers of observation wells should be increased in the cone region of groundwater level deproession and the positions of the observation wells should be adjusted. For this purpose, we design six different sets of plans (twelve individual ones)and select among them one plan in which the observation network is made up of eighty-eight observation wells.

  11. The Impact of Well-Field Configuration on Plume Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Brusseau, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is now recognized that most sites with large groundwater contaminant plumes will require many decades before cleanup will be achieved under current methods and standards. Conceptually, the factors that contribute to plume persistence have long been established, including uncontrolled source zones, dispersed reservoirs of dissolved (present in lower-permeability zones) and sorbed contaminant, and hydraulic-related factors such as non-optimal remedial well-field performance. Of these potential factors, hydraulic phenomena associated with configuration and operation of the well field employed for remedial operations have received minimal attention. The objective of this research is to investigate the influence of well-field configuration on contaminant mass removal and reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMD). Mathematical modeling, implemented using MODFLOW and MT3D, was conducted to simulate scenarios with different well-field configurations in both homogenous and heterogeneous aquifers. The system was designed such that contaminant was present as only aqueous and sorbed mass (no separate organic-liquid sources). The impacts of several variables on the results are investigated, including pumping rate, layer thickness, and vertical dispersivity. The results are assessed in terms of the relationship between reductions in CMD and reductions in contaminant mass.

  12. Development of a Groundwater Transport Simulation Tool for Remedial Process Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Tonkin, M.; Miller, Charles W.; Baker, S.

    2015-01-14

    The groundwater remedy for hexavalent chromium at the Hanford Site includes operation of five large pump-and-treat systems along the Columbia River. The systems at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units treat a total of about 9,840 liters per minute (2,600 gallons per minute) of groundwater to remove hexavalent chromium, and cover an area of nearly 26 square kilometers (10 square miles). The pump-and-treat systems result in large scale manipulation of groundwater flow direction, velocities, and most importantly, the contaminant plumes. Tracking of the plumes and predicting needed system modifications is part of the remedial process optimization, and is a continual process with the goal of reducing costs and shortening the timeframe to achieve the cleanup goals. While most of the initial system evaluations are conducted by assessing performance (e.g., reduction in contaminant concentration in groundwater and changes in inferred plume size), changes to the well field are often recommended. To determine the placement for new wells, well realignments, and modifications to pumping rates, it is important to be able to predict resultant plume changes. In smaller systems, it may be effective to make small scale changes periodically and adjust modifications based on groundwater monitoring results. Due to the expansive nature of the remediation systems at Hanford, however, additional tools were needed to predict the plume reactions to system changes. A computer simulation tool was developed to support pumping rate recommendations for optimization of large pump-and-treat groundwater remedy systems. This tool, called the Pumping Optimization Model, or POM, is based on a 1-layer derivation of a multi-layer contaminant transport model using MODFLOW and MT3D.

  13. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  14. Variability and Composition of Io's Pele Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, K. L.; Spencer, J.; Yelle, R.

    2004-11-01

    The Pele plume is one of the largest and most dynamic of the plumes on Io. While sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas was always assumed to be a constituent of this plume, spectral observations obtained in 1999 were the first to positively identify elemental sulfur (S2) (Spencer et al. 2000) within the Pele plume. The S2/SO2 ratio derived from this observation provided a critical component necessary for the constraint of the magma chemistry and vent conditions of the Pele plume (Zolotov and Fegley 1998). But, because the Pele plume has long been known to be variable in its eruptive behavior, it is not likely that the vent conditions are invariant. Consequently, additional observations were needed to constrain the extent of the variability of the plume's composition and gas abundances. To this end, in February 2003, March 2003 and January 2004 we obtained spectra of Pele with Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in transit of Jupiter, using the 0.1 arcsec slit, for the wavelength region extending from 2100-3100 Å. Contemporaneous with the spectral data we also obtained UV and visible-wavelength images of the plume in reflected sunlight with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) prior to Jupiter transit, in order to constrain plume dust abundance. The newly acquired STIS data show both the S2 and SO2 absorption signatures, and provide concrete evidence of temporal variability in the abundance of these gases. Likewise, the degree of dust scattering recorded in the ACS data varied as a function of the date of observation. We will present preliminary constraints on the composition and variability of the gas abundances of the Pele plume as recorded within the STIS data. We will also give a brief overview of the variability of the plume dust signatures relative to the gas signatures as a function of time.

  15. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  16. Proceedings of plumes, plates and mineralisation symposium: an introduction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hatton, CJ

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available of plume-theory. Mechanisms of magma formation are identified and plume positions and distances to their surface expression considered. Mantle plumes are considered as a heat and fluid source for the Witwatersrand gold deposits....

  17. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fukao

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF, probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  18. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  19. Numerical modeling of mantle plume diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupsky, D.; Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2004-12-01

    To clarify the influence of the heat diffusion on the mantle plume evolution, we develop a two-dimensional numerical model of the plume diffusion and relevant efficient numerical algorithm and code to compute the model. The numerical approach is based on the finite-difference method and modified splitting algorithm. We consider both von Neumann and Direchlet conditions at the model boundaries. The thermal diffusivity depends on pressure in the model. Our results show that the plume is disappearing from the bottom up - the plume tail at first and its head later - because of the mantle plume geometry (a thin tail and wide head) and higher heat conductivity in the lower mantle. We study also an effect of a lateral mantle flow associated with the plate motion on the distortion of the diffusing mantle plume. A number of mantle plumes recently identified by seismic tomography seem to disappear in the mid-mantle. We explain this disappearance as the effect of heat diffusion on the evolution of mantle plume.

  20. Aggregate Particles in the Plumes of Enceladus

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (2011), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of large aggregates and spheres. The high mass plumes can be divided into a population of large aggregates with total particulate mass of 116 +/- 12 X 10^3 kg, and a mixed population of spheres and aggregates consisting of a few large monomers that has a total plume...

  1. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  2. Modelling oil plumes from subsurface spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardner, Robin; Zodiatis, George

    2017-07-11

    An oil plume model to simulate the behavior of oil from spills located at any given depth below the sea surface is presented, following major modifications to a plume model developed earlier by Malačič (2001) and drawing on ideas in a paper by Yapa and Zheng (1997). The paper presents improvements in those models and numerical testing of the various parameters in the plume model. The plume model described in this paper is one of the numerous modules of the well-established MEDSLIK oil spill model. The deep blowout scenario of the MEDEXPOL 2013 oil spill modelling exercise, organized by REMPEC, has been applied using the improved oil plume module of the MEDSLIK model and inter-comparison with results having the oil spill source at the sea surface are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  4. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  5. Metallurgical Laboratory (HWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Units were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab Hazardous Waste Management Facility. This project began in July 1994 and is complete; however, analytical data from these wells are not yet available.

  6. Evaluation of Potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation of Perchlorate in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Perchlorate-Impacted Groundwater for Base Case 8-4 Cost Components for Extraction and Treatment of Perchlorate-Impacted Groundwater for Base Case 8-5...consumed, increasing the likelihood of perchlorate biodegradation in the natural environment (Coates and Jackson, 2009). Trace amounts of molybdenum are...chlorinated solvents (USEPA, 1998) have been in use for many years. These documents describe systematic steps for delineating contaminant plumes

  7. Method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiamin; Dong, Wenming; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2011-03-15

    Acidic uranium (U) groundwater plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/year) show that desorption of U and HA were nondetectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH ≤ 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results indicate that HA-treatment is a promising in situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost-effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  8. An extremely high altitude plume seen at Mars morning terminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Gomez-Forrellad, Josep M.; Pellier, Christophe; Delcroix, Marc; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Jaeschke, Wayne; Parker, Donald C.; Phillips, James H.; Peach, Damian

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence in March and April 2012 of two bright very high altitude plumes at the Martian terminator at 250 km or more above the surface, thus well into the ionosphere and bordering on the exosphere. They were located at about 195 deg West longitude and -45 deg latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and lasted for about 10 days. The features showed day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb, which indicates rapid evolution in less than 10 hours and a cyclic behavior. Photometric measurements are used to explore two possible scenarios to explain their nature. If the phenomenon is due to suspended particles (dust, CO2 or H2O ice clouds) reflecting solar radiation, the mean size is about 0.1 microns with a nadir optical depth > 0.06. Alternatively, the plume could be auroral emission above a region with a strong magnetic anomaly and where aurora has previously been detected. Importantly, both explanations defy our current understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere.AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Spanish MINECO projects AYA2012-36666 with FEDER support, CONSOLIDER program ASTROMOL CSD2009-00038 and AYA2011-30613-CO2-1. Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT765-13 and UPV/EHU UFI11/55.

  9. Elevated ozone in boreal fire plumes - the 2013 smoke season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickl, T.; Vogelmann, H.; Flentje, H.; Ries, L.

    2015-05-01

    In July 2013 very strong boreal fire plumes were observed at the northern rim of the Alps by lidar and ceilometer measurements of aerosol, ozone and water vapour for about three weeks. In addition, some of the lower-tropospheric components of these layers were analyzed at the Global Atmosphere Watch laboratory at the Schneefernerhaus high-altitude research station (2650 m a.s.l., located a few hundred metres south-west of the Zugspitze summit). The high amount of particles confirms our hypothesis that fires in the Arctic regions of North America have a much stronger impact on the Central European atmosphere than the multitude of fires in the United States. This has been ascribed to the prevailing anticyclonic advection pattern during favourable periods and subsidence, in contrast to warm-conveyor-belt export, rainout and dilution frequently found for lower latitudes. A high number of the pronounced aerosol structures were positively correlated with elevated ozone. Chemical ozone formation in boreal fire plumes is known to be rather limited. Indeed, these air masses could be attributed to stratospheric air intrusions over remote high latitude regions obviously picking up the aerosol on their way across Canada. In one case subsidence from the stratosphere over Siberia over as many as 15 to 20 days without increase in humidity was observed although a significant amount of Canadian smoke was trapped. These coherent air streams lead to rather straight and rapid transport of the particles to Europe.

  10. Transport of nitrogen in a treated-wastewater plume to coastal discharge areas, Ashumet Valley, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Walter, Donald A.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2013-01-01

    Land disposal of treated wastewater from a treatment plant on the Massachusetts Military Reservation in operation from 1936 to 1995 has created a plume of contaminated groundwater that is migrating toward coastal discharge areas in the town of Falmouth, Massachusetts. To develop a better understanding of the potential impact of the treated-wastewater plume on coastal discharge areas, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment, evaluated the fate of nitrogen (N) in the plume. Groundwater samples from two large sampling events in 1994 and 2007 were used to map the size and location of the plume, calculate the masses of nitrate-N and ammonium-N, evaluate changes in mass since cessation of disposal in 1995, and create a gridded dataset suitable for use in nitrogen-transport simulations. In 2007, the treated-wastewater plume was about 1,200 meters (m) wide, 30 m thick, and 7,700 m long and contained approximately 87,000 kilograms (kg) nitrate-N and 31,600 kg total ammonium-N. An analysis of previous studies and data from 1994 and 2007 sampling events suggests that most of biologically reactive nitrogen in the plume in 2007 will be transported to coastal discharge areas as either nitrate or ammonium with relatively little transformation to an environmentally nonreactive end product such as nitrogen gas. Nitrogen-transport simulations were conducted with a previously calibrated regional three-dimensional MODFLOW groundwater flow model. Mass-loaded particle tracking was used to simulate the advective transport of nitrogen to discharge areas (or receptors) along the coast. In the simulations, nonreactive transport (no mass loss in the aquifer) was assumed, providing an upper-end estimate of nitrogen loads to receptors. Simulations indicate that approximately 95 percent of the nitrate-N and 99 percent of the ammonium-N in the wastewater plume will eventually discharge to the Coonamessett River, Backus River, Green

  11. Study of electrokinetic effects to quantify groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haupt, R.W. [MIT Lincoln Lab., Lexington, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An experimental study of electrokinetic effects (streaming potential) in earth materials was undertaken. The objective was to evaluate the measurement of electrokinetic effects as a method of monitoring and predicting the movement of groundwater, contaminant plumes, and other fluids in the subsurface. The laboratory experiments verified that the electrokinetic effects in earth materials are prominent, repeatable, and can be described well to first order by a pair of coupled differential equations.

  12. Detailed landfill leachate plume mapping using 2D and 3D electrical resistivity tomography - with correlation to ionic strength measured in screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, P. K.; Rønde, V. K.; Fiandaca, G.; Balbarini, N.; Auken, E.; Bjerg, P. L.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Leaching of organic and inorganic contamination from landfills is a serious environmental problem as surface water and aquifers are affected. In order to assess these risks and investigate the migration of leachate from the landfill, 2D and large scale 3D electrical resistivity tomography were used at a heavily contaminated landfill in Grindsted, Denmark. The inverted 2D profiles describe both the variations along the groundwater flow as well as the plume extension across the flow directions. The 3D inversion model shows the variability in the low resistivity anomaly pattern corresponding to differences in the ionic strength of the landfill leachate. Chemical data from boreholes agree well with the observations indicating a leachate plume which gradually sinks and increases in size while migrating from the landfill in the groundwater flow direction. Overall results show that the resistivity method has been very successful in delineating the landfill leachate plume and that good correlation exists between the resistivity model and leachate ionic strength.

  13. Radioactive Seepage through Groundwater Flow from the Uranium Mines, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiru Abiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the seepage of uranium from unlined tailing dams into the alluvial aquifer in the Gawib River floodplain in Namibia where the region solely relies on groundwater for its economic activities as a result of arid climatic condition. The study reviewed previous works besides water sample collection and analyses for major ions, metals and environmental isotopes in addition to field tests on physico-chemical parameters (pH, Electrical Conductivity, Redox and T. Estimation of seepage velocity (true velocity of groundwater flow has been conducted in order to understand the extent of radioactive plume transport. The hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium results show that there is uranium contamination from the unlined uranium tailings in the Gawib shallow aquifer system which suggests high permeability of the alluvial aquifer facilitating groundwater flow in the arid region. The radioactive contaminants could spread into the deeper aquifer system through the major structures such as joints and faults. The contamination plume could also spread downstream into the Swakop River unless serious interventions are employed. There is also a very high risk of the plume to reach the Atlantic Ocean through seasonal flash floods that occurs in the area.

  14. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  15. Merging Thermal Plumes in the Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This experimental work deals with the basic problem of merging thermal plumes from heat sources situated in the vicinity of each other. No studies have been made yet of how close two heat sources must be to each other, before they can be considered as a single source with a cumulative heat effect......, and how far apart they must be to be considered separate. Also, it is not known how the flow field behaves in the intermediate fase, where the plumes are neither completely joined nor completely separate. A possible, very simple, solution of the velocity distribution between two plumes is to assume...

  16. RADIOLOGICAL STATUS OF THE GROUND-WATER BENEATH THE HANFORD PROJECT JANUARY-DECEMBER 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, PA

    1979-04-01

    This report is one of a series prepared annually for the Department of Energy, to provide an evaluation of the status of ground-water contamination resulting from Hanford's onsite discharges. Data collected during 1978 describe the movement of major plumes {{beta}{sub t}, {sup 3}H, NO{sub 3}) that respond to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion and radioactive decay. The total beta plume continues to recede, with the exception of a beta source that is beginning to show up in the 300 Area, a result of minor spills and leaks which have occurred during the operating life of the 300 Area. The tritium plume continues to expand and is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, although its contribution to the river cannot be distinguished from that attributable to atmospheric fallout. The plume now shows much the same configuration as in 1977. The nitrate plume shows general stability relative to its size with concentrations in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continuing to be high as a result of leaks from the evaporation facility. The results of a study to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the Hanford ground-water system indicate that the majority of contaminants are stratified in the upper portions of the unconfined aquifer.

  17. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  18. Sensitivity of air quality simulation to smoke plume rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Liu; Gary Achtemeier; Scott Goodrick

    2008-01-01

    Plume rise is the height smoke plumes can reach. This information is needed by air quality models such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate physical and chemical processes of point-source fire emissions. This study seeks to understand the importance of plume rise to CMAQ air quality simulation of prescribed burning to plume rise. CMAQ...

  19. Characteristics of the Great Whale River plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, R. Grant

    1981-03-01

    Observations of the motion field and dilution effects associated with the plume of Great Whale River in Hudson Bay are presented for both open water and ice-covered conditions. In the summer months a distinct plume of about 100 km2 in area is formed offshore which is characterized by a 1-2 m thickness and large velocities directed away from the river mouth in contrast to slower currents parallel to the shore in the ambient waters underneath. Surface drifter results suggest that the outer boundary of plume may be a zone of frontal convergence. Under ice-covered conditions the plume was significantly thicker and extended much farther offshore in spite of a marked reduction in river runoff at this time.

  20. Mantle plumes: Why the current skepticism?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gillian R. Foulger

    2005-01-01

    The present reappraisal of the mantle plume hypothesis is perhaps the most exciting current debate in Earth science. Nevertheless, the fundamental reasons for why it has arisen are often not well understood. They are that 1) many observations do not agree with the predictions of the original model, 2) it is possible that convection of the sort required to generate thermal plumes in the Earth's mantle does not occur, 3) so many variants of the original model have been invoked to accommodate conflicting data that the plume hypthesis is in practice no longer testable, and 4) alternative models are viable, though these have been largely neglected by researchers. Regardless of the final outcome, the present vigorous debate is to be welcomed since it is likely to stimulate new discoveries in a way that unquestioning acceptance of the conventional plume model will not.

  1. Plume Diagnostics for Combustion Stability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sierra Engineering Inc. and Purdue University propose to develop a non-intrusive plume instrument capable of detecting and diagnosing combustion instability. This...

  2. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  3. Novel plume deflection concept testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will explore the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing an electrically driven thermal shield for use as part of rocket plume deflectors. To...

  4. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of groundwater contaminants to human health and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Rasmussen, Jes; Funder, Simon G.;

    2010-01-01

    for evaluating the impact of a TCE groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamicsbased decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical...

  5. Toxicity of organic chemical pollution in groundwater downgradient of a landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Anders; Jensen, S. D.; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the occurrence and distribution of toxicity related to organic chemical contaminants in the leachate plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark). A total of 27 groundwater samples were preconcentrated by solidphase extraction (SPE) using XAD-2...

  6. Plume Ascent Tracker: Interactive Matlab software for analysis of ascending plumes in image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, S. A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Cerminara, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents Matlab-based software designed to track and analyze an ascending plume as it rises above its source, in image data. It reads data recorded in various formats (video files, image files, or web-camera image streams), and at various wavelengths (infrared, visible, or ultra-violet). Using a set of filters which can be set interactively, the plume is first isolated from its background. A user-friendly interface then allows tracking of plume ascent and various parameters that characterize plume evolution during emission and ascent. These include records of plume height, velocity, acceleration, shape, volume, ash (fine-particle) loading, spreading rate, entrainment coefficient and inclination angle, as well as axial and radial profiles for radius and temperature (if data are radiometric). Image transformations (dilatation, rotation, resampling) can be performed to create new images with a vent-centered metric coordinate system. Applications may interest both plume observers (monitoring agencies) and modelers. For the first group, the software is capable of providing quantitative assessments of plume characteristics from image data, for post-event analysis or in near real-time analysis. For the second group, extracted data can serve as benchmarks for plume ascent models, and as inputs for cloud dispersal models. We here describe the software's tracking methodology and main graphical interfaces, using thermal infrared image data of an ascending volcanic ash plume at Santiaguito volcano.

  7. Fire analog: a comparison between fire plumes and energy center cooling tower plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-10-01

    Thermal plumes or convection columns associated with large fires are compared to thermal plumes from cooling towers and proposed energy centers to evaluate the fire analog concept. Energy release rates of mass fires are generally larger than for single or small groups of cooling towers but are comparable to proposed large energy centers. However, significant physical differences exist between cooling tower plumes and fire plumes. Cooling tower plumes are generally dominated by ambient wind, stability and turbulence conditions. Fire plumes, depending on burning rates and other factors, can transform into convective columns which may cause the fire behavior to become more violent. This transformation can cause strong inflow winds and updrafts, turbulence and concentrated vortices. Intense convective columns may interact with ambient winds to create significant downwind effects such as wakes and Karman vortex streets. These characteristics have not been observed with cooling tower plumes to date. The differences in physical characteristics between cooling tower and fire plumes makes the fire analog concept very questionable even though the approximate energy requirements appear to be satisfied in case of large energy centers. Additional research is suggested in studying the upper-level plume characteristics of small experimental fires so this information can be correlated with similar data from cooling towers. Numerical simulation of fires and proposed multiple cooling tower systems could also provide comparative data.

  8. STRATAFORM Plume Study: Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    of settling is explained by the variation of plume speed, rather than by variations in settling velocity (Hill et al., submitted). Floculation is an...mouth. However, the fraction of floculated sediment does not vary as much as expected with changes in forcing conditions. There do appear to be large...differences in the floculation rate between the extreme flood conditions of 1997 and the more moderate floods of 1998. The detailed examination of plume

  9. Rocket plume tomography of combustion species

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Interest in accurate detection and targeting of aggressor missiles has received considerable interest with the national priority of developing a missile defense system. Understanding the thermal signatures of the exhaust plumes of such missiles is key to accomplishing that mission. Before signature models can be precisely developed for specific rockets, the radiation of the molecular or combustion species within those plumes must be accurately predicted. A combination translation / rotation s...

  10. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  11. Crude oil metabolites in groundwater at two spill sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Steenson, Ross; Thorn, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Two groundwater plumes in north central Minnesota with residual crude oil sources have 20 to 50 mg/L of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC). These values are over 10 times higher than benzene and two to three times higher than Diesel Range Organics in the same wells. On the basis of previous work, most of the NVDOC consists of partial transformation products from the crude oil. Monitoring data from 1988 to 2015 at one of the sites located near Bemidji, MN show that the plume of metabolites is expanding toward a lakeshore located 335 m from the source zone. Other mass balance studies of the site have demonstrated that the plume expansion is driven by the combined effect of continued presence of the residual crude oil source and depletion of the electron accepting capacity of solid phase iron oxide and hydroxides on the aquifer sediments. These plumes of metabolites are not covered by regulatory monitoring and reporting requirements in Minnesota and other states. Yet, a review of toxicology studies indicates that polar metabolites of crude oil may pose a risk to aquatic and mammalian species. Together the results suggest that at sites where residual sources are present, monitoring of NVDOC may be warranted to evaluate the fates of plumes of hydrocarbon transformation products.

  12. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  13. Groundwater recharge: Accurately representing evapotranspiration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bugan, Richard DH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater recharge is the basis for accurate estimation of groundwater resources, for determining the modes of water allocation and groundwater resource susceptibility to climate change. Accurate estimations of groundwater recharge with models...

  14. Arsenic and Associated Trace Metals in Texas Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.; Herbert, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The value of groundwater has increased substantially worldwide due to expanding human consumption. Both the quantity and quality of groundwater are important considerations when constructing policies on natural resource conservation. This study is focused on evaluating groundwater quality in the state of Texas. Historical data from the Texas Water Development Board and the National Uranium Resource Evaluation were collected into a GIS database for spatial and temporal analyses. Specific attentions were placed on arsenic and other trace metals in groundwater. Recent studies in the United States have focused on isolated incidences of high arsenic occurrence, ignoring possible connections between arsenic and other trace metals. Descriptive statistics revealed strong correlations in groundwater between arsenic and other oxyanions including vanadium, selenium and molybdenum. Arsenic and associated trace metals were clustered at three physiographic hotspots, the Southern High Plains, the Gulf Coastal Plains of Texas, and West Texas. A geologic survey showed that arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater follow local geologic trends. Uranium deposits and associated mineralization were found to occur in the same physiographic locations. Uranium mineralization may be a significant natural source of arsenic and other trace metals in Texas groundwater. Recharge, evaporative concentration, and aquifer characteristics were also contributing factors to the occurrence of trace metals in Texas groundwater. Spatial statistics were used to delineate natural sources from anthropogenic inputs. Similarly, the natural background was estimated from the spatial distribution of trace metal observations in Texas groundwater.

  15. A global sensitivity analysis of the PlumeRise model of volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark J.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2016-10-01

    Integral models of volcanic plumes allow predictions of plume dynamics to be made and the rapid estimation of volcanic source conditions from observations of the plume height by model inversion. Here we introduce PlumeRise, an integral model of volcanic plumes that incorporates a description of the state of the atmosphere, includes the effects of wind and the phase change of water, and has been developed as a freely available web-based tool. The model can be used to estimate the height of a volcanic plume when the source conditions are specified, or to infer the strength of the source from an observed plume height through a model inversion. The predictions of the volcanic plume dynamics produced by the model are analysed in four case studies in which the atmospheric conditions and the strength of the source are varied. A global sensitivity analysis of the model to a selection of model inputs is performed and the results are analysed using parallel coordinate plots for visualisation and variance-based sensitivity indices to quantify the sensitivity of model outputs. We find that if the atmospheric conditions do not vary widely then there is a small set of model inputs that strongly influence the model predictions. When estimating the height of the plume, the source mass flux has a controlling influence on the model prediction, while variations in the plume height strongly effect the inferred value of the source mass flux when performing inversion studies. The values taken for the entrainment coefficients have a particularly important effect on the quantitative predictions. The dependencies of the model outputs to variations in the inputs are discussed and compared to simple algebraic expressions that relate source conditions to the height of the plume.

  16. Using tree core samples to monitor natural attenuation and plume distribution after a PCE spill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Burken, J.; Machackova, J.;

    2008-01-01

    The potential of using tree core samples to detect and monitor natural attenuation of perchloroethene (PCE) in groundwater was investigated at a PCE-contaminated site. In the area of the known plume with PCE concentrations between 0.004 and >40 mg/L, cores were collected from tree trunks at a hei...... at a height of about 1 m above ground surface. Tree sampling of the site was completed in under six hours. Chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by headspace GC/MS. PCE (0.001 to 7 mg/kg) and natural attenuation products, TCE (...

  17. Nannofossils in 2011 El Hierro eruptive products reinstate plume model for Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Kirsten; Troll, Valentin R.; Cachao, Mario; Ferreira, Jorge; Deegan, Frances M.; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Soler, Vicente; Meade, Fiona C.; Burchardt, Steffi

    2015-01-01

    The origin and life cycle of ocean islands have been debated since the early days of Geology. In the case of the Canary archipelago, its proximity to the Atlas orogen led to initial fracture-controlled models for island genesis, while later workers cited a Miocene-Quaternary east-west age-progression to support an underlying mantle-plume. The recent discovery of submarine Cretaceous volcanic rocks near the westernmost island of El Hierro now questions this systematic age-progression within the archipelago. If a mantle-plume is indeed responsible for the Canaries, the onshore volcanic age-progression should be complemented by progressively younger pre-island sedimentary strata towards the west, however, direct age constraints for the westernmost pre-island sediments are lacking. Here we report on new age data obtained from calcareous nannofossils in sedimentary xenoliths erupted during the 2011 El Hierro events, which date the sub-island sedimentary rocks to between late Cretaceous and Pliocene in age. This age-range includes substantially younger pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks than the Jurassic to Miocene strata known from the older eastern islands and now reinstate the mantle-plume hypothesis as the most plausible explanation for Canary volcanism. The recently discovered Cretaceous submarine volcanic rocks in the region are, in turn, part of an older, fracture-related tectonic episode.

  18. Groundwater Managment Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset outlines the location of the five Groundwater Management Districts in Kansas. GMDs are locally formed and elected boards for regional groundwater...

  19. Cenozoic vertical motions in the Moray Firth Basin associated with initiation of the Iceland Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, L. M.; Turner, J.; Jones, S. M.; White, N. J.

    2005-10-01

    It is likely that the Iceland mantle plume generated transient uplift across the North Atlantic region when it initiated in earliest Cenozoic time. However, transient uplift recorded in sedimentary basins fringing the region can be overprinted by the effects of permanent uplift. Identifying and quantifying transient uplift can only be achieved in areas which have a well-constrained stratigraphic record and across which the relative importance of permanent and transient uplift varies (e.g., the Moray Firth Basin, North Sea). By analyzing the subsidence of 50 boreholes from the Moray Firth Basin (MFB), residual vertical motions unrelated to rifting have been isolated. Transient uplift of 180-425 m occurred during Paleocene times. The western MFB has also been affected by permanent Cenozoic uplift, with denudation decreasing from 1.3 ± 0.1 km in the west of the basin to zero denudation east of 1°W. Dynamic support above the Iceland Plume led to transient uplift of the entire MFB in early Paleocene times, peaking in latest Paleocene times. In early Eocene times the effect of the plume waned, and subsidence occurred. Paleocene permanent uplift of the NW British Isles is generally accepted to have been due to magmatic underplating of the crust emplaced during the British Tertiary Igneous Province (61-58.5 Ma). The cause of Neogene uplift events is poorly understood, but it could also be associated with the Iceland Plume.

  20. Sulfur chemistry in a copper smelter plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough, D. J.; Christensen, J. J.; Eatough, N. I.; Hill, M. W.; Major, T. D.; Mangelson, N. F.; Post, M. E.; Ryder, J. F.; Hansen, L. D.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Fischer, J. W.

    Sulfur transformation chemistry was studied in the plume of the Utah smelter of Kennecott Copper Corporation from April to October 1977. Samples were taken at up to four locations from 4 to 60 km from the stacks. Data collected at each station included: SO 2 concentration, low-volume collected total paniculate matter, high-volume collected size fractionated paniculate matter, wind velocity and direction, temperature, and relative humidity. Paniculate samples were analyzed for S(IV). sulfate, strong acid, anions, cations, and elemental concentrations using calorimetric, ion Chromatographie, FIXE, ESCA, ion microprobe, and SEM-ion microprobe techniques. The concentration of As in the paniculate matter was used as a conservative plume tracer. The ratios Mo/As, Pb/As, and Zn/As were constant in particulate matter collected at all sampling sites for any particle size. Strong mineral acid was neutralized by background metal oxide and/or carbonate particulates within 40km of the smelter. This neutralization process is limited only by the rate of incorporation of basic material into the plume. Two distinct metal-S(IV) species similar to those observed in laboratory aerosol experiments were found in the plume. The formation of paniculate S(IV) species occurs by interaction of SO 2 (g) with both ambient and plume derived aerosol and is equilibrium controlled. The extent of formation of S(IV) complexes in the aerosol is directly proportional to the SO 2(g) and paniculate (Cu + Fe) concentration and inversely proportional to the paniculate acidity. S(IV) species were stable in collected paniculate matter only in the neutralized material, but with proper sampling techniques could be demonstrated to also be present in very acidic particles at high ambient SO 2(g) concentrations. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite by the aerosol S(IV) complexes during plume transport is suggested. The SO 2(g)-sulfate conversion process in the plume is described by a mechanism which is first order

  1. West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    With its vast expanses of sand, framed by mountain ranges and exposed rock, northwestern Africa makes a pretty picture when viewed from above. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The Canary Islands can be seen on the left side of the image just off Africa's Atlantic shore. The light brown expanse running through the northern two thirds of the image is the Sahara Desert. The desert runs up against the dark brown Haut Atlas mountain range of Morocco in the northwest, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the semi-arid (light brown pixels) Sahelian region in the South. The Sahara, however, isn't staying put. Since the 1960s, the desert has been expanding into the Sahelian region at a rate of up to 6 kilometers per year. In the 1980s this desert expansion, combined with over cultivation of the Sahel, caused a major famine across west Africa. Over the summer months, strong winds pick up sands from the Sahara and blow them across the Atlantic as far west as North America, causing air pollution in Miami and damaging coral reefs in the Bahamas and the Florida Keys. The white outlines on the map represent country borders. Starting at the top-most portion of the map and working clockwise, the countries shown are Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Fasso, Nigeria, Mali (again), and Algeria. Image by Reto Stockli, Robert Simmon, and Brian Montgomery, NASA Earth Observatory, based on data from MODIS

  2. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  3. Simulation Of Groundwater Flow And Reactive Transport In A Tidally Influenced Estuarine Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X.; Barry, D. A.; Enot, P.; Li, L.

    2003-12-01

    Existing groundwater monitoring data from an estuarine sandy aquifer situated below an old industrial landfill (Scotland) showed that (1) leaching from sulphurous waste located in the landfill has generated an acidic plume; (2) associated with the low pH, metal contaminants within the acidic plume are slowly migrating towards the estuary; and (3) the groundwater fluctuations are influenced by the tidal oscillations of the estuary. In order to test the possible influence of rainfall/precipitation, tidal fluctuation and salt water intrusion on the groundwater flow and reactive chemical transport, a model for multi-component reactive transport with density dependent flow was developed and applied to the site. The groundwater flow and chemical transport in this coastal aquifer were simulated. Both the field observations and numerical simulations showed that the tidal influence on the groundwater table fluctuations was great even far inland. This influence could not be explained by standard analytical solutions. It is expected that the local morphology and hydro-geological conditions cause this behaviour. The simulation performed with a conservative tracer showed that it took much less time to reach the estuary than the acidic plume originating from the landfill, with the rate of movement influenced by recharge and tidal oscillations. Due to buffering reactions occurring in the geochemical system during the migration of the contaminants (ion exchange, mineral precipitation/dissolution and oxidation/reduction), the movement of the acidic plume and associated metals is strongly retarded. Sharp differences are apparent in chemical concentrations, pH and pe, between the plume location and unaffected areas.

  4. Submarine groundwater discharge and solute transport under a transgressive barrier island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tyler B.; Wilson, Alicia M.

    2017-04-01

    Many recent investigations of groundwater dynamics in beaches employed groundwater models that assumed isotropic, numerically-convenient hydrogeological conditions. Real beaches exhibit local variability with respect to stratigraphy, sediment grain size and associated topographic profile, so that groundwater flow may diverge significantly from idealized models. We used a combination of hydrogeologic field methods and a variable-density, saturated-unsaturated, transient groundwater flow model to investigate SGD and solute transport under Cabretta Beach, a small transgressive barrier island seaward of Sapelo Island, Georgia. We found that the inclusion of real beach heterogeneity drove important deviations from predictions based on theoretical beaches. Cabretta Beach sustained a stronger upper saline plume than predicted due to the presence of a buried silty mud layer beneath the surface. Infiltration of seawater was greater for neap tides than for spring tides due to variations in beach slope. The strength of the upper saline plume was greatest during spring tides, contrary to recent model predictions. The position and width of the upper saline plume was highly dynamic through the lunar cycle. Our results suggest that field measurements of salinity gradients may be useful for estimating rates of tidally and density driven recirculation through the beach. Finally, our results indicate that several important biogeochemical cycles recently studied at Cabretta Beach were heavily influenced by groundwater flow and associated solute transport.

  5. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  6. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  7. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  8. Selective sorption of technetium from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Groundwater used for processing uranium or plutonium at DOE sites is frequently contaminated with the radionuclide {sup 99}Tc. DOE`s Paducah and Portsmouth sites are typical of the contamination problem. Solutions contaminated with radionuclides were poured into lagoons and burial pits, which created a plume that has seeped into the sandy aquifers below the vadose zone. Technetium is the principal radioactive metal-ion contaminant in Paducah site ground-water, and it is present at a concentration of about 25 ng/L. At Portsmouth, Tc is present in the groundwater at a concentration that varies greatly with distance from the source, and concentrations of >400 ng/L have been reported. Commercially available anion-exchange resins can remove the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} ion in the presence of typical anions found in groundwater, but improving the selectivity will result in substantial cost savings in terms of the quantity of resin needed and the scale of the equipment required to treat huge flows rates. The pertechnetate anion is strongly sorbed on commercially-available strong-base anion-exchange resins, but in view of the low (typically nanomolar) concentrations of Tc involved, enhanced selectivity for the pertechnetate anion over other anions commonly found in groundwater such as chloride, sulfate, and nitrite will be needed. The authors have prepared and evaluated new anion-exchange resins that were designed to be highly selective for pertechnetate. The technology involves building those features that are known to enhance the selectivity of pertechnetate over other anions into the exchange sites of the resin (hydrophobicity), while at the same time maintaining favorable exchange kinetics.

  9. Using 3He/4He to Map the flow of the Samoan-Plume into the Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A.; Jackson, M. G.; Hall, P. S.; Sinton, J. M.; Kurz, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how the upper mantle flows beneath oceanic lithosphere is crucial to understanding mantle melting, the distribution of geochemical reservoirs, and movement of plate tectonics. Spatial variations in the geochemistry of igneous rocks can provide an understanding of flow in the upper mantle. Numerous geochemical and geophysical anomalies within the northern portion of the Lau basin--the presence of high 3He/4He (up to 28 times atmospheric), latitudinal gradients in trace element and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) enrichment, and trench parallel shear wave splitting near the Tonga arc--have been attributed to the southward flow of mantle material from the nearby Samoan hotspot. The Samoan plume is located only 200 km east of the northern terminus of the Tonga trench. North of the terminus, the Pacific plate "tears" and, instead of subducting into the trench, continues to the West. To the South of the terminus, the Pacific plate subducts into the Tonga Trench. The resulting tear generated a "slab window", allowing the Samoan mantle to flow southward beneath the Vitiaz lineament and penetrate into the shallow mantle of the Lau Basin. The juxtaposition of the Samoan hotspot and the Tonga Trench create a unique setting in which the southward flow of the distinctive high 3He/4He Samoan plume mantle can be readily detected in the Lau Basin. High 3He/4He ratios (up to 28.1 Ra) have been reported in a swath within the northern Lau Basin, which drop rapidly to both the South (~400km south of Peggy ridge) and East (Lupton, 2009) of this narrow incursion. It was suggested that the 3He/ 4He would also decline to the west, creating a "finger-like" corridor of Samoan Plume (Turner & Hawkesworth ,1998). However, such a model is not constrained, as 3He/4He ratios have not been reported in the region to the West of the infiltrating plume. Does the Samoan plume material extend broadly to the west, or is it confined to a narrow "finger-like" corridor in the North Lau Basin? We present

  10. Characterization of an old municipal landfill (Grindsted, Denmark) as a groundwater pollution source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Grundtvig, Aase; Winther, Pia

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into the pollution of groundwater from old landfill have, in most cases, focused on delineating the pollution plume rather than on the landfill as a source of groundwater pollution. Landfills often cover large areas and spatial variations in leachate composition within the landfill...... variations in leachate composition are very important for locating the main source of the groundwater pollution and for selection of cost-effective remedial action activities....... may have great impact on the location of the main pollution plume in the downstream aquifer. The history of the Grindsted Landfill in Denmark was investigated using aerial photographs and interviews. On the basis of the aerial photographs, waste volume and age of the different areas of the landfill...

  11. Integrated modelling for assessing the risk of TCE groundwater contamination to human and surface water ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Funder, Simon Goltermann; Finkel, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    management tools designed to work with sparse data sets from preliminary site assessments are needed which can explicitly link contaminant point sources with groundwater, surface water and ecological impacts. Here, a novel integrated modelling approach was employed for evaluating the impact of a TCE...... groundwater plume, located in an area with protected drinking water interests, to human health and surface water ecosystems. This is accomplished by coupling the system dynamics-based decision support system CARO-Plus to the aquatic ecosystem model AQUATOX via an analytical volatilisation model for the stream...... of “effective” parameters in groundwater transport modelling. The initial modelling results indicate that TCE contaminant plumes with μgL-1 concentrations entering surface water systems do not pose a significant risk to either human or ecological receptors. The current work will be extended to additional...

  12. Confirmation of Water Plumes on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, William

    Evidence was found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014a) - FUV detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We find additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa from HST transit imaging observations (Sparks et al 2016). The evidence for plumes remains marginal, 4-sigma, and there is considerable debate as to their reality. SOFIA can potentially resolve this issue with an unambiguous direct detection of water vapor using EXES. Detection of the fundamental vibrational mode of water vapor at 6 micron, as opposed to the atomic constituents of water, would prove that the plumes exist and inform us of their physical chemistry through quantitative consideration of the balance between water vapor and its dissociation products, hydrogen and oxygen. We propose to obtain spectra of the leading and trailing hemispheres separately, with trailing as the higher priority. These provide two very different physical environments and plausibly different degrees of activity. If the plumes of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System, and clarify an issue of major strategic importance in NASAs planning for its multi-billion dollar mission to Europa.

  13. Modelling of aerosol processes in plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, M.; Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Norwegian Institute of Air Research, Kjeller (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    A modelling platform for studying photochemical gaseous and aerosol phase processes from localized (e.g., point) sources has been presented. The current approach employs a reactive plume model which extends the regulatory model RPM-IV by incorporating aerosol processes and heterogeneous chemistry. The physics and chemistry of elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium material of aerosols are treated and attributed to the PM size distribution. A modified version of the carbon bond IV chemical mechanism is included to model the formation of organic aerosol. Aerosol dynamics modeled include mechanisms of nucleation, condensation, dry deposition and gas/particle partitioning of organic matter. The model is first applied to a number of case studies involving emissions from point sources and sulfate particle formation in plumes. Model calculations show that homogeneous nucleation is an efficient process for new particle formation in plumes, in agreement with previous field studies and theoretical predictions. In addition, the model is compared with field data from power plant plumes with satisfactory predictions against gaseous species and total sulphate mass measurements. Finally, the plume model is applied to study secondary organic matter formation due to various emission categories such as vehicles and the oil production sector.

  14. Intermittent heat instabilities in an air plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Perrier, Frederic; Morat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of heating experiments carried out in an abandoned limestone quarry close to Paris, in an isolated room of a volume of about 400 m3. A heat source made of a metallic resistor of power 100 W was installed on the floor of the room, at distance from the walls. High-quality temperature sensors, with a response time of 20 s, were fixed on a 2 m long bar. In a series of 24 h heating experiments the bar had been set up horizontally at different heights or vertically along the axis of the plume to record changes in temperature distribution with a sampling time varying from 20 to 120 s. When taken in averages over 24 h, the temperatures present the classical shape of steady-state plumes, as described by classical models. On the contrary, the temperature time series show a rich dynamic plume flow with intermittent trains of oscillations, spatially coherent, of large amplitude and a period around 400 s, separated by intervals of relative quiescence whose duration can reach several hours. To our knowledge, no specific theory is available to explain this behavior, which appears to be a chaotic interaction between a turbulent plume and a stratified environment. The observed behavior, with first-order factorization of a smooth spatial function with a global temporal intermittent function, could be a universal feature of some turbulent plumes in geophysical environments.

  15. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  16. Mantle plumes in the vicinity of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mériaux, C. A.; Mériaux, A.-S.; Schellart, W. P.; Duarte, J. C.; Duarte, S. S.; Chen, Z.

    2016-11-01

    We present three-dimensional deep-mantle laboratory models of a compositional plume within the vicinity of a buoyancy-driven subducting plate with a fixed trailing edge. We modelled front plumes (in the mantle wedge), rear plumes (beneath the subducting plate) and side plumes with slab/plume systems of buoyancy flux ratio spanning a range from 2 to 100 that overlaps the ratios in nature of 0.2-100. This study shows that 1) rising side and front plumes can be dragged over thousands of kilometres into the mantle wedge, 2) flattening of rear plumes in the trench-normal direction can be initiated 700 km away from the trench, and a plume material layer of lesser density and viscosity can ultimately almost entirely underlay a retreating slab after slab/plume impact, 3) while side and rear plumes are not tilted until they reach ∼600 km depth, front plumes can be tilted at increasing depths as their plume buoyancy is lessened, and rise at a slower rate when subjected to a slab-induced downwelling, 4) rear plumes whose buoyancy flux is close to that of a slab, can retard subduction until the slab is 600 km long, and 5) slab-plume interaction can lead to a diversity of spatial plume material distributions into the mantle wedge. We discuss natural slab/plume systems of the Cascadia/Bowie-Cobb, and Nazca/San Felix-Juan Fernandez systems on the basis of our experiments and each geodynamic context and assess the influence of slab downwelling at depths for the starting plumes of Java, Coral Sea and East Solomon. Overall, this study shows how slab/plume interactions can result in a variety of geological, geophysical and geochemical signatures.

  17. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for

  18. Simple model of a cooling tower plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Cizek; Jiri, Nozicka

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses the possibilities in the area of modeling of the so called cooling tower plume emergent at operating evaporating cooling systems. As opposed to recent publication, this text focuses on the possibilities of a simplified analytic description of the whole problem where this description shall - in the future - form the base of a calculation algorithms enabling to simulate the efficiency of systems reducing this cooling tower plume. The procedure is based on the application of basic formula for the calculation of the velocity and concentration fields in the area above the cooling tower. These calculation is then used to determine the form and the total volume of the plume. Although this approach does not offer more exact results, it can provide a basic understanding of the impact of individual quantities relating to this problem.

  19. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  20. Numerical and approximate solutions for plume rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Gordon Hall, J.

    Numerical and approximate analytical solutions are compared for turbulent plume rise in a crosswind. The numerical solutions were calculated using the plume rise model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass.19, 585-590), over a wide range of pertinent parameters. Some wind shear and elevated inversion effects are included. The numerical solutions are seen to agree with the approximate solutions over a fairly wide range of the parameters. For the conditions considered in the study, wind shear effects are seen to be quite small. A limited study was made of the penetration of elevated inversions by plumes. The results indicate the adequacy of a simple criterion proposed by Briggs (1969, AEC Critical Review Series, USAEC Division of Technical Information extension, Oak Ridge, Tennesse).

  1. Properties of industrial dense gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, E. M.; Forney, L. J.

    Hazardous gases and vapors are often discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants during catastrophic events (e.g. Union Carbide incident in Bhopal, India). In many cases the discharged components are more dense than air and settle to the ground surface downstream from the stack exit. In the present paper, the buoyant plume model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass. 19, 585-590.) has been altered to predict the properties of hazardous discharges. In particular, the plume impingement point, radius and concentration are predicted for typical stack exit conditions, wind speeds and temperature profiles. Asymptotic expressions for plume properties at the impingement point are also derived for a constant crosswind and neutral temperature profile. These formulae are shown to be useful for all conditions.

  2. Modeling the Enceladus plume--plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fleshman, B L; Bagenal, F

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the chemical interaction between Saturn's corotating plasma and Enceladus' volcanic plumes. We evolve plasma as it passes through a prescribed H2O plume using a physical chemistry model adapted for water-group reactions. The flow field is assumed to be that of a plasma around an electrically-conducting obstacle centered on Enceladus and aligned with Saturn's magnetic field, consistent with Cassini magnetometer data. We explore the effects on the physical chemistry due to: (1) a small population of hot electrons; (2) a plasma flow decelerated in response to the pickup of fresh ions; (3) the source rate of neutral H2O. The model confirms that charge exchange dominates the local chemistry and that H3O+ dominates the water-group composition downstream of the Enceladus plumes. We also find that the amount of fresh pickup ions depends heavily on both the neutral source strength and on the presence of a persistent population of hot electrons.

  3. Effects of meteorological conditions on spore plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, M.; Levetin, E.

    2002-05-01

    Fungal spores are an ever-present component of the atmosphere, and have long been known to trigger asthma and hay fever symptoms in sensitive individuals. The atmosphere around Tulsa has been monitored for airborne spores and pollen with Burkard spore traps at several sampling stations. This study involved the examination of the hourly spore concentrations on days that had average daily concentrations near 50,000 spores/m3 or greater. Hourly concentrations of Cladosporium, Alternaria, Epicoccum, Curvularia, Pithomyces, Drechslera, smut spores, ascospores, basidiospores, other, and total spores were determined on 4 days at three sites and then correlated with hourly meteorological data including temperature, rainfall, wind speed, dew point, air pressure, and wind direction. On each of these days there was a spore plume, a phenomenon in which spore concentrations increased dramatically over a very short period of time. Spore plumes generally occurred near midday, and concentrations were seen to increase from lows around 20,000 total spores/m3 to highs over 170,000 total spores/m3 in 2 h. Multiple regression analysis of the data indicated that increases in temperature, dew point, and air pressure correlated with the increase in spore concentrations, but no single weather variable predicted the appearance of a spore plume. The proper combination of changes in these meteorological parameters that result in a spore plume may be due to the changing weather conditions associated with thunderstorms, as on 3 of the 4 days when spore plumes occurred there were thunderstorms later that evening. The occurrence of spore plumes may have clinical significance, because other studies have shown that sensitization to certain spore types can occur during exposure to high spore concentrations.

  4. Cassini Radio Occultation by Enceladus Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliore, A.; Armstrong, J.; Flasar, F.; French, R.; Marouf, E.; Nagy, A.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Aguilar, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2006-12-01

    A fortuitous Cassini radio occultation by Enceladus plume occurs on September 15, 2006. The occultation track (the spacecraft trajectory in the plane of the sky as viewed from the Earth) has been designed to pass behind the plume (to pass above the south polar region of Enceladus) in a roughly symmetrical geometry centered on a minimum altitude above the surface of about 20 km. The minimum altitude was selected primarily to ensure probing much of the plume with good confidence given the uncertainty in the spacecraft trajectory. Three nearly-pure sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively) are simultaneously transmitted from Cassini and are monitored at two 34-m Earth receiving stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in Madrid, Spain (DSS-55 and DSS-65). The occultation of the visible plume is extremely fast, lasting less than about two minutes. The actual observation time extends over a much longer time interval, however, to provide a good reference baseline for potential detection of signal perturbations introduced by the tenuous neutral and ionized plume environment. Given the likely very small fraction of optical depth due to neutral particles of sizes larger than about 1 mm, detectable changes in signal intensity is perhaps unlikely. Detection of plume plasma along the radio path as perturbations in the signals frequency/phase is more likely and the magnitude will depend on the electron columnar density probed. The occultation time occurs not far from solar conjunction time (Sun-Earth-probe angle of about 33 degrees), causing phase scintillations due to the solar wind to be the primary limiting noise source. We estimate a delectability limit of about 1 to 3E16 electrons per square meter columnar density assuming about 100 seconds integration time. Potential measurement of the profile of electron columnar density along the occultation track is an exciting prospect at this time.

  5. Evaluating Contaminant Flux from the Vadose Zone to the Groundwater in the Hanford Central Plateau. SX Tank Farms Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tartakovsky, Guzel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    At the DOE Hanford Site, contaminants were discharged to the subsurface through engineered waste sites in the Hanford Central Plateau. Additional waste was released through waste storage tank leaks. Much of the contaminant inventory is still present within the unsaturated vadose zone sediments. The nature and extent of future groundwater contaminant plumes and the growth or decline of current groundwater plumes beneath the Hanford Central Plateau are a function of the contaminant flux from the vadose zone to the groundwater. In general, contaminant transport is slow through the vadose zone and it is difficult to directly measure contaminant flux in the vadose zone. Predictive analysis, supported by site characterization and monitoring data, was applied using a structured, systems-based approach to estimate the future contaminant flux to groundwater in support of remediation decisions for the vadose zone and groundwater (Truex and Carroll 2013). The SX Tank Farm was used as a case study because of the existing contaminant inventory in the vadose zone, observations of elevated moisture content in portions of the vadose zone, presence of a limited-extent groundwater plume, and the relatively large amount and wide variety of data available for the site. Although the SX Tank Farm case study is most representative of conditions at tank farm sites, the study has elements that are also relevant to other types of disposal sites in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  6. Plume head - trench interaction: impact on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Mason, W. G.; Willis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The geologic record provides numerous examples where plumes and their associated buoyancy swell have disrupted convergent plate margins. These interactions have produced a variety of responses in the overriding plate including transient episodes of arc amagmatism, transient episodes of crustal shortening followed by plume-related magmatism in the overriding plate. The latter observation implies the plume must have transitioned from the subducting plate to the overriding plate. We present several 3D Underworld numerical models of plume heads of variable dimension and buoyancy interacting with a subduction trench. The models indicate that plume heads impact enormously on trench geometry. Arcuate trenches are created as the trench retreats around the edges of the plume head, whereas trench advance occurs in front of the plume resulting in transient crustal shortening in the overriding plate. Stalling of subduction when the plume head impacts the trench causes slab windowing. The size of the slab window is dependent on the size and buoyancy of the plume. The creation of the slab window provides a potential conduit for plume migration to the overriding plate. Alternatively, the plume head may be transferred to the overriding plate as subduction is re-established behind the plume. Models with "strong" slabs, characterized by high yield strengths, display different behavior. Plume-heads are entrained in the slab and are subducted without the development of a slab window.

  7. EUV Sunspot Plumes Observed with SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Maltby, P; Brekke, P; Haugan, S V H; Kjeldseth-Moe, O; Wikstøl, O; Rimmele, T R; Wikstøl, O

    1998-01-01

    Bright EUV sunspot plumes have been observed in five out of nine sunspot regions with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer -- CDS on SOHO. In the other four regions the brightest line emissions may appear inside the sunspot but are mainly concentrated in small regions outside the sunspot areas. These results are in contrast to those obtained during the Solar Maximum Mission, but are compatible with the Skylab mission results. The present observations show that sunspot plumes are formed in the upper part of the transition region, occur both in magnetic unipolar-- and bipolar regions, and may extend from the umbra into the penumbra.

  8. Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Plumes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes release vast amounts of gases and particles in the atmosphere. Volcanic halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) are co-emitted alongside SO2, and observations show rapid formation of BrO and OClO in the plume as it disperses into the troposphere. The development of 1D and Box models (e.g. PlumeChem) that simulate volcanic plume halogen chemistry aims to characterise how volcanic reactive halogens form and quantify their atmospheric impacts. Following recent advances, these models can broadly reproduce the observed downwind BrO/SO2 ratios using "bromine-explosion" chemistry schemes, provided they use a "high-temperature initialisation" to inject radicals (OH, Cl, Br and possibly NOx) which "kick-start" the low-temperature chemistry cycles that convert HBr into reactive bromine (initially as Br2). The modelled rise in BrO/SO2 and subsequent plateau/decline as the plume disperses downwind reflects cycling between reactive bromine, particularly Br-BrO, and BrO-HOBr-BrONO2. BrCl is produced when aerosol becomes HBr-depleted. Recent model simulations suggest this mechanism for reactive chlorine formation can broadly account for OClO/SO2 reported at Mt Etna. Predicted impacts of volcanic reactive halogen chemistry include the formation of HNO3 from NOx and depletion of ozone. This concurs with HNO3 widely reported in volcanic plumes (although the source of NOx remains under question), as well as observations of ozone depletion reported in plumes from several volcanoes (Mt Redoubt, Mt Etna, Eyjafjallajokull). The plume chemistry can transform mercury into more easily deposited and potentially toxic forms, for which observations are limited. Recent incorporation of volcanic halogen chemistry in a 3D regional model of degassing from Ambrym (Vanuatu) also predicts how halogen chemistry causes depletion of OH to lengthen the SO2 lifetime, and highlights the potential for halogen transport from the troposphere to the stratosphere. However, the model parameter-space is vast and

  9. Groundwater Quality Assessment Based on Geographical Information System and Groundwater Quality Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Derakhshan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Iran is located in an arid and semi-arid part of the world. Accordingly, the management of the water resources in the country is a priority. In this regard, determining the quality and pollution of surface water and groundwater is very important, especially in areas where groundwater resources are used for drinking. Groundwater quality index (GQI checks the components of the available water with various quality levels. To assess the quality of drinking groundwater of Yazd-Ardakan plain according to GQI in geographical information system (GIS environment, the electrical conductivity, sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, pH, sodium adsorption ratio, bicarbonate, sulfate, potassium, water hardness, and all substances dissolved in the waters of 80 wells were determined. The samples were obtained from Yazd Regional Water Organization from 2005 to 2014. Using this data, the map components were plotted by Kriging geostatistical method. Then, the map of GQI was prepared after normalizing each map component, switching to a rating map, and extracting the weight of each component from the rating map. Based on the GQI index map, the index point which was 87 in 2005 has increased to 81 in 2014. These maps show a decline in groundwater quality from west to the east region. This decline in groundwater quality is due to the existence of Neogene Organizations in the east and geomorphologic unit of the bare epandage pediment in the west. The map removal and single-parameter sensitivity analysis showed that GQI index in Yazd-Ardakan plain is more sensitive to the components of electrical conductivity (EC, total dissolved solids (TDS, and total hardness (TH. Therefore, these components should be monitored more carefully and repeatedly.

  10. Tectonics in the Northwestern West Philippine Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Xianglong; Wu Shiguo; Shinjo Ryuichi

    2008-01-01

    The West Philippine basin (WPB) is a currently inactive marginal basin belonging to Philippine Sea plate, which has a complex formation history and various crust structures. Based on gravity, magnetic and seismic data, the tectonics in West Philippine basin is characterized by amagnma spreading stage and strike slip fractures. NNE trending Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone is a large fracture zone with apparent geomorphology and shows a right-handed movement. The results of joint gravity-magnetic-seismic inversion suggest that the Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone has intensive deformation and is a transform fault. Western existence of the NW trending fractures under Ryukyu Islands Arc is the main cause of the differences between south and north Okinawa Trough. The Urdaneta plateau is not a remained arc, but remnant of mantle plume although its lava chemistry is similar to oceanic island basalt (OIB).

  11. Mobile measurement of methane: plumes, isotopes and inventory verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, D.; Zazzeri, G.; Fisher, R. E.; France, J.; Al-Shalaan, A.; Lanoisellé, M.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 the RHUL group has been identifying methane plumes from major UK sources using a Picarro 2301 coupled to the A0941 mobile module. Once identified the plumes have been sampled by filling Tedlar or Flexfoil bags for later carbon isotopic analysis by high-precision IRMS. This method has ben successfully deployed to isotopically characterize the main anthropogenic methane emitters in the UK (natural gas, coal, landfill, wastewater treatment, cattle; Zazzeri et al., 2015) and during overseas campaigns in eastern Australia (coal, cattle, legacy gas wells) and Kuwait (landfill, wastewater treatment, oil refineries, cattle, camels). This has identified strong similarities of isotopic signature for some sources (landfill, cattle), but large variations for others (natural gas, coal), which must be isotopically resolved at regional scale. Both landfill and natural gas emissions in SE England have tightly-constrained δ13C signatures, averaging -58 ± 3‰ and -36 ± 2‰, respectively, the latter being characteristic of homogenised North Sea gas supply. In contrast, signatures for coal mines in England and Wales fall in a range of 51.2 ± 0.3‰ to 30.9 ± 1.4‰, but can be tightly constrained by region. On a local scale in west London, repeat surveys in the boroughs of Hounslow and Runnymede have been made for comparison with the latest 1x1 km grid UK inventories for 2009 and 2012, which are subdivided by UNECE categories. An excess methane map can be derived for comparison with inventory emissions maps by identifying daily background and binning the excess values from mobile measurements by grid-square. This shows that the spatial distribution of emissions in the UK 2012 inventory is a big improvement on that of 2009. It also suggests that there is an overestimation of emissions from old landfills (closed before 2000 and reliant on a topsoil cap for oxidation), and an underestimation on emissions from currently active landfill cells. Zazzeri, G. et al. (2015

  12. The Influence of Social Analysis on a Solid Waste Management Project : West Bank and Gaza

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    The West Bank and Gaza suffer from severe environmental degradation, including deterioration of groundwater and uncontrolled dumping of solid waste. These problems have been addressed in Gaza with the assistance of bilateral donors, but until the design of the Solid Waste and Environment Management Project (SWEMP) in 2000, they were largely neglected in the West Bank. Solid waste managemen...

  13. The Mean Residence Time (MRT) of exfiltrating groundwater in the Southern Vienna Basin (Fischa-Dagnitz spring area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyhlidal, Stefan; Rank, Dieter; Schuster, Katharina; Jung, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The "Mitterndorfer Senke" in the youngest zone of subsidence in the Southern Vienna Basin contains an important groundwater body used by regional water-supply facilities. The depression is filled with Pleistocene gravels and sands and is about 40 km long, up to 8 km wide and 50 to 150 m deep. Up to 13 m3/s of river water infiltrate in the alluvial cones in the most southern part of the "Mitterndorfer Senke" by the crossing rivers. The contribution of local precipitation to groundwater recharge is very low due to high evaporation in this area (up to 500 mm/a) compared with to an mean annual precipitation amount about of 500 mm/a in the southern Vienna basin. This sedimentary filling in the "Senke" acts very much like a pipeline, transmitting water readily from the main recharge area south-west of Wiener Neustadt to locations of surface discharge in the northern part of the basin. For many years a plume of chlorinated hydrocarbons has been moving from the industrial plants in the most southern part of the depression towards the Danube. In this context the determination of the groundwater flow velocity in the depression became important. The Fischa-Dagnitz spring is situated in a distance of some 20 km from the infiltration section and discharges about 350 l/s. A long-term environmental isotope monitoring record from 1964 - 2012 exists for this spring. The result of the evaluation of ³H time series using the dispersion model leads to a mean residence time between 13.5-16.5 years for the base flow of the Fischa-Dagnitz spring. This corresponds to previous studies, however, the present results are based on a more complete data set and therefore they are more significant. There is also evidence of occasional short-term influences of storm waters in the Fischa-Dagnitz spring. Normally these effects may be neglected. The difference between the δ18O values of precipitation of Gloggnitz (altitude 512 m) and the Fischa-Dagnitz spring leads to the conclusion, that the

  14. Propagation of the Sea of Azov plume in the Black Sea and its relation with atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialov, Ivan; Osadchiev, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    This work is devoted to research of the influence of wind forcing on propagation of the Sea of Azov water plume in the Black Sea. The Sea of Azov water is characterized by relatively low salinity and high concentrations of suspended matter, terrigenic nutrients, and anthropogenic pollutants. Thus, the Sea of Azov inflow has significant impacts on physical, chemical, and biological processes in the Black Sea. The increased concentration of the suspended matter in the Sea of Azov plume allows to determine accurately its borders based on remote sensing data. For this purpose, data of the satellite color scanner MERIS/EnviSat with 300-meter spatial resolution were used. Atmospheric forcing on the Sea of Azov plume was investigated with the data of 6-hour reanalysis of winds (MERRA and NCAR/NCEP) with spatial resolution at 1/2 degrees in latitude and 2/3 degrees in longitude. Based on satellite images and wind reanalysis data for 2002-2012 period, it was established that the Azov Sea water inflow is favored by strong N and NE winds, which prevail in the region. It is evident in the processed satellite data that the Sea of Azov plume mainly extends along the east coast of the Crimean peninsula. In some cases under sufficiently strong winds, the Azov waters spread to the southern coast of the Crimea, and sometimes even to its south-west extremity. Factors influencing the propagation of the Azov Sea plume include intensity of water exchange between the Azov and the Black seas, the Rim Current, mesoscale eddies and other dynamic processes. However, the study demonstrated that the influence of wind forcing is dominant. Empirical regressions are derived expressing the dependence of the Azov plume area and its orientation on the magnitude and directions of the wind stress. Satellite-derived statistics of the Azov plume in the Black Sea characteristics are obtained.

  15. Maximum entropy estimation of a Benzene contaminated plume using ecotoxicological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Agung; Bartzke, Mariana; Küster, Eberhard; Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ecotoxicological bioassays, e.g. based on Danio rerio teratogenicity (DarT) or the acute luminescence inhibition with Vibrio fischeri, could potentially lead to significant benefits for detecting on site contaminations on qualitative or semi-quantitative bases. The aim was to use the observed effects of two ecotoxicological assays for estimating the extent of a Benzene groundwater contamination plume. We used a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) method to rebuild a bivariate probability table that links the observed toxicity from the bioassays with Benzene concentrations. Compared with direct mapping of the contamination plume as obtained from groundwater samples, the MaxEnt concentration map exhibits on average slightly higher concentrations though the global pattern is close to it. This suggest MaxEnt is a valuable method to build a relationship between quantitative data, e.g. contaminant concentrations, and more qualitative or indirect measurements, in a spatial mapping framework, which is especially useful when clear quantitative relation is not at hand.

  16. Review of the potential effects of alkaline plume migration from a cementitious repository for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.

    1997-09-01

    Extensive use of cement and concrete is envisaged in the construction of geological repositories for low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, both for structural, and encapsulation and backfilling purposes. Saturation of these materials with groundwater may occur in the post-closure period of disposal, producing a hyperalkaline pore fluid with a pH in the range 10-13.5. These pore fluids have the potential to migrate from the repository according to local groundwater flow conditions and react chemically with the host rock. These chemical reactions may affect the rock`s capacity to retard the migration of radionuclides released from the repository after the degradation of the waste packages. The effects of these chemical reactions on the behaviour of the repository rock as a barrier to waste migration need to be investigated for the purposes of assessing the safety of the repository design (so-called `safety assessment` or `performance assessment`). The objectives of the work reported here were to: identify those processes influencing radionuclide mobility in the geosphere which could be affected by plume migration; review literature relevant to alkali-rock reaction; contact organisations carrying out relevant research and summarise their current and future activities; and make recommendations how the effects of plume migration can be incorporated into models of repository performance assessment. (author).

  17. The role of alluvial aquifer sediments in attenuating a dissolved arsenic plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Brady A.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2017-01-01

    In a crude-oil-contaminated sandy aquifer at the Bemidji site in northern Minnesota, biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons has resulted in release of naturally occurring As to groundwater under Fe-reducing conditions. This study used chemical extractions of aquifer sediments collected in 1993 and 2011–2014 to evaluate the relationship between Fe and As in different redox zones (oxic, methanogenic, Fe-reducing, anoxic-suboxic transition) of the contaminated aquifer over a twenty-year period. Results show that 1) the aquifer has the capacity to naturally attenuate the plume of dissolved As, primarily through sorption; 2) Fe and As are linearly correlated in sediment across all redox zones, and a regression analysis between Fe and As reasonably predicted As concentrations in sediment from 1993 using only Fe concentrations; 3) an As-rich “iron curtain,” associated with the anoxic-suboxic transition zone, migrated 30 m downgradient between 1993 and 2013 as a result of the hydrocarbon plume evolution; and 4) silt lenses in the aquifer preferentially sequester dissolved As, though As is remobilized into groundwater from sediment after reducing conditions are established. Using results of this study coupled with historical data, we develop a conceptual model which summarizes the natural attenuation of As and Fe over time and space that can be applied to other sites that experience As mobilization due to an influx of bioavailable organic matter.

  18. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J A; Parker, Beth L

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence.

  19. Groundwater arsenic contamination on the Ganges Delta: biogeochemistry, hydrology, human perturbations, and human suffering on a large scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Charles F.; Swartz, Christopher H.; Badruzzaman, Abu Bohran M.; Keon-Blute, Nicole; Yu, Winston; Ali, M. Ashraf; Jay, Jenny; Beckie, Roger; Niedan, Volker; Brabander, Daniel; Oates, Peter M.; Ashfaque, Khandaker N.; Islam, Shafiqul; Hemond, Harold F.; Ahmed, M. Feroze

    2005-02-01

    Over the last several decades, much of population of Bangladesh and West Bengal switched their water supply from surface water to groundwater. Tragically, much of the region's groundwater is dangerously contaminated by arsenic, and consumption of this water has already created severe health effects. Here we consider how groundwater flow may affect arsenic biogeochemistry and we compare the vertical patterns of groundwater chemistry at our intensive study site with the average values across the country. Detailed hydraulic data are presented from our field site that begins to characterize the groundwater flow system. To cite this article: C.F. Harvey et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  20. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  1. LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

    2012-09-30

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington produced plutonium for several decades and in the process generated billions of gallons of radioactive waste. Included in this complex mixture of waste was 50 Ci of iodine-129 ({sup 129}I). Iodine-129’s high abundance, due to its high fission yield, and extreme toxicity result in iodine-129 becoming a key risk driver at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The mobility of radioiodine in arid environments, such as the Hanford Site, depends largely on its chemical speciation and is also greatly affected by many other environmental factors, especially natural sediment organic matter (SOM). Groundwater radioiodine speciation has not been measured in arid regions with major plumes or large disposed {sup 129}I inventories, including the Hanford Site, Idaho National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. In this study, stable iodine-127 and radioiodine-129 speciation, pH, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of groundwater samples collected from seven wells located in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were investigated. The most striking finding was that iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) was the most abundant species. Unexpectedly, iodide (I{sup -}), which was likely the form of iodine in the source materials and the expected dominant groundwater species based on thermodynamic considerations, only accounted for 1-2% of the total iodine concentration. It is likely that the relatively high pH and the low abundance of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) that is present at the site slowed down or even inhibited the reduction of iodate, as SOM abiotically reduce iodate into iodide. Moreover, a study on the kinetics of iodide and iodate uptake and aqueous speciation transformation by three representative subsurface Hanford sediments was performed over a period of about one month. This study was carried out by using iodide-125 or iodate-125 at the ambient iodine-127concentration found at the site. Iodate K{sub d} values were on average 89% greater

  2. New method for calculation of integral characteristics of thermal plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Popiolek, Zbigniew; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2008-01-01

    A method for calculation of integral characteristics of thermal plumes is proposed. The method allows for determination of the integral parameters of plumes based on speed measurements performed with omnidirectional low velocity thermoanemometers. The method includes a procedure for calculation...

  3. New method for calculation of integral characteristics of thermal plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A method for calculation of integral characteristics of thermal plumes is proposed. The method allows for determination of the integral parameters of plumes based on speed measurements performed with omnidirectional low velocity thermoanemometers. The method includes a procedure for calculation...

  4. Application of 4D resistivity image profiling to detect DNAPLs plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Tsai, Y.

    2008-12-01

    In July 1993, the soil and groundwater of the factory of Taiwan , Miaoli was found to be contaminated by dichloroethane, chlorobenzene and other hazardous solvents. The contaminants were termed to be dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The contaminated site was neglected for the following years until May 1998, the Environment Protection Agency of Miaoli ordered the company immediately take an action for treatment of the contaminated site. Excavating and exposing the contaminated soil was done at the previous waste DNAPL dumped area. In addition, more than 53 wells were drilled around the pool with a maximum depth of 12 m where a clayey layer was found. Continuous pumping the groundwater and monitoring the concentration of residual DNAPL contained in the well water samples have done in different stages of remediation. However, it is suspected that the DNAPL has existed for a long time, therefore the contaminants might dilute but remnants of a DNAPL plume that are toxic to humans still remain in the soil and migrate to deeper aquifers. A former contaminated site was investigated using the 2D, 3D and 4D resisitivity image technique, with aims of determining buried contaminant geometry. This paper emphasizes the use of resistivity image profiling (RIP) method to map the limit of this DNAPL waste disposal site where the records of operations are not variations. A significant change in resistivity values was detected between known polluted and non-polluted subsurface; a high resistivity value implies that the subsurface was contaminated by DNAPL plume. The results of the survey serve to provide insight into the sensitivity of RIP method for detecting DNAPL plumes within the shallow subsurface, and help to provide valuable information related to monitoring the possible migration path of DNAPL plume in the past. According to the formerly studies in this site, affiliation by excavates with pumps water remediation had very long time, Therefore this research was used

  5. DYNAMICS OF AGRICULTURAL GROUNDWATER EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Hellegers, Petra J.G.J.; Zilberman, David; van Ierland, Ekko C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural shallow groundwater extraction can result in desiccation of neighbouring nature reserves and degradation of groundwater quality in the Netherlands, whereas both externalities are often not considered when agricultural groundwater extraction patterns are being determined. A model is developed to study socially optimal agricultural shallow groundwater extraction patterns. It shows the importance of stock size to slow down changes in groundwater quality.

  6. DYNAMICS OF AGRICULTURAL GROUNDWATER EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Hellegers, Petra J.G.J.; Zilberman, David; van Ierland, Ekko C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural shallow groundwater extraction can result in desiccation of neighbouring nature reserves and degradation of groundwater quality in the Netherlands, whereas both externalities are often not considered when agricultural groundwater extraction patterns are being determined. A model is developed to study socially optimal agricultural shallow groundwater extraction patterns. It shows the importance of stock size to slow down changes in groundwater quality.

  7. Groundwater sustainability strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; VanderSteen, Jonathan; Sophocleous, Marios A.; Taniguchi, Makoto; Alley, William M.; Allen, Diana M.; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater extraction has facilitated significant social development and economic growth, enhanced food security and alleviated drought in many farming regions. But groundwater development has also depressed water tables, degraded ecosystems and led to the deterioration of groundwater quality, as well as to conflict among water users. The effects are not evenly spread. In some areas of India, for example, groundwater depletion has preferentially affected the poor. Importantly, groundwater in some aquifers is renewed slowly, over decades to millennia, and coupled climate–aquifer models predict that the flux and/or timing of recharge to many aquifers will change under future climate scenarios. Here we argue that communities need to set multigenerational goals if groundwater is to be managed sustainably.

  8. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    Contaminated groundwater associated with Building 100 at the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center, formerly the DOE Pinellas plant, is the primary remedial challenge that remains to be addressed at the site. Currently, Building 100 is an active industrial facility that is now owned and operated by the Pinellas county government. Groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells recently installed near the southern boundary of the site suggest that contaminated groundwater has migrated off the plant site. In response to the challenges presented by the Building 100 plume, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) requested assistance from the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) to provide a review team to make technical recommendations so that they can efficiently and effectively address characterization and remediation of the plume. The review team was unanimous in the conclusion that a dynamic strategy that combines a phased implementation of direct push samplers, sensors, and tools can be used to better delineate the extent of contamination, control plume migration, and rapidly remediate the contaminated groundwater at the site. The initial efforts of the team focused on reviewing the site history and data, organizing the information into a conceptual model, identifying appropriate technologies, and recommending an integrated strategy. The current groundwater data from the site indicate a two-lobed plume extending to the east and south. To the east vinyl chloride is the primary contaminant of concern, to the south, vinyl chloride and cis1, 2-DCE are the primary contaminants. The limited data that are available suggest that reductive dechlorination of the TCE is already occurring but is not sufficient to prevent offsite migration of low concentrations of TCE daughter products. The team recommends that DOE pursue a strategy that builds on the natural cleansing capacity of the subsurface with reductive methods including biostimulation

  9. Visualising volcanic gas plumes with virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T. E.; Burton, M.; Pyle, D. M.; Caltabiano, T.

    2009-09-01

    The recent availability of small, cheap ultraviolet spectrometers has facilitated the rapid deployment of automated networks of scanning instruments at several volcanoes, measuring volcanic SO 2 gas flux at high frequency. These networks open up a range of other applications, including tomographic reconstruction of the gas distribution which is of potential use for both risk mitigation, particularly to air traffic, and environmental impact modelling. Here we present a methodology for visualising reconstructed plumes using virtual globes, such as Google Earth, which allows animations of the evolution of the gas plume to be displayed and easily shared on a common platform. We detail the process used to convert tomographically reconstructed cross-sections into animated gas plume models, describe how this process is automated and present results from the scanning network around Mt. Etna, Sicily. We achieved an average rate of one frame every 12 min, providing a good visual representation of the plume which can be examined from all angles. In creating these models, an approximation to turbulent diffusion in the atmosphere was required. To this end we derived the value of the turbulent diffusion coefficient for quiescent conditions near Etna to be around 200- 500m2s-1.

  10. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...

  11. Ablation plume dynamics in a background gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the expa...

  12. DSMC simulation of Europa water vapor plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    A computational investigation of the physics of water vapor plumes on Europa was performed with a focus on characteristics relevant to observation and spacecraft mission operations. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to model the plume expansion assuming a supersonic vent source. The structure of the plume was determined, including the number density, temperature, and velocity fields. The possibility of ice grain growth above the vent was considered and deemed probable for large (diameter > ∼20 m) vents at certain Mach numbers. Additionally, preexisting grains of three diameters (0.1, 1, 50 μm) were included and their trajectories examined. A preliminary study of photodissociation of H2O into OH and H was performed to demonstrate the behavior of daughter species. A set of vent parameters was evaluated including Mach number (Mach 2, 3, 5), reduced temperature as a proxy for flow energy loss to the region surrounding the vent, and mass flow rate. Plume behavior was relatively insensitive to these factors, with the notable exception of mass flow rate. With an assumed mass flow rate of ∼1000 kg/s, a canopy shock occurred and a maximum integrated line of sight column density of ∼1020 H2O molecules/m2 was calculated, comparing favorably with observation (Roth et al., 2014a).

  13. Propagation of light through ship exhaust plumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M. van; Mack, A.; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Looking through the atmosphere, it is sometimes difficult to see the details of an object. Effects like scintillation and blur are the cause of these difficulties. Exhaust plumes of e.g. a ship can cause extreme scintillation and blur, making it even harder to see the details of what lies behind the

  14. Plume dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Jerome A.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2008-11-01

    Buoyancy driven flows in layered porous media are present in many geological settings and play an important role in the mixing of fluids, from the dispersal of pollutants in underground aquifers to enhanced oil recovery techniques and, of more recent importance, the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Seismic images of the rise of a buoyant CO2 plume at Sleipner in the North Sea indicate that these plumes are greatly influenced by a vertical array of thin lenses of relatively low permeability material. We model propagation of CO2 at each layer as a gravity current in a porous medium which propagates along, and drains through, a thin, low permeability seal. Drainage, driven both by hydrostatic pressure and the body force on the draining fluid, leads to an initial rapid advance followed by a gradual retreat of the current to a steady-state. By incorporating a vertical array of these single layer models we are able to capture the rise of the buoyant plume in layered reservoirs. We find that the plume is characterized by a broad head with a tail given by the steady state extent.

  15. DSMC simulation of Io's unsteady Tvashtar plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoey, W. A.; Ackley, P. C.; Trafton, L. M.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.

    2016-11-01

    Jupiter's moon Io supports its rarefied atmosphere with prolific tidally-driven episodic volcanism. Its largest volcanic plumes erupt violently and exhibit intricate structure, their canopies rising to hundreds of km above the Ionian surface. In early 2007, the NASA New Horizons (NH) spacecraft captured the active Tvashtar plume in a time sequence of panchromatic images at high spatial resolution and observed both discrete "filamentary" patterns in the descending particulate structure, and a prominent traveling canopy wave. These are transient and asymmetric features, indicative of Tvashtar's unresolved and complex vent processes. In this work, we introduce a methodology for identifying vent spatial and temporal scales in the rarefied plume. Three-dimensional DSMC simulations of the collisional gas flowfield are combined with a flow-tracking dust particle model, enabling a broad exploration of parameter space in pursuit of the critical frequencies that qualitatively reproduce the dynamical phenomena observed in Tvashtar's collisional canopy and providing insight into the dynamics of transient extra-terrestrial volcanic plumes.

  16. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    CERN Document Server

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  17. Groundwater flow and heterogeneous discharge into a seepage lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmierczak, Jolanta; Müller, Sascha; Nilsson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater discharge into a seepage lake was investigated by combining flux measurements, hydrochemical tracers, geological information, and a telescopic modeling approach using first two-dimensional (2-D) regional then 2-D local flow and flow path models. Discharge measurements and hydrochemical...... with the lake remained under seemingly steady state conditions across seasons, a high spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the discharge to the lake was observed. The results showed that part of the groundwater flowing from the west passes beneath the lake and discharges at the eastern shore, where groundwater...... springs and high discharge zones (HDZs) are observed at the lake bottom and at seepage faces adjacent to the lake. In the 2-D cross section, surface runoff from the seepage faces delivers 64% of the total groundwater inputs to the lake, and a 2 m wide offshore HDZ delivers 13%. Presence of HDZs may...

  18. Hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of groundwater-dominated lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmierczak, Jolanta

    , while deeper groundwater by-passes the lake by flowing underneath the gyttja sediments and discharges at the eastern sandy shore, where groundwater springs and high discharge zones (HDZ) are observed. Hydrogeochemical tracers were successfully used for estimating the general discharge distribution...... at a 25-m-wide sandy lakebed, while surface runoff from the western and southern seepage faces delivers approximately 65%. The simulated seepage rates are an acceptable approximation of the average fluxes measured with seepage meters on the eastern shore. Seepage measurements and the observation...... bottom and heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of the lakebed have a significant influence on the groundwater flow patterns and discharge dynamics. Part of the groundwater flowing from the west and south is forced to discharge at wetlands/seepage faces at the western and southern lake shores...

  19. Plume or no Plume, the Case of the Siberian Trap Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, M. K.; Saunders, A. D.; White, R. V.; Al'Mukhamedov, A. I.; Medvedev, A. I.; Inger, S.

    2003-12-01

    The generation mechanism of continental large igneous provinces, such as the Siberian Traps, are matters of recent debate, particularly their relation to mantle plumes derived from the Earth's interior. Alternative models relate the formation of large igneous provinces to bolide impacts or small-scale convection at the boundary of asymmetric lithospheres. Neither of these models is without criticism and each model cannot explain all characteristics of continental flood basalt formation alone. However, strong support for the involvement of a mantle plume comes from the observation that large volumes of basaltic melts ( ˜3 x 106 km3) erupted within a short period of time (pulse of volcanism extruded over large areas of the Siberian craton. Although the major and trace element data are consistent with a plume origin for the Siberian Traps, they cannot prove it; however, magma volume and timing constraints do strongly suggest that a mantle plume was involved in the formation of the Earth's largest continental flood basalt province.

  20. Project Opalinus Clay: Sorption Data Bases For Opalinus Clay Influenced By A High pH Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of groundwater with the large quantities of cement/concrete used in the construction and backfilling of emplacement tunnels containing long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste may give rise to the release of a pulse of hyper alkaline fluid (pH plume) into the surrounding rock. Since the pH of this plume could remain in excess of 12.5 for tens of thousands of years, many minerals in a sedimentary host rock would be unstable leading to dissolution reactions, secondary mineral precipitation and changes in groundwater chemistry. An Opalinus day formation in the Zuercher Weinland, is under consideration by Nagra as a potential host rock for a repository of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of spent fuel and long-lived intermediate-Ievel radioactive waste (ILW). The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of the interactions between a pH plume and Opalinus day on the sorption properties of the formation and to provide appropriate sorption data bases. (author)

  1. A groundwater management plan for Stuttgart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasin, Sandra; Carle, Achim; Lang, Ulrich; Kirchholtes, Hermann Josef

    2016-09-01

    In general, groundwater in urban areas is exposed to anthropogenic influence and suffers from concentrations of contaminants. Stuttgart, as a highly industrialized city, has more than 5000 contaminated sites which might influence the Stuttgart's mineral water quality. Despite tremendous efforts and intensive single site orientated remediation since 1984 in downtown, the mineral springs were still affected with chlorinated hydrocarbons at low concentrations. Therefore, the applied practices of environmental management and measures for mitigation of pollution sources were not sufficient and had to be adjusted. The main goal of this study is to define an integral remediation plan (a groundwater management plan), focusing on the key sources of chlorinated solvents which are relevant for the mineral springs. For the large-scale investigated area of 26.6km(2) and eight aquifers, an extensive investigation and characterization methods were used in order to delineate the contamination plumes. By means of a 3D numerical model, the prioritization of the contaminated sites could be performed. Five contaminated sites with high remediation priority and need for optimized or additional remediation efforts were determined. For those five contaminated sites feasibility studies were performed which resulted in recommendation of remediation measures with total costs of more than 12.5 million euros. The proposed strategy and approach are suitable for multiple sources of contamination. Only in this way, the contributions of single contaminated sites to the total groundwater contamination can be identified and local remediation measures with their spatial impact simulated. Due to very complex geological conditions, technically there is no alternative to this strategy in order to achieve the contamination reduction in groundwater.

  2. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  3. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  4. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  5. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...

  6. Groundwater Remediation in a Floodplain Aquifer at Shiprock, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Dave [Navarro Research and Engineering; Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering; Kautsky, Mark [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Dander, David [Navarro Research and Engineering; Nofchissey, Joni [Navajo Nation Division of Natural Resources

    2016-03-06

    A uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill operated from 1954 to 1968 within the Navajo Nation near Shiprock, New Mexico. By September 1986, all tailings and structures on the former mill property were encapsulated in a disposal cell built on top of two existing tailings piles on the Shiprock site (the site) [1]. Local groundwater was contaminated by multiple inorganic constituents as a result of the milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took over management of the site in 1978 as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The DOE Office of Legacy Management currently manages ongoing activities at the former mill facility, including groundwater remediation. Remediation activities are designed primarily to reduce the concentrations and total plume mass of the mill-related contaminants sulfate, uranium, and nitrate. In addition to contaminating groundwater in alluvial and bedrock sediments directly below the mill site, ore processing led to contamination of a nearby floodplain bordering the San Juan River. Groundwater in a shallow alluvial aquifer beneath the floodplain is strongly influenced by the morphology of the river channel as well as changing flows in the river, which provides drainage for regional runoff from the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. As part of a recent study of the floodplain hydrology, a revised conceptual model was developed for the alluvial aquifer along with an updated status of contaminant plumes that have been impacted by more than 10 years of groundwater pumping for site remediation purposes. Several findings from the recent study will be discussed here.

  7. Lidar measurements of launch vehicle exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Phan D.; Curtis, David; Farley, Robert; Soletsky, Philip; Davidson, Gilbert; Gelbwachs, Jerry A.

    1997-10-01

    The Mobile Lidar Trailer (MLT) was developed and operated to characterize launch vehicle exhaust plume and its effects on the environment. Two recent applications of this facility are discussed in this paper. In the first application, the MLT was used to characterize plumes in the stratosphere up to 45 km in support of the Air Force Space and Missile Center's Rocket Impact on Stratospheric Ozone program. Solid rocket motors used by Titan IV and other heavy launch vehicles release large quantities of gaseous hydrochloric acid in the exhaust and cause concerns about a possible depletion of the ozone layer. The MLT was deployed to Cape Canaveral Air Station since October 1995 to monitor ozone and to investigate plume dynamics and properties. Six campaigns have been conducted and more are planned to provide unique data with the objective of addressing the environmental issues. The plume was observed to disperse rapidly into horizontally extended yet surprisingly thin layer with thickness recorded in over 700 lidar profiles to be less than 250 meters. MLT operates with the laser wavelengths of 532, 355 and 308 nm and a scanning receiving telescope. Data on particle backscattering at the three wavelengths suggest a consistent growth of particle size in the 2-3 hour observation sessions following the launch. In the second type of application, the MLT was used as a remote sensor of nitrogen dioxide, a caustic gaseous by-product of common liquid propellant oxidizer. Two campaigns were conducted at the Sol Se Mete Canyon test site in New Mexico in December 1996 an January 1997 to study the dispersion of nitrogen dioxide and rocket plume.

  8. Quantifying Potential Groundwater Recharge In South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, S.; Zhou, Y.; Leite, P. A.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater in South Texas is heavily relied on for human consumption and irrigation for food crops. Like most of the south west US, woody encroachment has altered the grassland ecosystems here too. While brush removal has been widely implemented in Texas with the objective of increasing groundwater recharge, the linkage between vegetation and groundwater recharge in South Texas is still unclear. Studies have been conducted to understand plant-root-water dynamics at the scale of plants. However, little work has been done to quantify the changes in soil water and deep percolation at the landscape scale. Modeling water flow through soil profiles can provide an estimate of the total water flowing into deep percolation. These models are especially powerful with parameterized and calibrated with long term soil water data. In this study we parameterize the HYDRUS soil water model using long term soil water data collected in Jim Wells County in South Texas. Soil water was measured at every 20 cm intervals up to a depth of 200 cm. The parameterized model will be used to simulate soil water dynamics under a variety of precipitation regimes ranging from well above normal to severe drought conditions. The results from the model will be compared with the changes in soil moisture profile observed in response to vegetation cover and treatments from a study in a similar. Comparative studies like this can be used to build new and strengthen existing hypotheses regarding deep percolation and the role of soil texture and vegetation in groundwater recharge.

  9. A comparison of the turbulent entrainment process in line plumes and wall plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Burridge, Henry; Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Flows driven by sources of buoyancy appear in a large number of geophysical and industrial applications. The process of turbulent entrainment in these flows is key to understanding how they evolve and how one might model them. It has been observed that the entrainment is reduced when a line source of buoyancy is positioned immediately adjacent to a wall. To gain insight into the effect of the wall on the entrainment process we perform simultaneous PIV and LIF on both line plumes, in the absence of any boundary, and when the source is adjacent to a vertical boundary forming a wall plume. The experiments are designed to isolate the effect of the wall by using the same experimental setup and parameters for both flows with the addition of the wall and half the buoyancy flux used in the wall plume case. Of particular interest is the effect the large scale eddies, forming at the edge of the plume and engulfing ambient fluid, have on the entrainment process. By using velocity statistics in a coordinate system based on the instantaneous scalar edge of the plume, a technique we have recently used to analyse similar effects in an axisymmetric plume, the significance of this large scale engulfment will be quantified.

  10. Dynamics of Agricultural Groundwater Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Zilberman, D.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural shallow groundwater extraction can result in desiccation of neighbouring nature reserves and degradation of groundwater quality in the Netherlands, whereas both externalities are often not considered when agricultural groundwater extraction patterns are being determined. A model is

  11. Transport and Degradation of Phenol in Groundwater at Four Ashes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Drift deposits and Triassic Sandstone of the Bromsgrove and Wildmoor Formations, 700m thick, form the main aquifers at Four Ashes. The coal tar and products from early plant and tank storage facilities constructed over unprotected ground directly and indirectly caused significant groundwater pollution. The organic pollutants include phenol, cresol, and xylenol. The maximum phenol concentration in the groundwater reached 12000mg/L, with an average of 1300mg/L, which accounts for 40%-60% of the total organic contaminants. Three computer codes, Visual Modflow, MT3D, and BioRedox, which solute transport model to groundwater flow were used to simulate and predict the distribution, transport, and degradation of phenol in the polluted groundwater. Over about 46 years, the phenol moved from the pollutant source to the plume front and it will take 220 years to reach the main pumping wells. The BioRebox model was used to simulate the aerobic, sulfidogenic, nitrate-reducing, ferrogenic, manganogenic, and methanogenic zones. The residual mass in the groundwater will decrease from 1600 t to 400 t by the year 2080, with 80% of total phenol eventually lost with maximum concentration declining from 15000mg/L to 2000mg/L.

  12. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers in groundwater in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stempvoort, Dale R.; Roy, James W.; Brown, Susan J.; Bickerton, Greg

    2011-04-01

    SummaryThere is little information available on the prevalence of artificial sweeteners in groundwater, though these compounds may prove to be useful tracers of human wastewater, especially in urban settings with complex hydrology. In this study, the artificial sweetener acesulfame was detected in groundwater at all eight urban sites investigated (from five different urban areas in Canada), often at high concentrations (i.e., μg/L-scale). In a municipal wastewater plume at Jasper, Alberta, acesulfame was strongly correlated with chloride and was positively correlated with other wastewater-related contaminants indicating that this sweetener has potential to be a good tracer of young wastewater (artificial sweeteners were detected in urban groundwater: saccharin at six of the sites, sucralose at three sites, and cyclamate at five of seven sites where it was analyzed. The occurrence of sucralose may have been affected by its detection limit, which was much higher than for the other sweeteners. These results, and those of a parallel study, are the first reported detections of saccharin and cyclamate in groundwater, and suggest that these sweeteners may be more common than previously anticipated. In general, fewer samples from each site contained these other three sweeteners compared to acesulfame. At Barrie, Ontario, adjacent to an old landfill, the concentration of saccharin was higher than acesulfame in many samples. These results suggest that analyses of multiple sweeteners, rather than just acesulfame, may provide useful information on contaminant sources and groundwater conditions in urban settings. Further work is needed to address this potential use.

  13. Groundwater Monitoring at the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2007-04-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive summary of the distribution and trends of volatile organic compound concentrations near USDOE’s Horn Rapids Landfill (HRL). This report focuses mainly on the TCE plume monitored in the top of the unconfined aquifer near the HRL, but also addresses potential breakdown products of TCE. TCE concentrations in deep portions of the unconfined aquifer and the underlying confined aquifer are discussed to show the vertical extent of contamination. This report incorporates TCE data from offsite wells at the AREVA facility south of the Hanford Site. Discussion of TCE in groundwater in the 300 Area is included to differentiate between contaminant plumes and their sources in the 300 Area and near the HRL. Chromium monitoring results from a specific well downgradient of the 1171 Building is also included.

  14. Geophysical technique and groundwater monitoring to detect leachate contamination in the surrounding area of a landfill--Londrina (PR--Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Deize Dias; Silva, Sandra M C P; Fernandes, Fernandes; Teixeira, Raquel S; Celligoi, André; Dall'Antônia, Luiz Henrique

    2012-12-30

    The aim of the present study was to define leachate plume by using two techniques: geophysical and groundwater sampling in order to evaluate groundwater contamination. After performing a topographic survey and using geophysics, the leachate plume was identified. With this data, the wells for groundwater monitoring were located. Groundwater samples were analyzed for: COD, BOD, pH, alkalinity, conductivity, TKN and heavy metals. Through the electroresistivity method it was possible to define the shape of plume contamination. This method was important to locate the groundwater monitoring wells. The results of the physicochemical parameters showed the suitability of the geophysical study. The highest values of electric conductivity and alkalinity correspond to the wells located in the area interpreted as contaminated by leachate in the map of the resistivity. Even with seasonal variations, BOD values are low if compared to Brazilian environmental regulations, but COD values are higher up to 40 times the values of BOD. The concentrations of Ni, Zn, Cd and Cu in the groundwater are below the limits established by the potable water quality standards in Brazil, except for Pb whose concentration in groundwater were higher if compared to Brazilian legislation.

  15. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells

  16. Application of vector autoregressive model for rainfall and groundwater level analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keng, Chai Yoke; Shan, Fam Pei; Shimizu, Kunio; Imoto, Tomoaki; Lateh, Habibah; Peng, Koay Swee

    2017-08-01

    Groundwater is a crucial water supply for industrial, agricultural and residential use, hence it is important to understand groundwater system. Groundwater is a dynamic natural resource and can be recharged. The amount of recharge depends on the rate and duration of rainfall, as rainfall comprises an important component of the water cycle and is the prime source of groundwater recharge. This study applies Vector Autoregressive (VAR) model in the analysis of rainfall and groundwater level. The study area that is focused in the study is along the East-West Highway, Gerik-Jeli, Malaysia. The VAR model with optimum lag length 8, VAR(8) is selected to model the rainfall and groundwater level in the study area. Result of Granger causality test shows significant influence of rainfall to groundwater level. Impulse Response Function reveals that changes in rainfall significantly affect changes in groundwater level after some time lags. Moreover, Variance Decomposition reported that rainfall contributed to the forecast of the groundwater level. The VAR(8) model is validated by comparing the actual value with the in-sample forecasted value and the result is satisfied with all forecasted groundwater level values lies inside the confidence interval which indicate that the model is reliable. Furthermore, the closeness of both actual and forecasted groundwater level time series plots implies the high degree of accurateness of the estimated model.

  17. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  18. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  19. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  20. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for July through December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Dennison, D.I.; Bryce, R.W.; Mitchell, P.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Hinman, N.W.; Jacobson, E.A.; Freshley, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between July and December 1987 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water, geochemical evaluations of unconfined ground-water data, and calibration of ground-water flow and transport models. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Central Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. The MINTEQ geochemical code was used to identify chemical reactions that may be affecting the concentrations of dissolved hazardous chemicals in the unconfined ground water. Results indicate that many cations are present mainly as dissolved carbonate complexes and that a majority of the ground-water samples are in near equilibrium with carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite, dolomite, otavite).

  1. Plume meander and dispersion in a stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.; Nappo, Carmen J.

    2010-11-01

    Continuous lidar measurements of elevated plume dispersion and corresponding micrometeorology data are analyzed to establish the relationship between plume behavior and nocturnal boundary layer dynamics. Contrasting nights of data from the JORNADA field campaign in the New Mexico desert are analyzed. The aerosol lidar measurements were used to separate the plume diffusion (plume spread) from plume meander (displacement). Mutiresolution decomposition was used to separate the turbulence scale (90 s). Durations of turbulent kinetic energy stationarity and the wind steadiness were used to characterize the local scale and submesoscale turbulence. Plume meander, driven by submesoscale wind motions, was responsible for most of the total horizontal plume dispersion in weak and variable winds and strong stability. This proportion was reduced in high winds (i.e., >4 m s-1), weakly stable conditions but remained the dominant dispersion mechanism. The remainder of the plume dispersion in all cases was accounted for by internal spread of the plume, which is a small eddy diffusion process driven by turbulence. Turbulence stationarity and the wind steadiness are demonstrated to be closely related to plume diffusion and plume meander, respectively.

  2. Human health and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The high quality of most groundwaters, consequent upon the self-purification capacity of subsurface strata, has long been a key factor in human health and wellbeing. More than 50% of the world’s population now rely on groundwater for their supply of drinking water – and in most circumstances a prope...

  3. Groundwater and Distribution Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, John E.

    Presented is a student manual designed for the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Groundwater and Distribution Training Course. This program introduces waterworks operators-in-training to basic skills and knowledge required for the operation of a groundwater distribution waterworks facility. Arranged according to the general order…

  4. 2D-Cell Experiment on Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether Transport in Saturated Zone of Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an additive of gasoline, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has a higher solubility in water, which is about 20 times as high as that of benzene. This characteristic results in MTBE dissolving out of the gasoline into the soil and groundwater. Due to relative unique physicochemical behavior of MTBE it would be an ideal candidate for use in environmental forensic investigations. In order to study the transport and distribution of MTBE in saturated zone of ground water, a two-dimensional experimental cell was setup to simulate the real environment of the groundwater flow.The effects of soil and groundwater flow velocity on the MTBE transport were investigated. The results show that the mobile distance of MTBE in vertical direction was smaller than that in horizontal direction paralleling with the groundwater flow. Because the main dynamics of groundwater flow direction was convection and dispersion, the movement of MTBE is also diffusion in the vertical direction. In addition, the transport of MTBE was more quick in high permeability porous media, and the increase of groundwater flow velocity can accelerate the MTBE plume development, but the irregularity and randomness of the plume are enhanced synchronously. These research results can give some helps for the investigation of MTBE movement in the groundwater, also can make some references for other petroleum contamination behavior.

  5. Environmental restoration: Integrating hydraulic control of groundwater, innovative contaminant removal technologies and wetlands restoration--A case study at SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C.M.; Serkiz, S.M.; Adams, J.; Welty, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater remediation program at the F and H Seepage Basins, Savannah River Sits (SRS) is a case study of the integration of various environmental restoration technologies at a single waste site. Hydraulic control measures are being designed to mitigate the discharge of groundwater plumes to surface water. One of the primary constituents of the plumes is tritium. An extraction and reinjection scenario is being designed to keep the tritium in circulation in the shallow groundwater, until it can naturally decay. This will be accomplished by extracting groundwater downgradient of the waste sites, treatment, and reinjection of the tritiated water into the water table upgradient of the basins. Innovative in-situ technologies, including electrolytic migration, are being field tested at the site to augment the pump-treat-reinject system. The in-situ technologies target removal of contaminants which are relatively immobile, yet represent long term risks to human health and the environment. Wetland restoration is an integral part of the F and H remediation program. Both in-situ treatment of the groundwater discharging the wetlands to adjust the pH, and replacement of water loss due to the groundwater extraction program ar being considered. Toxicity studies indicate that drought and the effects of low pH groundwater discharge have been factors in observed tree mortality in wetlands near the waste sites.

  6. Ensemble models on palaeoclimate to predict India's groundwater challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi Datta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In many parts of the world, freshwater crisis is largely due to increasing water consumption and pollution by rapidly growing population and aspirations for economic development, but, ascribed usually to the climate. However, limited understanding and knowledge gaps in the factors controlling climate and uncertainties in the climate models are unable to assess the probable impacts on water availability in tropical regions. In this context, review of ensemble models on δ18O and δD in rainfall and groundwater, 3H- and 14C- ages of groundwater and 14C- age of lakes sediments helped to reconstruct palaeoclimate and long-term recharge in the North-west India; and predict future groundwater challenge. The annual mean temperature trend indicates both warming/cooling in different parts of India in the past and during 1901–2010. Neither the GCMs (Global Climate Models nor the observational record indicates any significant change/increase in temperature and rainfall over the last century, and climate change during the last 1200 yrs BP. In much of the North-West region, deep groundwater renewal occurred from past humid climate, and shallow groundwater renewal from limited modern recharge over the past decades. To make water management to be more responsive to climate change, the gaps in the science of climate change need to be bridged.

  7. Speciation of iodine isotopes inside and outside of a contaminant plume at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwehr, Kathleen A. [Laboratory for Oceanographic and Environmental Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, OCSB 3029, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Otosaka, Shigeyoshi [Laboratory for Oceanographic and Environmental Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, OCSB 3029, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Research Group for Environmental Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Mura, Ibaraki 319 1195 (Japan); Merchel, Silke [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang [Laboratory for Oceanographic and Environmental Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, OCSB 3029, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Yeager, Chris M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Santschi, Peter H. [Laboratory for Oceanographic and Environmental Research, Department of Marine Sciences, Texas A and M University, OCSB 3029, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A primary obstacle in understanding the fate and transport of the toxic radionuclide {sup 129}I (a thyroid seeker) is an accurate method to distinguish it from the stable isotope, {sup 127}I, and to quantify the various species at environmentally relevant concentrations (∼ 10{sup −8} M). A pH-dependent solvent extraction and combustion method was paired with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure ambient levels of {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I isotope ratios and iodine speciation (iodide (I{sup −}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup −}), and organo-I (OI)) in aquatic systems. The method exhibited an overall uncertainty of 10% or less for I{sup −} and IO{sub 3}{sup −}, and less than 30% for OI species concentrations and enabled {sup 129}I measurements as low as 0.001 Bq/L (1 Bq/L = 10{sup −13} M). The method was used to analyze groundwater from the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, USA, along a pH, redox potential (Eh), and organic carbon gradient (8–60 μM DOC). The data confirmed that the {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios and species distribution were strongly pH dependent and varied in a systematic manner from the strongly acidic source. While {sup 129}I speciation in plume samples containing total I concentrations > 1.7 Bq/L was similar whether measured by AMS or GC–MS ([I{sup −}] ≫ [IO{sub 3}{sup −}] = [OI]), AMS enabled {sup 129}I speciation measurements at much lower concentrations than what was possible with GC–MS. AMS analyses demonstrated that groundwater samples minimally impacted by the plume were still orders of magnitude higher than ambient {sup 129}I concentrations typically found elsewhere in the USA groundwaters and rivers. This is likely due to past atmospheric releases of volatile {sup 129}I species by SRS nuclear reprocessing facilities near the study site. Furthermore, the results confirmed the existence of {sup 129}I not only as I{sup −}, but also as OI and IO{sub 3}{sup −} species. - Highlights: • Total {sup 129}I in a

  8. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Bradbury, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (travel times in aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile in groundwater. Virus “snaphots” result from infection and disappearance in a population over time; therefore, the virus snapshot shed in the fecal wastes of an infected population at a specific point in time can serve as a marker for tracking virus and groundwater movement. The virus tracing approach and an example application are described to illustrate their ability to characterize travel times in high-groundwater velocity settings, and provide insight unavailable from standard hydrogeologic approaches. Although characterization of preferential flowpaths does not usually characterize the majority of other travel times occurring in the groundwater system (e.g., center of plume mass; tail of the breakthrough curve), virus approaches can trace very short times of transport, and thus can fill an important gap in our current hydrogeology toolbox.

  9. Computational modelling of contaminants flow in groundwater in the Bom Jardim cemetery, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leonardy Sousa Lopes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of groundwater by degradation of buried corpses in cemeteries appears as a common reality in Brazil and worldwide. In the Fortaleza (CE, the Bom Jardim cemetery is a typical example of a contamination threat. The risk is mainly due to the fact that often the population utilizes the groundwater for different purposes. In this investigation, we analyzed the possibility of the Bom Jardim cemetery to contribute to microbiological contamination in the local aquifer. The software PMWIN PRO® was utilized to simulate the groundwater flow and to evaluate the transport of pathogenic microorganisms presented in a pollution plume. The numerical simulation of groundwater was achieved in steady state and was admitted the advective transport of pathogenic microorganisms. The results showed a slight possibility of microbiological contamination to exceed the boundaries of the cemetery.

  10. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J; Borchardt, Mark A; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile in groundwater. Virus "snaphots" result from infection and disappearance in a population over time; therefore, the virus snapshot shed in the fecal wastes of an infected population at a specific point in time can serve as a marker for tracking virus and groundwater movement. The virus tracing approach and an example application are described to illustrate their ability to characterize travel times in high-groundwater velocity settings, and provide insight unavailable from standard hydrogeologic approaches. Although characterization of preferential flowpaths does not usually characterize the majority of other travel times occurring in the groundwater system (e.g., center of plume mass; tail of the breakthrough curve), virus approaches can trace very short times of transport, and thus can fill an important gap in our current hydrogeology toolbox.

  11. Supplemental Technical Data Summary M-Area Groundwater Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marine, I.W., Bledsoe, H.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This supplement to the Preliminary Technical Data Summary (TDS) (Gordon, 1982) presents the state of knowledge on the hydrogeology and contaminant plume characteristics in the vicinity of M Area as of October 1984. As discussed in the previous TDS, the contaminants consist of organic solvents used for metal degreasing, namely trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Since the issuance of the previous TDS, the groundwater consulting firm of Geraghty & Miller, Inc. has been retained to assist with program strategy, planning, and investigative techniques

  12. Flows in Sunspot Plumes Detected with SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Brynildsen, N; Brekke, P; Fredvik, T; Haugan, S V H; Kjeldseth-Moe, O; Wikstøl, O

    1998-01-01

    Bright EUV sunspot plumes have been observed in eight out of eleven different sunspot regions with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer -- CDS on SOHO. From wavelength shifts we derive the line-of-sight velocity, relative to the average velocity in the rastered area, 120 arcsec x 120 arcsec. In sunspot plumes we find that the motion is directed away from the observer and increases with increasing line formation temperature, reaches a maximum between 15 and 41 km~s$^{-1}$ close to log T $\\approx$ 5.5, then decreases abruptly. The flow field in the corona is not well correlated with the flow in the transition region and we discuss briefly the implication of this finding.

  13. Plume RF interference calculations for space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, F. P.; Rajasekhar, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    During a static ground test of a full-scale SRM, measurements of attenuation of the UHF 416.5 MHz Range Safety Signal, the VHF voice link (230 MHz), and of S-band (c. 2.2. GHz) communications links were undertaken. Analyses of these results indicate that measurable attenuation did occur at all test frequencies. The measured attenuation levels are compared with a simple model in which the received signal is identified as that diffracted about the edge of the highly absorbing plume and the signal level in the shadow zone is evaluated using the formula for diffraction at a straight edge. The comparison is satisfactory at VHF and UHF frequencies, and slightly less so at S-band. Reasons for the discrepancies found at higher frequencies are discussed. A revised procedure which appears to relieve the accuracy problem was developed. This procedure is discussed along with applications to high altitude SRM plume attenuation.

  14. Numerical Modelling of Jets and Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1993-01-01

    An overview on numerical models for prediction of the flow and mixing processes in turbulent jets and plumes is given. The overview is structured to follow an increasing complexity in the physical and numerical principles. The various types of models are briefly mentioned, from the one-dimensiona......An overview on numerical models for prediction of the flow and mixing processes in turbulent jets and plumes is given. The overview is structured to follow an increasing complexity in the physical and numerical principles. The various types of models are briefly mentioned, from the one......-dimensional integral method to the general 3-dimensional solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Also the predictive capabilities of the models are discussed. The presentation takes the perspective of civil engineering and covers issues like sewage outfalls and cooling water discharges to the sea....

  15. Electric Propulsion Plume Simulations Using Parallel Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A parallel, three-dimensional electrostatic PIC code is developed for large-scale electric propulsion simulations using parallel supercomputers. This code uses a newly developed immersed-finite-element particle-in-cell (IFE-PIC algorithm designed to handle complex boundary conditions accurately while maintaining the computational speed of the standard PIC code. Domain decomposition is used in both field solve and particle push to divide the computation among processors. Two simulations studies are presented to demonstrate the capability of the code. The first is a full particle simulation of near-thruster plume using real ion to electron mass ratio. The second is a high-resolution simulation of multiple ion thruster plume interactions for a realistic spacecraft using a domain enclosing the entire solar array panel. Performance benchmarks show that the IFE-PIC achieves a high parallel efficiency of ≥ 90%

  16. Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report in response to a petition the agency received in March 2000. The petition requested that EPA assess and where necessary control discharges from cruise ships. Comments received during public hearings, in 2000, resulted in the EPA agreeing to conduct a survey to assess the discharge plumes resulting from cruise ships, operating in ocean waters off the Florida coast and to compare the results to the Alaska dispersion models. This survey report describes the daily activities of August 2001 Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey, and provides a synopsis of the observations from the survey. It also provides data that can be used to assess dispersion of cruise ship wastewater discharges, while in transit. A description of the survey methods is provided in Section 2. Survey results are presented in Section 3. Findings and conclusions are discussed in Section 4.

  17. Changes in Groundwater Flow and Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations at the Fischer and Porter Superfund Site, Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    units into generalized units representing upward fining sedimentary cycles capped by a siltstone bed. These cycles were labeled units 1 through 8 and are called stratigraphic units in this report. Groundwater in the unweathered zone mainly moves through a network of interconnecting secondary openings--bedding-plane fractures and joints. Groundwater generally is unconfined in the shallower part of the aquifer and confined or semiconfined in the deeper part of the aquifer. The migration of VOCs from the Fischer and Porter Site source area is influenced by geologic and hydrologic controls. The hydrologic controls have changed with time. Stratigraphic units 2 and 3 crop out beneath the former Fischer and Porter plant. VOCs originating at the plant source area entered these stratigraphic units and moved downdip to the northwest. When the wells at and in the vicinity of the site were initially sampled in 1979-80, three public-supply wells (BK-366, BK-367, MG-946) and three industrial-supply wells (BK-368, BK-370, and BK-371) were pumping. Groundwater contaminated with VOCs flowed downdip and then northeast along strike toward well BK-366, downdip toward well BK-368, and downdip and then west along strike toward well MG-946. The long axis of the TCE plume is oriented about N. 18? W. in the direction of dip. In 1979-80, the leading edge of the plume was about 3,500 feet wide. With the cessation of pumping of the supply wells in 2004, the size of the plume has decreased. In 2007-09, the plume was approximately 2,000 feet long and 2,000 feet wide at the leading edge. On the western side of the site, TCE and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) appear to be moving downdip though stratigraphic unit 3. The downdip extent of TCE and PCE migration extended approximately 550 feet off-site to the northwest and 750 feet off-site to the north. TCE concentrations in water samples from wells at the western site boundary increased from 1996 to 2007. On the northern side of the site, TCE and P

  18. Trends in groundwater quality in relation to groundwater age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a valuable natural resource and as such should be protected from chemical pollution. Because of the long travel times of pollutants through groundwater bodies, early detection of groundwater quality deterioration is necessary to efficiently protect groundwater bodies. The aim of this

  19. Trends in groundwater quality in relation to groundwater age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a valuable natural resource and as such should be protected from chemical pollution. Because of the long travel times of pollutants through groundwater bodies, early detection of groundwater quality deterioration is necessary to efficiently protect groundwater bodies. The aim of this

  20. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  1. Groundwater and climate change in Africa : review of recharge studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsor, H. C.; MacDonald, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The review of recharge studies was conducted as part of a one year DFID-funded research programme, aimed at improving understanding of the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources and local livelihoods – see http://www.bgs.ac.uk/GWResilience/. The review is one of a series of components within the project. The overall outputs of the project are: Two hydrogeological case studies in West and East Africa – which assess the storage and availability of groundwater in different aquifers a...

  2. Plume Comparisons between Segmented Channel Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemack, Michael; Staack, David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2001-10-01

    Angular ion flux plume measurements were taken in several configurations of segmented channel Hall thrusters. The configurations differed by the placement of relatively short rings made from materials with different conductive and secondary electron emission properties along the boron nitride ceramic channel of the thrusters (these have been shown to affect the plume [1]). The ion fluxes are compared with ion trajectory simulations based on plasma potential data acquired with a high speed emissive probe [2]. Preliminary results indicate that in addition to the physical properties of the segments, the plume angle can be strongly affected by the placement of segmented rings relative to the external and internal walls of the channel. [1] Y. Raitses, L. Dorf, A. Litvak and N. J. Fisch, Journal of Applied Physics 88, 1263, 2000 [2] D. Staack, Y. Raitses, N. J. Fisch, Parametric Investigations of Langmuir Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster, DPP01 Poster Presentation This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-ACO2-76-CHO3073.

  3. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  4. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also

  5. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone: U TRANSPORT IN A GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER TRANSITION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Murray, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hammond, Glenn [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New Mexico USA

    2016-03-01

    A tightly spaced well-field within a groundwater uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a three year period for groundwater elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from mountain snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trends for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal well-to well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common temporal behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Concentration hot spots were observed in groundwater that varied in location with increasing water table elevation. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized U was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While uranium time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year to year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of the river water intrusion event.

  6. Tvashtar's Plume during the New Horizons Flyby of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafton, Laurence M.; Hoey, William Andrew; Ackley, Peter; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.

    2016-10-01

    During the gravity-assist flyby of the Jovian system from 26 Feb 2007 to 3 Mar 2007, the New Horizons spacecraft obtained multiple images of Io's Pele-class plume "Tvashtar" using the panchromatic LORRI camera, including a unique "movie" sequence of 5 images taken 2 minutes apart that provide the only record of dynamical activity for an extra-terrestrial volcanic plume. Prominent plume activity included a single traveling wave traveling down the west side of the canopy and a semi-regular particulate pattern that evolved down the canopy. The spout was detected in an average of the 5 movie images and its intensity may constrain the refractory complement of the plume. Comparison with the observed plume irradiance may then constrain the condensate complement. Other features, more apparent after subtracting the mean movie image, include semi-periodic azimuthal density variation in the canopy at plausibly common flight times from the vent, implying an azimuthal component to the dust density distribution at the vent. There are features that show a few large tendrils distributed in azimuth around the canopy that extend all the way to the surface, like the canopy projection, while the rest of the canopy appears to have a large discontinuity in density at the rim, as if the canopy were suspended. Successive waves having contrasting mean wavefront density suggest a fundamental-mode temporal pulsing at the vent. The scattering phase function for the plume particulates was found to be strongly forward scattering, increasing nearly monotonically during the flyby by an order of magnitude over the solar phase angle range 57 - 150 deg. Rathbun et al. (2014; Icarus 231, 261) reported that neither the Girru nor Tvashtar surface eruptions varied dramatically over 1-2 Mar 2007; however, most of the growth we found in Tvashtar's brightness during the flyby occurred by these dates. Therefore, increasing eruption activity, rising refractory dust density, or condensation may have

  7. Evidence for Little Shallow Entrainment in Starting Mantle Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, F. C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Hort, M.

    2005-12-01

    Basalts from intraplate or hotspot ocean islands show distinct geochemical signatures. Their diversity in composition is generally believed to result from the upwelling plume entraining shallow mantle material during ascent, while potentially also entraining other deep regions of the mantle. Here we present results from analogue laboratory experiments and numerical modelling that there is evidence for little shallow entrainment into ascending mantle plumes, i.e. most of the plume signature is inherited from the source. We conducted laboratory experiments using glucose syrup contaminated with glass beads to visualize fluid flow and origin. The plume is initiated by heating from below or by injecting hot, uncontaminated syrup. Particle movement is captured by a CCD camera. In our numerical experiments we solve the Stokes equations for a viscous fluid at infinite Prandtl number with passive tracer particles being used to track fluid flow and entrainment rates, simulating laboratory as well as mantle conditions. In both analogue experiments and numerical models we observe the classical plume structure being embedded in a `sheath' of material from the plume source region that retains little of the original temperature anomaly of the plume source. Yet, this sheath ascends in the `slipstream' of the plume at speeds close to the ascent speed of the plume head, and effectively prevents the entrainment of surrounding material into the plume head or plume tail. We find that the source region is most effectively sampled by an ascending plume and that compositional variations in the source region are preserved during plume ascent. The plume center and plume sheath combined are composed of up to 85% source material. However, there is also evidence of significant entrainment of up to 30% of surrounding material into the outer layers of the plume sheath. Entrainment rates are found to be influenced by mantle composition and structure, with the radial viscosity profile of the

  8. Key Factors for Determining Risk of Groundwater Impacts Due to Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Susan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Keating, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mansoor, Kayyum [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Zhenue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trainor-Guitton, Whitney [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, Diana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow underwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models,l referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could result from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which "no impact" to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur.

  9. Global depletion of groundwater resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Beek, L.P.H. van; van Kempen, C.M.; Reckman, J.W.T.M.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems groundwater is often used as an additional water source. If groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge for extensive areas and long times, overexploitation or persistent groundwater depletion occurs. Here we provid

  10. Assessing anthropogenic pressures on groundwater using stable OH isotopes: perspectives and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Philippe; Ollivier, Patrick; Flehoc, Christine; Hube, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Large developments of isotope hydrogeology were done and well-established techniques mainly applying stable isotopes of the water molecule (hydrogen and oxygen) are now used largely to trace water provenance but also recharge processes. New methods allow the use of non-traditional isotopes (metals, compound specific stable isotope analysis CSIA...) to trace anthropogenic pressures in surface- and groundwater. Groundwater contamination in large industrial sites may come from several origins such as leakage from tanks during the production process of chemical products, liquid storage tanks, solid end product or past accumulated product in soil which is released over the time. The understanding of the origin and the further evolution of the chemical contamination in groundwater in an industrial site issued from past or current industrial activities is essential for the industrial companies regarding their environmental policies. The objective of this study was to use with an innovative way the stable isotopes of the water molecule as a low cost tool to trace pollutant plumes in groundwater and help to a better management of contaminated industrial sites. We present data on stable isotopes O and H in an European region where electrochemistry plants occur. For confidentiality purposes, the sites remain anonymous. Present day industrial activities have a direct impact on the groundwater over the site and migration of the contaminant(s) plume out of the site is supposed. We first characterize the natural groundwater background through the O-H characterization of surface water, lakes, thermal waters and regional shallow aquifers. High and low altitude recharge can be demonstrated in the area. Secondly, we used the stable isotope of the water molecule to trace over the site the impact of the Cl-rich liquor manufacturing process. Large deuterium enrichment was evidenced in the groundwater and the high values can be related to a direct contamination of the groundwater through

  11. Occurrence and Distribution of Pharmaceutical Organic Compounds in the Groundwater Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, John V.; Rügge, Kirsten; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    1995-01-01

    Usually landfill leachates contain specific organic compounds as BTEXs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and chlorobenzenes originating from household chemicals and waste from small businesses (I). However, where industrial waste has been landfilled......, the leachate may contain many other organic compounds (2). Another paper of ours (3) described the distribution of commonly found organic compounds in the leachate plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill and discussed the fate of the organic compounds in view of the redox environments determined...... in the plume (4). In this paper, we describe the occurrence and distribution of organic compounds originating from waste from the pharmaceutical industry in the groundwater downgradient of the same landfill. According to our knowledge, this is the first report on pharmaceutical compounds in a leachate plume....

  12. Lunar maria - result of mantle plume activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E.

    It is generally accepted that lunar maria are the result of catastrophic impact events. However, comparative studying of the Earth's and the Moon's tectonomagmatic evolution could evidence about another way of these specific structures origin. Such studies showed that the both planetary bodies evolved on the close scenario: their geological development began after solidification of global magmatic oceans which led to appearance of their primordial crusts: granitic on the Earth and anorthositic - on the Moon. The further evolution of the both bodies occurred in two stages. For their first stages, lasted ˜2.5 mlrd. years on the Earth and ˜1.5 mlrd. years on the Moon, were typical melts, generated in depleted mantle (Bogatikov et al., 2000). However, at the boundary 2.2-2.0 Ga ago on the Earth and 3.9-3.8 Ga on the Moon another type of magmas appeared: geochemical enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts, characteristic for the terrestrial Phanerozoic plume-related situations, and basaltic mare magmatism with high-Ti varieties on the Moon. It suggests that evolution of the Earth's magmatism was linked with ascending of mantle plumes (superplumes) of two generation: (1) generated in the mantle, depleted during solidification of magmatic ocean and Archean magmatic activity, and (2) generated at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The latter were enriched in the mantle fluid components (Fe, Ti, alkalies, etc); this lighter material could ascend to shallower depths, leading to change of tectonic processes, in particular, to appearance of plate tectonics as the major type of tectonomagmatic activity till now (Bogatikov et al., 2000). By analogy to the Earth, magmatism of the Moon was also linked with ascending of mantle plumes: (1) generated in the depleted mantle (magnesian suite) and (2) generated at the lunar CMB with liquid at that time metallic core (mare basalt and picrites with high-Ti varieties). Like on the Earth, these plumes were lighter than the older plumes, and

  13. Groundwater data network interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodaric, Boyan; Booth, Nathaniel; Boisvert, Eric; Lucido, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Water data networks are increasingly being integrated to answer complex scientific questions that often span large geographical areas and cross political borders. Data heterogeneity is a major obstacle that impedes interoperability within and between such networks. It is resolved here for groundwater data at five levels of interoperability, within a Spatial Data Infrastructure architecture. The result is a pair of distinct national groundwater data networks for the United States and Canada, and a combined data network in which they are interoperable. This combined data network enables, for the first time, transparent public access to harmonized groundwater data from both sides of the shared international border.

  14. Groundwater contamination in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tase, Norio [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1992-07-01

    Problems on groundwater contamination in Japan are briefly summarized in this paper. Although normal physical conditions in Japan restrict the possibilities of groundwater contamination, human activities are threatening groundwater resources. A survey by the Environment Agency of Japan showed nationwide spreading of organic substances, such as trichloroethylene as well as nitrogen compounds. Synthetic detergents have also been detected even in rural areas and in deep confined aquifers, although their concentrations are not as high. Public awareness of agrichemical or pesticides abuse, especially from golf courses, is apparent. Other problems such as nitrate-nitrogen, leachate from landfills, and the leaking of underground storage tanks are also discussed. 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Groundwater contamination in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tase, Norio

    1992-07-01

    Problems on groundwater contamination in Japan are briefly summarized in this paper. Although normal physical conditions in Japan restrict the possibilities of groundwater contamination, human activities are threatening groundwater resources. A survey by the Environment Agency of Japan showed nationwide spreading of organic substances, such as trichloroethylene as well as nitrogen compounds. Synthetic detergents have also been detected even in rural areas and in deep confined aquifers, although their concentrations are not as high. Public awareness of agrichemical or pesticides abuse, especially from golf courses, is apparent. Other problems such as nitrate-nitrogen, leachate from landfills, and the leaking of underground storage tanks are also discussed.

  16. STRATIGRAPHIC CONTROL ON CCL4 AND CHCL3 CONCENTRATIONS IN THE 200 WEST AREA, HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winsor, K.; Last, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive subsurface contaminant plume of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is the focus of a remedial effort in the 200 West Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in eastern Washington. Remediation requires a high-resolution understanding of the region’s spatially variable lithofacies and of the effect these lithofacies have on CCl4 migration through the unconfi ned aquifer. To increase the level of detail of our current understanding, a transect was chosen along the primary groundwater fl ow path in the most heavily contaminated area. Borehole logs of wells along this 3.7 km-long transect were standardized and used to create a cross section displaying the depth and continuity of lithofacies. Natural and spectral gamma geophysical logs were examined to pinpoint the depths of geologic units. Depth discrete concentrations of CCl4 and its reductive dechlorination product, chloroform (CHCl3), were overlain on this cross section. Comparison of stratigraphy to contaminant levels shows that peaks in CCl4 concentration occur in thin, fine-grained layers and that other fine-grained layers frequently form lower boundaries to regions of high concentration. Peaks in CCl4 concentrations are frequently located at different depths from those of CHCl3, suggesting that these concentrations are affected by dechlorination of CCl4. Transformation of CCl4 to CHCl3 appears to be more prevalent within reduced, iron-containing sediments. The infl uence of thin, fine-grained layers within the larger aquifer unit indicates that characterization of contamination in this locality should consider subsurface geology with at least as much resolution as provided in this study.

  17. On the observability of the fortnightly cycle of the Tagus estuary turbid plume using MODIS ocean colour images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, André S.; da Silva, José C. B.

    2009-01-01

    Using three years (2003 to 2005) of MODIS-Aqua normalized water-leaving radiance at 551 nm this paper shows a fortnightly cycle in the Tagus estuary turbid plume. The Tagus estuary is one of the largest estuaries of the west coast of Europe and is located in the most populated area of Portugal, including the capital Lisbon. The turbid plume has been detected by the backscattering characteristics of the surface waters in the vicinity of the estuary mouth. In fortnightly scales, the turbid plume has smaller dimensions during and after neap tides and higher dimensions during and after spring tides. This is most probably associated with the fortnightly spring-neap tidal cycle and the consequent increase in turbidity inside the estuary during spring tides. During the summer weak spring tides (tidal amplitude approximately 2.5 m) no turbid plume is observed for an entire fortnightly cycle. Outside the summer months, precipitation, river discharge and winds, were found to increase the turbid area, but the fortnightly cycle appears to be superimposed on the large time-scale variability, and present throughout the year.

  18. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Puberty Train Your Temper What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es el Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West ...

  19. Chloroethene dechlorination in acidic groundwater: Implications for combining fenton's treatment with natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Singletary , Michael A.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    A sulfuric acid leak in 1988 at a chloroethene-contaminated groundwater site at the Naval Air Station Pensacola has resulted in a long-term record of the behavior of chloroethene contaminants at low pH and a unique opportunity to assess the potential impact of source area treatment technologies, which involve acidification of the groundwater environment (e.g., Fenton's-based in situ chemical oxidation), on downgradient natural attenuation processes. The greater than 75 percent decrease in trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations and the shift in contaminant composition toward predominantly reduced daughter products (dichloroethene [DCE] and vinyl chloride [VC]) that were observed along a 30-m groundwater flow path characterized by highly acidic conditions (pH = 3.5 ± 0.4) demonstrated that chloroethene reductive dechlorination can continue to be efficient under persistent acidic conditions. The detection of Dehalococcoides-type bacteria within the sulfuric acid/chloroethene co-contaminant plume was consistent with biotic chloroethene reductive dechlorination. Microcosm studies conducted with 14C-TCE and 14C-VC confirmed biotic reductive dechlorination in sediment collected from within the sulfuric acid/chloroethene co-contaminant plume. Microcosms prepared with sediment from two other locations within the acid plume, however, demonstrated only a limited mineralization to 14CO2 and 14CO, which was attributed to abiotic degradation because no significant differences were observed between experimental and autoclaved control treatments. These results indicated that biotic and abiotic mechanisms contributed to chloroethene attenuation in the acid plume at NAS Pensacola and that remediation techniques involving acidification of the groundwater environment (e.g., Fenton's-based source area treatment) do not necessarily preclude efficient chloroethene degradation.

  20. Laboratory models of three-dimensional mantle flow: Implications on Northwest U.S. volcanism for plume and non-plume sources (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, K. A.; Kincaid, C. R.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from laboratory modeling addressing the question of whether a plume is required for reconciling the existing data sets of the Cascade subduction system in the Northwest U.S. Three-dimensional analog models are used to map the spatial and temporal patterns of subduction-induced upwelling associated with decompression melting. A series of experiments with varied combinations of down-dip, rollback and steepening plate motions, as well as extension in the overriding plate, were run with particle tracking techniques to focus on vertical velocities (e.g. favorable to decompression melting) in the mantle wedge. An overriding plate with varied depth is also incorporated to the model in order to more accurately approximate the lithosphere structure of the Northwest U.S. Glucose syrup, with a temperature dependent viscosity, and a phenolic plate were used to model the upper mantle and subducting plate, respectively. Hydraulic pistons control longitudinal, translational and steepening motions of the slab as a simplified kinematic approach to mimic dynamic experiments. Results show that the strongest vertical velocities occur in response to the onset of trench retreat and extension of the overriding plate, independent of the lithospheric “bottom topography”, with the largest occurring when there is an asymmetric style of extension. Spatial and temporal melt patterns mapped from these upwelling events, in addition to experiments with a buoyant plume source, are compared with the Northwest U.S. volcanism over the last 20 Ma. Preliminary results show non-plume melt patterns initially follow a trench parallel (north/south) orientation, which is progressively distorted trench-normal (east/west) with continued rollback subduction.

  1. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  2. Experimental study of oil plume stability: Parametric dependences and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoshuai; Shen, Tiantian; Bao, Mutai

    2016-10-15

    Oil plume is known to interact with density layer in spilled oil. Previous studies mainly focused on tracking oil plumes and predicting their impact on marine environment. Here, simulated experiments are presented that investigated the conditions inducing the formation of oil plume, focusing especially on the effects of oil/water volume ratio, oil/dispersant volume rate, ambient stratification and optimal conditions of oil plume on determining whether a plume will trap or escape. Scenario simulations showed that OWR influences the residence time most, dispersants dosage comes second and salinity least. The optimum residence time starts from 2387s, occurred at approximately condition (OWR, 0.1, DOR, 25.53% and salinity, 32.38). No change in the relative distribution under the more scale tank was observed, indicating these provide the time evolution of the oil plumes.

  3. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  4. Changes between early development (1930–60) and recent (2005–15) groundwater-level altitudes and dissolved-solids and nitrate concentrations In and near Gaines, Terry, and Yoakum Counties, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan V.; Teeple, Andrew; Payne, Jason; Ikard, Scott

    2016-06-21

    Llano Estacado Underground Water Conservation District, Sandy Land Underground Water Conservation District, and South Plains Underground Water Conservation District manage groundwater resources in a part of west Texas near the Texas-New Mexico State line. Declining groundwater levels have raised concerns about the amount of available groundwater in the study area and the potential for water-quality changes resulting from dewatering and increased vertical groundwater movement between adjacent water-bearing units.

  5. Canada's groundwater resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivera, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater is essential for life in arid and semiarid region. It is also important in humid regions, and is one of the fundamental requirements for the maintenance of natural landscapes and aquatic ecosystem...

  6. Groundwater Capture Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Source water protection areas are delineated for each groundwater-based public water supply system using available geologic and hydrogeologic information to...

  7. Life Cycle of Mantle Plumes: A perspective from the Galapagos Plume (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Hotspots are localized sources of heat and magmatism considered as modern-day evidence of mantle plumes. Some hotspots are related to massive magmatic production that generated Large Igneous Provinces (LIPS), an initial-peak phase of plume activity with a mantle source hotter and more magmatically productive than present-day hotspots. Geological mapping and geochronological studies have shown much lower eruption rates for OIB compared to lavas from Large Igneous Provinces LIPS such as oceanic plateaus and continental flood provinces. Our study is the first quantitative petrological comparison of mantle source temperatures and extent of melting for OIB and LIP sources. The wide range of primary magma compositions and inferred mantle potential temperatures for each LIP and OIB occurrence suggest that this rocks originated form a hotspot, a spatially localized source of heat and magmatism restricted in time. Extensive outcrops of basalt, picrite, and sometimes komatiite with circa 65-95 Ma ages occupy portions of the pacific shore of Central and South America included in the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). There is general consensus of a Pacific-origin of CLIP and most studies suggest that it was produced by melting in the Galapagos mantle plume. The Galapagos connection is consistent with isotopic and geochemical similarities with lavas from the present-day Galapagos hotspot. A Galapagos link for rocks in South American oceanic complexes (eg. the island of Gorgona) is more controversial and requires future work. The MgO and FeO contents of lavas from the Galapagos related lavas and their primary magmas have decreased since the Cretaceous. From petrological modeling we infer that these changes reflect a cooling of the Galapagos mantle plume from a potential temperature of 1560-1620 C in the Cretaceous to 1500 C at the present time. These temperatures are higher than 1350 C for ambient mantle associated with oceanic ridges, and provide support for the mantle

  8. Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

  9. Plume tectonics and cratons formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Stern, R. J.; Baes, M.; Fischer, R.; Sizova, E.; Sobolev, S. V.; Whattam, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geodynamics and continental growth are critically driven by subduction and plate tectonics, however how this tectonic regime started and what geodynamic regime was before remains controversial. Most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and/or pre-existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are themselves the consequence of plate tectonics. Here, we focus on plume-lithosphere interactions and spontaneous plume-induced subduction initiation, which does not require pre-existing lithospheric fabric and is viable for both stagnant lid and mobile/deformable lid conditions. We present results of 2D and 3D numerical modeling of plume-induced deformation and associated crustal growth resulting from tectono-magmatic interaction of ascending mantle plumes with oceanic-type lithosphere. We demonstrate that weakening of the lithosphere by plume-induced magmatism is the key factor allowing for its internal deformation and differentiation resulting in continental crust growth. We also show that plume-lithosphere interaction can enable subduction and rudimentary plate tectonics initiation at the margins of a crustal plateau growing above the plume head. We argue that frequent plume-arc interactions recorded in Archean crust could reflect either short-term plume-induced subduction or plume-induced episodic lithospheric drips. We furthermore suggest a distinct plume-tectonics regime operated on Earth before plate tectonics, which was associated with widespread tectono-magmatic heat and mass exchange between the crust and the mantle. This regime was characterized by weak deformable plates with low topography, massive juvenile crust production from mantle derived melts, mantle-flows-driven crustal deformation, magma-assisted crustal convection and widespread development of lithospheric delamination and crustal drips. Plume tectonics also resulted in growth of hot depleted chemically buoyant subcrustal proto-cratonic mantle layer. Later

  10. Groundwater Quality in the Wassa West District of the Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. K. Kortatsi

    Arsenic and barium exceeded the WHO guideline limit in less .... water to attack geological materials and leach toxic trace metals into the water ..... from other sources, for example, from toothpaste to prevent high incidence dental caries. On the.

  11. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  12. Marine bird aggregations associated with the tidally-driven plume and plume fronts of the Columbia River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamon, Jeannette E.; Phillips, Elizabeth M.; Guy, Troy J.

    2014-09-01

    Freshwater discharge from large rivers into the coastal ocean creates tidally-driven frontal systems known to enhance mixing, primary production, and secondary production. Many authors suggest that tidal plume fronts increase energy flow to fish-eating predators by attracting planktivorous fishes to feed on plankton aggregated by the fronts. However, few studies of plume fronts directly examine piscivorous predator response to plume fronts. Our work examined densities of piscivorous seabirds relative to the plume region and plume fronts of the Columbia River, USA. Common murres (Uria aalge) and sooty shearwaters (Puffinus griseus) composed 83% of all birds detected on mesoscale surveys of the Washington and Oregon coasts (June 2003-2006), and 91.3% of all birds detected on fine scale surveys of the plume region less than 40 km from the river mouth (May 2003 and 2006). Mesoscale comparisons showed consistently more predators in the central plume area compared to the surrounding marine area (murres: 10.1-21.5 vs. 3.4-8.2 birds km-2; shearwaters: 24.2-75.1 vs. 11.8-25.9 birds km-2). Fine scale comparisons showed that murre density in 2003 and shearwater density in both 2003 and 2006 were significantly elevated in the tidal plume region composed of the most recently discharged river water. Murres tended to be more abundant on the north face of the plume. In May 2003, more murres and shearwaters were found within 3 km of the front on any given transect, although maximum bird density was not necessarily found in the same location as the front itself. Predator density on a given transect was not correlated with frontal strength in either year. The high bird densities we observed associated with the tidal plume demonstrate that the turbid Columbia River plume does not necessarily provide fish with refuge from visual predators. Bird predation in the plume region may therefore impact early marine survival of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), which must migrate through the

  13. Fate of arsenic, phosphate and ammonium plumes in a coastal aquifer affected by saltwater intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, N; Mastrocicco, M; Prommer, H; Sbarbati, C; Petitta, M

    2015-08-01

    A severe groundwater contamination with extensive plumes of arsenic, phosphate and ammonium was found in a coastal aquifer beneath a former fertilizer production plant. The implementation of an active groundwater remediation strategy, based on a comprehensive pump and treat scheme, now prevents the migration of the dissolved contaminants into the marine environment. However, due to the site's proximity to the coastline, a seawater wedge was induced by the pumping scheme. Additionally the groundwater flow and salinity patterns were also strongly affected by leakage from the site's sewer system and from a seawater-fed cooling canal. The objective of this study was to elucidate the fate of arsenic and its co-contaminants over the site's history under the complex, coupled hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions that prevail at the site. A detailed geochemical characterisation of samples from sediment cores and hydrochemical data provided valuable high-resolution information. The obtained data were used to develop various conceptual models and to constrain the development and calibration of a reactive transport model. The reactive transport simulations were performed for a sub-domain (two-dimensional transect) of an earlier developed three-dimensional flow and variable density solute transport model. The results suggest that in the upper sub-oxic zone the influx of oxygenated water promoted As attenuation via co-precipitation with Al and Fe oxides and copper hydroxides. In contrast, in the deeper aquifer zone, iron reduction, associated with the release of adsorbed As and the dissolution of As bearing phases, provided and still provides to date a persistent source for groundwater pollution. The presented monitoring and modelling approach could be broadly applied to coastal polluted sites by complex contaminant mixture containing As.

  14. Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

  15. An infrared method for plume rise visualization and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickel, Cindy; Lamb, Brian; Guenther, Alex; Allwine, Eugene

    An infrared video camera and recording system were used to record near source plume rise from a low turbine stack at an oil gathering center at Prudhoe Bay, AK. The system provided real-time, continuous visualization of the plume using a color monitor while the images were recorded with a standard video tape recorder. Following the field study, single frame images were digitized using a micro-computer video system. As part of the digitization, the plume centerline was determined as well as an isotherm of the plume outline. In this application, one frame from each 2-min period in the record was digitized. The results were used to calculate the variability in plume centerline during each hour. During strong winds with blowing snow, the mean plume rise for the hour at 15 m downwind was 6±2 m. The observed plume rise from the turbine stack was greater than that calculated using momentum-only or buoyancy-only plume rise models and only slightly larger than that estimated from combined momentum-buoyancy plume rise models.

  16. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravita......A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes...

  17. Turbulence and Mixing in the Columbia River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcher, L. F.; Nash, J.; Moum, J.

    2004-12-01

    Thin bouyant plumes represent a technical challenge for in-situ observations. In July 2004 a unique set of measurements were taken in which our vertical microstructure profiler, Chameleon, and acoustics (300 kHz ADCP and 120 kHz echosounder) were modified to measure the O(1-5 m) thick plume. The Chameleon profiles included measurements of density, fluorescence, optical backscatter and turbulent energy dissipation. Intense turbulence was observed in plume fronts (with 30 m vertical displacements), at the plume base (with O(1 s-1) shear) and in O(20 m) thick bottom boundary layers. Preliminary results from 10 days of observations will be presented and discussed.

  18. The thermal consequences of river-level variations in an urban groundwater body highly affected by groundwater heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñe, Enric; Schneider, Eduardo Garrido; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo-Lázaro, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    The extensive implementation of ground source heat pumps in urban aquifers is an important issue related to groundwater quality and the future economic feasibility of existent geothermal installations. Although many cities are in the immediate vicinity of large rivers, little is known about the thermal river-groundwater interaction at a kilometric-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the thermal impact of river water recharges induced by flood events into an urban alluvial aquifer anthropogenically influenced by geothermal exploitations. The present thermal state of an urban aquifer at a regional scale, including 27 groundwater heat pump installations, has been evaluated. The thermal impacts of these installations in the aquifer together with the thermal impacts from "cold" winter floods have also been spatially and temporally evaluated to ensure better geothermal management of the aquifer. The results showed a variable direct thermal impact from 0 to 6 °C depending on the groundwater-surface water interaction along the river trajectory. The thermal plumes far away from the riverbed also present minor indirect thermal impacts due to hydraulic gradient variations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Flows in Sunspot Plumes Detected with SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynildsen, N.; Maltby, P.; Brekke, P.; Fredvik, T.; Haugan, S. V. H.; Kjeldseth-Moe, O.; Wikstol, O.

    1998-09-01

    In the Letter, ``Flows in Sunspot Plumes Detected with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory'' by N. Brynildsen, P. Maltby, P. Brekke, T. Fredvik, S. V. H. Haugan, O. Kjeldseth-Moe, and Ø. Wikstøl (ApJ, 502, L85 [1998]), the following correction should be made: In the last line on page L86, which reads ``peak line intensity I>=5 are located (1) above the umbra or, '' an ``Ī'' should be inserted so that the revised line reads ``peak line intensity I>=5Ī are located (1) above the umbra or.''

  20. Observations of nearshore groundwater discharge: Kahekili Beach Park submarine springs, Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Dulai, H.; Kroeger, K.D.; Smith, C.G.; Dimova, N.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Prouty, N.G.; Gingerich, S.B.; Glenn, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Study regionThe study region encompasses the nearshore, coastal waters off west Maui, Hawaii. Here abundant groundwater—that carries with it a strong land-based fingerprint—discharges into the coastal waters and over a coral reef.Study focusCoastal groundwater discharge is a ubiquitous hydrologic feature that has been shown to impact nearshore ecosystems and material budgets. A unique combined geochemical tracer and oceanographic time-series study addressed rates and oceanic forcings of submarine groundwater discharge at a submarine spring site off west Maui, Hawaii.New hydrological insights for the regionEstimates of submarine groundwater discharge were derived for a primary vent site and surrounding coastal waters off west Maui, Hawaii using an excess 222Rn (t1/2 = 3.8 d) mass balance model. Such estimates were complemented with a novel thoron (220Rn,t1/2 = 56 s) groundwater discharge tracer application, as well as oceanographic time series and thermal infrared imagery analyses. In combination, this suite of techniques provides new insight into the connectivity of the coastal aquifer with the near-shore ocean and examines the physical drivers of submarine groundwater discharge. Lastly, submarine groundwater discharge derived constituent concentrations were tabulated and compared to surrounding seawater concentrations. Such work has implications for the management of coastal aquifers and downstream nearshore ecosystems that respond to sustained constituent loadings via this submarine route.

  1. Isotopic Systematics (U, nitrate and Sr) of the F-Area Acidic Contamination Plume at the Savannah River Site: Clues to Contaminant History and Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J. N.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Denham, M.; Wan, J.; Rakshit, S.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Spycher, N.

    2010-12-01

    Seepage basins in the F-Area of the Savannah River Site were used from 1955 to 1989 for the disposal of low-level radioactive acidic (ave. pH ˜2.9) waste solutions from site operations involving irradiated uranium billets and other materials used in the production of radionuclides. These disposal activities resulted in a persistent acidic groundwater plume (pH as low as 3.2) beneath the F-Area including contaminants such as tritium, nitrate, 90Sr, 129I and uranium and that has impinged on surface water (Four Mile Branch) about 600 m from the basins. After cessation of disposal in 1989, the basins were capped in 1991. Since that time, remediation has consisted of a pump-and-treat system that has recently been replaced with in situ treatment using a funnel-and-gate system with injection of alkaline solutions in the gates to neutralize pH. In order to delineate the history of contamination and the current mobility and fate of contaminants in F-Area groundwater, we have undertaken a study of variations in the isotopic compositions of U (234U/238U, 235U/238U, 236U/238U), Sr (87Sr/86Sr) and nitrate (δ15N, δ18O) within the contaminant plume. This data can be used to trace U transport within the plume, evaluate chemical changes of nitrate, and potentially track plume/sediment chemical interaction and trace the migration of 90Sr. We have analyzed a suite of groundwater samples from monitoring wells, as well as pore-water samples extracted from aquifer sediment cores to map out the isotopic variation within the plume. The isotopic compositions of U from well samples and porewater samples are all consistent with the variable burn-up of depleted U. The variation in U isotopic composition requires at least three different endmembers, without any significant influence of background natural U. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate from F-Area plume groundwater are distinct both from natural and unaltered synthetic nitrate, and likely represents fractionation due to waste volume

  2. Review on Trickle Irrigation Application in Groundwater Irrigation Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastowo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The Government of Indonesia has developed groundwater irrigation schemes in some province e.g. East Java, Central Java, Yogyakarta, Wast Java, Bali, West Nusa Tenggara and East Nusa Tenggara. However, not all regions were able to optimally utilize it. The irrigation effeciency of groundwater irrigation scheme was about 59%, while the wells-pumping efficiencies were varied from 28 to 98 %. In thefuture, the irrigation effieciency should be increased to anticipate water deficit during dry season. The application of trickle irrigation in indonesia has not been widely developed. Although trickle system has been used, however, it is still limited for few commercial agribusinesses. Trickle irrigation systems have a prospect to be developed in some regions having limited water resources. For preliminary stage, the systems could be applied in groundwater irrigation schemes that have been developed either by farmers or government.

  3. Evaluating the impact of irrigation on surface water – groundwater interaction and stream temperature in an agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Caldwell, Rodney R.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in groundwater discharge to streams caused by irrigation practices can influence stream temperature. Observations along two currently flood-irrigated reaches in the 640-square-kilometer upper Smith River watershed, an important agricultural and recreational fishing area in west-central Montana, showed a downstream temperature decrease resulting from groundwater discharge to the stream. A watershed-scale coupled surface water and groundwater flow model was used to examine changes in streamflow, groundwater discharge to the stream and stream temperature resulting from irrigation practices. The upper Smith River watershed was used to develop the model framework including watershed climate, topography, hydrography, vegetation, soil properties and current irrigation practices. Model results were used to compare watershed streamflow, groundwater recharge, and groundwater discharge to the stream for three scenarios: natural, pre-irrigation conditions (PreIrr); current irrigation practices involving mainly stream diversion for flood and sprinkler irrigation (IrrCurrent); and a hypothetical scenario with only groundwater supplying sprinkler irrigation (IrrGW). Irrigation increased groundwater recharge relative to natural PreIrr conditions because not all applied water was removed by crop evapotranspiration. Groundwater storage and groundwater discharge to the stream increased relative to natural PreIrr conditions when the source of irrigation water was mainly stream diversion as in the IrrCurrent scenario. The hypothetical IrrGW scenario, in which groundwater withdrawals were the sole source of irrigation water, resulted in widespread lowering of the water table and associated decreases in groundwater storage and groundwater discharge to the stream. A mixing analysis using model predicted groundwater discharge along the reaches suggests that stream diversion and flood irrigation, represented in the IrrCurrent scenario, has led to cooling of stream temperatures

  4. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia – aerosol and chemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24–25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia only six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was indeed found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy and ozone (O3 measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17–34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv and O3 by 2–9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv. Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface due to the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume

  5. Aircraft measurements over Europe of an air pollution plume from Southeast Asia – aerosol and chemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An air pollution plume from Southern and Eastern Asia, including regions in India and China, was predicted by the FLEXPART particle dispersion model to arrive in the upper troposphere over Europe on 24–25 March 2006. According to the model, the plume was exported from Southeast Asia six days earlier, transported into the upper troposphere by a warm conveyor belt, and travelled to Europe in a fast zonal flow. This is confirmed by the retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO from AIRS satellite measurements, which are in excellent agreement with the model results over the entire transport history. The research aircraft DLR Falcon was sent into this plume west of Spain on 24 March and over Southern Europe on 25 March. On both days, the pollution plume was found close to the predicted locations and, thus, the measurements taken allowed the first detailed characterization of the aerosol content and chemical composition of an anthropogenic pollution plume after a nearly hemispheric transport event. The mixing ratios of CO, reactive nitrogen (NOy and ozone (O3 measured in the Asian plume were all clearly elevated over a background that was itself likely elevated by Asian emissions: CO by 17–34 ppbv on average (maximum 60 ppbv and O3 by 2–9 ppbv (maximum 22 ppbv. Positive correlations existed between these species, and a ΔO3/ΔCO slope of 0.25 shows that ozone was formed in this plume, albeit with moderate efficiency. Nucleation mode and Aitken particles were suppressed in the Asian plume, whereas accumulation mode aerosols were strongly elevated and correlated with CO. The suppression of the nucleation mode was likely due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface of the transported larger particles. Super-micron particles, likely desert dust, were found in part of the Asian pollution plume and also in surrounding cleaner air. The aerosol light absorption coefficient was enhanced in the plume (average values for individual plume encounters 0.25–0

  6. Evaluation of the impact of fuel hydrocarbons and oxygenates on groundwater resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tom; Rong, Yue; Harmon, Thomas; Suffet, Mel

    2004-01-01

    The environmental behavior of fuel oxygenates (other than methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE]) is poorly understood because few data have been systematically collected and analyzed. This study evaluated the potential for groundwater resource contamination by fuel hydrocarbons (FHCs) and oxygenates (e.g., tert-butyl alcohol [TBA], tertamyl methyl ether [TAME], diisopropyl ether [DIPE], ethyl tert-butyl ether [ETBE], and MTBE) by examining their occurrence, distribution, and spatial extent in groundwater beneath leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) facilities, focusing on data collected from over 7200 monitoring wells in 868 LUFT sites from the greater Los Angeles, CA, region. Excluding the composite measure total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline (TPHG), TBA has the greatestsite maximum (geometric mean) groundwater concentration among the study analytes; therefore, its presence needs to be confirmed at LUFT sites so that specific cleanup strategies can be developed. The alternative ether oxygenates (DIPE, TAME, and ETBE) are less likely to be detected in groundwater beneath LUFT facilities in the area of California studied and when detected are present at lower dissolved concentrations than MTBE, benzene, or TBA. Groundwater plume length was used as an initial indicator of the threat of contamination to drinking water resources. Approximately 500 LUFT sites were randomly selected and analyzed. The results demonstrate MTBE to pose the greatest problem, followed by TBA and benzene. The alternative ether oxygenates were relatively localized and indicated lesser potential for groundwater resource contamination. However, all indications suggest the alternative ether oxygenates would pose groundwater contamination threats similar to MTBE if their scale of usage is expanded. Plume length data suggest that in the absence of a completely new design and construction of the underground storage tank (UST) system, an effective management strategy may involve placing greater emphasis

  7. Mapping the groundwater vulnerability for pollution at the pan African scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Issoufou; Defourny, Pierre; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2016-02-15

    We estimated vulnerability and pollution risk of groundwater at the pan-African scale. We therefore compiled the most recent continental scale information on soil, land use, geology, hydrogeology and climate in a Geographical Information System (GIS) at a resolution of 15 km × 15 km and at the scale of 1:60,000,000. The groundwater vulnerability map was constructed by means of the DRASTIC method. The map reveals that groundwater is highly vulnerable in Central and West Africa, where the watertable is very low. In addition, very low vulnerability is found in the large sedimentary basins of the African deserts where groundwater is situated in very deep aquifers. The groundwater pollution risk map is obtained by overlaying the DRASTIC vulnerability map with land use. The northern, central and western part of the African continent is dominated by high pollution risk classes and this is very strongly related to shallow groundwater systems and the development of agricultural activities. Subsequently, we performed a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the relative importance of each parameter on groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the removal of the impact of vadose zone, the depth of the groundwater, the hydraulic conductivity and the net recharge causes a large variation in the mapped vulnerability and pollution risk. The mapping model was validated using nitrate concentration data of groundwater as a proxy of pollution risk. Pan-African concentration data were inferred from a meta-analysis of literature data. Results shows a good match between nitrate concentration and the groundwater pollution risk classes. The pan African assessment of groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk is expected to be of particular value for water policy and for designing groundwater resources management programs. We expect, however, that this assessment can be strongly improved when better pan African monitoring data related to groundwater

  8. Limits to global groundwater consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, I.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater is the largest accessible freshwater resource worldwide and is of critical importance for irrigation, and so for global food security. For many regions of the world where groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge, persistent groundwater depletion occurs. A direct consequence of depletion is falling groundwater levels, reducing baseflows to rivers, harming ecosystems. Also, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence can occur. Water demands are expected to increase further due to growing population, economic development and climate change, posing the urgent question how sustainable current water abstractions are worldwide and where and when these abstractions approach conceivable limits with all the associated problems. Here, we estimated past and future trends (1960-2050) in groundwater levels resulting from changes in abstractions and climate and predicted when limits of groundwater consumption are reached. We explored these limits by predicting where and when groundwater levels drop that low that groundwater becomes unattainable for abstractions and how river flows are affected. Water availabilities, abstractions, and lateral groundwater flows are simulated (5 arcmin. resolution) using a coupled version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and a groundwater model based on MODFLOW. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of the worlds confined and unconfined aquifer systems, needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Results show that, next to the existing regions experiencing groundwater depletion (like India, Pakistan, Central Valley) new regions will develop, e.g. Southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Using a limit that reflects present-day feasibility of