WorldWideScience

Sample records for groundwater nitrogen dynamics

  1. Dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange and nitrogen transport in the riparian aquifer of a tidal river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Barnes, R.; Wallace, C.; Knights, D.; Tight, D.; Bayer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Tides in coastal rivers can propagate tens to hundreds of kilometers inland and drive large daily changes in water and nitrogen exchange across the sediment-water interface. We use field observations and numerical models to illuminate hydrodynamic controls on nitrogen export from the riparian aquifer to a fresh, tidal reach of White Clay Creek (Delaware, USA). In the banks, an aerobic zone with high groundwater nitrate concentrations occurs near the fluctuating water table. Continuous depth-resolved measurements of redox potential suggest that this zone is relatively stable over tidal timescales but moves up or down in response to storms. The main source of dissolved oxygen is soil air that is imbibed in the zone of water table fluctuations, and the source of nitrate is likely nitrification of ammonium produced locally from the mineralization of organic matter in floodplain soils. Much of the nitrate is removed by denitrification along oscillating flow paths towards the channel. Within centimeters of the sediment-water interface, denitrification is limited by the mixing of groundwater with oxygen-rich river water. Our models predict that the benthic zones of tidal rivers play an important role in removing new nitrate inputs from discharging groundwater but may be less effective at removing nitrate from river water. Nitrate removal and production rates are expected to vary significantly along tidal rivers as permeability, organic matter content, tidal range vary. It is imperative that we understand nitrogen dynamics along tidal rivers and their role in nitrogen export to the coast.

  2. Dynamics of Agricultural Groundwater Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Zilberman, D.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural shallow groundwater extraction can result in desiccation of neighbouring nature reserves and degradation of groundwater quality in the Netherlands, whereas both externalities are often not considered when agricultural groundwater extraction patterns are being determined. A model is

  3. Study Of Isotopic Technical Application To Estimate Origin Of Nitrogen Composition Of Groundwater In Hanoi Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Van Giap; Dinh Bich Lieu; Dang Anh Minh; Vo Thi Anh; Bui Dac Dung; Nguyen Thi Hong Thinh; Nguyen Manh Hung; Nguyen Van Hoan; Nguyen Van Hai

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater in Hanoi area as well as some other areas in Bac-Bo Delta is being contaminated by heavy metals and nitrogen compounds, especially arsenic and ammonium. The origin of nitrogen compounds in groundwater in Hanoi area is estimated in order to exploit and manage sustainable groundwater served for production and live. (author)

  4. Nitrogen dynamics in land cleared of alien vegetation (Acacia saligna) and impacts on groundwater at Riverlands Nature Reserve (Western Cape, South Africa)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, Nebojsa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Woody invading alien plants, many of which are nitrogen-fixing legumes (Fabaceae family), are currently cleared in South African catchments to reduce water loss and preserve streamflow, and for the restoration of the ecosystem. This study tested...

  5. Stream Nitrogen Inputs Reflect Groundwater Across a Snowmelt-Dominated Montane to Urban Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven J; Weintraub, Samantha R; Eiriksson, David; Brooks, Paul D; Baker, Michelle A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Bowling, David R

    2016-02-02

    Snowmelt dominates the hydrograph of many temperate montane streams, yet little work has characterized how streamwater sources and nitrogen (N) dynamics vary across wildland to urban land use gradients in these watersheds. Across a third-order catchment in Salt Lake City, Utah, we asked where and when groundwater vs shallow surface water inputs controlled stream discharge and N dynamics. Stream water isotopes (δ(2)H and δ(18)O) reflected a consistent snowmelt water source during baseflow. Near-chemostatic relationships between conservative ions and discharge implied that groundwater dominated discharge year-round across the montane and urban sites, challenging the conceptual emphasis on direct stormwater inputs to urban streams. Stream and groundwater NO3(-) concentrations remained consistently low during snowmelt and baseflow in most montane and urban stream reaches, indicating effective subsurface N retention or denitrification and minimal impact of fertilizer or deposition N sources. Rather, NO3(-) concentrations increased 50-fold following urban groundwater inputs, showing that subsurface flow paths potentially impact nutrient loading more than surficial land use. Isotopic composition of H2O and NO3(-) suggested that snowmelt-derived urban groundwater intercepted NO3(-) from leaking sewers. Sewer maintenance could potentially mitigate hotspots of stream N inputs at mountain/valley transitions, which have been largely overlooked in semiarid urban ecosystems.

  6. Nitrogen removal in shallow groundwater below three arable land systems in a high nitrogen loading region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X.; Zhou, W.

    2017-12-01

    The Taihu Lake region (TLR) is one of the most intensive agricultural regions with high nitrogen (N) loading in eastern China. Large inputs of synthetic N fertilizer have led to a series of environmental problems including eutrophication of surface waters, nitrate (NO3-) pollution of groundwater. To fully evaluate the risk of NO3- on groundwater environments, it is necessary to know the natural NO3- removal ability. In this study, denitrification capacity was assessed for two years through measuring the concentration of different N species (NO3-, NH4+, TN, excess N2 and dissolved N2O) in groundwater below three typical agricultural land-use types in the TLR. The results suggested that the conversion of paddy field (PF) to vineyard (VY) and vegetable (VF) significantly increased the groundwater NO3-N concentration, but denitrification consumed 76%, 83% and 65% of the groundwater NO3-N in VY, VF and PF, respectively. Because of the low O2 and high DOC concentrations in groundwater, denitrification activity was high in the study sites, resulting in high excess N2 accumulation in groundwater, and the concentration even exceeded the total active N in the deep layer. The large amounts of excess N2 observed in the VY and VF over all the sample times indicated that considerable N was stored as gaseous N2 in groundwater and should not be ignored in balancing N budgets in aquifers where denitrification is high. Our results also demonstrated that the indirect N2O emission factor (EF5-g) in VY (0.0052)and VF (0.0057)was significantly higher than PF (0.0011)as well as higher than the IPCC default values (0.0025. In view of the increasing trend of paddy fields being converted to uplands combined with the low GWT in the TLR, we thus concluded that the risk of NO3- contamination in groundwater and indirect N2O emission will intensify below arable land.

  7. Groundwater Discharge of Legacy Nitrogen to River Networks: Linking Regional Groundwater Models to Streambed Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange and Nitrogen Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, J. R.; Helton, A. M.; Briggs, M. A.; Starn, J. J.; Hunt, A.

    2017-12-01

    Despite years of management, excess nitrogen (N) is a pervasive problem in many aquatic ecosystems. More than half of surface water in the United States is derived from groundwater, and widespread N contamination in aquifers from decades of watershed N inputs suggest legacy N discharging from groundwater may contribute to contemporary N pollution problems in surface waters. Legacy N loads to streams and rivers are controlled by both regional scale flow paths and fine-scale processes that drive N transformations, such as groundwater-surface water exchange across steep redox gradients that occur at stream bed interfaces. Adequately incorporating these disparate scales is a challenge, but it is essential to understanding legacy N transport and making informed management decisions. We developed a regional groundwater flow model for the Farmington River, a HUC-8 basin that drains to the Long Island Sound, a coastal estuary that suffers from elevated N loads despite decades of management, to understand broad patterns of regional transport. To evaluate and refine the regional model, we used thermal infrared imagery paired with vertical temperature profiling to estimate groundwater discharge at the streambed interface. We also analyzed discharging groundwater for multiple N species to quantify fine scale patterns of N loading and transformation via denitrification at the streambed interface. Integrating regional and local estimates of groundwater discharge of legacy N to river networks should improve our ability to predict spatiotemporal patterns of legacy N loading to and transformation within surface waters.

  8. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  9. Vadose Zone Nitrate Transport Dynamics Resulting from Agricultural Groundwater Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, N. P.; McLaughlin, S.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, California's increased reliance on groundwater resources to meet agricultural and municipal demands has resulted in significant overdraft and water quality issues. Agricultural groundwater banking (AGB) has emerged as a promising groundwater replenishment opportunity in California; AGB is a form of managed aquifer recharge where farmland is flooded during the winter using excess surface water in order to recharge the underlying groundwater. Suitable farmland that is connected to water delivery systems is available for AGB throughout the Central Valley. However, questions remain how AGB could be implemented on fertilized agricultural fields such that nitrate leaching from the root zone is minimized. Here, we present results from field and soil column studies that investigate the transport dynamics of nitrogen in the root and deeper vadose zone during flooding events. We are specifically interested in estimating how timing and duration of flooding events affect percolation rates, leaching and nitrification/denitrification processes in three soil types within the Central Valley. Laboratory and field measurements include nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+, NO2-, N2O), redox potentials, total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, moisture content and EC. Soil cores are collected in the field before and after recharge events up to a depth of 4m, while other sensors monitor field conditions continuously. Preliminary results from the three field sites show that significant portions of the applied floodwater (12-62 cm) infiltrated below the root zone: 96.1% (Delhi), 88.6% (Modesto) and 76.8% (Orland). Analysis of the soil cores indicate that 70% of the residual nitrate was flushed from the sandy soil, while the fine sandy loam showed only a 5% loss and in some cores even an increase in soil nitrate (in the upper 20cm). Column experiments support these trends and indicate that increases in soil nitrate in the upper root zone might be due to organic nitrogen mineralization and

  10. Transport and potential attenuation of nitrogen in shallow groundwaters in the lower Rangitikei catchment, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S.; Singh, R.; Rivas, A.; Palmer, A.; Horne, D.; Manderson, A.; Roygard, J.; Matthews, A.

    2017-11-01

    Intensive agricultural activities are generally associated with nitrogen leaching from agricultural soils, and this nitrogen has the potential to percolate and contaminate groundwater and surface waters. We assessed surface water and groundwater interactions, and nitrogen leaching and its potential attenuation in shallow groundwater in the lower Rangitikei River catchment (832 km2), New Zealand. We combined regional- and local-scale field surveys and experiments, nutrient budget modelling, and hydraulic and geochemical methods, to gain an insight into leaching, transformation and transport of nitrogen via groundwaters to the river in the study area. Concurrent river flow gaugings (in January 2015) and a piezometric map, developed from measured depths to groundwater in 110 bores (in October 2014), suggest groundwater discharges to the Rangitikei River in the upper parts of the study area, while there is groundwater recharge near the coast. The groundwater redox characterisation, based on sampling and analysis of 15 mostly shallow bores ( 5 m bgl), despite being installed under intensive land uses, such as dairying and cropping. Our in-field push-pull tests showed NO3-N reduction at four shallow groundwater piezometers, with the rates of reduction varying from 0.04 mg N L- 1 h-1 to 1.57 mg N L- 1 h-1. This highlights the importance of a sound understanding of not only the sources, but also transport and transformation, or fate, of nutrients leached from farms, to mitigate the likely impacts of land use on water quality and ecosystem health in agricultural catchments.

  11. Knowledge base to develop expert system prototype for predicting groundwater pollution from nitrogen fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta-oun, M.; Daud, M.; Bardaie, M.Z.; Jusop, S.

    1999-01-01

    An expert system for prediction the impact of nitrogen fertilizer on groundwater pollution potential was established by using CLIPS (NASA's Jonson Space Centre). The knowledge base could be extracted from FAO reports, ministry of agriculture and rural development Malaysia report, established literature and domain expert for preparing an expert system skeleton. An expert system was used to correlate the availability of nitrogen fertilizer with the vulnerability of groundwater to pollution in Peninsula Malaysia and to identify potential groundwater quality problems. An n-fertilizer groundwater pollution potential index produced b using the vulnerability of groundwater to pollution yields a more accurate screening toll for identifying potential pollution problems than by considering vulnerability alone. An expert system can predict the groundwater pollution potential under several conditions of agricultural activities and existing environments. (authors)

  12. Factors Controlling Nitrogen Fluxes in Groundwater in Agricultural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Green, C. T.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Predictions of effects of land use changes on water quality require identification of the relative importance of geochemical and hydrologic factors. To understand the factors controlling the transport of nitrogen in groundwater, vertical fluxes of water and solutes were estimated for 13 aquifers in agricultural areas located in California, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin. The aquifers are overlain by unsaturated zones with thicknesses ranging from 2.5 to 100 m. Precipitation ranges from 19 to 132 cm/yr and irrigation ranges from 0 to 120 cm/yr. Main crop types include corn, soybeans, forage, wheat, and cotton. A 1-dimensional mathematical model was developed to estimate vertical N transport in response to N inputs on the land surface from chemical fertilizer, manure and atmospheric deposition. Simulated vertical profiles of O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, Cl- and atmospheric age tracers were matched to observations by adjusting parameters for recharge rate, unsaturated zone travel time, N leaching ratio (defined as leaching fraction of N reaching water table of N input at land surface), Cl- leaching ratio, O2 reduction rate and denitrification rate. Results indicated that vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table were affected by both geochemical and physical factors. High vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table are associated with high N input at the land surface. Values of Cl- leaching ratios were less than 1 (0.42 to 1) likely as a result of runoff and exported harvested crops. N leaching ratios were lower (0.1 to 0.6), consistent with additional N losses such as denitrification and volatilization. The sites with high leaching ratios for both N and Cl tended to be those with high recharge rates and low ET loss, defined as the fraction of applied water lost to ET. Modeled zero-order denitrification rates in the saturated zone varied within an order of magnitude with a maximum rate of 1.6 mg

  13. Transport and potential attenuation of nitrogen in shallow groundwaters in the lower Rangitikei catchment, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S; Singh, R; Rivas, A; Palmer, A; Horne, D; Manderson, A; Roygard, J; Matthews, A

    2017-11-01

    Intensive agricultural activities are generally associated with nitrogen leaching from agricultural soils, and this nitrogen has the potential to percolate and contaminate groundwater and surface waters. We assessed surface water and groundwater interactions, and nitrogen leaching and its potential attenuation in shallow groundwater in the lower Rangitikei River catchment (832km 2 ), New Zealand. We combined regional- and local-scale field surveys and experiments, nutrient budget modelling, and hydraulic and geochemical methods, to gain an insight into leaching, transformation and transport of nitrogen via groundwaters to the river in the study area. Concurrent river flow gaugings (in January 2015) and a piezometric map, developed from measured depths to groundwater in 110 bores (in October 2014), suggest groundwater discharges to the Rangitikei River in the upper parts of the study area, while there is groundwater recharge near the coast. The groundwater redox characterisation, based on sampling and analysis of 15 mostly shallow bores (shallow groundwater piezometers (3-6mbgl) using single-well push-pull tests. We found generally low levels (shallow groundwater piezometers (>5mbgl), despite being installed under intensive land uses, such as dairying and cropping. Our in-field push-pull tests showed NO 3 -N reduction at four shallow groundwater piezometers, with the rates of reduction varying from 0.04mgNL -1 h - 1 to 1.57mgNL -1 h - 1 . This highlights the importance of a sound understanding of not only the sources, but also transport and transformation, or fate, of nutrients leached from farms, to mitigate the likely impacts of land use on water quality and ecosystem health in agricultural catchments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Next Generation Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Vrugt, J. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen is a key regulator of vegetation dynamics, soil carbon release, and terrestrial carbon cycles. Thus, to assess energy impacts on the global carbon cycle and future climates, it is critical that we have a mechanism-based and data-calibrated nitrogen model that simulates nitrogen limitation upon both above and belowground carbon dynamics. In this study, we developed a next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model within the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). This next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model utilized 1) a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation on photosynthesis with nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage; 2) an optimal leaf nitrogen model that links soil nitrogen availability and leaf nitrogen content; and 3) an ecosystem demography (ED) model that simulates the growth and light competition of tree cohorts and is currently coupled to CLM. Our three test cases with changes in CO2 concentration, growing temperature and radiation demonstrate the model's ability to predict the impact of altered environmental conditions on nitrogen allocations. Currently, we are testing the model against different datasets including soil fertilization and Free Air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments across different forest types. We expect that our calibrated model will considerably improve our understanding and predictability of vegetation-climate interactions.itrogen allocation model evaluations. The figure shows the scatter plots of predicted and measured Vc,max and Jmax scaled to 25 oC (i.e.,Vc,max25 and Jmax25) at elevated CO2 (570 ppm, test case one), reduced radiation in canopy (0.1-0.9 of the radiation at the top of canopy, test case two) and reduced growing temperature (15oC, test case three). The model is first calibrated using control data under ambient CO2 (370 ppm), radiation at the top of the canopy (621 μmol photon/m2/s), the normal growing temperature (30oC). The fitted model

  15. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  16. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  17. Nitrogen fate in a subtropical mangrove swamp: Potential association with seawater-groundwater exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kai; Wu, Jiapeng; Li, Hailong; Hong, Yiguo; Wilson, Alicia M; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Shananan, Meghan

    2018-04-18

    Coastal mangrove swamps play an important role in nutrient cycling at the land-ocean boundary. However, little is known about the role of periodic seawater-groundwater exchange in the nitrogen cycling processes. Seawater-groundwater exchange rates and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were investigated along a shore-perpendicular intertidal transect in Daya Bay, China. The intertidal transect comprises three hydrologic subzones (tidal creek, mangrove and bare mudflat zones), each with different physicochemical characteristics. Salinity and hydraulic head measurements taken along the transect were used to estimate the exchange rates between seawater and groundwater over a spring-neap tidal cycle. Results showed that the maximum seawater-groundwater exchange occurred within the tidal creek zone, which facilitated high-oxygen seawater infiltration and subsequent nitrification. In contrast, the lowest exchange rate found in the mangrove zone caused over-loading of organic matter and longer groundwater residence times. This created an anoxic environment conducive to nitrogen loss through the anammox and denitrification processes. Potential oxidation rates of ammonia and nitrite were measured by the rapid and high-throughput method and rates of denitrification and anammox were measured by the modified membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) with isotope pairing, respectively. In the whole transect, denitrification accounted for 90% of the total nitrogen loss, and anammox accounted for the remaining 10%. The average nitrogen removal rate was about 2.07g per day per cubic meter of mangrove sediments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ambient groundwater flow diminishes nitrogen cycling in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, M.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.; Detwiler, R. L.; Boano, F.; Cook, P. L. M.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling and experimental studies demonstrate that ambient groundwater reduces hyporheic exchange, but the implications of this observation for stream N-cycling is not yet clear. We utilized a simple process-based model (the Pumping and Streamline Segregation or PASS model) to evaluate N- cycling over two scales of hyporheic exchange (fluvial ripples and riffle-pool sequences), ten ambient groundwater and stream flow scenarios (five gaining and losing conditions and two stream discharges), and three biogeochemical settings (identified based on a principal component analysis of previously published measurements in streams throughout the United States). Model-data comparisons indicate that our model provides realistic estimates for direct denitrification of stream nitrate, but overpredicts nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification. Riffle-pool sequences are responsible for most of the N-processing, despite the fact that fluvial ripples generate 3-11 times more hyporheic exchange flux. Across all scenarios, hyporheic exchange flux and the Damkohler Number emerge as primary controls on stream N-cycling; the former regulates trafficking of nutrients and oxygen across the sediment-water interface, while the latter quantifies the relative rates of organic carbon mineralization and advective transport in streambed sediments. Vertical groundwater flux modulates both of these master variables in ways that tend to diminish stream N-cycling. Thus, anthropogenic perturbations of ambient groundwater flows (e.g., by urbanization, agricultural activities, groundwater mining, and/or climate change) may compromise some of the key ecosystem services provided by streams.

  19. A fate model for nitrogen dynamics in the Scheldt basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haest, Pieter Jan; van der Kwast, Johannes; Broekx, Steven; Seuntjens, Piet

    2010-05-01

    The European Union (EU) adopted the Water Framework Directive (WFD) in 2000 ensuring that all aquatic ecosystems meet ‘good ecological status' by 2015. However, the large population density in combination with agricultural and industrial activities in some European river basins pose challenges for river basin managers in meeting this status. The EU financed AQUAREHAB project (FP7) specifically examines the ecological and economic impact of innovative rehabilitation technologies for multi-pressured degraded waters. For this purpose, a numerical spatio-temporal model is developed to evaluate innovative technologies versus conventional measures at the river basin scale. The numerical model describes the nitrogen dynamics in the Scheldt river basin. Nitrogen is examined since nitrate is of specific concern in Belgium, the country comprising the largest area of the Scheldt basin. The Scheldt basin encompasses 20000 km2 and houses over 10 million people. The governing factors describing nitrogen fluxes at this large scale differ from the field scale with a larger uncertainty on input data. As such, the environmental modeling language PCRaster was selected since it was found to provide a balance between process descriptions and necessary input data. The resulting GIS-based model simulates the nitrogen dynamics in the Scheldt basin with a yearly time step and a spatial resolution of 1 square kilometer. A smaller time step is being evaluated depending on the description of the hydrology. The model discerns 4 compartments in the Scheldt basin: the soil, shallow groundwater, deep groundwater and the river network. Runoff and water flow occurs along the steepest slope in all model compartments. Diffuse emissions and direct inputs are calculated from administrative and statistical data. These emissions are geographically defined or are distributed over the domain according to land use and connectivity to the sewer system. The reactive mass transport is described using

  20. Why is the Groundwater Level Rising? A Case Study Using HARTT to Simulate Groundwater Level Dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yihdego, Yohannes; Danis, Cara; Paffard, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater from a shallow unconfined aquifer at a site in coastal New South Wales has been causing recent water logging issues. A trend of rising groundwater level has been anecdotally observed over the last 10 years. It was not clear whether the changes in groundwater levels were solely natural variations within the groundwater system or whether human interference was driving the level up. Time series topographic images revealed significant surrounding land use changes and human modification to the environment of the groundwater catchment. A statistical model utilising HARTT (multiple linear regression hydrograph analysis method) simulated the groundwater level dynamics at five key monitoring locations and successfully showed a trend of rising groundwater level. Utilising hydrogeological input from field investigations, the model successfully simulated the rise in the water table over time to the present day levels, whilst taking into consideration rainfall and land changes. The underlying geological/land conditions were found to be just as significant as the impact of climate variation. The correlation coefficient for the monitoring bores (MB), excluding MB4, show that the groundwater level fluctuation can be explained by the climate variable (rainfall) with the lag time between the atypical rainfall and groundwater level ranging from 4 to 7 months. The low R2 value for MB4 indicates that there are factors missing in the model which are primarily related to human interference. The elevated groundwater levels in the affected area are the result of long term cumulative land use changes, instigated by humans, which have directly resulted in detrimental changes to the groundwater aquifer properties.

  1. Nitrogen speciation and trends, and prediction of denitrification extent, in shallow US groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Tesoriero, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainties surrounding nitrogen cycling complicate assessments of the environmental effects of nitrogen use and our understanding of the global carbon–nitrogen cycle. In this paper, we synthesize data from 877 ambient-monitoring wells across the US to frame broad patterns of nitrogen speciation and trends. At these sites, groundwater frequently contains substantial co-occurring NO3− and XSN2 (N2 from denitrification), reflecting active/ongoing denitrification and/or a mixture of undenitrified and denitrified groundwater. NO3− and NH4+ essentially do not co-occur, indicating that the dominant source of NH4+ at these sites likely is not dissimilatory reduction of NO3− to NH4+. Positive correlations of NH4+ with apparent age, CH4, dissolved organic carbon, and indicators of reduced conditions are consistent with NH4+ mobilization from degradation of aquifer organic matter and contraindicate an anthropogenic source of NH4+ for most sites. Glacial aquifers and eastern sand and gravel aquifers generally have lower proportions of NO3− and greater proportions of XSN2 than do fractured rock and karst aquifers and western sand and gravel aquifers. NO3− dominates in the youngest groundwater, but XSN2 increases as residence time increases. Temporal patterns of nitrogen speciation and concentration reflect (1) changing NO3− loads over time, (2) groundwater residence-time controls on NH4+ mobilization from solid phases, and (3) groundwater residence-time controls on denitrification. A simple classification tree using readily available variables (a national coverage of soil water depth, generalized geology) or variables reasonably estimated in many aquifers (residence time) identifies categorical denitrification extent (50%) with 79% accuracy in an independent testing set, demonstrating a predictive application based on the interconnected effects of redox, geology, and residence time.

  2. Nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for the Yucatán littoral: An approach for groundwater management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandacirerol, Nancy; Comín, Francisco; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have altered the balance of ecosystems to the detriment of natural environments. Eutrophication is a serious risk in Yucatán, a state in the eastern peninsula of México where groundwater supplies the only freshwater to a karst shelf environment. While economic development in Yucatán is increasing, environmental awareness is lagging, and efficient waste treatment systems are lacking. To assess potential nitrogen and phosphorus inputs into the coastal zone of Yucatán, we analyzed government reports and the chemical composition of groundwater and aquaculture wastewater. Swine, poultry, and tourism are revealed as the main continental nutrient sources, while groundwater with high nitrate concentrations is the principal coastal nutrient source, a pattern similar to other river discharges around the world. This study demonstrates that environmental risk management practices must be implemented in the Yucatán region to protect groundwater quality.

  3. Source partitioning of anthropogenic groundwater nitrogen in a mixed-use landscape, Tutuila, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Christopher K.; El-Kadi, Aly I.; Dulai, Henrietta; Glenn, Craig R.; Fackrell, Joseph

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a modeling framework for quantifying human impacts and for partitioning the sources of contamination related to water quality in the mixed-use landscape of a small tropical volcanic island. On Tutuila, the main island of American Samoa, production wells in the most populated region (the Tafuna-Leone Plain) produce most of the island's drinking water. However, much of this water has been deemed unsafe to drink since 2009. Tutuila has three predominant anthropogenic non-point-groundwater-pollution sources of concern: on-site disposal systems (OSDS), agricultural chemicals, and pig manure. These sources are broadly distributed throughout the landscape and are located near many drinking-water wells. Water quality analyses show a link between elevated levels of total dissolved groundwater nitrogen (TN) and areas with high non-point-source pollution density, suggesting that TN can be used as a tracer of groundwater contamination from these sources. The modeling framework used in this study integrates land-use information, hydrological data, and water quality analyses with nitrogen loading and transport models. The approach utilizes a numerical groundwater flow model, a nitrogen-loading model, and a multi-species contaminant transport model. Nitrogen from each source is modeled as an independent component in order to trace the impact from individual land-use activities. Model results are calibrated and validated with dissolved groundwater TN concentrations and inorganic δ15N values, respectively. Results indicate that OSDS contribute significantly more TN to Tutuila's aquifers than other sources, and thus should be prioritized in future water-quality management efforts.

  4. Identification of groundwater microorganisms capable of assimilating RDX-derived nitrogen during in-situ bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a nitroamine explosive, is commonly detected in groundwater at military testing and training sites. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial community capable of using nitrogen derived from the RDX or RDX intermediates during in situ bioremediation. Active groundwater microorganisms capable of utilizing nitro-, ring- or fully-labeled "1"5N-RDX as a nitrogen source were identified using stable isotope probing (SIP) in groundwater microcosms prepared from two wells in an aquifer previously amended with cheese whey to promote RDX biodegradation. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were derived from the "1"5N-labeled DNA fractions, suggesting the presence of metabolically active bacteria capable of using RDX and/or RDX intermediates as a nitrogen source. None of the derived sequences matched RDX-degrading cultures commonly studied in the laboratory, but some of these genera have previously been linked to RDX degradation in site groundwater via "1"3C-SIP. When additional cheese whey was added to the groundwater samples, 28 sequences grouped into Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria were identified. The data suggest that numerous bacteria are capable of incorporating N from ring- and nitro-groups in RDX during anaerobic bioremediation, and that some genera may be involved in both C and N incorporation from RDX. - Highlights: • Cheese whey addition resulted in 28 different clones associated with RDX degradation. • The 28 clones belong to Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. • SIP identified 15 clones using RDX and/or its metabolites as a nitrogen source. • The clones clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes

  5. Identification of groundwater microorganisms capable of assimilating RDX-derived nitrogen during in-situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kun-Ching [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States); Fuller, Mark E.; Hatzinger, Paul B. [CB& I Federal Services, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States); Chu, Kung-Hui, E-mail: kchu@civil.tamu.edu [Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a nitroamine explosive, is commonly detected in groundwater at military testing and training sites. The objective of this study was to characterize the microbial community capable of using nitrogen derived from the RDX or RDX intermediates during in situ bioremediation. Active groundwater microorganisms capable of utilizing nitro-, ring- or fully-labeled {sup 15}N-RDX as a nitrogen source were identified using stable isotope probing (SIP) in groundwater microcosms prepared from two wells in an aquifer previously amended with cheese whey to promote RDX biodegradation. A total of fifteen 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were derived from the {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fractions, suggesting the presence of metabolically active bacteria capable of using RDX and/or RDX intermediates as a nitrogen source. None of the derived sequences matched RDX-degrading cultures commonly studied in the laboratory, but some of these genera have previously been linked to RDX degradation in site groundwater via {sup 13}C-SIP. When additional cheese whey was added to the groundwater samples, 28 sequences grouped into Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria were identified. The data suggest that numerous bacteria are capable of incorporating N from ring- and nitro-groups in RDX during anaerobic bioremediation, and that some genera may be involved in both C and N incorporation from RDX. - Highlights: • Cheese whey addition resulted in 28 different clones associated with RDX degradation. • The 28 clones belong to Bacteroidia, Bacilli, and α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. • SIP identified 15 clones using RDX and/or its metabolites as a nitrogen source. • The clones clustered in Clostridia, β-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes.

  6. Toward a Mechanistic Modeling of Nitrogen Limitation on Vegetation Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nate G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO(2) concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we deve...

  7. Towards a method to characterize temporary groundwater dynamics during droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorfer, Benedikt; Stahl, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the development, propagation and termination of drought events, a major challenge is to grasp the role of groundwater systems. Research on how groundwater responds to meteorological drought events (i.e. short-term climate anomalies) is still limited. Part of the problem is that there is as yet no generic method to characterize the response of different groundwater systems to extreme climate anomalies. In order to explore possibilities for such a methodology, we evaluate two statistical approaches to characterize groundwater dynamics on short time scales by applying them on observed groundwater head data from different pre- and peri-mountainous groundwater systems in humid central Europe (Germany). The first method is based on the coefficient of variation in moving windows of various lengths, the second method is based on streamflow recession characteristics applied on groundwater data. With these methods, the gauges behavior during low head events and its response to precipitation was explored. Findings regarding the behavior of the gauges make it possible to distinguish between gauges with a dominance of cyclic patterns, and gauges with a dominance of patterns on seasonal or event scale (commonly referred to as slow/fast responding gauges, respectively). While some clues on what factors that might control these patterns are present, the specific controls are general unclear for the gauges in this study. However as the key conclusion stands the question if the variety of manifestations of groundwater dynamics, as they occur in real systems, is subsumable with one unique method. Further studies on the topic are in progress.

  8. Inexact Socio-Dynamic Modeling of Groundwater Contamination Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination may alter the behaviors of the public such as adaptation to such a contamination event. On the other hand, social behaviors may affect groundwater contamination and associated risk levels such as through changing ingestion amount of groundwater due to the contamination. Decisions should consider not only the contamination itself, but also social attitudes on such contamination events. Such decisions are inherently associated with uncertainty, such as subjective judgement from decision makers and their implicit knowledge on selection of whether to supply water or reduce the amount of supplied water under the scenario of the contamination. A socio-dynamic model based on the theories of information-gap and fuzzy sets is being developed to address the social behaviors facing the groundwater contamination and applied to a synthetic problem designed based on typical groundwater remediation sites where the effects of social behaviors on decisions are investigated and analyzed. Different uncertainties including deep uncertainty and vague/ambiguous uncertainty are effectively and integrally addressed. The results can provide scientifically-defensible decision supports for groundwater management in face of the contamination.

  9. Temporal-Spatial Evolution of Groundwater Nitrogen Pollution Over Seven Years in a Highly Urbanized City in the Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaorui; Qian, Jiazhong; Liu, Zufa; Lu, Yuehan; Ma, Lei; Zhao, Weidong; Kang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the temporospatial variation in nitrogen pollution in groundwater and the associated controlling factors is important to establish management practices that ensure sustainable use of groundwater. In this study, we analyzed inorganic nitrogen content (nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium) in 1164 groundwater samples from shallow, middle-deep, and deep aquifers in Zhanjiang, a highly urbanized city in the southern China. Our data span a range of 7 years from 2005 to 2011. Results show that shallow aquifers had been heavily contaminated by nitrate and ammonium. Temporal patterns show that N contamination levels remained high and relatively stable over time in urban areas. This stability and high concentration is hypothesized as a result of uncontrolled, illicit sewer discharges from nearby business facilities. Groundwater in urban land and farmland displays systematic differences in geochemical characteristics. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the importance of continuously monitoring groundwater quality and strictly regulating sewage discharges in Zhanjiang.

  10. Determination of nitrogen reduction levels necessary to reach groundwater quality targets in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelov, Miso; Kunkel, Ralf; Uhan, Jože; Wendland, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Within a collaborative project between Slovenian Environment Agency (ARSO) and Research Center Jülich (FZJ), nitrogen reduction levels necessary to reach groundwater quality targets in Slovenia were assessed. For this purpose the hydrological model GROWA-DENUZ was coupled with agricultural N balances and applied consistently to the whole territory of Slovenia in a spatial resolution of 100×100m. GROWA was used to determine the water balance in Slovenia for the hydrologic period 1971-2000. Simultaneously, the displaceable N load in soil was assessed from agricultural Slovenian N surpluses for 2011 and the atmospheric N deposition. Subsequently, the DENUZ model was used to assess the nitrate degradation in soil and, in combination with the percolation water rates from the GROWA model, to determine nitrate concentration in the leachate. The areas showing predicted nitrate concentrations in the leachate above the EU groundwater quality standard of 50mg NO3(-)/L have been identified as priority areas for implementing nitrogen reduction measures. For these "hot spot" areas DENUZ was used in a backward mode to quantify the maximal permissible nitrogen surplus levels in agriculture to guarantee a nitrate concentration in percolation water below 50mg NO3(-)/L. Model results indicate that additional N reduction measures should be implemented in priority areas rather than area-covering. Research work will directly support the implementation of the European Union Water Framework Directive in Slovenia, e.g., by using the maximal permissible nitrogen surplus levels as a framework for the derivation of regionally adapted and hence effective nitrogen reduction measures. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The fate of ammonium-nitrogen in leachate contaminated groundwater system

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Atta; W, Yaacob W. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogeochemical conditions influences strongly on ammonium attenuation and ultimately its long-term fate in the subsurface. The purpose of this work was to identify the conditions influencing the persistence of ammonium-nitrogen in the contaminated groundwater system of Taman Beringin ex-landfill site in Malaysia. This study applies hydrogeochemical data extractions techniques of redox sensitive groundwater species from previously installed monitoring wells between February to August 2014. Electrochemical measurements of Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) were collected successively with several other physicochemical parameters including pH, Temperature, and DO in the landfill site. The result show that the mean concentration of NH4-N, NO2-N, and NO3-N are: (47.98±81.83 mg/L), (0.17±0.22 mg/L) and (6.11± 8.74 mg/L) respectively. The mean range of redox potentials (-10.25±128.28 mV) delineated areas of strongly reducing conditions. Based on the evaluation of the data, NH4-N, NO2-N and NO3-N accounts for 89.98%, 0.28% and 9.7% respectively of the groundwater concentration of total nitrogen, while a miniature proportion of oxidisable nitrogen concentrations (10.02%) are attributed t o biological process of nitrification. Relationship exist between data set NH4-N and ORP (r = -0.65009). It was concluded that although biological attenuation processes are effectively decreasing the ammonia concentrations in some of the wells, the processes are inhibited by chemical conditions that were attributed to Fe reducing conditions as observed in some of the wells. NH4-N will remain persistent and at elevated levels as much as the conditions persist and contributes in determining the fate of NH4-N in the Taman Beringin ground water system.

  12. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonggang Xu

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO(2 concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO(2 concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V(c,max (maximum carboxylation rate and J(max (maximum electron transport rate. A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO(2 concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the

  13. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wilson, Cathy J; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nate G

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO(2) concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO(2) concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V(c,max) (maximum carboxylation rate) and J(max) (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO(2) concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation

  14. Toward a Mechanistic Modeling of Nitrogen Limitation on Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nate G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO2 concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO2 concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of Vc,max (maximum carboxylation rate) and Jmax (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO2 concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks

  15. Sources and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in the shallow groundwater of agricultural areas (Poyang Lake basin, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Evgeniya; Guseva, Natalia; Sun, Zhanxue; Bychinsky, Valeriy; Boeckx, Pascal; Gao, Bai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen contamination of natural water is a typical problem for various territories throughout the world. One of the regions exposed to nitrogen pollution is located in the Poyang Lake basin. As a result of agricultural activity and dense population, the shallow groundwater of this area is characterised by a high concentration of nitrogen compounds, primarily NO 3 - , with the concentration varying from 0.1mg/L to 206mg/L. Locally, high ammonium content occurs in the shallow groundwater with low reduction potential Eh (shallow groundwater of the Poyang Lake basin has Eh>100mV. To identify sources of nitrogen species and the factors that determine their behaviour, the dual stable isotope approach (δ 15 N and δ 18 О) and physical-chemical modelling were applied. Actual data were collected by sampling shallow groundwater from domestic water supply wells around the lake. The δ 18 О values from -4.1‰ to 13.9‰ with an average value of 5.3 permille indicate a significant influence of nitrification on nitrogen balance. The enrichment of nitrate with the 15 N isotope indicates that manure and domestic sewage are the principal sources of nitrogen compounds. Inorganic nitrogen speciation and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the high stability of nitrate in the studied groundwater. Computer simulation and field observations indicate the reducing conditions formed under joint effects of anthropogenic factors and appropriate natural conditions, such as the low-level topography in which decreased water exchange rate can occur. The simulation also demonstrates the growth in pH of the groundwater as a consequence of fertilisation, which, in turn, conduced to the clay mineral formation at lower concentrations of aqueous clay-forming components than the ones under the natural conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, Jennifer J.; Drake, Meghan M.; Carroll, Susan L.; Yang, Zamin K.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brown, Stephen D.; Podar, Mircea; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historically impacted by U and Cr from the nuclear weapons industry. In an attempt to stimulate microbial remediation of these metals, in-situ lactate enrichment experiments are ongoing. In order to bridge the gap from the laboratory to the field, we inoculated triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors with groundwater collected from well Hanford 100-H in order to obtain a stable, enriched community while selecting for metal-reducing bacteria. Each reactor was fed from a single carboy containing defined media with 30 mM lactate at a rate of 0.223 ml/min under continuous nitrogen flow at 9 ml/min. Cell counts, organic acids, gDNA (for qPCR and pyrosequencing) and gases were sampled during the experiment. Cell counts remained low (less than 1x107 cells/ml) during the first two weeks of the experiment, but by day 20, had reached a density greater than 1x108 cells/ml. Metabolite analysis showed a decrease in the lactate concentrations over time. Pyruvate concentrations ranged from 20-40 uM the first week of the experiment then was undetectable after day 10. Likewise, formate appeared in the reactors during the first week with concentrations of 1.48-1.65 mM at day 7 then the concentrations decreased to 0.69-0.95 on day 10 and were undetectable on day 15. Acetate was present in low amounts on day 3 (0.15-0.33 mM) and steadily increased to 3.35-5.22 mM over time. Similarly, carbon dioxide was present in low concentrations early on and increased to 0.28-0.35 mM as the experiment progressed. We also were able to detect low amounts of methane (10-20 uM) during the first week of the experiment, but by day 10 the methane was undetectable. From these results and pyrosequencing analysis, we conclude that a shift in the microbial community dynamics occurred over time to eventually form a stable and enriched microbial community. Comprehensive investigations such as these allow for the examination of not only which

  17. Chronic nitrogen deposition influences the chemical dynamics ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition induces a forest carbon sink across broad parts of the Northern Hemisphere; this carbon sink may partly result from slower litter decomposition. Although microbial responses to experimental nitrogen deposition have been well-studied, evidence linking these microbial responses to changes in the degradation of specific compounds in decaying litter is sparse. We used wet chemistry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) methodologies to study the effects of chronic simulated nitrogen deposition on leaf litter and fine root chemistry during a three-year decomposition experiment at four northern hardwood forests in the north-central USA. Leaf litter and fine roots were highly different in initial chemistry such as concentrations of acid-insoluble fraction (AIF, or Klason lignin) and condensed tannins (CTs). These initial differences persisted over the course of decomposition. Results from gravimetrically-defined AIF and lignin/carbohydrate reference IR peak ratios both provide evidence that lignin in fine roots was selectively preserved under simulated nitrogen deposition. Lignin/carbohydrate peak ratios were strongly correlated with AIF, suggesting that AIF is a good predictor of lignin. Because AIF is abundant in fine roots, slower AIF degradation was the major driver of the slower fine root decomposition under nitrogen enrichment, explaining 73.9 % of the additional root mass retention. Nitrogen enrichment also slowed the

  18. Sources and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in the shallow groundwater of agricultural areas (Poyang Lake basin, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Evgeniya; Guseva, Natalia; Sun, Zhanxue; Bychinsky, Valeriy; Boeckx, Pascal; Gao, Bai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen contamination of natural water is a typical problem for various territories throughout the world. One of the regions exposed to nitrogen pollution is located in the Poyang Lake basin. As a result of agricultural activity and dense population, the shallow groundwater of this area is characterised by a high concentration of nitrogen compounds, primarily NO3-, with the concentration varying from 0.1 mg/L to 206 mg/L. Locally, high ammonium content occurs in the shallow groundwater with low reduction potential Eh ( 100 mV. To identify sources of nitrogen species and the factors that determine their behaviour, the dual stable isotope approach (δ15N and δ18О) and physical-chemical modelling were applied. Actual data were collected by sampling shallow groundwater from domestic water supply wells around the lake. The δ18О values from - 4.1‰ to 13.9‰ with an average value of 5.3 permille indicate a significant influence of nitrification on nitrogen balance. The enrichment of nitrate with the 15N isotope indicates that manure and domestic sewage are the principal sources of nitrogen compounds. Inorganic nitrogen speciation and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the high stability of nitrate in the studied groundwater. Computer simulation and field observations indicate the reducing conditions formed under joint effects of anthropogenic factors and appropriate natural conditions, such as the low-level topography in which decreased water exchange rate can occur. The simulation also demonstrates the growth in pH of the groundwater as a consequence of fertilisation, which, in turn, conduced to the clay mineral formation at lower concentrations of aqueous clay-forming components than the ones under the natural conditions.

  19. Connecting carbon and nitrogen storage in rural wetland soil to groundwater abstraction for urban water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David Bruce; Feit, Sharon J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether groundwater abstraction for urban water supply diminishes the storage of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and organic matter in the soil of rural wetlands. Wetland soil organic matter (SOM) benefits air and water quality by sequestering large masses of C and N. Yet, the accumulation of wetland SOM depends on soil inundation, so we hypothesized that groundwater abstraction would diminish stocks of SOM, C, and N in wetland soils. Predictions of this hypothesis were tested in two types of subtropical, depressional-basin wetland: forested swamps and herbaceous-vegetation marshes. In west-central Florida, >650 ML groundwater day(-1) are abstracted for use primarily in the Tampa Bay metropolis. At higher abstraction volumes, water tables were lower and wetlands had shorter hydroperiods (less time inundated). In turn, wetlands with shorter hydroperiods had 50-60% less SOM, C, and N per kg soil. In swamps, SOM loss caused soil bulk density to double, so areal soil C and N storage per m(2) through 30.5 cm depth was diminished by 25-30% in short-hydroperiod swamps. In herbaceous-vegetation marshes, short hydroperiods caused a sharper decline in N than in C. Soil organic matter, C, and N pools were not correlated with soil texture or with wetland draining-reflooding frequency. Many years of shortened hydroperiod were probably required to diminish soil organic matter, C, and N pools by the magnitudes we observed. This diminution might have occurred decades ago, but could be maintained contemporarily by the failure each year of chronically drained soils to retain new organic matter inputs. In sum, our study attributes the contraction of hydroperiod and loss of soil organic matter, C, and N from rural wetlands to groundwater abstraction performed largely for urban water supply, revealing teleconnections between rural ecosystem change and urban resource demand. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nitrogen dynamics in northern peatland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen pollution has become a global issue over the last century due to increased fertilizer use and burning of fossil fuels. Excess N has been responsible for algal blooms, hypoxic zones, climate change, and human health issues. Extent of peatlands in the Great Lakes basin is ...

  1. Mapping groundwater dynamics using multiple sources of exhaustive high resolution data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finke, P.A.; Brus, D.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Hoogland, T.; Knotters, M.; Vries, de F.

    2004-01-01

    Existing groundwater table (GWT) class maps, available at full coverage for the Netherlands at 1:50,000 scale, no longer satisfy user demands. Groundwater levels have changed due to strong human impact, so the maps are partially outdated. Furthermore, a more dynamic description of groundwater table

  2. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  3. Temporal-spatial variations and influencing factors of nitrogen in the shallow groundwater of the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anqiang; Lei, Baokun; Hu, Wanli; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhai, Limei; Mao, Yanting; Fu, Bin; Zhang, Dan

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen export from the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake seriously threatens the water quality of Erhai Lake, which is the second largest highland freshwater lake in Yunnan Province, China. Among the nitrogen flows into Erhai Lake, shallow groundwater migration is a major pathway. The nitrogen variation and influencing factors in the shallow groundwater of the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake are not well documented. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to determine the concentrations of nitrogen species in the shallow groundwater and their influencing factors in the nearshore vegetable field of Erhai Lake. The results showed that concentrations of TN, NO 3 - -N, and NO 2 - -N gradually increased with increasing elevation and distance from Erhai Lake, but the opposite was observed for NH 4 + -N in the shallow groundwater. The concentrations of nitrogen species in the rainy season were greater than those in the dry season. NO 3 - -N accounted for more than 79% of total nitrogen in shallow groundwater. Redundancy analysis showed that more than 70% of the temporal and spatial variations of nitrogen concentrations in the shallow groundwater were explained by shallow groundwater depth, and only approximately 10% of variation was explained by the factors of soil porosity, silt clay content of soil, and NH 4 + -N and NO 3 - -N concentrations of soil (p shallow groundwater depth had more notable effects on nitrogen concentrations in the shallow groundwater than other factors. This result will strongly support the need for further research regarding the management practices for reducing nitrogen concentrations in shallow groundwater.

  4. Insect-mediated nitrogen dynamics in decomposing wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen

    2015-01-01

    1.Wood decomposition is characterised by complex and poorly understood nitrogen (N) dynamics with unclear implications for forest nutrient cycling and productivity.Wood-dwelling microbes have developed unique strategies for coping with the N limitations imposed by their substrate, including the translocation of N into wood by cord-forming fungi and the fixation of...

  5. Applying a System Dynamics Approach for Modeling Groundwater Dynamics to Depletion under Different Economical and Climate Change Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Balali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, due to many different factors, including climate change effects towards be warming and lower precipitation, as well as some structural policies such as more intensive harvesting of groundwater and low price of irrigation water, the level of groundwater has decreased in most plains of Iran. The objective of this study is to model groundwater dynamics to depletion under different economic policies and climate change by using a system dynamics approach. For this purpose a dynamic hydro-economic model which simultaneously simulates the farmer’s economic behavior, groundwater aquifer dynamics, studied area climatology factors and government economical policies related to groundwater, is developed using STELLA 10.0.6. The vulnerability of groundwater balance is forecasted under three scenarios of climate including the Dry, Nor and Wet and also, different scenarios of irrigation water and energy pricing policies. Results show that implementation of some economic policies on irrigation water and energy pricing can significantly affect on groundwater exploitation and its volume balance. By increasing of irrigation water price along with energy price, exploitation of groundwater will improve, in so far as in scenarios S15 and S16, studied area’s aquifer groundwater balance is positive at the end of planning horizon, even in Dry condition of precipitation. Also, results indicate that climate change can affect groundwater recharge. It can generally be expected that increases in precipitation would produce greater aquifer recharge rates.

  6. Dynamical Analysis of a Nitrogen-Phosphorus-Phytoplankton Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunli Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a nitrogen-phosphorus-phytoplankton model in a water ecosystem. The main aim of this research is to analyze the global system dynamics and to study the existence and stability of equilibria. It is shown that the phytoplankton-eradication equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if the input nitrogen concentration is less than a certain threshold. However, the coexistence equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable as long as it exists. The system is uniformly persistent within threshold values of certain key parameters. Finally, to verify the results, numerical simulations are provided.

  7. Limiting nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceutical input into groundwater: combining hydrogeophysics and soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Ursula; Stadler, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The EU Interreg project TOPSOIL investigates opportunities to improve surface and groundwater quality as well as water management strategies under the consideration of climate adaptation challenges. Within the framework of the project, we investigate the transport behavior of percolation water in the unsaturated zone, the migration of nitrogen and veterinary pharmaceuticals in soils, and - together with different stakeholders (e.g. farmers, water supply companies) - develop common strategies to minimize the migration of these substances into the groundwater. In our study we focus on distinguishing preferential and diffuse flow using soil scientific and geophysical methods. During the first investigation campaign, we combined soil sampling with radiometry and electrical conductivity overview measurements on the typical sandy soil of the studied area south of Oldenburg, Germany. We used the CMD explorer for the electromagnetic mapping (horizontal and vertical dipoles, intercoil spacing of 1.48/2.82/4.49 m, investigations depths of appr. 0 - 6 m) and the radiometry detector comprised five sodium-iodide crystals each with a volume of 4 litres. The spectral data are evaluated for potassium (1.37 - 1.57 MeV), uranium (Bi-214) (1.66 - 1.86MeV) and thorium (T-208) (2.41 - 2.81MeV) and total counts (0.41-2.81MeV). A total of 292 soil samples were taken from 46 ram coring profiles (depth range: 0 to 3 m) and analyzed for soil chemical parameters and water content. The first evaluation showed a good correlation between conductivity and radiometry measurements. While the uranium and thorium values are generally low, the potassium values possibly reflect higher clay contents as do the higher conductivity values. The geophysical overview measurements were used to select the locations for soil sampling and we specifically targeted presumably clay-rich as well as clay-poor areas for sampling.

  8. Nitrate-nitrogen contamination in groundwater: Spatiotemporal variation and driving factors under cropland in Shandong Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiang, L. H.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, P.; Zhao, T. K.

    2017-08-01

    High groundwater nitrate-N is a serious problem especially in highly active agricultural areas. In study, the concentration and spatialtemporal distribution of groundwater nitrate-N under cropland in Shandong province were assessed by statistical and geostatistical techniques. Nitrate-N concentration reached a maximum of 184.60 mg L-1 and 29.5% of samples had levels in excess of safety threshold concentration (20 mg L-1). The median nitrate-N contents after rainy season were significantly higher than those before rainy season, and decreased with increasing groundwater depth. Nitrate-N under vegetable and orchard area are significantly higher than ones under grain. The kriging map shows that groundwater nitrate-N has a strong spatial variability. Many districts, such as Weifang, Linyi in Shandong province are heavily contaminated with nitrate-N. However, there are no significant trends of NO3 --N for most cities. Stepwise regression analysis showed influencing factors are different for the groundwater in different depth. But overall, vegetable yield per unit area, percentages of orchard area, per capita agricultural production, unit-area nitrogen fertilizer, livestock per unit area, percentages of irrigation areas, population per unit area and annual mean temperature are significant variables for groundwater nitrate-N variation.

  9. An intelligent instrument for measuring the dynamic parameters of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Guoping

    2002-01-01

    An intelligent instrument was developed for measuring direction and velocity of the groundwater, permeability coefficient, hydraulic transmitting coefficient, static level, hydraulic gradient and flow direction of each layer. The instrument can be widely applied for detecting seepage of abutment and river bank, exploitation of groundwater, conservation of water and soil, water surging in mine, survey of groundwater resource and environment protection etc

  10. Regional Variability of Agriculturally-Derived Nitrate-Nitrogen in Shallow Groundwater in China, 2004–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing diffuse nitrate loading of groundwater has long been a major environmental and health concern in China, but little is known about the spatial and temporal variability of nitrate concentrations in groundwater at regional scales. The aim of this study was to assess the spatial distribution and variation of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3−-N concentrations in groundwater. We used groundwater quality monitoring data and soil physical characteristics from 21 agro-ecosystems in China for years 2004 to 2014. The results indicated that NO3−-N concentrations were highly variable in shallow groundwater across the landscape. Over the study period, most of the NO3−-N concentrations were below the World Health Organization permissible limit for drinking water (<10 mg N·L. NO3−-N concentrations in groundwater neither significantly increased nor decreased in most agro-ecosystems, but fluctuated with seasons. In addition, groundwater NO3−-N under purple soil (6.81 mg·L−1 and Aeolian sandy soil (6.02 mg·L−1 were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than that under other soil types, and it was medium-high (4.49 mg·L−1 under aquic cinnamon soil. Elevated nitrate concentrations occurred mainly in oasis agricultural areas of northwestern China, where farmlands with coarse-textured soils use flood irrigation. Therefore, arid and semi-arid areas are expected to sustain high NO3−-N concentrations in groundwater. Mitigation strategies can prevent this problem, and include control of N fertilizer input, balanced fertilization, proper rotation system, adoption of improved irrigation methods, and establishment of environmental policies.

  11. Nitrogen-isotope ratio studies of soils and groundwater nitrate from alluvial fan aquifers in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitler, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Kreitler has previously identified two ranges of nitrogen-isotope values (delta 15 N) for soil nitrate under different land uses in west Texas: nitrate originating from nonfertilized, cultivated fields (delta 14 N range, 2 to +8per thousand with an average of +4.9per thousand), and nitrate from animal wastes (delta 15 N range, +10 to +22per thousand with an average of +14.4per thousand). The delta 15 N of groundwater nitrate from irrigation wells on the Lockhart and Taylor and alluvial fans range from +3.3 to +10.8per thousand with an average of +7.3per thousand. Ground water from domestic wells on the two fans has higher nitrate concentrations and a more positive delta 15 N range (+6.7 to 18.2per thousand with an average of +11.1per thousand) than wells located in the cultivated fields. Nitrate contamination of wells located in cultivated fields results primarily from cultivation with ammonium-type fertilizers, whereas animal wastes are contaminating domestic well waters. (Auth.)

  12. Long-term natural attenuation of carbon and nitrogen within a groundwater plume after removal of the treated wastewater source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repert, Deborah A; Barber, Larry B; Hess, Kathryn M; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kent, Douglas B; LeBlanc, Denis R; Smith, Richard L

    2006-02-15

    Disposal of treated wastewater for more than 60 years onto infiltration beds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts produced a groundwater contaminant plume greater than 6 km long in a surficial sand and gravel aquifer. In December 1995 the wastewater disposal ceased. A long-term, continuous study was conducted to characterize the post-cessation attenuation of the plume from the source to 0.6 km downgradient. Concentrations and total pools of mobile constituents, such as boron and nitrate, steadily decreased within 1-4 years along the transect. Dissolved organic carbon loads also decreased, but to a lesser extent, particularly downgradient of the infiltration beds. After 4 years, concentrations and pools of carbon and nitrogen in groundwater were relatively constant with time and distance, but substantially elevated above background. The contaminant plume core remained anoxic for the entire 10-year study period; temporal patterns of integrated oxygen deficit decreased slowly at all sites. In 2004, substantial amounts of total dissolved carbon (7 mol C m(-2)) and fixed (dissolved plus sorbed) inorganic nitrogen (0.5 mol N m(-2)) were still present in a 28-m vertical interval at the disposal site. Sorbed constituents have contributed substantially to the dissolved carbon and nitrogen pools and are responsible for the long-term persistence of the contaminant plume. Natural aquifer restoration at the discharge location will take at least several decades, even though groundwater flow rates and the potential for contaminant flushing are relatively high.

  13. Simulating the reactive transport of nitrogen species in a regional irrigated agricultural groundwater system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. T.; Gates, T. K.

    2011-12-01

    The fate and transport of nitrogen (N) species in irrigated agricultural groundwater systems is governed by irrigation patterns, cultivation practices, aquifer-surface water exchanges, and chemical reactions such as oxidation-reduction, volatilization, and sorption, as well as the presence of dissolved oxygen (O2). We present results of applying the newly-developed numerical model RT3D-AG to a 50,400-ha regional study site within the Lower Arkansas River Valley in southeastern Colorado, where elevated concentrations of NO3 have been observed in both groundwater and surface water during the recent decade. Furthermore, NO3 has a strong influence on the fate and transport of other contaminants in the aquifer system such as selenium (Se) through inhibition of reduction of dissolved Se as well as oxidation of precipitate Se from outcropped and bedrock shale. RT3D-AG, developed by appending the multi-species reactive transport finite-difference model RT3D with modular packages that account for variably-saturated transport, the cycling of carbon (C) and N, and the fate and transport of O2 within the soil and aquifer system, simulates organic C and organic N decomposition and mineralization, oxidation-reduction reactions, and sorption. System sources/sinks consist of applied fertilizer and manure; crop uptake of ammonium (NH4) and NO3 during the growing season; mass of O2, NO3, and NH4 associated with irrigation water and canal seepage; mass of O2, NO3, and NH4 transferred to canals and the Arkansas River from the aquifer; and dead root mass and after-harvest stover mass incorporated into the soil organic matter at the end of the growing season. Chemical reactions are simulated using first-order Monod kinetics, wherein the rate of reaction is dependent on the concentration of the reactants as well as temperature and water content of the soil. Fertilizer and manure application timing and loading, mass of seasonal crop uptake, and end-of-season root mass and stover mass are

  14. Biogeochemical dynamics of pollutants in Insitu groundwater remediation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Millot, R.; Rose, J.; Négrel, P.; Battaglia-Brunnet, F.; Diels, L.

    2010-12-01

    Insitu (bio) remediation of groundwater contaminants has been area of potential research interest in last few decades as the nature of contaminant encountered has also changed drastically. This gives tough challenge to researchers in finding a common solution for all contaminants together in one plume. Redox processes play significant role in pollutant dynamics and mobility in such systems. Arsenic particularly in reduced environments can get transformed into its reduced form (As3+), which is apparently more mobile and highly toxic. Also parallel sulfate reduction can lead to sulfide production and formation of thioarsenic species. On the other hand heavy metals (Zn, Fe, and Cd) in similar conditions will favour more stable metal sulfide precipitation. In the present work, we tested Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) in handling such issues and found promising results. Although it has been well known for contaminants like arsenic and chlorinated compounds but not much explored for heavy metals. Its high available surface area supports precipitation and co -precipitation of contaminants and its highly oxidizing nature and water born hydrogen production helps in stimulation of microbial activities in sediment and groundwater. These sulfate and Iron reducing bacteria can further fix heavy metals as stable metal sulfides by using hydrogen as potential electron donor. In the present study flow through columns (biotic and control) were set up in laboratory to understand the behaviour of contaminants in subsurface environments, also the impact of microbiology on performance of ZVI was studied. These glass columns (30 x 4cm) with intermediate sampling points were monitored over constant temperature (20°C) and continuous groundwater (up)flow at ~1ml/hr throughout the experiment. Simulated groundwater was prepared in laboratory containing sulfate, metals (Zn,Cd) and arsenic (AsV). While chemical and microbial parameters were followed regularly over time, solid phase has been

  15. Simulating Groundwater Dynamics across the Contiguous United States Using MODFLOW-OWHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alattar, M.; Troy, T. J.; Russo, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is a critical water resource for irrigation, industry, and domestic water supply. Because of the importance of groundwater, especially for agriculture water supply, many regional studies have been implemented to understand groundwater dynamics, to protect groundwater resources, and to support more efficient management of surface and groundwater supplies to meet the water demands. While these regional studies provide invaluable insights into local problems, it is difficult to understand the state of America's water supplies holistically to understand how irrigation, pumping, and climate determine groundwater availability. To fill this gap, we use MODFLOW-OWHM to simulate and analyze groundwater flow across the United States from 1950 through 2010 at a monthly resolution. The model estimates the irrigation demand by crop type, pumping rates from groundwater wells, and groundwater availability and water levels. This allows us to analyze the impact of crop choices and on groundwater pumping as well as surface water withdrawals. The model is calibrated and validated across the contiguous United States with parameter sensitivity analysis. Because of the study region size, climate conditions vary temporally and spatially based on the mean climate and phenomena such as El Niño and La Niña. We do model experiments to analyze how this climate variability can affect recharge and water table depths and how irrigated crop choices impact surface and ground water sustainability. These model simulations have the potential to inform water resources management at a range of spatial scales.

  16. Plant nitrogen dynamics and nitrogen-use strategies under altered nitrogen seasonality and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhiyou; Liu, Weixing; Niu, Shuli; Wan, Shiqiang

    2007-10-01

    Numerous studies have examined the effects of climatic factors on the distribution of C(3) and C(4) grasses in various regions throughout the world, but the role of seasonal fluctuations in temperature, precipitation and soil N availability in regulating growth and competition of these two functional types is still not well understood. This report is about the effects of seasonality of soil N availability and competition on plant N dynamics and N-use strategies of one C(3) (Leymus chinensis) and one C(4) (Chloris virgata) grass species. Leymus chinensis and C. virgata, two grass species native to the temperate steppe in northern China, were planted in a monoculture and a mixture under three different N seasonal availabilities: an average model (AM) with N evenly distributed over the growing season; a one-peak model (OM) with more N in summer than in spring and autumn; and a two-peak model (TM) with more N in spring and autumn than in summer. The results showed that the altered N seasonality changed plant N concentration, with the highest value of L. chinensis under the OM treatment and C. virgata under the TM treatment, respectively. N seasonality also affected plant N content, N productivity and N-resorption efficiency and proficiency in both the C(3) and C(4) species. Interspecific competition influenced N-use and resorption efficiency in both the C(3) and C(4) species, with higher N-use and resorption efficiency in the mixture than in monoculture. The C(4) grass had higher N-use efficiency than the C(3) grass due to its higher N productivity, irrespective of the N treatment or competition. The observations suggest that N-use strategies in the C(3) and C(4) species used in the study were closely related to seasonal dynamics of N supply and competition. N seasonality might be involved in the growth and temporal niche separation between C(3) and C(4) species observed in the natural ecosystems.

  17. Influences of groundwater extraction on flow dynamics and arsenic levels in the western Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Guo, Huaming; Zhao, Weiguang; Liu, Shuai; Cao, Yongsheng; Jia, Yongfeng

    2018-04-01

    Data on spatiotemporal variations in groundwater levels are crucial for understanding arsenic (As) behavior and dynamics in groundwater systems. Little is known about the influences of groundwater extraction on the transport and mobilization of As in the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia (China), so groundwater levels were recorded in five monitoring wells from 2011 to 2016 and in 57 irrigation wells and two multilevel wells in 2016. Results showed that groundwater level in the groundwater irrigation area had two troughs each year, induced by extensive groundwater extraction, while groundwater levels in the river-diverted (Yellow River) water irrigation area had two peaks each year, resulting from surface-water irrigation. From 2011 to 2016, groundwater levels in the groundwater irrigation area presented a decreasing trend due to the overextraction. Groundwater samples were taken for geochemical analysis each year in July from 2011 to 2016. Increasing trends were observed in groundwater total dissolved solids (TDS) and As. Owing to the reverse groundwater flow direction, the Shahai Lake acts as a new groundwater recharge source. Lake water had flushed the near-surface sediments, which contain abundant soluble components, and increased groundwater salinity. In addition, groundwater extraction induced strong downward hydraulic gradients, which led to leakage recharge from shallow high-TDS groundwater to the deep semiconfined aquifer. The most plausible explanation for similar variations among As, Fe(II) and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations is the expected dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides.

  18. A framework for quantification of groundwater dynamics - concepts and hydro(geo-)logical metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaf, Ezra; Heudorfer, Benedikt; Stahl, Kerstin; Barthel, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuation patterns in groundwater hydrographs are generally assumed to contain information on aquifer characteristics, climate and environmental controls. However, attempts to disentangle this information and map the dominant controls have been few. This is due to the substantial heterogeneity and complexity of groundwater systems, which is reflected in the abundance of morphologies of groundwater time series. To describe the structure and shape of hydrographs, descriptive terms like "slow"/ "fast" or "flashy"/ "inert" are frequently used, which are subjective, irreproducible and limited. This lack of objective and refined concepts limit approaches for regionalization of hydrogeological characteristics as well as our understanding of dominant processes controlling groundwater dynamics. Therefore, we propose a novel framework for groundwater hydrograph characterization in an attempt to categorize morphologies explicitly and quantitatively based on perceptual concepts of aspects of the dynamics. This quantitative framework is inspired by the existing and operational eco-hydrological classification frameworks for streamflow. The need for a new framework for groundwater systems is justified by the fundamental differences between the state variable groundwater head and the flow variable streamflow. Conceptually, we extracted exemplars of specific dynamic patterns, attributing descriptive terms for means of systematisation. Metrics, primarily taken from streamflow literature, were subsequently adapted to groundwater and assigned to the described patterns for means of quantification. In this study, we focused on the particularities of groundwater as a state variable. Furthermore, we investigated the descriptive skill of individual metrics as well as their usefulness for groundwater hydrographs. The ensemble of categorized metrics result in a framework, which can be used to describe and quantify groundwater dynamics. It is a promising tool for the setup of a successful

  19. Spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of global scale climate-groundwater interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Gleeson, T. P.; Moosdorf, N.; Schneider, A. C.; Hartmann, J.; Befus, K. M.; Lehner, B.

    2017-12-01

    The interactions between groundwater and climate are important to resolve in both space and time as they influence mass and energy transfers at Earth's land surface. Despite the significance of these processes, little is known about the spatio-temporal distribution of such interactions globally, and many large-scale climate, hydrological and land surface models oversimplify groundwater or exclude it completely. In this study we bring together diverse global geomatic data sets to map spatial patterns in the sensitivity and degree of connectedness between the water table and the land surface, and use the output from a global groundwater model to assess the locations where the lateral import or export of groundwater is significant. We also quantify the groundwater response time, the characteristic time for groundwater systems to respond to a change in boundary conditions, and map its distribution globally to assess the likely dynamics of groundwater's interaction with climate. We find that more than half of the global land surface significantly exports or imports groundwater laterally. Nearly 40% of Earth's landmass has water tables that are strongly coupled to topography with water tables shallow enough to enable a bi-directional exchange of moisture with the climate system. However, only a small proportion (around 12%) of such regions have groundwater response times of 100 years or less and have groundwater fluxes that would significantly respond to rapid environmental changes over this timescale. We last explore fundamental relationships between aridity, groundwater response times and groundwater turnover times. Our results have wide ranging implications for understanding and modelling changes in Earth's water and energy balance and for informing robust future water management and security decisions.

  20. Reducing uncertainty of estimated nitrogen load reductions to aquatic systems through spatially targeting agricultural mitigation measures using groundwater nitrogen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Jabloun, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    variation across the landscape in natural N-reduction (denitrification) of leached nitrate in the groundwater and surface water systems. A critical basis for including spatial targeting in regulation of N-load in Denmark is the uncertainty associated with the effect of spatially targeting measures, since......The need to further abate agricultural nitrate (N)-loadings to coastal waters in Denmark represents the main driver for development of a new spatially targeted regulation that focus on locating N-mitigation measures in agricultural areas with high N-load. This targeting makes use of the spatial...... the effect will be critically affected by uncertainty in the quantification of the spatial variation in N-reduction. In this study, we used 30 equally plausible N-reduction maps, at 100 m grid and sub-catchment resolutions, for the 85-km2 groundwater dominated Norsminde catchment in Denmark, applying set...

  1. Groundwater recharge dynamics in unsaturated fractured chalk: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicolaetta M.

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of the unsaturated zone controls its hydraulic response to rainfall and the extent to which pollutants are delayed or attenuated before reaching groundwater. It plays therefore a very important role in the recharge of aquifers and the transfer of pollutants because of the presence of temporary storage zones and preferential flows. A better knowledge of the physical processes in the unsaturated zone would allow an improved assessment of the natural recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer and of its vulnerability to surface-applied pollution. The case study regards the role of the thick unsaturated zone of the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in Picardy (North of France) that controls the hydraulic response to rainfall. In the North Paris Basin, much of the recharge must pass through a regional chalk bed that is composed of a porous matrix with embedded fractures. Different types of conceptual models have been formulated to explain infiltration and recharge processes in the unsaturated fractured rock. The present study analyses the episodic recharge in fractured Chalk aquifer using the kinematic diffusion theory to predict water table fluctuation in response to rainfall. From an analysis of the data, there is the evidence of 1) a seasonal behavior characterized by a constant increase in the water level during the winter/spring period and a recession period, 2) a series of episodic behaviors during the summer/autumn. Kinematic diffusion models are useful for predict preferential fluxes and dynamic conditions. The presented approach conceptualizes the unsaturated flow as a combination of 1) diffusive flow refers to the idealized portion of the pore space of the medium within the flow rate is driven essentially by local gradient of potential; 2) preferential flow by which water moves across macroscopic distances through conduits of macropore length.

  2. Modelling soil nitrogen: The MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulehle, F.; Cosby, B.J.; Wright, R.F.; Hruška, J.; Kopáček, J.; Krám, P.; Evans, C.D.; Moldan, F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new formulation of the acidification model MAGIC that uses decomposer dynamics to link nitrogen (N) cycling to carbon (C) turnover in soils. The new model is evaluated by application to 15–30 years of water chemistry data at three coniferous-forested sites in the Czech Republic where deposition of sulphur (S) and N have decreased by >80% and 40%, respectively. Sulphate concentrations in waters have declined commensurately with S deposition, but nitrate concentrations have shown much larger decreases relative to N deposition. This behaviour is inconsistent with most conceptual models of N saturation, and with earlier versions of MAGIC which assume N retention to be a first-order function of N deposition and/or controlled by the soil C/N ratio. In comparison with earlier versions, the new formulation more correctly simulates observed short-term changes in nitrate leaching, as well as long-term retention of N in soils. The model suggests that, despite recent deposition reductions and recovery, progressive N saturation will lead to increased future nitrate leaching, ecosystem eutrophication and re-acidification. - Highlights: ► New version of the biogeochemical model MAGIC developed to simulate C/N dynamics. ► New formulation of N retention based directly on the decomposer processes. ► The new formulation simulates observed changes in nitrate leaching and in soil C/N. ► The model suggests progressive N saturation at sites examined. ► The model performance meets a growing need for realistic process-based simulations. - Process-based modelling of nitrogen dynamics and acidification in forest ecosystems.

  3. A framework for quantification of groundwater dynamics - redundancy and transferability of hydro(geo-)logical metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorfer, Benedikt; Haaf, Ezra; Barthel, Roland; Stahl, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    A new framework for quantification of groundwater dynamics has been proposed in a companion study (Haaf et al., 2017). In this framework, a number of conceptual aspects of dynamics, such as seasonality, regularity, flashiness or inter-annual forcing, are described, which are then linked to quantitative metrics. Hereby, a large number of possible metrics are readily available from literature, such as Pardé Coefficients, Colwell's Predictability Indices or Base Flow Index. In the present work, we focus on finding multicollinearity and in consequence redundancy among the metrics representing different patterns of dynamics found in groundwater hydrographs. This is done also to verify the categories of dynamics aspects suggested by Haaf et al., 2017. To determine the optimal set of metrics we need to balance the desired minimum number of metrics and the desired maximum descriptive property of the metrics. To do this, a substantial number of candidate metrics are applied to a diverse set of groundwater hydrographs from France, Germany and Austria within the northern alpine and peri-alpine region. By applying Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to the correlation matrix of the metrics, we determine a limited number of relevant metrics that describe the majority of variation in the dataset. The resulting reduced set of metrics comprise an optimized set that can be used to describe the aspects of dynamics that were identified within the groundwater dynamics framework. For some aspects of dynamics a single significant metric could be attributed. Other aspects have a more fuzzy quality that can only be described by an ensemble of metrics and are re-evaluated. The PCA is furthermore applied to groups of groundwater hydrographs containing regimes of similar behaviour in order to explore transferability when applying the metric-based characterization framework to groups of hydrographs from diverse groundwater systems. In conclusion, we identify an optimal number of metrics

  4. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gases emissions in constructed wetlands: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M. M. R.; Fenton, O.; Gill, L.; Müller, C.; Johnston, P.; Richards, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    The nitrogen (N) removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs) is very inconsistent and does not alone explain if the removed species are reduced by physical attenuation or if they are transformed to other reactive forms (pollution swapping). There are many pathways for the removed N to remain in the system: accumulation in the sediments, leaching to groundwater (nitrate-NO3- and ammonium-NH4+), emission to atmosphere via nitrous oxide- N2O and ammonia and/or conversion to N2 gas and adsorption to sediments. The kinetics of these pathways/processes varies with CWs management and therefore needs to be studied quantitatively for the sustainable use of CWs. For example, the quality of groundwater underlying CWs with regards to the reactive N (Nr) species is largely unknown. Equally, there is a dearth of information on the extent of Nr accumulation in soils and discharge to surface waters and air. Moreover, CWs are rich in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and produce substantial amounts of CO2 and CH4. These dissolved carbon (C) species drain out to ground and surface waters and emit to the atmosphere. The dynamics of dissolved N2O, CO2 and CH4 in CWs is a key "missing piece" in our understanding of global greenhouse gas budgets. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge and discussion about the dynamics of C and N in CWs and their likely impacts on aquatic and atmospheric environments. We suggest that the fate of various N species in CWs and their surface emissions and subsurface drainage fluxes need to be evaluated in a holistic way to better understand their potential for pollution swapping. Research on the process based N removal and balancing the end products into reactive and benign forms are critical to assess environmental impacts of CWs. Thus we strongly suggest that in situ N transformation and fate of the transformation products with regards to pollution swapping requires further detailed examination.

  5. Groundwater Depth Affects Phosphorus But Not Carbon and Nitrogen Concentrations of a Desert Phreatophyte in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Gao, Xiaopeng; Li, Lei; Lu, Yan; Shareef, Muhammad; Huang, Caibian; Liu, Guojun; Gui, Dongwei; Zeng, Fanjiang

    2018-01-01

    Ecological stoichiometry is an important aspect in the analysis of the changes in ecological system composition, structure, and function and understanding of plant adaptation in habitats. Leaf carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) concentrations in desert phreatophytes can be affected by different depths of groundwater through its effect on the adsorption and utilization of nutrient and plant biomass. We examined the biomass, soil organic C, available (mineral) N, and available P, and leaf C, N, and P concentrations of Alhagi sparsifolia grown at varying groundwater depths of 2.5, 4.5, and 11.0 m in 2015 and 2016 growing seasons in a desert-oasis ecotone in northwest China. The biomass of A. sparsifolia and the C, N, and P concentrations in soil and A. sparsifolia showed different responses to various groundwater depths. The leaf P concentration of A. sparsifolia was lower at 4.5 m than at 2.5 and 11.0 m likely because of a biomass dilution effect. By contrast, leaf C and N concentrations were generally unaffected by groundwater depth, thereby confirming that C and N accumulations in A. sparsifolia were predominantly determined by C fixation through the photosynthesis and biological fixation of atmospheric N 2 , respectively. Soil C, N, and P concentrations at 4.5 m were significantly lower than those at 11.0 m. Leaf P concentration was significantly and positively correlated with soil N concentration at all of the groundwater depths. The C:N and C:P mass ratios of A. sparsifolia at 4.5 m were higher than those at the other groundwater depths, suggesting a defensive life history strategy. Conversely, A. sparsifolia likely adopted a competitive strategy at 2.5 and 11.0 m as indicated by the low C:N and C:P mass ratios. To our knowledge, this study is the first to elucidate the variation in the C, N, and P stoichiometry of a desert phreatophyte at different groundwater depths in an arid ecosystem.

  6. Analysis of shallow-groundwater dynamic responses to water supply change in the Haihe River plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z.; Lin, W.; Pengfei, L.

    2015-05-01

    When the middle route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project is completed, the water supply pattern of the Haihe River plain in North China will change significantly due to the replenishment of water sources and groundwater-exploitation control. The water-cycle-simulation model - MODCYCLE, has been used in simulating the groundwater dynamic balance for 2001-2010. Then different schemes of water supply in 2020 and 2030 were set up to quantitatively simulate the shallow-groundwater dynamic responses in the future. The results show that the total shallow-groundwater recharge is mainly raised by the increases in precipitation infiltration and surface-water irrigation infiltration. Meanwhile, the decrease of groundwater withdrawal contributes to reduce the total discharge. The recharge-discharge structure of local groundwater was still in a negative balance but improved gradually. The shallow-groundwater level in most parts was still falling before 2030, but more slowly. This study can benefit the rational exploitation of water resources in the Haihe River plain.

  7. Global land–ocean linkage: direct inputs of nitrogen to coastal waters via submarine groundwater discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beusen, A H W; Slomp, C P; Bouwman, A F

    2013-01-01

    The role of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), the leakage of groundwater from aquifers into coastal waters, in coastal eutrophication has been demonstrated mostly for the North American and European coastlines, but poorly quantified in other regions. Here, we present the first spatially explicit global estimates of N inputs via SGD to coastal waters and show that it has increased from about 1.0 to 1.4 Tg of nitrate (NO 3 -N) per year over the second half of the 20th century. Since this increase is not accompanied by an equivalent increase of groundwater phosphorus (P) and silicon (Si), SGD transport of nitrate is an important factor for the development of harmful algal blooms in coastal waters. Groundwater fluxes of N are linked to areas with high runoff and intensive anthropogenic activity on land, with Southeast Asia, parts of North and Central America, and Europe being hot spots. (letter)

  8. Nitrogen uptake dynamics, yield and quality as influenced by nitrogen fertilization in Piel de sapo melon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, M. T.; Cabello, M. J.; Cartagena, M. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Arce, A.; Ribas, F.

    2012-11-01

    The need to reduce nitrogen (N) fertilizer pollution strengthens the importance of improving the utilization efficiency of applied N to crops. This requires knowledge of crop N uptake characteristics and how fertilization management affects it. A three-year field experiment was conducted from May to September in central Spain to investigate the influence of different N rates, which ranged from 11 to 393 kg ha{sup -}1, applied through drip irrigation, on the dynamics of N uptake, nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), fruit yield and quality of a Piel de sapo melon crop (Cucumis melo L. cv. Sancho). Both N concentration and N content increased in different plant parts with the N rate. Leaves had the highest N concentration, which declined by 40-50% from 34-41 days after transplanting (DAT), while the highest N uptake rate was observed from 30-35 to 70-80 DAT, coinciding with fruit development. In each year, NUE declined with increasing N rate. With N fertilizer applications close to the optimum N rate of 90-100 kg ha -1, the fruits removed approximately 60 kg N ha -1, and the amount of N in the crop residue was about 80 kg N ha -1; this serves to replenish the organic nutrient pool in the soil and may be used by subsequent crops following mineralization. (Author) 36 refs.

  9. Nitrogen balance and groundwater nitrate contamination: Comparison among three intensive cropping systems on the North China Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, X.T. [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Agricultural Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Kou, C.L. [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Agricultural Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Institute of Soils and Fertilizers, Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Zhang, F.S. [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Agricultural Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)]. E-mail: zfs@cau.edu.cn; Christie, P. [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Agricultural Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-15

    The annual nitrogen (N) budget and groundwater nitrate-N concentrations were studied in the field in three major intensive cropping systems in Shandong province, north China. In the greenhouse vegetable systems the annual N inputs from fertilizers, manures and irrigation water were 1358, 1881 and 402 kg N ha{sup -1} on average, representing 2.5, 37.5 and 83.8 times the corresponding values in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-maize (Zea mays L.) rotations and 2.1, 10.4 and 68.2 times the values in apple (Malus pumila Mill.) orchards. The N surplus values were 349, 3327 and 746 kg N ha{sup -1}, with residual soil nitrate-N after harvest amounting to 221-275, 1173 and 613 kg N ha{sup -1} in the top 90 cm of the soil profile and 213-242, 1032 and 976 kg N ha{sup -1} at 90-180 cm depth in wheat-maize, greenhouse vegetable and orchard systems, respectively. Nitrate leaching was evident in all three cropping systems and the groundwater in shallow wells (<15 m depth) was heavily contaminated in the greenhouse vegetable production area, where total N inputs were much higher than crop requirements and the excessive fertilizer N inputs were only about 40% of total N inputs. - Intensive greenhouse vegetable production systems may pose a greater nitrogen pollution threat than apple orchards or cereal rotations to soil and water quality in north China.

  10. Nitrogen balance and groundwater nitrate contamination: Comparison among three intensive cropping systems on the North China Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, X.T.; Kou, C.L.; Zhang, F.S.; Christie, P.

    2006-01-01

    The annual nitrogen (N) budget and groundwater nitrate-N concentrations were studied in the field in three major intensive cropping systems in Shandong province, north China. In the greenhouse vegetable systems the annual N inputs from fertilizers, manures and irrigation water were 1358, 1881 and 402 kg N ha -1 on average, representing 2.5, 37.5 and 83.8 times the corresponding values in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-maize (Zea mays L.) rotations and 2.1, 10.4 and 68.2 times the values in apple (Malus pumila Mill.) orchards. The N surplus values were 349, 3327 and 746 kg N ha -1 , with residual soil nitrate-N after harvest amounting to 221-275, 1173 and 613 kg N ha -1 in the top 90 cm of the soil profile and 213-242, 1032 and 976 kg N ha -1 at 90-180 cm depth in wheat-maize, greenhouse vegetable and orchard systems, respectively. Nitrate leaching was evident in all three cropping systems and the groundwater in shallow wells (<15 m depth) was heavily contaminated in the greenhouse vegetable production area, where total N inputs were much higher than crop requirements and the excessive fertilizer N inputs were only about 40% of total N inputs. - Intensive greenhouse vegetable production systems may pose a greater nitrogen pollution threat than apple orchards or cereal rotations to soil and water quality in north China

  11. Hydrologic controls on nitrogen cycling processes and functional gene abundance in sediments of a groundwater flow-through lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Conaway, Christopher; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  12. Isotopes reveal dynamics of groundwater system in Region 2, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, N.D.S.; Racadio, C.D.T.; Sucgang, R.J.; Castañeda, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Steady economic and population growth in Region 2 could lead to an exponential increase freshwater demand. However, region 2’s main source of freshwater is groundwater and, if not checked and managed carefully, it could eventually affect the availability and sustainability of groundwater resources in Water Resource Region 2 (WRR2). Stable isotopes along with Tritium analysis in different water bodies such as rain, shallow and deep groundwater, springs and rivers were used to gain insight about the hydrological process in WRR2. Local meteoric water line for WRR2 was found to be δ2H = 8.6 δ 18O + 13.3 (r = 0.98). The estimated annual mean, which was used as a local index was to be -7.1 ‰ δ “1”8O_v_s_m_o_w_-_s_l_a_p. Shallow wells (20 – 30 m) and production wells (multi-screened wells, max depth of about 100 – 120m) were found to exhibit relatively more enrich than the index (i.e. -7.1‰) with means of -6.2 ‰ (s.d. 1.1‰, n=19) and -6.6 ‰ (s.d. 0.9; n= 151), respectively, which was an indication of infiltration of evaporated waters possibly from river and irrigation waters. Tritium analysis were done on selected sites to identify groundwater age (GWA) and possibly track the flow of groundwater from recharge areas (such as in Nueva Vizcaya, GWA = 3 years) down to the plains (Tuguegarao, GWA range from 9 to 30 years). Groundwaters drawn from production wells in Tuguegarao with ages of more than 30 years suggest that more fraction of water were being drawn from deeper aquifers. Such scenario could mean that were less water in shallow aquifers (e.g. 30 m deep) which are typically younger in age than waters found at deeper aquifers (e.g. 100 m deep). (author)

  13. Studying The Contamination Status And The Sources Of Nitrogen Compounds In Groundwater In Ho Chi Minh City Area Using The Isotope Hydrology Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Kien Chinh; Le Danh Chuan; Nguyen Van Nhien; Huynh Long; Tran Bich Lien; Luong Thu Tra

    2013-01-01

    The obtained data on nitrate, ammonium and total nitrogen concentration of 100 groundwater samples collected from 3 main aquifers show that although the nitrate concentration is still lower than the authorized limit of this compound in groundwater but the concentration and, specially the distribution of nitrate in shallow aquifer (Pleistocene) shows the increasing tendency in pollution level while ammonium and also total nitrogen content exceeded the authorized limit of these compounds in groundwater. For deeper aquifers (Upper and Lower Pliocene) groundwater is less polluted by nitrogen compounds. Analysis data on isotopic composition δ 15 N and δ 18 O of nitrate of the collected groundwater samples in compiling with other environmental isotopes data as δ 2 H, δ 18 O of water and natural radioactive isotopes in groundwater ( 3 H and 14 C) show that nitrate in Pleistocene groundwater is derived from both sources, geogenic source such as organic matter buried in aquifer soil layers and anthropogenic source like fertilizers, manure and septic wastes with the dominance of anthropogenic source. At the same time, obtained isotopic data proved the geogenic source of nitrate in water of the deeper aquifers. Study results on infiltration rate and infiltration depth of fertilizers and water using tracer techniques in the zone specializing in legume cultivation of the study area show the possible infiltration into shallow groundwater of water and also fertilizers. The obtained results prove the need of better management of the use of fertilizers for cultivation activities in the study area and to apply the advanced cultural manners for minimizing amount of fertilizers used. At the same time to strengthen wastes management and treatment in whole study area, especially in the zones which intake rain water as a recharge source to shallow groundwater such as Cu Chi, Hoc Mon and also inner city districts. (author)

  14. Groundwater biofilm dynamics grown in situ along a nutrient gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Wendy M; Close, Murray E; Leonard, Margaret M; Webber, Judith B; Lin, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the in situ response of groundwater biofilms in an alluvial gravel aquifer system on the Canterbury Plains, New Zealand. Biofilms were developed on aquifer gravel, encased in fine mesh bags and suspended in protective columns in monitoring wells for at least 20 weeks. Four sites were selected in the same groundwater system where previous analyses indicated a gradient of increasing nitrate down the hydraulic gradient from Sites 1 to 4. Measurements during the current study classified the groundwater as oligotrophic. Biofilm responses to the nutrient gradients were assessed using bioassays, with biomass determined using protein and cellular and nucleic acid staining and biofilm activity using enzyme assays for lipid, carbohydrate, phosphate metabolism, and cell viability. In general, biofilm activity decreased as nitrate levels increased from Sites 1 to 4, with the opposite relationship for carbon and phosphorus concentrations. These results showed that the groundwater system supported biofilm growth and that the upper catchment supported efficient and productive biofilms (high ratio of activity per unit biomass). © 2012, Institute of Environmental Science & Research Ltd (ESR). Ground Water © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Groundwater chemistry, storage and dynamics in parts of Jigawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Sedimentary (Chad formation) and Basement complex rocks in parts of Jigawa State were investigated for groundwater suitability for drinking, efficiency in water transmission and storage using aquifer properties derived from pumping test data using the Cooper and Jacob straight line method for single well tests.

  16. Dynamics of rainwater lenses on upward seeping saline groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Fresh water is generally a limited resource in coastal areas which are often densely populated. In low-lying areas, groundwater is mostly saline and both agriculture and freshwater nature depend on a thin lens of rainwater that is formed by precipitation surplus on top of saline, upward seeping

  17. A New Approach to Simulate Groundwater Table Dynamics and Its Validation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, M.; Lu, H.; Dan, L.; Yang, K.

    2017-12-01

    The groundwater has very important role in hydrology-climate-human activity interaction. But the groundwater table dynamics currently is not well simulated in global-scale land surface models. Meanwhile, almost all groundwater schemes are adopting a specific yield method to estimate groundwater table, in which how to determine the proper specific yield value remains a big challenge. In this study, we developed a Soil Moisture Correlation (SMC) method to simulate groundwater table dynamics. We coupled SMC with a hydrological model (named as NEW) and compared it with the original model in which a specific yield method is used (named as CTL). Both NEW and CTL were tested in Tangnaihai Subbasin of Yellow River and Jialingjiang Subbasin along Yangtze River, where underground water is less impacted by human activities. The simulated discharges by NEW and CTL are compared against gauge observations. The comparison results reveal that after calibration both models are able to reproduce the discharge well. However, there is no parameter needed to be calibrated for SMC. It indicates that SMC method is more efficient and easy-to-use than the specific yield method. Since there is no direct groundwater table observation in these two basins, simulated groundwater table were compared with a global data set provided by Fan et al. (2013). Both NEW and CTL estimate lower depths than Fan does. Moreover, when comparing the variation of terrestrial water storage (TWS) derived from NEW with that observed by GRACE, good agreements were confirmed. It demonstrated that SMC method is able to reproduce groundwater level dynamics reliably.

  18. Simulated groundwater flow paths, travel time, and advective transport of nitrogen in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, Barnegat Bay–Little Egg Harbor Watershed, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Lois M.; Cauller, Stephen J.

    2017-07-31

    Elevated concentrations of nitrogen in groundwater that discharges to surface-water bodies can degrade surface-water quality and habitats in the New Jersey Coastal Plain. An analysis of groundwater flow in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system and deeper confined aquifers that underlie the Barnegat Bay–Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH) watershed and estuary was conducted by using groundwater-flow simulation, in conjunction with a particle-tracking routine, to provide estimates of groundwater flow paths and travel times to streams and the BB-LEH estuary.Water-quality data from the Ambient Groundwater Quality Monitoring Network, a long-term monitoring network of wells distributed throughout New Jersey, were used to estimate the initial nitrogen concentration in recharge for five different land-use classes—agricultural cropland or pasture, agricultural orchard or vineyard, urban non-residential, urban residential, and undeveloped. Land use at the point of recharge within the watershed was determined using a geographic information system (GIS). Flow path starting locations were plotted on land-use maps for 1930, 1973, 1986, 1997, and 2002. Information on the land use at the time and location of recharge, time of travel to the discharge location, and the point of discharge were determined for each simulated flow path. Particle-tracking analysis provided the link from the point of recharge, along the particle flow path, to the point of discharge, and the particle travel time. The travel time of each simulated particle established the recharge year. Land use during the year of recharge was used to define the nitrogen concentration associated with each flow path. The recharge-weighted average nitrogen concentration for all flow paths that discharge to the Toms River upstream from streamflow-gaging station 01408500 or to the BB-LEH estuary was calculated.Groundwater input into the Barnegat Bay–Little Egg Harbor estuary from two main sources— indirect discharge from base

  19. Assessing groundwater depletion and dynamics using GRACE and InSAR: Potential and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Martel, Richard; Galloway, Devin L.; Longuevergne, Laurent; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing of the temporal variation of ground level and gravity has improved our understanding of groundwater dynamics and storage. Mass changes are measured by GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites, whereas ground deformation is measured by processing synthetic aperture radar satellites data using the InSAR (Interferometry of Synthetic Aperture Radar) techniques. Both methods are complementary and offer different sensitivities to aquifer system processes. GRACE is sensitive to mass changes over large spatial scales (more than 100,000 km2). As such, it fails in providing groundwater storage change estimates at local or regional scales relevant to most aquifer systems, and at which most groundwater management schemes are applied. However, InSAR measures ground displacement due to aquifer response to fluid-pressure changes. InSAR applications to groundwater depletion assessments are limited to aquifer systems susceptible to measurable deformation. Furthermore, the inversion of InSAR-derived displacement maps into volume of depleted groundwater storage (both reversible and largely irreversible) is confounded by vertical and horizontal variability of sediment compressibility. During the last decade, both techniques have shown increasing interest in the scientific community to complement available in situ observations where they are insufficient. In this review, we present the theoretical and conceptual bases of each method, and present idealized scenarios to highlight the potential benefits and challenges of combining these techniques to remotely assess groundwater storage changes and other aspects of the dynamics of aquifer systems.

  20. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF SMALL MAMMALS ACROSS A NITROGEN AMENDED LANDSCAPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical alterations of the nitrogen cycle from anthropogenic activities could have significant effects on ecological processes at the population, community and ecosystem levels. Nitrogen additions in grasslands have produced qualitative and quantitative changes in vegetat...

  1. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  2. Isotope investigation on groundwater recharge and dynamics in shallow and deep alluvial aquifers of southwest Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesari, Tirumalesh; Sharma, Diana A; Rishi, Madhuri S; Pant, Diksha; Mohokar, Hemant V; Jaryal, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, U K

    2017-11-01

    Groundwater samples collected from the alluvial aquifers of southwest Punjab, both shallow and deep zones were measured for environmental tritium ( 3 H) and stable isotopes ( 2 H and 18 O) to evaluate the source of recharge and aquifer dynamics. The shallow groundwater shows wide variation in isotopic signature (δ 18 O: -11.3 to -5.0‰) reflecting multiple sources of recharge. The average isotopic signature of shallow groundwaters (δ 18 O: -6.73 ± 1.03‰) is similar to that of local precipitation (-6.98 ± 1.66‰) indicating local precipitation contributes to a large extent compared to other sources. Other sources have isotopically distinct signatures due to either high altitude recharge (canal sources) or evaporative enrichment (irrigation return flow). Deep groundwater shows relatively depleted isotopic signature (δ 18 O: -8.6‰) and doesn't show any evaporation effect as compared to shallow zone indicating recharge from precipitation occurring at relatively higher altitudes. Environmental tritium indicates that both shallow ( 3 H: 5 - 10 T.U.) and deeper zone ( 3 H: 1.5 - 2.5 T.U.) groundwaters are modern. In general the inter-aquifer connections seem to be unlikely except a few places. Environmental isotope data suggests that shallow groundwater is dynamic, local and prone to changes in land use patterns while deep zone water is derived from distant sources, less dynamic and not impacted by surface manifestations. A conceptual groundwater flow diagram is presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impacts of urbanization on nitrogen cycling and aerosol, surface and groundwater transport in semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, K. A.; Gallo, E.; Carlson, M.; Riha, K. M.; Brooks, P. D.; McIntosh, J. C.; Sorooshian, A.; Michalski, G. M.; Meixner, T.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid regions are experiencing disproportionate increases in human population and land transformation worldwide, taxing limited water resources and altering nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry. How the redistribution of water and N by urbanization affects semi-arid ecosystems and downstream water quality (e.g. drinking water) is unclear. Understanding these interactions and their feedbacks will be critical for developing science-based management strategies to sustain these limited resources. This is especially true in the US where some of the fastest growing urban areas are in semi-arid ecosystems, where N and water cycles are accelerated, and intimately coupled, and where runoff from urban ecosystems is actively managed to augment a limited water supply to the growing human population. Here we synthesize several ongoing studies from the Tucson Basin in Arizona and examine how increasing urban land cover is altering rainfall-runoff relationships, groundwater recharge, water quality, and long range transport of atmospheric N. Studies across 5 catchments varying in impervious land cover showed that only the least impervious catchment responded to antecedent moisture conditions while hydrologic responses were not statistically related to antecedent rainfall conditions at more impervious sites. Regression models indicated that rainfall depth, imperviousness, and their combined effect control discharge and runoff ratios (p channel characteristics and infrastructure controlled runoff chemistry. Groundwater studies showed nonpoint source contamination of CFCs and associated nitrate in areas of rapid recharge along ephemeral channels. Aerosol measurements indicate that both long-range transport of N and N emissions from Tucson are being transported and deposited at high elevation in areas that recharge regional groundwater. Combined, our findings suggest that urbanization in semi-arid regions results in tradeoffs in the redistribution of water and N that have important

  4. Nitrogen Dynamics in European Forest Ecosystems: Considerations regarding Anthropogenic Nitrogen Depositions

    OpenAIRE

    Agren, G.I.; Kauppi, P.

    1983-01-01

    This study deals with the nutrient cycle of forest ecosystems over large geographic regions in Europe as affected by nitrogen deposition. The view is taken that the nitrogen cycle of a forest ecosystem has a maximum capacity for circulating nitrogen. Two different cases are defined: case (1) in which the nutrient cycle functions below its maximum capacity, and case (2) in which the circulation operates at the maximum level.

  5. Seasonal dynamics and effects of nitrogen supply rate on nitrogen and carbohydrate reserves in cutting-derived Salix viminalis plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Bollmark; Lisa Sennerby-Forsse; Tom Ericsson

    1999-01-01

    Nurient storage is an important aspect of resprouting potential and production of Salix viminalis L., a pioneer species used for biomas production in weden. Seasonal dynamics of nitrogen (N), protien, soluble arbohydrates, starches, and lipids were studied in roots, cutting, stems, and leaves during a full growth cycle induced by varying photoperiod...

  6. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics beneath on-site wastewater treatment systems in Pitt County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosario, Katie L; Humphrey, Charles P; Mitra, Siddhartha; O'Driscoll, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWS) are a potentially significant non-point source of nutrients to groundwater and surface waters, and are extensively used in coastal North Carolina. The goal of this study was to determine the treatment efficiency of four OWS in reducing total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations before discharge to groundwater and/or adjacent surface water. Piezometers were installed for groundwater sample collection and nutrient analysis at four separate residences that use OWS. Septic tank effluent, groundwater, and surface water samples (from an adjacent stream) were collected four times during 2012 for TDN and DOC analysis and pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and dissolved oxygen measurements. Treatment efficiencies from the tank to the groundwater beneath the drainfields ranged from 33 to 95% for TDN and 45 to 82% for DOC, although dilution accounted for most of the concentration reductions. There was a significant positive correlation between nitrate concentration and separation distance from trench bottom to water table and a significant negative correlation between DOC concentration and separation distance. The TDN and DOC transport (>15 m) from two OWS with groundwater saturated drainfield trenches was significant.

  7. Coupled Hydro-Economic Dynamics of Groundwater Irrigated Agriculture in a Hard Rock Region of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, V.; Fishman, R.; Siegfried, T. U.; Raj, P.; Vasquez, V.; Narula, K.; Lall, U.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of groundwater and irrigated agriculture in a semi-arid, hard rock region of India, which is characterized by low-yield, limited storativity aquifers. Telengana, in western Andhra Pradesh has witnessed a relentless expansion of the total irrigated area. Total crop irrigation water requirements have increased by more than 50 percent over the last 30 years. Nowadays, more than 80 percent of the net irrigated area in the region is irrigated from groundwater. Given limited, period monsoonal recharge to the aquifers, it can be estimated that groundwater irrigation intensity is surpassing sustainable allocation levels by a factor of 3. It is not further surprising that the region is increasingly affected by widespread groundwater depletion, with negative consequences for farmers and the energy sector as well as the natural environment. Using data on water tables, precipitation and agricultural land use, we show how both rainfall and farmers’ choices effect water tables and how these, in turn, re-effect farmers choices and agricultural outcomes in a dynamic relationship that allows us to model the interaction between the natural hydrological and agricultural-social dynamics. We use the model to elucidate and quantify the meaning of groundwater mining in this hard rock environment. In contrast to deep alluvial aquifers, excessive extraction does not lead to sustained long term deepening of the water table, but to increased fluctuations in the supply of groundwater for irrigation and the loss of the buffering capacity. For the farmers, this potentially translates into increasingly perilous agricultural production outcomes during monsoonal failures. Furthermore, the dry season agricultural production that entirely depends on the availability of sufficient amounts of irrigation water is progressively threatened under the current allocation scenario. Alternative management practices to address the aquifer depletion issues are discussed. We show that

  8. Soil Microbial Communities and Gas Dynamics Contribute to Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Nitrogen Uptake and Transfer to Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestrin, R.; Harrison, M. J.; Lehmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associate with most terrestrial plants and influence ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. There is evidence that AMF play a role in soil nitrogen cycling, in part by taking up nitrogen and transferring it to plants. However, many aspects of this process are poorly understood, including the factors that control fungal access to nitrogen stored in soil organic matter. In this study, we used stable isotopes and root exclusion to track nitrogen movement from organic matter into AMF and host plants. AMF significantly increased total plant biomass and nitrogen content, but both AMF and other soil microbes seemed to compete with plants for nitrogen. Surprisingly, gaseous nitrogen species also contributed significantly to plant nitrogen content under alkaline soil conditions. Our current experiments investigate whether free-living microbial communities that have evolved under a soil nitrogen gradient influence AMF access to soil organic nitrogen and subsequent nitrogen transfer to plants. This research links interactions between plants, mycorrhizal symbionts, and free-living microbes with terrestrial carbon and nitrogen dynamics.

  9. In-situ study of migration and transformation of nitrogen in groundwater based on continuous observations at a contaminated desert site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Rui; Jin, Shuhe; Chen, Minhua; Guan, Xin; Wang, Jinsheng; Zhai, Yuanzheng; Teng, Yanguo; Guo, Xueru

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the controlling factors on the migration and transformation of nitrogenous wastes in groundwater using long-term observations from a contaminated site on the southwestern edge of the Tengger Desert in northwestern China. Contamination was caused by wastewater discharge rich in ammonia. Two long-term groundwater monitoring wells (Wells 1# and 2#) were constructed, and 24 water samples were collected. Five key indicators were tested: ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, dissolved oxygen, and manganese. A numerical method was used to simulate the migration process and to determine the migration stage of the main pollutant plume in groundwater. The results showed that at Well 1# the nitrogenous waste migration process had essentially been completed, while at Well 2# ammonia levels were still rising and gradually transitioning to a stable stage. The differences for Well 1# and Well 2# were primarily caused by differences in groundwater flow. The change in ammonia concentration was mainly controlled by the migration of the pollution plume under nitrification in groundwater. The nitrification rate was likely affected by changes in dissolved oxygen and potentially manganese.

  10. Measuring and modeling the temporal dynamics of nitrogen balance in an experimental-scale paddy field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C.; Lin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen balance involves many mechanisms and plays an important role to maintain the function of nature. Fertilizer application in agriculture activity is usually seen as a common and significant nitrogen input to environment. Improper fertilizer application on paddy field can result in great amount of various types of nitrogen losses. Hence, it is essential to understand and quantify the nitrogen dynamics in paddy field for fertilizer management and pollution control. In this study, we develop a model which considers major transformation processes of nitrogen (e.g. volatilization, nitrification, denitrification and plant uptake). In addition, we measured different types of nitrogen in plants, soil and water at plant growth stages in an experimental-scale paddy field in Taiwan. The measurement includes total nitrogen in plants and soil, and ammonium-N (NH4+-N), nitrate-N (NO3--N) and organic nitrogen in water. The measured data were used to calibrate the model parameters and validate the model for nitrogen balance simulation. The results showed that the model can accurately estimate the temporal dynamics of nitrogen balance in paddy field during the whole growth stage. This model might be helpful and useful for future fertilizer management and pollution control in paddy field.

  11. Dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics in the North Sea: A time series analysis (1995-2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Knuijt, A.; Laane, R.W.P.M.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) dynamics in the North Sea was explored by means of long-term time series of nitrogen parameters from the Dutch national monitoring program. Generally, the data quality was good with little missing data points. Different imputation methods were used to verify the

  12. Monitoring groundwater storage changes in the highly dynamic Bengal Basin: validation of GRACE measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudduha, M.; Taylor, R. G.; Longuevergne, L.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring of spatio-temporal changes in terrestrial water storage (ΔTWS) provides valuable information regarding the basin-scale dynamics of hydrological systems. Recent satellite measurements of the ΔTWS under the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) enable the derivation of groundwater storage changes (ΔGWS) where in situ data are limited. In the well monitored and highly-dynamic Bengal Basin of Bangladesh, we test the ability of GRACE measurements to trace the seasonality and trend in groundwater storage associated with intensive groundwater abstraction for dry-season irrigation and wet-season (monsoonal) recharge. Two different GRACE products (CSR and GRGS) and data processing methods (gridded and spherical harmonics) are also compared. Results show that GRACE derived estimates of recent (2003 to 2007) ΔGWS correlate well (r=0.77 to 0.93, p-value CSR for these estimates. ΔGWS accounts for 44% of the total variation in ΔTWS in the Bengal Basin. Changes in surface water storage (ΔSWS) estimated from a network of 298 river gauging stations and soil moisture storage (ΔSMS) derived from Land Surface Models explain 22% and 33% of ΔTWS respectively. Groundwater depletion estimated from borehole hydrographs (-0.52±0.30 km3/yr) is within the range of satellite-derived estimates (-0.44 to -2.04 km3/yr) that result from uncertainty associated with ΔSMS (CLM, NOAH, VIC) and GRACE data processing techniques. Recent (2003 to 2007) estimates of groundwater depletion are substantially greater than the long-term (1985 to 2007) mean (-0.21±0.03 km3/yr) and are explained primarily by substantial increases in groundwater abstraction for the dry-season irrigation and drinking water supplies over the last two decades.

  13. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of differing...

  14. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of...

  15. Application of factor analysis in identification of dominant hydrogeochemical processes of some nitrogenous groundwater of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Jana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistical analyses are used for reducing large datasets to a smaller number of variables, which explain main hydrogeochemical processes that control water geochemistry. Factor analysis (FA allows discovering intercorrelations inside the data matrix and grouping of similar variables, i.e. chemical parameters. In this way new variables are extracted, which are called factors, and each factor is explained by some hydrogeochemical process. Applying FA to a dataset that consists of 15 chemical parameters measured on 40 groundwater samples from Serbia, four factors were extracted, which explain 73.9% of total variance in the analyzed dataset. Interpretation of obtained factors indicated several hydrogeochemical processes: the impact of sea water intrusions and volatiles in previous geological periods, solutes diffusion from the marine clay, cation exchange and dissolution of carbonate and silicate minerals. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43004

  16. Optimizing conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater resources with stochastic dynamic programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xinguo

    2014-01-01

    . A stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) approach is used to minimize the basin-wide total costs arising from water allocations and water curtailments. Dynamic allocation problems with inclusion of groundwater resources proved to be more complex to solve with SDP than pure surface water allocation problems due...... to head-dependent pumping costs. These dynamic pumping costs strongly affect the total costs and can lead to non-convexity of the future cost function. The water user groups (agriculture, industry, domestic) are characterized by inelastic demands and fixed water allocation and water supply curtailment...

  17. Linking Watershed Nitrogen Sources with Nitrogen Dynamics in Rivers of Western Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, D. J.; Compton, J.; Goodwin, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    We constructed contemporary nitrogen (N) budgets for 25 river basins in the Willamette River Basin (WRB) of western Oregon, USA, to improve the understanding of how recent trends in human-driven N loading have influenced riverine N dynamics in the region. Nearly 20% of WRB stream length is currently in fair or poor condition because of high N concentrations. Additionally, nitrate contamination of drinking water affects at least 8,000 people in the WRB. We hypothesized that 1) the majority of N inputs in the WRB would originate from agricultural activities in lowland portions of watersheds, 2) annual riverine N yield (kg/ha/yr) would correspond to annual per area watershed N inputs, and 3) riverine N yields would be seasonal and highest during winter due to the region's Mediterranean climate. We calculated average annual N inputs for each study basin by summing newly available datasets describing spatially explicit N inputs of synthetic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition, crop biological N2 fixation, biological N2 fixation by red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), livestock manure, and point sources for the period 1996 - 2007. Annual and seasonal riverine N exports were estimated with the USGS model LOADEST calibrated to N concentration data collected during the study period. We estimated that two-thirds of total N input to the WRB study basins in the 2000s came from synthetic fertilizer application. Nearly all fertilizer application occurred on the lowlands near watershed mouths. We found a wide range of riverine N yields from the study basins, ranging from one to 70 kg N/ha/yr. Across the study basins, N export was more strongly correlated to fertilizer application rates than to percent of agricultural area in the watershed. Low watershed N yields reflected a high proportion of watershed area in the forested Cascade Mountain Range, which received low N inputs mainly from atmospheric deposition. N yields from study basins were strongly seasonal, with at least 50%, and

  18. Groundwater Dynamics in Fossil Fractured Carbonate Aquifers in Eastern Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, A. Z. A.; Heggy, E.; Helal, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, D.; Scabbia, G.; Palmer, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Eastern Arabian Peninsula, notably the Qatar Peninsula, represents one of the highest natural groundwater discharge areas for the Arabian platform fossil aquifer system. Groundwater flow dynamics in these aquifers trace the paleoclimatic conditions that have prevailed the Arabian Peninsula during the Quaternary. In such settings, connections between aquifers strongly affect the flow dynamics, water quality and availability as well as karst formation and landscape evolution. Geological structures such as folds, faults and fractures are central to aquifer connectivity, yet their role on groundwater flow is poorly understood. Herein, we performed a detailed mapping of exposed and buried structural features in Qatar using Landsat, Sentinel and ALOS-PalSAR scenes, correlated with field and laboratory measurements to understand their role in aquifer connectivity and groundwater dynamics. Our results suggest that E-W oriented fold-related faults act as vertical conduits along which artesian upward leakages from the deep aquifers (e.g. Aruma and Umm er Radhuma) take place into the shallower aquifers (e.g. Rus and Dammam). Evidence includes: (1) the high potentiometric surfaces of deep aquifers (6 to 25 m amsl) compare to the shallower aquifers (2-3 m amsl for the same region); (2) anomalous elevation of groundwater levels and steeper hydraulic gradients in densely faulted regions; (3) mixed isotopic composition in shallow aquifers (δ18O: -5 to -2 ‰, δ2H: -40 to -10 ‰) between reported deep fossil waters (δ18O: -6.3 ‰, δ2H: -55 ‰) and modern meteoric waters (weighted average: δ18O: -0.6 ‰, δ2H: 4 ‰); (4) abundant meso-crystalline fibrous gypsum veins along fault zones in the Dammam Formation (up to 28 m amsl) in southern Qatar where the anhydritic member of the Rus Formation predominates the subsurface leading to gypsum oversaturation of groundwater. The similarity of crystal morphology (platy crystals under SEM), mineralogical compositions from XRD

  19. Submarine groundwater discharge driven nitrogen fluxes to Long Island Sound, NY: Terrestrial vs. marine sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborski, J. J.; Cochran, J. K.; Bokuniewicz, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Bottom-waters in Smithtown Bay (Long Island Sound, NY) are subject to hypoxic conditions every summer despite limited nutrient inputs from waste-water and riverine sources, while modeling estimates of groundwater inputs are thought to be insignificant. Terrestrial and marine fluxes of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) were quantified to Smithtown Bay using mass balances of 222Rn, 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra during the spring and summer of 2014/2015, in order to track this seasonal transition period. Intertidal pore waters from a coastal bluff (terrestrial SGD) and from a barrier beach (marine SGD) displayed substantial differences in N concentrations and sources, traced using a multi-isotope approach (222Rn, Ra, δ15N-NO3-, δ18O-NO3-). NO3- in terrestrial SGD did not display any seasonality and was derived from residential septic systems and fertilizer. Marine SGD N concentrations varied month-to-month because of mixing between oxic seawater and hypoxic saline pore waters; N concentrations were greatest during the summer, when NO3- was derived from the remineralization of organic matter. Short-lived 222Rn and 224Ra SGD fluxes were used to determine remineralized N loads along tidal recirculation flow paths, while long-lived 228Ra was used to trace inputs of anthropogenic N in terrestrial SGD. 228Ra-derived terrestrial N load estimates were between 20 and 55% lower than 224Ra-derived estimates (excluding spring 2014); 228Ra may be a more appropriate tracer of terrestrial SGD N loads. Terrestrial SGD NO3- (derived from 228Ra) to Smithtown Bay varied from (1.40-12.8) ∗ 106 mol N y-1, with comparable marine SGD NO3- fluxes of (1.70-6.79) ∗ 106 mol N y-1 derived from 222Rn and 224Ra. Remineralized N loads were greater during the summer compared with spring, and these may be an important driver toward the onset of seasonal hypoxic conditions in Smithtown Bay and western Long Island Sound. Seawater recirculation through the coastal aquifer can rival the N load from

  20. Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: Part 2, nitrogen dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, A. de; Mallard, P.; Teglia, C.; Marin, A.; Le Pape, C.; Launay, M.; Benoist, J.C.; Petiot, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and

  1. Groundwater dynamics in mountain peatlands with contrasting climate, vegetation, and hydrogeological setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, David J.; Cooper, David J.; Ronayne, Michael J.

    2018-06-01

    Hydrological dynamics act as a primary control on ecosystem function in mountain peatlands, serving as an important regulator of carbon fluxes. In western North America, mountain peatlands exist in different hydrogeological settings, across a range climatic conditions, and vary in floristic composition. The sustainability of these ecosystems, particularly those at the low end of their known elevation range, is susceptible to a changing climate via changes in the water cycle. We conducted a hydrological investigation of two mountain peatlands, with differing vegetation, hydrogeological setting (sloping vs basin), and climate (strong vs weak monsoon influence). Growing season saturated zone water budgets were modeled on a daily basis, and subsurface flow characterizations were performed during multiple field campaigns at each site. The sloping peatland expectedly showed a strong lateral groundwater potential gradient throughout the growing season. Alternatively, the basin peatland had low lateral gradients but more pronounced vertical gradients. A zero-flux plane was apparent at a depth of approximately 50 cm below the peat surface at the basin peatland; shallow groundwater above this depth moved upward towards the surface via evapotranspiration. The differences in groundwater flow dynamics between the two sites also influenced water budgets. Higher groundwater inflow at the sloping peatland offset higher rates of evapotranspiration losses from the saturated zone, which were apparently driven by differences in vegetative cover. This research revealed that although sloping peatlands cover relatively small portions of mountain watersheds, they provide unique settings where vegetation directly utilizes groundwater for transpiration, which were several-fold higher than typically reported for surrounding uplands.

  2. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades

  3. Modelling soil nitrogen: The MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, F.; Cosby, B. J.; Wright, R. F.; Hruška, J.; Kopáček, Jiří; Krám, P.; Evans, C. D.; Moldan, F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 165, June (2012), s. 158-166 ISSN 0269-7491 Grant - others:FM EHS(CZ) CZ-0051 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nitrogen saturation * leaching * acidification * Norway spruce * Bohemian Forest * Slavkov Forest * Ore Mountains * Erzgebirge Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  4. An Isotopic view of water and nitrogen transport through the vadose zone in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley's Groundwater Management Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/MethodsGroundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nit...

  5. Nitrogen dynamics in a soil-sugar cane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Julio Cesar Martins de; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Timm, Luis Carlos; Tominaga, Tania Toyomi; Castro Navarro, Roberta de; Cassaro, Fabio Augusto Meira; Dourado-Neto, Durval; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuse; Piccolo, Marisa de Cassia

    2000-01-01

    Results of an organic matter management experiment of a sugar cane crop are reported for the first cropping year. Sugar cane was planted in October 1997, and labeled with a 15 N fertilizer pulse to study the fate of organic matter in the soil-plant system. A nitrogen balance is presented, partitioning the system in plant components (stalk, tip and straw), soil components (five soil organic matter fractions) and evaluating leaching losses. The 15 N label permitted to determine, at the end of the growing season, amounts of nitrogen derived from the fertilizer, present in the above mentioned compartments. (author)

  6. Evaluating Chemical Tracers in Suburban Groundwater as Indicators of Nitrate-Nitrogen Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitka, A.; DeVita, W. M.; McGinley, P.

    2015-12-01

    The CDC reports that over 15 million US households use private wells. These wells are vulnerable to contamination. One of the most common contaminants in private wells is nitrate. Nitrate has a health standard of 10 mg/L. This standard is set to prevent methemaglobinemia, or "blue baby" syndrome, in infants. In extreme cases it can affect breathing and heart function, and even lead to death. Elevated nitrate concentrations have also been associated with increased risk of thyroid disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Unlike municipal wells, there is no mandatory testing of private wells. It is the responsibility of users to have their well water tested. The objective of this research was to identify the most useful chemical tracers for determining sources of nitrate in private water supplies. Chemical characteristics, such as mobility in groundwater and water solubility, as well as frequency of use, were considered when choosing source indicators. Fourteen pharmaceuticals and personal care products unique to human use were chosen to identify wells impacted by septic waste. A bovine antibiotic and five pesticide metabolites were used to identify contamination from agricultural sources. Eighteen private wells were selected in a suburban area with septic systems and adjacent agricultural land. The wells were sampled five times and analyzed to provide a temporal profile of nitrate and the tracers. The artificial sweetener sucralose was found in >70% of private wells. Wells with sucralose detected had nitrate concentrations between 5-15 mg/L. The herbicide metabolite metolachlor ESA was detected in 50% of the wells. These wells typically had the highest nitrate concentrations, often >10 mg/L. The common use and frequent detection of these two compounds made them the most reliable indicators of nitrate sources evaluated in this study. This information will help well owners determine appropriate treatment and remediation options and could direct future

  7. Nitrogen dynamics in flooded soil systems: An overview on concepts and performance of models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khairudin, Nurul; Gaydon, Donald S.; Jing, Qi; Zakaria, Mohamad P.; Struik, Paul C.; Keesman, Karel J.

    2018-01-01

    Extensive modelling studies on nitrogen (N) dynamics in flooded soil systems have been published. Consequently, many N dynamics models are available for users to select from. With the current research trend, inclined towards multi-disciplinary research, and with substantial progress in understanding

  8. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van Brie; Helmig, Detlev; Toro, Claudia; Doskey, Paul; Kramer, Louisa; Murray, Keenan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A multi-year investigation of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in snowpack interstitial air down to a depth of 2.8 m was conducted at Summit, Greenland, to elucidate mechanisms controlling the production and destruction of these important trace gases within the snow.

  9. Nitrogen Dynamics Variation in Overlying Water of Jinshan Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Lake is a famous urban landscape lake with approximately 8.8 km2 water area, which is located on the north of Zhenjiang, of Jiangsu Province, China. Eighteen sampled sites were selected and overlying water was sampled from 2013 to 2014 to study the seasonal and spatial variation of nitrogen in overlying water of Jinshan Lake. Results showed that physicochemical characteristics of temperature, pH, and DO showed high seasonal variation, whereas they had no significant spatial differences in the 18 sampling points (P>0.05 in overlying water of Jinshan Lake. Nitrogen concentrations showed strong seasonal variation trends. The ranked order of TN was as follows: spring > summer > autumn > winter; the order of NH4+-N was as follows: spring > autumn > summer > winter, whereas NO3--N concentrations revealed an inverse seasonal pattern, with maxima occurring in winter and minimal values occurring in spring. Nitrogen concentrations had dramatic spatial changes in 18 sampling points of Jinshan Lake. Physicochemical parameter difference, domestic wastes pollution, and rainfall runoff source may have led to seasonal and spatial fluctuation variations of nitrogen in overlying water of Jinshan Lake, China.

  10. Total Nitrogen and Available Phosphorus Dynamics in Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total nitrogen and available phosphorus concentration of soils in three secondary forest fields aged 1, 5 and 10 years of age regenerating from degraded abandoned rubber plantation (Hevea brasiliensis) and a mature forest in the west African Rainforest belt in southern Nigeria were investigated in order to determine the ...

  11. Evaluating nitrogen taxation scenarios using the dynamic whole farm simulation model FASSET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Jørgen; Petersen, Bjørn Molt; Jacobsen, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The whole farm model FASSET ver. 1.0 was used for evaluation of the environmental and economic consequences of implementing different nitrogen taxes. The taxation policies analysed were a tax on nitrogen in mineral fertiliser, a tax on nitrogen in mineral fertiliser and imported animal feedstuff......, and a tax on the farm nitrogen surplus. In these scenarios, the tax price was equal to the price of the nitrogen in mineral fertilisers (0.67 € kg N−1). Four farm types were considered: arable on sandy soil, arable on loamy soil, pig production on sandy soil and pig production on loamy soil. Impacts...... of the taxes for each farm type on crop rotation, fertiliser use and pig production were estimated by the Linear Programming module of FASSET. The dynamic simulation module of FASSET evaluated the environmental and economic consequences of the new production plans. The social abatement cost of reducing nitrate...

  12. Response of deep groundwater to land use change in desert basins of the Trans-Pecos region, Texas, USA: Effects on infiltration, recharge, and nitrogen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wendy Marie; Böhlke, John Karl; Sharp, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the effects of anthropogenic processes on groundwater in arid regions can be complicated by thick unsaturated zones with long transit times. Human activities can alter water and nutrient fluxes, but their impact on groundwater is not always clear. This study of basins in the Trans-Pecos region of Texas links anthropogenic land use and vegetation change with alterations to unsaturated zone fluxes and regional increases in basin groundwater NO3−concentrations. Median increases in groundwater NO3− (by 0.7–0.9 mg-N/l over periods ranging from 10 to 50+ years) occurred despite low precipitation (220–360 mm/year), high potential evapotranspiration (~1570 mm/year), and thick unsaturated zones (10–150+ m). Recent model simulations indicate net infiltration and groundwater recharge can occur beneath Trans-Pecos basin floors, and may have increased due to irrigation and vegetation change. These processes were investigated further with chemical and isotopic data from groundwater and unsaturated zone cores. Some unsaturated zone solute profiles indicate flushing of natural salt accumulations has occurred. Results are consistent with human-influenced flushing of naturally accumulated unsaturated zone nitrogen as an important source of NO3− to the groundwater. Regional mass balance calculations indicate the mass of natural unsaturated zone NO3− (122–910 kg-N/ha) was sufficient to cause the observed groundwater NO3− increases, especially if augmented locally with the addition of fertilizer N. Groundwater NO3− trends can be explained by small volumes of high NO3− modern recharge mixed with larger volumes of older groundwater in wells. This study illustrates the importance of combining long-term monitoring and targeted process studies to improve understanding of human impacts on recharge and nutrient cycling in arid regions, which are vulnerable to the effects of climate change and increasing human reliance on dryland ecosystems.

  13. Bayesian Nitrate Source Apportionment to Individual Groundwater Wells in the Central Valley by use of Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Boron Isotopic Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, K.; Harter, T.; Grote, M.; Young, M. B.; Eppich, G.; Deinhart, A.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers underlying agricultural areas worldwide, an example of which is the San Joaquin Valley, California. Nitrate from land applied fertilizers or from animal waste can leach to groundwater and contaminate drinking water resources. Dairy manure and synthetic fertilizers are the major sources of nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, however, septic waste can be a major source in some areas. As in other such regions around the world, the rural population in the San Joaquin Valley relies almost exclusively on shallow domestic wells (≤150 m deep), of which many have been affected by nitrate. Consumption of water containing nitrate above the drinking water limit has been linked to major health effects including low blood oxygen in infants and certain cancers. Knowledge of the proportion of each of the three main nitrate sources (manure, synthetic fertilizer, and septic waste) contributing to individual well nitrate can aid future regulatory decisions. Nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes can be used as tracers to differentiate between the three main nitrate sources. Mixing models quantify the proportional contributions of sources to a mixture by using the concentration of conservative tracers within each source as a source signature. Deterministic mixing models are common, but do not allow for variability in the tracer source concentration or overlap of tracer concentrations between sources. Bayesian statistics used in conjunction with mixing models can incorporate variability in the source signature. We developed a Bayesian mixing model on a pilot network of 32 private domestic wells in the San Joaquin Valley for which nitrate as well as nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotopes were measured. Probability distributions for nitrogen, oxygen, and boron isotope source signatures for manure, fertilizer, and septic waste were compiled from the literature and from a previous groundwater monitoring project on several

  14. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  15. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  16. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jacob, Eshel Ben [School of Physics and Astronomy, 69978 Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: aranson@msd.anl.gov

    2008-04-15

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 {sup 0}C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  17. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitrogen droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S; Jacob, Eshel Ben

    2008-01-01

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 0 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets

  18. Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the δ 18 O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 ± 0.5 per-thousand), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high 18 O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low 18 O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in δ 18 O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are ∼10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for ∼40 years, creating cones of depression ∼25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low 18 O water (-11.0 per-thousand) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp 18 O gradients in our groundwater isotope map

  19. Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Temperate Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginzburg Ozeri, Shimon

    Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrog...... implications for modelling the carbon sink-strength of temperate forests under global change.......Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrogen...... (N) deposition into forest ecosystems has been increasing globally and was hypothesized to raise soil organic C (SOC) stocks by increasing forest productivity and by reducing SOM decomposition. Yet, these effects of N deposition on forest SOC stocks are uncertain and largely based on observations...

  20. Imaging groundwater infiltration dynamics in the karst vadose zone with long-term ERT monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, Arnaud; Kaufmann, Olivier; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Poulain, Amaël; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Meldrum, Philip I.; Wilkinson, Paul B.; Hallet, Vincent; Quinif, Yves; Van Ruymbeke, Michel; Van Camp, Michel

    2018-03-01

    Water infiltration and recharge processes in karst systems are complex and difficult to measure with conventional hydrological methods. In particular, temporarily saturated groundwater reservoirs hosted in the vadose zone can play a buffering role in water infiltration. This results from the pronounced porosity and permeability contrasts created by local karstification processes of carbonate rocks. Analyses of time-lapse 2-D geoelectrical imaging over a period of 3 years at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (RCL) site in south Belgium highlight variable hydrodynamics in a karst vadose zone. This represents the first long-term and permanently installed electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring in a karst landscape. The collected data were compared to conventional hydrological measurements (drip discharge monitoring, soil moisture and water conductivity data sets) and a detailed structural analysis of the local geological structures providing a thorough understanding of the groundwater infiltration. Seasonal changes affect all the imaged areas leading to increases in resistivity in spring and summer attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration, whereas winter is characterised by a general decrease in resistivity associated with a groundwater recharge of the vadose zone. Three types of hydrological dynamics, corresponding to areas with distinct lithological and structural features, could be identified via changes in resistivity: (D1) upper conductive layers, associated with clay-rich soil and epikarst, showing the highest variability related to weather conditions; (D2) deeper and more resistive limestone areas, characterised by variable degrees of porosity and clay contents, hence showing more diffuse seasonal variations; and (D3) a conductive fractured zone associated with damped seasonal dynamics, while showing a great variability similar to that of the upper layers in response to rainfall events. This study provides detailed images of the sources of drip

  1. Imaging groundwater infiltration dynamics in the karst vadose zone with long-term ERT monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Watlet

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water infiltration and recharge processes in karst systems are complex and difficult to measure with conventional hydrological methods. In particular, temporarily saturated groundwater reservoirs hosted in the vadose zone can play a buffering role in water infiltration. This results from the pronounced porosity and permeability contrasts created by local karstification processes of carbonate rocks. Analyses of time-lapse 2-D geoelectrical imaging over a period of 3 years at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (RCL site in south Belgium highlight variable hydrodynamics in a karst vadose zone. This represents the first long-term and permanently installed electrical resistivity tomography (ERT monitoring in a karst landscape. The collected data were compared to conventional hydrological measurements (drip discharge monitoring, soil moisture and water conductivity data sets and a detailed structural analysis of the local geological structures providing a thorough understanding of the groundwater infiltration. Seasonal changes affect all the imaged areas leading to increases in resistivity in spring and summer attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration, whereas winter is characterised by a general decrease in resistivity associated with a groundwater recharge of the vadose zone. Three types of hydrological dynamics, corresponding to areas with distinct lithological and structural features, could be identified via changes in resistivity: (D1 upper conductive layers, associated with clay-rich soil and epikarst, showing the highest variability related to weather conditions; (D2 deeper and more resistive limestone areas, characterised by variable degrees of porosity and clay contents, hence showing more diffuse seasonal variations; and (D3 a conductive fractured zone associated with damped seasonal dynamics, while showing a great variability similar to that of the upper layers in response to rainfall events. This study provides detailed images of

  2. Dynamic optimal control of groundwater remediation with management periods: Linearized and quasi-Newton approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, T.B.

    1991-01-01

    Several modifications of the linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) optimization algorithm are developed, and the computational efficiency of each algorithm with respect to groundwater remediation is evaluated. In each case, the optimization model is combined with a finite element groundwater flow and transport simulation model to determine the optimal time-varying pump-and-treat policy. The first modification of the LQR algorithm incorporated management periods, which are groups of simulation time steps during which the pumping policy remains constant. Management periods reduced the total computational demand, as measured by the CPU time, by as much as 85% compared to the time needed for the LQR solution without management periods. Complexity analysis revealed that computational savings of equal or greater magnitude can be expected in general for groundwater remediation applications and for many other applications of dynamic control. The LQR algorithm with management periods was further modified by assuming steady-state hydraulics within a management period (SSLQR), which simplifies the derivatives of the transition equation. A quasi-Newton differential dynamic programming (QNDDP) was formulated by approximating the complicated second derivatives of the transition equation using a Broyden rank-one approximation. QNDDP converged to the optimal policy for the test problem significantly faster than the LQR algorithm, requiring approximately half the computational time. With the test problem expanded to include the capacity of the treatment facility as a state variable, QNDDP with management periods can determine the optimal treatment facility capacity. With many management periods, the addition of the capital costs of the treatment facility changed the optimal policy so that the required treatment facility capacity was reduced

  3. Effects of harvest on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest forest catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used a new ecohydrological model, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessments (VELMA), to analyze the effects of forest harvest on catchment carbon and nitrogen dynamics. We applied the model to a 10 ha headwater catchment in the western Oregon Cascade Range where t...

  4. Learning nitrogen-vacancy electron spin dynamics on a silicon quantum photonic simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Paesani, S.; Santagati, R.; Knauer, S.; Gentile, A. A.; Wiebe, N.; Petruzzella, M.; Laing, A.; Rarity, J. G.; O'Brien, J. L.; Thompson, M. G.

    2017-01-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of quantum Hamiltonian learning. Using an integrated silicon-photonics quantum simulator with the classical machine learning technique, we successfully learn the Hamiltonian dynamics of a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center's electron ground-state spin.

  5. Burrowing herbivores alter soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a semi-arid ecosystem, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Jose L. Hierro; Diego Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Activities of burrowing herbivores, including movement of soil and litter and deposition of waste material, can alter the distribution of labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil, affecting spatial patterning of nutrient dynamics in ecosystems where they are abundant. Their role in ecosystem processes in surface soil has been studied extensively, but effects of...

  6. Carbon respiration and nitrogen dynamics in Corsican pine litter amended with aluminium and tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Kaal, J.; Tietema, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the carbon (C) mineralisation and nitrogen (N) dynamics in litter from a Corsican pine forest in response to individual and combined additions of aluminium (M), condensed tannin (extracted from fresh Corsican pine needles) and hydrolysable tannin (commercial tannic acid). Production

  7. Prescribed fire, soil inorganic nitrogen dynamics, and plant responses in a semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Augustine; Paul Brewer; Dana M. Blumenthal; Justin D. Derner; Joseph C. von Fischer

    2014-01-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems, fire can potentially affect ecosystem dynamics through changes in soil moisture, temperature, and nitrogen cycling, as well as through direct effects on plant meristem mortality. We examined effects of annual and triennial prescribed fires conducted in early spring on soil moisture, temperature, and N, plant growth, and plant N content...

  8. Nitrogen Dynamics in the Westerschelde Estuary (Sw Netherlands) Estimated by Means of the Ecosystem Model Moses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Herman, P.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A tentative nitrogen budget for the Westerschelde (SW Netherlands) is constructed by means of a simulation model with thirteen spatial compartments. Biochemical and chemical processes in the water column are dynamically modeled; fluxes of dissolved constituents across the water-bottom interface are

  9. Water and nitrogen dynamics in rotational woodlots of five tree species in western Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyadzi, G.I.; Janssen, B.H.; Otsyina, R.M.; Booltink, H.W.G.; Ong, C.K.; Oenema, O.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of woodlots of five tree species, continuous maize (Zea mays L.) and natural fallow on soil water and nitrogen dynamics in western Tanzania. The tree species evaluated were Acacia crassicarpa (A. Cunn. ex Benth.), Acacia julifera ( Berth.),

  10. Dynamics of vapor bubbles in nitrogen tetroxide in conditions of pipeline seal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpova, T.A.; Kolesnikov, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of cavitation processe ocurring in liquid nitrogen tetroxide with an abrupt liquid pressure drop in a temperature range from 300 to 333 K. An influence of the initial process temperature and pressure drop on dynamics of vapor bubbles with regard for heat transfer processes and phase transition liquid-vapor has been investigated

  11. Effects of soil mesofauna and microclimate on nitrogen dynamics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    Jul 13, 2011 ... In this paper, carbon (C) and N dynamics in decomposing. Castanopsis ... between litter wet and dry weights divided by the dry weight and ..... 45. 55. 65. 75. EVB. COF. DWF. ALM sites. M e a n a n n u a. l a ir te m p e ra tu re.

  12. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, P.J.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  13. Dynamic factor analysis of groundwater quality trends in an agricultural area adjacent to Everglades National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Carpena, R.; Ritter, A.; Li, Y. C.

    2005-11-01

    The extensive eastern boundary of Everglades National Park (ENP) in south Florida (USA) is subject to one of the most expensive and ambitious environmental restoration projects in history. Understanding and predicting the water quality interactions between the shallow aquifer and surface water is a key component in meeting current environmental regulations and fine-tuning ENP wetland restoration while still maintaining flood protection for the adjacent developed areas. Dynamic factor analysis (DFA), a recent technique for the study of multivariate non-stationary time-series, was applied to study fluctuations in groundwater quality in the area. More than two years of hydrological and water quality time series (rainfall; water table depth; and soil, ground and surface water concentrations of N-NO 3-, N-NH 4+, P-PO 43-, Total P, F -and Cl -) from a small agricultural watershed adjacent to the ENP were selected for the study. The unexplained variability required for determining the concentration of each chemical in the 16 wells was greatly reduced by including in the analysis some of the observed time series as explanatory variables (rainfall, water table depth, and soil and canal water chemical concentration). DFA results showed that groundwater concentration of three of the agrochemical species studied (N-NO 3-, P-PO 43-and Total P) were affected by the same explanatory variables (water table depth, enriched topsoil, and occurrence of a leaching rainfall event, in order of decreasing relative importance). This indicates that leaching by rainfall is the main mechanism explaining concentration peaks in groundwater. In the case of N-NH 4+, in addition to leaching, groundwater concentration is governed by lateral exchange with canals. F -and Cl - are mainly affected by periods of dilution by rainfall recharge, and by exchange with the canals. The unstructured nature of the common trends found suggests that these are related to the complex spatially and temporally varying

  14. Dynamics of trace elements in shallow groundwater of an agricultural land in the northeast of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Abrahan; Mahlknecht, Jürgen; Hernández-Antonio, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    The citrus zone located in northeastern Mexico covers an area of 8000 km2 and produces 10% of the Mexican citrus production. The aquifer system of this zone constitutes the major source of water for drinking and irrigation purposes for local population and provides base flows to surface water supplied to the city of Monterrey ( 4.5 million inhabitants). Although the study area is near the recharge zones, several works have reported nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater of this agricultural area, mainly due to animal manure and human waste produced by infiltration of urban sewers and septic tanks. Thus, the goals of this work were to assess the dynamics of selected trace elements in this aquifer system and determine if the trace element content in groundwater poses a threat to the population living in the area. Thirty-nine shallow water wells were sampled in 2010. These water samples were filtered through 0,45 µm pore size membranes and preserved with nitric acid for storage. The concentrations of Cd, Cs, Cu, Mo, Pb, Rb, Si, Ti, U, Y, and Zn were measured by ICP-MS. Also, sulfate concentrations were measured by ion chromatography in unacidified samples. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed in the data set show five principal components (PC). PC1 includes elements derived from silicate weathering, such as Si and Ti. The relationship found between Mo and U with sulfates in PC2 indicates that both elements show a high mobility in groundwater. Indeed, the concentrations of sulfate, Mo and U are increased as groundwater moves eastward. PC3 includes the alkali trace elements (Rb and Cs), indicating that both elements could be derived from the same source of origin. PC4 represents the heavy trace elements (Cd and Pb) whereas PC5 includes divalent trace elements such as Zn and Cu. None of the water samples showed trace element concentrations higher than the guideline values for drinking water proposed by the World Health Organization, which indicates that the

  15. Online flow cytometry reveals microbial dynamics influenced by concurrent natural and operational events in groundwater used for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Michael D; Epting, Jannis; Page, Rebecca M; Sigrist, Jürg A; Huggenberger, Peter; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-12-07

    Detailed measurements of physical, chemical and biological dynamics in groundwater are key to understanding the important processes in place and their influence on water quality - particularly when used for drinking water. Measuring temporal bacterial dynamics at high frequency is challenging due to the limitations in automation of sampling and detection of the conventional, cultivation-based microbial methods. In this study, fully automated online flow cytometry was applied in a groundwater system for the first time in order to monitor microbial dynamics in a groundwater extraction well. Measurements of bacterial concentrations every 15 minutes during 14 days revealed both aperiodic and periodic dynamics that could not be detected previously, resulting in total cell concentration (TCC) fluctuations between 120 and 280 cells μL -1 . The aperiodic dynamic was linked to river water contamination following precipitation events, while the (diurnal) periodic dynamic was attributed to changes in hydrological conditions as a consequence of intermittent groundwater extraction. Based on the high number of measurements, the two patterns could be disentangled and quantified separately. This study i) increases the understanding of system performance, ii) helps to optimize monitoring strategies, and iii) opens the possibility for more sophisticated (quantitative) microbial risk assessment of drinking water treatment systems.

  16. Nitrogen Dynamic Study on Rice Mutant Lines Using 15N Isotope Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nazrul Abd Wahid; Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2015-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency in collaboration with UPM and MARDI has produced two types of rice mutant lines of MR219, viz. MR219-4 and MR219-9 developed under rice radiation mutagenenesis programme for adaptability to aerobic conditions. Aerobic cultivating is rice cultivation system on well drained soil and using minimal water input. At Malaysian Nuclear Agency, a nitrogen fertilization study in aerobic condition for the rice mutant lines was carried out in the shade house and field. The study is intended to examine and assess the dynamics of nitrogen by rice mutant lines through the different soil water management and nitrogen levels. Direct 15 N isotopic tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15 N labeled urea fertilizer was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake by the test crops. This paper is intended to highlight the progress that has been made in the study of the nitrogen dynamics on MR219-4 and MR219-9 rice mutant lines. (author)

  17. Dynamic strain ageing of deformed nitrogen-alloyed AISI 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnsten, U.; Toivonen, A.; Ivanchenko, M.; Nevdacha, V.; Yagozinskyy, Y.; Haenninen, H.

    2004-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has occurred in BWR environment in non-sensitized, deformed austenitic stainless steel materials. The affecting parameters are so far not fully known, but deformation mechanisms may be decisive. The effect of deformation and nitrogen content on the behaviour of austenitic stainless steels was investigated. The materials were austenitic stainless steels of AISI 316L type with different amounts of nitrogen (0.03 - 0.18%) and they were mechanically deformed 0, 5 and 20%. The investigations are focused on the dynamic strain ageing (DSA) behaviour. A few crack growth rate measurements are performed on nuclear grade AISI 316NG material with different degrees of deformation (0, 5 and 20%). The effects of DSA on mechanical properties of these materials are evaluated based on peaks in ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening coefficient and minimum in ductility in the DSA temperature range. Additionally, internal friction measurements have been performed in the temperature range of -100 to 600 deg. C for determining nitrogen interactions with other alloying elements and dislocations (cold-worked samples). The results show an effect of nitrogen on the stainless steel behaviour, e.g. clear indications of dynamic strain ageing and changes in the internal friction peaks as a function of nitrogen content and amount of deformation. (authors)

  18. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  19. Control of Groundwater Pollution from Animal Feeding Operations: A Farm-Level Dynamic Model for Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Baerenklau, K.

    2012-12-01

    Consolidation in livestock production generates higher farm incomes due to economies of scale, but it also brings waste disposal problems. Over-application of animal waste on adjacent land produces adverse environmental and health effects, including groundwater nitrate pollution. The situation is particularly noticeable in California. In respond to this increasingly severe problem, EPA published a type of command-and-control regulation for concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in 2003. The key component of the regulation is its nutrient management plans (NMPs), which intend to limit the land application rates of animal waste. Although previous studies provide a full perspective on potential economic impacts for CAFOs to meet nutrient standards, their models are static and fail to reflect changes in management practices other than spreading manure on additional land and changing cropping patterns. We develop a dynamic environmental-economic modeling framework for representative CAFOs. The framework incorporates four models (i.e., animal model, crop model, hydrologic model, and economic model) that include various components such as herd management, manure handling system, crop rotation, water sources, irrigation system, waste disposal options, and pollutant emissions. We also include the dynamics of soil characteristics in the rootzone as well as the spatial heterogeneity of the irrigation system. The operator maximizes discounted total farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. Decision rules from the dynamic optimization problem demonstrate best management practices for CAFOs to improve their economic and environmental performance. Results from policy simulations suggest that direct quantity restrictions of emission or incentive-based emission policies are much more cost-effective than the standard approach of limiting the amount of animal waste that may be applied to fields (as shown in the figure below); reason being

  20. Nutrient Management Programs, Nitrogen Fertilizer Practices, and Groundwater Quality in Nebraska’s Central Platte Valley (U.S., 1989–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Daberkow

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the societal concern about groundwater pollution from agricultural sources, public programs have been proposed or implemented to change farmer behavior with respect to nutrient use and management. However, few of these programs designed to change farmer behavior have been evaluated due to the lack of detailed data over an appropriate time frame. The Central Platte Natural Resources District (CPNRD in Nebraska has identified an intensively cultivated, irrigated area with average groundwater nitrate-nitrogen (N levels about double the EPA’s safe drinking water standard. The CPNRD implemented a joint education and regulatory N management program in the mid-1980s to reduce groundwater N. This analysis reports N use and management, yield, and groundwater nitrate trends in the CPNRD for nearly 3000 continuous-corn fields from 1989 to 1998, where producers faced limits on the timing of N fertilizer application but no limits on amounts. Groundwater nitrate levels showed modest improvement over the 10 years of this analysis, falling from the 1989–1993 average of 18.9 to 18.1 mg/l during 1994–1998. The availability of N in excess of crop needs was clearly documented by the CPNRD data and was related to optimistic yield goals, irrigation water use above expected levels, and lack of adherence to commercial fertilizer application guidelines. Over the 10-year period of this analysis, producers reported harvesting an annual average of 9729 kg/ha, 1569 kg/ha (14% below the average yield goal. During 1989�1998, producers reported annually applying an average of 162.5 kg/ha of commercial N fertilizer, 15.7 kg/ha (10% above the guideline level. Including the N contribution from irrigation water, the potential N contribution to the environment (total N available less estimated crop use was estimated at 71.7 kg/ha. This is an estimate of the nitrates available for denitrification, volatilization, runoff, future soil N, and leaching to groundwater. On

  1. Effects of road salts on groundwater and surface water dynamics of socium and chloride in an urban restored stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Road salts are a growing environmental concern in urban watersheds. We examined groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) dynamics of Na+ and Cl− in Minebank Run (MBR), an urban stream in Maryland, USA. We observed an increasing salinity trend in this restored stream. Current basef...

  2. Groundwater and surface water dynamics of Na and Cl in an urban stream: effects of road salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractRoad salts are a growing environmental and health concern in urban watersheds. We examined groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) dynamics of Na and Cl in an urban stream, Minebank Run (MBR), MD. We observed an increasing salinity trend in this restored stream. Current b...

  3. Rainwater lens dynamics and mixing between infiltrating rainwater and upward saline groundwater seepage beneath a tile-drained agricultural field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louw, de P.G.B.; Eeman, S.; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Vermue, E.; Post, V.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thin rainwater lenses (RW-lenses) near the land surface are often the only source of freshwater in agricultural areas with regionally-extensive brackish to saline groundwater. The seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of these lenses are poorly known. Here this knowledge gap is addressed by

  4. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eSpät

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth’s biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signalling, adaptation and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry towards the unbiased detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labelling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phosphoproteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2,382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2,111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 hours. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signalling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria.

  5. Understanding groundwater dynamics on barrier islands using geochronological data: An example from North Stradbroke Island, South-east Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Harald; Newborn, Dean; Cartwright, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater lenses underneath barrier islands are dynamic systems affected by changing sea levels and groundwater use. They are vulnerable to contamination and over-abstraction. Residence times of fresh groundwater in barrier islands are poorly understood and have mostly been assessed by modelling approaches and estimates without fundamental validation with geochronological data. Assessing residence time and recharge rates will improve significantly our understanding of hydrological processes of coastal environments that will in turn allow us to make informed decisions on groundwater use and environmental protection. This project focused on groundwater recharge rates and residence times of the fresh water aquifer system of North Stradbroke Island, south-east Queensland, Australia. Groundwater bores, wetlands and submarine groundwater discharge points in the tidal areas (wonky holes) were sampled along a transect across the island and were analysed for major ion chemistry and stable isotopes (δ2H, δ18O, δ13C) in combination with 3H and 14C analysis. Calculated 3H using a 95% exponential-piston flow model and 14C ages range from 12 to >100 years and modern to 3770 years, respectively, indicating a highly heterogeneous aquifer system with mixing from low and high conductive areas. The major ion chemistry in combination with stable and radiogenic isotopes suggests that a significant groundwater component derives from the fractured rock basement and older sedimentary formations underlying the sand dunes of the island. The results help refining the conceptual and numerical groundwater flow model for North Stradbroke island in this particular case but also demonstrate the possible complexity of barrier island hydrogeology.

  6. Nitrogen-isotopes and multi-parameter sewage water test for identification of nitrate sources: Groundwater body Marchfeld East of Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The application of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate allows, under favourable circumstances, to identify potential sources such as precipitation, chemical fertilisers and manure or sewage water. Without any additional tracer, the source distinction of nitrate from manure or sewage water is still difficult. Even the application of boron isotopes can in some cases not avoid ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, the Environment Agency Austria developed a new multi parametrical indicator test to allow the identification and quantification of pollution by domestic sewage water. The test analyses 8 substances well known to occur in sewage water: Acesulfame and sucralose (two artificial, calorie-free sweeteners), benzotriazole and tolyltriazole (two industrial chemicals/corrosion inhibitors), metoprolol, sotalol, carbamazepine and the metabolite 10,11-Dihydro-10,11-dihydroxycarbamazepine (pharmaceuticals) [1]. These substances are polar and degradation in the aquatic system by microbiological processes is not documented. These 8 Substances do not occur naturally which make them ideal tracers. The test can detect wastewater in the analysed water sample down to 0.1 %. This ideal coupling of these analytic tests helps to identify the nitrogen sources in the groundwater body Marchfeld East of Vienna to a high confidence level. In addition, the results allow a reasonable quantification of nitrogen sources from different types of fertilizers as well as sewage water contributions close to villages and in wells recharged by bank filtration. Recent investigations of groundwater in selected wells in Marchfeld [2] indicated a clear nitrogen contribution by wastewater leakages (sewers or septic tanks) to the total nitrogen budget. However, this contribution is shrinking and the main source comes still from agricultural activities. [1] Humer, F.; Weiss, S.; Reinnicke, S.; Clara, M.; Grath, J.; Windhofer, G. (2013): Multi parametrical indicator test for urban wastewater influence

  7. Predicting major subsurface transport pathways as a key to understand spatial dynamics of reactive nitrogen in stream water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, P.; Dalgaard, Tommy; Schelde, Kirsten

    Process based modelling of nitrogen turnover and transport is mainly focused on the plot and field scale. However, scaling up to the landscape level with sufficient topographic gradient and conductivities, Nr is relocated in the landscape through surface runoff, interflow as well as lateral...... groundwater movement. Cause and effects of Nr Approach can therefore be spatially disaggregated, i.e. leached Nr applied uphill on agricultural land can for example lead to gaseous N emissions downhill in riparian plains. In the Danish NitroEurope study landscape, lateral translocation of dissolved nitrogen...

  8. EFFECTS OF NITRIFICATION INHIBITORS ON MINERAL NITROGEN DYNAMICS IN AGRICULTURE SOILS

    OpenAIRE

    Ferisman Tindaon; Gero Benckiser; ohannes Carl Gottlieb Ottow

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to elucidate the effect of three nitrification inhibitors viz, 3.4dimethylpyrazo-lephosphate (DMPP), 4-Chlormethylpyrazole (ClMP) and dicyandiamide (DCD) on mineral nitrogen dynamics of (NH4)2SO4 in soil incubated at 25oC in soils. The quantitative determination of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were carried out spectrophotometrically, while potential denitrify-cation capacity (PDC) was measured gas chromatographically. DMPP, ClMP and DCD ...

  9. Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Mineral Nitrogen Dynamics in Agriculture Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Tindaon, Ferisman; Benckiser, Gero; Ottow, Johannes Carl Gottlieb

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to elucidate the effect of three nitrification inhibitors viz, 3.4dime-thylpyrazo-lephosphate (DMPP), 4-Chlormethylpyrazole (ClMP) and dicyandiamide (DCD) on mineral nitrogen dynamics of (NH4)2SO4 in soil incubated at 25oC in soils. The quantitative determination of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were carried out spectrophotometrically, while potential denitrify-cation capacity (PDC) was measured gas chromatographically. DMPP, ClMP and DCD...

  10. Predicting nitrogen and acidity effects on long-term dynamics of dissolved organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, E.C.; Tipping, E.; Posch, M.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.M.; Jones, T.G.; Burden, A.; Hall, J.; Evans, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes may relate to changes in sulphur and nitrogen pollution. We integrated existing models of vegetation growth and soil organic matter turnover, acid-base dynamics, and organic matter mobility, to form the ‘MADOC’ model. After calibrating parameters governing interactions between pH and DOC dissolution using control treatments on two field experiments, MADOC reproduced responses of pH and DOC to additions of acidifying and alkalising solutions. ...

  11. Study of vapour phase dynamics with nitrogen boiling in the field of centrifugal forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, N.M.; Kolod'ko, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    The vapour phase dynamics during film boiling of liquid nitrogen on horizontal wire in the field of centrifugal forces has been studied experimentally in a wide range of overloads(1 ≤ η ≤ 375) and heat fluxes (q kp2 ≤ q ≤ 4q kpi ). The available data confirmed and the theoretical relationships suggested make it possible to calculate the hydrodynamic film boiling parameters (wave length, bubble departure diameter and frequency) for other liquids

  12. Permafrost carbon−climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koven, Charles D.; Lawrence, David M.; Riley, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon whose stability is contingent on remaining frozen. With future warming, these soils may release carbon to the atmosphere and act as a positive feedback to climate change. Significant uncertainty remains on the postthaw carbon dynamics of permafrost-affected ecosystems, in particular since most of the carbon resides at depth where decomposition dynamics may differ from surface soils, and since nitrogen mineralized by decomposition may enhance plant growth. Here we show, using a carbon−nitrogen model that includes permafrost processes forced in an unmitigated warming scenario, that the future carbon balance of the permafrost region is highly sensitive to the decomposability of deeper carbon, with the net balance ranging from 21 Pg C to 164 Pg C losses by 2300. Increased soil nitrogen mineralization reduces nutrient limitations, but the impact of deep nitrogen on the carbon budget is small due to enhanced nitrogen availability from warming surface soils and seasonal asynchrony between deeper nitrogen availability and plant nitrogen demands. Although nitrogen dynamics are highly uncertain, the future carbon balance of this region is projected to hinge more on the rate and extent of permafrost thaw and soil decomposition than on enhanced nitrogen availability for vegetation growth resulting from permafrost thaw. PMID:25775603

  13. On the dynamics of a subnanosecond breakdown in nitrogen below atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shklyaev, V. A., E-mail: shklyaev@to.hcei.tsc.ru, E-mail: beh@loi.hcei.tsc.ru [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Baksht, E. Kh., E-mail: shklyaev@to.hcei.tsc.ru, E-mail: beh@loi.hcei.tsc.ru; Tarasenko, V. F. [Laboratory of Optical Radiations, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Grishkov, A. A. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Burachenko, A. G. [Laboratory of Optical Radiations, Institute of High Current Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Low Temperature Plasma, Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The dynamics of a breakdown in a gas-filled diode with a highly inhomogeneous electric field was studied in experiments at a time resolution of ∼100 ps and in numerical simulation by the 2D axisymmetric particle-in-cell (PIC) code XOOPIC. The diode was filled with nitrogen at pressures of up to 100 Torr. The dynamics of the electric field distribution in the diode during the breakdown was analyzed, and the factors that limit the pulse duration of the runaway electron beam current at different pressures were determined.

  14. Plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations and follicular dynamics in ewes fed proteins of different degradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bianchi Lazarin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of overfeeding with protein of different degradability on body condition, plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone concentrations, ovulation number and follicular dynamics were assessed in Santa Ines ewes. Twelve ewes were assigned to a randomized block design according to body weight and received overfeeding with soybean meal or with corn gluten meal or maintenance diet for 28 days before ovulation and during the next estrous cycle. Blood samples were taken on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the beginning of treatments for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and on days 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 into the estrous cycle for analysis of plasma urea nitrogen and progesterone. Follicular dynamics was monitored daily by ultrasound during one estrous cycle. Dry matter and crude protein intake, weight gain, plasma urea nitrogen concentration before ovulation, number of ovulations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 1st and of the 2nd waves and the growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave were higher in the ewes that received overfeeding. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave was higher in the ewes fed maintenance diet. The back fat thickness, plasma urea nitrogen before ovulation and progesterone concentrations, diameter of the largest follicle of the 2nd wave and growth rate of the largest follicle of the 3rd wave were higher in ewes that received overfeeding with soybean meal. The growth rate of the largest follicle of the 1st wave was higher in ewes that received overfeeding with corn gluten meal. Overfeeding with protein-rich feeds may increase the ovulation number and with soybean meal, it may be effective in increasing plasma progesterone concentration in ewes.

  15. Nitrogen isotopes suggest a change in nitrogen dynamics between the Late Pleistocene and modern time in Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, Fred J.; Zazula, Grant

    2018-01-01

    A magnificent repository of Late Pleistocene terrestrial megafauna fossils is contained in ice-rich loess deposits of Alaska and Yukon, collectively eastern Beringia. The stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope compositions of bone collagen from these fossils are routinely used to determine paleodiet and reconstruct the paleoecosystem. This approach requires consideration of changes in C- and N-isotope dynamics over time and their effects on the terrestrial vegetation isotopic baseline. To test for such changes between the Late Pleistocene and modern time, we compared δ13C and δ15N for vegetation and bone collagen and structural carbonate of some modern, Yukon, arctic ground squirrels with vegetation and bones from Late Pleistocene fossil arctic ground squirrel nests preserved in Yukon loess deposits. The isotopic discrimination between arctic ground squirrel bone collagen and their diet was measured using modern samples, as were isotopic changes during plant decomposition; Over-wintering decomposition of typical vegetation following senescence resulted in a minor change (~0–1 ‰) in δ13C of modern Yukon grasses. A major change (~2–10 ‰) in δ15N was measured for decomposing Yukon grasses thinly covered by loess. As expected, the collagen-diet C-isotope discrimination measured for modern samples confirms that modern vegetation δ13C is a suitable proxy for the Late Pleistocene vegetation in Yukon Territory, after correction for the Suess effect. The N-isotope composition of vegetation from the fossil arctic ground squirrel nests, however, is determined to be ~2.8 ‰ higher than modern grasslands in the region, after correction for decomposition effects. This result suggests a change in N dynamics in this region between the Late Pleistocene and modern time. PMID:29447202

  16. Desert and groundwater dynamics of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, southeast Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Hasiotis, S. T.; Parrish, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    The Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southeastern Utah is a rich archive of a desert complex with an active groundwater system, influenced by climate changes and recharge from the Uncompahgre Uplift of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains. This eastern erg margin was dominated by dune deposits of large (>10 m thick) and small (m-scale) crossbedded sandstone sets. Within these porous deposits, common soft sediment deformation is expressed as contorted and upturned bedding, fluid escape structures, concentrations of clastic pipes with ring faults, and thick intervals of massive sandstone embedded in crossbedded sandstone. Collectively, these deformation features reflect changes and/or overpressure in the groundwater system. Interdune deposits record laterally variable bounding surfaces, resulting from the change in position of and proximity to the water table. Interdune modification by pedogenesis from burrows, roots, and trees suggest stable periods of moisture and water supply, as well as periodic drying expressed as polygonal cracked mud- to sand-cracked layers. Freshwater bedded and platy limestone beds represent lakes of decameter to kilometer extent, common in the upper part of the formation. Some carbonate springs that fed the lakes are preserved as limestone buildups (tufa mounds) with microbial structures. Extradunal deposits of rivers to small ephemeral streams show channelized and lenticular, subhorizontal, cm- to m-scale sandstone bodies with basal scours and rip-up clasts. Proxy records of the active hydrology imply a changing landscape at the Navajo desert's edge, punctuated by periods of significant rainfall, runoff, rivers, lakes, and springs, fed by high water table conditions to sustain periods of flourishing communities of plants, arthropods, reptiles, mammals, and dinosaurs. Strong ground motion perturbations periodically disrupted porous, water-saturated sands with possible surface eruptions, adding to the dynamic activity of the desert regime.

  17. Catchment features controlling nitrogen dynamics in running waters above the tree line (central Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Balestrini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of nitrogen cycling in mountain areas has a long tradition, as it was applied to better understand and describe ecosystem functioning, as well as to quantify long-distance effects of human activities on remote environments. Nonetheless, very few studies, especially in Europe, have considered catchment features controlling nitrogen dynamics above the tree line with focus on running waters. In this study, relationships between some water chemistry descriptors – including nitrogen species and dissolved organic carbon (DOC – and catchment characteristics were evaluated for a range of sites located above the tree line (1950–2650 m a.s.l. at Val Masino, in the central Italian Alps. Land cover categories as well as elevation and slope were assessed at each site. Water samples were collected during the 2007 and 2008 snow free periods, with a nearly monthly frequency. In contrast to dissolved organic nitrogen, nitrate concentrations in running waters showed a spatial pattern strictly connected to the fractional extension of tundra and talus in each basin. Exponential models significantly described the relationships between maximum NO3 and the fraction of vegetated soil cover (negative relation and talus (positive relation, explaining almost 90% of nitrate variation in running waters. Similarly to nitrate but with an opposite behavior, DOC was positively correlated with vegetated soil cover and negatively correlated with talus. Therefore, land cover can be considered one of the most important factors affecting water quality in high-elevation catchments with contrasting effects on N and C pools.

  18. Groundwater nitrogen pollution and assessment of its health risks: a case study of a typical village in rural-urban continuum, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    Full Text Available Protecting groundwater from nitrogen contamination is an important public-health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. In this study, we monitored water quality in 29 wells from 2009 to 2010 in a village in Shanghai city, whick belong to typical rural-urban continuum in China. The total N and NO(3-N exhibited seasonal changes, and there were large fluctuations in NH(4-N in residential areas, but without significant seasonal patterns. NO(2-N in the water was not stable, but was present at high levels. Total N and NO(3-N were significantly lower in residential areas than in agricultural areas. The groundwater quality in most wells belonged to Class III and IV in the Chinese water standard, which defines water that is unsuitable for human consumption. Our health risk assessments showed that NO(3-N posed the greatest carcinogenic risk, with risk values ranging from 19×10(-6 to 80×10(-6, which accounted for more than 90% of the total risk in the study area.

  19. Complementary effects of surface water and groundwater on soil moisture dynamics in a degraded coastal floodplain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D.; Muñoz-Carpena, R.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryRestoration of degraded floodplain forests requires a robust understanding of surface water, groundwater, and vadose zone hydrology. Soil moisture is of particular importance for seed germination and seedling survival, but is difficult to monitor and often overlooked in wetland restoration studies. This research hypothesizes that the complex effects of surface water and shallow groundwater on the soil moisture dynamics of floodplain wetlands are spatially complementary. To test this hypothesis, 31 long-term (4-year) hydrological time series were collected in the floodplain of the Loxahatchee River (Florida, USA), where watershed modifications have led to reduced freshwater flow, altered hydroperiod and salinity, and a degraded ecosystem. Dynamic factor analysis (DFA), a time series dimension reduction technique, was applied to model temporal and spatial variation in 12 soil moisture time series as linear combinations of common trends (representing shared, but unexplained, variability) and explanatory variables (selected from 19 additional candidate hydrological time series). The resulting dynamic factor models yielded good predictions of observed soil moisture series (overall coefficient of efficiency = 0.90) by identifying surface water elevation, groundwater elevation, and net recharge (cumulative rainfall-cumulative evapotranspiration) as important explanatory variables. Strong and complementary linear relationships were found between floodplain elevation and surface water effects (slope = 0.72, R2 = 0.86, p < 0.001), and between elevation and groundwater effects (slope = -0.71, R2 = 0.71, p = 0.001), while the effect of net recharge was homogenous across the experimental transect (slope = 0.03, R2 = 0.05, p = 0.242). This study provides a quantitative insight into the spatial structure of groundwater and surface water effects on soil moisture that will be useful for refining monitoring plans and developing ecosystem restoration and management scenarios

  20. Velocity Potential in Engineering Hydraulics versus Force Potential in Groundwater Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, K.

    2013-12-01

    required to overcome the resistance to downward flow in penetrated rocks. As one of the consequences, the engineering hydraulics concept of buoyancy forces does not comply with physics. In general the vectorial forces within gravitationally-driven flow systems are ignored when using engineering hydraulics. Scheidegger (1974, p. 79) states, however, verbatim and unequivocally: 'It is thus a force potential and not a velocity potential which governs flow through porous media' (emphasis added). This presentation will outline the proper forces for groundwater flow and their calculations based on Hubbert's force potential and additional physical insights by Weyer (1978). REFERENCES Bear, J. 1972. Dynamics of Fluids in Porous Media. American Elsevier Publishing Company, Inc., New York, NY, USA. de Marsily, G. 1986. Quantitative Hydrogeology: Groundwater Hydrology for Engineers. Academic Press, San Diego, California, USA. Hubbert, M.K. 1940. The theory of groundwater motion. Journal of Geology 48(8): 785-944. Muskat, Morris, 1937. The flow of homogeneous fluids through porous media. McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., New York, NY, USA Scheidegger. A.E., 1974. The physics of flow through permeable media. Third Edition. University of Toronto Press, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Weyer, K.U., 1978. Hydraulic forces in permeable media. Bulletin du B.R.G.M., Vol. 91, pp. 286-297, Orléans, France.

  1. Nanopores creation in boron and nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Mohammadreza; Abadi, Rouzbeh; Nezhad Shirazi, Ali Hossein; Alajlan, Naif; Rabczuk, Timon

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, molecular dynamic simulations have been conducted to investigate the nanopores creation on 10% of boron and nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene by silicon and diamond nanoclusters. Two types of nanoclusters based on silicon and diamond are used to investigate their effect for the fabrication of nanopores. Therefore, three different diameter sizes of the clusters with five kinetic energies of 10, 50, 100, 300 and 500 eV/atom at four different locations in boron or nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene nanosheets have been perused. We also study the effect of 3% and 6% of boron doped polycrystalline graphene with the best outcome from 10% of doping. Our results reveal that the diamond cluster with diameter of 2 and 2.5 nm fabricates the largest nanopore areas on boron and nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene, respectively. Furthermore, the kinetic energies of 10 and 50 eV/atom can not fabricate nanopores in some cases for silicon and diamond clusters on boron doped polycrystalline graphene nanosheets. On the other hand, silicon and diamond clusters fabricate nanopores for all locations and all tested energies on nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene. The area sizes of nanopores fabricated by silicon and diamond clusters with diameter of 2 and 2.5 nm are close to the actual area size of the related clusters for the kinetic energy of 300 eV/atom in all locations on boron doped polycrystalline graphene. The maximum area and the average maximum area of nanopores are fabricated by the kinetic energy of 500 eV/atom inside the grain boundary at the center of the nanosheet and in the corner of nanosheet with diameters of 2 and 3 nm for silicon and diamond clusters on boron and nitrogen doped polycrystalline graphene.

  2. Experimental, Numerical, and Analytical Slosh Dynamics of Water and Liquid Nitrogen in a Spherical Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Jedediah Morse

    2016-01-01

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid slosh dynamics is critical to safety and improving performance of space missions when a significant percentage of the spacecraft's mass is a liquid. Computational fluid dynamics simulations can be used to predict the dynamics of slosh, but these programs require extensive validation. Many experimental and numerical studies of water slosh have been conducted. However, slosh data for cryogenic liquids is lacking. Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with a spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. A single ring baffle is installed in the tank for some of the tests. Analytical models for slosh modes, slosh forces, and baffle damping are constructed based on prior work. Select experiments are simulated using a commercial CFD software, and the numerical results are compared to the analytical and experimental results for the purposes of validation and methodology-improvement.

  3. Dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge and associated fluxes of dissolved nutrients, carbon, and trace gases to the coastal zone (Okatee River estuary, South Carolina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubsky, W.P.; Weston, N.B.; Moore, W.S.; Ruppel, C.; Joye, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple techniques, including thermal infrared aerial remote sensing, geophysical and geological data, geochemical characterization and radium isotopes, were used to evaluate the role of groundwater as a source of dissolved nutrients, carbon, and trace gases to the Okatee River estuary, South Carolina. Thermal infrared aerial remote sensing surveys illustrated the presence of multiple submarine groundwater discharge sites in Okatee headwaters. Significant relationships were observed between groundwater geochemical constituents and 226Ra activity in groundwater with higher 226Ra activity correlated to higher concentrations of organics, dissolved inorganic carbon, nutrients, and trace gases to the Okatee system. A system-level radium mass balance confirmed a substantial submarine groundwater discharge contribution of these constituents to the Okatee River. Diffusive benthic flux measurements and potential denitrification rate assays tracked the fate of constituents in creek bank sediments. Diffusive benthic fluxes were substantially lower than calculated radium-based submarine groundwater discharge inputs, showing that advection of groundwater-derived nutrients dominated fluxes in the system. While a considerable potential for denitrification in tidal creek bank sediments was noted, in situ denitrification rates were nitrate-limited, making intertidal sediments an inefficient nitrogen sink in this system. Groundwater geochemical data indicated significant differences in groundwater chemical composition and radium activity ratios between the eastern and western sides of the river; these likely arose from the distinct hydrological regimes observed in each area. Groundwater from the western side of the Okatee headwaters was characterized by higher concentrations of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, inorganic nutrients and reduced metabolites and trace gases, i.e. methane and nitrous oxide, than groundwater from the eastern side

  4. Dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics in the North Sea: A time series analysis (1995-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Engeland, T.; Soetaert, K.; Knuijt, A.; Laane, R. W. P. M.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) dynamics in the North Sea was explored by means of long-term time series of nitrogen parameters from the Dutch national monitoring program. Generally, the data quality was good with little missing data points. Different imputation methods were used to verify the robustness of the patterns against these missing data. No long-term trends in DON concentrations were found over the sampling period (1995-2005). Inter-annual variability in the different time series showed both common and station-specific behavior. The stations could be divided into two regions, based on absolute concentrations and the dominant times scales of variability. Average DON concentrations were 11 μmol l -1 in the coastal region and 5 μmol l -1 in the open sea. Organic fractions of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) averaged 38 and 71% in the coastal zone and open sea, respectively, but increased over time due to decreasing dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations. In both regions intra-annual variability dominated over inter-annual variability, but DON variation in the open sea was markedly shifted towards shorter time scales relative to coastal stations. In the coastal zone a consistent seasonal DON cycle existed with high values in spring-summer and low values in autumn-winter. In the open sea seasonality was weak. A marked shift in the seasonality was found at the Dogger Bank, with DON accumulation towards summer and low values in winter prior to 1999, and accumulation in spring and decline throughout summer after 1999. This study clearly shows that DON is a dynamic actor in the North Sea and should be monitored systematically to enable us to understand fully the functioning of this ecosystem.

  5. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth rate is regulated in response to the abundance and molecular form of essential nutrients. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), the molecular form of environmental nitrogen is a major determinant of cell growth rate, supporting growth rates that vary at least threefold. Transcriptional control of nitrogen use is mediated in large part by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which results in the repression of specific transcripts in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source that supports a fast growth rate, such as glutamine, that are otherwise expressed in the presence of a nonpreferred nitrogen source, such as proline, which supports a slower growth rate. Differential expression of the NCR regulon and additional nitrogen-responsive genes results in >500 transcripts that are differentially expressed in cells growing in the presence of different nitrogen sources in batch cultures. Here we find that in growth rate–controlled cultures using nitrogen-limited chemostats, gene expression programs are strikingly similar regardless of nitrogen source. NCR expression is derepressed in all nitrogen-limiting chemostat conditions regardless of nitrogen source, and in these conditions, only 34 transcripts exhibit nitrogen source–specific differential gene expression. Addition of either the preferred nitrogen source, glutamine, or the nonpreferred nitrogen source, proline, to cells growing in nitrogen-limited chemostats results in rapid, dose-dependent repression of the NCR regulon. Using a novel means of computational normalization to compare global gene expression programs in steady-state and dynamic conditions, we find evidence that the addition of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited cells results in the transient overproduction of transcripts required for protein translation. Simultaneously, we find that that accelerated mRNA degradation underlies the rapid clearing of a subset of transcripts, which is most pronounced for the highly expressed NCR

  6. A model of milk production in lactating dairy cows in relation to energy and nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, I R; France, J; Cullen, B R

    2016-02-01

    A generic daily time-step model of a dairy cow, designed to be included in whole-system pasture simulation models, is described that includes growth, milk production, and lactation in relation to energy and nitrogen dynamics. It is a development of a previously described animal growth and metabolism model that describes animal body composition in terms of protein, water, and fat, and energy dynamics in relation to growth requirements, resynthesis of degraded protein, and animal activity. This is further developed to include lactation and fetal growth. Intake is calculated in relation to stage of lactation, pasture availability, supplementary feed, and feed quality. Energy costs associated with urine N excretion and methane fermentation are accounted for. Milk production and fetal growth are then calculated in relation to the overall energy and nitrogen dynamics. The general behavior of the model is consistent with expected characteristics. Simulations using the model as part of a whole-system pasture simulation model (DairyMod) are compared with experimental data where good agreement between pasture, concentrate and forage intake, as well as milk production over 3 consecutive lactation cycles, is observed. The model is shown to be well suited for inclusion in large-scale system simulation models. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evolutionary Dynamics of Nitrogen Fixation in the Legume–Rhizobia Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hironori; Aoki, Seishiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The stabilization of host–symbiont mutualism against the emergence of parasitic individuals is pivotal to the evolution of cooperation. One of the most famous symbioses occurs between legumes and their colonizing rhizobia, in which rhizobia extract nutrients (or benefits) from legume plants while supplying them with nitrogen resources produced by nitrogen fixation (or costs). Natural environments, however, are widely populated by ineffective rhizobia that extract benefits without paying costs and thus proliferate more efficiently than nitrogen-fixing cooperators. How and why this mutualism becomes stabilized and evolutionarily persists has been extensively discussed. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of this symbiosis system, we construct a simple model based on the continuous snowdrift game with multiple interacting players. We investigate the model using adaptive dynamics and numerical simulations. We find that symbiotic evolution depends on the cost–benefit balance, and that cheaters widely emerge when the cost and benefit are similar in strength. In this scenario, the persistence of the symbiotic system is compatible with the presence of cheaters. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is robust to the emergence of cheaters, and may explain the prevalence of cheating rhizobia in nature. In addition, various stabilizing mechanisms, such as partner fidelity feedback, partner choice, and host sanction, can reinforce the symbiotic relationship by affecting the fitness of symbionts in various ways. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is cooperatively stabilized by various mechanisms. In addition, mixed nodule populations are thought to encourage cheater emergence, but our model predicts that, in certain situations, cheaters can disappear from such populations. These findings provide a theoretical basis of the evolutionary dynamics of legume–rhizobia symbioses, which is extendable to other single-host, multiple

  8. Research on the groundwater flow dynamics of Lamas basin by isotope methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onhon, E.; Sayin, M.; Basaran, N.; Can, D.; Yuce, G.; Pelen, N.; Kaplan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of Lamas Project is to define the relation between the recharge to highlands and the discharge realized by the springs along the Mediterranean coast and thus assist to the development of karst water resources by preparing a dependable evaluation of the water budget. The investigation area covers almost 4400 square kilometers where the elevation rises from 0 to 2900 m. Lamas is the main river crossing the area from northwest to southeast with a yield between 13.48 to 2.77 cu.m/s. the karstification in the area has at least reached 300 m in depth. The water samples were collected from 16 springs, 3 drilled wells, stream and two meteorological stations, to define the groundwater dynamics and investigate the relation between the sampling points and to assist the establishment of an evaluation in isotope hydrology. By taking into consideration the unmeasured discharges along the coast line, the infiltration from the precipitation is approximately 50-60 %. The water in the aquifer is isotopically affected by the infiltration of low altitude precipitation. The hydrogeological and isotope hydrology investigations have reached the conclusions that the karst water resources can be developed by drilling of deep wells near the karst springs. (author). 9 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Dynamic reallocation of marketable nitrogen emission permits in Danish freshwater aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Andersen, Jesper Levring; Bogetoft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    farms are gradually introduced to the industry over 10 years. The new industry structure, production, and profitability gains are investigated, and the effect of changing the overall level of nitrogen emission is analyzed. Our results show that there is scope for a more efficient allocation of resources...... to either increase the production level or to reduce the emission level. This article adds to the literature by extending previous static reallocation models to a dynamic model, which allows for a gradual introduction of new firms. This makes it possible for managers to analyze the effects of reallocating...

  10. Study of vapour phase dynamics with nitrogen boiling in the field of centrifugal forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchenko, N M; Kolod' ko, I M

    1987-07-01

    The vapour phase dynamics during film boiling of liquid nitrogen on horizontal wire in the field of centrifugal forces has been studied experimentally in a wide range of overloads(1 less than or equal to eta less than or equal to 375) and heat fluxes (q/sub kp2/ less than or equal to q less than or equal to 4q/sub kpi/). The available data confirmed and the theoretical relationships suggested make it possible to calculate the hydrodynamic film boiling parameters (wave length, bubble departure diameter and frequency) for other liquids.

  11. Dynamics of excited nitrogen molecular states in glow- and afterglow phases of discharge: experiment and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napartovich, A.P.; Akishev, Yu.S.; Dyatko, N.A.; Grushin, M.E.; Filippov, A.V.; Trushkin, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Population dynamics for a number of levels from N2 ( A 3 Σ + u ), N 2 (B 3 Π g ) and N 2 (C 3 Π u ) manifolds was studied spectroscopically in a long pulse glow discharge in pure nitrogen and in afterglow at pressure 50 Torr. Overshot in time behaviour of N 2 (A 3Σ + u ), N 2 (B 3 Π g ) and N 2 (C 3 Π u ) levels populations was revealed. A rather complete kinetic model is developed for conditions of the experiments. Results of comparison are analyzed

  12. Dynamic Succession of Groundwater Sulfate-Reducing Communities during Prolonged Reduction of Uranium in a Contaminated Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); He, Zhili [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Van Nostrand, Joy D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Qin, Yujia [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Deng, Ye [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Wu, Liyou [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Tu, Qichao [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Wang, Jianjun [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Nanjing (China); Schadt, Christopher W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); W. Fields, Matthew [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Hazen, Terry C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arkin, Adam P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stahl, David A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhou, Jizhong [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    2017-03-16

    To further understand the diversity and dynamics of SRB in response to substrate amendment, we sequenced in this paper genes coding for the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) in groundwater samples collected after an emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) amendment, which sustained U(VI)-reducing conditions for one year in a fast-flowing aquifer. EVO amendment significantly altered the composition of groundwater SRB communities. Sequences having no closely related-described species dominated (80%) the indigenous SRB communities in nonamended wells. After EVO amendment, Desulfococcus, Desulfobacterium, and Desulfovibrio, known for long-chain-fatty-acid, short-chain-fatty-acid and H2 oxidation and U(VI) reduction, became dominant accounting for 7 ± 2%, 21 ± 8%, and 55 ± 8% of the SRB communities, respectively. Succession of these SRB at different bioactivity stages based on redox substrates/products (acetate, SO4–2, U(VI), NO3, Fe(II), and Mn(II)) was observed. Desulfovibrio and Desulfococcus dominated SRB communities at 4–31 days, whereas Desulfobacterium became dominant at 80–140 days. By the end of the experiment (day 269), the abundance of these SRB decreased but the overall diversity of groundwater SRB was still higher than non-EVO controls. Up to 62% of the SRB community changes could be explained by groundwater geochemical variables, including those redox substrates/products. A significant (P < 0.001) correlation was observed between groundwater U(VI) concentrations and Desulfovibrio abundance. Finally, our results showed that the members of SRB and their dynamics were correlated significantly with slow EVO biodegradation, electron donor production and maintenance of U(VI)-reducing conditions in the aquifer.

  13. Development and Application of a Stakeholder Assisted Dynamic Model to Facilitate Socio Hydrological Groundwater Management on Watershed Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, A. I.; Adamowski, J. F.; Malard, J. J.; Peng, G.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater resource, especially in canal downstream areas are under direct threat due to over extraction by farming community. The resource is easily exploitable and no regulatory policies are enforced effectively in the region. Therefore, there is an urgent need to manage the resource judiciously through policy implementation and stakeholder engagement. In developing countries such as Pakistan, effective management solutions need consideration of some addition factors such as small land holdings, the poor economic status of farmers, and limited modeling and mathematical skills. This presentation will discuss development and application of a comprehensive but simple stakeholder assisted dynamic model to address such challenges. Two major components of the dynamic model were: (i) a system dynamics model that describes socio-economic factors such as market values; and ii) a physically based model that simulates the salt balance in the root zone with conjunctive use of canal and tube well irrigation water. Stakeholder proposed policy scenarios such as canal lining, government-sponsored tubewell installation schemes were tested and optimized through economic and environmental tradeoff criteria. After 20 years of simulation, government subsidies on tubewells appear as a short term policy that resulted 37% increase in water availability with 12% increase in farmer income. However, it showed detrimental effects on groundwater sustainability in long terms, with 10% drop in groundwater levels.

  14. Groundwater contamination from an inactive uranium mill tailings pile. 2. Application of a dynamic mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narashimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

    1986-01-01

    At Riverton, Wyoming, low pH process waters from an abandoned uranium mill tailings pile have been infiltrating into and contaminating the shallow water table aquifer. The contamination process has been governed by transient infiltration rates, saturated-unsaturated flow, as well as transient chemical reactions between the many chemical species present in the mixing waters and the sediments. In the first part of this two-part series the authors presented field data as well as an interpretation based on a static mixing models. As an upper bound, the authors estimated that 1.7% of the tailings water had mixed with the native groundwater. In the present work they present the results of numerical investigation of the dynamic mixing process. The model, DYNAMIX (DYNamic MIXing), couples a chemical speciation algorithm, PHREEQE, with a modified form of the transport algorithm, TRUMP, specifically designed to handle the simultaneous migration of several chemical constituents. The overall problem of simulating the evolution and migration of the contaminant plume was divided into three sub problems that were solved in sequential stages. These were the infiltration problem, the reactive mixing problem, and the plume-migration problem. The results of the application agree reasonably with the detailed field data. The methodology developed in the present study demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing the evolution of natural hydrogeochemical systems through a coupled analysis of transient fluid flow as well as chemical reactions. It seems worthwhile to devote further effort toward improving the physicochemical capabilities of the model as well as to enhance its computational efficiency

  15. Assessment of variables controlling nitrate dynamics in groundwater: is it a threat to surface aquatic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasiah, V; Armour, J D; Cogle, A L

    2005-01-01

    The impact of fertilised cropping on nitrate-N dynamics in groundwater (GW) was assessed in a catchment from piezometers installed: (i) to different depths, (ii) in different soil types, (iii) on different positions on landscape, and (iv) compared with the Australian and New Zealand Environmental and Conservation Council guideline values provided for different aquatic ecosystems. The GW and NO(3)-N concentration dynamics were monitored in 39 piezometer wells, installed to 5-90 m depth, under fertilized sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum-S) in the Johnstone River Catchment, Australia, from 1999 January through September 2002. The median nitrate-N concentration ranged from 14 to 1511 microg L(-1), and the 80th percentile from 0 to 1341 microg L(-1). In 34 out of the 39 piezometer wells the 80th percentile or 80% of the nitrate-N values were higher than 30 microg L(-1), which is the maximum trigger value provided in the ANZECC table for sustainable health of different aquatic ecosystems. Nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing well depth, increasing depth of water in wells, and with decreasing relief on landscape. Nitrate-N was higher in alluvial soil profiles than on those formed in-situ. Nitrate-N increased with increasing rainfall at the beginning of the rainy season, fluctuated during the peak rainy period, and then decreased when the rain ceased. The rapid decrease in GW after the rains ceased suggested potential existed for nitrate-N to be discharged as lateral-flow into streams. This may contribute towards the deterioration in the health of down-stream aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Real - time Dynamic Simulation and Prediction of Groundwater in Typical Arid Area Based on SPASS Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-ming

    2018-03-01

    The establishment of traditional groundwater numerical simulation model, parameter identification and inspection process, especially the water level fitting and the actual observation of the value obtained compared to a large error. Based on the SPASS software, a large number of statistical analysis of the numerical simulation results show that the complexity of the terrain in the study area, the distribution of lithology and the influence of the parameters on the groundwater level in the study area have great influence on the groundwater level. Through the multi-factor analysis and adjustment, the simulated groundwater flow and the actual observation are similar. Then, the final result is taken as the standard value, and the groundwater in the study area is simulated and predicted in real time. The simulation results provide technical support for the further development and utilization of the local water resources.

  17. Factors controlling the evolution of groundwater dynamics and chemistry in the Senegal River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul Aziz Gning

    2017-04-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Results show that groundwater far away from rivers and outside irrigated plots has evolved from marine water to brines under the influence of evapotranspiration. Near rivers, salinity of groundwater is lower than seawater and groundwater mineralization seems to evolve in the direction of softening through cationic exchanges related to permanent contact with fresh water. Despite large volumes of water used for rice cultivation, groundwater does not show any real softening trend in the cultivated parcels. Results show that the mechanisms that contribute to repel salt water from the sediments correspond to a lateral flush near permanent surface water streams and not to vertical drainage and dilution with rainfall or irrigation water. It is however difficult to estimate the time required to come back to more favorable conditions of groundwater salinity.

  18. Dynamic modeling of the Ganga river system: impacts of future climate and socio-economic change on flows and nitrogen fluxes in India and Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, P G; Sarkar, S; Jin, L; Futter, M N; Caesar, J; Barbour, E; Butterfield, D; Sinha, R; Nicholls, R; Hutton, C; Leckie, H D

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the potential impacts of future climate and socio-economic change on the flow and nitrogen fluxes of the Ganga river system. This is the first basin scale water quality study for the Ganga considering climate change at 25 km resolution together with socio-economic scenarios. The revised dynamic, process-based INCA model was used to simulate hydrology and water quality within the complex multi-branched river basins. All climate realizations utilized in the study predict increases in temperature and rainfall by the 2050s with significant increase by the 2090s. These changes generate associated increases in monsoon flows and increased availability of water for groundwater recharge and irrigation, but also more frequent flooding. Decreased concentrations of nitrate and ammonia are expected due to increased dilution. Different future socio-economic scenarios were found to have a significant impact on water quality at the downstream end of the Ganga. A less sustainable future resulted in a deterioration of water quality due to the pressures from higher population growth, land use change, increased sewage treatment discharges, enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition, and water abstraction. However, water quality was found to improve under a more sustainable strategy as envisaged in the Ganga clean-up plan.

  19. 226Ra, 228Ra, 223Ra, and 224Ra in coastal waters with application to coastal dynamics and groundwater input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    Four radium isotopes offer promise in unraveling the complex dynamics of coastal ocean circulation and groundwater input. Each isotope is produced by decay of a thorium parent bound to sediment. The activities of these thorium isotopes and the sediment-water distribution coefficient for radium provide an estimate of the source function of each Ra isotope to the water. In salt marshes that receive little surface water input, Ra activities which exceed coastal ocean values must originate within the marsh. In North Inlet, South Carolina, the activities of 226 Ra exported from the marsh far exceed the activities generated within the marsh. To supply the exported activities, substantial groundwater input is required. In the coastal region itself, 226 Ra activities exceed the amount that can be supplied from rivers. Here also, substantial groundwater input is required. Within the coastal ocean, 223 Ra and 224 Ra may be used to determine mixing rates with offshore waters. Shore-perpendicular profiles of 223 Ra and 224 Ra show consistent trends which may be modeled as eddy diffusion coefficients of 350-540 m 2 s -1 . These coefficients allow an assessment of cross-shelf transport and provide further insight on the importance of groundwater to coastal regions. (author)

  20. Predicting nitrogen and acidity effects on long-term dynamics of dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, E.C.; Tipping, E.; Posch, M.; Oulehle, F.; Cooper, D.M.; Jones, T.G.; Burden, A.; Hall, J.; Evans, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes may relate to changes in sulphur and nitrogen pollution. We integrated existing models of vegetation growth and soil organic matter turnover, acid–base dynamics, and organic matter mobility, to form the ‘MADOC’ model. After calibrating parameters governing interactions between pH and DOC dissolution using control treatments on two field experiments, MADOC reproduced responses of pH and DOC to additions of acidifying and alkalising solutions. Long-term trends in a range of acid waters were also reproduced. The model suggests that the sustained nature of observed DOC increases can best be explained by a continuously replenishing potentially-dissolved carbon pool, rather than dissolution of a large accumulated store. The simulations informed the development of hypotheses that: DOC increase is related to plant productivity increase as well as to pH change; DOC increases due to nitrogen pollution will become evident, and be sustained, after soil pH has stabilised. -- Highlights: • A model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was developed by integrating simple models • MADOC simulates effects of sulphur and nitrogen deposition and interactions with pH. • Responses of DOC and pH to experimental acidification and alkalisation were reproduced. • The persistence of DOC increases will depend on continued supply of potential DOC. • DOC fluxes are likely determined by plant productivity as well as soil solution pH. -- Effects of changes in sulphur and nitrogen pollution on dissolved organic carbon fluxes are predicted by simulating soil organic matter cycling, the release of potentially-dissolved carbon, and interactions with soil pH

  1. The Implications of Growing Bioenergy Crops on Water Resources, Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. K.; Song, Y.; Kheshgi, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    What is the potential for the crops Corn, Miscanthus and switchgrass to meet future energy demands in the U.S.A., and would they mitigate climate change by offsetting fossil fuel greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? The large-scale cultivation of these bioenergy crops itself could also drive climate change through changes in albedo, evapotranspiration (ET), and GHG emissions. Whether these climate effects will mitigate or exacerbate climate change in the short- and long-term is uncertain. This uncertainty stems from our incomplete understanding of the effects of expanded bioenergy crop production on terrestrial water and energy balance, carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and their interactions. This study aims to understand the implications of growing large-scale bioenergy crops on water resources, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the United States using a data-modeling framework (ISAM) that we developed. Our study indicates that both Miscanthus and Cave-in-Rock switchgrass can attain high and stable yield over parts of the Midwest, however, this high production is attained at the cost of increased soil water loss as compared to current natural vegetation. Alamo switchgrass can attain high and stable yield in the southern US without significant influence on soil water quantity.

  2. An Isotopic view of water and nitrogen transport through the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in Oregon’s southern Willamette Valley and many more across the Pacific Northwest. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (SWV GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater exceeding the human health standard of 10 mg nitrate-N L-1. Much of the nitrogen inputs to the GWMA comes from agricultural nitrogen use, and thus efforts to reduce N inputs to groundwater are focused upon improving N management. However, the effectiveness of these improvements on groundwater quality is unclear because of the complexity of nutrient transport through the vadose zone and long groundwater residence times. Our objective was to focus on vadose zone transport and understand the dynamics and timing of N and water movement below the rooting zone in relation to N management and water inputs. Stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking water movement, and understanding nitrogen transformations within the vadose zone. In partnership with local farmers, and state agencies, we established lysimeters and groundwater wells in multiple agricultural fields in the GWMA, and have monitored nitrate, nitrate isotopes, and water isotopes weekly for multiple years. Our results indicate that vadose zone transport is highly complex, and the residence time of water collected in lysimeters was much longer than expected. While input precipitation water isotopes were highly variab

  3. A technique developed for labeling the green manures (sunnhemp and velvet bean) with 15 N for nitrogen dynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed for labeling the leguminous plant tissue with nitrogen ( 15 N) to obtain labelled material for nitrogen dynamic studies. Sunnhemp (crotalaria juncea L.) and velvet beans (Mucuna aterrima, sinonimia Stizolobium aterrimum Piper and Tracy) were grown in pots containing 10 kg of a Red Yellow Podzolic soil, under greenhouse conditions. The rate of 1.2 of nitrogen (ammonium sulphate with 11.37 atom % 15 N) per pot was applied three times. The labelled dried plant material showed 3.177 and 4.337 of atom % 15 N, respectively for velvet beans and sunnhemp. (author)

  4. THE IMPACT OF BIOSTIMULATION ON THE FATE OF SULFATE AND ASSOCIATED SULFUR DYNAMICS IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ziheng; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepcion; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of electron-donor addition on sulfur dynamics for a groundwater system with low levels of metal contaminants was evaluated with a pilot-scale biostimulation test conducted at a former uranium mining site. Geochemical and stable-isotope data collected before, during, and after the test were analyzed to evaluate the sustainability of sulfate reducing conditions induced by the test, the fate of hydrogen sulfide, and the impact on aqueous geochemical conditions. The results of site characterization activities conducted prior to the test indicated the absence of measurable bacterial sulfate reduction. The injection of an electron donor (ethanol) induced bacterial sulfate reduction, as confirmed by an exponential decrease of sulfate concentration in concert with changes in oxidation-reduction potential, redox species, alkalinity, production of hydrogen sulfide, and fractionation of δ34S-sulfate. High, stoichiometrically-equivalent hydrogen sulfide concentrations were not observed until several months after the start of the test. It is hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide produced from sulfate reduction was initially sequestered in the form of iron sulfides until the exhaustion of readily reducible iron oxides associated with the sediment. The fractionation of δ34S for sulfate was atypical, wherein the enrichment declined in the latter half of the experiment. It was conjectured that mixing effects associated with the release of sulfate from sulfate minerals associated with the sediments, along with possible sulfide re-oxidation contributed to this behavior. The results of this study illustrate the biogeochemical complexity that is associated with in-situ biostimulation processes involving bacterial sulfate reduction. PMID:25016586

  5. The impact of biostimulation on the fate of sulfate and associated sulfur dynamics in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ziheng; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepcion; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    The impact of electron-donor addition on sulfur dynamics for a groundwater system with low levels of metal contaminants was evaluated with a pilot-scale biostimulation test conducted at a former uranium mining site. Geochemical and stable-isotope data collected before, during, and after the test were analyzed to evaluate the sustainability of sulfate reducing conditions induced by the test, the fate of hydrogen sulfide, and the impact on aqueous geochemical conditions. The results of site characterization activities conducted prior to the test indicated the absence of measurable bacterial sulfate reduction. The injection of an electron donor (ethanol) induced bacterial sulfate reduction, as confirmed by an exponential decrease of sulfate concentration in concert with changes in oxidation-reduction potential, redox species, alkalinity, production of hydrogen sulfide, and fractionation of δ34S-sulfate. High, stoichiometrically-equivalent hydrogen sulfide concentrations were not observed until several months after the start of the test. It is hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide produced from sulfate reduction was initially sequestered in the form of iron sulfides until the exhaustion of readily reducible iron oxides within the sediment. The fractionation of δ34S for sulfate was atypical, wherein the enrichment declined in the latter half of the experiment. It was conjectured that mixing effects associated with the release of sulfate from sulfate minerals associated with the sediments, along with possible sulfide re-oxidation contributed to this behavior. The results of this study illustrate the biogeochemical complexity that is associated with in-situ biostimulation processes involving bacterial sulfate reduction.

  6. Nitrate and ammonium lead to distinct global dynamic phosphorylation patterns when resupplied to nitrogen-starved Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Inorganic nitrogen and its assimilation products control various metabolic, physiological and developmental processes. Although the transcriptional responses induced by nitrogen have been extensively studied in the past, our work here focused on the discovery of candidate proteins for regulatory events that are complementary to transcriptional changes. Most signaling pathways involve modulation of protein abundance and/or activity by protein phosphorylation. Therefore, we analyzed the dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation in membrane and soluble proteins from plants exposed to rapid changes in nutrient availability over a time course of 30 min. Plants were starved of nitrogen and subsequently resupplied with nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium. Proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level at up to 5 min after nitrogen resupply (fast responses) included GPI-anchored proteins, receptor kinases and transcription factors, while proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level after 10 min of nitrogen resupply (late responses) included proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation, as well as proteins with functions in central metabolism and hormone metabolism. Resupply of nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium resulted in distinct phosphorylation patterns, mainly of proteins with signaling functions, transcription factors and transporters. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Modeling the effects of the variability of temperature-related dynamic viscosity on the thermal-affected zone of groundwater heat-pump systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Stefano; Taddia, Glenda; Cerino Abdin, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Thermal perturbation in the subsurface produced in an open-loop groundwater heat pump (GWHP) plant is a complex transport phenomenon affected by several factors, including the exploited aquifer's hydrogeological and thermal characteristics, well construction features, and the temporal dynamics of the plant's groundwater abstraction and reinjection system. Hydraulic conductivity has a major influence on heat transport because plume propagation, which occurs primarily through advection, tends to degrade following conductive heat transport and convection within moving water. Hydraulic conductivity is, in turn, influenced by water reinjection because the dynamic viscosity of groundwater varies with temperature. This paper reports on a computational analysis conducted using FEFLOW software to quantify how the thermal-affected zone (TAZ) is influenced by the variation in dynamic viscosity due to reinjected groundwater in a well-doublet scheme. The modeling results demonstrate non-negligible groundwater dynamic-viscosity variation that affects thermal plume propagation in the aquifer. This influence on TAZ calculation was enhanced for aquifers with high intrinsic permeability and/or substantial temperature differences between abstracted and post-heat-pump-reinjected groundwater.

  8. Modelling nitrogen dynamics and distributions in the River Tweed, Scotland: an application of the INCA model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Jarvie

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The INCA (Integrated Nitrogen in Catchments model was applied to the River Tweed in the Scottish Borders, a large-scale (4400km2, spatially heterogeneous catchment, draining a wide range of agricultural land-use types, and which contributes approximately 20% of UK river flows to the North Sea. The model was calibrated for the first four years' data record (1994 to 1997 and tested over the following three years (1998 to 2000. The model calibration and testing periods incorporated a high degree of variability in climatic conditions and river flows within the Tweed catchment. The ability of the INCA model to reproduce broad-scale spatial patterns and seasonal dynamics in river flows and nitrate concentrations suggests that the processes controlling first order variability in river water nitrate concentrations have been represented successfully within the model. The tendency of the model to overestimate summer/early autumn baseflow nitrate concentrations during dry years may be linked to the operation of aquatic plant uptake effects. It is, therefore, suggested that consideration be given to incorporating a spatially and temporally variable in-stream plant uptake term for the application of INCA to lowland eutrophic rivers. Scenarios to examine possible impacts of environmental change on nitrate concentrations on the Tweed are examined. These include the effects of (i implementing different recommendations for fertiliser use and land use change under the Nitrate Sensitive Areas (NSA Scheme and the Scottish Code of Good Agricultural Practice, (ii worst case scenario changes linked to a dramatic reduction in livestock numbers as a result of a crisis in UK livestock farming and (iii changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Keywords: Nitrate, nitrogen, modelling, Tweed, INCA

  9. Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating groundwater flow and contaminant transport at a former uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. We estimated effects of temporal and spatial variability in evapotranspiration (ET) on recharge and discharge within a groundwater model domain (GMD) as part of this evaluation. We used remote sensing algorithms and precipitation (PPT) data to estimate ET and the ET/PPT ratios within the 3531 hectare GMD. For the period from 2000 to 2012, ET and PPT were nearly balanced (129 millimeters per year [mm yr-1] and 130 mm yr-1, respectively; ET/PPT = 0.99). However, seasonal and annual variability in ET and PPT were out of phase, and spatial variability in vegetation differentiated discharge and recharge areas within the GMD. Half of ET occurred during spring and early summer when PPT was low, and about 70% of PPT arriving in fall and winter was discharged as plant transpiration in the spring and summer period. Vegetation type and health had a significant effect on the site water balance. Plant cover and ET were significantly higher (1) during years of lighter compared to years of heavier grazing pressure, and (2) on rangeland protected from grazing compared to rangeland grazed by livestock. Heavy grazing increased groundwater recharge (PPT > ET over the 13-year period). Groundwater discharge (ET > PPT over the 13-year period) was highest in riparian phreatophyte communities but insignificant in desert phreatophyte communities impacted by heavy grazing. Grazing management in desert upland and phreatophyte communities may result in reduced groundwater recharge, increased groundwater discharge, and could be used to influence local groundwater flow.

  10. Nitrogen dynamics in soils cultivated with maize and fertilized with pig slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Borges Alves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The proper disposal of pig manure is of great importance because, when mishandled, it can contaminate water resources. This study aimed to evaluate the nitrogen dynamics in a Cerrado Oxisol and its absorption, over time, by a maize crop managed with pig slurry associated with mineral fertilization (N P K. The study was conducted at a private farm, in the region of Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The maize crop was able to recover 62% of the mineral nitrogen that entered the soil-plant system, while 9% leached as nitrate and, to a lesser amount, as ammonium. The maximum average content of nitrate and ammonium of 92 kg ha-1 and 43 kg ha-1, respectively, was observed in the 0 to 0.3 m soil layer during the early crop development stage. A minimum content of 5.8 kg ha-1 of nitrate and 9.0 kg ha-1 of ammonium, respectively, was measured at the end of the cycle. In addition, the nitrate content at that soil layer, at the end of the maize cycle, remained below the values measured at the native Cerrado, indicating that the agricultural use of the land poses no additional risk to the nitrate accumulation and leaching into the soil profile.

  11. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  12. Dynamics of liquid nitrogen cooling process of solid surface at wetting contact coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smakulski, P; Pietrowicz, S

    2015-01-01

    Liquid cryogens cooling by direct contact is very often used as a method for decreasing the temperature of electronic devices or equipment i.e. HTS cables. Somehow, cooldown process conducted in that way could not be optimized, because of cryogen pool boiling characteristic and low value of the heat transfer coefficient. One of the possibilities to increase the efficiency of heat transfer, as well as the efficiency of cooling itself, it is to use a spray cooling method. The paper shows dynamics analysis of liquid nitrogen cooling solid surface process. The model of heat transfer for the single droplet of liquid nitrogen, which hits on a flat and smooth surface with respect to the different Weber numbers, is shown. Temperature profiles in calculation domains are presented, as well as the required cooling time. The numerical calculations are performed for different initial and boundary conditions, to study how the wetting contact coefficient is changing, and how it contributed to heat transfer between solid and liquid cryogen. (paper)

  13. Supply circuit for and dynamic characteristics of discharge in a nitrogen laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, Yu L; Sukhanov, A N

    1978-03-01

    The dynamic characteristics of discharge in a nitrogen laser with an output radiation power at the 1 MW level were measured in an experiment under pressures ranging from 30 to 350 mm Hg. At the same time, the design and the performance of a supply circuit on the basis of a Blumlein line as pumping source were evaluated. The results of this study indicate that the practically attainable efficiency, which depends on the characteristics impedance of the discharge circuit, can be increased from 0.07 to 0.1% with a two-stage laser, by shortening the pump discharge and supplying most energy to the second stage at higher E/p ratios. Multistage high-power lasers operating in the generator-amplifier mode with high gain in the active medium are thus feasible without the need for expensive optical decoupling of stages.

  14. Nitrogen dynamics in subtropical fringe and basin mangrove forests inferred from stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Carla Roberta Gonçalves; Nardoto, Gabriela Bielefeld; Rochelle, André Luis Casarin; Vieira, Simone Aparecida; Oliveira, Rafael Silva

    2017-03-01

    Mangroves exhibit low species richness compared to other tropical forests, but great structural and functional diversity. Aiming to contribute to a better understanding of the functioning of mangrove forests, we investigated nitrogen (N) dynamics in two physiographic types of mangroves (fringe and basin forests) in southeastern Brazil. Because fringe forests are under great influence of tidal flushing we hypothesized that these forests would exhibit higher N cycling rates in sediment and higher N losses to the atmosphere compared to basin forests. We quantified net N mineralization and nitrification rates in sediment and natural abundance of N stable isotopes (δ 15 N) in the sediment-plant-litter system. The fringe forest exhibited higher net N mineralization rates and δ 15 N in the sediment-plant-litter system, but net nitrification rates were similar to those of the basin forest. The results of the present study suggest that fringe forests exhibit higher N availability and N cycling in sediment compared to basin forests.

  15. Temporal dynamics of abundance and composition of nitrogen-fixing communities across agricultural soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele C Pereira E Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that the fixation of nitrogen is one of the most significant nutrient processes in the terrestrial ecosystem, a thorough study of the spatial and temporal patterns in the abundance and distribution of N-fixing communities has been missing so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to understand the dynamics of diazotrophic communities and their resilience to external changes, we quantified the abundance and characterized the bacterial community structures based on the nifH gene, using real-time PCR, PCR-DGGE and 454-pyrosequencing, across four representative Dutch soils during one growing season. In general, higher nifH gene copy numbers were observed in soils with higher pH than in those with lower pH, but lower numbers were related to increased nitrate and ammonium levels. Results from nifH gene pyrosequencing confirmed the observed PCR-DGGE patterns, which indicated that the N fixers are highly dynamic across time, shifting around 60%. Forward selection on CCA analysis identified N availability as the main driver of these variations, as well as of the evenness of the communities, leading to very unequal communities. Moreover, deep sequencing of the nifH gene revealed that sandy soils (B and D had the lowest percentage of shared OTUs across time, compared with clayey soils (G and K, indicating the presence of a community under constant change. Cosmopolitan nifH species (present throughout the season were affiliated with Bradyrhizobium, Azospirillum and Methylocistis, whereas other species increased their abundances progressively over time, when appropriate conditions were met, as was notably the case for Paenibacilus and Burkholderia. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the N-fixing community at both spatial and temporal scales, providing insights into the cosmopolitan and specific portions of the nitrogen fixing bacterial communities in soil.

  16. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money

  17. Effects of sea-level rise on barrier island groundwater system dynamics: ecohydrological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Thieler, E. Robert; Gesch, Dean B.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    We used a numerical model to investigate how a barrier island groundwater system responds to increases of up to 60 cm in sea level. We found that a sea-level rise of 20 cm leads to substantial changes in the depth of the water table and the extent and depth of saltwater intrusion, which are key determinants in the establishment, distribution and succession of vegetation assemblages and habitat suitability in barrier islands ecosystems. In our simulations, increases in water-table height in areas with a shallow depth to water (or thin vadose zone) resulted in extensive groundwater inundation of land surface and a thinning of the underlying freshwater lens. We demonstrated the interdependence of the groundwater response to island morphology by evaluating changes at three sites. This interdependence can have a profound effect on ecosystem composition in these fragile coastal landscapes under long-term changing climatic conditions.

  18. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in deciduous and broad leaf trees under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jobin; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias; Saurer, Matthias; siegwolf, Rolf; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is projected to lead to an increased frequency and duration of severe drought events in future. Already within the last twenty years, however, drought stress related forest mortality has been increasing across the globe. Tree and forest die off events have multiple adverse effects on ecosystem functioning and might convert previous carbon sinks to act as carbon sources instead and can thus intensify the effect of climate change and global warming. Current predictions of forest's functioning under drought and thus forest mortality under future climatic conditions are constrained by a still incomplete picture of the trees' physiological reactions that allows some trees to survive drought periods while others succumb. Concerning the effects of drought on the carbon balance and on tree hydraulics our picture is getting more complete, but still interactions between abiotic factors and pest and diseases as well as the interaction between carbon and nutrient balances as factors affecting drought induced mortality are not well understood. Reduced carbon allocation from shoots to roots might cause a lack of energy for root nutrient uptake and to a shortage of carbon skeletons for nitrogen assimilation and thus to an impaired nutrient status of trees. To tackle these points, we have performed a drought stress experiment with six different plant species, 3 broad leaf (maple, beech and oak) and 3 deciduous (pine, fir and spruce). Potted two-year-old seedlings were kept inside a greenhouse for 5 months and 3 levels of drought stress (no stress (control), intermediate and intensive drought stress) were applied by controlling water supply. Gas exchange measurements were performed periodically to monitor photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance. At the pinnacle of drought stress, we applied isotopic pulse labelling: On the one hand we exposed trees to 13CO2 to investigate on carbon dynamics and the allocation of new assimilates within the plant. Moreover

  19. Modelling of seasonal dynamics of Wetland-Groundwater flow interaction in the Canadian Prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Melkamu; Nussbaumer, Raphaël; Ireson, Andrew; Keim, Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Wetland-shallow groundwater interaction is studied at the St. Denis National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada, located within the northern glaciated prairies of North America. Ponds in the Canadian Prairies are intermittently connected by fill-spill processes in the spring and growing season of some wetter years. The contribution of the ponds and wetlands to groundwater is still a significant research challenge. The objective of this study is to evaluate model's ability to reproduce observed effects of groundwater-wetland interactions including seasonal pattern of shallow groundwater table, intended flow direction and to quantify the depression induced infiltration from the wetland to the surrounding uplands. The integrated surface-wetland-shallow groundwater processes and the changes in land-energy and water balances caused by the flow interaction are simulated using ParFlow-CLM at a small watershed of 1km2 containing both permanent and seasonal wetland complexes. We compare simulated water table depth with piezometers reading monitored by level loggers at the watershed. We also present the strengths and limitations of the model in reproducing observed behaviour of the groundwater table response to the spring snowmelt and summer rainfall. Simulations indicate that the shallow water table at the uphill recovers quickly after major rainfall events in early summer that generates lateral flow to the pond. In late summer, the wetland supplies water to the surrounding upland when the evapotranspiration is higher than the precipitation in which more water from the root zone is up taken by plants. Results also show that Parflow-CLM is able to reasonably simulate the water table patterns response to summer rainfall, while it is insufficient to reproduce the spring snowmelt infiltration which is the most dominant hydrological process in the Prairies.

  20. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N 2 O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N 2 O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O 2 ) supply, which feeds back on N 2 O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O 2 and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O 2 concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N 2 O, dissolved nitrate (NO 3 − ) and ammonium (NH 4 + ) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O 2 and redox potential. Hot spots of N 2 O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O 2 in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO 3 − reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O 2 and N 2 O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to consider

  1. Dynamic optimal metabolic control theory: a cybernetic approach for modelling of the central nitrogen metabolism of S. cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, van N.A.W.; Giuseppin, M.L.F.; Verrips, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of dynamic optimal metabolic control (DOMC), as developed by Giuseppin and Van Riel (Metab. Eng., 2000), is applied to model the central nitrogen metabolism (CNM) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CNM represents a typical system encountered in advanced metabolic engineering. The CNM is the

  2. Natural 15N abundance of soil N pools and N2O reflect the nitrogen dynamics of forest soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pörtl, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Wanek, W.

    2007-01-01

    Natural N-15 abundance measurements of ecosystem nitrogen (N) pools and N-15 pool dilution assays of gross N transformation rates were applied to investigate the potential of delta N-15 signatures of soil N pools to reflect the dynamics in the forest soil N cycle. Intact soil cores were collected...

  3. Nitrogen dynamics in the soil-plant system under deficit and partial root-zone drying irrigation strategies in potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahnazari, Ali; Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in lysimeters with sandy soil under an automatic rain-out shelter to study the effects of subsurface drip irrigation treatments, full irrigation (FI), deficit irrigation (DI) and partial root-zone drying (PRD), on nitrogen (N) dynamics in the soil-plant system of potatoes...

  4. Controls on mass loss and nitrogen dynamics of oak leaf litter along an urban-rural land-use gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard V. Pouyat; Margaret M. Carreiro

    2003-01-01

    Using reciprocal leaf litter transplants, we investigated the effects of contrasting environments (urban vs. rural) and intraspecific variations in oak leaf litter quality on mass loss rates and nitrogen (N) dynamics along an urban-rural gradient in the New York City metropolitan area. Differences in earthworm abundances and temperature had previously been documented...

  5. The long-term impact of urbanization on nitrogen patterns and dynamics in Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Baojing; Dong Xiaoli; Peng Changhui; Luo Weidong; Chang Jie; Ge Ying

    2012-01-01

    Urbanization is an important process that alters the regional and global nitrogen biogeochemistry. In this study, we test how long-term urbanization (1952–2004) affects the nitrogen flows, emissions and drivers in the Greater Shanghai Area (GSA) based on the coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) approach. Results show that: (1) total nitrogen input to the GSA increased from 57.7 to 587.9 Gg N yr −1 during the period 1952–2004, mainly attributing to fossil fuel combustion (43%), Haber–Bosch nitrogen fixation (31%), and food/feed import (26%); (2) per capita nitrogen input increased from 13.5 to 45.7 kg N yr −1 , while per gross domestic product (GDP) nitrogen input reduced from 22.2 to 0.9 g N per Chinese Yuan, decoupling of nitrogen with GDP; (3) emissions of reactive nitrogen to the environment transformed from agriculture dominated to industry and human living dominated, especially for air pollution. This study provides decision-makers a novel view of nitrogen management. - Highlights: ► Major Nr emission source shifts from agriculture to industry alongside urbanization. ► Decoupling of nitrogen with GDP and urban expansion arises alongside urbanization. ► Nitrogen fluxes increase with population growth and living standard promotion. - Major nitrogen emission source shifts from agriculture to industry and human, and decoupling of nitrogen with GDP and urban expansion arises alongside urbanization.

  6. Parameterization of Nitrogen Limitation for a Dynamic Ecohydrological Model: a Case Study from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, S.; Bras, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    Feedbacks between vegetation and the soil nutrient cycle are important in ecosystems where nitrogen limits plant growth, and consequently influences the carbon balance in the plant-soil system. However, many biosphere models do not include such feedbacks, because interactions between carbon and the nitrogen cycle can be complex, and remain poorly understood. In this study we coupled a nitrogen cycle model with an eco-hydrological model by using the concept of carbon cost economics. This concept accounts for different "costs" to the plant of acquiring nitrogen via different pathways. This study builds on tRIBS-VEGGIE, a spatially explicit hydrological model coupled with a model of photosynthesis, stomatal resistance, and energy balance, by combining it with a model of nitrogen recycling. Driven by climate and spatially explicit data of soils, vegetation and topography, the model (referred to as tRIBS-VEGGIE-CN) simulates the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in the soil-plant system; the dynamics of vegetation; and different components of the hydrological cycle. The tRIBS-VEGGIE-CN is applied in a humid tropical watershed at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO). The region is characterized by high availability and cycling of nitrogen, high soil respiration rates, and large carbon stocks.We drive the model under contemporary CO2 and hydro-climatic forcing and compare results to a simulation under doubling CO2 and a range of future climate scenarios. The results with parameterization of nitrogen limitation based on carbon cost economics show that the carbon cost of the acquisition of nitrogen is 14% of the net primary productivity (NPP) and the N uptake cost for different pathways vary over a large range depending on leaf nitrogen content, turnover rates of carbon in soil and nitrogen cycling processes. Moreover, the N fertilization simulation experiment shows that the application of N fertilizer does not significantly change the simulated NPP. Furthermore, an

  7. Bacterial Community Dynamics in Dichloromethane-Contaminated Groundwater Undergoing Natural Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Wright

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The uncontrolled release of the industrial solvent methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane (DCM, has resulted in widespread groundwater contamination in the United States. Here we investigate the role of groundwater bacterial communities in the natural attenuation of DCM at an undisclosed manufacturing site in New Jersey. This study investigates the bacterial community structure of groundwater samples differentially contaminated with DCM to better understand the biodegradation potential of these autochthonous bacterial communities. Bacterial community analysis was completed using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of groundwater samples (n = 26 with DCM contamination ranging from 0.89 to 9,800,000 μg/L. Significant DCM concentration-driven shifts in overall bacterial community structure were identified between samples, including an increase in the abundance of Firmicutes within the most contaminated samples. Across all samples, a total of 6,134 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified, with 16 taxa having strong correlations with increased DCM concentration. Putative DCM degraders such as Pseudomonas, Dehalobacterium and Desulfovibrio were present within groundwater across all levels of DCM contamination. Interestingly, each of these taxa dominated specific DCM contamination ranges respectively. Potential DCM degrading lineages yet to be cited specifically as a DCM degrading organisms, such as the Desulfosporosinus, thrived within the most heavily contaminated groundwater samples. Co-occurrence network analysis revealed aerobic and anaerobic bacterial taxa with DCM-degrading potential were present at the study site. Our 16S rRNA gene survey serves as the first in situ bacterial community assessment of contaminated groundwater harboring DCM concentrations ranging over seven orders of magnitude. Diversity analyses revealed known as well as potentially novel DCM degrading taxa within defined DCM concentration

  8. Groundwater discharge and phosphorus dynamics in a flood-pulse system: Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, William C.; Wattayakorn, Gullaya; Supcharoen, Ratsirin; Sioudom, Khamfeuane; Kum, Veasna; Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan

    2017-06-01

    Tonle Sap Lake (Cambodia), a classic example of a "flood pulse" system, is the largest freshwater lake in SE Asia, and is reported to have one of the highest freshwater fish productions anywhere. During the dry season (November-April) the lake drains through a tributary to the Mekong River. The flow in the connecting tributary completely reverses during the wet monsoon (May-October), adding huge volumes of water back to the lake, increasing its area about six fold. The lake is likely phosphorus limited and we hypothesized that groundwater discharge, including recirculated lake water, may represent an important source of P and other nutrients. To address this question, we surveyed hundreds of kilometers of the lake for natural 222Rn (radon), temperature, conductivity, GPS coordinates and water depth. All major inorganic nutrients and phosphorus species were evaluated by systematic sampling throughout the lake. Results showed that there were radon hotspots, all at the boundaries between the permanent lake and the floodplain, indicating likely groundwater inputs. A radon mass balance model indicates that the groundwater flow to Tonle Sap Lake is approximately 10 km3/yr, about 25% as large as the floodwaters entering from the Mekong River during the wet monsoon. Our results suggest that the groundwater-derived dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) contribution to Tonle Sap is more than 30% of the average inflows from all natural sources. Since the productivity of the lake appears to be phosphorus limited, this finding suggests that the role of groundwater is significant for Tonle Sap Lake and perhaps for other flood pulse systems worldwide.

  9. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubol, Simonetta; Silver, Whendee L; Bellin, Alberto

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N(2)O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N(2)O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O(2)) supply, which feeds back on N(2)O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O(2) and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O(2) concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N(2)O, dissolved nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O(2) and redox potential. Hot spots of N(2)O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O(2) in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO(3)(-) reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O(2) and N(2)O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential and N cycling, and suggest that models working at a daily scale need to

  10. Molecular biological and isotopic biogeochemical prognoses of the nitrification-driven dynamic microbial nitrogen cycle in hadopelagic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Nishizawa, Manabu; Kikuchi, Tohru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Hirai, Miho; Koide, Osamu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2013-11-01

    There has been much progress in understanding the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters including the recent identification of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, and in the comprehensive estimation in abundance and activity of these microbial populations. However, compared with the nitrogen cycle in oceanic waters, there are fewer studies concerning the oceanic benthic nitrogen cycle. To further elucidate the dynamic nitrogen cycle in deep-sea sediments, a sediment core obtained from the Ogasawara Trench at a water depth of 9760 m was analysed in this study. The profiles obtained for the pore-water chemistry, and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of pore-water nitrate in the hadopelagic sediments could not be explained by the depth segregation of nitrifiers and nitrate reducers, suggesting the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction in the shallowest nitrate reduction zone. The abundance of SSU rRNA and functional genes related to nitrification and denitrification are consistent with the co-occurrence of nitrification and nitrate reduction observed in the geochemical analyses. This study presents the first example of cooperation between aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen metabolism in the deep-sea sedimentary environments. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Global sensitivity analysis for an integrated model for simulation of nitrogen dynamics under the irrigation with treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huaiwei; Zhu, Yan; Yang, Jinzhong; Wang, Xiugui

    2015-11-01

    As the amount of water resources that can be utilized for agricultural production is limited, the reuse of treated wastewater (TWW) for irrigation is a practical solution to alleviate the water crisis in China. The process-based models, which estimate nitrogen dynamics under irrigation, are widely used to investigate the best irrigation and fertilization management practices in developed and developing countries. However, for modeling such a complex system for wastewater reuse, it is critical to conduct a sensitivity analysis to determine numerous input parameters and their interactions that contribute most to the variance of the model output for the development of process-based model. In this study, application of a comprehensive global sensitivity analysis for nitrogen dynamics was reported. The objective was to compare different global sensitivity analysis (GSA) on the key parameters for different model predictions of nitrogen and crop growth modules. The analysis was performed as two steps. Firstly, Morris screening method, which is one of the most commonly used screening method, was carried out to select the top affected parameters; then, a variance-based global sensitivity analysis method (extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, EFAST) was used to investigate more thoroughly the effects of selected parameters on model predictions. The results of GSA showed that strong parameter interactions exist in crop nitrogen uptake, nitrogen denitrification, crop yield, and evapotranspiration modules. Among all parameters, one of the soil physical-related parameters named as the van Genuchten air entry parameter showed the largest sensitivity effects on major model predictions. These results verified that more effort should be focused on quantifying soil parameters for more accurate model predictions in nitrogen- and crop-related predictions, and stress the need to better calibrate the model in a global sense. This study demonstrates the advantages of the GSA on a

  12. Global simulation of interactions between groundwater and terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhekke, M. C.; Rebel, K.; Dekker, S. C.; Smith, B.; Van Beek, L. P.; Sutanudjaja, E.; van Kampenhout, L.; Wassen, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    In many places in the world ecosystems are influenced by the presence of a shallow groundwater table. In these regions upward water flux due to capillary rise increases soil moisture availability in the root zone, which has strong positive effect on evapotranspiration. Additionally it has important consequences for vegetation dynamics and fluxes of carbon and nitrogen. Under water limited conditions shallow groundwater stimulates vegetation productivity, and soil organic matter decomposition while under saturated conditions groundwater may have a negative effect on these processes due to lack of oxygen. Furthermore, since plant species differ with respect to their root distribution, preference for moisture conditions, and resistance to oxygen stress, shallow groundwater also influences vegetation type. Finally, processes such as denitrification and methane production occur under strictly anaerobic conditions and are thus strongly influenced by moisture availability. Most global hydrological models and several land surface models simulate groundwater table dynamics and their effects on land surface processes. However, these models typically have relatively simplistic representation of vegetation and do not consider changes in vegetation type and structure and are therefore less suitable to represent effects of groundwater on biogeochemical fluxes. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), describe land surface from an ecological perspective, combining detailed description of vegetation dynamics and structure and biogeochemical processes. These models are thus more appropriate to simulate the ecological and biogeochemical effects of groundwater interactions. However, currently virtually all DGVMs ignore these effects, assuming that water tables are too deep to affect soil moisture in the root zone. We have implemented a tight coupling between the dynamic global ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS and the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. Using this coupled model we aim to

  13. Nitrogen Dynamics Along a Headwater Stream Draining a Fen, Swamp, and Marsh in a Fractured Dolomite Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, T. P.; Waddington, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Stream-wetland interaction has been shown to have a significant effect on nutrient cycling and downstream water quality. Additionally, connection to regional groundwater systems can dilute or enrich stream water with a number of dissolved constituents. This study demonstrates the resultant downstream change in dissolved nitrogen species as a hardwater stream emerges from a calcareous aquifer and traverses a calcareous fen, a cedar swamp, and a cattail marsh over two growing seasons, a very dry 2006 and a very wet 2007. Upon emergence at a number of groundwater seeps, the water contained appreciable nitrate levels averaging 2.72±0.42 mg NO3-N L-1, minimal organic nitrogen, and ammonium below detectable levels. Through the gently sloping calcareous fen, with a stream residence time of ~ 5 hours, NO3-N concentration decreases of 0.35 mg L-1 were observed. Concomitantly, stream recharge into the dolomite bedrock depressed stream discharge values significantly, further removing nitrate from the stream system. This resulted in the fen-bedrock system acting as an estimated net sink of 432 kg of NO3-N in the early summer of 2007, for example. In contrast, the hydrological-biogeochemical systems became decoupled through the swamp during the same period, where concentrations increased from 2.58±0.34 mg L-1 entering the swamp to 2.65±0.58 mg L-1 exiting, but streamflow decreased in general by 5 L s- 1. This resulted in the swamp, with its large depression storage, acting as a small net sink of nitrate (75 kg through the early summer), which would not be detected simply from concentration changes. The concentration-discharge relation realigned through the marsh, where significant groundwater entered the wetland, increasing both concentration and discharge, yielding a small export of 93 kg over the same time period. A series of tracer injections in each wetland type will be presented to compare the streamflow- concentration patterns with the measured nutrient spiralling

  14. River-groundwater connectivity and nutrient dynamics in a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Musolff, Andreas; Gilfedder, Benjamin; Frei, Sven; Wankmüller, Fabian; Trauth, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse solute exports from catchments are governed by many interrelated factors such as land use, climate, geological-/ hydrogeological setup and morphology. Those factors create spatial variations in solute concentrations and turnover rates in the subsurface as well as in the stream network. River-groundwater connectivity is a crucial control in this context: On the one hand groundwater is a main pathway for nitrate inputs to the stream. On the other hand, groundwater connectivity with the stream affects the magnitude of hyporheic exchange of stream water with the stream bed. We present results of a longitudinal sampling campaign along the Selke river, a 67 km long third-order stream in the Harz mountains in central Germany. Water quality at the catchment outlet is strongly impacted by agriculture with high concentrations of nitrate and a chemostatic nitrate export regime. However, the specific nitrate pathways to the stream are not fully understood as there is arable land distributed throughout the catchment. While the sparsely distributed arable land in the mountainous upper catchment receives much higher amounts of precipitation, the downstream alluvial plains are drier, but more intensively used. The three-day campaign was conducted in June 2016 under constant low flow conditions. Stream water samples were taken every 2 km along the main stem of the river and at its major tributaries. Samples were analyzed for field parameters, major cations and anions, N-O isotopes, nutrients and Radon-222 (Rn) concentrations. Additionally, at each sampling location, river discharge was manually measured using current meters. Groundwater influxes to each sampled river section were quantified from the Rn measurements using the code FINIFLUX, (Frei and Gilfedder 2015). Rn and ion concentrations showed an increase from the spring to the mouth, indicating a growing impact of groundwater flux to the river. However, increases in groundwater gains were not gradual. The strongest

  15. Effects of Groundwater Dynamics on Hydrometeorological Conditions over South America: Analysis of Offline NoahMP and Fully-coupled WRF-NoahMP Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Agudelo, J. A.; Dominguez, F.; Miguez-Macho, G.

    2014-12-01

    Renalysis data suggests that nearly 20% of the atmospheric moisture over the La Plata basin comes from Amazonian Evapotranspiration (ET). However, these estimates of ET are model dependent. Simulations using land-surface models (LSMs) in off-line mode (i.e. with prescribed atmospheric forcing) have shown that Amazonian ET depends on the groundwater dynamics. In this study we use the NoahMP LSM in off-line mode and the coupled system WRF-NoahMP to assess the role of groundwater on South American ET. In particular, we study the role of the groundwater in sustaining ET during the dry season in the southern Amazon and the La Plata basin. We compare simulations that do not account for the groundwater reservoir (free drainage approach) with simulations that include the Miguez-Macho and Fan parameterization to represent the groundwater storage, its lateral flow, and its interaction with the unsaturated zone. The off-line simulations show the effects associated solely with groundwater dynamics (as opposed to coupled land-atmosphere processes), while the coupled simulations provide information about the regulation and/or response from the atmosphere. Preliminary results from the coupled system suggest that the largest effects of the groundwater on ET are observed during the austral dry season. ET is larger over regions of Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina when groundwater is included, due to the existence of a relatively shallow water table over these regions, which via upward capillary fluxes reduces drainage during the rainy season and increases soil moisture availability in the dry season. These differences in the simulated ET could have an impact on the estimates of the transport of atmospheric moisture to La Plata basin.

  16. Geophysical Characterization of Groundwater-Fault Dynamics at San Andreas Oasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, D.; Polet, J.; Osborn, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The San Andreas Oasis has historically provided a reliable source of fresh water near the northeast margin of the Salton Sea, although since the recent completion of the Coachella Canal Lining Project and persistent drought in California, surface water at the site has begun to disappear. This may be an effect of the canal lining, however, the controls on groundwater are complicated by the presence of the Hidden Springs Fault (HSF), a northeast dipping normal fault that trends near the San Andreas Oasis. Its surface expression is apparent as a lineation against which all plant growth terminates, suggesting that it may form a partial barrier to subsurface groundwater flow. Numerous environmental studies have detailed the chemical evolution of waters resources at San Andreas Spring, although there remains a knowledge gap on the HSF and its relation to groundwater at the site. To better constrain flow paths and characterize groundwater-fault interactions, we have employed resistivity surveys near the surface trace of the HSF to generate profiles of lateral and depth-dependent variations in resistivity. The survey design is comprised of lines installed in Wenner Arrays, using an IRIS Syscal Kid, with 24 electrodes, at a maximum electrode spacing of 5 meters. In addition, we have gathered constraints on the geometry of the HSF using a combination of ground-based magnetic and gravity profiles, conducted with a GEM walking Proton Precession magnetometer and a Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter. Seventeen gravity measurements were acquired across the surface trace of the fault. Preliminary resistivity results depict a shallow conductor localized at the oasis and discontinuous across the HSF. Magnetic data reveal a large contrast in subsurface magnetic susceptibility that appears coincident with the surface trace and trend of the HSF, while gravity data suggests a shallow, relatively high density anomaly centered near the oasis. These data also hint at a second, previously

  17. Climate-mediated nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a tropical watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, A. P.; Baker, P. A.; Fritz, S. C.; Poulter, B.

    2011-06-01

    Climate variability affects the capacity of the biosphere to assimilate and store important elements, such as nitrogen and carbon. Here we present biogeochemical evidence from the sediments of tropical Lake Titicaca indicating that large hydrologic changes in response to global glacial cycles during the Quaternary were accompanied by major shifts in ecosystem state. During prolonged glacial intervals, lake level was high and the lake was in a stable nitrogen-limited state. In contrast, during warm dry interglacials lake level fell and rates of nitrogen concentrations increased by a factor of 4-12, resulting in a fivefold to 24-fold increase in organic carbon concentrations in the sediments due to increased primary productivity. Observed periods of increased primary productivity were also associated with an apparent increase in denitrification. However, the net accumulation of nitrogen during interglacial intervals indicates that increased nitrogen supply exceeded nitrogen losses due to denitrification, thereby causing increases in primary productivity. Although primary productivity in tropical ecosystems, especially freshwater ecosystems, tends to be nitrogen limited, our results indicate that climate variability may lead to changes in nitrogen availability and thus changes in primary productivity. Therefore some tropical ecosystems may shift between a stable state of nitrogen limitation and a stable state of nitrogen saturation in response to varying climatic conditions.

  18. Molecular-dynamics study of the dynamical excitations in commensurate monolayer films of nitrogen molecules on graphite: A test of the corrugation in the nitrogen-graphite potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical excitations in a commensurate monolayer solid of N2 molecules adsorbed on graphite have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Velocity and rotational correlation functions as well as coherent intermediate scattering functions and dynamical structure factors have been ca...

  19. Remote sensing techniques to monitor nitrogen-driven carbon dynamics in field corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Daughtry, Craig S. T.

    2009-08-01

    Patterns of change in vegetation growth and condition are one of the primary indicators of the present and future ecological status of the globe. Nitrogen (N) is involved in photochemical processes and is one of the primary resources regulating plant growth. As a result, biological carbon (C) sequestration is driven by N availability. Large scale monitoring of photosynthetic processes are currently possible only with remote sensing systems that rely heavily on passive reflectance (R) information. Unlike R, fluorescence (F) emitted from chlorophyll is directly related to photochemical reactions and has been extensively used for the elucidation of the photosynthetic pathways. Recent advances in passive fluorescence instrumentation have made the remote acquisition of solar-induced fluorescence possible. The goal of this effort is to evaluate existing reflectance and emerging fluorescence methodologies for determining vegetation parameters related to photosynthetic function and carbon sequestration dynamics in plants. Field corn N treatment levels of 280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N / ha were sampled from an intensive test site for a multi-disciplinary project, Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE). Aircraft, near-ground, and leaf-level measurements were used to compare and contrast treatment effects within this experiment site assessed with both reflectance and fluorescence approaches. A number of spectral indices including the R derivative index D730/D705, the normalized difference of R750 vs. R705, and simple ratio R800/R750 differentiated three of the four N fertilization rates and yielded high correlations to three important carbon parameters: C:N, light use efficiency, and grain yield. These results advocate the application of hyperspectral sensors for remotely monitoring carbon cycle dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

  20. Nitrogen limitation of growth and nutrient dynamics in a disturbed mangrove forest, Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Ilka C.; Whigham, D.F.; McKee, K.L.; Lovelock, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of nutrient enrichment on plant growth, nutrient dynamics, and photosynthesis in a disturbed mangrove forest in an abandoned mosquito impoundment in Florida. Impounding altered the hydrology and soil chemistry of the site. In 1997, we established a factorial experiment along a tree-height gradient with three zones, i.e., fringe, transition, dwarf, and three fertilizer treatment levels, i.e., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), control, in Mosquito Impoundment 23 on the eastern side of Indian River. Transects traversed the forest perpendicular to the shoreline, from a Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringe through an Avicennia germinans stand of intermediate height, and into a scrub or dwarf stand of A. germinans in the hinterland. Growth rates increased significantly in response to N fertilization. Our growth data indicated that this site is N-limited along the tree-height gradient. After 2 years of N addition, dwarf trees resembled vigorously growing saplings. Addition of N also affected internal dynamics of N and P and caused increases in rates of photosynthesis. These findings contrast with results for a R. mangle-dominated forest in Belize where the fringe is N-limited, but the dwarf zone is P-limited and the transition zone is co-limited by N and P. This study demonstrated that patterns of nutrient limitation in mangrove ecosystems are complex, that not all processes respond similarly to the same nutrient, and that similar habitats are not limited by the same nutrient when different mangrove forests are compared.

  1. In situ carbon and nitrogen dynamics in ryegrass-clover mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.; Eriksen, J.; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2007-01-01

    =9). 15N-enriched compounds were not detected in percolating pore water, which may be caused by either dilution from irrigation or low availability of leachable N compounds. 14C was found solely as 14CO2 in the pore water indicating that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) did not originate from fresh......Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a third production year ryegrass–clover mixture were investigated in the field. Cylinders (diameter 29.7 cm) were installed to depths of 20, 40 and 60 cm and equipped with suction cups to collect percolating pore water. Ryegrass and clover leaves were cross......-labelled with 14C- and 15N-enriched urea and the fate of the two tracers was studied for 3 months during summer. Transfer of 14C occurred mainly from ryegrass to clover, whereas the largest transfer of 15N was in the opposite direction. The average transfer of N from clover was 40% (SE±3.1, n=9) of N in ryegrass...

  2. Understanding of coupled terrestrial carbon, nitrogen and water dynamics-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baozhang; Coops, Nicholas C

    2009-01-01

    Coupled terrestrial carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and hydrological processes play a crucial role in the climate system, providing both positive and negative feedbacks to climate change. In this review we summarize published research results to gain an increased understanding of the dynamics between vegetation and atmosphere processes. A variety of methods, including monitoring (e.g., eddy covariance flux tower, remote sensing, etc.) and modeling (i.e., ecosystem, hydrology and atmospheric inversion modeling) the terrestrial carbon and water budgeting, are evaluated and compared. We highlight two major research areas where additional research could be focused: (i) Conceptually, the hydrological and biogeochemical processes are closely linked, however, the coupling processes between terrestrial C, N and hydrological processes are far from well understood; and (ii) there are significant uncertainties in estimates of the components of the C balance, especially at landscape and regional scales. To address these two questions, a synthetic research framework is needed which includes both bottom-up and top-down approaches integrating scalable (footprint and ecosystem) models and a spatially nested hierarchy of observations which include multispectral remote sensing, inventories, existing regional clusters of eddy-covariance flux towers and CO(2) mixing ratio towers and chambers.

  3. EFFECTS OF NITRIFICATION INHIBITORS ON MINERAL NITROGEN DYNAMICS IN AGRICULTURE SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to elucidate the effect of three nitrification inhibitors viz, 3.4dimethylpyrazo-lephosphate (DMPP, 4-Chlormethylpyrazole (ClMP and dicyandiamide (DCD on mineral nitrogen dynamics of (NH42SO4 in soil incubated at 25oC in soils. The quantitative determination of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were carried out spectrophotometrically, while potential denitrify-cation capacity (PDC was measured gas chromatographically. DMPP, ClMP and DCD were used on recommended rates of 90kg N ha-1 corresponding to 0.36µg DMPP; 0.25µg ClMP and 10µg DCD g-1 dry soil. In all treatments, the influence of 1, 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 times of the recommended-concentrations were examined. Results suggested that DMPP, ClMP and DCD applied at rates generally recommended for agricultural use may not be effective to inhibit nitrification. Thus even at the highest tested NIs-concentrations, nitrate and nitrite formation still occurred. Application of high concentrations of these chemicals up to 180µg DMPP, 125µg ClMP and 2500µg DCD were needed for inhibiting nitrification completely. The three NIs began to inhibit PDC at 10 to 50 times recommended concentration and were more effective in sandy than in loamy or clay soils. ClMP influenced PDC at much lower concentration as DMPP or DCD.

  4. Modeling Nitrogen Dynamics in a Waste Stabilization Pond System Using Flexible Modeling Environment with MCMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Hussnain; Lin, Yu-Pin; Shipin, Oleg V; Petway, Joy R

    2017-07-12

    This study presents an approach for obtaining realization sets of parameters for nitrogen removal in a pilot-scale waste stabilization pond (WSP) system. The proposed approach was designed for optimal parameterization, local sensitivity analysis, and global uncertainty analysis of a dynamic simulation model for the WSP by using the R software package Flexible Modeling Environment (R-FME) with the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Additionally, generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) was integrated into the FME to evaluate the major parameters that affect the simulation outputs in the study WSP. Comprehensive modeling analysis was used to simulate and assess nine parameters and concentrations of ON-N, NH₃-N and NO₃-N. Results indicate that the integrated FME-GLUE-based model, with good Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients (0.53-0.69) and correlation coefficients (0.76-0.83), successfully simulates the concentrations of ON-N, NH₃-N and NO₃-N. Moreover, the Arrhenius constant was the only parameter sensitive to model performances of ON-N and NH₃-N simulations. However, Nitrosomonas growth rate, the denitrification constant, and the maximum growth rate at 20 °C were sensitive to ON-N and NO₃-N simulation, which was measured using global sensitivity.

  5. Assessment and Monitoring of Nutrient Management in Irrigated Agriculture for Groundwater Quality Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Davis, R.; Smart, D. R.; Brown, P. H.; Dzurella, K.; Bell, A.; Kourakos, G.

    2017-12-01

    Nutrient fluxes to groundwater have been subject to regulatory assessment and control only in a limited number of countries, including those in the European Union, where the Water Framework Directive requires member countries to manage groundwater basis toward achieving "good status", and California, where irrigated lands will be subject to permitting, stringent nutrient monitoring requirements, and development of practices that are protective of groundwater. However, research activities to rigorously assess agricultural practices for their impact on groundwater have been limited and instead focused on surface water protection. For groundwater-related assessment of agricultural practices, a wide range of modeling tools has been employed: vulnerability studies, nitrogen mass balance assessments, crop-soil-system models, and various statistical tools. These tools are predominantly used to identify high risk regions, practices, or crops. Here we present the development of a field site for rigorous in-situ evaluation of water and nutrient management practices in an irrigated agricultural setting. Integrating groundwater monitoring into agricultural practice assessment requires large research plots (on the order of 10s to 100s of hectares) and multi-year research time-frames - much larger than typical agricultural field research plots. Almonds are among the most common crops in California with intensive use of nitrogen fertilizer and were selected for their high water quality improvement potential. Availability of an orchard site with relatively vulnerable groundwater conditions (sandy soils, water table depth less than 10 m) was also important in site selection. Initial results show that shallow groundwater concentrations are commensurate with nitrogen leaching estimates obtained by considering historical, long-term field nitrogen mass balance and groundwater dynamics.

  6. Hydrologic control on redox and nitrogen dynamics in a peatland soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubol, Simonetta, E-mail: rubols@ing.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy); Silver, Whendee L. [Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, 130 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bellin, Alberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile ed Ambientale, Universita di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, the complexity of the drivers of N{sub 2}O production and emissions has hindered our ability to predict the magnitude and spatial dynamics of N{sub 2}O fluxes. Soil moisture can be considered a key driver because it influences oxygen (O{sub 2}) supply, which feeds back on N{sub 2}O sources (nitrification versus denitrification) and sinks (reduction to dinitrogen). Soil water content is directly linked to O{sub 2} and redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Despite its importance, only a few laboratory studies have addressed the effects of hydrological transient dynamics on nitrogen (N) cycling in the vadose zone. To further investigate these aspects, we performed a long term experiment in a 1.5 m depth soil column supplemented by chamber experiments. With this experiment, we aimed to investigate how soil moisture dynamics influence redox sensitive N cycling in a peatland soil. As expected, increased soil moisture lowered O{sub 2} concentrations and redox potential in the soil. The decline was more severe for prolonged saturated conditions than for short events and at deep than at the soil surface. Gaseous and dissolved N{sub 2}O, dissolved nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) changed considerably along the soil column profile following trends in soil O{sub 2} and redox potential. Hot spots of N{sub 2}O concentrations corresponded to high variability in soil O{sub 2} in the upper and lower parts of the column. Results from chamber experiments confirmed high NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction potential in soils, particularly from the bottom of the column. Under our experimental conditions, we identified a close coupling of soil O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O dynamics, both of which lagged behind soil moisture changes. These results highlight the relationship among soil hydrologic properties, redox potential

  7. A Dynamic Economic Analysis of Nitrogen-Induced Soil Acidification in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ziyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the environmental value of nitrogen fertilizer in a rapeseed-rice double-crop system in China to address the issue of nitrogen-induced soil acidification in China’s farmland. Previous literature always regarded the acid rain as the most important contributor to soil acidification. Thus, previous literature seldom linked soil quality with nitrogen leaching but studied acidification as a side product of air pollution. However, the latest scientific evidences show that China’s...

  8. A dynamic modelling approach for estimating critical loads of nitrogen based on plant community changes under a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyazid, Salim; Kurz, Dani; Braun, Sabine; Sverdrup, Harald; Rihm, Beat; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic model of forest ecosystems was used to investigate the effects of climate change, atmospheric deposition and harvest intensity on 48 forest sites in Sweden (n = 16) and Switzerland (n = 32). The model was used to investigate the feasibility of deriving critical loads for nitrogen (N) deposition based on changes in plant community composition. The simulations show that climate and atmospheric deposition have comparably important effects on N mobilization in the soil, as climate triggers the release of organically bound nitrogen stored in the soil during the elevated deposition period. Climate has the most important effect on plant community composition, underlining the fact that this cannot be ignored in future simulations of vegetation dynamics. Harvest intensity has comparatively little effect on the plant community in the long term, while it may be detrimental in the short term following cutting. This study shows: that critical loads of N deposition can be estimated using the plant community as an indicator; that future climatic changes must be taken into account; and that the definition of the reference deposition is critical for the outcome of this estimate. - Research highlights: → Plant community changes can be used to estimate critical loads of nitrogen. → Climate change is decisive for future changes of geochemistry and plant communities. → Climate change cannot be ignored in estimates of critical loads. → The model ForSAFE-Veg was successfully used to set critical loads of nitrogen. - Plant community composition can be used in dynamic modelling to estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition, provided the appropriate reference deposition, future climate and target plant communities are defined.

  9. Nitrogen trading tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  10. The long-term impact of urbanization on nitrogen patterns and dynamics in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baojing; Dong, Xiaoli; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Weidong; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying

    2012-12-01

    Urbanization is an important process that alters the regional and global nitrogen biogeochemistry. In this study, we test how long-term urbanization (1952-2004) affects the nitrogen flows, emissions and drivers in the Greater Shanghai Area (GSA) based on the coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) approach. Results show that: (1) total nitrogen input to the GSA increased from 57.7 to 587.9 Gg N yr(-1) during the period 1952-2004, mainly attributing to fossil fuel combustion (43%), Haber-Bosch nitrogen fixation (31%), and food/feed import (26%); (2) per capita nitrogen input increased from 13.5 to 45.7 kg N yr(-1), while per gross domestic product (GDP) nitrogen input reduced from 22.2 to 0.9 g N per Chinese Yuan, decoupling of nitrogen with GDP; (3) emissions of reactive nitrogen to the environment transformed from agriculture dominated to industry and human living dominated, especially for air pollution. This study provides decision-makers a novel view of nitrogen management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimating the dynamics of groundwater input into the coastal zone via continuous radon-222 measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, William C.; Dulaiova, Henrieta

    2003-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the coastal zone has received increased attention in the last few years as it is now recognized that this process represents an important pathway for material transport. Assessing these material fluxes is difficult, as there is no simple means to gauge the water flux. To meet this challenge, we have explored the use of a continuous radon monitor to measure radon concentrations in coastal zone waters over time periods from hours to days. Changes in the radon inventories over time can be converted to fluxes after one makes allowances for tidal effects, losses to the atmosphere, and mixing with offshore waters. If one assumes that advective flow of radon-enriched groundwater (pore waters) represent the main input of 222 Rn in the coastal zone, the calculated radon fluxes may be converted to water fluxes by dividing by the estimated or measured 222 Rn pore water activity. We have also used short-lived radium isotopes ( 223 Ra and 224 Ra) to assess mixing between near-shore and offshore waters in the manner pioneered by . During an experiment in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, we showed that the mixing loss derived from the 223 Ra gradient agreed very favorably to the estimated range based on the calculated radon fluxes. This allowed an independent constraint on the mixing loss of radon--an important parameter in the mass balance approach. Groundwater discharge was also estimated independently by the radium isotopic approach and was within a factor of two of that determined by the continuous radon measurements and an automated seepage meter deployed at the same site

  12. Detecting groundwater discharge dynamics from point-to-catchment scale in a lowland stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J. R.; Sebök, Éva; Duque, C.

    2015-01-01

    was quantified using differential gauging with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). At the catchment scale (26–114 km2), runoff sources during main rain events were investigated by hydrograph separations based on electrical conductivity (EC) and stable isotopes 2H/1H. Clear differences in runoff sources...... response to precipitation events. This shows a large variability in groundwater discharge to the stream, despite the similar lowland characteristics of sub-catchments indicating the usefulness of environmental tracers for obtaining information about integrated catchment functioning during precipitation...

  13. Nitrogen and dry matter dynamics in linseed as affected by the nitrogen level and genotype in a Mediterranean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dordas, Christos A.

    2012-01-01

    Linseed or oilseed flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important source of edible and industrial vegetable oil and is grown widely in temperate regions around the world. Nitrogen, one of the most important nutrients for linseed, is often applied for higher yield and better quality. However, the effects of N level on dry matter and N accumulation, partitioning, and retranslocation have not yet been identified in linseed. A two-year field study was therefore conducted to determine the effects of N level on dry matter, N accumulation, partitioning, and retranslocation of three linseed cultivars (Livia, Lirina, Creola) grown in a Mediterranean environment under rain-fed conditions. It was found that N fertilization increased biomass at anthesis by an average of 47% and at maturity by an average of 38%, compared with the control. N fertilization increased the dry matter partitioning in leaves + flowers and stems at anthesis, and also in leaves + capsule vegetative components, stems, and seeds at maturity. Dry matter translocation was affected by N fertilization, growing season, and by the interaction between growing season and N treatment. In addition, N fertilization increased N retranslocation from the vegetative parts of the plant to the seed. Moreover, the N uptake by seeds was more affected by the seed yield and less affected by the seed N concentration. The present study indicates that N fertilization affects dry matter and N translocation in linseed. -- Highlights: ► Dry matter translocation was affected by N fertilization, year, and their interaction. ► HI was affected by N fertilization while NHI was not. ► N fertilization increased N retranslocation from the vegetative parts to the seed.

  14. Landscape structure, groundwater dynamics, and soil water content influence soil respiration across riparian-hillslope transitions in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent J. Pacific; Brian L. McGlynn; Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Daniel L. Welsch; Howard E. Epstein

    2011-01-01

    Variability in soil respiration at various spatial and temporal scales has been the focus of much research over the last decade aimed to improve our understanding and parameterization of physical and environmental controls on this flux. However, few studies have assessed the control of landscape position and groundwater table dynamics on the spatiotemporal variability...

  15. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...

  16. Alteration of belowground carbon dynamics by nitrogen addition in southern California mixed conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.S. Nowinski; S.E. Trumbore; G. Jimenez; M.E. Fenn

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition rates in southern California are the highest in North America and have had substantial effects on ecosystem functioning. We document changes in the belowground C cycle near ponderosa pine trees experiencing experimental nitrogen (N) addition (50 and 150 kg N ha−1 a−1 as slow release urea since 1997) at two end‐member...

  17. Dynamics of dissolved and extractable organic nitrogen upon soil amendment with crop residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, G.H.; Hoffland, E.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is increasingly recognized as a pivotal pool in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle. Numerous devices and sampling procedures have been used to estimate its size, varying from in situ collection of soil solution to extraction of dried soil with salt solutions. Extractable

  18. The influence of riverine nitrogen on the dynamics of the North Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große, Fabian; Kreus, Markus; Lenhart, Hermann; Pätsch, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The mitigation of eutrophication and its concomitants, like oxygen deficiency in bottom waters, is one of the major aspects of the ecological management of coastal marine ecosystems. In the past, biogeochemical models helped to significantly improve the understanding of the interaction of the physical and biological processes driving eutrophication. Anthropogenic river input of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) is the main driver for eutrophication. Nevertheless, the quantification of their influence in a specific region remains an important issue, since it is as crucial for an efficient management as it is difficult to obtain. During the past decade, a quantitative method applicable to biogeochemical models - often referred to as `trans-boundary nutrient transports' (TBNT) - became more and more popular in the context of marine ecosystem management. This method allows for the tracing of elements from various sources, e.g., nitrogen (N) from different rivers, throughout the whole process chain of the applied model. By this, it provides valuable information about the contributions from different sources to the overall amount and turnover of an element in different areas of the model domain. This information constitutes the basis for the quantification, evaluation and optimisation of river input reduction targets for the tributaries, which are defined in relation to their ecological consequences in the marine environment. In existing studies, the TBNT method has been applied to a variety of biogeochemical models, e.g. to quantify the atmospheric contribution to total N in the North Sea (Troost et al., 2013). This study presents a novel approach to link the TBNT method applied to N to the biological processes driving the oxygen dynamics in the bottom layer of the North Sea. For this purpose, simulations from the biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model HAMburg) are analysed for the years 2002 and 2010, with the focus on the southern central North Sea, the region of

  19. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Richard B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; David, Mark B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Seitzinger, Sybil P.; Tobias, Craig R.; Tonitto, Christina; Wollheim, Wilfred M.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  20. Positive responses of belowground C dynamics to nitrogen enrichment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Peng, Changhui; Zhu, Guangyu; Chen, Lei; Liu, Yulin; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2018-03-01

    Determining how nitrogen (N) impacts ecosystem carbon (C) cycling is critical to using C sequestration to offset anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. The N deposition rate in China is higher than the global average; however, many results of N enrichment experiments in China have not been included in global syntheses. In this study, we assembled a large dataset that comprised 124 published studies concerning N addition experiments, including 570 observations at 127 sites across China, to quantify the responses of belowground C dynamics to N enrichment in terrestrial ecosystems in China by a meta-analysis. The results showed that overall soil organic C, dissolved organic C (DOC) and soil microbial biomass C (MBC) increased by 1.8, 7.4, and 8.8%, respectively (Penrichment; belowground biomass and litter increased by 14.6 and 24.4%, respectively (Penrichment promoted C inputs into the soil mainly by increasing litter and belowground biomass inputs. Additionally, N enrichment increased C output by increasing soil respiration. Land use type and N addition level had different impacts on the soil C pool and on soil respiration. DOC, MBC, and litter exhibited more positive responses to N deposition in cooler and more arid regions than in other regions. The meta-analysis indicated that N enrichment had a positive impact on belowground C cycles in China. Climate played a greater role than did N deposition level in affecting processes of ecosystem C cycling. Moreover, belowground C cycle processes are determined by complicated interactions among land use type, N enrichment, and climate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of nitrogen oxides and ozone above and within a mixed hardwood forest in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Seok

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 and ozone (O3 above and within the canopy at the University of Michigan Biological Station AmeriFlux (UMBS Flux site was investigated by continuous multi-height vertical gradient measurements during the summer and the fall of 2008. A daily maximum in nitric oxide (NO mixing ratios was consistently observed during the morning hours between 06:00 and 09:00 EST above the canopy. Daily NO maxima ranged between 0.1 and 2 ppbv (with a median of 0.3 ppbv, which were 2 to 20 times above the atmospheric background. The sources and causes of the morning NO maximum were evaluated using NOx and O3 measurements and synoptic and micrometeorological data. Numerical simulations with a multi-layer canopy-exchange model were done to further support this analysis. The observations indicated that the morning NO maximum was caused by the photolysis of NO2 from non-local air masses, which were transported into the canopy from aloft during the morning breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer. The analysis of simulated process tendencies indicated that the downward turbulent transport of NOx into the canopy compensates for the removal of NOx through chemistry and dry deposition. The sensitivity of NOx and O3 concentrations to soil and foliage NOx emissions was also assessed with the model. Uncertainties associated with the emissions of NOx from the soil or from leaf-surface nitrate photolysis did not explain the observed diurnal behavior in NOx (and O3 and, in particular, the morning peak in NOx mixing ratios. However, a ~30% increase in early morning NOx and NO peak mixing ratios was simulated when a foliage exchange NO2 compensation point was considered. This increase suggests the potential importance of leaf-level, bidirectional exchange of NO2 in understanding the observed temporal variability in NOx at UMBS.

  2. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen dynamics in riparian soils: model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, A; Batlle-Aguilar, J; Barry, D A

    2012-07-01

    The quality of riparian soils and their ability to buffer contaminant releases to aquifers and streams are connected intimately to moisture content and nutrient dynamics, in particular of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). A multi-compartment model-named the Riparian Soil Model (RSM)-was developed to help investigate the influence and importance of environmental parameters, climatic factors and management practices on soil ecosystem functioning in riparian areas. The model improves existing tools, in particular regarding its capability to simulate a wide range of temporal scales, from days to centuries, along with its ability to predict the concentration and vertical distribution of dissolved organic matter (DOM). It was found that DOM concentration controls the amount of soil organic matter (SOM) stored in the soil as well as the respiration rate. The moisture content was computed using a detailed water budget approach, assuming that within each time step all the water above field capacity drains to the layer underneath, until it becomes fully saturated. A mass balance approach was also used for nutrient transport, whereas the biogeochemical reaction network was developed as an extension of an existing C and N turnover model. Temperature changes across the soil profile were simulated analytically, assuming periodic temperature changes in the topsoil. To verify the consistency of model predictions and to illustrate its capabilities, a synthetic but realistic soil profile in a deciduous forest was simulated. Model parameters were taken from the literature, and model predictions were consistent with experimental observations for a similar scenario. Modelling results stressed the importance of environmental conditions on SOM cycling in soils. The mineral and organic C and N stocks fluctuate at different time scales in response to oscillations in climatic conditions and vegetation inputs/uptake. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions in constructed wetlands treating wastewater: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, M. M. R.; Richards, K. G.; Healy, M. G.; Gill, L.; Müller, C.; Johnston, P.; Fenton, O.

    2016-01-01

    The removal efficiency of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in constructed wetlands (CWs) is very inconsistent and frequently does not reveal whether the removal processes are due to physical attenuation or whether the different species have been transformed to other reactive forms. Previous research on nutrient removal in CWs did not consider the dynamics of pollution swapping (the increase of one pollutant as a result of a measure introduced to reduce a different pollutant) driven by transformational processes within and around the system. This paper aims to address this knowledge gap by reviewing the biogeochemical dynamics and fate of C and N in CWs and their potential impact on the environment, and by presenting novel ways in which these knowledge gaps may be eliminated. Nutrient removal in CWs varies with the type of CW, vegetation, climate, season, geographical region, and management practices. Horizontal flow CWs tend to have good nitrate (NO3-) removal, as they provide good conditions for denitrification, but cannot remove ammonium (NH4+) due to limited ability to nitrify NH4+. Vertical flow CWs have good NH4+ removal, but their denitrification ability is low. Surface flow CWs decrease nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions but increase methane (CH4) emissions; subsurface flow CWs increase N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, but decrease CH4 emissions. Mixed species of vegetation perform better than monocultures in increasing C and N removal and decreasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but empirical evidence is still scarce. Lower hydraulic loadings with higher hydraulic retention times enhance nutrient removal, but more empirical evidence is required to determine an optimum design. A conceptual model highlighting the current state of knowledge is presented and experimental work that should be undertaken to address knowledge gaps across CWs, vegetation and wastewater types, hydraulic loading rates and regimes, and retention times, is suggested. We recommend that

  4. Dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen and their responses to nitrogen additions in three subtropical forests, south China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yun-ting; ZHU Wei-xing; MO Jiang-ming; ZHOU Guo-yi; GUNDERSEN Per

    2006-01-01

    Three forests with different historical land-use, forest age, and species assemblages in subtropical China were selected to evaluate current soil N status and investigate the responses of soil inorganic N dynamics to monthly ammonium nitrate additions.Results showed that the mature monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest that has been protected for more than 400 years exhibited an advanced soil N status than the pine (Pinus massoniana) and pine-broadleaf mixed forests, both originated from the 1930's clear-cut and pine plantation. Mature forests had greater extractable inorganic N pool, lower N retention capacity, higher inorganic N leaching,and higher soil C/N ratios. Mineral soil extractable NH4+-N and NO3--N concentrations were significantly increased by experimental N additions on several sampling dates, but repeated ANOVA showed that the effect was not significant over the whole year except NH4+-N in the mature forest. In contrast, inorganic N (both NH4+-N and NO3--N) in soil 20-cm below the surface was significantly elevated by the N additions. From 42% to 74% of N added was retained by the upper 20 cm soils in the pine and mixed forests, while 0%-70% was retained in the mature forest. Our results suggest that land-use history, forest age and species composition were likely to be some of the important factors that determine differing forest N retention responses to elevated N deposition in the study region.

  5. Dynamic chemistry in the perched groundwater flowing through weathered bedrock underling a steep forested hillslope, north California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Rempe, D. M.; Bishop, J. K.; Dietrich, W.; Fung, I.; Wood, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of groundwater chemistry in the seasonally perched groundwater systems that develop in the weathered bedrock zone under hillslopes have rarely been documented, yet chemical evolution of water here dictates the runoff chemistry to streams in many places. Here we exploit an intensively instrumented hillslope to document water well chemistry at three wells and adjacent stream. We have been sampling groundwater at daily frequency since October 2008 on a forested hillslope, "Rivendell", at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve located at the headwaters of the Eel River, California. The site is typical of California's coastal Mediterranean climate. The groundwater samples have been collected from a depth near the boundary between the weathered and fresh bedrock at three locations along the hillslope: Well 1 (bottom of hillslope), Well 3 (mid-slope), and Well 10 (near the ridge). Bulk rainwater and throughfall samples were collected at a meadow across the hillslope and at the middle of the slope, respectively, as well. Near the ridge (Well 10), during the first significant rainstorms of 2009 (133mm/42.5hours) and 2010 (220mm/42hours), when the water table changed only 0.32m and 0.66m, respectively, the concentration of Ca, Mg, and Na started to increase rapidly compared to the dry season (e.g. 2-6 μM vs 0.02-0.2μM [Mg]/day). However, during these same storms, K concentration sharply increased to 50-60 μM and decreased to 20-30μM, synchronizing with the water table responses. Throughfalls of these storms had at least 10 fold lower Ca, Mg, and Na concentrations than the well water while they had 10 fold higher K compared to the pre-event groundwater values. When the total seasonal cumulative rainfall exceeds 600 mm, the Well 10 solute concentration was diluted nearly 3 fold (e.g. [Mg] 0.3 mM vs. 0.1 mM) and the water table was raised significantly (2-6 meters). Throughout the rainy season, Well10 retained its diluted chemistry signature and on

  6. Soil microbial community and its interaction with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics following afforestation in central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Cheng, Xiaoli; Hui, Dafeng; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ming; Zhang, Quanfa

    2016-01-15

    Afforestation may alter soil microbial community structure and function, and further affect soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Here we investigated soil microbial carbon and nitrogen (MBC and MBN) and microbial community [e.g. bacteria (B), fungi (F)] derived from phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis in afforested (implementing woodland and shrubland plantations) and adjacent croplands in central China. Relationships of microbial properties with biotic factors [litter, fine root, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and inorganic N], abiotic factors (soil temperature, moisture and pH), and major biological processes [basal microbial respiration, microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2), net N mineralization and nitrification] were developed. Afforested soils had higher mean MBC, MBN and MBN:TN ratios than the croplands due to an increase in litter input, but had lower MBC:SOC ratio resulting from low-quality (higher C:N ratio) litter. Afforested soils also had higher F:B ratio, which was probably attributed to higher C:N ratios in litter and soil, and shifts of soil inorganic N forms, water, pH and disturbance. Alterations in soil microbial biomass and community structure following afforestation were associated with declines in basal microbial respiration, qCO2, net N mineralization and nitrification, which likely maintained higher soil carbon and nitrogen storage and stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of pelleted sewage sludge on Norway spruce establishment and nitrogen dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Anders

    1999-01-01

    In Sweden there is a big resource in unutilised sewage sludge. Studies have shown that application of municipal sewage sludge can improve forest productivity and planting environment. This study is examining the effects of two types of pelleted sewage sludge (pure sludge and a mixture of sludge and domestic wastes compost) on nitrogen turnover. Large differences were found in the fertilisation effect of the different treatments. The pure sewage sludge pellets treatment showed significant increases for NH 4 -accumulation, nitrification and NO 3 -leaching in the top 10 cm of the soil. Uptake of nitrogen was increased in spruce plants and vegetation. The mixed sludge/domestic waste pellets treatment showed indications of a minor initial release of nitrogen. This is seen as a small but significant initial increase in soil nitrification. These results suggest that the pure sewage sludge pellet is an adequate nitrogen fertiliser. The mixed sludge though is inadequate at least in the short run

  8. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales. PMID:27296550

  9. Simulating Root Density Dynamics and Nitrogen Uptake – Can a Simple Approach be Sufficient?

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Anders; Zhang, Kefeng; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    The modeling of root growth in many plant–soil models is simple and with few possibilities to adapt simulated root proliferation and depth distribution to that actually found with different crop species. Here we propose a root model, developed to describe root growth, root density and nitrogen uptake. The model focuses on annual crops, and attempts to model root growth of different crop species and row crops and its significance for nitrogen uptake from different parts of the soil volume.

  10. The influence of wildfire severity on soil char composition and nitrogen dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Charles; Fegel, Timothy; Chow, Alex; Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Norman, John, III; Kelly, Eugene

    2017-04-01

    both indicate that C contained or leached from severely-burned char layers has higher aromaticity and thus chemical stability compared to C in unburned soils. Mineral soil (0-5 cm depth) beneath char layers in high severity portions of the Hayman Fire had significantly more soil N and C and lower pH. Potential net mineralization - an index of the supply of plant-available nitrogen - differed between the severely-burned areas and both unburned and moderately-burn areas. Negative net mineralization in unburned and moderately burned soils indicates immobilization or retention of inorganic N by soil microbes. In contrast, soils burned at high severity produced inorganic N sources available to plants, leaching and gas losses. Water soluble nitrate comprised a larger proportion of inorganic N leached from the char layer of high severity burns. Mineral soil in those areas had both higher water soluble nitrate and total inorganic N in leachate. Char layers that have persisted for fifteen years influence soil N turnover within the Hayman Fire affected area and may contribute to elevated N losses in streams burned at high severity. The chemical stability of soil char layers perpetuates their importance for C sequestration and N dynamics in burned landscapes.

  11. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  12. Utilizing multichannel electrical resistivity methods to examine the dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface in two Hawaiian groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Natasha T.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Dulaiova, Henrieta; Glenn, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    Multichannel electrical resistivity (ER) measurements were conducted at two contrasting coastal sites in Hawaii to obtain new information on the spatial scales and dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface and rates of coastal groundwater exchange. At Kiholo Bay (located on the dry, Kona side of the Big Island) and at a site in Maunalua Bay (Oahu), there is an evidence for abundant submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). However, the hydrologic and geologic controls on coastal groundwater discharge are likely to be different at these two sites. While at Kiholo Bay SGD is predominantly through lava tubes, at the Maunalua Bay site exchange occurs mostly through nearshore submarine springs. In order to calculate SGD fluxes, it is important to understand the spatial and temporal scales of coastal groundwater exchange. From ER time series data, subsurface salinity distributions were calculated using site-specific formation factors. A salinity mass balance box model was then used to calculate rates of point source (i.e., spatially discreet) and total fresh water discharge. From these data, mean SGD rates were calculated for Kiholo Bay (∼9,200 m3/d) and for the Maunalua Bay site (∼5,900 m3/d). While such results are on the same order of magnitude to geochemical tracer-derived SGD rates, the ER SGD rates provide enhanced details of coastal groundwater exchange that can enable a more cohesive whole watershed perspective.

  13. Integration of nitrogen dynamics into the Noah-MP land surface model v1.1 for climate and environmental predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, X.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Climate and terrestrial biosphere models consider nitrogen an important factor in limiting plant carbon uptake, while operational environmental models view nitrogen as the leading pollutant causing eutrophication in water bodies. The community Noah land surface model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) is unique in that it is the next-generation land surface model for the Weather Research and Forecasting meteorological model and for the operational weather/climate models in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Here in this study, we add a capability to Noah-MP to simulate nitrogen dynamics by coupling the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) plant model and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) soil nitrogen dynamics. This model development incorporates FUN's state-of-the-art concept of carbon cost theory and SWAT's strength in representing the impacts of agricultural management on the nitrogen cycle. Parameterizations for direct root and mycorrhizal-associated nitrogen uptake, leaf retranslocation, and symbiotic biological nitrogen fixation are employed from FUN, while parameterizations for nitrogen mineralization, nitrification, immobilization, volatilization, atmospheric deposition, and leaching are based on SWAT. The coupled model is then evaluated at the Kellogg Biological Station – a Long Term Ecological Research site within the US Corn Belt. Results show that the model performs well in capturing the major nitrogen state/flux variables (e.g., soil nitrate and nitrate leaching). Furthermore, the addition of nitrogen dynamics improves the modeling of net primary productivity and evapotranspiration. The model improvement is expected to advance the capability of Noah-MP to simultaneously predict weather and water quality in fully coupled Earth system models.

  14. Watershed vs. within-lake drivers of nitrogen: phosphorus dynamics in shallow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginger, Luke J; Zimmer, Kyle D; Herwig, Brian R; Hanson, Mark A; Hobbs, William O; Small, Gaston E; Cotner, James B

    2017-10-01

    Research on lake eutrophication often identifies variables affecting amounts of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in lakes, but understanding factors influencing N:P ratios is important given its influence on species composition and toxin production by cyanobacteria. We sampled 80 shallow lakes in Minnesota (USA) for three years to assess effects of watershed size, proportion of watershed as both row crop and natural area, fish biomass, and lake alternative state (turbid vs. clear) on total N : total P (TN : TP), ammonium, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), and seston stoichiometry. We also examined N:P stoichiometry in 20 additional lakes that shifted states during the study. Last, we assessed the importance of denitrification by measuring denitrification rates in sediment cores from a subset of 34 lakes, and by measuring seston δ 15 N in four additional experimental lakes before and after they were experimentally manipulated from turbid to clear states. Results showed alternative state had the largest influence on overall N:P stoichiometry in these systems, as it had the strongest relationship with TN : TP, seston C:N:P, ammonium, and TDP. Turbid lakes had higher N at given levels of P than clear lakes, with TN and ammonium 2-fold and 1.4-fold higher in turbid lakes, respectively. In lakes that shifted states, TN was 3-fold higher in turbid lakes, while TP was only 2-fold higher, supporting the notion N is more responsive to state shifts than is P. Seston δ 15 N increased after lakes shifted to clear states, suggesting higher denitrification rates may be important for reducing N levels in clear states, and potential denitrification rates in sediment cores were among the highest recorded in the literature. Overall, our results indicate lake state was a primary driver of N:P dynamics in shallow lakes, and lakes in clear states had much lower N at a given level of P relative to turbid lakes, likely due to higher denitrification rates. Shallow lakes are often

  15. Assessment of watershed scale nitrogen cycling and dynamics by hydrochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, T.; Hiramatsu, K.; Somura, H.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen cycling in terrestrial areas is affecting water quality and ecosystem of aquatic area such as lakes and oceans through rivers. Owing to the intensive researches on nitrogen cycling in each different type of ecosystem, we acquired rich knowledge on nitrogen cycling of each ecosystem. On the other hand, since watershed are composed of many different kinds of ecosystems, nitrogen cycling in a watershed as a complex of these ecosystems is not well quantified. Thus, comprehensive understanding of nitrogen cycling of watersheds by modelling efforts are required. In this study, we attempted to construct hydrochemical model of the Ise Bay watershed to reproduce discharge, TN, and NO3 concentration. The model is based on SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tools) model. As anthropogenic impacts related to both hydrological cycling and nitrogen cycling, agricultural water intake/drainage, and domestic water intake/drainage were considered. In addition, fertilizer input to agricultural lands were also considered. Calibration period and validation period are 2004-2006, and 2007-2009, respectively. As a result of calibration using 2000 times LCS (Latin Cubic Sampling) method, discharge of rivers were reproduced fairly well with NS of 0.6-0.8. In contrast, the calibration result of TN and NO3 concentration tended to show overestimate values in spite of considering parameter uncertainties. This implies that unimplemented denitrification processes in the model. Through exploring the results, it is indicated that riparian areas, and agricultural drainages might be important spots for denitrification. Based on the result, we also attempted to evaluate the impact of climate change on nitrogen cycling. Though it is fully explored, this result will also be reported.

  16. Earthquake related dynamic groundwater pressure changes observed at the Kamaishi Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shunji; Yasuike, Shinji; Komada, Hiroya; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Makoto; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    From 342 seismic records observed at the Kamaishi Mine form 1990 to 1998, a total of 92 data whose acceleration is greater than 1 gal or ground water pressure is greater than 1 kPa were selected and dynamic ground water pressure changes associated with earthquakes were studied. The results obtained are as follows: (1) A total of 27 earthquakes accompanied by static ground water pressure changes were observed. Earthquake-related static ground water pressure changes are smaller than 1/10 of the annual range of ground water pressure changes. There is also a tendency that the ground water pressure changes recovers to its original trend in several weeks after earthquakes. (2) Dynamic ground water pressure changes associated with earthquakes occur when P-waves arrive. However, the largest dynamic ground water pressure changes occur on S-wave part arrivals where the amplitude of seismic wave is the largest. A positive correlation is recognized between the maximum value of velocity wave form and that of dynamic ground water pressure changes. (3) The characteristic of dynamic change in ground water pressure due to earthquakes can be explained qualitatively by mechanism in which the P-wave converted from an incident SV wave propagates along the borehole. (author)

  17. Highway deicing salt dynamic runoff to surface water and subsequent infiltration to groundwater during severe UK winters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Michael O; Cuthbert, Mark O; Gamble, Richard; Connon, Lucy E; Pearson, Andrew; Shepley, Martin G; Davis, John

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic impact to the water environment of deicing salt application at a major highway (motorway) interchange in the UK is quantitatively evaluated for two recent severe UK winters. The contaminant transport pathway studied allowed controls on dynamic highway runoff and storm-sewer discharge to a receiving stream and its subsequent leakage to an underlying sandstone aquifer, including possible contribution to long-term chloride increases in supply wells, to be evaluated. Logged stream electrical-conductivity (EC) to estimate chloride concentrations, stream flow, climate and motorway salt application data were used to assess salt fate. Stream loading was responsive to salt applications and climate variability influencing salt release. Chloride (via EC) was predicted to exceed the stream Environmental Quality Standard (250mg/l) for 33% and 18% of the two winters. Maximum stream concentrations (3500mg/l, 15% sea water salinity) were ascribed to salt-induced melting and drainage of highway snowfall without dilution from, still frozen, catchment water. Salt persistance on the highway under dry-cold conditions was inferred from stream observations of delayed salt removal. Streambed and stream-loss data demonstrated chloride infiltration could occur to the underlying aquifer with mild and severe winter stream leakage estimated to account for 21 to 54% respectively of the 70t of increased chloride (over baseline) annually abstracted by supply wells. Deicing salt infiltration lateral to the highway alongside other urban/natural sources were inferred to contribute the shortfall. Challenges in quantifying chloride mass/fluxes (flow gauge accuracy at high flows, salt loading from other roads, weaker chloride-EC correlation at low concentrations), may be largely overcome by modest investment in enhanced data acquisition or minor approach modification. The increased understanding of deicing salt dynamic loading to the water environment obtained is relevant to improved

  18. Synergistic dynamics of nitrogen and phosphorous influences lipid productivity in Chlorella minutissima for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Neha; Patel, Alok; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-08-01

    The study synergistically optimized nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations for attainment of maximum lipid productivity in Chlorella minutissima. Nitrogen and phosphorous limited cells (N(L)P(L)) showed maximum lipid productivity (49.1±0.41mg/L/d), 1.47 folds higher than control. Nitrogen depletion resulted in reduced cell size with large sized lipid droplets encompassing most of the intracellular space while discrete lipid bodies were observed under nitrogen sufficiency. Synergistic N/P starvations showed more prominent effect on photosynthetic pigments as to individual deprivations. Phosphorous deficiency along with N starvation exhibited 17.12% decline in carbohydrate while no change in nitrogen sufficient cells were recorded. The optimum N(L)P(L) concentration showed balance between biomass and lipid by maintaining intermediate cell size, pigments, carbohydrate and proteins. FAME profile showed C14-C18 carbon chains in N(L)P(L) cells with biodiesel properties comparable to plant oil methyl esters. Hence, synergistic N/P limitation was effective for enhancing lipid productivity with reduced consumption of nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simplifying dynamic river water quality modelling: A case study of inorganic nitrogen dynamics in the Crocodile River (South Africa).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Deksissa, T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality Model No. 1, which is one of the most comprehensive basic river water quality models available in literature. The applicability of the simplified model in data limited situations was investigated using a case study of inorganic nitrogen (nitrate...

  20. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...... (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r......-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal....

  1. Nitrogen fertilization and root growth dynamics of durum wheat for a sustainable production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato De Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In an area of the Apulian Tavoliere (southern Italy, the effects of three levels of nitrogen fertilization (0, 50 and 100 kg N ha–1 on root development, growth analysis and yield parameters of durum wheat were evaluated. The research was conducted over a four-year period (1994-97. The non-destructive mini-rhizotron method was used to study the root system at stem extension and at the beginning of heading and ripening stages. At the end of tillering and at boot and flowering stages, samples of wheat biomass were taken and subjected to growth analysis. Yield data and the main biometric parameters were collected at harvest time. The doses of nitrogen (N fertilizer 50 and 100 kg N ha–1 had a greater effect on root development in the 20-30 cm soil layer and on epigeal biomass than the control test (N0 without nitrogen fertilization. In the test (N0 the growth of root and epigeal biomass was slower during the first vegetative phases, however, afterwards both of them recovered and the root system was mainly developed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A better development of root system in deeper soil layers, without nitrogen supply, has allowed the plant to overcome more easily the water-deficit and thermal stresses during the ripening stage. The results of this research have shown that the production of grain with 50 kg ha–1 of N is similar to those of 100 kg ha–1 of N doses and higher than the test without nitrogen fertilization. In this kind of environment can be recommended a nitrogen dose of 50 kg ha–1 for obtaining an increase in grain production with low costs and reduced agricultural sources of pollution.

  2. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  3. Influence of lag effect, soil release, and climate change on watershed anthropogenic nitrogen inputs and riverine export dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dingjiang; Huang, Hong; Hu, Minpeng; Dahlgren, Randy A

    2014-05-20

    This study demonstrates the importance of the nitrogen-leaching lag effect, soil nitrogen release, and climate change on anthropogenic N inputs (NANI) and riverine total nitrogen (TN) export dynamics using a 30-yr record for the Yongan River watershed in eastern China. Cross-correlation analysis indicated a 7-yr, 5-yr, and 4-yr lag time in riverine TN export in response to changes in NANI, temperature, and drained agricultural land area, respectively. Enhanced by warmer temperature and improved agricultural drainage, the upper 20 cm of agricultural soils released 270 kg N ha(-1) between 1980 and 2009. Climate change also increased the fractional export of NANI to river. An empirical model (R(2) = 0.96) for annual riverine TN flux incorporating these influencing factors estimated 35%, 41%, and 24% of riverine TN flux originated from the soil N pool, NANI, and background N sources, respectively. The model forecasted an increase of 45%, 25%, and 6% and a decrease of 13% in riverine TN flux from 2010 to 2030 under continued development, climate change, status-quo, and tackling scenarios, respectively. The lag effect, soil N release, and climate change delay riverine TN export reductions with respect to decreases in NANI and should be considered in developing and evaluating N management measures.

  4. Temporal dynamics of light and nitrogen vertical distributions in canopies of sunflower, kenaf and cynara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archontoulis, S.V.; Vos, J.; Yin, X.; Bastiaans, L.; Danalatos, N.G.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance eco-physiological and modelling studies, we quantified vertical distributions of light and nitrogen in canopies of three Mediterranean bio-energy crops: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) and cynara (Cynara cardunculus). Field crops were grown with and without

  5. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniela F. Cusack; Whendee L. Silver; Margaret S. Torn; William H. McDowell

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and...

  6. Nitrogen dynamics of spring-fed wetland ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada foothills oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall D. Jackson; Barbara Allen-Diaz

    2002-01-01

    Spring-fed wetlands are small, highly productive, patchy ecosystems nested within the oak woodland/annual grassland matrix of the Sierra Nevada foothills. In an effort to place these wetlands in a landscape context, we described seasonal variation (1999-2000 growing season) in nitrogen cycling parameters at 6 spring-fed wetland sites of the Sierra Nevada foothill oak...

  7. Dynamics of nitrogenous substances content in the diet of the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepelka, L.; Heroldová, Marta; Jánová, E.; Suchomel, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 5 (2013), s. 1247-1253 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH72075 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Apodemus sylvaticus * wood mouse * diet quality * near-infrared spectroscopy * nitrogenous substances Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  8. The dynamics of nitrogenous substances in rodent diet in a forest environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepelka, L.; Heroldová, Marta; Jánová, Eva; Suchomel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 3 (2014), s. 327-333 ISSN 0025-1461 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH72075 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Apodemus flavicollis * Apodemus sylvaticus * Clethrionomys glareolus * diet quality * Microtus arvalis * NIR spectroscopy * nitrogenous substances Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.681, year: 2014

  9. A dynamic nitrogen budget model of a Pacific Northwest salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of salt marshes as either nitrogen sinks or sources in relation to their adjacent estuaries has been a focus of ecosystem service research for many decades. The complex hydrology of these systems is driven by tides, upland surface runoff, precipitation, evapotranspirati...

  10. Nitrogen dynamics in organic and conventional cotton production systems in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboc, O.; Adamtey, N.; Forster, D.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing population growth still represents a challenge to agricultural production (food, fiber and fuel material supply). In spite of the undeniable achievements reached with the "green revolution" technologies, there is a growing awareness among scientists and policy makers that diverse and integrated approaches which are both productive and sustainable are now necessary to meet the agricultural challenges. Integrated and organic agriculture are such alternatives which need to be better investigated and implemented. While long-term experiments in temperate regions have assessed the effect of organic agriculture on different crops and soil quality, there is currently a lack of reliable data from tropical regions, such as findings arising from long-term systems comparison trials. This has necessitated a long-term system comparison trials in Kenya, Bolivia and India by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) and its partners (icipe, BioRe, Ecotop and Institute of Ecology) (www.systems-comparison.fibl.org). In India the project is based in Madhya Pradesh, in which organic and conventional production systems are being compared in a 2-yr crop rotation - cotton (yr 1) and soybean-wheat (yr 2). The field trial is planned for a time span of 10-20 years, in order to investigate long-term effects of those production systems on yields, soil characteristics, or economic return. A PhD study is incorporated into this project to investigate the effect of the production systems on soil characteristics. The main focus will be on nitrogen cycling under the different production systems. Particular attention will be given to nitrogen use efficiencies and the synchrony of nitrogen availability (e.g. nitrogen mineralization with the polyethylene bag technique, monitoring of soil mineral N) with plant nitrogen uptake, for which allometric equations will be calibrated in order to circumvent destructive sampling on the plots of the long-term experiment. Nitrogen losses

  11. [Dynamics of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen during foliar litter decomposition under artificial forest gap in Pinus massoniana plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming Jin; Chen, Liang Hua; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Wan Qin; Liu, Hua; Li, Xun; Zhang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays large areas of plantations have caused serious ecological problems such as soil degradation and biodiversity decline. Artificial tending thinning and construction of mixed forest are frequently used ways when we manage plantations. To understand the effect of this operation mode on nutrient cycle of plantation ecosystem, we detected the dynamics of microbial bio-mass carbon and nitrogen during foliar litter decomposition of Pinus massoniana and Toona ciliate in seven types of gap in different sizes (G 1 : 100 m 2 , G 2 : 225 m 2 , G 3 : 400 m 2 , G 4 : 625 m 2 , G 5 : 900 m 2 , G 6 : 1225 m 2 , G 7 : 1600 m 2 ) of 42-year-old P. massoniana plantations in a hilly area of the upper Yang-tze River. The results showed that small and medium-sized forest gaps(G 1 -G 5 ) were more advantageous for the increment of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in the process of foliar litter decomposition. Along with the foliar litter decomposition during the experiment (360 d), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) in P. massoniana foliar litter and MBN in T. ciliata foliar litter first increased and then decreased, and respectively reached the maxima 9.87, 0.22 and 0.80 g·kg -1 on the 180 th d. But the peak (44.40 g·kg -1 ) of MBC in T. ciliata foliar litter appeared on the 90 th d. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in T. ciliate was significantly higher than that of P. massoniana during foliar litter decomposition. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in foliar litter was not only significantly associated with average daily temperature and the water content of foliar litter, but also closely related to the change of the quality of litter. Therefore, in the thinning, forest gap size could be controlled in the range of from 100 to 900 m 2 to facilitate the increase of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in the process of foliar litter decomposition, accelerate the decomposition of foliar litter and improve soil fertility of plantations.

  12. [Dynamic changes in functional genes for nitrogen bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil cycle during].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin-Bin; Lu, Dian-Nan; Liu, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Microorganisms in nitrogen cycle serve as an important part of the ecological function of soil. The aim of this research was to monitor the abundance of nitrogen-fixing, denitrifying and nitrifying bacteria during bioaugmentation of petroleum-contaminated soil using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) of nifH, narG and amoA genes which encode the key enzymes in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and ammoniation respectively. Three different kinds of soils, which are petroleum-contaminated soil, normal soil, and remediated soil, were monitored. It was shown that the amounts of functional microorganisms in petroleum-contaminated soil were far less than those in normal soil, while the amounts in remediated soil and normal soil were comparable. Results of this experiment demonstrate that nitrogen circular functional bacteria are inhibited in petroleum-contaminated soil and can be recovered through bioremediation. Furthermore, copies of the three functional genes as well as total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) for soils with six different treatments were monitored. Among all treatments, the one, into which both E. cloacae as an inoculant and wheat straw as an additive were added, obtained the maximum copies of 2.68 x 10(6), 1.71 x 10(6) and 8.54 x 10(4) per gram dry soil for nifH, narG and amoA genes respectively, companying with the highest degradation rate (48% in 40 days) of TPH. The recovery of functional genes and removal of TPH were better in soil inoculated with E cloacae and C echinulata collectively than soil inoculated with E cloacae only. All above results suggest that the nitrogen circular functional genes could be applied to monitor and assess the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil.

  13. Instrumentation for cryogenic magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization using 90L of liquid nitrogen per day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Brice J; Pahng, Seong Ho; Alaniva, Nicholas; Sesti, Erika L; Rand, Peter W; Saliba, Edward P; Scott, Faith J; Choi, Eric J; Barnes, Alexander B

    2017-10-01

    Cryogenic sample temperatures can enhance NMR sensitivity by extending spin relaxation times to improve dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and by increasing Boltzmann spin polarization. We have developed an efficient heat exchanger with a liquid nitrogen consumption rate of only 90L per day to perform magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP experiments below 85K. In this heat exchanger implementation, cold exhaust gas from the NMR probe is returned to the outer portion of a counterflow coil within an intermediate cooling stage to improve cooling efficiency of the spinning and variable temperature gases. The heat exchange within the counterflow coil is calculated with computational fluid dynamics to optimize the heat transfer. Experimental results using the novel counterflow heat exchanger demonstrate MAS DNP signal enhancements of 328±3 at 81±2K, and 276±4 at 105±2K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrological application of the INCA model with varying spatial resolution and nitrogen dynamics in a northern river basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rankinen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As a first step in applying the Integrated Nitrogen model for CAtchments (INCA to the Simojoki river basin (3160 km2, this paper focuses on calibration of the hydrological part of the model and nitrogen (N dynamics in the river during the 1980s and 1990s. The model application utilised the GIS land-use and forest classification of Finland together with a recent forest inventory based on remote sensing. In the INCA model, the Hydrologically Effective Rainfall (HER is used to drive the water flow and N fluxes through the catchment system. HER was derived from the Watershed Simulation and Forecast System (WSFS. The basic component of the WSFS is a conceptual hydrological model which simulates runoff using precipitation, potential evapotranspiration and temperature data as inputs. Spatially uniform, lumped input data were calculated for the whole river basin and spatially semi-distributed input data were calculated for each of the nine sub-basins. When comparing discharges simulated by the INCA model with observed values, a better fit was obtained with the semi-distributed data than with the spatially uniform data (R2 0.78 v. 0.70 at Hosionkoski and 0.88 v. 0.78 at the river outlet. The timing of flow peaks was simulated rather well with both approaches, although the semi-distributed input data gave a more realistic simulation of low flow periods and the magnitude of spring flow peaks. The river basin has a relatively closed N cycle with low input and output fluxes of inorganic N. During 1982-2000, the average total N flux to the sea was 715 tonnes yr–1, of which 6% was NH4-N, 14% NO3-N, and 80% organic N. Annual variation in river flow and the concentrations of major N fractions in river water, and factors affecting this variation are discussed. Keywords: northern river basin, nitrogen, forest management, hydrology, dynamic modelling, semi-distributed modelling

  15. Soil nitrogen dynamics in high-altitude ski runs during the winter season (Monterosaski - Vallée d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freppaz, M.; Icardi, M.; Filippa, G.; Zanini, E.

    2009-04-01

    In many Alpine catchments, the development of winter tourism determined a widespread change in land use, shifting from forested and cultivated lands to ski slopes. The construction of a ski slope implies a strong impact on the landscape, with potential consequences on the soil quality. In most cases, the construction procedures include the total or partial removal of the soil body, the reallocation of the fine hearth fraction, the subsequent seeding of plants and the use of organic fertilizers. This work aims to evaluate soil physical and chemical properties and nitrogen (N) dynamics in anthropogenic soils from ski slopes of different age. Study sites were located in Champoluc (AO)- NW Italy between 2400 and 2700 m ASL. Topsoils (0-10 cm depth) were sampled in 4 ski slopes hydroseeded with commercial mixtures 4, 6, 10 and 12 years earlier, and in 4 control plots at the same exposure and altitude as the ski slopes. Soil samples were characterized, N dynamics in winter was evaluated with the buried bag technique and snowpack was analyzed for chemical and physical properties. Total nitrogen (TN) content in topsoil ranged 0.75-1.06 g kg-1 and was not correlated with the ski slope age. In all but one site, the TN content was significantly lower in the ski slope than in the control plot. A positive net ammonification and nitrification throughout the winter were found in all but one ski runs. These results suggest a high variability in the evolution degree of these anthropogenic soils. The net overwinter N mineralization that we report demonstrates that these soils are biologically active during the winter season. Such activity results in a pool of labile inorganic nitrogen potentially available for plant demand at the spring snowmelt.

  16. Biomass production and nitrogen dynamics in an integrated aquaculture/agriculture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, L. P.; Hall, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    A combined aquaculture/agriculture system that brings together the three major components of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) - biomass production, biomass processing, and waste recycling - was developed to evaluate ecological processes and hardware requirements necessary to assess the feasibility of and define design criteria for integration into the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Breadboard Project. The system consists of a 1 square meter plant growth area, a 500 liter fish culture tank, and computerized monitoring and control hardware. Nutrients in the hydrophonic solution were derived from fish metabolites and fish food leachate. In five months of continuous operation, 27.0 kg of lettuce tops, 39.9 kg of roots and biofilm, and 6.6 kg of fish (wet weights) were produced with 12.7 kg of fish food input. Based on dry weights, a biomass conversion index of 0.52 was achieved. A nitrogen budget was derived to determine partitioning of nitrogen within various compartments of the system. Accumulating nitrogen in the hypoponic solution indicated a need to enlarge the plant growth area, potentially increasing the biomass production and improving the biomass conversion index.

  17. Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of 15N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huysen, Tiff L.; Harmon, Mark E.; Perakis, Steven S.; Chen, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Litter nutrient dynamics contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. We examined how site environment and initial substrate quality influence decomposition and nitrogen (N) dynamics of multiple litter types. A 2.5-year decomposition study was installed in the Oregon Coast Range and West Cascades using 15N-labeled litter from Acer macrophyllum, Picea sitchensis, and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Mass loss for leaf litter was similar between the two sites, while root and twig litter exhibited greater mass loss in the Coast Range. Mass loss was greatest from leaves and roots, and species differences in mass loss were more prominent in the Coast Range. All litter types and species mineralized N early in the decomposition process; only A. macrophyllum leaves exhibited a net N immobilization phase. There were no site differences with respect to litter N dynamics despite differences in site N availability, and litter N mineralization patterns were species-specific. For multiple litter × species combinations, the difference between gross and net N mineralization was significant, and gross mineralization was 7–20 % greater than net mineralization. The mineralization results suggest that initial litter chemistry may be an important driver of litter N dynamics. Our study demonstrates that greater amounts of N are cycling through these systems than may be quantified by only measuring net mineralization and challenges current leaf-based biogeochemical theory regarding patterns of N immobilization and mineralization.

  18. Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of (15)N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huysen, Tiff L; Harmon, Mark E; Perakis, Steven S; Chen, Hua

    2013-12-01

    Litter nutrient dynamics contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. We examined how site environment and initial substrate quality influence decomposition and nitrogen (N) dynamics of multiple litter types. A 2.5-year decomposition study was installed in the Oregon Coast Range and West Cascades using (15)N-labeled litter from Acer macrophyllum, Picea sitchensis, and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Mass loss for leaf litter was similar between the two sites, while root and twig litter exhibited greater mass loss in the Coast Range. Mass loss was greatest from leaves and roots, and species differences in mass loss were more prominent in the Coast Range. All litter types and species mineralized N early in the decomposition process; only A. macrophyllum leaves exhibited a net N immobilization phase. There were no site differences with respect to litter N dynamics despite differences in site N availability, and litter N mineralization patterns were species-specific. For multiple litter × species combinations, the difference between gross and net N mineralization was significant, and gross mineralization was 7-20 % greater than net mineralization. The mineralization results suggest that initial litter chemistry may be an important driver of litter N dynamics. Our study demonstrates that greater amounts of N are cycling through these systems than may be quantified by only measuring net mineralization and challenges current leaf-based biogeochemical theory regarding patterns of N immobilization and mineralization.

  19. Evolutionarily stable strategy of carbon and nitrogen investments in forest leaves and its application in vegetation dynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, E.; Farrior, C.; Dybzinski, R.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf mass per area (LMA) and leaf lifespan (LL) are two highly correlated plant traits that are key to plant physiological and ecological properties. Usually, low LMA means short LL, high nitrogen (N) content per unit mass, and fast turnover rates of nutrients; high LMA leads to long LL, low N content, and slow turnover rates. Deciduous trees with low LMA and short lifespan leaves have low carbon cost but high nitrogen demand; and evergreen trees, with high LMA and long lifespan leaves, have high carbon cost but low nitrogen demand. These relationships lead to: 1) evergreen trees have higher leaf area index than deciduous trees; 2) evergreen trees' carbon use efficiency is lower than the deciduous trees' because of their thick leaves and therefore high maintenance respiration; 3) the advantage of evergreens trees brought by their extra leaves over deciduous trees diminishes with increase N in ecosystem. These facts determine who will win when trees compete with each other in a N-limited ecosystem. In this study, we formulate a mathematical model according to the relationships between LMA, LL, leaf nitrogen, and leaf building and maintenance cost, where LMA is the fundamental variable determining the other three. We analyze the evolutionarily stable strategies (ESSs) of LMA with this mathematical model by examining the benefits of carbon and nitrogen investments to leaves in ecosystems with different N. The model shows the ESS converges to low LMA at high N and high LMA at low N. At intermediate N, there are two ESSs at low and high ends of LMA, respectively. The ESS also leads to low forest productivity by outcompeting the possible high productive strategies. We design a simulation scheme in an individual-based competition model (LM3-PPA) to simulate forest dynamics as results of the competition between deciduous and evergreen trees in three different biomes, which are temperate deciduous forest, deciduous-evergreen mixed forest, and boreal evergreen forest. The

  20. POSTEROLATERAL DEFECT OF THE NORMAL HUMAN HEART INVESTIGATED WITH NITROGEN-13-AMMONIA AND DYNAMIC PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEJONG, RM; BLANKSMA, PK; WILLEMSEN, ATM; ANTHONIO, RL; MEEDER, JG; PRUIM, J; VAALBURG, W; LIE, KI

    The posterolateral defect is a common artifact seen when static N-13-ammonia imaging with PET is used to assess myocardial perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare dynamic and static N-13-ammonia PET and to obtain more insight into the cause of the posterolateral defect. Methods: Dynamic

  1. Effects of poultry manure, compost, and biochar amendments on soil nitrogen dynamics in maize production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryals, R.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Dell, C. J.; Sims, T.

    2013-12-01

    Intensification of animal agriculture has profound impacts on the global and local biogeochemistry of nitrogen (N), resulting in consequences to environmental and human health. In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, intensive agriculture is the primary contributor to N pollution, with animal manure comprising more than half of N from agriculture. Management interventions may play an important role in mitigating reactive N pollution in the Bay watershed. The objective of our research was to test management strategies that maximize benefits of poultry manure as an agricultural resource while minimizing it as a source of reactive nitrogen to the atmosphere and ground and surface waters. We conducted field experiments in two agricultural regions of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Georgetown, Delaware and State College, Pennsylvania) to explore the effects of poultry manure amendments on gaseous N losses and soil N transformations. Treatments were applied at rates needed to meet the plant N demand at each site and included unfertilized controls, fertilizer N (urea), and raw, composted, or and biocharred poultry manure. The fate of the N from all sources was followed throughout the growing season. Global greenhouse gases emitted from soil (nitrous oxide [N2O] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) and regional air pollutants (nitrogen oxides [NOx] and ammonia [NH3]) were measured. Gas measurements were coupled with data on treatment effects on temperature, moisture, and concentrations of nitrate (NO3¬-) and ammonium (NH4+) in surface soils (0-10 cm). Soil NO3- and NH4+ were also measured approximately monthly in the soil profile (0-10, 10-30, 30-50, 50-70, and 70-100 cm) as an index of leaching potential. Plant N uptake and grain production were also quantified to quantify crop N use efficiency and compare measured N losses for each N source. Our results suggest that the form of poultry manure amendments can affect the magnitude of reactive N losses to the environment.

  2. Nitrogen fixation dynamics of two diazotrophic communities in Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of diazotrophic microbial communities were found in the littoral zone of alkaline hypersaline Mono Lake, California. One consisted of anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the flocculent surface layers of sediments. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by flocculent surface layers occurred under anaerobic conditions, was not stimulated by light or by additions of organic substrates, and was inhibited by O2, nitrate, and ammonia. The second community consisted of a ball-shaped association of a filamentous chlorophyte (Ctenocladus circinnatus) with diazotrophic, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, as well as anaerobic bacteria (Ctenocladus balls). Nitrogen fixation by Ctenocladus balls was usually, but not always, stimulated by light. Rates of anaerobic dark fixation equaled those in the light under air. Fixation in the light was stimulated by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and by propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propanamide]. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea-elicited nitrogenase activity was inhibited by ammonia (96%) and nitrate (65%). Fixation was greatest when Ctenocladus balls were incubated anaerobically in the light with sulfide. Dark anaerobic fixation was not stimulated by organic substrates in short-term (4-h) incubations, but was in long-term (67-h) ones. Areal estimates of benthic N2 fixation were measured seasonally, using chambers. Highest rates (~29.3 ??mol of C2H4 m-2 h-1) occurred under normal diel regimens of light and dark. These estimates indicate that benthic N2 fixation has the potential to be a significant nitrogen source in Mono Lake.

  3. Hydro-ecological controls on dissolved carbon dynamics in groundwater and export to streams in a temperate pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deirmendjian, Loris; Loustau, Denis; Augusto, Laurent; Lafont, Sébastien; Chipeaux, Christophe; Poirier, Dominique; Abril, Gwenaël

    2018-02-01

    We studied the export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from forested shallow groundwater to first-order streams, based on groundwater and surface water sampling and hydrological data. The selected watershed was particularly convenient for such study, with a very low slope, with pine forest growing on sandy permeable podzol and with hydrology occurring exclusively through drainage of shallow groundwater (no surface runoff). A forest plot was instrumented for continuous eddy covariance measurements of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and net ecosystem exchanges of sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as CO2 fluxes. Shallow groundwater was sampled with three piezometers located in different plots, and surface waters were sampled in six first-order streams; river discharge and drainage were modeled based on four gauging stations. On a monthly basis and on the plot scale, we found a good consistency between precipitation on the one hand and the sum of evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater storage and drainage on the other hand. DOC and DIC stocks in groundwater and exports to first-order streams varied drastically during the hydrological cycle, in relation with water table depth and amplitude. In the groundwater, DOC concentrations were maximal in winter when the water table reached the superficial organic-rich layer of the soil. In contrast, DIC (in majority excess CO2) in groundwater showed maximum concentrations at low water table during late summer, concomitant with heterotrophic conditions of the forest plot. Our data also suggest that a large part of the DOC mobilized at high water table was mineralized to DIC during the following months within the groundwater itself. In first-order streams, DOC and DIC followed an opposed seasonal trend similar to groundwater but with lower concentrations. On an annual basis, leaching of carbon to streams occurred as DIC and DOC in similar proportion, but DOC export occurred in

  4. Hydro-ecological controls on dissolved carbon dynamics in groundwater and export to streams in a temperate pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Deirmendjian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We studied the export of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC from forested shallow groundwater to first-order streams, based on groundwater and surface water sampling and hydrological data. The selected watershed was particularly convenient for such study, with a very low slope, with pine forest growing on sandy permeable podzol and with hydrology occurring exclusively through drainage of shallow groundwater (no surface runoff. A forest plot was instrumented for continuous eddy covariance measurements of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and net ecosystem exchanges of sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as CO2 fluxes. Shallow groundwater was sampled with three piezometers located in different plots, and surface waters were sampled in six first-order streams; river discharge and drainage were modeled based on four gauging stations. On a monthly basis and on the plot scale, we found a good consistency between precipitation on the one hand and the sum of evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater storage and drainage on the other hand. DOC and DIC stocks in groundwater and exports to first-order streams varied drastically during the hydrological cycle, in relation with water table depth and amplitude. In the groundwater, DOC concentrations were maximal in winter when the water table reached the superficial organic-rich layer of the soil. In contrast, DIC (in majority excess CO2 in groundwater showed maximum concentrations at low water table during late summer, concomitant with heterotrophic conditions of the forest plot. Our data also suggest that a large part of the DOC mobilized at high water table was mineralized to DIC during the following months within the groundwater itself. In first-order streams, DOC and DIC followed an opposed seasonal trend similar to groundwater but with lower concentrations. On an annual basis, leaching of carbon to streams occurred as DIC and DOC in similar proportion, but DOC export

  5. Phytoplankton distribution and nitrogen dynamics in the southwest indian subtropical gyre and Southern Ocean waters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thomalla, J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available and regenerated nitrogen uptake is quantified by the f-ratio, a measure of that frac- tion of “new” primary production that is available for ex- port to the deep ocean or to higher trophic levels, relative to “regenerated” production which supports planktonic com... for evaluating the potential for carbon export. In this paper, we report on new and regenerated produc- tion measurements made along a transect from 31◦ S (just SW of Madagascar) to the Prince Edward Islands (45◦ S) following the Madagascar and SW Indian ridge...

  6. Soil nitrogen dynamics and Capsicum Annuum sp. plant response to biochar amendment in silt loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Gelybo, Gyorgyi; Dencso, Marton; Toth, Eszter; Farkas, Csilla; Kasa, Ilona; Pokovai, Klara

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the growth of Capsicum Annuum sp. (pepper) in small-scale experiment to observe changes in plant growth and health as reflected by leaf area, plant height, yield, root density, and nitrogen usage. Based on field conditions, part of the study aimed to examine the photosynthetic and photochemical responses of plants to treatments resulting from different plant growth rates. During the 12.5 week long study, four treatments were investigated with biochar amount of 0, 0.5%, 2.5%, and 5.0% (by weight) added to silt loam soil. The plants were placed under natural environmental conditions, such that photosynthetic activities from photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the plants photochemical reflectance index (PRI) could be continuously measured after exposure to sunlight. In this study we found that benefits from biochar addition to silt loam soil most distinguishable occurred in the BC2.5 treatments, where the highest plant yield, highest root density, and highest leaf areas were observed compared to other treatments. Furthermore, data showed that too low (0.5%) or too high (5.0%) biochar addition to the soil had diminishing effects on Capsicum Annuum sp. growth and yield over time. At the end of the 12th week, BC2.5 had 22.2%, while BC0.5 and BC5.0 showed 17.4% and 15.7% increase in yield dry weight respectively compared to controls. The collected data also showed that the PRI values of plants growing on biochar treated soils were generally lower compared to control treatments, which could relate to leaf nitrogen levels. Total nitrogen amount showed marginal changes over time in all treatments. The total nitrogen concentration showed 28.6% and 17.7% increase after the 6th week of the experiment for BC2.5 and BC5.0, respectively, while inorganic nutrients of NO3-N and NH4+-N showed a continuous decrease during the course of the study, with a substantial drop during the first few weeks. The present study provides evidence for impact

  7. Dynamic model-based N management reduces surplus nitrogen and improves the environmental performance of corn production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, S.; Woodbury, P. B.; van Es, H. M.

    2018-05-01

    The US Midwest is the largest and most intensive corn (Zea mays, L.) production region in the world. However, N losses from corn systems cause serious environmental impacts including dead zones in coastal waters, groundwater pollution, particulate air pollution, and global warming. New approaches to reducing N losses are urgently needed. N surplus is gaining attention as such an approach for multiple cropping systems. We combined experimental data from 127 on-farm field trials conducted in seven US states during the 2011–2016 growing seasons with biochemical simulations using the PNM model to quantify the benefits of a dynamic location-adapted management approach to reduce N surplus. We found that this approach allowed large reductions in N rate (32%) and N surplus (36%) compared to existing static approaches, without reducing yield and substantially reducing yield-scaled N losses (11%). Across all sites, yield-scaled N losses increased linearly with N surplus values above ~48 kg ha‑1. Using the dynamic model-based N management approach enabled growers to get much closer to this target than using existing static methods, while maintaining yield. Therefore, this approach can substantially reduce N surplus and N pollution potential compared to static N management.

  8. Solute transport dynamics in small, shallow groundwater-dominated agricultural catchments: insights from a high-frequency, multisolute 10 yr-long monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Aubert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency, long-term and multisolute measurements are required to assess the impact of human pressures on water quality due to (i the high temporal and spatial variability of climate and human activity and (ii the fact that chemical solutes combine short- and long-term dynamics. Such data series are scarce. This study, based on an original and unpublished time series from the Kervidy-Naizin headwater catchment (Brittany, France, aims to determine solute transfer processes and dynamics that characterise this strongly human-impacted catchment. The Kervidy-Naizin catchment is a temperate, intensive agricultural catchment, hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Over 10 yr, five solutes (nitrate, sulphate, chloride, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were monitored daily at the catchment outlet and roughly every four months in the shallow groundwater. The concentrations of all five solutes showed seasonal variations but the patterns of the variations differed from one solute to another. Nitrate and chloride exhibit rather smooth variations. In contrast, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon is dominated by flood flushes. The observed nitrate and chloride patterns are typical of an intensive agricultural catchment hydrologically controlled by shallow groundwater. Nitrate and chloride originating mainly from organic fertilisers accumulated over several years in the shallow groundwater. They are seasonally exported when upland groundwater connects with the stream during the wet season. Conversely, sulphate as well as organic and inorganic carbon patterns are not specific to agricultural catchments. These solutes do not come from fertilisers and do not accumulate in soil or shallow groundwater; instead, they are biogeochemically produced in the catchment. The results allowed development of a generic classification system based on the specific temporal patterns and source locations of each solute. It also considers the

  9. Geo mathematic tools for the design of a radioisotopes monitoring network in order to modelling the groundwater dynamics processes and hydrodynamic management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, J.L.; Gil, R.; Leyva, D.; Molerio, L.F.; Pin, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper, shows the application of geo mathematic tools [Mangin,1981; Molerio,1997] for the design of a radioisotopes monitoring network in order to modelling the groundwater dynamics processes and hydrodynamic management of a Karstic Basin (Almendares-Vento watershed), which is very difficult to evaluate due to the physical-geographical, geologic and hydrogeological characteristics. The Almendares Vento watershed (AVW) is close to the Jaruco-Aguacate watershed, with a similar hydrogeologic and geologic structure, therefore similar result must be expected. In the AVW case is necessary to identify, with more precision, the water propagation limits of the stratified layers according to the waters transit times, recharges and dynamics aquifers, residence time, groundwater contamination and the groundwater-surface water interaction due to the dam placed on the basin. The paper allowed the identification of a monitoring points network, taking into account, between other statistical approaches, the good correlation, the high memory effect, etc. According to the analysis of the variances spectral, have been obtained and optimized the sampling frequency of the network points in the Basin. Besides, it have been identified the necessities to include the detailed evaluation of a specific point of the network in the hydrodynamic study (Vento watershed). In order to evaluate the optimization of the designed monitoring network, the geo mathematic study developed was compared with the results of the mathematical model AQUIMPE, the final result showed the validation of the obtained design. The results of the work allow the best monitoring of the parameters in order to determine the aquifer recharge, residence times, the vulnerability to the waters contamination and the groundwater-surface water interaction

  10. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  11. Dynamic optimal control of homeostasis: an integrative system approach for modeling of the central nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, N A; Giuseppin, M L; Verrips, C T

    2000-01-01

    The theory of dynamic optimal metabolic control (DOMC), as developed by Giuseppin and Van Riel (Metab. Eng., 2000), is applied to model the central nitrogen metabolism (CNM) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CNM represents a typical system encountered in advanced metabolic engineering. The CNM is the source of the cellular amino acids and proteins, including flavors and potentially valuable biomolecules; therefore, it is also of industrial interest. In the DOMC approach the cell is regarded as an optimally controlled system. Given the metabolic genotype, the cell faces a control problem to maintain an optimal flux distribution in a changing environment. The regulation is based on strategies and balances feedback control of homeostasis and feedforward regulation for adaptation. The DOMC approach is an integrative, holistic approach, not based on mechanistic descriptions and (therefore) not biased by the variation present in biochemical and molecular biological data. It is an effective tool to structure the rapidly increasing amount of data on the function of genes and pathways. The DOMC model is used successfully to predict the responses of pulses of ammonia and glutamine to nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of a wild-type strain and a glutamine synthetase-negative mutant. The simulation results are validated with experimental data.

  12. Nitrogen balance and dynamics in corn under different soil fertility levels using “1“5N isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rallos, R.V.; Rivera, F.G.; Samar, E.D.; Rojales, J.S.; Anida, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) Fertilizer plays a vital role on the growth and development of any crop. The inefficient N fertilizer utilization contributes to poor crop productivity and environment pollution. This study used the 15N isotope tracer technique to understand the nitrogen balance and dynamics in corn grown during the wet and dry season for low, medium and high N soils in Northern Luzon. The experiments were laid out following the randomized complete block design (RCBD) potassium requirements were applied at optimum level on solid chemical analysis and fertilizer recommendation. The study was able to separate the source of N from applied fertilizer and from the soils, traced using 15N during the 30 days after planting (DAP), 60 DAP and at harvest. Result show that, more than half of N in the plant came directly from added fertilizer during the early stage, which decreased towards harvest period. Fertilizer N yield use efficiency showed negative relationship with the rate of N application and soil fertility levels. Of N fertilization in different soil fertility levels were also established using isotope tracer technique. (author)

  13. Nitrogen attenuation along delivery pathways in agricultural catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, Eoin; Mellander, Per-Erik; Coxon, Catherine; Richards, Karl G.

    2014-05-01

    Hillslope hydrologic systems and in particular near-stream saturated zones are active sites of nitrogen (N) biogeochemical dynamics. The efficiency of N removal and the ratio of reaction products (nitrous oxide and dinitrogen) in groundwater is highly variable and depends upon aquifer hydrology, mineralogy, dissolved oxygen, energy sources and redox chemistry. There are large uncertainties in the closing of N budgets in agricultural catchments. Spatial and temporal variability in groundwater physico-chemistry, catchment hydrology and land-use gives rise to hotspots and hot moments of N attenuation. In addition the production, consumption and movement of denitrification products remains poorly understood. The focus of this study is to develop a holistic understanding of N dynamics in groundwater as it moves from the top of the hillslope to the stream. This includes saturated groundwater flow, exchange at the groundwater-surface water interface and hyporheic zone flow. This project is being undertaken in two ca. 10km2 Irish catchments, characterised by permeable soils. One catchment is dominated by arable land overlying slate bedrock and the other by grassland overlying sandstone. Multi-level monitoring wells have been installed at the upslope, midslope and bottom of each hillslope. The piezometers are screened to intercept the subsoil, weathered bedrock and competent bedrock zones. Groundwater samples for nitrate (NO3-N) nitrite (NO2-N), ammonium (NH4-N) and total nitrogen are collected on a monthly basis while dissolved gas concentrations are collected seasonally. Groundwater NO3-N profiles from monitoring data to date in both catchments differ markedly. Although the two catchments had similar 3 year mean concentrations of 6.89 mg/L (arable) and 6.24 mg/L (grassland), the grassland catchment had higher spatial and temporal variation. The arable catchment showed relatively homogenous NO3-N concentrations in all layers and zones (range: 1.2 - 12.13 mg/L, SD = 1.60 mg

  14. Tropical montane forest conversion affects spatial and temporal nitrogen dynamics in Kenyan headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Suzanne; Weeser, Björn; Breuer, Lutz; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Guzha, Alphonce; Rufino, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Deforestation and land use change (LUC) are often stated as major contributors to changes in water quality, although other catchment characteristics such as topography, geology and climate can also play a role. Understanding how stream water chemistry is affected by LUC is essential for sustainable water management and land use planning. However, there is often a lack of reliable data, especially in less studied regions such as East Africa. This study focuses on three sub-catchments (27-36 km2) with different land use types (natural forest, smallholder agriculture and tea/tree plantations) nested in a 1023 km2 headwater catchment in the Mau Forest Complex, Kenya's largest closed-canopy indigenous tropical montane forest. In the past decades approx. 25% of the natural forest was lost due to land use change. We studied seasonal, diurnal and spatial patterns of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), nitrate (NO3-N) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) using a combination of high-resolution in-situ measurements, bi-weekly stream water samples and spatial sampling campaigns. Multiple linear regression analysis of the spatial data indicates that land use shows a strong influence on TDN and nitrate, while DON is more influenced by precipitation. Highest TDN and nitrate concentrations are found in tea plantations, followed by smallholder agriculture and natural forest. This ranking does not change throughout the year, though concentrations of TDN and nitrate are respectively 27.6 and 25.4% lower in all catchments during the dry season. Maximum Overlap Discrete Wavelet Transform (MODWT) analysis of the high resolution nitrate data revealed a seasonal effect on diurnal patterns in the natural forest catchment, where the daily peak shifts from early morning in the wet season to mid-afternoon in the dry season. The smallholder and tea catchment do not exhibit clear diurnal patterns. The results suggest that land use affects dissolved nitrogen concentrations, leading to higher N

  15. A multi-tracer approach to delineate groundwater dynamics in the Rio Actopan Basin, Veracruz State, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Quezadas, Juan; Heilweil, Victor M.; Cortés Silva, Alejandra; Araguas, Luis; Salas Ortega, María del Rocío

    2016-12-01

    Geochemistry and environmental tracers were used to understand groundwater resources, recharge processes, and potential sources of contamination in the Rio Actopan Basin, Veracruz State, Mexico. Total dissolved solids are lower in wells and springs located in the basin uplands compared with those closer to the coast, likely associated with rock/water interaction. Geochemical results also indicate some saltwater intrusion near the coast and increased nitrate near urban centers. Stable isotopes show that precipitation is the source of recharge to the groundwater system. Interestingly, some high-elevation springs are more isotopically enriched than average annual precipitation at higher elevations, indicating preferential recharge during the drier but cooler winter months when evapotranspiration is reduced. In contrast, groundwater below 1,200 m elevation is more isotopically depleted than average precipitation, indicating recharge occurring at much higher elevation than the sampling site. Relatively cool recharge temperatures, derived from noble gas measurements at four sites (11-20 °C), also suggest higher elevation recharge. Environmental tracers indicate that groundwater residence time in the basin ranges from 12,000 years to modern. While this large range shows varying groundwater flowpaths and travel times, ages using different tracer methods (14C, 3H/3He, CFCs) were generally consistent. Comparing multiple tracers such as CFC-12 with CFC-113 indicates piston-flow to some discharge points, yet binary mixing of young and older groundwater at other points. In summary, groundwater within the Rio Actopan Basin watershed is relatively young (Holocene) and the majority of recharge occurs in the basin uplands and moves towards the coast.

  16. Transpiration and Groundwater Uptake Dynamics of Pinus Brutia on a Fractured Mediterranean Mountain Slope during Two Hydrologically Contrasting Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Marinos; Bruggeman, Adriana; Lubczynski, Maciek; Christou, Andreas; Camera, Corrado; Djuma, Hakan

    2017-04-01

    Semi-arid environments tend to have extreme temporal variability in rainfall, resulting in extended periods with little to no precipitation. The mountainous topography is characterized by steep slopes, often leading to shallow soil layers with limited water storage capacity. Tree species survive in these environments by developing various adaptation mechanisms to access water. The main objective of this study is to examine the differences of two hydrologically contrasting years on the transpiration and groundwater uptake dynamics of Pinus brutia trees. We selected four trees for sap flow monitoring in an 8966-m2 fenced area of Pinus brutia forest. The site is located at 620 m elevation, on the northern foothills of the Troodos mountains in Cyprus. The slope of the site ranges between 0 and 82%. The average daily minimum temperature is 5 0C in January and the average daily maximum temperature is 35 oC in August. The mean annual rainfall is 425 mm. Monitoring started on 1 January 2015 and is ongoing. We measured soil depth in a 1-m grid around each of the selected trees for monitoring. We processed soil depths in ArcGIS software (ESRI) to create a soil depth map. We used a Total Station and a differential GPS for the creation of a high resolution DEM of the area covering the selected trees. We installed seventeen soil moisture sensors at 12-cm depth and two at 30-cm depth, where the soil was deeper than 24 cm. We randomly installed 28 metric manual rain gauges under the trees' canopy to measure throughfall. For stemflow we installed a plastic tube around each tree trunk and connected it to a manual rain gauge. We used sap flow heat ratio method (HRM) instruments to determine sap flow rates of the Pinus brutia. Hourly meteorological conditions were observed by an automatic meteorological station. Here we present the results of the January to October periods, in order to have comparable results for the two contrasting years. During the wet year of 2015, we measured 439

  17. Quantification of the impact of macrophytes on oxygen dynamics and nitrogen retention in a vegetated lowland river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, N. J. S.; Van Belleghem, S.; Seuntjens, P.; Bouma, T. J.; Buis, K.; Meire, P.

    When macrophytes are growing in the river, the vegetation induces substantial changes to the water quality. Some effects are the result of direct interactions, such as photosynthetic activity or nutrient uptake, whereas others may be attributed to indirect effects of the water plants on hydrodynamics and river processes. This research focused on the direct effect of macrophytes on oxygen dynamics and nutrient cycling. Discharge, macrophyte biomass density, basic water quality, dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations were in situ monitored throughout the year in a lowland river (Nete catchment, Belgium). In addition, various processes were investigated in more detail in multiple ex situ experiments. The field and aquaria measurement results clearly demonstrated that aquatic plants can exert considerable impact on dissolved oxygen dynamics in a lowland river. When the river was dominated by macrophytes, dissolved oxygen concentrations varied from 5 to 10 mg l -1. Considering nutrient retention, it was shown that the investigated in-stream macrophytes could take up dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) from the water column at rates of 33-50 mg N kgdry matter-1 h. And DIN fluxes towards the vegetation were found to vary from 0.03 to 0.19 g N ha -1 h -1 in spring and summer. Compared to the measured changes in DIN load over the river stretch, it means that about 3-13% of the DIN retention could be attributed to direct nitrogen uptake from the water by macrophytes. Yet, the role of macrophytes in rivers should not be underrated as aquatic vegetation also exerts considerable indirect effects that may have a greater impact than the direct fixation of nutrients into the plant biomass.

  18. Isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen reveal contributions of submarine groundwater and septic systems discharges to algal bloom in Boracay Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucgang, Raymond; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon; Mendoza, Norman; Racho, Joseph Michael; Bautista, Angel; Morco, Ryan; Petrache, Christina; Castaneda, Soledad; Dela Rosa, Alumanda

    2014-01-01

    The study showed that critical areas in Boracay island were contaminated by coliform bacteria and blue green algae (cyanobacteria). The distribution of tritium, 18 O, 15 N and 13 C in seawater, biota and sediments in the inter tidal zone, helped to identify sites with septic sewage outflows and submarine groundwater discharge, SGD. Nitrates (from 0.0 to 2.3 parts per million, ppm) and nutrients were discovered in seawater, particularly in four identified sites in the bathing zone. Point sources of infiltrating plumes were exposed by anomalies in tritium and 18 O in sea water. Septic and canal outflows as well as land based run-offs and submarine groundwater discharge were the identified causes of nutrient enrichments in sites with eminent algal bloom. The isotope composition implied that algae acquire nutrients from septic contamination, while a number of corals assimilate inorganic fertilizer nutrients from land-based plumes and SGD. The elements identified in sediments and corals were related to the natural mineral matrix of calcareous beach zone materials, however, sporadic spikes of lead, chromium and zinc were detected in particular sites at certain depths. These element spikes proxy processes linked to anthropogenic pollution and or organic matter decomposition in the sediment-water interfaces. The practicality of applying isotope-based techniques in conjunction with other chemical methods for the tracking down of the sources of nutrient contamination in polluted systems in demonstrated by the study.(author)

  19. Dynamics of triacylglycerol and EPA production in Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen starvation at different light intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse M Remmers

    Full Text Available Lipid production in microalgae is highly dependent on the applied light intensity. However, for the EPA producing model-diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, clear consensus on the impact of incident light intensity on lipid productivity is still lacking. This study quantifies the impact of different incident light intensities on the biomass, TAG and EPA yield on light in nitrogen starved batch cultures of P. tricornutum. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum TAG and EPA contents were found to be independent of the applied light intensity. The lipid yield on light was reduced at elevated light intensities (>100 μmol m-2 s-1. The highest TAG yield on light (112 mg TAG molph-1 was found at the lowest light intensity tested (60 μmol m-2 s-1, which is still relatively low to values reported in literature for other algae. Furthermore, mass balance analysis showed that the EPA fraction in TAG may originate from photosynthetic membrane lipids.

  20. Combined climate factors alleviate changes in gross soil nitrogen dynamics in heathlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorsne, Anna-Karin; Rutting, Tobias; Ambus, Per

    2014-01-01

    of exposure to three climate change factors, i.e. warming, elevated CO2 (eCO(2)) and summer drought, applied both in isolation and in combination. By conducting laboratory N-15 tracing experiments we show that warming increased both gross N mineralization and nitrification rates. In contrast, gross......The ongoing climate change affects biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, but the magnitude and direction of this impact is yet unclear. To shed further light on the climate change impact, we investigated alterations in the soil nitrogen (N) cycling in a Danish heathland after 5 years......CO(2). In the full treatment combination, simulating the predicted climate for the year 2075, gross N transformations were only moderately affected compared to control, suggesting a minor alteration of the N cycle due to climate change. Overall, our study confirms the importance of multifactorial field...

  1. Changes in soil nitrogen dynamics caused by prescribed fires in dense gorse lands in SW Pyrenees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múgica, Leire; Canals, Rosa M; San Emeterio, Leticia

    2018-05-18

    Rural depopulation, abandonment of traditional land uses and decrease of extensive stockfarming is accelerating shrub encroachment in mountain areas. In NW Spain, gorse (Ulex gallii Planch.) is expanding, developing dense shrublands that accumulate high fuel-loads, ignite easily and persist during long periods as alternate stable states. Under this scenario, traditional bush-to-bush farming fires are being replaced by high fuel-load burnings performed by specialised teams to reduce fuels and promote mosaic landscapes. This research analyses the effects on soil function and nitrogen (N)-cycling of these new generation of prescribed fires practiced under similar conditions to traditional fires (winter time, moist soils), but differing in the biomass and the continuity of the surface burnt. The results showed significant changes in N-cycle parameters, such as increases in inorganic N and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), but declines in N microbial biomass and urease activity. At the ecosystem level, potential N losses were high because the pulse of water-soluble forms, DON and nitrate, following fire overlaps with periods of low biological N retention by microorganisms and plants. Although most effects were similar to those observed in traditional burnings done in the same region, the primary concern is the high potential for DON losses following prescribed burning in highly gorse-encroached areas. In N-limited ecosystems, a crucial issue is to attain an equilibrium between frequent burnings, which may prevent an optimal recovery of the soil function, and uneven burnings, which burn high amounts of accumulated fuel and increase the risk of removing large quantities of dissolved N from the ecosystem in a unique fire event. Overall, the use of different techniques combined with fire are needed to promote and consolidate desired changes in dense gorse lands. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of three years of simulated nitrogen deposition on soil nitrogen dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions in a Korean pine plantation of northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Tian, Peng; Zhang, Jinbo; Jin, Guangze

    2017-12-31

    Continuously enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition alters the pattern of N and carbon (C) transformations, and thus influences greenhouse gas emissions. It is necessary to clarify the effect of N deposition on greenhouse gas emissions and soil N dynamics for an accurate assessment of C and N budgets under increasing N deposition. In this study, four simulated N deposition treatments (control [CK: no N addition], low-N [L: 20kgNha -1 yr -1 ], medium-N [M: 40kgNha -1 yr -1 ], and high-N [H: 80kgNha -1 yr -1 ]) were operated from 2014. Carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide fluxes were monitored semimonthly, as were soil variables such as temperature, moisture and the concentrations of total dissolved N (TDN), NO 3 - , NO 2 - , NH 4 + , and dissolved organic N (DON) in soil solutions. The simulated N deposition resulted in a significant increase in TDN, NO 3 - and DON concentrations in soil solutions. The average CO 2 emission rate ranged from 222.6mgCO 2 m -2 h -1 in CK to 233.7mgCO 2 m -2 h -1 in the high-N treatment. Three years of simulated N deposition had no effect on soil CO 2 emission, which was mainly controlled by soil temperature. The mean N 2 O emission rate during the whole 3years was 0.02mgN 2 Om -2 h -1 for CK, which increased significantly to 0.05mgN 2 Om -2 h -1 in the high-N treatment. The N 2 O emission rate positively correlated with NH 4 + concentrations, and negatively correlated with soil moisture. The average CH 4 flux during the whole 3years was -0.74μgCH 4 m -2 h -1 in CK, which increased to 1.41μgCH 4 m -2 h -1 in the low-N treatment. CH 4 flux positively correlated with NO 3 - concentrations. These results indicate that short-term N deposition did not affect soil CO 2 emissions, while CH 4 and N 2 O emissions were sensitive to N deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium on the Dynamics of Synthesis of Nucleic Acids and Proteins in the Different Phases of Wheat Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic, B.; Grujic-Injac, B.; Jelenic, Dj. [Institute for the Application of Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Veterinary Medicine and Forestry, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1968-07-01

    The influence of different nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium levels on the dynamics of RNA synthesis and raw proteins, as well as the uptake of phosphorus in the different phases of wheat development, were studied by applying radioactive phosphorus {sup 32}P . The rate of the uptake of phosphorus is proportional to its concentration in the nutrient supply in all phases of wheat development, in spite of the fact that the uptake of phosphorus during vegetation decreases with the plant's maturity. The influence of nitrogen on the uptake of phosphorus is inversely proportional to the concentration of nitrogen in the nutrient, while the influence of potassium depends on the relation of the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus. The increased levels of nitrogen and phosphorus are directly proportional to the increase of RNA synthesis, and conversely the decrease of these levels decreases the RNA synthesis. The RNA synthesis decreases with the wheat's maturity during vegetation and is considerably greater in the first phase than in the later phases of the plant's development. Nitrogen and phosphorus have the greatest influence on protein synthesis; potassium has far less influence. These investigations show that the synthesis of nucleic acids and the building up of phosphorus in the RNA-fraction is directly proportional to the concentration of nitrogen in the nutrient supply, even though the uptake of phosphorus by wheat is not proportional to the increased nitrogen levels. Investigations now being carried out provide further explanations concerning the mutual relationship of some forms of RNA of the cells and the amino acids in the synthesis of certain protein fractions of wheat under the influence of different levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. (author)

  4. DRAINMOD-FOREST: Integrated Modeling of Hydrology, Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics, and Plant Growth for Drained Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shiying; Youssef, Mohamed A; Skaggs, R Wayne; Amatya, Devendra M; Chescheir, G M

    2012-01-01

    We present a hybrid and stand-level forest ecosystem model, DRAINMOD-FOREST, for simulating the hydrology, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics, and tree growth for drained forest lands under common silvicultural practices. The model was developed by linking DRAINMOD, the hydrological model, and DRAINMOD-N II, the soil C and N dynamics model, to a forest growth model, which was adapted mainly from the 3-PG model. The forest growth model estimates net primary production, C allocation, and litterfall using physiology-based methods regulated by air temperature, water deficit, stand age, and soil N conditions. The performance of the newly developed DRAINMOD-FOREST model was evaluated using a long-term (21-yr) data set collected from an artificially drained loblolly pine ( L.) plantation in eastern North Carolina, USA. Results indicated that the DRAINMOD-FOREST accurately predicted annual, monthly, and daily drainage, as indicated by Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.93, 0.87, and 0.75, respectively. The model also predicted annual net primary productivity and dynamics of leaf area index reasonably well. Predicted temporal changes in the organic matter pool on the forest floor and in forest soil were reasonable compared to published literature. Both predicted annual and monthly nitrate export were in good agreement with field measurements, as indicated by Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients above 0.89 and 0.79 for annual and monthly predictions, respectively. This application of DRAINMOD-FOREST demonstrated its capability for predicting hydrology and C and N dynamics in drained forests under limited silvicultural practices. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. MASS LOSS AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS DURING THE DECOMPOSITION OF A N-LABELED N2-FIXING EPOPHYTIC LICHEN, LOBARIA OREGANA (TUCK.) MULL. ARG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied mass loss and nitrogen dynamics during fall and spring initiated decomposition of an N2-fixing epiphytic lichen, Lobaria oregana (Tuck.) Mull. Arg. using 15N. We developed a method of labeling lichens with 15N that involved spraying lichen material with a nutrient sol...

  6. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in mesocosms of five different European peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodau, Christian; Zajac, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition, a key growth limiting nutrient in ombrotrophic peatlands, can cause various shifts in peatland N cycling. Quantification of N transformation rates and fluxes within peatlands that are induced by long-term N deposition is crucial for understanding the mechanisms and robustness of N retention. Using a 15N labeled tracer under steady state conditions at two water table levels, we investigated the fate of N in mesocosms from five European peatlands, which have a history of differing long-term N load. Peat contained the largest N pool, followed by Sphagnum (0 - 5 cm), shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. We found a decline of N recovery from the peat and an increase of N recovery from shrubs and the dissolved pool across the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum mosses not only intercepted large amounts of 15N in the mesocosms (0.2 - 0.35 mg g-1) but they also retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Polluted sites (Lille Vildmose, Frölichshaier Sattelmoor) contained the largest dissolved nitrogen pools and the highest nitrate concentrations. At the same time the recoveries of their Sphagnum pools were in the range of the recovery recorded for the Sphagnum layer from the 'clean' site (Degerö Stormyr). Our experiment shows that a decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, might not be an evidence for Sphagnum saturation. As long as N is required for the synthesis of biomass Sphagnum species can thrive even at strongly elevated long-term N loads. A change in WT position from -28 to -8 cm influenced CO2 fluxes from mesocosms only to a small degree, which implies that small changes in water table position may be less important in controlling CO2 exchange with the atmosphere than often assumed. Although water table rise was a main driver for increase of methane emissions in all cores, short time lags (3

  7. Nitrogen dynamics across silvicultural canopy gaps in young forests of western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, A.L.; Perakis, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Silvicultural canopy gaps are emerging as an alternative management tool to accelerate development of complex forest structure in young, even-aged forests of the Pacific Northwest. The effect of gap creation on available nitrogen (N) is of concern to managers because N is often a limiting nutrient in Pacific Northwest forests. We investigated patterns of N availability in the forest floor and upper mineral soil (0-10 cm) across 6-8-year-old silvicultural canopy gaps in three 50-70-year-old Douglas-fir forests spanning a wide range of soil N capital in the Coast Range and Cascade Mountains of western Oregon. We used extractable ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) pools, net N mineralization and nitrification rates, and NH4+ and NO3- ion exchange resin (IER) concentrations to quantify N availability along north-south transects run through the centers of 0.4 and 0.1 ha gaps. In addition, we measured several factors known to influence N availability, including litterfall, moisture, temperature, and decomposition rates. In general, gap-forest differences in N availability were more pronounced in the mineral soil than in the forest floor. Mineral soil extractable NH4+ and NO3- pools, net N mineralization and nitrification rates, and NH4+ and NO3- IER concentrations were all significantly elevated in gaps relative to adjacent forest, and in several cases exhibited significantly greater spatial variability in gaps than forest. Nitrogen availability along the edges of gaps more often resembled levels in the adjacent forest than in gap centers. For the majority of response variables, there were no significant differences between northern and southern transect positions, nor between 0.4 and 0.1 ha gaps. Forest floor and mineral soil gravimetric percent moisture and temperature showed few differences along transects, while litterfall carbon (C) inputs and litterfall C:N ratios in gaps were significantly lower than in the adjacent forest. Reciprocal transfer incubations of

  8. Similar below-ground carbon cycling dynamics but contrasting modes of nitrogen cycling between arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guigang; McCormack, M Luke; Ma, Chengen; Guo, Dali

    2017-02-01

    Compared with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) forests are hypothesized to have higher carbon (C) cycling rates and a more open nitrogen (N) cycle. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized 645 observations, including 22 variables related to below-ground C and N dynamics from 100 sites, where AM and ECM forests co-occurred at the same site. Leaf litter quality was lower in ECM than in AM trees, leading to greater forest floor C stocks in ECM forests. By contrast, AM forests had significantly higher mineral soil C concentrations, and this result was strongly mediated by plant traits and climate. No significant differences were found between AM and ECM forests in C fluxes and labile C concentrations. Furthermore, inorganic N concentrations, net N mineralization and nitrification rates were all higher in AM than in ECM forests, indicating 'mineral' N economy in AM but 'organic' N economy in ECM trees. AM and ECM forests show systematic differences in mineral vs organic N cycling, and thus mycorrhizal type may be useful in predicting how different tree species respond to multiple environmental change factors. By contrast, mycorrhizal type alone cannot reliably predict below-ground C dynamics without considering plant traits and climate. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Charge Dynamics in near-Surface, Variable-Density Ensembles of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Zangara, Pablo R; Meriles, Carlos A

    2018-06-13

    Although the spin properties of superficial shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers have been the subject of extensive scrutiny, considerably less attention has been devoted to studying the dynamics of NV charge conversion near the diamond surface. Using multicolor confocal microscopy, here we show that near-surface point defects arising from high-density ion implantation dramatically increase the ionization and recombination rates of shallow NVs compared to those in bulk diamond. Further, we find that these rates grow linearly, not quadratically, with laser intensity, indicative of single-photon processes enabled by NV state mixing with other defect states. Accompanying these findings, we observe NV ionization and recombination in the dark, likely the result of charge transfer to neighboring traps. Despite the altered charge dynamics, we show that one can imprint rewritable, long-lasting patterns of charged-initialized, near-surface NVs over large areas, an ability that could be exploited for electrochemical biosensing or to optically store digital data sets with subdiffraction resolution.

  10. Impact of understory vegetation on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamic in aerially seeded Pinus massoniana plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping; Zhao, Fang; Ning, Jinkui; Ouyang, Xunzhi; Zang, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Understory vegetation plays a vital role in regulating soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) characteristics due to differences in plant functional traits. Different understory vegetation types have been reported following aerial seeding. While aerial seeding is common in areas with serious soil erosion, few studies have been conducted to investigate changes in soil C and N cycling as affected by understory vegetation in aerially seeded plantations. Here, we studied soil C and N characteristics under two naturally formed understory vegetation types (Dicranopteris and graminoid) in aerially seeded Pinus massoniana Lamb plantations. Across the two studied understory vegetation types, soil organic C was significantly correlated with all measured soil N variables, including total N, available N, microbial biomass N and water-soluble organic N, while microbial biomass C was correlated with all measured variables except soil organic C. Dicranopteris and graminoid differed in their effects on soil C and N process. Except water-soluble organic C, all the other C and N variables were higher in soils with graminoids. The higher levels of soil organic C, microbial biomass C, total N, available N, microbial biomass N and water-soluble organic N were consistent with the higher litter and root quality (C/N) of graminoid vegetation compared to Dicranopteris. Changes in soil C and N cycles might be impacted by understory vegetation types via differences in litter or root quality. PMID:29377926

  11. TILLAGE AND DYNAMICS OF INORGANIC NITROGEN IN ECOLOGICAL AND INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J SMATANA

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available During the period of 1991-1993 in the field experiment, the effect of different soil management (tillage 0,24 m and tillage 0,12-0,15 m in ecological and integration management system on changes of inorganic nitrogen (Nan = N-NH4 + + N-NO3 - content in the soil layer from 0 up to 0,6 m of the soil depth (0,00-0,30 m and 0,30- 0,60 m were studied. Trials were held in a warm climatic zone of the South – Western Slovakia on the brown soil. Different soil management systems (tillage 0,24 m and tillage 0,12-0,15 m considerably did not affected ammonification and nitrification processes in the soil. The sustainability of minimalization via shallow ploughing is not excluded, on the contrary this minimalization may have high a positive influence on economic saving the energy, labour costs, etc. The quantitative and qualitative changes of studied form of N were significantly effected by weather and soil depth. Soil content of N-NH4 + and N-NO3 - was in negative correlation with soil depth.

  12. Speciation and dynamics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export in the Danshui River, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.-Y.; Shih, Y.-T.; Huang, J.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Shiah, F.-K.; Liu, K.-K.

    2014-10-01

    Human-induced excess nitrogen outflowing from land through rivers to oceans has resulted in serious impacts on terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Oceania, which occupies Agriculture and population density control DIN export in less densely populated regions and urban areas, respectively, and runoff controls DIN at the watershed scale. Compared to documented estimates from global models, the observed DIN export from the Danshui River is 2.3 times larger, which results from the region-specific response of DIN yield to dense population and abundant runoff. The dominating DIN species change gradually from NO3- in the headwaters (∼97%) to NH4+ in the estuary (∼60%) following the urbanization gradient. The prominent existence of NH4+ is probably the result of the anaerobic water body and short residence time, unlike in large river basins. Given the analogous watershed characteristics of the Danshui River to the rivers in Oceania, our study could serve as a first example to examine riverine DIN fluxes in Oceania.

  13. Design and Season Influence Nitrogen Dynamics in Two Surface Flow Constructed Wetlands Treating Nursery Irrigation Runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. White

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Constructed wetlands (CWs are used to remediate runoff from a variety of agricultural, industrial, and urban sources. CW remediation performance is often evaluated at the laboratory scale over durations less than one year. The purpose of this study was to characterize the effect of CW design (cell depth and residence time on nitrogen (N speciation and fate across season and years in two free water surface wetlands receiving runoff from irrigated plant production areas at an ornamental plant nursery. Water quality (mg·L−1 of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, dissolved oxygen and oxidation reduction potential was monitored at five sites within each of two CWs each month over four years. Nitrate-N was the dominant form of ionic N present in both CWs. Within CW1, a deep cell to shallow cell design, nitrate comprised 86% of ionic N in effluent. Within CW2, designed with three sequential deep cells, nitrate comprised only 66% of total N and ammonium comprised 27% of total N in CW2 effluent. Differences in ionic N removal efficacies and shifts in N speciation in CW1 and CW2 were controlled by constructed wetland design (depth and hydraulic retention time, the concentration of nutrients entering the CW, and plant species richness.

  14. Presence and Expression of Microbial Genes Regulating Soil Nitrogen Dynamics Along the Tanana River Successional Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, R. D.; Rogers, S. L.

    2004-12-01

    We report on work to assess the functional gene sequences for soil microbiota that control nitrogen cycle pathways along the successional sequence (willow, alder, poplar, white spruce, black spruce) on the Tanana River floodplain, Interior Alaska. Microbial DNA and mRNA were extracted from soils (0-10 cm depth) for amoA (ammonium monooxygenase), nifH (nitrogenase reductase), napA (nitrate reductase), and nirS and nirK (nitrite reductase) genes. Gene presence was determined by amplification of a conserved sequence of each gene employing sequence specific oligonucleotide primers and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Expression of the genes was measured via nested reverse transcriptase PCR amplification of the extracted mRNA. Amplified PCR products were visualized on agarose electrophoresis gels. All five successional stages show evidence for the presence and expression of microbial genes that regulate N fixation (free-living), nitrification, and nitrate reduction. We detected (1) nifH, napA, and nirK presence and amoA expression (mRNA production) for all five successional stages and (2) nirS and amoA presence and nifH, nirK, and napA expression for early successional stages (willow, alder, poplar). The results highlight that the existing body of previous process-level work has not sufficiently considered the microbial potential for a nitrate economy and free-living N fixation along the complete floodplain successional sequence.

  15. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Vigneault, Harold; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Qian, Budong

    2016-03-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentration could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. The change in groundwater recharge regime induced by climate change (with current agricultural practices) would only contribute 0 to 6 % of that increase for the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to

  16. Dynamics in groundwater and surface water quality : from field-scale processes to catchment-scale monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemeijer, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Clean water is essential for our existence on earth. In areas with intensive agricultural land use, such as The Netherlands, groundwater and surface water resources are threatened. The leaching of agrochemicals from agricultural fields leads to contamination of drinking water resources and toxic

  17. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

    2011-04-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

  18. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through stormwater basins designed for groundwater recharge in urban area: Assessment of retention efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; Simon, Laurent; Maazouzi, Chafik; Foulquier, Arnaud; Delolme, Cécile; Marmonier, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has been developed in many countries to limit the risk of urban flooding and compensate for reduced groundwater recharge in urban areas. The environmental performances of MAR systems like infiltration basins depend on the efficiency of soil and vadose zone to retain stormwater-derived contaminants. However, these performances need to be finely evaluated for stormwater-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) that can affect groundwater quality. Therefore, this study examined the performance of MAR systems to process DOM during its transfer from infiltration basins to an urban aquifer. DOM characteristics (fluorescent spectroscopic properties, biodegradable and refractory fractions of dissolved organic carbon -DOC-, consumption by micro-organisms during incubation in slow filtration sediment columns) were measured in stormwater during its transfer through three infiltration basins during a stormwater event. DOC concentrations sharply decreased from surface to the aquifer for the three MAR sites. This pattern was largely due to the retention of biodegradable DOC which was more than 75% for the three MAR sites, whereas the retention of refractory DOC was more variable and globally less important (from 18% to 61% depending on MAR site). Slow filtration column experiments also showed that DOC retention during stormwater infiltration through soil and vadose zone was mainly due to aerobic microbial consumption of the biodegradable fraction of DOC. In parallel, measurements of DOM characteristics from groundwaters influenced or not by MAR demonstrated that stormwater infiltration increased DOC quantity without affecting its quality (% of biodegradable DOC and relative aromatic carbon content -estimated by SUVA254-). The present study demonstrated that processes occurring in soil and vadose zone of MAR sites were enough efficient to limit DOC fluxes to the aquifer. Nevertheless, the enrichments of DOC concentrations measured in groundwater below

  19. Mapping the dissociative ionization dynamics of molecular nitrogen with attosecond resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinker, M; González-Vázquez, J; Martin, F; Trabattoni, A; Sansone, G; Nisoli, M; Liu, C; Linguerri, R; Hochlaf, M; Klei, J; Vrakking, M J J; Calegari, F

    2015-01-01

    We wish to understand the processes underlying the ionization dynamics of N 2 as experimentally induced and studied by recording the kinetic energy release (KER) in a XUV-pump/IR-probe setup. To this end a theoretical model was developed describing the ionization process using Dyson Orbitals and, subsequently, the dissociation process using a large set of diabatic potential energy surfaces (PES) on which to propagate. From said set of PES, a small subset is extracted allowing for the identification of one and two photon processes chiefly responsible for the experimentally observed features. (paper)

  20. N fluxes in two nitrogen saturated forested catchments in Germany: dynamics and modelling with INCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Langusch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The N cycle in forests of the temperate zone in Europe has been changed substantially by the impact of atmospheric N deposition. Here, the fluxes and concentrations of mineral N in throughfall, soil solution and runoff in two German catchments, receiving high N inputs are investigated to test the applicability of an Integrated Nitrogen Model for European Catchments (INCA to small forested catchments. The Lehstenbach catchment (419 ha is located in the German Fichtelgebirge (NO Bavaria, 690-871 m asl. and is stocked with Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. of different ages. The Steinkreuz catchment (55 ha with European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. as the dominant tree species is located in the Steigerwald (NW Bavaria, 400-460 m asl.. The mean annual N fluxes with throughfall were slightly higher at the Lehstenbach (24.6 kg N ha-1 than at the Steinkreuz (20.4 kg N ha-1. In both catchments the N fluxes in the soil are dominated by NO3. At Lehstenbach, the N output with seepage at 90 cm soil depth was similar to the N flux with throughfall. At Steinkreuz more than 50 % of the N deposited was retained in the upper soil horizons. In both catchments, the NO3 fluxes with runoff were lower than those with seepage. The average annual NO3 concentrations in runoff in both catchments were between 0.7 to 1.4 mg NO3-N L-1 and no temporal trend was observed. The N budgets at the catchment scale indicated similar amounts of N retention (Lehstenbach: 19 kg N ha-1yr-1 ; Steinkreuz: 17 kg N ha-1yr-1. The parameter settings of the INCA model were simplified to reduce the model complexity. In both catchments, the NO3 concentrations and fluxes in runoff were matched well by the model. The seasonal patterns with lower NO3 runoff concentrations in summer at the Lehstenbach catchment were replicated. INCA underestimated the increased N3 concentrations during short periods of rewetting in late autumn at the Steinkreuz catchment. The model will be a helpful tool for the

  1. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    ) such as the Marine nitrogen cycle The marine nitrogen cycle. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ are intra-cellular intermediates that do not accumulate in water column. (Source: Codispoti et al., 2001) Page 1 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www... and nitrous oxide budgets: Moving targets as we enter the anthropocene?, Sci. Mar., 65, 85-105, 2001. Page 2 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www.eoearth.org/article/Marine_nitrogen_cycle square6 Gruber, N.: The dynamics...

  2. Soil and plant nitrogen dynamics of a tomato crop under different fertilization strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doltra, Jordi; Muñoz, P; Antón, A

    2010-01-01

    (TM) kg N ha-1. The N contents of plants sampled on three occasions during the growing period and those of marketable fruits were also analyzed. Total marketable yield was determined at the end of the harvest period. The EU-Rotate_N model was used to predict the effects of the applied treatments......A field experiment was conducted in 2007 to investigate the effects of the N fertilizer source on the soil and plant N dynamics of a tomato crop grown in a sandy loam soil. The fertilization treatments were: mineral N-fertilization applied by fertigation (TM); organic N-fertilization (TO....... The model was calibrated using data from a previous experiment. No differences between treatments were observed with respect to yield or N content in marketable fruits. The amount of N left in the field at the end of the cropping period was significantly lower in TO than in TC and TM. Simulated plant growth...

  3. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics of the intertidal seagrass, Zostera japonica, on the southern coast of the Korean peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyeob; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Kim, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-12-01

    Seagrasses require a large amount of nutrient assimilation to support high levels of production, and thus nutrient limitation for growth often occurs in seagrass habitats. Seagrasses can take up nutrients from both the water column and sediments. However, since seagrasses inhabiting in the intertidal zones are exposed to the air during low tide, the intertidal species may exhibit significantly different carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics compared to the subtidal species. To examine C and N dynamics of the intertidal seagrass, Zostera japonica, C and N content and stable isotope ratios of above- and below-ground tissues were measured monthly at the three intertidal zones in Koje Bay on the southern coast of Korea. The C and N content and stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) ratios of seagrass tissues exhibited significant seasonal variations. Both leaf and rhizome C content were not significantly correlated with productivity. Leaf δ13C values usually exhibited negative correlations with leaf productivity. These results of tissue C content and δ13C values suggest that photosynthesis of Z. japonica in the study site was not limited by inorganic C supply, and sufficient inorganic C was provided from the atmosphere. The tissue N content usually exhibited negative correlations with leaf productivity except at the upper intertidal zone, suggesting that Z. japonica growth was probably limited by N availability during high growing season. In the upper intertidal zone, no correlations between leaf productivity and tissue elemental content and stable isotope ratios were observed due to the severely suppressed growth caused by strong desiccation stress.

  4. Study on the fluid dynamics of nitrogen and hydrogen gases subjected to wires element in monolithic channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidi Amirah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia has a very significant value in the fertilizer industry where it was being synthesized via Haber-Bosch process in the early 19th century. As the process utilize high operating conditions, it imposes high capital cost and is an energy-consuming process. Due to this unsustainable process, researchers have initiated an alternative to overcome this drawback by performing a simulation in microfluidic environment using ambient temperature and pressure (25°C and 1 atm. Wires element configured in a 50 mm x 10 mm, (L x D dimension monolithic channel with different spacing and number of wires, arranged axially in 60o pitch have been introduced to investigate the dynamic mixing of nitrogen and hydrogen for ammonia synthesis. As the wires are configured in a different manner, the results show dissimilar volume fraction profile, contours and mixing index. Creating suitable obstruction with larger obstruction space enhanced the mixing. Reducing spacing from 2 mm to 1.5 mm illustrates fluctuating velocity at the centre of the channel causing the flow velocity become less than the set velocity 0.05ms-1. By substituting from 19 wires to 13 wires to the flow, chaotic advection occurs lead to the increased of mixing index up to 94%.

  5. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed.

  7. Nitrogen Effects on Organic Dynamics and Soil Communities in Forest and Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, S.; Neff, J.; Sinsabaugh, B.; Wickings, K.

    2008-12-01

    Human activities have doubled the global flux of biologically available N to terrestrial ecosystems but the effects of N on soil organic matter dynamics and soil communities remain difficult to predict. We examined soil organic matter chemistry and enzyme kinetics in three soil fractions (>250, 63-250, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, we found striking, ecosystem-specific effects of N deposition on carbohydrate abundance. Furfural, the dominant pyrolysis product of polysaccharides, was significantly decreased by simulated N deposition in the sugar maple/basswood system (15.87 versus 4.99%) but increased by N in the black oak/white oak system (8.83 versus 24.01%). There were ca. 3-fold increases in the ratio of total lignin derivatives to total polysaccharides in the >250 μm fraction of the sugar maple/basswood system but there were no changes in other size classes or in the black oak/white oak system. We also measured significant increases in the ratio of lignin derivatives to N-bearing compounds in the 63-250 and >250 μm fractions in both ecosystems but not in the corn-based cropping system. Our results demonstrate that changes in soil organic matter chemistry resulting from atmospheric N deposition or fertilization are directly linked to variation in enzyme responses to increased N availability across ecosystems and soil size fractions.

  8. Arc dynamics of a pulsed DC nitrogen rotating gliding arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengsen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Angjian; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Tu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a novel pulsed direct current (DC) rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor co-driven by an external magnetic field and a tangential gas flow has been developed. The dynamic characteristics of the rotating gliding arc have been investigated by means of numerical simulation and experiment. The simulation results show that a highly turbulent vortex flow can be generated at the bottom of the RGA reactor to accelerate the arc rotation after arc ignition, whereas the magnitude of gas velocity declined significantly along the axial direction of the RGA reactor. The calculated arc rotation frequency (14.4 Hz) is reasonably close to the experimental result (18.5 Hz) at a gas flow rate of 10 l min-1. In the presence of an external magnet, the arc rotation frequency is around five times higher than that of the RGA reactor without using a magnet, which suggests that the external magnetic field plays a dominant role in the maintenance of the arc rotation in the upper zone of the RGA reactor. In addition, when the magnet is placed outside the reactor reversely to form a reverse external magnetic field, the arc can be stabilized at a fixed position in the inner wall of the outer electrode at a critical gas flow rate of 16 l min-1.

  9. The conversion of grasslands to forests in Southern South America: Shifting evapotranspiration, stream flow and groundwater dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.; Pineiro, G.; Farley, K. A.; Palmer, S. M.; Jackson, R. B.

    2005-12-01

    Vegetation changes, particularly those involving transitions between tree- and grass-dominated systems, often modify evaporation as a result of plant-mediated shifts in moisture access and demand. The establishment of tree plantations (fast growing eucalypts and pines) on native grasslands is emerging as a major land-use change, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, where cheap land and labor, public subsidies, and prospective C sequestration rewards provide converging incentives. What are the hydrological consequences of grassland afforestation? How are crucial ecosystem services such as fresh water supply and hydrological regulation being affected? We explore these questions focusing on a) evapotranspiration, b) stream flow, and c) groundwater recharge-discharge patterns across a network of paired stands and small watershed occupied by native grassland and tree plantation in Argentina and Uruguay. Radiometric information obtained from Landsat satellite images was used to estimate daily evapotranspiration in >100 tree plantations and grasslands stands in the humid plains of the Uruguay River (mean annual precipitation, MAP= 1350 mm). In spite of their lower albedo, tree plantations were 0.5 C° cooler than grasslands. Energy balance calculations suggested 80% higher evapotranspiration in afforested plots with relative differences becoming larger during dry periods. Seasonal stream flow measurements in twelve paired watershed (50-500 Ha) in the hills of Comechingones (MAP= 800 mm) and Minas (MAP= 1200 mm) showed declining water yields following afforestation. Preliminary data in Cordoba showed four-fold reductions of base flow in the dry season and two-fold reductions of peak flow after storms. A network of twenty paired grassland-plantation stands covering a broad range of sediment textures in the Pampas (MAP= 1000 mm, typical groundwater depth= 1-5 m) showed increased groundwater salinity in afforested stands (plantation:grassland salinity ratio = 1.2, 10, and

  10. Effects of small-scale hydrogeologic heterogeneity on submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) dynamics in river dominated estuaries: example of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, D.; Dimova, N.

    2017-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is known to be an important pathway for nutrients and dissolved constituents in estuarine environments worldwide. Despite its limited contribution to the total fresh water flux to the ocean (5 - 10 %), SGD-derived material loadings can rival riverine inputs. Therefore, a good understanding of the coastal hydrogeology and subsequent SGD dynamics is crucial to further investigate constituent fluxes and its implications on small and large scale coastal ecosystems. We evaluated SGD in Mobile Bay (Alabama), the fourth largest estuary in the US, using a combination of radiotracer techniques (223Ra, 226Ra, and 222Rn), stable isotopes (δ 18O and δ 2H), geophysical surveys (continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)), and seepage meters during three consecutive years. A detailed examination of the entire shoreline of Mobile Bay using CRP, ERT imaging, and multiple sediment cores collection unveiled a heterogeneous (horizontal and vertical) distribution of the surficial coastal aquifer. This was reflected and confirmed by groundwater tracer measurements and direct measurements of SGD in the coastal zone. We found that SGD occurs mainly in the northeast section of Mobile Bay with a total flux that ranged between 0.9 and 13 × 105 m3 d-1 during dry and wet periods, which represents 0.4 - 2 % of the total fresh water inputs into the Bay. While total SGD is insignificant when accounting the whole water budget of Mobile Bay, we found that small-scale geology variations produce groundwater flow preferential pathways in particular areas where SGD inputs play an important role in the water and nutrient budgets.

  11. The role of deep nitrogen and dynamic rooting profiles on vegetation dynamics and productivity in response to permafrost thaw and climate change in Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, R. E.; Helene, G.; Taylor, D. L.; McGuire, A. D.; Mack, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    The release of permafrost-derived nitrogen (N) has the potential to fertilize tundra vegetation, modulating plant competition, stimulating productivity, and offsetting carbon losses from thawing permafrost. Dynamic rooting, mycorrhizal interactions, and coupling of N availability and root N uptake have been identified as gaps in ecosystem models. As a first step towards understanding whether Arctic plants can access deep permafrost-derived N, we characterized rooting profiles and quantified acquisition of 15N tracer applied at the permafrost boundary by moist acidic tundra plants subjected to almost three decades of warming at Toolik Lake, Alaska. In the ambient control plots the vegetation biomass is distributed between five plant functional types (PFTs): sedges, evergreen and deciduous shrubs, mosses and in lower abundance, forbs. The warming treatment has resulted in the increase of deciduous shrub biomass and the loss of sedges, evergreen shrubs, and mosses. We harvested roots by depth increment down to the top of the permafrost. Roots were classified by size class and PFT. The average thaw depth in the warmed plots was 58.3 cm ± 6.4 S.E., close to 18 cm deeper than the average thaw depth in the ambient plots (40.8 cm ± 1.8 S.E.). Across treatments the deepest rooting species was Rubus chamaemorus (ambient 40.8 cm ± 1.8 S.E., warmed 50.3 cm ± 9.8 S.E.), a non-mycorrhizal forb, followed by Eriophorum vaginatum, a non-mycorrhizal sedge. Ectomycorrhizal deciduous and ericoid mycorrhizal evergreen shrubs were rooted at more shallow depths. Deeply rooted non-mycorrhizal species had the greatest uptake of 15N tracer within 24 hours across treatments. Tracer uptake was greatest for roots of E. vaginatum in ambient plots and R. chamaemorus in warmed plots. Root profiles were integrated into a process-based ecosystem model coupled with a dynamic vegetation model. Functions modeling dynamic rooting profile relative to thaw depth were implemented for each PFT. The

  12. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics of soil and litter along an altitudinal gradient in Atlantic Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, M. D.; Martins, S. C.; Camargo, P. B.; Carmo, J. B.; Sousa Neto, E.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    The Ombrophylus Dense Forest or Atlantic Forest is the second most important Biome in extension of Brazil, and it is considered a hot-spot in terms of biodiversity. It is localized in Brazilian Coast, and it covered originally 1.2 million km2, but currently only 8% of the original forest remains. The study was carried out in Sao Paulo State, Brazil (23° 24' S and 45° 11' W). The studied areas were: Restinga Vegetation (RV), 5 m above sea level; Low Altitude Ombrophylus Dense Forest (LAODF), 100 m asl; Submontane Ombrophylus Dense Forest (SODF), 600m asl and; Montane Ombrophylus Dense Forest (MODF), 1000 m asl. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of altitudinal gradient, with specific phytophysiognomies, on C and N dynamics in the soil and litter at Atlantic Forest. A sampling area of 1 ha was subdivided in contiguous sub- parcels (10 x 10 m). The forest floor litter accumulated (0.06 m2) was collected monthly (n=60), during 12 months, in each phytophysiognomies. Soils samples (0-0.05m depth) were collected (n=32) from square regular grids, 30 m away from each other. Changes in litter contents of C and N were not detected along the altitudinal gradient, and the values observed were 400 and 15g kg-1 for C and N, respectively. Litter ä13C values did not change significantly with the altitudinal gradient and were represented by C3 plants values. The C and N stocks were high in the clay soils (LAODF, SODF and MODF) when compared to sandy soil (RV). The soil C stocks (24 to 30 Mg ha-1) were similar among the altitudinal gradients, except RV (16 Mg ha-1). The areas of elevated altitude (MODF and SODF) showed high N stocks (2.3 Mg ha-1), followed by LAODF (1.8Mg ha-1) and RV (0.9Mg ha-1). In all altitudes there was 13C enrichment with soil depth, and it can be explained by the different fractions of the organic matter distributed along the soil profile, and also due the effect of the isotopic dilution between the forest floor litter and the soil.

  13. Forage yield and nitrogen nutrition dynamics of warm-season native forage genotypes under two shading levels and in full sunlight

    OpenAIRE

    Barro,Raquel Santiago; Varella,Alexandre Costa; Lemaire,Gilles; Medeiros,Renato Borges de; Saibro,João Carlos de; Nabinger,Carlos; Bangel,Felipe Villamil; Carassai,Igor Justin

    2012-01-01

    The successful achievement of a highly productive understorey pasture in silvopastoral systems depends on the use of well-adapted forage genotypes, showing good agronomic performance and persistence under shading and grazing. In this study, the herbage dry matter yield (DMY) and nitrogen nutrition dynamics were determined in three native warm-season grasses (Paspalum regnellii, Paspalum dilatatum and Paspalum notatum) and a forage legume (Arachis pintoi) under two shading levels compared with...

  14. Gaseous Nitrogen Losses from Tropical Savanna Soils of Northern Australia: Dynamics, Controls and Magnitude of N2O, NO, and N2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Hickler, T.; Hutley, L. B.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical savanna covers a large fraction of the global land area and thus may have a substantial effect on the global soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen. The pronounced seasonality of hygric conditions in this ecosystem affects strongly microbial process rates in the soil. As these microbial processes control the uptake, production, and release of nitrogen compounds, it is thought that this seasonality finally leads to strong temporal dynamics and varying magnitudes of gaseous losses to the atmosphere. However, given their areal extent and in contrast to other ecosystems, still few in-situ or laboratory studies exist that assess the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen. We present laboratory incubation results from intact soil cores obtained from a natural savanna site in Northern Australia, where N2O, NO, and N2 emissions under controlled environmental conditions were investigated. Furthermore, in-situ measurements of high temporal resolution at this site recorded with automated static and dynamic chamber systems are discussed (N2O, NO). This data is then used to assess the performance of a process-based biogeochemical model (LandscapeDNDC), and the potential magnitude and dynamics of components of the site-scale nitrogen cycle where no measurements exist (biological nitrogen fixation and nitrate leaching). Our incubation results show that severe nutrient limitation of the soil only allows for very low N2O emissions (0.12 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and even a periodic N2O uptake. Annual NO emissions were estimated at 0.68 kg N ha-1 yr-1, while the release of inert nitrogen (N2) was estimated at 6.75 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (data excl. contribution by pulse emissions). We observed only minor N2O pulse emissions after watering the soil cores and initial rain events of the dry to wet season transition in-situ, but short-lived NO pulse emissions were substantial. Interestingly, some cores exhibited a very different N2O emission potential, indicating a substantial spatial variability of

  15. Temporal dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction under the effects of climate change: A case study in the Kiskatinaw River Watershed, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Gopal Chandra; Li, Jianbing; Thring, Ronald W.; Hirshfield, Faye; Paul, Siddhartho Shekhar

    2017-08-01

    Groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction plays a vital role in the functioning of riparian ecosystem, as well as sustainable water resources management. In this study, temporal dynamics of GW-SW interaction were investigated under climate change. A case study was chosen for a study area along the Kiskatinaw River in Mainstem sub-watershed of the Kiskatinaw River Watershed, British Columbia, Canada. A physically based and distributed GW-SW interaction model, Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA), was used. Two different greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenarios (i.e., A2: heterogeneous world with self-reliance and preservation of local identities, and B1: more integrated and environmental friendly world) of SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) from Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) were used for climate change study for 2020-2040. The simulation results showed that climate change influences significantly the temporal patterns of GW-SW interaction by generating variable temporal mean groundwater contributions to streamflow. Due to precipitation variability, these contributions varied monthly, seasonally, and annually. The mean annual groundwater contribution to streamflow during 2020-2040 under the A2 and B1 scenarios is expected to be 74.5% (σ = 2%) and 75.6% (σ = 3%), respectively. As compared to that during the base modeling period (2007-2011), the mean annual groundwater contribution to streamflow during 2020-2040 under the A2 and B1 scenarios is expected to decrease by 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, due to the increased precipitation (on average 6.7% in the A2 and 4.8% in the B1 scenarios) and temperature (on average 0.83 °C in the A2 and 0.64 °C in the B1 scenarios). The results obtained from this study will provide useful information in the long-term seasonal and annual water extractions from the river for future water supply, as well as for evaluating the ecological conditions of the

  16. Quantification of submarine groundwater discharge and its short-term dynamics by linking time-variant end-member mixing analysis and isotope mass balancing (222-Rn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Eric; Knöller, Kay; Stollberg, Reiner; Scholten, Jan; Rocha, Carlos; Weiß, Holger; Schubert, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) plays a crucial role for the water quality of coastal waters due to associated fluxes of nutrients, organic compounds and/or heavy-metals. Thus, the quantification of SGD is essential for evaluating the vulnerability of coastal water bodies with regard to groundwater pollution as well as for understanding the matter cycles of the connected water bodies. Here, we present a scientific approach for quantifying discharge of fresh groundwater (GWf) and recirculated seawater (SWrec), including its short-term temporal dynamics, into the tide-affected Knysna estuary, South Africa. For a time-variant end-member mixing analysis we conducted time-series observations of radon (222Rn) and salinity within the estuary over two tidal cycles in combination with estimates of the related end-members for seawater, river water, GWf and SWrec. The mixing analysis was treated as constrained optimization problem for finding an end-member mixing ratio that simultaneously fits the observed data for radon and salinity best for every time-step. Uncertainty of each mixing ratio was quantified by Monte Carlo simulations of the optimization procedure considering uncertainty in end-member characterization. Results reveal the highest GWf and SWrec fraction in the estuary during peak low tide with averages of 0.8 % and 1.4 %, respectively. Further, we calculated a radon mass balance that revealed a daily radon flux of 4.8 * 108 Bq into the estuary equivalent to a GWf discharge of 29.000 m3/d (9.000-59.000 m3/d for 25th-75th percentile range) and a SWrec discharge of 80.000 m3/d (45.000-130.000 m3/d for 25th-75th percentile range). The uncertainty of SGD reflects the end-member uncertainty, i.e. the spatial heterogeneity of groundwater composition. The presented approach allows the calculation of mixing ratios of multiple uncertain end-members for time-series measurements of multiple parameters. Linking these results with a tracer mass balance allows conversion

  17. Conceptualization and validation of a dynamic model for the simulation of nitrogen transformations and fluxes in fish ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez-Montealegre, R.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Dam, van A.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen is a key element in aquatic environments and an important pond management variable. In aquaculture systems, nitrogen accumulation eventually leads to a deterioration of the system. The interactions between various N-species are complex and difficult to integrate. Modelling can improve our

  18. Nitrogen dynamics model for a pilot field-scale novel dewatered alum sludge cake-based constructed wetland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J L G; Zhao, Y Q; Hu, Y S; Babatunde, A O; Zhao, X H

    2015-01-01

    A model simulating the effluent nitrogen (N) concentration of treated animal farm wastewater in a pilot on-site constructed wetland (CW) system, using dewatered alum sludge cake (DASC) as wetland substrate, is presented. The N-model was developed based on the Structural Thinking Experiential Learning Laboratory with Animation software and is considering organic nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen (NH3) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) as the major forms of nitrogen involved in the transformation chains. Ammonification (AMM), ammonia volatilization, nitrification (NIT), denitrification, plant uptake, plant decaying and uptake of inorganic nitrogen by algae and bacteria were considered in this model. pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, precipitation, solar radiation and nitrogen concentrations were considered as forcing functions in the model. The model was calibrated by observed data with a reasonable agreement prior to its applications. The simulated effluent detritus nitrogen, NH4-N, NO3-N and TN had a considerably good agreement with the observed results. The mass balance analysis shows that NIT accounts for 65.60%, adsorption (ad) (11.90%), AMM (8.90%) followed by NH4-N (Plants) (5.90%) and NO3-N (Plants) (4.40%). The TN removal was found 52% of the total influent TN in the CW. This study suggested an improved overall performance of a DASC-based CW and efficient N removal from wastewater.

  19. The effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ö. Aydan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that some sinkholes or subsidence take place from time to time in the areas where abandoned room and pillar type mines exist. The author has been involved with the stability of abandoned mines beneath urbanized residential areas in Tokai region and there is a great concern about the stability of these abandoned mines during large earthquakes as well as in the long term. The 2003 Miyagi Hokubu and 2011 Great East Japan earthquakes caused great damage to abandoned mines and resulted in many collapses. The author presents the effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions and discusses the implications on the areas above abandoned lignite mines in this paper.

  20. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E W

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  1. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E.W.

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  2. Simulating temporal variations of nitrogen losses in river networks with a dynamic transport model unravels the coupled effects of hydrological and biogeochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Alexander, Richard [U.S. Geological Survey; Bohlke, John [U.S. Geological Survey; Boyer, Elizabeth [Pennsylvania State University; Harvey, Judson [U.S. Geological Survey; Seitzinger, Sybil [Rutgers University; Tobias, Craig [University of North Carolina, Wilmington; Tonitto, Christina [Cornell University; Wollheim, Wilfred [University of New Hampshire

    2009-01-01

    The importance of lotic systems as sinks for nitrogen inputs is well recognized. A fraction of nitrogen in streamflow is removed to the atmosphere via denitrification with the remainder exported in streamflow as nitrogen loads. At the watershed scale, there is a keen interest in understanding the factors that control the fate of nitrogen throughout the stream channel network, with particular attention to the processes that deliver large nitrogen loads to sensitive coastal ecosystems. We use a dynamic stream transport model to assess biogeochemical (nitrate loadings, concentration, temperature) and hydrological (discharge, depth, velocity) effects on reach-scale denitrification and nitrate removal in the river networks of two watersheds having widely differing levels of nitrate enrichment but nearly identical discharges. Stream denitrification is estimated by regression as a nonlinear function of nitrate concentration, streamflow, and temperature, using more than 300 published measurements from a variety of US streams. These relations are used in the stream transport model to characterize nitrate dynamics related to denitrification at a monthly time scale in the stream reaches of the two watersheds. Results indicate that the nitrate removal efficiency of streams, as measured by the percentage of the stream nitrate flux removed via denitrification per unit length of channel, is appreciably reduced during months with high discharge and nitrate flux and increases during months of low-discharge and flux. Biogeochemical factors, including land use, nitrate inputs, and stream concentrations, are a major control on reach-scale denitrification, evidenced by the disproportionately lower nitrate removal efficiency in streams of the highly nitrate-enriched watershed as compared with that in similarly sized streams in the less nitrate-enriched watershed. Sensitivity analyses reveal that these important biogeochemical factors and physical hydrological factors contribute nearly

  3. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Aqueous Geochemical Dynamics at the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory and The Case for Subsurface Mixing of Regional Groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Schrenk, M. O.; McCollom, T. M.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration (or hydration) of olivine and pyroxene minerals in ultramafic rocks, occurring in the seabed and ultramafic units on continents, such as at the Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) in northern California, USA. Mineral products of serpentinization include serpentine, magnetite, brucite, talc, oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and diverse clay minerals. Such mineral transformations generate extremely high pH solutions with characteristic cation and dissolved metal loads, transmitting CH4, H2, and CO gas mixtures from depth; deep life in ultramafic terrains is thought to be fueled by chemical energy derived from these geochemical reactions. The installation of 8 groundwater monitoring wells in the CRO has allowed frequent monitoring since 2011. Influx of deeply sourced, serpentinization-influenced waters is evidenced by related geochemical shifts (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential), but is apparently mixing with other, regionally important groundwater types. Evaluation salinity loads in concert with other parameters, we model the mixing scenario of this site of ongoing scientific study and experimentation.

  5. Temporal variation of transit time of rainfall-runoff water and groundwater flow dynamics inferred by noble gasses concentration (SF6, CFCs) in a forested small catchment (Fukushima, Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Koichi; Tsujimura, Maki; Onda, Yuichi; Iwagami, Sho; Konuma, Ryohei; Sato, Yutaro

    2016-04-01

    Time variant transit time of water in catchments can fundamentally describe catchment function, controlling rainfall-runoff generation, groundwater flow pathway and water storage. Though rainstorm event has been recognized as active phase on catchment hydrology, accurate and precise time variance of water transit time and related water dynamics during rainstorm have not been well clarified yet. Here, in order to reveal temporal variation of mean transit time of groundwater and related hydrological processes in a forested small catchment during rainstorm event, periodic and intensive field observations (15 - 17th July 2015, rainfall of 100.8 mm in total) were conducted in Yamakiya district (Fukushima, Japan) from September 2014 to December 2015. Discharge volume, groundwater table and precipitation amount were measured in 10 minutes interval. Water samples were taken from groundwater, discharge water, soil water and precipitation for determination of stable isotopic compositions (δ18O, δ2H), inorganic solutes concentration and dissolved noble gasses concentration (CFC11, CFC12, CFC113, SF6) in water. Storm hydrograph and groundwater table clearly responded to rainfall event especially with more than 30 mm per day throughout monitoring period. According to SF6 concentration in water, the mean transit time of discharge water (perennial spring) showed 3 - 6.5 years in the no-rainfall period (steady state), but fluctuated from zero to 12.5 years in the rainstorm event with totally 100.8 mm (unsteady state). The mean transit time of discharge water dramatically altered from zero to 12.5 years from before to after the tentative hydrograph peak in the rising limb, indicating new water components were dominant before tentative hydrograph peak, whereas deep groundwater component with longer residence time contributed much to discharge after the tentative hydrograph peak. On the other hand, mean residence time of groundwater (water in 5 m well) ranged from 0.5 to 11.5 years

  6. Relationship between Remote Sensing Data, Plant Biomass and Soil Nitrogen Dynamics in Intensively Managed Grasslands under Controlled Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Christoph; Watson, Conor; Berendonk, Clara; Becker, Rolf; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Wichern, Florian

    2017-06-23

    The sustainable use of grasslands in intensive farming systems aims to optimize nitrogen (N) inputs to increase crop yields and decrease harmful losses to the environment at the same time. To achieve this, simple optical sensors may provide a non-destructive, time- and cost-effective tool for estimating plant biomass in the field, considering spatial and temporal variability. However, the plant growth and related N uptake is affected by the available N in the soil, and therefore, N mineralization and N losses. These soil N dynamics and N losses are affected by the N input and environmental conditions, and cannot easily be determined non-destructively. Therefore, the question arises: whether a relationship can be depicted between N fertilizer levels, plant biomass and N dynamics as indicated by nitrous oxide (N₂O) losses and inorganic N levels. We conducted a standardized greenhouse experiment to explore the potential of spectral measurements for analyzing yield response, N mineralization and N₂O emissions in a permanent grassland. Ryegrass was subjected to four mineral fertilizer input levels over 100 days (four harvests) under controlled environmental conditions. The soil temperature and moisture content were automatically monitored, and the emission rates of N₂O and carbon dioxide (CO₂) were detected frequently. Spectral measurements of the swards were performed directly before harvesting. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) were moderately correlated with an increasing biomass as affected by fertilization level. Furthermore, we found a non-linear response of increasing N₂O emissions to elevated fertilizer levels. Moreover, inorganic N and extractable organic N levels at the end of the experiment tended to increase with the increasing N fertilizer addition. However, microbial biomass C and CO₂ efflux showed no significant differences among fertilizer treatments, reflecting no substantial changes in the soil

  7. Drivers of pCO2 dynamics in two contrasting coral reef lagoons: The influence of submarine groundwater discharge (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyronak, T.; Santos, I. R.; Erler, D.; Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon chemistry of coral reef lagoons can be highly variable over short time scales. While much of the diel variability in seawater carbon chemistry is explained by biological processes, external sources such as river and groundwater seepage may deliver large amounts of organic and inorganic carbon to coral reefs and represent a poorly understood feedback to ocean acidification. Here, we assess the impact of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on pCO2 variability in two coral reef lagoons with distinct SGD driving mechanisms. Diel variability of pCO2 in the two ecosystems was explained by a combination of biological drivers and SGD inputs. In Rarotonga, a South Pacific volcanic island, SGD was driven primarily by a steep terrestrial hydraulic gradient, and the lagoon was influenced by the high pCO2 (5,501 μatm) of the fresh groundwater. In Heron Island, a Great Barrier Reef coral cay, SGD was dominated by seawater recirculation through sediments (i.e. tidal pumping) and pCO2 was mainly impacted through the stimulation of biological processes. The Rarotonga water column had a relatively higher average pCO2 (549 μatm) than Heron Island (471 μatm). However, pCO2 exhibited a greater diel range in Heron Island (778 μatm) than in Rarotonga (507 μatm). The Rarotonga lagoon received 31.2 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 from SGD, while the Heron Island lagoon received 12.3 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. Over the course of this study both systems were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (3.00 to 9.67 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1), with SGD-derived CO2 contributing a large portion to the air-sea CO2 flux. The relationship between both water column pH and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and radon (222Rn) concentrations indicate that SGD may enhance the local acidification of some coral reef lagoons. Studies measuring the carbon chemistry of coral reefs (e.g. community metabolism, calcification rates) may need to consider SGD-derived CO2.

  8. Field Scale Groundwater Nitrate Loading Model for the Central Valley, California, 1945-Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Dzurella, K.; Bell, A.; Kourakos, G.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic groundwater nitrate contamination in the Central Valley aquifer system, California, is widespread, with over 40% of domestic wells in some counties exceeding drinking water standards. Sources of groundwater nitrate include leaky municipal wastewater systems, municipal wastewater recharge, onsite wastewater treatment (septic) systems, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, animal farming, application of organic waste materials (sludge, biosolids, animal manure) to agricultural lands, and synthetic fertilizer. At the site or field scale, nitrogen inputs to the landscape are balanced by plant nitrogen uptake and harvest, atmospheric nitrogen losses, surface runoff of nitrogen, soil nitrogen storage changes, and leaching to groundwater. Irrigated agriculture is a dominant player in the Central Valley nitrogen cycle: The largest nitrogen fluxes are synthetic fertilizer and animal manure applications to cropland, crop nitrogen uptake, and groundwater nitrogen losses. We construct a historic field/parcel scale groundwater nitrogen loading model distinguishing urban and residential areas, individual animal farming areas, leaky wastewater lagoons, and approximately 50 different categories of agricultural crops. For non-agricultural landuses, groundwater nitrate loading is based on reported leaching values, animal population, and human population. For cropland, groundwater nitrate loading is computed from mass balance, taking into account diverse and historically changing management practices between different crops. Groundwater nitrate loading is estimated for 1945 to current. Significant increases in groundwater nitrate loading are associated with the expansion of synthetic fertilizer use in the 1950s to 1970s. Nitrate loading from synthetic fertilizer use has stagnated over the past 20 years due to improvements in nutrient use efficiency. However, an unbroken 60 year exponential increase in dairy production until the late 2000s has significantly impacted the

  9. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    4Department of Geology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Corresponding ... integrated for the classification of the study area into different groundwater potential zones. .... table is mainly controlled by subsurface movement of water into ...

  10. Modeling seasonal redox dynamics and the corresponding fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Massmann, Gudrun; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2006-11-01

    Reactive multicomponent transport modeling was used to investigate and quantify the factors that affect redox zonation and the fate of the pharmaceutical residue phenazone during artificial recharge of groundwater at an infiltration site in Berlin, Germany. The calibrated model and the corresponding sensitivity analysis demonstrated thattemporal and spatial redox zonation at the study site was driven by seasonally changing, temperature-dependent organic matter degradation rates. Breakthrough of phenazone at monitoring wells occurred primarily during the warmer summer months, when anaerobic conditions developed. Assuming a redox-sensitive phenazone degradation behavior the model results provided an excellent agreement between simulated and measured phenazone concentrations. Therefore, the fate of phenazone was shown to be indirectly controlled by the infiltration water temperature through its effect on the aquifer's redox conditions. Other factors such as variable residence times appeared to be of less importance.

  11. Nitrogen sources, transport and processing in peri-urban floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooddy, D C; Macdonald, D M J; Lapworth, D J; Bennett, S A; Griffiths, K J

    2014-10-01

    Peri-urban floodplains are an important interface between developed land and the aquatic environment and may act as a source or sink for contaminants moving from urban areas towards surface water courses. With increasing pressure from urban development the functioning of floodplains is coming under greater scrutiny. A number of peri-urban sites have been found to be populated with legacy landfills which could potentially cause pollution of adjacent river bodies. Here, a peri-urban floodplain adjoining the city of Oxford, UK, with the River Thames has been investigated over a period of three years through repeated sampling of groundwaters from existing and specially constructed piezometers. A nearby landfill has been found to have imprinted a strong signal on the groundwater with particularly high concentrations of ammonium and generally low concentrations of nitrate and dissolved oxygen. An intensive study of nitrogen dynamics through the use of N-species chemistry, nitrogen isotopes and dissolved nitrous oxide reveals that there is little or no denitrification in the majority of the main landfill plume, and neither is the ammonium significantly retarded by sorption to the aquifer sediments. A simple model has determined the flux of total nitrogen and ammonium from the landfill, through the floodplain and into the river. Over an 8 km reach of the river, which has a number of other legacy landfills, it is estimated that 27.5 tonnes of ammonium may be delivered to the river annually. Although this is a relatively small contribution to the total river nitrogen, it may represent up to 15% of the ammonium loading at the study site and over the length of the reach could increase in-stream concentrations by nearly 40%. Catchment management plans that encompass floodplains in the peri-urban environment need to take into account the likely risk to groundwater and surface water quality that these environments pose. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Growth and nitrogen dynamics of glycine max inoculated with bradyrhizobium japonicum and exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Hamid, N.; Jawaid, F.

    2010-01-01

    Seeds of Glycine max (soybean) were inoculated with N-fixing bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum and grown in growth chamber to investigate interactive effects of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and plants Nitrogen status on root and shoot length and biomass, nodule formation and Nitrogen concentration. Plants were grown with CO/sub 2/ at 3500 and 1000 ppm with or without Bradyrhizobium japonicum inoculation. Root and shoot length and dry mass of Glycine max increased significantly with CO/sub 2/ enrichment provided with Bradyrhizobium japonicum as compared to deficient Nitrogen fixing bacterium. While ambient and enriched CO/sub 2/ levels resulted in increased Nitrogen concentration of Glycine max shoot and root which is inoculated with N-fixing bacterium. Nodule formation was also enhanced in plants supplied with Bradyrhizobium japonicum as compared to plants which is Bradyrhizobium japonicum deficient at both CO/sub 2/ concentrations. (author)

  13. Effects of tillage, organic resources and nitrogen fertiliser on soil carbon dynamics and crop nitrogen uptake in semi-arid West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouédraogo, E.; Mando, A.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2006-01-01

    Tillage, organic resources and fertiliser effects on soil carbon (C) dynamics were investigated in 2000 and 2001 in Burkina Faso (West Africa). A split plot design with four replications was laid-out on a loamy-sand Ferric Lixisol with till and no-till as main treatments and fertiliser types as

  14. Nitrogen gas emissions and nitrate leaching dynamics under different tillage practices based on data synthesis and process-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Ren, W.; Tao, B.; Zhu, X.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen losses from the agroecosystems have been of great concern to global changes due to the effects on global warming and water pollution in the form of nitrogen gas emissions (e.g., N2O) and mineral nitrogen leaching (e.g., NO3-), respectively. Conservation tillage, particularly no-tillage (NT), may enhance soil carbon sequestration, soil aggregation and moisture; therefore it has the potential of promoting N2O emissions and reducing NO3- leaching, comparing with conventional tillage (CT). However, associated processes are significantly affected by various factors, such as soil properties, climate, and crop types. How tillage management practices affect nitrogen transformations and fluxes is still far from clear, with inconsistent even opposite results from previous studies. To fill this knowledge gap, we quantitatively investigated gaseous and leaching nitrogen losses from NT and CT agroecosystems based on data synthesis and an improved process-based agroecosystem model. Our preliminary results suggest that NT management is more efficient in reducing NO3- leaching, and meanwhile it simultaneously increases N2O emissions by approximately 10% compared with CT. The effects of NT on N2O emissions and NO3- leaching are highly influenced by the placement of nitrogen fertilizer and are more pronounced in humid climate conditions. The effect of crop types is a less dominant factor in determining N2O and NO3- losses. Both our data synthesis and process-based modeling suggest that the enhanced carbon sequestration capacity from NT could be largely compromised by relevant NT-induced increases in N2O emissions. This study provides the comprehensive quantitative assessment of NT on the nitrogen emissions and leaching in agroecosystems. It provides scientific information for identifying proper management practices for ensuring food security and minimizing the adverse environmental impacts. The results also underscore the importance of suitable nitrogen management in the NT

  15. Dissolved Nitrogen and Phosphorus Dynamics in the Lower Portion of the Paraiba do Sul River, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Aparecida Leite Silva

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paraíba do Sul river lower reach was monitored monthly between August 1995 and July 1996. This study was aimed at evaluating the temporal dynamics of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus and its main controlling factors. Minimum and maximum observed values were as follows: N-NO2- - 0.08/0.51; N-NO3- - 21/57; N-NH4+ - 1.4/6.7; DON - 4.9/86.0; DIN -24.5/60.9; P-PO4(3- - 0.43/1.66; DOP - 0.05/0.92; pH - 6.2/7.8; Dissolved Oxygen - 6.4/10.1; Conductivity - 48/74; Temperature - 20.5/31.1 (Nutrients - µM; Dissolved Oxygen - mg/l; Conductivity - µS/cm; Temperature - °C. Discharge presented a characteristic seasonal variation, showing a peak in January. Increasing P-PO4(3-, DOP, N-NH4+ and N-NO2- concentrations with increasing discharges could be associated to the partial flooding of inumerous fluvial islands and floodplains and to the agricultural practices of sugar cane crops that during the wet season could transfer nitrogen and phosphorus compounds to the fluvial channel.O Rio Paraíba do Sul foi monitorado mensalmente na sua porção inferior, entre agosto de 1995 e julho de 1996, objetivando estudar a dinâmica temporal de nitrogênio e fósforo dissolvidos e avaliar seus principais fatores controladores. Os valores mínimos e máximos observados para os parâmetros analisados foram os seguintes: N-NO2- - 0,08/0,51; N-NO3- - 21/57; N-NH4+ - 1,4/6,7; Nitrogênio Orgânico Dissolvido (NOD - 4,9/86,0; Nitrogênio Inorgânico Dissolvido (NID - 24,5/60,9; P-PO4(3 - - 0,43/1,66; Fósforo Orgânico Dissolvido (POD - 0,05/0,92; pH - 6,2/7,8; Oxigênio Dissolvido - 6,4/10,1; Condutividade - 48/74; Temperatura - 20,5/31,1 (Nutrientes - µM; Oxigênio Dissolvido - mg/l; Condutividade - µS/cm; Temperatura - °C. A vazão apresentou uma variação sazonal característica, com pico de descarga em janeiro. A elevação das concentrações de P-PO4(3 -, POD, N-NH4+ e N-NO2- com o aumento da vazão pode estar associada à inundação parcial de numerosas

  16. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  17. Effect of the nitrogen incorporation and fast carrier dynamics in (In,Ga)AsN/GaP self-assembled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, J.-P.; Almosni, S.; Léger, Y.; Perrin, M.; Even, J.; Cornet, C., E-mail: charles.cornet@insa-rennes.fr; Durand, O. [UMR FOTON, CNRS, INSA-Rennes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Robert, C. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Balocchi, A.; Carrère, H.; Marie, X. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the structural and optical properties of (In,Ga)AsN self-assembled quantum dots grown on GaP (001) substrate. A comparison with nitrogen free (In,Ga)As system is presented, showing a clear modification of growth mechanisms and a significant shift of the photoluminescence spectrum. Low temperature carrier recombination dynamics is studied by time-resolved photoluminescence, highlighting a drastic reduction of the characteristic decay-time when nitrogen is incorporated in the quantum dots. Room temperature photoluminescence is observed at 840 nm. These results reveal the potential of (In,Ga)AsN as an efficient active medium monolithically integrated on Si for laser applications.

  18. Combining stable isotopes with contamination indicators: A method for improved investigation of nitrate sources and dynamics in aquifers with mixed nitrogen inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, E P; Goodhue, R; Meier-Augenstein, W; Kalin, R M; Fenton, O; Richards, K G; Coxon, C E

    2017-11-01

    Excessive nitrate (NO 3 - ) concentration in groundwater raises health and environmental issues that must be addressed by all European Union (EU) member states under the Nitrates Directive and the Water Framework Directive. The identification of NO 3 - sources is critical to efficiently control or reverse NO 3 - contamination that affects many aquifers. In that respect, the use of stable isotope ratios 15 N/ 14 N and 18 O/ 16 O in NO 3 - (expressed as δ 15 N-NO 3 - and δ 18 O-NO 3 - , respectively) has long shown its value. However, limitations exist in complex environments where multiple nitrogen (N) sources coexist. This two-year study explores a method for improved NO 3 - source investigation in a shallow unconfined aquifer with mixed N inputs and a long established NO 3 - problem. In this tillage-dominated area of free-draining soil and subsoil, suspected NO 3 - sources were diffuse applications of artificial fertiliser and organic point sources (septic tanks and farmyards). Bearing in mind that artificial diffuse sources were ubiquitous, groundwater samples were first classified according to a combination of two indicators relevant of point source contamination: presence/absence of organic point sources (i.e. septic tank and/or farmyard) near sampling wells and exceedance/non-exceedance of a contamination threshold value for sodium (Na + ) in groundwater. This classification identified three contamination groups: agricultural diffuse source but no point source (D+P-), agricultural diffuse and point source (D+P+) and agricultural diffuse but point source occurrence ambiguous (D+P±). Thereafter δ 15 N-NO 3 - and δ 18 O-NO 3 - data were superimposed on the classification. As δ 15 N-NO 3 - was plotted against δ 18 O-NO 3 - , comparisons were made between the different contamination groups. Overall, both δ variables were significantly and positively correlated (p contamination groups revealed that denitrification did not occur in the absence of point

  19. Evaluation of Seasonality in Shallow Groundwater Dynamics and Storage in an Urban Prairie Nature Preserve Using a High-Frequency Sensing Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, V. A.; Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. M.; Phillips, C. B.; Nair, A.; Negri, M. C.; Gnaedinger, K. J.; Miller, W. M.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Changing regional climate applies stresses to urban areas in the form of altered weather patterns, requiring new strategies for stormwater runoff management and flood mitigation. At the same time, the proportion of people residing in urban areas is increasing and cities are turning to greenspace as a tool for managing runoff. Gensburg Markham Prairie (GMP), located in Markham, Illinois south of Chicago, is an urban prairie nature preserve and a U.S. National Natural Landmark. Owned by Northeastern Illinois University and managed by the Nature Conservancy, GMP receives runoff from surrounding urban areas and provides valuable stormwater storage, while also hosting high biodiversity and providing critical habitat for sensitive and endemic. A successful management strategy for GMP should preserve both of these valuable ecosystem services. To understand GMP's role within the urban environment, we installed a suite of instruments in 2016 and 2017 to measure surface and groundwater levels, rainfall, soil moisture, and electrical conductivity throughout the prairie. This monitoring network includes 40 sensors collecting high frequency data (every 30 minutes). We are also collecting monthly distributed surface and groundwater samples to quantify a range of anions and cations that signal potentially detrimental anthropogenic impacts on the prairie. In addition, we are using historical and ongoing plant distribution surveys to explore the interactions between spatial patterns in vegetation and water dynamics in the prairie. The high measurement frequency and large diversity of sensor types supports holistic investigation of the response of the prairie to diverse events, including summer thunderstorms, winter road salt runoff, and spring snowmelt. The 18 months of data collected to date reveals clear patterns in response to weather events with influence from soil type and spatial variables. We are using time-series analysis with MODFLOW modelling to explore surface-groundwater

  20. Modelling inorganic nitrogen in runoff: Seasonal dynamics at four European catchments as simulated by the MAGIC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulehle, F; Cosby, B J; Austnes, K; Evans, C D; Hruška, J; Kopáček, J; Moldan, F; Wright, R F

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is globally considered as a major threat to ecosystem functioning with important consequences for biodiversity, carbon sequestration and N retention. Lowered N retention as manifested by elevated concentrations of inorganic N in surface waters indicates ecosystem N saturation. Nitrate (NO3) concentrations in runoff from semi-natural catchments typically show an annual cycle, with low concentrations during the summer and high concentrations during the winter. Process-oriented catchment-scale biogeochemical models provide tools for simulation and testing changes in surface water and soil chemistry in response to changes in sulphur (S) and N deposition and climate. Here we examine the ability of MAGIC to simulate the observed monthly as well as the long-term trends over 10-35 years of inorganic N concentrations in streamwaters from four monitored headwater catchments in Europe: Čertovo Lake in the Czech Republic, Afon Gwy at Plynlimon, UK, Storgama, Norway and G2 NITREX at Gårdsjön, Sweden. The balance between N inputs (mineralization+deposition) and microbial immobilization and plant uptake defined the seasonal pattern of NO3 leaching. N mineralization and N uptake were assumed to be governed by temperature, described by Q10 functions. Seasonality in NO3 concentration and fluxes were satisfactorily reproduced at three sites (R2 of predicted vs. modelled concentrations varied between 0.32 and 0.47 and for fluxes between 0.36 and 0.88). The model was less successful in reproducing the observed NO3 concentrations and fluxes at the experimental N addition site G2 NITREX (R2=0.01 and R2=0.19, respectively). In contrast to the three monitored sites, Gårdsjön is in a state of change from a N-limited to N-rich ecosystem due to 20 years of experimental N addition. At Gårdsjön the measured NO3 seasonal pattern did not follow typical annual cycle for reasons which are not well understood, and thus not simulated by the model. The MAGIC model is

  1. Seasonal variations in the nitrogen isotope composition of Okinotori coral in the tropical western Pacific: A new proxy for marine nitrate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Nanako O.; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Shirai, Kotaro; Toratani, Mitsuhiro; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2011-12-01

    To demonstrate the utility of coral skeletons as a recorder of nitrate dynamics in the surface ocean, we collected coral skeletons of Porites lobata and determined their nitrogen isotope composition (δ15Ncoral) from 2002 to 2006. Skeletons were collected at Okinotori Island in southwestern Japan, far from any sources of terrestrial nitrogen. Nitrogen isotope compositions along the growth direction were determined at 800 μm intervals (˜1 month resolution) and compared against the skeletal carbon isotope composition (δ13Ccoral-carb), barium/calcium ratio (Ba/Ca), and Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). From 2002 to 2004, ratios of the δ15Ncoral varied between +0.8 and +8.3‰ with inverse variation to SST (r = -0.53). Ba/Ca ratios and Chl-a concentrations were also observed to be high during seasons with low SST. These results suggested that the vertical mixing that occurs during periods of low SST carries nutrients from deeper water (δ15NDIN; +5˜+6‰) to the sea surface. In 2005 onward, δ15Ncoral and Ba/Ca ratios also had positive peaks even in high SST during periods of transient upwelling caused by frequent large typhoons (maximum wind speed 30 m/s). In addition, low δ15Ncoral (+0.8˜+2.0‰) four months after the last typhoon implied nitrogen fixation because of the lack of typhoon upwelling through the four years record of δ15Ncoral. Variations in the δ13Ccoral-carb and δ15Ncoral were synchronized, suggesting that nitrate concentration could control zooxanthellae photosynthesis. Our results suggested that δ15Ncoral holds promise as a proxy for reconstructing the transport dynamics of marine nitrate and thus also a tool for estimating nitrate origins in the tropical and subtropical oceans.

  2. Efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers for rice

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Pierre-Armand; Grant, I.F.; Reddy, P.M.; Watanabe, I.

    1987-01-01

    The photosynthetic biomass that develops in the floodwater of wetland rice fields affects nitrogen dynamics in the ecosystem. This review summarizes available data on the nature, productivity, and composition of the photosynthetic aquatic biomass, and its major activities regarding the nitrogen cycle, i.e., nitrogen fixation by free living blue-green algae and #Azolla$, nitrogen trapping, nitrogen accumulation at the soil surface, its effect on nitrogen losses by ammonia volatilization, nitro...

  3. Dynamics of nitrogen in an oxic paleudalf soil with the incorporation of 15N-tagged organic nitrogen (maize straw) and 15N-tagged mineral nitrogen (ammonium sulphate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, J.R. de.

    1984-12-01

    An experiment, carried out under field conditions in 12 lysimeters, each containing 3.0 ton of Oxic Paleudalf soil with four replicates, is described. This objective is labelling soil organic N. Nitrogen was incorporated into soil as maize straw, non-labelled and labelled with 15 N and ammonium sulphate - 15 N. The soil was sampled every 15 days in three different depths. N as NH + 4 , NO - 3 , total-N and (%)C and (%) moisture was analysed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  5. Exposure Time Distributions reveal Denitrification Rates along Groundwater Flow Path of an Agricultural Unconfined Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, T.; Abbott, B. W.; Thomas, Z.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.; Laverman, A.; Babey, T.; Marçais, J.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Peiffer, S.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Pinay, G.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by nitrate is nearly ubiquitous in agricultural regions. Nitrate is highly mobile in groundwater and though it can be denitrified in the aquifer (reduced to inert N2 gas), this process requires the simultaneous occurrence of anoxia, an electron donor (e.g. organic carbon, pyrite), nitrate, and microorganisms capable of denitrification. In addition to this the ratio of the time groundwater spent in a denitrifying environment (exposure time) to the characteristic denitrification reaction time plays an important role, because denitrification can only occur if the exposure time is longer than the characteristic reaction time. Despite a long history of field studies and numerical models, it remains exceedingly difficult to measure or model exposure times in the subsurface at the catchment scale. To approach this problem, we developed a unified modelling approach combining measured environmental proxies with an exposure time based reactive transport model. We measured groundwater age, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes, and water chemistry from agricultural wells in an unconfined aquifer in Brittany, France, to quantify changes in nitrate concentration due to dilution and denitrification. Field data showed large differences in nitrate concentrations among wells, associated with differences in the exposure time distributions. By constraining a catchment-scale characteristic reaction time for denitrification with water chemistry proxies and exposure times, we were able to assess rates of denitrification along groundwater flow paths. This unified modeling approach is transferable to other catchments and could be further used to investigate how catchment structure and flow dynamics interact with biogeochemical processes such as denitrification.

  6. Tillering dynamics of Tanzania guinea grass under nitrogen levels and plant densities - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i4.13382

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo Rozalino Santos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of nitrogen levels (N and plant density (D on the tillering dynamics of Tanzania guinea grass (Panicum maximum Jacq.. Treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design with 12 treatments and two replicates in a factorial scheme (4 × 3 with four levels of N (0, 80, 160 or 320 kg ha-1 N and three plant densities (9, 25, and 49 plant m-². Higher number of tillers was observed in the treatment with 9 plants m-² and under higher levels of N, especially in the second and third generations. Still, the N influenced quadratically the appearance rate of basal and total tillers, which were also affected by plant density and interaction N × D. However, the appearance rate of aerial tiller was not influenced by factors evaluated. The mortality rate of total tiller was influenced quadratically by the nitrogen levels and plant densities. The mortality rate of basal tiller responded quadratically to plant density, whereas the mortality rate of aerial tiller increased linearly with fertilization. Pastures with low or intermediate densities fertilized with nitrogen, presented a more intense pattern of tiller renewal.

  7. Modelling inorganic nitrogen in runoff: Seasonal dynamics at four European catchments as simulated by the MAGIC model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, F.; Cosby, B.J.; Austnes, K.; Evans, C.D.; Hruška, J.; Kopáček, Jiří; Moldan, F.; Wright, R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 536, DEC 1 (2015), s. 1019-1028 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1218 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nitrogen * soil * freshwater * catchment * deposition Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 3.976, year: 2015

  8. Litter decomposition in southern Appalachian black locust and pine-hardwood stands: litter quality and nitrogen dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. White; Bruce L. Haines

    1988-01-01

    The chemical quality of litter, through its interaction with macroclimate and the litter biota, largely regulates the rate of organic matter (OM) and nitrogen (N) turnover in the forest floor (Cromack 1973; Fogel and Cromack 1977; Meentemeyer 1978; Aber and Melillo 1982; Melillo et al. 1982). Litter quality is thought to be related to the N require-ment and...

  9. Groundwater Pollution Arising From The Disposal Of Creosote Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Flyvbjerg, J.

    1992-01-01

    Creosote-contaminated groundwater contains a complex mixture of phenols, aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic, aromatic compounds. One of the most important factors that limits the spreading of these contaminants in groundwater aquifers is degradation by...... enhancement of the native population of subsurface micro-organisms to degrade the contaminants (in situ treatment) and withdrawal of the groundwater followed by treatment by various wastewater treatment processes (above-ground treatment)....

  10. Seawater-groundwater exchange and nutrients carried by submarine groundwater discharge in different types of wetlands at Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenjing; Li, Hailong; Huang, Hao; Zheng, Chunmiao; Wang, Chaoyue; Wang, Xuejing; Zhang, Yan

    2017-12-01

    In Jiaozhou Bay, there are four wetland types, including sandy beaches, mud flats, tidal marshes, and estuarine intertidal zones. Four typical transects representing each of the wetland types were selected to investigate the flow dynamics, seawater-groundwater exchange and nutrients carried by submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Based on field measurements of groundwater heads and salinity along each transect, the SGD averaged over the observation period was estimated using generalized Darcy's law. The SGD along the four transects ranges from 3.6 × 10-3 to 7.6 cm/d with the maximum occurring at the sandy beach. The SGD rate has a good correlation with the hydraulic conductivities of the wetland sediments. There is a positive correlation between the ratio of NO3-N/DIN and SGD rates. The SGD-associated nutrient output rate ranges from 3.3 × 10-2 to 9.5 mmol/m2/d for DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen), and from 6.2 × 10-5 to 1.8 × 10-2 mmol/m2/d for DIP (dissolved inorganic phosphorus). Compared to the nutrients delivered by the river, nutrients carried by SGD provide a more important source for the phosphate-limited environment to plankton in Jiaozhou Bay.

  11. Understanding the groundwater dynamics in the Southern Rift Valley Lakes Basin (Ethiopia). Multivariate statistical analysis method, oxygen (δ 18O) and deuterium (δ 2H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girum Admasu Nadew; Zebene Lakew Tefera

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is very important to classify waters of different hydrochemical groups. Statistical techniques, such as cluster analysis, can provide a powerful tool for analyzing water chemistry data. This method is used to test water quality data and determine if samples can be grouped into distinct populations that may be significant in the geologic context, as well as from a statistical point of view. Multivariate statistical analysis method is applied to the geochemical data in combination with δ 18 O and δ 2 H isotopes with the objective to understand the dynamics of groundwater using hierarchical clustering and isotope analyses. The geochemical and isotope data of the central and southern rift valley lakes have been collected and analyzed from different works. Isotope analysis shows that most springs and boreholes are recharged by July and August rainfalls. The different hydrochemical groups that resulted from the multivariate analysis are described and correlated with the geology of the area and whether it has any interaction with a system or not. (author)

  12. Dynamics of N-NH4 +, N-NO3 -, and total soil nitrogen in paddy field with azolla and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, W. S.; Wahyuningsih, G. I.; Syamsiyah, J.; Mujiyo

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of macronutrients which is dynamic in the soil and becomes constraint factor for rice crops. The addition of nitrogen fertilizers and its absorption in paddy field causes the dynamics of nitrogen, thus declines of N absorption efficiency. The aim of this research is to know influence Azolla, biochar and different varieties application on N-NH4 +, N-NO3 -, and total soil N in paddy field. This research was conducted in a screen house located in Jumantono Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sebelas Maret (UNS) with altitude 170 m asl from April to June 2016. Treatment factors that were examined consisted of azolla (0 and 10 tons/ha), biochar (0 and 2 tons/ha), and rice varieties (Cisadane, Memberamo, Ciherang, IR64). The results of this research showed that there was no interaction between azolla, biochar and varieties. Nevertheless, azolla treatment with dose of 10 tons/ha increased soil NH4 + content (41 days after planting, DAP) by 13.4% but tend to decrease at 70 and 90 DAP. Biochar treatment with dose of 2 ton/ha increases NO3 - soil content (70 DAP) by 1.7% but decreases total N soil by 5.8% (41 DAP) and 4.7% (90 DAP). Different rice varieties generated different soil NH4 + content (41 DAP) and rice root volume. Cisadane variety can increase soil NH4 + content (41 DAP) by 52.08% and root volume by 51.80% (90 DAP) compared with Ciherang variety. Organic rice field management with azolla and biochar affects the availability of N in the soil and increase N absorption efficiency through its role in increasing rice root volume.

  13. The mechanism of enhanced wastewater nitrogen removal by photo-sequencing batch reactors based on comprehensive analysis of system dynamics within a cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianfeng; Liang, Junyu; Wang, Liang; Markou, Giorgos

    2018-07-01

    To understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrogen removal by photo-sequencing batch reactors (photo-SBRs), which incorporated microalgal photosynthetic oxygenation into the aerobic phases of a conventional cycle, this study performed comprehensive analysis of one-cycle dynamics. Under a low aeration intensity (about 0.02 vvm), a photo-SBR, illuminated with light at 92.27 μ·mol·m -2 ·s -1 , could remove 99.45% COD, 99.93% NH 4 + -N, 90.39% TN, and 95.17% TP, while the control SBR could only remove 98.36% COD, 83.51% NH 4 + -N, 78.96% TN, and 97.75% TP, for a synthetic domestic sewage. The specific oxygen production rate (SOPR) of microalgae in the photo-SBR could reach 6.63 fmol O 2 ·cell -1 ·h -1 . One-cycle dynamics shows that the enhanced nitrogen removal by photo-SBRs is related to photosynthetic oxygenation, resulting in strengthened nitrification, instead of direct nutrient uptake by microalgae. A too high light or aeration intensity could deteriorate anoxic conditions and thus adversely affect the removal of TN and TP in photo-SBRs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of dynamic surface water-groundwater exchange on streambed denitrification in a first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mina; Essaid, Hedeff I.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-12-01

    The role of temporally varying surface water-groundwater (SW-GW) exchange on nitrate removal by streambed denitrification was examined along a reach of Leary Weber Ditch (LWD), Indiana, a small, first-order, low-relief agricultural watershed within the Upper Mississippi River basin, using data collected in 2004 and 2005. Stream stage, GW heads (H), and temperatures (T) were continuously monitored in streambed piezometers and stream bank wells for two transects across LWD accompanied by synoptic measurements of stream stage, H, T, and nitrate (NO3) concentrations along the reach. The H and T data were used to develop and calibrate vertical two-dimensional, models of streambed water flow and heat transport across and along the axis of the stream. Model-estimated SW-GW exchange varied seasonally and in response to high-streamflow events due to dynamic interactions between SW stage and GW H. Comparison of 2004 and 2005 conditions showed that small changes in precipitation amount and intensity, evapotranspiration, and/or nearby GW levels within a low-relief watershed can readily impact SW-GW interactions. The calibrated LWD flow models and observed stream and streambed NO3 concentrations were used to predict temporal variations in streambed NO3 removal in response to dynamic SW-GW exchange. NO3 removal rates underwent slow seasonal changes, but also underwent rapid changes in response to high-flow events. These findings suggest that increased temporal variability of SW-GW exchange in low-order, low-relief watersheds may be a factor contributing their more efficient removal of NO3.

  15. Global scale groundwater flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  16. Nitrogen removal capacity and bacterial community dynamics of a Canon biofilter system at different organic matter concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, María J; Maza-Márquez, Paula; González-López, Jesús; Osorio, Francisco

    2018-02-01

    Three Canon bench-scale bioreactors with a volume of 2 L operating in parallel were configured as submerged biofilters. In the present study we investigated the effects of a high ammonium concentration (320 mgNH 4 + · L -1 ) and different concentrations of organic matter (0, 100 and 400 mgCOD·L -1 ) on the nitrogen removal capacity and the bacterial community structure. After 60 days, the Canon biofilters operated properly under concentrations of 0 and 100 mgCOD·L -1 of organic matter, with nitrogen removal efficiencies up to 85%. However, a higher concentration of organic matter (400 mgCOD·L -1 ) produced a partial inhibition of nitrogen removal (68.1% efficiency). The addition of higher concentrations of organic matter a modified the bacterial community structure in the Canon biofilter, increasing the proliferation of heterotrophic bacteria related to the genera of Thauera, Longilinea, Ornatilinea, Thermomarinilinea, unclassified Chlorobiales and Denitratisoma. However, heterotrophic bacteria co-exist with Nitrosomonas and Candidatus Scalindua. Thus, our study confirms the co-existence of different microbial activities (AOB, Anammox and denitrification) and the adaptation of a fixed-biofilm system to different concentrations of organic matter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The combined use of dynamic factor analysis and wavelet analysis to evaluate latent factors controlling complex groundwater level fluctuations in a riverside alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yun-Yeong; Yun, Seong-Taek; Yu, Soonyoung; Hamm, Se-Yeong

    2017-12-01

    To identify and quantitatively evaluate complex latent factors controlling groundwater level (GWL) fluctuations in a riverside alluvial aquifer influenced by barrage construction, we developed the combined use of dynamic factor analysis (DFA) and wavelet analysis (WA). Time series data of GWL, river water level and precipitation were collected for 3 years (July 2012 to June 2015) from an alluvial aquifer underneath an agricultural area of the Nakdong river basin, South Korea. Based on the wavelet coefficients of the final approximation, the GWL data was clustered into three groups (WCG1 to WCG3). Two dynamic factors (DFs) were then extracted using DFA for each group; thus, six major factors were extracted. Next, the time-frequency variability of the extracted DFs was examined using multiresolution cross-correlation analysis (MRCCA) with the following steps: 1) major driving forces and their scales in GWL fluctuations were identified by comparing maximum correlation coefficients (rmax) between DFs and the GWL time series and 2) the results were supplemented using the wavelet transformed coherence (WTC) analysis between DFs and the hydrological time series. Finally, relative contributions of six major DFs to the GWL fluctuations could be quantitatively assessed by calculating the effective dynamic efficiency (Def). The characteristics and relevant process of the identified six DFs are: 1) WCG1DF4,1 as an indicative of seasonal agricultural pumping (scales = 64-128 days; rmax = 0.68-0.89; Def ≤ 23.1%); 2) WCG1DF4,4 representing the cycle of regional groundwater recharge (scales = 64-128 days; rmax = 0.98-1.00; Def ≤ 11.1%); 3) WCG2DF4,1 indicating the complex interaction between the episodes of precipitation and direct runoff (scales = 2-8 days; rmax = 0.82-0.91; Def ≤ 35.3%) and seasonal GW-RW interaction (scales = 64-128 days; rmax = 0.76-0.91; Def ≤ 14.2%); 4) WCG2DF4,4 reflecting the complex effects of seasonal pervasive pumping and the local recharge

  18. Floodplain Vegetation Productivity and Carbon Cycle Dynamics of the Middle Fork Flathead River of Northwest Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakins, A. J.; Kimball, J. S.; Relyea, S.; Stanford, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    River floodplains are vital natural features that store floodwaters, improve water quality, provide habitat, and create recreational opportunities. Recent studies have shown that strong interactions among flooding, channel and sediment movement, vegetation, and groundwater create a dynamic shifting habitat mosaic that promotes biodiversity and complex food webs. Multiple physical and environmental processes interact within these systems to influence forest productivity, including water availability, nutrient supply, soil texture, and disturbance history. This study is designed to quantify the role of groundwater depth and meteorology in determining spatial and temporal patterns of net primary productivity (NPP) within the Nyack floodplain of the Middle Fork Flathead River, Northwestern Montana. We examine three intensive field sites composed of mature, mixed deciduous and evergreen conifer forest with varying hydrologic and vegetative characteristics. We use a modified Biome-BGC ecosystem process model with field-collected data (LAI, increment growth cores, groundwater depth, vegetation sap-flow, and local meteorology) to describe the effects of floodplain groundwater dynamics on vegetation community structure, and carbon/nitrogen cycling. Initial results indicate that conifers are more sensitive than deeper-rooted deciduous species to variability in groundwater depth and meteorological conditions. Forest productivity also shows a non-linear response to groundwater depth. Sites with intermediate groundwater depths (0.2-0.5m) allow vegetation to maintain connectivity to groundwater over longer periods during the growing season, are effectively uncoupled from atmospheric constraints on photosynthesis, and generally have greater productivity. Shallow groundwater sites (<0.2m) are less productive due to the indirect effects of reduced soil aerobic decomposition and reduced plant available nitrogen.

  19. Transient simulations of the carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands: from the Last Glacial Maximum to the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Spahni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of northern high-latitude peatlands played an important role in the carbon (C balance of the land biosphere since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. At present, carbon storage in northern peatlands is substantial and estimated to be 500 ± 100 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1015 g C. Here, we develop and apply a peatland module embedded in a dynamic global vegetation and land surface process model (LPX-Bern 1.0. The peatland module features a dynamic nitrogen cycle, a dynamic C transfer between peatland acrotelm (upper oxic layer and catotelm (deep anoxic layer, hydrology- and temperature-dependent respiration rates, and peatland specific plant functional types. Nitrogen limitation down-regulates average modern net primary productivity over peatlands by about half. Decadal acrotelm-to-catotelm C fluxes vary between −20 and +50 g C m−2 yr−1 over the Holocene. Key model parameters are calibrated with reconstructed peat accumulation rates from peat-core data. The model reproduces the major features of the peat core data and of the observation-based modern circumpolar soil carbon distribution. Results from a set of simulations for possible evolutions of northern peat development and areal extent show that soil C stocks in modern peatlands increased by 365–550 Pg C since the LGM, of which 175–272 Pg C accumulated between 11 and 5 kyr BP. Furthermore, our simulations suggest a persistent C sequestration rate of 35–50 Pg C per 1000 yr in present-day peatlands under current climate conditions, and that this C sink could either sustain or turn towards a source by 2100 AD depending on climate trajectories as projected for different representative greenhouse gas concentration pathways.

  20. Increasing the speed of computational fluid dynamics procedure for minimization the nitrogen oxide polution from the premixed atmospheric gas burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotev Vasko G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents innovative method for increasing the speed of procedure which includes complex computational fluid dynamic calculations for finding the distance between flame openings of atmospheric gas burner that lead to minimal NO pollution. The method is based on standard features included in commercial computational fluid dynamic software and shortens computer working time roughly seven times in this particular case.

  1. Contrasting above- and belowground organic matter decomposition and carbon and nitrogen dynamics in response to warming in High Arctic tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Daan; Faucherre, Samuel; Banyasz, Imre; Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Elberling, Bo

    2017-12-13

    Tundra regions are projected to warm rapidly during the coming decades. The tundra biome holds the largest terrestrial carbon pool, largely contained in frozen permafrost soils. With warming, these permafrost soils may thaw and become available for microbial decomposition, potentially providing a positive feedback to global warming. Warming may directly stimulate microbial metabolism but may also indirectly stimulate organic matter turnover through increased plant productivity by soil priming from root exudates and accelerated litter turnover rates. Here, we assess the impacts of experimental warming on turnover rates of leaf litter, active layer soil and thawed permafrost sediment in two high-arctic tundra heath sites in NE-Greenland, either dominated by evergreen or deciduous shrubs. We incubated shrub leaf litter on the surface of control and warmed plots for 1 and 2 years. Active layer soil was collected from the plots to assess the effects of 8 years of field warming on soil carbon stocks. Finally, we incubated open cores filled with newly thawed permafrost soil for 2 years in the active layer of the same plots. After field incubation, we measured basal respiration rates of recovered thawed permafrost cores in the lab. Warming significantly reduced litter mass loss by 26% after 1 year incubation, but differences in litter mass loss among treatments disappeared after 2 years incubation. Warming also reduced litter nitrogen mineralization and decreased the litter carbon to nitrogen ratio. Active layer soil carbon stocks were reduced 15% by warming, while soil dissolved nitrogen was reduced by half in warmed plots. Warming had a positive legacy effect on carbon turnover rates in thawed permafrost cores, with 10% higher respiration rates measured in cores from warmed plots. These results demonstrate that warming may have contrasting effects on above- and belowground tundra carbon turnover, possibly governed by microbial resource availability. © 2017 John

  2. A New Application of Dynamic Data Driven System in the Talbot-Ogden Model for Groundwater Infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Douglas, Craig C.; Ogden, Fred L.

    2012-01-01

    The TalbotOgden model is a mass conservative method to simulate flow of a wetting liquid in variably-saturated porous media. The principal feature of this model is the discretization of the moisture content domain into bins. This paper gives an analysis of the relationship between the number of bins and the computed flux. Under the circumstances of discrete bins and discontinuous wetting fronts, we show that fluxes increase with the number of bins. We then apply this analysis to the continuous case and get an upper bound of the difference of infiltration rates when the number of bins tends to infinity. We also extend this model by creating a two dimensional moisture content domain so that there exists a probability distribution of the moisture content for different soil systems. With these theoretical and experimental results and using a Dynamic Data Driven Application System (DDDAS), sensors can be put in soils to detect the infiltration fluxes, which are important to compute the proper number of bins for a specific soil system and predict fluxes. Using this feedback control loop, the extended TalbotOgden model can be made more efficient for estimating infiltration into soils.

  3. A New Application of Dynamic Data Driven System in the Talbot-Ogden Model for Groundwater Infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2012-06-02

    The TalbotOgden model is a mass conservative method to simulate flow of a wetting liquid in variably-saturated porous media. The principal feature of this model is the discretization of the moisture content domain into bins. This paper gives an analysis of the relationship between the number of bins and the computed flux. Under the circumstances of discrete bins and discontinuous wetting fronts, we show that fluxes increase with the number of bins. We then apply this analysis to the continuous case and get an upper bound of the difference of infiltration rates when the number of bins tends to infinity. We also extend this model by creating a two dimensional moisture content domain so that there exists a probability distribution of the moisture content for different soil systems. With these theoretical and experimental results and using a Dynamic Data Driven Application System (DDDAS), sensors can be put in soils to detect the infiltration fluxes, which are important to compute the proper number of bins for a specific soil system and predict fluxes. Using this feedback control loop, the extended TalbotOgden model can be made more efficient for estimating infiltration into soils.

  4. Tidal effects on groundwater contamination at Pekan, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Dalila Desa; Dominic, J.A.; Mohd Muzamil Mohd Hashim; Kamarudin Samuding; Mohd Faizun Khalid; Mod Omar Hassan; Kamaruzaman Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of coastal ground water and the sea is a unique and dynamic hydro geologic boundary phenomenon that has fascinated groundwater engineers and scientists for the past century. The variation of seawater level resulting from tidal fluctuations is usually neglected in regional groundwater flow studies. In this study the effects of seawater tidal on groundwater are investigated using geophysical together with conventional method. Comparative result between these two methods shown how tidal fluctuations effects groundwater in study area. (author)

  5. Dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community structure and functioning along a nitrogen enrichment gradient in an alpine meadow ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shengjing; Liu, Yongjun; Luo, Jiajia; Qin, Mingsen; Johnson, Nancy Collins; Öpik, Maarja; Vasar, Martti; Chai, Yuxing; Zhou, Xiaolong; Mao, Lin; Du, Guozhen; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan

    2018-03-30

    Nitrogen (N) availability is increasing dramatically in many ecosystems, but the influence of elevated N on the functioning of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in natural ecosystems is not well understood. We measured AM fungal community structure and mycorrhizal function simultaneously across an experimental N addition gradient in an alpine meadow that is limited by N but not by phosphorus (P). AM fungal communities at both whole-plant-community (mixed roots) and single-plant-species (Elymus nutans roots) scales were described using pyro-sequencing, and the mycorrhizal functioning was quantified using a mycorrhizal-suppression treatment in the field (whole-plant-community scale) and a glasshouse inoculation experiment (single-plant-species scale). Nitrogen enrichment progressively reduced AM fungal abundance, changed AM fungal community composition, and shifted mycorrhizal functioning towards parasitism at both whole-plant-community and E. nutans scales. N-induced shifts in AM fungal community composition were tightly linked to soil N availability and/or plant species richness, whereas the shifts in mycorrhizal function were associated with the communities of specific AM fungal lineages. The observed changes in both AM fungal community structure and functioning across an N enrichment gradient highlight that N enrichment of ecosystems that are not P-limited can induce parasitic mycorrhizal functioning and influence plant community structure and ecosystem sustainability. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Modeling the Effects of Hydrogeomorphology and Climactic Factors on Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Riparian Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Y.; Vidon, P.; Gold, A.; Pradhanang, S. M.; Addy, K.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetated riparian zones are often considered for use as best management practices to mitigate the impacts of agriculture on water quality. However, riparian zones can also be a source of greenhouse gases and their influence on water quality varies depending on landscape hydrogeomorphic characteristics and climate. Methods used to evaluate riparian zone functions include conceptual models, and spatially explicit and process based models (REMM), but very few attempts have been made to connect riparian zone characteristics with function using easily accessible landscape scale data. Here, we present comprehensive statistical models that can be used to assess riparian zone functions with easily obtainable landscape-scale hydrogeomorphic attributes and climate data. Models were developed from a database spanning 88 years and 36 sites. Statistical methods including principal component analysis and stepwise regression were used to reduced data dimensionality and identify significant predictors. Models were validated using additional data collected from scientific literature. The 8 models developed connect landscape characteristics to nitrogen and phosphorus concentration and removal (1-4), greenhouse gas emissions (5-7), and water table depth (8). Results show the range of influence that various climate and landscape characteristics have on riparian zone functions, and the tradeoffs that exist with regards to nitrogen, phosphorous, and greenhouse gases. These models will help reduce the need for extensive field measurements and help scientists and land managers make more informed decisions regarding the use of riparian zones for water quality management.

  7. Long-term dynamic and pseudo-state modeling of complete partial nitrification process at high nitrogen loading rates in a sequential batch reactor (SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Recently, partial nitrification has been adopted widely either for the nitrite shunt process or intermediate nitrite generation step for the Anammox process. However, partial nitrification has been hindered by the complexity of maintaining stable nitrite accumulation at high nitrogen loading rates (NLR) which affect the feasibility of the process for high nitrogen content wastewater. Thus, the operational data of a lab scale SBR performing complete partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process at NLRs of 0.3-1.2kg/(m 3 d) have been used to calibrate and validate a process model developed using BioWin® in order to describe the long-term dynamic behavior of the SBR. Moreover, an identifiability analysis step has been introduced to the calibration protocol to eliminate the needs of the respirometric analysis for SBR models. The calibrated model was able to predict accurately the daily effluent ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, alkalinity concentrations and pH during all different operational conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  9. The dynamic process of interspecific interactions of competitive nitrogen capture between intercropped wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and Faba Bean (Vicia faba L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Li

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L./faba bean (Vicia faba L. intercropping shows significant overyielding and high nitrogen (N-use efficiency, but the dynamics of plant interactions have rarely been estimated. The objective of the present study was to investigate the temporal dynamics of competitive N acquisition between intercropped wheat and faba bean with the logistic model. Wheat and faba bean were grown together or alone with limited N supply in pots. Data of shoot and root biomass and N content measured from 14 samplings were fitted to logistic models to determine instantaneous rates of growth and N uptake. The superiority of instantaneous biomass production and N uptake shifted from faba bean to wheat with their growth. Moreover, the shift of superiority on N uptake occurred 7-12 days earlier than that of biomass production. Interspecific competition stimulated intercropped wheat to have a much earlier and stronger superiority on instantaneous N uptake compared with isolated wheat. The modeling methodology characterized the temporal dynamics of biomass production and N uptake of intercropped wheat and faba bean in different planting systems, which helps to understand the underlying process of plant interaction for intercropping plants.

  10. The dynamic process of interspecific interactions of competitive nitrogen capture between intercropped wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Dong, Yan; Li, Haigang; Shen, Jianbo; Zhang, Fusuo

    2014-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)/faba bean (Vicia faba L.) intercropping shows significant overyielding and high nitrogen (N)-use efficiency, but the dynamics of plant interactions have rarely been estimated. The objective of the present study was to investigate the temporal dynamics of competitive N acquisition between intercropped wheat and faba bean with the logistic model. Wheat and faba bean were grown together or alone with limited N supply in pots. Data of shoot and root biomass and N content measured from 14 samplings were fitted to logistic models to determine instantaneous rates of growth and N uptake. The superiority of instantaneous biomass production and N uptake shifted from faba bean to wheat with their growth. Moreover, the shift of superiority on N uptake occurred 7-12 days earlier than that of biomass production. Interspecific competition stimulated intercropped wheat to have a much earlier and stronger superiority on instantaneous N uptake compared with isolated wheat. The modeling methodology characterized the temporal dynamics of biomass production and N uptake of intercropped wheat and faba bean in different planting systems, which helps to understand the underlying process of plant interaction for intercropping plants.

  11. Identification of groundwater nitrate sources in pre-alpine catchments: a multi-tracer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoewer, Myriam; Stumpp, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Porous aquifers in pre-alpine areas are often used as drinking water resources due to their good water quality status and water yield. Maintaining these resources requires knowledge about possible sources of pollutants and a sustainable management practice in groundwater catchment areas. Of particular interest in agricultural areas, like in pre-alpine regions, is limiting nitrate input as main groundwater pollutant. Therefore, the objective of the presented study is i) to identify main nitrate sources in a pre-alpine groundwater catchment with current low nitrate concentration using stable isotopes of nitrate (d18O and d15N) and ii) to investigate seasonal dynamics of nitrogen compounds. The groundwater catchment areas of four porous aquifers are located in Southern Germany. Most of the land use is organic grassland farming as well as forestry and residential area. Thus, potential sources of nitrate mainly are mineral fertilizer, manure/slurry, leaking sewage system and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. Monthly freshwater samples (precipitation, river water and groundwater) are analysed for stable isotope of water (d2H, d18O), the concentration of major anions and cations, electrical conductivity, water temperature, pH and oxygen. In addition, isotopic analysis of d18O-NO3- and d15N-NO3- for selected samples is carried out using the denitrifier method. In general, all groundwater samples were oxic (10.0±2.6mg/L) and nitrate concentrations were low (0.2 - 14.6mg/L). The observed nitrate isotope values in the observation area compared to values from local precipitation, sewage, manure and mineral fertilizer as well as to data from literature shows that the nitrate in freshwater samples is of microbial origin. Nitrate derived from ammonium in fertilizers and precipitation as well as from soil nitrogen. It is suggested that a major potential threat to the groundwater quality is ammonia and ammonium at a constant level mainly from agriculture activities as

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  13. Nitrogen sources, transport and processing in peri-urban floodplains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooddy, D.C.; Macdonald, D.M.J.; Lapworth, D.J.; Bennett, S.A.; Griffiths, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peri-urban floodplains are an important interface between developed land and the aquatic environment and may act as a source or sink for contaminants moving from urban areas towards surface water courses. With increasing pressure from urban development the functioning of floodplains is coming under greater scrutiny. A number of peri-urban sites have been found to be populated with legacy landfills which could potentially cause pollution of adjacent river bodies. Here, a peri-urban floodplain adjoining the city of Oxford, UK, with the River Thames has been investigated over a period of three years through repeated sampling of groundwaters from existing and specially constructed piezometers. A nearby landfill has been found to have imprinted a strong signal on the groundwater with particularly high concentrations of ammonium and generally low concentrations of nitrate and dissolved oxygen. An intensive study of nitrogen dynamics through the use of N-species chemistry, nitrogen isotopes and dissolved nitrous oxide reveals that there is little or no denitrification in the majority of the main landfill plume, and neither is the ammonium significantly retarded by sorption to the aquifer sediments. A simple model has determined the flux of total nitrogen and ammonium from the landfill, through the floodplain and into the river. Over an 8 km reach of the river, which has a number of other legacy landfills, it is estimated that 27.5 tonnes of ammonium may be delivered to the river annually. Although this is a relatively small contribution to the total river nitrogen, it may represent up to 15% of the ammonium loading at the study site and over the length of the reach could increase in-stream concentrations by nearly 40%. Catchment management plans that encompass floodplains in the peri-urban environment need to take into account the likely risk to groundwater and surface water quality that these environments pose. - Highlights: • Peri-urban floodplains have been found to

  14. Nitrogen sources, transport and processing in peri-urban floodplains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooddy, D.C., E-mail: dcg@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Macdonald, D.M.J.; Lapworth, D.J. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Bennett, S.A. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Griffiths, K.J. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Peri-urban floodplains are an important interface between developed land and the aquatic environment and may act as a source or sink for contaminants moving from urban areas towards surface water courses. With increasing pressure from urban development the functioning of floodplains is coming under greater scrutiny. A number of peri-urban sites have been found to be populated with legacy landfills which could potentially cause pollution of adjacent river bodies. Here, a peri-urban floodplain adjoining the city of Oxford, UK, with the River Thames has been investigated over a period of three years through repeated sampling of groundwaters from existing and specially constructed piezometers. A nearby landfill has been found to have imprinted a strong signal on the groundwater with particularly high concentrations of ammonium and generally low concentrations of nitrate and dissolved oxygen. An intensive study of nitrogen dynamics through the use of N-species chemistry, nitrogen isotopes and dissolved nitrous oxide reveals that there is little or no denitrification in the majority of the main landfill plume, and neither is the ammonium significantly retarded by sorption to the aquifer sediments. A simple model has determined the flux of total nitrogen and ammonium from the landfill, through the floodplain and into the river. Over an 8 km reach of the river, which has a number of other legacy landfills, it is estimated that 27.5 tonnes of ammonium may be delivered to the river annually. Although this is a relatively small contribution to the total river nitrogen, it may represent up to 15% of the ammonium loading at the study site and over the length of the reach could increase in-stream concentrations by nearly 40%. Catchment management plans that encompass floodplains in the peri-urban environment need to take into account the likely risk to groundwater and surface water quality that these environments pose. - Highlights: • Peri-urban floodplains have been found to

  15. Impact of Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea and Flax (Linum usitatissimum Seed Meal Applications on Soil Carbon, Nitrogen, and Microbial Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Autumn S. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a critical need to investigate how land application of dedicated biofuel oilseed meals affects soil ecosystems. In this study, mustard (Brassica juncea and flax (Linum usitatissimum seed meals and sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor were added to soil at levels of 0, 1, 2.5, and 5% (w/w. Both the type of amendment and application rate affected soil organic C, total C & N, and C & N mineralization. Mustard meal amendment initially inhibited C mineralization as compared to flax, but >50% of mustard and flax organic C was mineralized within 51 d. Nitrogen mineralization was similar for flax and mustard, except for the 2.5% rate for which a lower proportion of mustard N was converted to nitrate. The mustard meal greatly impacted microbial community composition, appearing to select for specific fungal populations. The potential varying impacts of different oilseed meals on soil ecosystems should be considered when developing recommendations for land application.

  16. Application of Fast Pyrolysis Biochar to a Loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben

    -biochar for agronomic use, since field trials are needed in order to verify potential benefits or drawbacks on soil fertility and crop yields. However, this thesis has improved the mechanistic understanding of the effects of applying FP-biochar to soil, and shows that wheat-straw FP-biochar has properties beneficial...... increased it moderately. Moreover, soil amendment of FP-biochar caused immobilization of considerable amounts of soil N, whereas SP-biochar resulted in a net mineralization of N after two months of soil incubation. Nitrogen immobilisation can be detrimental to crop yields, as shown in a Barley pot trial......Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility...

  17. Long-term groundwater contamination after source removal—The role of sorbed carbon and nitrogen on the rate of reoxygenation of a treated-wastewater plume on Cape Cod, MA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Barber, Larry B.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of groundwater contamination can remain long after a contaminant source has been removed. Documentation of natural aquifer recoveries and empirical tools to predict recovery time frames and associated geochemical changes are generally lacking. This study characterized the long-term natural attenuation of a groundwater contaminant plume in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, after the removal of the treated-wastewater source. Although concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other soluble constituents have decreased substantially in the 15 years since the source was removed, the core of the plume remains anoxic and has sharp redox gradients and elevated concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. Aquifer sediment was collected from near the former disposal site at several points in time and space along a 0.5-km-long transect extending downgradient from the disposal site and analyses of the sediment was correlated with changes in plume composition. Total sediment carbon content was generally low (rates in laboratory incubations, which ranged from 11.6 to 44.7 nmol (g dry wt)− 1 day− 1. Total water extractable organic carbon was groundwater velocity. This suggests that the total sorbed carbon pool is large relative to the rate of oxygen entrainment and will be impacting groundwater geochemistry for many decades. This has implications for long-term oxidation of reduced constituents, such as ammonium, that are being transported downgradient away from the infiltration beds toward surface and coastal discharge zones.

  18. Experimental and molecular dynamics study on the inhibition performance of some nitrogen containing compounds for iron corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study for the adsorption of three benzimidazole derivatives and their inhibition characteristics was studied using chemical (weight loss) and electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS). Electrochemical measurements results revealed that the inhibition efficiencies increased with the concentration of inhibitors. Results obtained from weight loss, dc polarization and ac impedance measurements are in reasonably good agreement and show increased inhibitor efficiency with increasing inhibitor concentration. The molecular dynamics calculations showed that the higher the binding energy between the inhibitor and metal surface, the higher the inhibition efficiency. Also, the higher the adsorption energy, the higher the inhibition efficiency. The molecular dynamics study revealed that the benzimidazole ring as well as the side chain are the active sites in these inhibitors and they can absorb on Fe surface by donating electrons to Fe d-orbital.

  19. Isotope and chemical tracers in groundwater hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, C.; Stewart, M.K.; Morgenstern, U.; Trompetter, V.

    1999-01-01

    The course sessions cover: session 1, Fundamentals of stable and radioactive isotopes; session 2, Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in hydrology: background, examples, sampling strategy; session 3, Catchment studies using oxygen and hydrogen isotopes: background - the hydrologic water balance, evapotranspiration - the lion's share, runoff generation - new water/old water fractions, groundwater recharge - the crumbs; session 4, Isotopes in catchment hydrology: survey of applications, future developments; session 5, Applications of tritium in hydrology: background and measurement, interpretation, examples; session 6, Case studies using mixing models: Hutt Valley groundwater system, an extended mixing model for simulating tracer transport in the unsaturated zone; session 7, Groundwater dating using CFC concentrations: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 8, Groundwater dating with carbon-14: background, sampling and measurement, use and applications; session 9, NZ case studies: Tauranga warm springs, North Canterbury Plains groundwater; session 10, Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes: background and examples, biological applications of C-N-S isotopes; session 11, New developments in isotope hydrology: gas isotopes, compound specific applications, age dating of sediments etc; session 12, NZ case studies: North Canterbury Plains groundwater (continued), Waimea Plains groundwater. (author). refs., figs

  20. Groundwater environmental capacity and its evaluation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li Ting; Wu, Qiang; Ye, Chun He; Ye, Nan

    2010-10-01

    To date, no unified and acknowledged definition or well-developed evaluation index system of groundwater environment capacity can be found in the academia at home or abroad. The article explores the meaning of water environment capacity, and analyzes the environmental effects caused by the exploitation of groundwater resources. This research defines groundwater environmental capacity as a critical value in terms of time and space, according to which the groundwater system responds to the external influences within certain goal constraint. On the basis of observing the principles of being scientific, dominant, measurable, and applicable, six level 1 evaluation indexes and 11 constraint factors are established. Taking Jinan spring region for a case study, this research will adopt groundwater level and spring flow as constraint factors, and the allowable groundwater yield as the critical value of groundwater environmental capacity, prove the dynamic changeability and its indicating function of groundwater environmental capacity through calculation, and finally point out the development trends of researches on groundwater environmental capacity.

  1. Dynamic seasonal nitrogen cycling in response to anthropogenic N loading in a tropical catchment, Athi-Galana-Sabaki River, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, T. R.; Tamooh, F.; Ogwoka, B.; Teodoru, C.; Borges, A. V.; Darchambeau, F.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Athi-Galana-Sabaki (A-G-S) River catchment (Kenya), we present data constraining the sources, transit and transformation of multiple nitrogen (N) species as they flow through the A-G-S catchment (~47 000 km2). The data set was obtained in August-September 2011, November 2011, and April-May 2012, covering the dry season, short rain season and long rain season respectively. Release of (largely untreated) wastewater from the city of Nairobi had a profound impact on the biogeochemistry of the upper Athi River, leading to low dissolved oxygen (DO) saturation levels (36-67%), high ammonium (NH4+) concentrations (123-1193 μmol L-1), and high dissolved methane (CH4) concentrations (3765-6729 nmol L-1). Riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN; sum of NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-); nitrite was not measured) concentration at the most upstream site on the Athi River was highest during the dry season (1195 μmol L-1), while DIN concentration was an order of magnitude lower during the short and long rain seasons (212 and 193 μmol L-1, respectively). During the rain seasons, low water residence time led to relatively minimal in-stream N cycling prior to discharge to the ocean, whereas during the dry season we speculate that prolonged residence time creates two differences comparative to wet season, where (1) intense N cycling and removal of DIN is possible in the upper to mid-catchment and leads to significantly lower concentrations at the outlet during the dry season, and (2) as a result this leads to the progressive enrichment of 15N in the particulate N (PN) pool, highlighting the dominance of untreated wastewater as the prevailing source of riverine DIN. The rapid removal of NH4+ in the upper reaches during the dry season was accompanied by a quantitatively similar production of NO3- and nitrous oxide (N2O) downstream, pointing towards strong nitrification over this reach during the dry season. Nitrous oxide

  2. Characteristics and factors of groundwater contamination in Asian coastal megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M.; Onodera, S. I.; Jin, G.; Shimizu, Y.; Admajaya, F. T.

    2017-12-01

    For the sustainable use of groundwater resources for the future, it is important to conserve its quality as well as quantity. Especially in the developing megacities, land subsidence and groundwater pollution by several contaminants (e.g. nitrogen, trace metals and organic pollutants etc.) is one of a critical environmental problems, because of the intensive extraction of groundwater and huge amount of contaminant load derived from domestic wastewater as well as agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, the process of groundwater degradation, including depletion and contamination with urbanization, has not been examined well in the previous studies. In the present study, we aim to confirm the characteristics and factors of groundwater contamination in coastal Asian megacities such as Osaka and Jakarta. In Osaka, groundwater was used as a water resource during the period of rapid population increase before 1970, and consequently groundwater resources have been degraded. Hydraulic potential of groundwater has been recovered after the regulation for abstraction. However, it is still below sea level in the deeper aquifer (>20 m) of some regions, and higher Cl-, NH4+-N and PO43-P concentrations were detected in these regions. The results also suggest that shallower aquifer (>10 m) is influenced by infiltration of sewage to groundwater. In the Jakarta metropolitan area, current hydraulic potential is below sea level in because of prior excess abstraction of groundwater. As a result, the direction of groundwater flow is now downward in the coastal area. The distribution of Cl- and Mn concentration in groundwater suggests that the decline in hydraulic potential has caused the intrusion of seawater and shallow groundwater into deep groundwater. It implies an accumulation of contaminants in deep aquifers. On the other hands, NO3-N in groundwater is suggested to be attenuated by the processes of denitrification and dilution in the coastal area.

  3. The Impacts of Soil Fertility and Salinity on Soil Nitrogen Dynamics Mediated by the Soil Microbial Community Beneath the Halophytic Shrub Tamarisk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Chikae; Imada, Shogo; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Du, Sheng; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Tateno, Ryunosuke

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most common limiting nutrients for primary production in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil microbes transform organic N into inorganic N, which is available to plants, but soil microbe activity in drylands is sometimes critically suppressed by environmental factors, such as low soil substrate availability or high salinity. Tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) is a halophytic shrub species that is widely distributed in the drylands of China; it produces litter enriched in nutrients and salts that are thought to increase soil fertility and salinity under its crown. To elucidate the effects of tamarisks on the soil microbial community, and thus N dynamics, by creating "islands of fertility" and "islands of salinity," we collected soil samples from under tamarisk crowns and adjacent barren areas at three habitats in the summer and fall. We analyzed soil physicochemical properties, inorganic N dynamics, and prokaryotic community abundance and composition. In soils sampled beneath tamarisks, the N mineralization rate was significantly higher, and the prokaryotic community structure was significantly different, from soils sampled in barren areas, irrespective of site and season. Tamarisks provided suitable nutrient conditions for one of the important decomposers in the area, Verrucomicrobia, by creating "islands of fertility," but provided unsuitable salinity conditions for other important decomposers, Flavobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, by mitigating salt accumulation. However, the quantity of these decomposers tended to be higher beneath tamarisks, because they were relatively unaffected by the small salinity gradient created by the tamarisks, which may explain the higher N mineralization rate beneath tamarisks.

  4. Long-term time series of legume cycles in a seminatural montane grassland: evidence for nitrogen-driven grass dynamics?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Mayerová, Hana; Skálová, Hana; Hadincová, Věroslava; Pecháčková, Sylvie; Krahulec, František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 7 (2017), s. 1430-1440 ISSN 0269-8463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05506S; GA ČR GA13-17118S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : C : N ratio * legume selfinhibition * dynamic linear model Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 5.630, year: 2016

  5. Ash recycling to spruce and beech stands effects on nutrients, growth, nitrogen dynamics and carbon balance; Askaaterfoering till gran- och bokbestaand - effekter paa naering, tillvaext, kvaevedynamik och kolbalans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2006-03-15

    Ash recycling is an important part in a modern, sustainable forestry, especially in whole-tree harvest systems. Nutrients lost at harvest are returned to the forest with the wood-ash. In the project the effects of ash treatment on needle and leaf chemistry, tree growth, soil chemistry, soil water chemistry, and carbon and nitrogen dynamics were studied on 23 Norway spruce sites in south-western Sweden and in ten European beech sites in Scania, southern Sweden. On some of the sites there were previously established ash recycling experiments, but on a majority of the sites ash recycling was performed without experimental lay-out and ash and control plots were established afterwards. The most common dose was two tons of self hardened crushed wood-ash and two tons of Mg-lime. On average seven to eight years after ash recycling the results were 1. increased exchangeable stores of base cations in the soil in the beech and the spruce stands 2. increased base saturation in the beech and the spruce stands and increased BC/Al in the spruce stands 3. increased concentrations and ratios to N of P, Ca, Zn, and S in the needles, the increased P-values are especially important since P is close to or below deficiency levels in a majority of the spruce stands 4. decreased K-concentration in the beech leaves 5. increased tree growth with on average 14 % in the ash treated spruce stands compared to the control plots 6. increased carbon and nitrogen amounts in the biomass in the spruce stands 7. tendencies towards increased amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the soil in the beech stands and no effect in the soil in the spruce stands 8. increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, and SO{sub 4} and no effect on ANC in the soil water 9. no effect on potential net mineralization but increased potential nitrification rates 10. decreased concentration of nitrate in the soil water in the beech stands and no effect in the spruce stands 11. lower system N losses in the beech stands and possibly in the

  6. Comparison of DNDC and RZWQM2 for simulating hydrology and nitrogen dynamics in a corn-soybean system with a winter cover crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, R.; Smith, W.; Qi, Z.; Grant, B.; VanderZaag, A.

    2017-12-01

    Biophysical models are needed for assessing science-based mitigation options to improve the efficiency and sustainability of agricultural cropping systems. In order to account for trade-offs between environmental indicators such as GHG emissions, soil C change, and water quality it is important that models can encapsulate the complex array of interrelated biogeochemical processes controlling water, nutrient and energy flows in the agroecosystem. The Denitrification Decomposition (DNDC) model is one of the most widely used process-based models, and is arguably the most sophisticated for estimating GHG emissions and soil C&N cycling, however, the model simulates only simple cascade water flow. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of DNDC to a comprehensive water flow model, the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM2), to determine which processes in DNDC may be limiting and recommend improvements. Both models were calibrated and validated for simulating crop biomass, soil hydrology, and nitrogen loss to tile drains using detailed observations from a corn-soybean rotation in Iowa, with and without cover crops. Results indicated that crop yields, biomass and the annual estimation of nitrogen and water loss to tiles drains were well simulated by both models (NSE > 0.6 in all cases); however, RZWQM2 performed much better for simulating soil water content, and the dynamics of daily water flow (DNDC: NSE -0.32 to 0.28; RZWQM2: NSE 0.34 to 0.70) to tile drains. DNDC overestimated soil water content near the soil surface and underestimated it deeper in the profile which was presumably caused by the lack of a root distribution algorithm, the inability to simulate a heterogeneous profile and lack of a water table. We recommend these improvements along with the inclusion of enhanced water flow and a mechanistic tile drainage sub-model. The accurate temporal simulation of water and N strongly impacts several biogeochemical processes.

  7. Forage yield and nitrogen nutrition dynamics of warm-season native forage genotypes under two shading levels and in full sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Santiago Barro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The successful achievement of a highly productive understorey pasture in silvopastoral systems depends on the use of well-adapted forage genotypes, showing good agronomic performance and persistence under shading and grazing. In this study, the herbage dry matter yield (DMY and nitrogen nutrition dynamics were determined in three native warm-season grasses (Paspalum regnellii, Paspalum dilatatum and Paspalum notatum and a forage legume (Arachis pintoi under two shading levels compared with full sun. The experiment was conducted in the Campanha region, Bagé, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, during two evaluation cycles (2008/2009 and 2009/2010. Three shade cloth levels (0%, 50% and 80% of light restriction were applied to the forage genotypes in a split plot design, in which shading levels were the main plot and forage genotypes were the subplots, with three replications. P. regnellii showed the highest accumulated DMY (1500 and 1700 g m-2, respectively, for the first and second evaluation cycles at all shading levels and showed no DMY decreased under the heavy shade (80%. Average DMY over the four genotypes under the 50% shade level was higher or equal compared with full sun. Influence of rainfall was observed on the DMY performance of all genotypes: the positive effect of moderate shading (50% on P. dilatatum and P. notatum DMY was associated to a low soil water availability status. Increased shading level resulted in high nitrogen nutrition index values on grasses, in comparison with full sun. All genotypes performed well under the moderate shading level, but the DMY of both P. regnellii and P. dilatatum and the herbage N content in P. notatum and A. pintoi of all genotypes stood out, showing that those main genotypes are promising to grow in silvopastoral systems at the Campanha region in southern Brazil.

  8. Spatial Isotopic Characterization of Slovak Groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, P. P.; Sivo, A.; Breier, R.; Richtarikova, M. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Bratislava (Slovakia); Zenisova, Z. [Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Aggarwal, P. K.; Araguas Araguas, L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Isotope Hydrology Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    Zitny ostrov (Rye Island) in the south west of Slovakia is the largest groundwater reservoir in Central Europe (about 10 Gm{sup 3}). Groundwater contamination with radionuclides, heavy metals and organic compounds from the Danube River and local industrial and agricultural activities has recently been of great concern. Geostatistical analysis of experimental isotope data has been carried out with the aim of better understanding groundwater dynamics. For this purpose, spatial variations in the distribution of water isotopes and radiocarbon in the groundwater of Zitny ostrov have been evaluated. Subsurface water profiles showed enriched {delta}{sup 18}O levels at around 20 m water depth, and depleted values below 30 m, which are similar to those observed in the Danube River. The core of the subsurface {sup 14}C profiles represents contemporary groundwater with {sup 14}C values above 80 pMc. (author)

  9. Leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen dynamics and their relationship to lowland rice yield for site-specific paddy management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Gholizadeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimum rate and application timing of Nitrogen (N fertilizer are crucial in achieving a high yield in rice cultivation; however, conventional laboratory testing of plant nutrients is time-consuming and expensive. To develop a site-specific spatial variable rate application method to overcome the limitations of traditional techniques, especially in fields under a double-cropping system, this study focused on the relationship between Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD chlorophyll meter readings and N content in leaves during different growth stages to introduce the most suitable stage for assessment of crop N and prediction of rice yield. The SPAD readings and leaf N content were measured on the uppermost fully expanded leaf at panicle formation and booting stages. Grain yield was also measured at the end of the season. The analysis of variance, variogram, and kriging were calculated to determine the variability of attributes and their relationship, and finally, variability maps were created. Significant linear relationships were observed between attributes, with the same trends in different sampling dates; however, accuracy of semivariance estimation reduces with the growth stage. Results of the study also implied that there was a better relationship between rice leaf N content (R2 = 0.93, as well as yield (R2 = 0.81, with SPAD readings at the panicle formation stage. Therefore, the SPAD-based evaluation of N status and prediction of rice yield is more reliable on this stage rather than at the booting stage. This study proved that the application of SPAD chlorophyll meter paves the way for real-time paddy N management and grain yield estimation. It can be reliably exploited in precision agriculture of paddy fields under double-cropping cultivation to understand and control spatial variations. Keywords: Spatial variability, Non-invasive measurement, Precision farming, Decision support

  10. Simulating the effects of soil organic nitrogen and grazing on arctic tundra vegetation dynamics on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Qin; Epstein, Howard [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walker, Donald [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Sustainability of tundra vegetation under changing climate on the Yamal Peninsula, northwestern Siberia, home to the world's largest area of reindeer husbandry, is of crucial importance to the local native community. An integrated investigation is needed for better understanding of the effects of soils, climate change and grazing on tundra vegetation in the Yamal region. In this study we applied a nutrient-based plant community model-ArcVeg-to evaluate how two factors (soil organic nitrogen (SON) levels and grazing) interact to affect tundra responses to climate warming across a latitudinal climatic gradient on the Yamal Peninsula. Model simulations were driven by field-collected soil data and expected grazing patterns along the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT), within bioclimate subzones C (high arctic), D (northern low arctic) and E (southern low arctic). Plant biomass and NPP (net primary productivity) were significantly increased with warmer bioclimate subzones, greater soil nutrient levels and temporal climate warming, while they declined with higher grazing frequency. Temporal climate warming of 2 deg. C caused an increase of 665 g m{sup -2} in total biomass at the high SON site in subzone E, but only 298 g m{sup -2} at the low SON site. When grazing frequency was also increased, total biomass increased by only 369 g m{sup -2} at the high SON site in contrast to 184 g m{sup -2} at the low SON site in subzone E. Our results suggest that high SON can support greater plant biomass and plant responses to climate warming, while low SON and grazing may limit plant response to climate change. In addition to the first order factors (SON, bioclimate subzones, grazing and temporal climate warming), interactions among these significantly affect plant biomass and productivity in the arctic tundra and should not be ignored in regional scale studies.

  11. Simulating the effects of soil organic nitrogen and grazing on arctic tundra vegetation dynamics on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qin; Epstein, Howard; Walker, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability of tundra vegetation under changing climate on the Yamal Peninsula, northwestern Siberia, home to the world's largest area of reindeer husbandry, is of crucial importance to the local native community. An integrated investigation is needed for better understanding of the effects of soils, climate change and grazing on tundra vegetation in the Yamal region. In this study we applied a nutrient-based plant community model-ArcVeg-to evaluate how two factors (soil organic nitrogen (SON) levels and grazing) interact to affect tundra responses to climate warming across a latitudinal climatic gradient on the Yamal Peninsula. Model simulations were driven by field-collected soil data and expected grazing patterns along the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT), within bioclimate subzones C (high arctic), D (northern low arctic) and E (southern low arctic). Plant biomass and NPP (net primary productivity) were significantly increased with warmer bioclimate subzones, greater soil nutrient levels and temporal climate warming, while they declined with higher grazing frequency. Temporal climate warming of 2 deg. C caused an increase of 665 g m -2 in total biomass at the high SON site in subzone E, but only 298 g m -2 at the low SON site. When grazing frequency was also increased, total biomass increased by only 369 g m -2 at the high SON site in contrast to 184 g m -2 at the low SON site in subzone E. Our results suggest that high SON can support greater plant biomass and plant responses to climate warming, while low SON and grazing may limit plant response to climate change. In addition to the first order factors (SON, bioclimate subzones, grazing and temporal climate warming), interactions among these significantly affect plant biomass and productivity in the arctic tundra and should not be ignored in regional scale studies.

  12. Resource Utilization by Native and Invasive Earthworms and Their Effects on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Puerto Rican Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resource utilization by earthworms affects soil C and N dynamics and further colonization of invasive earthworms. By applying 13C-labeled Tabebuia heterophylla leaves and 15N-labeled Andropogon glomeratus grass, we investigated resource utilization by three earthworm species (invasive endogeic Pontoscolex corethrurus, native anecic Estherella sp, and native endogeic Onychochaeta borincana and their effects on soil C and N dynamics in Puerto Rican soils in a 22-day laboratory experiment. Changes of 13C/C and 15N/N in soils, earthworms, and microbial populations were analyzed to evaluate resource utilization by earthworms and their influences on C and N dynamics. Estherella spp. utilized the 13C-labeled litter; however, its utilization on the 13C-labeled litter reduced when cultivated with P. corethrurus and O. borincana. Both P. corethrurus and O. borincana utilized the 13C-labeled litter and 15C-labeled grass roots and root exudates. Pontoscolex corethrurus facilitated soil respiration by stimulating 13C-labeled microbial activity; however, this effect was suppressed possibly due to the changes in the microbial activities or community when coexisting with O. borincana. Increased soil N mineralization by individual Estherella spp. and O. borincana was reduced in the mixed-species treatments. The rapid population growth of P. corethrurus may increase competition pressure on food resources on the local earthworm community. The relevance of resource availability to the population growth of P. corethrurus and its significance as an invasive species is a topic in need of future research.

  13. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-06-30

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems.

  14. Nitrate in Danish groundwater during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B; Thorling, L; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater (see Figure 1). Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark...

  15. Estimates of Nutrient Loading by Ground-Water Discharge into the Lynch Cove Area of Hood Canal, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, F. William; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Reich, Christopher D.; Paulson, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    field investigations show that ground-water discharge into the Lynch Cove area of Hood Canal is highly dynamic and strongly affected by the large tidal range. In areas with a steep shoreline and steep hydraulic gradient, ground-water discharge is spatially concentrated in or near the intertidal zone, with increased discharge during low tide. Topographically flat areas with weak hydraulic gradients had more spatial variability, including larger areas of seawater recirculation and more widely dispersed discharge. Measured total-dissolved-nitrogen concentrations in ground water ranged from below detection limits to 2.29 milligrams per liter and the total load entering Lynch Cove was estimated to be approximately 98 ? 10.3 metric tons per year (MT/yr). This estimate is based on net freshwater seepage rates from Lee-type seepage meter measurements and can be compared to estimates derived from geochemical tracer mass balance estimates (radon and radium) of 231 to 749 MT/yr, and previous water-mass-balance estimates (14 to 47 MT/ yr). Uncertainty in these loading estimates is introduced by complex biogeochemical cycles of relevant nutrient species, the representativeness of measurement sites, and by energetic dynamics at the coastal aquifer-seawater interface caused by tidal forcing.

  16. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Most people think of groundwater as a resource, but it is also a useful indicator of climate variability and human impacts on the environment. Groundwater storage varies slowly relative to other non-frozen components of the water cycle, encapsulating long period variations and trends in surface meteorology. On seasonal to interannual timescales, groundwater is as dynamic as soil moisture, and it has been shown that groundwater storage changes have contributed to sea level variations. Groundwater monitoring well measurements are too sporadic and poorly assembled outside of the United States and a few other nations to permit direct global assessment of groundwater variability. However, observational estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the GRACE satellites largely represent groundwater storage variations on an interannual basis, save for high latitude/altitude (dominated by snow and ice) and wet tropical (surface water) regions. A figure maps changes in mean annual TWS from 2009 to 2010, based on GRACE, reflecting hydroclimatic conditions in 2010. Severe droughts impacted Russia and the Amazon, and drier than normal weather also affected the Indochinese peninsula, parts of central and southern Africa, and western Australia. Groundwater depletion continued in northern India, while heavy rains in California helped to replenish aquifers that have been depleted by drought and withdrawals for irrigation, though they are still below normal levels. Droughts in northern Argentina and western China similarly abated. Wet weather raised aquifer levels broadly across western Europe. Rains in eastern Australia caused flooding to the north and helped to mitigate a decade long drought in the south. Significant reductions in TWS seen in the coast of Alaska and the Patagonian Andes represent ongoing glacier melt, not groundwater depletion. Figures plot time series of zonal mean and global GRACE derived non-seasonal TWS anomalies (deviation from the mean of

  17. Assessment of seawater intrusion and nitrate contamination on the groundwater quality in the Korba coastal plain of Cap-Bon (North-east of Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zghibi, Adel; Tarhouni, Jamila; Zouhri, Lahcen

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, seawater intrusion and nitrate contamination of groundwater have become a growing concern for people in rural areas in Tunisia where groundwater is always used as drinking water. The coastal plain of Korba (north-east of Tunisia) is a typical area where the contamination of the aquifer in the form of saltwater intrusion and high nitrate concentrations is very developed and represents the major consequence of human activities. The objective of this study is to evaluate groundwater resource level, to determine groundwater quality and to assess the risk of NO3- pollution in groundwater using hydrogeochemical tools. Groundwater were sampled and analyzed for physic-chemical parameters: Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, NO3-, Total Dissolved Solid and of the physical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity and the temperature). The interpretation of the analytical results is shown numerically and graphically through the ionic deviations, Piper Diagram, seawater fractions and binary diagrams. Moreover, electrical conductivity investigations have been used to identify the location of the major intrusion plumes in this coastal area and to obtain new information on the spatial scales and dynamics of the fresh water-seawater interface. Those processes can be used as indicators of seawater intrusion progression. First, the hydrogeochemical investigation of this aquifer reveals the major sources of contamination, represented by seawater intrusion. Thus, the intensive extraction of groundwater from aquifer reduces freshwater outflow to the sea, creates several drawdown cones and lowering of the water table to as much as 12 m below mean sea level in the center part of the study area especially between Diarr El Hojjej and Tafelloun villages, causing seawater migration inland and rising toward the wells. Moreover, the results of this study revealed the presence of direct cation exchange linked to seawater intrusion and dissolution processes associated with

  18. Distribution and dynamics of nitrogen and microbial plankton in southern Lake Michigan during spring transition 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Wayne S.; Lavrentyev, Peter J.; Cavaletto, Joann F.; McCarthy, Mark J.; Eadie, Brian J.; Johengen, Thomas H.; Cotner, James B.

    2004-03-01

    Ammonium and amino acid fluxes were examined as indicators of N and microbial food web dynamics in southern Lake Michigan during spring. Either 15NH4+ or a mixture of 15N-labelled amino acids (both at 4 μM N final concentration) was added to Lake Michigan water. Net fluxes were measured over 24 h under natural light and dark conditions using deck-top incubators and compared to microbial food web characteristics. Isotope dilution experiments showed similar light and dark NH4+ regeneration rates at lake (6 versus 5 nM N h-1) and river-influenced (20 versus 24 nM N h-1) sites. Ammonium uptake rates were similar to regeneration rates in dark bottles. Dark uptake (attributed mainly to bacteria) accounted for ˜70% of total uptake (bacteria plus phytoplankton) in the light at most lake sites but only ˜30% of total uptake at river-influenced sites in or near the St. Joseph River mouth (SJRM). Cluster analysis grouped stations having zero, average, or higher than average N-cycling rates. Discriminant analysis indicated that chlorophyll concentration, oligotrich ciliate biomass, and total P concentration could explain 66% of N-cycling rate variation on average. Heterotrophic bacterial N demand was about one third of the NH4+ regeneration rate. Results suggest that, with the exception of SJRM stations, bacterial uptake and protist grazing mediated much of the N dynamics during spring transition. Since NH4+ is more available to bacteria than NO3-, regenerated NH4+ may have a strong influence on spring, lake biochemical energetics by enhancing N-poor organic matter degradation in this NO3- -replete ecosystem.

  19. Molecular diffusion in monolayer and submonolayer nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    2001-01-01

    The orientational and translational motions in a monolayer fluid of physisorbed molecular nitrogen are treated using molecular dynamics simulations. Dynamical response functions and several approximations to the coefficient of translational diffusion are determined for adsorption on the basal plane...

  20. Simulation of Long-Term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Grassland-Based Dairy Farming Systems to Evaluate Mitigation Strategies for Nutrient Losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Abbas Shah

    Full Text Available Many measures have been proposed to mitigate gaseous emissions and other nutrient losses from agroecosystems, which can have large detrimental effects for the quality of soils, water and air, and contribute to eutrophication and global warming. Due to complexities in farm management, biological interactions and emission measurements, most experiments focus on analysis of short-term effects of isolated mitigation practices. Here we present a model that allows simulating long-term effects at the whole-farm level of combined measures related to grassland management, animal housing and manure handling after excretion, during storage and after field application. The model describes the dynamics of pools of organic carbon and nitrogen (N, and of inorganic N, as affected by farm management in grassland-based dairy systems. We assessed the long-term effects of delayed grass mowing, housing type (cubicle and sloping floor barns, resulting in production of slurry and solid cattle manure, respectively, manure additives, contrasting manure storage methods and irrigation after application of covered manure. Simulations demonstrated that individually applied practices often result in compensatory loss pathways. For instance, methods to reduce ammonia emissions during storage like roofing or covering of manure led to larger losses through ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching or denitrification after application, unless extra measures like irrigation were used. A strategy of combined management practices of delayed mowing and fertilization with solid cattle manure that is treated with zeolite, stored under an impermeable sheet and irrigated after application was effective to increase soil carbon stocks, increase feed self-sufficiency and reduce losses by ammonia volatilization and soil N losses. Although long-term datasets (>25 years of farm nutrient dynamics and loss flows are not available to validate the model, the model is firmly based on knowledge of

  1. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Human activities have greatly altered the global nitrogen cycle and these changes are apparent in water quality, air quality, ecosystem and human health. However, the relative magnitude of the sources of new reactive nitrogen and the fate of this nitrogen is not well established. Further, the biogeochemical aspects of the nitrogen cycle are often studied in isolation from the economic and social implications of all the transformations of nitrogen. The California Nitrogen Assessment is an interdisciplinary project whose aim is evaluating the current state of nitrogen science, practice, and policy in the state of California. Because of the close proximity of large population centers, highly productive and diverse agricultural lands and significant acreage of undeveloped land, California is a particularly interesting place for this analysis. One component of this assessment is developing a mass balance of nitrogen as well as identifying gaps in knowledge and quantifying uncertainty. The main inputs of new reactive nitrogen to the state are 1) synthetic nitrogen fertilizer, 2) biological nitrogen fixation, and 3) atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Permanent losses of nitrogen include 1) gaseous losses (N2, N2O, NHx, NOy), 2) riverine discharge, 3) wastewater discharge to the ocean, and 4) net groundwater recharge. A final term is the balance of food, feed, and fiber to support the human and animal populations. The largest input of new reactive nitrogen to California is nitrogen fertilizer, but both nitrogen fixation and atmospheric deposition contribute significantly. Non-fertilizer uses, such as the production of nylon and polyurethane, constitutes about 5% of the synthetic N synthesized production. The total nitrogen fixation in California is roughly equivalent on the 400,000 ha of alfalfa and the approximately 40 million ha of natural lands. In addition, even with highly productive agricultural lands, the large population of livestock, in particular dairy cows

  2. Global scale analysis and evaluation of an improved mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the Community Land Model (CLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.; Randerson, J. T.; Mu, M.; Kattge, J.; Rogers, A.; Reich, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However mechanistic representation of nitrogen uptake linked to root traits, and functional nitrogen allocation among different leaf enzymes involved in respiration and photosynthesis is currently lacking in Earth System models. The linkage between nitrogen availability and plant productivity is simplistically represented by potential photosynthesis rates, and is subsequently downregulated depending on nitrogen supply and other nitrogen consumers in the model (e.g., nitrification). This type of potential photosynthesis rate calculation is problematic for several reasons. Firstly, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate. Secondly, there is considerable subjectivity on the meaning of potential photosynthesis rates. Thirdly, there exists lack of understanding on modeling these potential photosynthesis rates in a changing climate. In addition to model structural issues in representing photosynthesis rates, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition have been largely ignored in Earth System models. For example, in CLM4.5, nitrogen uptake is linked to leaf level processes (e.g., primarily productivity) rather than root scale process involved in nitrogen uptake. We present a new plant model for CLM with an improved mechanistic presentation of plant nitrogen uptake based on root scale Michaelis Menten kinetics, and stronger linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity by inferring relationships observed in global databases of plant traits (including the TRY database and several individual studies). We also incorporate improved representation of plant nitrogen leaf allocation, especially in tropical regions where significant over-prediction of plant growth and productivity in CLM4.5 simulations exist. We evaluate our improved global model simulations using the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) framework. We conclude that

  3. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  4. Actively heated high-resolution fiber-optic-distributed temperature sensing to quantify streambed flow dynamics in zones of strong groundwater upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Buckley, Sean F.; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Werkema, Dale D.; Lane, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Zones of strong groundwater upwelling to streams enhance thermal stability and moderate thermal extremes, which is particularly important to aquatic ecosystems in a warming climate. Passive thermal tracer methods used to quantify vertical upwelling rates rely on downward conduction of surface temperature signals. However, moderate to high groundwater flux rates (>−1.5 m d−1) restrict downward propagation of diurnal temperature signals, and therefore the applicability of several passive thermal methods. Active streambed heating from within high-resolution fiber-optic temperature sensors (A-HRTS) has the potential to define multidimensional fluid-flux patterns below the extinction depth of surface thermal signals, allowing better quantification and separation of local and regional groundwater discharge. To demonstrate this concept, nine A-HRTS were emplaced vertically into the streambed in a grid with ∼0.40 m lateral spacing at a stream with strong upward vertical flux in Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA. Long-term (8–9 h) heating events were performed to confirm the dominance of vertical flow to the 0.6 m depth, well below the extinction of ambient diurnal signals. To quantify vertical flux, short-term heating events (28 min) were performed at each A-HRTS, and heat-pulse decay over vertical profiles was numerically modeled in radial two dimension (2-D) using SUTRA. Modeled flux values are similar to those obtained with seepage meters, Darcy methods, and analytical modeling of shallow diurnal signals. We also observed repeatable differential heating patterns along the length of vertically oriented sensors that may indicate sediment layering and hyporheic exchange superimposed on regional groundwater discharge.

  5. Groundwater flow, nutrient, and stable isotope dynamics in the parafluvial-hyporheic zone of the regulated Lower Colorado River (Texas, USA) over the course of a small flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briody, Alyse C.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Shuai, Pin; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2016-06-01

    Periodic releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Lower Colorado River near Austin, Texas, USA. These daily pulses modulate fluid exchange and residence times in the hyporheic zone where biogeochemical reactions are typically pronounced. The effects of a small flood pulse under low-flow conditions on surface-water/groundwater exchange and biogeochemical processes were studied by monitoring and sampling from two dense transects of wells perpendicular to the river. The first transect recorded water levels and the second transect was used for water sample collection at three depths. Samples were collected from 12 wells every 2 h over a 24-h period which had a 16-cm flood pulse. Analyses included nutrients, carbon, major ions, and stable isotopes of water. The relatively small flood pulse did not cause significant mixing in the parafluvial zone. Under these conditions, the river and groundwater were decoupled, showed potentially minimal mixing at the interface, and did not exhibit any discernible denitrification of river-borne nitrate. The chemical patterns observed in the parafluvial zone can be explained by evaporation of groundwater with little mixing with river water. Thus, large pulses may be necessary in order for substantial hyporheic mixing and exchange to occur. The large regulated river under a low-flow and small flood pulse regime functioned mainly as a gaining river with little hydrologic connectivity beyond a narrow hyporheic zone.

  6. Effect of different levels of nitrogen fertilizer on yield and quality of sugar beet Beta vulgaris irrigated with saline groundwater (fertigation and surface irrigation) and grown under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janat, M.

    2009-07-01

    In a field experiment Sugar beet Beta vulgaris was grown as a spring crop during the growing seasons of 2004 and 2006, in salt affected soil, previously planted with sesbania and barley (2005 and 2003) to evaluate the response of sugar beet to two irrigation methods, (drip fertigation and surface irrigation), different levels of nitrogen fertilizer and its effect on yield and quality. Different rates of nitrogen fertilizers (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg N/ ha) as urea (46% N) were injected for drip irrigation or broadcasted for the surface-irrigated treatments in four equally split applications. The 15 N labelled urea was applied to sub-plots of 1.0 m 2 in each experimental unit in a manner similar to that of unlabeled urea. Irrigation scheduling was carried out using the direct method of neutron scattering technique. Sugar beet was irrigated when soil moisture in the upper 25 cm was 80% of the field capacity (FC) and such practice continued until the six leaf stage. From the latter stage until harvest, sugar beet was irrigated when soil moisture in the upper 50 cm reached 80% of the FC. The amount of irrigation water applied, electrical conductivity of the soil paste, dry matter and fresh roots yield, total nitrogen uptake and N derived from fertilizer were also determined. Furthermore, Nitrogen use as well as water use-efficiencies for dry matter and roots yield were also calculated. Results revealed that sugar beets and dry matter yield increased with increasing N input up to 100-150 kg N/ha which was indicated by the higher dry matter yield, and sugar beet yield. Sugar percentage was also increased relative to the average percentage recorded in Syria. Crop water use efficiencies, for both the drip-fertigated and surface-irrigated treatments were increased in most cases with increasing rate of nitrogen fertilizer. During the course of this study, small increases in soil salinity under both irrigation methods were observed. Higher increases in soil salinity was

  7. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination in alluvial fan of Eastern Kofu basin, JAPAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.

    2009-12-01

    Agriculture has significant effects on the rate and composition of groundwater recharge. The chemical loading into groundwater have been dominated by the constituents derived directly or indirectly from agricultural practices and additives. The contamination of groundwater with nitrate is a major public health and environmental concern around the world. The inorganic constituents like, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42-, Cl- and variety of other minor elements of groundwater are often used as agricultural additives; and the natural occurrence of these elements are dominated by the agricultural sources. A recent study has reported that Kofu basin groundwater aquifer is contaminated by nitrate from agricultural areas because of the fertilizer application for the orchard (Kazama and Yoneyama, 2002; Sakamoto et al., 1997, Nakamura et al., 2007). The water-oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope (δ18O and δD) and nitrate-nitrogen stable isotope (δ15N) of groundwater, river water and precipitation samples were investigated to identify the source of groundwater and nitrate nitrogen contamination in groundwater in the Fuefukigawa and Hikawa_Kanegawa alluvial fans in Kofu basin. The plot of δD versus δ18O values of groundwater, river water and precipitation samples suggest that the groundwater is a mixture of precipitation and river water. And nitrate-nitrogen isotope values have suggested the nitrate contamination of groundwater is from agricultural area. The study revealed positive correlation between groundwater δ18O values and NO3-, Cl-, SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+ concentration, which shows the agricultural contamination is carried by the recharge of groundwater from precipitation in alluvial fan. Whereas, NO3-, Cl-, SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+ are diluted by the river water recharges. This study showed the quality of groundwater is resulted from the mixing of water from the different source during the groundwater recharge in the study area. References Kazama F, Yoneyama M (2002) Nitrogen generation

  8. Groundwater Managment Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset outlines the location of the five Groundwater Management Districts in Kansas. GMDs are locally formed and elected boards for regional groundwater...

  9. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Inge; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays a vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater storage provides a large natural buffer against water shortage and sustains flows to rivers and wetlands, supporting ecosystem habitats and biodiversity. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, although it is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle. Thus, a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system that allows for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows is essential for GHMs that increasingly run at finer resolution. In this study we present a global groundwater model with a resolution of 5 arc-minutes (approximately 10 km at the equator) using MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988). With this global groundwater model we eventually intend to simulate the changes in the groundwater system over time that result from variations in recharge and abstraction. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps and datasets (Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2013), combined with our estimate of aquifer thickness for sedimentary basins. We forced the groundwater model with the output from the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. For the parameterization, we relied entirely on available global datasets and did not calibrate the model so that it can equally be expanded to data poor environments. Based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run the model with various hydrogeological parameter settings, we observed that most variance in groundwater

  10. Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a coupled modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrates the value of a coupled chemical transport modeling system for investigating groundwater nitrate contamination responses associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer application and increased corn production. The coupled Community Multiscale Air Quality Bidirect...

  11. Rational Exploitation and Utilizing of Groundwater in Jiangsu Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, B.; Lin, X.

    2017-12-01

    Jiangsu coastal area is located in the southeast coast of China, where is a new industrial base and an important coastal and Land Resources Development Zone of China. In the areas with strong human exploitation activities, regional groundwater evolution is obviously affected by human activities. In order to solve the environmental geological problems caused by groundwater exploitation fundamentally, we must find out the forming conditions of regional groundwater hydrodynamic field, and the impact of human activities on groundwater hydrodynamic field evolution and hydrogeochemical evolition. Based on these results, scientific management and reasonable exploitation of the regional groundwater resources can be provided for the utilization. Taking the coastal area of Jiangsu as the research area, we investigate and analyze of the regional hydrogeological conditions. The numerical simulation model of groundwater flow was established according to the water power, chemical and isotopic methods, the conditions of water flow and the influence of hydrodynamic field on the water chemical field. We predict the evolution of regional groundwater dynamics under the influence of human activities and climate change and evaluate the influence of groundwater dynamic field evolution on the environmental geological problems caused by groundwater exploitation under various conditions. We get the following conclusions: Three groundwater exploitation optimal schemes were established. The groundwater salinization was taken as the primary control condition. The substitution model was proposed to model groundwater exploitation and water level changes by BP network method.Then genetic algorithm was used to solve the optimization solution. Three groundwater exploitation optimal schemes were submit to local water resource management. The first sheme was used to solve the groundwater salinization problem. The second sheme focused on dual water supply. The third sheme concerned on emergency water

  12. Can nitrate contaminated groundwater be remediated by optimizing flood irrigation rate with high nitrate water in a desert oasis using the WHCNS model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Qi, Zhiming; Hu, Kelin; Prasher, Shiv O; Zhang, Yuanpei

    2016-10-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is an environmental concern in intensively cultivated desert oases where this polluted groundwater is in turn used as a major irrigation water resource. However, nitrate fluxes from root zone to groundwater are difficult to monitor in this complex system. The objectives of this study were to validate and apply the WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) model to simulate water drainage and nitrate leaching under different irrigation and nitrogen (N) management practices, and to assess the utilization of groundwater nitrate as an approach to remediate nitrate contaminated groundwater while maintain crop yield. A two-year field experiment was conducted in a corn field irrigated with high nitrate groundwater (20 mg N L(-1)) in Alxa, Inner Mongolia, China. The experiment consisted of two irrigation treatments (Istd, standard, 750 mm per season; Icsv, conservation, 570 mm per season) factorially combined with two N fertilization treatments (Nstd, standard, 138 kg ha(-1); Ncsv, conservation, 92 kg ha(-1)). The validated results showed that the WHCNS model simulated values of crop dry matter, yield, soil water content and soil N concentration in soil profile all agreed well with the observed values. Compared to the standard water management (Istd), the simulated drainage and nitrate leaching decreased about 65% and 59%, respectively, under the conservation water management (Icsv). Nearly 55% of input N was lost by leaching under the IstdNstd and IstdNcsv treatments, compared to only 26% under the IcsvNstd and IcsvNcsv treatments. Simulations with more than 240 scenarios combing different levels of irrigation and fertilization indicated that irrigation was the main reason leading to the high risk of nitrate leaching, and the nitrate in irrigation groundwater can be best utilized without corn yield loss when the total irrigation was reduced from the current 750 mm to 491 mm. This reduced irrigation rate facilitated

  13. Potassium adsorption ratios as an indicator for the fate of agricultural potassium in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fertilization of agricultural land in groundwater infiltration areas often causes deterioration of groundwater quality. In addition to nitrogen and phosphorous, potassium deserves attention. The fate of potassium in the subsurface is controlled mainly by cation-exchange. Use of the Potassium

  14. Modelling impacts of acid deposition and groundwater level on habitat quality and plant species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, J.; Mol, J.P.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Reinds, G.J.; Hinsberg, van A.; Vries, de W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction
    We quantified the effects of the site factors pH and nitrate (NO3) concentration in soil solution and groundwater level on the vegetation of terrestrial ecosystems for the Netherlands in response to changes in atmospheric nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) deposition and groundwater level

  15. The sweet side of global change-dynamic responses of non-structural carbohydrates to drought, elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization in tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibin; Hartmann, Henrik; Adams, Henry D; Zhang, Hongxia; Jin, Changjie; Zhao, Chuanyan; Guan, Dexin; Wang, Anzhi; Yuan, Fenghui; Wu, Jiabing

    2018-06-11

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) play a central role in plant functioning as energy carriers and building blocks for primary and secondary metabolism. Many studies have investigated how environmental and anthropogenic changes, like increasingly frequent and severe drought episodes, elevated CO2 and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, influence NSC concentrations in individual trees. However, this wealth of data has not been analyzed yet to identify general trends using a common statistical framework. A thorough understanding of tree responses to global change is required for making realistic predictions of vegetation dynamics. Here we compiled data from 57 experimental studies on 71 tree species and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate general responses of stored soluble sugars, starch and total NSC (soluble sugars + starch) concentrations in different tree organs (foliage, above-ground wood and roots) to drought, elevated CO2 and N deposition. We found that drought significantly decreased total NSC in roots (-17.3%), but not in foliage and above-ground woody tissues (bole, branch, stem and/or twig). Elevated CO2 significantly increased total NSC in foliage (+26.2%) and roots (+12.8%), but not in above-ground wood. By contrast, total NSC significantly decreased in roots (-17.9%), increased in above-ground wood (+6.1%), but was unaffected in foliage from N fertilization. In addition, the response of NSC to three global change drivers was strongly affected by tree taxonomic type, leaf habit, tree age and treatment intensity. Our results pave the way for a better understanding of general tree function responses to drought, elevated CO2 and N fertilization. The existing data also reveal that more long-term studies on mature trees that allow testing interactions between these factors are urgently needed to provide a basis for forecasting tree responses to environmental change at the global scale.

  16. Influence of nitrogen additions on litter decomposition, nutrient dynamics, and enzymatic activity of two plant species in a peatland in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanyu; Song, Changchun; Ren, Jiusheng; Tan, Wenwen; Jin, Shaofei; Jiang, Lei

    2018-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability affects litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics, especially in N-limited ecosystems. We investigated the response of litter decomposition to N additions in Eriophorum vaginatum and Vaccinium uliginosum peatlands. These two species dominate peatlands in Northeast China. In 2012, mesh bags containing senesced leaf litter of Eriophorum vaginatum and Vaccinium uliginosum were placed in N addition plots and sprayed monthly for two years with NH 4 NO 3 solution at dose rates of 0, 6, 12, and 24gNm -2 year -1 (CK, N1, N2 and N3, respectively). Mass loss, N and phosphorus (P) content, and enzymatic activity were measured over time as litter decomposed. In the control plots, V. uliginosum litter decomposed faster than E. vaginatum litter. N1, N2, and N3 treatments increased the mass losses of V. uliginosum litter by 6%, 9%, and 4% respectively, when compared with control. No significant influence of N additions was found on the decomposition of E. vaginatum litter. However, N and P content in E. vaginatum litter and V. uliginosum litter significantly increased with N additions. Moreover, N additions significantly promoted invertase and β-glucosidase activity in E. vaginatum and V. uliginosum litter. However, only in V. uliginosum litter was polyphenol oxidase activity significantly enhanced. Our results showed that initial litter quality and polyphenol oxidase activity influence the response of plant litter to N additions in peatland ecosystems. Increased N availability may change peatland soil N and P cycling by enhancing N and P immobilization during litter decomposition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An isotopic view of water and nitrate transport through the vadose zone in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley's Groundwater Management Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J. R.; Pearlstein, S.; Hutchins, S.; Faulkner, B. R.; Rugh, W.; Willard, K.; Coulombe, R.; Compton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate contamination affects thousands of households in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley and many more across the USA. The southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area (GWMA) was established in 2004 due to nitrate levels in the groundwater exceeding the human health standard of 10 mg nitrate-N L-1. Much of the nitrogen (N) inputs to the GWMA comes from agricultural fertilizers, and thus efforts to reduce N inputs to groundwater are focused upon improving N management. However, the effectiveness of these improvements on groundwater quality is unclear because of the complexity of nutrient transport through the vadose zone and long groundwater residence times. Our objective was to focus on vadose zone transport and understand the dynamics and timing of N and water movement below the rooting zone in relation to N management and water inputs. Stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking water movement, and understanding N transformations. In partnership with local farmers and state agencies, we established lysimeters and groundwater wells in multiple agricultural fields in the GWMA, and have monitored nitrate, nitrate isotopes, and water isotopes weekly for multiple years. Our results indicate that vadose zone transport is highly complex, and the residence time of water collected in lysimeters was much longer than expected. While input precipitation water isotopes were highly variable over time, lysimeter water isotopes were surprisingly consistent, more closely resembling long-term precipitation isotope means rather than recent precipitation isotopic signatures. However, some particularly large precipitation events with unique isotopic signatures revealed high spatial variability in transport, with some lysimeters showing greater proportions of recent precipitation inputs than others. In one installation where we have groundwater wells and lysimeters at multiple depths, nitrate/nitrite concentrations decreased with depth. N concentrations

  18. Chronic groundwater decline: A multi-decadal analysis of groundwater trends under extreme climate cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocque, Andrew F.; Kath, Jarrod; Reardon-Smith, Kathryn

    2018-06-01

    Chronic groundwater decline is a concern in many of the world's major agricultural areas. However, a general lack of accurate long-term in situ measurement of groundwater depth and analysis of trends prevents understanding of the dynamics of these systems at landscape scales. This is particularly worrying in the context of future climate uncertainties. This study examines long-term groundwater responses to climate variability in a major agricultural production landscape in southern Queensland, Australia. Based on records for 381 groundwater bores, we used a modified Mann-Kendall non-parametric test and Sen's slope estimator to determine groundwater trends across a 26-year period (1989-2015) and in distinct wet and dry climatic phases. Comparison of trends between climatic phases showed groundwater level recovery during wet phases was insufficient to offset the decline in groundwater level from the previous dry phase. Across the entire 26-year sampling period, groundwater bore levels (all bores) showed an overall significant declining trend (p 0.05). Spatially, both declining and rising bores were highly clustered. We conclude that over 1989-2015 there is a significant net decline in groundwater levels driven by a smaller subset of highly responsive bores in high irrigation areas within the catchment. Despite a number of targeted policy interventions, chronic groundwater decline remains evident in the catchment. We argue that this is likely to continue and to occur more widely under potential climate change and that policy makers, groundwater users and managers need to engage in planning to ensure the sustainability of this vital resource.

  19. Study of groundwater colloids and their ability to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjus, K.; Wikberg, P.

    1987-03-01

    Natural occurring colloids in groundwater can adsorb and transport released radionuclides. In this work groundwater colloids have been investigated with zeta potential measurements and dynamic light scattering. The goal was i) to estimate the detection limits of the Institute's equipment for particle size estimation with dynamic light scattering and zeta potential with dynamic light scattering combined with estimation of Doppler shift in the scattered light frequency; ii) to examine several different groundwaters (Stripa, Kamlunge, Svartboberget). The possibility to apply a theoretical adsorption model for interpreting the results is also discussed. (orig.)

  20. 137Cs tracing dynamics of soil erosion, organic carbon and nitrogen in sloping farmland converted from original grassland in Tibetan plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Xiaojun; Wang Xiaodan; Liu Suzhen; Gu Shixian; Liu Haijun

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of research concerning the relationships between land-use change, soil erosion, and soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in alpine environments such as those found in the Tibetan plateau. In this paper, typical sloping farmlands converted from grassland 50 years ago in eastern Tibet were selected to determine dynamics of soil erosion, SOC, and total N associated with land-use change. Soil samples were collected from sloping farmland and control fields (grassland). The 137 Cs, SOC, total N contents, and soil particle size fractions were analyzed in these samples. As compared with the control fields, 137 Cs, SOC, and total N inventories in the sloping farmlands decreased by 30%, 27%, and 33%, respectively. Meanwhile variations in the three parameters were enhanced in the sloping farmlands, with coefficients of variation (CVs) of 38%, 23%, and 20%, respectively, for 37 Cs, SOC, and total N. In addition, SOC and total N inventories significantly decreased with increasing soil erosion in the sloping farmland. In a sloping farmland with a steep 24 o gradient, the 137 Cs inventory gradually increased along a downslope transect with its lowest value at 0 Bq m -2 in the top-slope position (0 m). The soil clay ( 137 Cs and clay (r=0.92, p=0.003), SOC (r=0.96, p=0.001), or total N (r=0.95, p=0.001) were also found in the farmland. These results showed that converting alpine grassland to sloping farmland accelerates soil erosion, losses in SOC and N, and increases the soil's spatial variability. The combined impacts of tillage and water erosion contributed a significant decrease in the soil's organic carbon and N storages. Particularly in steep sloping farmlands, tillage erosion contributed for severe soil loss, but the soil redistribution pattern was dominated by water erosion, not tillage erosion, due to the lack of boundaries across the field patches. It was also found that 137 Cs, SOC, and total N moved along the same pathway within these

  1. {sup 137}Cs tracing dynamics of soil erosion, organic carbon and nitrogen in sloping farmland converted from original grassland in Tibetan plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Xiaojun, E-mail: niexj2005@126.co [School of Surveying and Land Information Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Wang Xiaodan; Liu Suzhen; Gu Shixian [Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Conservation, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Haijun [Institute of Water Resources Planning, Surveying, Design, and Research, Lhasa 850000 (China)

    2010-09-15

    There is a shortage of research concerning the relationships between land-use change, soil erosion, and soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in alpine environments such as those found in the Tibetan plateau. In this paper, typical sloping farmlands converted from grassland 50 years ago in eastern Tibet were selected to determine dynamics of soil erosion, SOC, and total N associated with land-use change. Soil samples were collected from sloping farmland and control fields (grassland). The {sup 137}Cs, SOC, total N contents, and soil particle size fractions were analyzed in these samples. As compared with the control fields, {sup 137}Cs, SOC, and total N inventories in the sloping farmlands decreased by 30%, 27%, and 33%, respectively. Meanwhile variations in the three parameters were enhanced in the sloping farmlands, with coefficients of variation (CVs) of 38%, 23%, and 20%, respectively, for {sup 37}Cs, SOC, and total N. In addition, SOC and total N inventories significantly decreased with increasing soil erosion in the sloping farmland. In a sloping farmland with a steep 24{sup o} gradient, the {sup 137}Cs inventory gradually increased along a downslope transect with its lowest value at 0 Bq m{sup -2} in the top-slope position (0 m). The soil clay (<0.002 mm) content in such an area increased with decreasing elevation (r=-0.95, p=0.001). Significant correlations between {sup 137}Cs and clay (r=0.92, p=0.003), SOC (r=0.96, p=0.001), or total N (r=0.95, p=0.001) were also found in the farmland. These results showed that converting alpine grassland to sloping farmland accelerates soil erosion, losses in SOC and N, and increases the soil's spatial variability. The combined impacts of tillage and water erosion contributed a significant decrease in the soil's organic carbon and N storages. Particularly in steep sloping farmlands, tillage erosion contributed for severe soil loss, but the soil redistribution pattern was dominated by water erosion

  2. Biochar from swine manure solids: influence on carbon sequestration and Olsen phosphorus and mineral nitrogen dynamics in soil with and without digestate incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Marchetti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in biochar (BC has grown dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the fact that its incorporation into soil reportedly enhances carbon sequestration and fertility. Currently, BC types most under investigation are those obtained from organic matter (OM of plant origin. As great amounts of manure solids are expected to become available in the near future, thanks to the development of technologies for the separation of the solid fraction of animal effluents, processing of manure solids for BC production seems an interesting possibility for the recycling of OM of high nutrient value. The aim of this study was to investigate carbon (C sequestration and nutrient dynamics in soil amended with BC from dried swine manure solids. The experiment was carried out in laboratory microcosms on a silty clay soil. The effect on nutrient dynamics of interaction between BC and fresh digestate obtained from a biogas plant was also investigated to test the hypothesis that BC can retain nutrients. A comparison was made of the following treatments: soil amended with swine manure solids (LC, soil amended with charred swine manure solids (LT, soil amended with wood chip (CC, soil amended with charred wood chip (CT, soil with no amendment as control (Cs, each one of them with and without incorporation of digestate (D for a total of 10 treatments. Biochar was obtained by treating OM (wood chip or swine manure with moisture content of less than 10% at 420°C in anoxic conditions. The CO2-C release and organic C, available phosphorus (P (Olsen P, POls and inorganic (ammonium+nitrate nitrogen (N (Nmin contents at the start and three months after the start of the experiment were measured in the amended and control soils. After three months of incubation at 30°C, the CO2-C emissions from soil with BC (CT and LT, ±D were the same as those in the control soil (Cs and were lower than those in the soils with untreated amendments (CC and LC, ±D. The organic C content

  3. DOE groundwater protection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, S.

    1988-01-01

    EH is developing a DOE-wide Groundwater Quality Protection Strategy to express DOE's commitment to the protection of groundwater quality at or near its facilities. This strategy responds to a September 1986 recommendation of the General Accounting Office. It builds on EPA's August 1984 Ground-Water Protection Strategy, which establishes a classification system designed to protect groundwater according to its value and vulnerability. The purposes of DOE's strategy are to highlight groundwater protection as part of current DOE programs and future Departmental planning, to guide DOE managers in developing site-specific groundwater protection practices where DOE has discretion, and to guide DOE's approach to negotiations with EPA/states where regulatory processes apply to groundwater protection at Departmental facilities. The strategy calls for the prevention of groundwater contamination and the cleanup of groundwater commensurate with its usefulness. It would require long-term groundwater protection with reliance on physical rather than institutional control methods. The strategy provides guidance on providing long-term protection of groundwater resources; standards for new remedial actions;guidance on establishing points of compliance; requirements for establishing classification review area; and general guidance on obtaining variances, where applicable, from regulatory requirements. It also outlines management tools to implement this strategy

  4. Nitrogen fate and Transport in Diverse Agricultural Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, H.; McCarthy, K. A.; Baker, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen mass budgets have been estimated for ten agricultural watersheds located in a range of hydrologic settings in order to understand the factors controlling the fate of nitrogen applied at the surface. The watersheds, study areas of the Agricultural Chemical Sources, Transport and Fate study of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program, are located in Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Maryland (MD), Nebraska (NE), Mississippi (MS) and Washington (WA). They range in size from 7 to 1254 km2, with four of the watersheds nested within larger watersheds. Surface water outflow (normalized to watershed area) ranged from 4 to 83 cm/yr. Crops planted include corn, soybean, small grains, rice, cotton, orchards and vegetables. “Surplus nitrogen” was determined for each watershed by subtracting estimates of crop uptake and volatilization from estimates of nitrogen input from atmospheric deposition, plant fixation, and fertilizer and manure applications for the period from 1987 to 2004. This surplus nitrogen is transported though the watershed via surface and subsurface flow paths, while simultaneously undergoing transformations (such as denitrification and in-stream processing) that result in less export of nitrogen from the watershed. Surface-water discharge and concentration data were used to estimate the export of nitrogen from the watersheds (groundwater outflow from the watersheds was minimal). Subtracting nitrogen export from surplus nitrogen provides an estimate of the net amount of nitrogen removal occurring during internal watershed transport. Watershed average nitrogen surplus ranged from 6 to 49 kg-N/ha. The more permeable and/or greater water flux watersheds (MD, NE, and WA) tended to have larger surplus nitrogen, possibly due to less crop uptake caused by greater leaching and runoff of nitrogen. Almost all of the surplus nitrogen in the low permeability (MS) and tile drained watersheds (IA, IN) was exported from the watershed with

  5. Continuous Groundwater Monitoring Collocated at USGS Streamgages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantz, J. E.; Eddy-Miller, C.; Caldwell, R.; Wheeer, J.; Barlow, J.

    2012-12-01

    USGS Office of Groundwater funded a 2-year pilot study collocating groundwater wells for monitoring water level and temperature at several existing continuous streamgages in Montana and Wyoming, while U.S. Army Corps of Engineers funded enhancement to streamgages in Mississippi. To increase spatial relevance with in a given watershed, study sites were selected where near-stream groundwater was in connection with an appreciable aquifer, and where logistics and cost of well installations were considered representative. After each well installation and surveying, groundwater level and temperature were easily either radio-transmitted or hardwired to existing data acquisition system located in streamgaging shelter. Since USGS field personnel regularly visit streamgages during routine streamflow measurements and streamgage maintenance, the close proximity of observation wells resulted in minimum extra time to verify electronically transmitted measurements. After field protocol was tuned, stream and nearby groundwater information were concurrently acquired at streamgages and transmitted to satellite from seven pilot-study sites extending over nearly 2,000 miles (3,200 km) of the central US from October 2009 until October 2011, for evaluating the scientific and engineering add-on value of the enhanced streamgage design. Examination of the four-parameter transmission from the seven pilot study groundwater gaging stations reveals an internally consistent, dynamic data suite of continuous groundwater elevation and temperature in tandem with ongoing stream stage and temperature data. Qualitatively, the graphical information provides appreciation of seasonal trends in stream exchanges with shallow groundwater, as well as thermal issues of concern for topics ranging from ice hazards to suitability of fish refusia, while quantitatively this information provides a means for estimating flux exchanges through the streambed via heat-based inverse-type groundwater modeling. In June

  6. Sustainable Groundwater Management Using Economic Incentive Approach