WorldWideScience

Sample records for groundwater matrix effects

  1. A Study of Groundwater Matrix Effects for the Destruction of Trichloroethylene Using Fe/Pd Nanoaggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    meyer, D E [Univ of KY, dept of chemical and materials engineering; Hampson, Steve [Univ of KY Center for Applied Energy Research - Ky Research Consortium of Energy and Environment; ormsbee, Lindelle [Univ of KY Center for Applied Energy Research - Ky Research Consortium of Energy and Environment; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar [univ of KY, Dept of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2008-06-01

    Fe nanoaggregates have been prepared using the sodium borohydride reduction method and post-coated with Pd using aqueous phase electro-depostition. The Fe/Pd particles have been used to examine dechlorination of TCE with regard to matrix effects using materials representative of examine dechlorination of TCE with regard to matrix effects using materials representative of a potential zero-valent metal remediation site surrounding the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY.

  2. A Study of Groundwater Matrix Effects for the Destruction of Trichloroethylene Using Fe/Pd Nanoaggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, D.E.; Hampson, S.; Ormsbee, L.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2009-01-01

    Iron nanoaggregates have been prepared using the sodium borohydride reduction method and post-coated with Pd using aqueous phase electro-deposition. The Fe/Pd nanoaggregates were used to examine dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) with regard to matrix effects using materials representative of a potential zero-valent metal remediation site surrounding the Paducah gaseous diffusion plant in Paducah, KY. A surface-area-normalized first-order rate constant of 1.4 × 10–1 L m–2 h–1 was obtai...

  3. Investigating the effect of landfill leachates on the characteristics of dissolved organic matter in groundwater using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra coupled with fluorescence regional integration and self-organizing map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Song; Fan, Qin-Dong

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of investigating the effect of landfill leachate on the characteristics of organic matter in groundwater, groundwater samples were collected near and in a landfill site, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) was extracted from the groundwater samples and characterized by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) and self-organizing map (SOM). The results showed that the groundwater DOM comprised humic-, fulvic-, and protein-like substances. The concentration of humic-like matter showed no obvious variation for all groundwater except the sample collected in the landfill site. Fulvic-like substance content decreased when the groundwater was polluted by landfill leachates. There were two kinds of protein-like matter in the groundwater. One kind was bound to humic-like substances, and its content did not change along with groundwater pollution. However, the other kind was present as "free" molecules or else bound in proteins, and its concentration increased significantly when the groundwater was polluted by landfill leachates. The FRI and SOM methods both can characterize the composition and evolution of DOM in the groundwater. However, the SOM analysis can identify whether protein-like moieties was bound to humic-like matter.

  4. Matrix Effects in XRF Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Gabr, N.A.; El-Aryan, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research treats the matrix effect on XRF measurements. The problem is treated by preparing general oxide program, which contains many samples that represent all materials in cement factories, then by using T rail Lachance m ethod to correct errors of matrix effect. This work compares the effect of using lithium tetraborate or sodium tetraborate as a fluxing agent in terms of accuracy and economic cost

  5. Potential Health Effects from Groundwater Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyer, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the growing awareness of potential toxicological effects of synthetic organic chemicals contaminating groundwater. Problems concerning pesticides, chlorination, epidemiologic studies, cancer, nephrotoxicity, and considerations of risk are addressed. Additional research in this area is advocated. (DH)

  6. Effect of Groundwater Abstraction on Fen Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ole; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Jensen, Jacob Birk

    2011-01-01

    within a distance of 1.5 km to a planned well field. In the river valley the interaction between groundwater and surface water is strongly affected by low permeable sediments. These sediments reduce the direct discharge to the river and have a large impact on the functioning and presence of the rich fen......Quantifying the effects of groundwater abstraction on fen ecosystems located in discharge areas can be complicated. The water level in fens is close to the terrain surface most of the year and it is controlled by a relatively constant groundwater exfiltration. It is difficult to measure...... the exfiltration fluxes and thus water level data is typically used to evaluate if the ecosystem is affected. The paper presents collected data and analysis from a case study, where the hydrological effect of groundwater abstraction on rich fens and springs in a Danish river valley has been studied. The natural...

  7. Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Tidal effects on groundwater contamination at Pekan, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Dalila Desa; Dominic, J.A.; Mohd Muzamil Mohd Hashim; Kamarudin Samuding; Mohd Faizun Khalid; Mod Omar Hassan; Kamaruzaman Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of coastal ground water and the sea is a unique and dynamic hydro geologic boundary phenomenon that has fascinated groundwater engineers and scientists for the past century. The variation of seawater level resulting from tidal fluctuations is usually neglected in regional groundwater flow studies. In this study the effects of seawater tidal on groundwater are investigated using geophysical together with conventional method. Comparative result between these two methods shown how tidal fluctuations effects groundwater in study area. (author)

  9. Effects of temperature changes on groundwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebler, Christian; Kellermann, Claudia; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Lueders, Tillmann; Brielmann, Heike; Schmidt, Susanne; Kuntz, David; Walker-Hertkorn, Simone

    2014-05-01

    The use of groundwater as a carrier of thermal energy is becoming more and more important as a sustainable source of heating and cooling. At the same time, the present understanding of the effects of aquifer thermal usage on geochemical and biological aquifer ecosystem functions is extremely limited. Recently we started to assess the effects of temperature changes in groundwater on the ecological integrity of aquifers. In a field study, we have monitored hydrogeochemical, microbial, and faunal parameters in groundwater of an oligotrophic aquifer in the vicinity of an active thermal discharge facility. The observed seasonal variability of abiotic and biotic parameters between wells was considerable. Yet, due to the energy-limited conditions no significant temperature impacts on bacterial or faunal abundances and on bacterial productivity were observed. In contrast, the diversity of aquifer bacterial communities and invertebrate fauna was either positively or negatively affected by temperature, respectively. In follow-up laboratory experiments temperature effects were systematically evaluated with respect to energy limitation (e.g. establishment of unlimited growth conditions), geochemistry (e.g. dynamics of DOC and nutrients), microbiology (e.g. survival of pathogens), and fauna (temperature preference and tolerance). First, with increased nutrient and organic carbon concentrations even small temperature changes revealed microbiological dynamics. Second, considerable amounts of adsorbed DOC were mobilized from sediments of different origin with an increase in temperatures. No evidence was obtained for growth of pathogenic bacteria and extended survival of viruses at elevated temperatures. Invertebrates clearly preferred natural thermal conditions (10-12°C), where their highest frequency of appearance was measured in a temperature gradient. Short-term incubations (48h) of invertebrates in temperature dose-response tests resulted in LT50 (lethal temperature) values

  10. Effects Of Leaky Sewers On Groundwater Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Oswald, S. E.; Schirmer, M.

    2007-12-01

    The impact of urban areas on groundwater quality has become an emerging research field in hydrogeology. Urban subsurface infrastructures like sewer networks are often leaky, so untreated wastewater may enter the urban aquifer. The transport of wastewater into the groundwater is still not well understood under field conditions. In the research platform WASSER Leipzig (Water And Sewershed Study of Environmental Risk in Leipzig- Germany) the effects of leaky sewers on the groundwater quality are investigated. The research is focused on the occurrence and transport of so-called "xenobiotics" such as pharmaceuticals and personal care product additives. Xenobiotics may pose a threat on human health, but can also be considered a marker for an urban impact on water resources. A new test site was established in Leipzig to quantify mass fluxes of xenobiotics into the groundwater from a leaky sewer. Corresponding to the leaks which were detected by closed circuit television inspections, monitoring wells were installed up- and downstream of the sewer. Concentrations of eight xenobiotics (technical-nonylphenol, bisphenol-a, caffeine, galaxolide, tonalide, carbamazepine, phenazone, ethinylestradiol) obtained from first sampling programmes were found to be highly heterogeneous, but a relation between the position of the sampling points and the sewer could not be clearly identified. However, concentrations of sodium, chloride, potassium and nitrate increased significantly downstream of the sewer which may be due to wastewater exfiltration, since no other source is known on the water flowpath from the upstream to the downstream wells. Because of the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of xenobiotics at the test site, a monitoring concept was developed comprising both high-resolution sampling and an integral approach to obtain representative average concentrations. Direct-push techniques were used to gain insight into the fine-scale spatial distribution of the target compounds

  11. Microlevel thermal effects in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    A method for studying the influence of thermal effects on the inelastic response of metal matrix composites is reviewed. A micromechanics approach based upon the method of cells is shown to be quite versatile for studying a variety of materials response phenomena. Yielding and inelastic response of the composite are predicted as functions of thermal stresses, yielding of the matrix, and imperfect fiber/matrix bonding. Results are presented in the form of yield surfaces and nonlinear stress-strain curves for unidirectional and laminated boron/aluminum and silicon-carbide/titanium.

  12. 1998 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-06-02

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. The Interim Action T-1 Air Stripper System began operation on September 16, 1996. A comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. The Interim Action is meeting its objectives and is capable of continuing to do so until the final groundwater remedial action is in place.

  13. AQMAN; linear and quadratic programming matrix generator using two-dimensional ground-water flow simulation for aquifer management modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkoff, L.J.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN-77 computer program code that helps solve a variety of aquifer management problems involving the control of groundwater hydraulics. It is intended for use with any standard mathematical programming package that uses Mathematical Programming System input format. The computer program creates the input files to be used by the optimization program. These files contain all the hydrologic information and management objectives needed to solve the management problem. Used in conjunction with a mathematical programming code, the computer program identifies the pumping or recharge strategy that achieves a user 's management objective while maintaining groundwater hydraulic conditions within desired limits. The objective may be linear or quadratic, and may involve the minimization of pumping and recharge rates or of variable pumping costs. The problem may contain constraints on groundwater heads, gradients, and velocities for a complex, transient hydrologic system. Linear superposition of solutions to the transient, two-dimensional groundwater flow equation is used by the computer program in conjunction with the response matrix optimization method. A unit stress is applied at each decision well and transient responses at all control locations are computed using a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey two dimensional aquifer simulation model. The program also computes discounted cost coefficients for the objective function and accounts for transient aquifer conditions. (Author 's abstract)

  14. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health ampersand Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a 'capture zone' that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater

  15. 1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-04-01

    Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

  16. Effect of matrix metalloproteinase promoter polymorphisms on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large-scale studies regarding gene–gene and gene–environment interactions are needed in the future. [Ye H., He Y., Wang J., Song T., Lan Z., Zhao Y. and Xi M. 2016 Effect of matrix metalloproteinase promoter polymorphisms on endometriosis and adenomyosis risk: evidence from a meta-analysis. J. Genet. 95, 611–619].

  17. Transport of reactive colloids and contaminants in groundwater: effect of nonlinear kinetic interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van de H.; Leijnse, A.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Transport of reactive colloids in groundwater may enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater. Often, the interpretation of results of transport experiments is not a simple task as both reactions of colloids with the solid matrix and reactions of contaminants with the solid matrix and

  18. Modeling Effects of Groundwater Basin Closure, and Reversal of Closure, on Groundwater Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauloo, R.; Guo, Z.; Fogg, G. E.

    2017-12-01

    Population growth, the expansion of agriculture, and climate uncertainties have accelerated groundwater pumping and overdraft in aquifers worldwide. In many agricultural basins, a water budget may be stable or not in overdraft, yet disconnected ground and surface water bodies can contribute to the formation of a "closed" basin, where water principally exits the basin as evapotranspiration. Although decreasing water quality associated with increases in Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) have been documented in aquifers across the United States in the past half century, connections between water quality declines and significant changes in hydrologic budgets leading to closed basin formation remain poorly understood. Preliminary results from an analysis with a regional-scale mixing model of the Tulare Lake Basin in California indicate that groundwater salinization resulting from open to closed basin conversion can operate on a decades-to-century long time scale. The only way to reverse groundwater salinization caused by basin closure is to refill the basin and change the hydrologic budget sufficiently for natural groundwater discharge to resume. 3D flow and transport modeling, including the effects of heterogeneity based on a hydrostratigraphic facies model, is used to explore rates and time scales of groundwater salinization and its reversal under different water and land management scenarios. The modeling is also used to ascertain the extent to which local and regional heterogeneity need to be included in order to appropriately upscale the advection-dispersion equation in a basin scale groundwater quality management model. Results imply that persistent managed aquifer recharge may slow groundwater salinization, and complete reversal may be possible at sufficiently high water tables.

  19. Groundwater contamination and its effect on health in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Alper; Tayfur, Gokmen

    2011-12-01

    The sources of groundwater pollution in Turkey are identified, and pathways of contaminants to groundwater are first described. Then, the effects of groundwater quality on health in Turkey are evaluated. In general, sources of groundwater contamination fall into two main categories: natural and anthropogenic sources. Important sources of natural groundwater pollution in Turkey include geological formations, seawater intrusion, and geothermal fluid(s). The major sources of anthropogenic groundwater contamination are agricultural activities, mining waste, industrial waste, on-site septic tank systems, and pollution from imperfect well constructions. The analysis results revealed that natural contamination due to salt and gypsum are mostly found in Central and Mediterranean regions and arsenic in Aegean region. Geothermal fluids which contain fluoride poses a danger for skeleton, dental, and bone problems, especially in the areas of Denizli, Isparta, and Aydın. Discharges from surface water bodies contaminate groundwater by infiltration. Evidence of such contamination is found in Upper Kızılırmak basin, Gediz basin, and Büyük Melen river basin and some drinking water reservoirs in İstanbul. Additionally, seawater intrusion causes groundwater quality problems in coastal regions, especially in the Aegean coast. Industrial wastes are also polluting surface and groundwater in industrialized regions of Turkey. Deterioration of water quality as a result of fertilizers and pesticides is another major problem especially in the regions of Mediterranean, Aegean, Central Anatolia, and Marmara. Abandoned mercury mines in the western regions of Turkey, especially in Çanakkale, İzmir, Muğla, Kütahya, and Balıkesir, cause serious groundwater quality problems.

  20. Effect of land use and groundwater flow path on submarine groundwater discharge nutrient flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Bishop

    2017-06-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Low nitrate + nitrite (N + N SGD fluxes (24 mols/d were measured where groundwater flowed beneath primarily undeveloped land on transit to the coast. By contrast, of all land use types, sugarcane and pineapple fields contributed the largest amount of N to coastal waters via SGD (3800 mols/d. Despite their much smaller freshwater flux, these SGD sources provide substantially larger N fluxes than the State's largest rivers (avg. 700 mols/d. Septic systems, cesspools, and near coast wastewater injection wells also contribute N + N to groundwater and coastal waters, although in much smaller quantities. This study demonstrates that numerical groundwater modeling combined with geochemical modeling can be used to determine sources and flux of nutrients in SGD and provides a unique, original, and practical framework for studying the effect of land use and its impact on nutrient delivery to coastal waters.

  1. Interdisciplinary and participatory approaches: the key to effective groundwater management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Roland; Foster, Stephen; Villholth, Karen G.

    2017-11-01

    The challenges of a changing world, which are progressively threatening sustainable use of groundwater resources, can only be rationally and effectively addressed through close collaboration between experts and practitioners from different disciplines. Furthermore, science and management need to build on stakeholder opinions and processes in order to generate useful knowledge and positive outcomes in terms of sustainable and equitable groundwater management. This essay provides a discussion of the status of and vision for participatory and inter-disciplinary approaches to groundwater evaluation and management as well as a conceptual framework and relevant research questions that will facilitate such approaches.

  2. Matrix effective theories of the fractional quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Rodriguez, Ivan D

    2009-01-01

    The present understanding of nonperturbative ground states in the fractional quantum Hall effect is based on effective theories of the Jain 'composite fermion' excitations. We review the approach based on matrix variables, i.e. D0 branes, originally introduced by Susskind and Polychronakos. We show that the Maxwell-Chern-Simons matrix gauge theory provides a matrix generalization of the quantum Hall effect, where the composite-fermion construction naturally follows from gauge invariance. The matrix ground states obtained by suitable projections of higher Landau levels are found to be in one-to-one correspondence with the Laughlin and Jain hierarchical states. The matrix theory possesses a physical limit for commuting matrices that could be reachable while staying in the same phase.

  3. Effects of intensive urbanization on the intrusion of shallow groundwater into deep groundwater: Examples from Bangkok and Jakarta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University (Japan)], E-mail: sonodera@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Saito, Mitsuyo [Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University (Japan); Sawano, Misa [Oyo Corporation (Japan); Hosono, Takahiro [Department of Earth Science and Technology, Akita University (Japan); Taniguchi, Makoto [Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (Japan); Shimada, Jun [Graduate School of Sciences, Kumamoto University (Japan); Umezawa, Yu [Faculty of Fisheries, Nagasaki University (Japan); Lubis, Rachmat Fajar [Indonesia Institute of Science (Indonesia); Buapeng, Somkid [Groundwater Division, Department of Mineral Resources (Thailand); Delinom, Robert [Indonesia Institute of Science (Indonesia)

    2008-10-15

    Asian megacities have severe pollution problems in both coastal and urban areas. In addition, the groundwater potential has decreased and land subsidence has occurred because of intensive groundwater pumping in urban areas. To prevent the adverse effects of urbanization on groundwater quality, it is necessary to confirm the changes in groundwater flow and contaminant transport caused by urbanization. We examined the effects of urbanization on contaminant transport in groundwater. The research areas were located around Bangkok, Thailand, and akarta, Indonesia, cities with populations of approximately 8 and 12 million, respectively. Each metropolitan city is located on a river delta and is adjacent to a bay. We measured the water level and collected water samples at boreholes at multiple depths (100 to 200 m) in 2004 and 2006 in Bangkok and Jakarta, respectively. The current hydraulic potential is below sea level in both cities because of prior excess abstraction of groundwater. As a result, the direction of groundwater flow is now downward in the coastal area. The Cl{sup -} concentration and {delta}{sup 18}O distributions in groundwater suggest that the decline in hydraulic potential has caused the intrusion of seawater and shallow groundwater into deep groundwater. Concentrations of Mn and NO3{sup -}-N in groundwater suggest the intrusion of these contaminants from shallow to deep aquifers with downward groundwater flow and implies an accumulation of contaminants in deep aquifers. Therefore, it is important to recognize the possibility of future contaminant transport with the discharge of deep groundwater into the sea after the recovery of groundwater potential in the coastal areas.

  4. Effects of intensive urbanization on the intrusion of shallow groundwater into deep groundwater: Examples from Bangkok and Jakarta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Shin-ichi; Saito, Mitsuyo; Sawano, Misa; Hosono, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Umezawa, Yu; Lubis, Rachmat Fajar; Buapeng, Somkid; Delinom, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Asian megacities have severe pollution problems in both coastal and urban areas. In addition, the groundwater potential has decreased and land subsidence has occurred because of intensive groundwater pumping in urban areas. To prevent the adverse effects of urbanization on groundwater quality, it is necessary to confirm the changes in groundwater flow and contaminant transport caused by urbanization. We examined the effects of urbanization on contaminant transport in groundwater. The research areas were located around Bangkok, Thailand, and akarta, Indonesia, cities with populations of approximately 8 and 12 million, respectively. Each metropolitan city is located on a river delta and is adjacent to a bay. We measured the water level and collected water samples at boreholes at multiple depths (100 to 200 m) in 2004 and 2006 in Bangkok and Jakarta, respectively. The current hydraulic potential is below sea level in both cities because of prior excess abstraction of groundwater. As a result, the direction of groundwater flow is now downward in the coastal area. The Cl - concentration and δ 18 O distributions in groundwater suggest that the decline in hydraulic potential has caused the intrusion of seawater and shallow groundwater into deep groundwater. Concentrations of Mn and NO3 - -N in groundwater suggest the intrusion of these contaminants from shallow to deep aquifers with downward groundwater flow and implies an accumulation of contaminants in deep aquifers. Therefore, it is important to recognize the possibility of future contaminant transport with the discharge of deep groundwater into the sea after the recovery of groundwater potential in the coastal areas

  5. Erratum to "Effects of intensive urbanization on the intrusion of shallow groundwater into deep groundwater: examples from Bangkok and Jakarta".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Shin-ichi; Saito, Mitsuyo; Sawano, Misa; Hosono, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Umezawa, Yu; Lubis, Rachmat Fajar; Buapeng, Somkid; Delinom, Robert

    2009-04-15

    Asian megacities have severe pollution problems in both coastal and urban areas. In addition, the groundwater potential has decreased and land subsidence has occurred because of intensive groundwater pumping in urban areas. To prevent the adverse effects of urbanization on groundwater quality, it is necessary to confirm the changes in groundwater flow and contaminant transport caused by urbanization. We examined the effects of urbanization on contaminant transport in groundwater. The research areas were located around Bangkok, Thailand, and Jakarta, Indonesia, cities with populations of approximately 8 and 12 million, respectively. Each metropolitan city is located on a river delta and is adjacent to a bay. We measured the water level and collected water samples at boreholes at multiple depths (100 to 200 m) in 2004 and 2006 in Bangkok and Jakarta, respectively. The current hydraulic potential is below sea level in both cities because of prior excess abstraction of groundwater. As a result, the direction of groundwater flow is now downward in the coastal area. The Cl- concentration and delta18O distributions in groundwater suggest that the decline in hydraulic potential has caused the intrusion of seawater and shallow groundwater into deep groundwater. Concentrations of Mn and NO3--N in groundwater suggest the intrusion of these contaminants from shallow to deep aquifers with downward groundwater flow and implies an accumulation of contaminants in deep aquifers. Therefore, it is important to recognize the possibility of future contaminant transport with the discharge of deep groundwater into the sea after the recovery of groundwater potential in the coastal areas.

  6. Effects of intensive urbanization on the intrusion of shallow groundwater into deep groundwater: examples from Bangkok and Jakarta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Shin-ichi; Saito, Mitsuyo; Sawano, Misa; Hosono, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Umezawa, Yu; Lubis, Rachmat Fajar; Buapeng, Somkid; Delinom, Robert

    2008-10-15

    Asian megacities have severe pollution problems in both coastal and urban areas. In addition, the groundwater potential has decreased and land subsidence has occurred because of intensive groundwater pumping in urban areas. To prevent the adverse effects of urbanization on groundwater quality, it is necessary to confirm the changes in groundwater flow and contaminant transport caused by urbanization. We examined the effects of urbanization on contaminant transport in groundwater. The research areas were located around Bangkok, Thailand, and Jakarta, Indonesia, cities with populations of approximately 8 and 12 million, respectively. Each metropolitan city is located on a river delta and is adjacent to a bay. We measured the water level and collected water samples at boreholes at multiple depths (100 to 200 m) in 2004 and 2006 in Bangkok and Jakarta, respectively. The current hydraulic potential is below sea level in both cities because of prior excess abstraction of groundwater. As a result, the direction of groundwater flow is now downward in the coastal area. The Cl(-) concentration and delta(18)O distributions in groundwater suggest that the decline in hydraulic potential has caused the intrusion of seawater and shallow groundwater into deep groundwater. Concentrations of Mn and NO3(-)-N in groundwater suggest the intrusion of these contaminants from shallow to deep aquifers with downward groundwater flow and implies an accumulation of contaminants in deep aquifers. Therefore, it is important to recognize the possibility of future contaminant transport with the discharge of deep groundwater into the sea after the recovery of groundwater potential in the coastal areas.

  7. Effect of Pumping on Groundwater Levels: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, G.; Vijayachandran, Lekshmi

    2018-03-01

    Groundwater is a major source for drinking and domestic purposes. Nowadays, extensive pumping has become a major issue of concern since pumping has led to rapid decline in the groundwater table, thus imposing landward gradient, leading to saline water intrusion especially in coastal areas. Groundwater pumping has seen its utmost effect on coastal aquifer systems, where the sea-ward gradient gets disturbed due to anthropogenic influences. Hence, a groundwater flow modelling of an aquifer system is essential for understanding the various hydro-geologic conditions, which can be used to study the responses of the aquifer system with regard to various pumping scenarios. Besides, a model helps to predict the water levels for the future period with respect to changing environment. In this study, a finite element groundwater flow model of a coastal aquifer system at Aakulam, Trivandrum district is developed, calibrated and simulated using the software Finite Element subsurface Flow system (FEFLOW 6.2).This simulated model is then used to predict the groundwater levels for a future 5 year period during pre monsoon and post monsoon season.

  8. Modelling the effects of surface water flood pulses on groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Flood pulses in wetlands steer ecosystem development directly through surface water processes and indirectly through the effects of the flood pulse on groundwater. Direct effects on ecosystems are exerted by e.g. inundation and deposition of sediments containing nutrients. Indirect effects include

  9. Evaluating changes in matrix based, recovery-adjusted concentrations in paired data for pesticides in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Breen, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Pesticide concentration data for waters from selected carbonate-rock aquifers in agricultural areas of Pennsylvania were collected in 1993–2009 for occurrence and distribution assessments. A set of 30 wells was visited once in 1993–1995 and again in 2008–2009 to assess concentration changes. The data include censored matched pairs (nondetections of a compound in one or both samples of a pair). A potentially improved approach for assessing concentration changes is presented where (i) concentrations are adjusted with models of matrix-spike recovery and (ii) area-wide temporal change is tested by use of the paired Prentice-Wilcoxon (PPW) statistical test. The PPW results for atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, prometon, and an atrazine degradate, deethylatrazine (DEA), are compared using recovery-adjusted and unadjusted concentrations. Results for adjusted compared with unadjusted concentrations in 2008–2009 compared with 1993–1995 were similar for atrazine and simazine (significant decrease; 95% confidence level) and metolachlor (no change) but differed for DEA (adjusted, decrease; unadjusted, increase) and prometon (adjusted, decrease; unadjusted, no change). The PPW results were different on recovery-adjusted compared with unadjusted concentrations. Not accounting for variability in recovery can mask a true change, misidentify a change when no true change exists, or assign a direction opposite of the true change in concentration that resulted from matrix influences on extraction and laboratory method performance. However, matrix-based models of recovery derived from a laboratory performance dataset from multiple studies for national assessment, as used herein, rather than time- and study-specific recoveries may introduce uncertainty in recovery adjustments for individual samples that should be considered in assessing change.

  10. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1995-04-01

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d'Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass

  11. Effect of seasonal drawdown variations on groundwater quality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... Igbinosa and Okoh (2009) reported the damaging conse- quences of leachate infiltration into groundwater bodies on life expectancy of such water consumers, while Quinn et al. (2006) enumerated its effect and that of delayed drawdown on moist plant productivity and wetland ecology. Several studies have ...

  12. Effects of geological structures on groundwater flow and quality in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 2. Effects of geological structures on groundwater flow and quality in hardrock regions of northern Tirunelveli district, southern India. M Senthilkumar R Arumugam D Gnanasundar D S C Thambi E Sampath Kumar. Volume 124 Issue 2 March 2015 pp ...

  13. Effect of Waste Dumps on Groundwater in Choba using Geophysical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of waste dumps on the groundwater in Choba using resistivity sounding method and laboratory water sample analysis. An ABEM SAS 1000 terrameter was used to acquire data in two locations namely; at the dumpsite and at University Demonstration Secondary School ...

  14. Innovative use of a microbial tracer for measuring groundwater through a fractured matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Site characterization for ground water remediation activities is limited by the one's ability to visualize the complexity of the subsurface environment. Currently, a variety of dyes, colloids, gases, etc., are used to monitor and estimate ground water flow and contaminant transport. The author has recently identified a new, innovative colloidal tracer that is a non-hazardous bacterium that is detectable at very low concentrations (ng/kg), and can provide real-time analysis (3--5 min) for measuring colloid transport. The tracer is the ice nucleating active (INA) bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. The assay conditions require measuring the freezing point of the sample (e.g., ground water and soil slurries). Typically, 10--100 microL drops of water will not freeze until -15 to -20 C. However, if the tracer is present the water will freeze at -3 to -7 C. This increase in the freezing point can only be due to the presence of the tracer and this phenomenon is well documented in the plant pathology and low-temperature biology literature but has only now been applied to site characterization and remediation activities. Laboratory experiments have identified the stability of the tracer in the presence of a variety of ground water contaminants (> 100 ppm) and it is stable over a pH range of 2.3--10.0. The tracer has been demonstrated in conjunction with other commonly used tracers at a variety of field sites: (1) a drilling tracer to identify potential cross contamination, and as a colloid/bacterial tracer in (2) a hydrofracturing demonstration, (3) a horizontal recirculation well system, (4) a fractured karst matrix, and (5) a radioactive contaminated site. The data from these demonstrations have provided additional information about site characteristics including faster ground water flow rates than previously identified and due to its low sensitivities better distribution into a clay matrix than estimated by the bromide tracer

  15. The effectiveness of groundwater pumping as a restoration technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doty, C.B.; Travis, C.C.

    1991-05-01

    An in-depth analysis of the effectiveness of pumping groundwater for aquifer restoration was conducted based on: (1) performance records for 16 sites where pumping with the objective of aquifer restoration has been implemented for periods of 2 to 12 years, and (2) recent theoretical and modeling studies. The reduction of aquifer concentrations is the primary indicator of effectiveness of groundwater extraction. However, other indicators of effectiveness such as plume containment, mass reduction, and achievement of specific cleanup goals were also components of the evaluation. Based on our review of performance records and recent theoretical studies, the following can be concluded regarding the use of groundwater pumping for aquifer restoration: (1) Pumping is effective for contaminant mass reduction, plume containment and extraction of groundwater for point-of-use treatment. Its use for attaining these objectives should be encouraged. (2) Groundwater pumping is ineffective for restoring aquifers to health-based levels. This reality needs to be explicitly recognized by regulators. (3) The primary contributors to the ineffectiveness of pumping in meeting cleanup goals are the time-dependent decrease in the rate of desorption of contaminants from contaminated soils and the existence of immobile contaminants either in the non-aqueous phase or trapped in zones of low permeability. (4) Remedial time frames of 2 years to 30 years were predicted at the sites reviewed. Regulators currently maintain that 20 to 40 years may be needed to reach health-based cleanup goals. However, recent modeling studies estimate pump and treat time frames of 100 to 1000 years. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  16. The effectiveness of groundwater pumping as a restoration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, C.B.; Travis, C.C.

    1991-05-01

    An in-depth analysis of the effectiveness of pumping groundwater for aquifer restoration was conducted based on: (1) performance records for 16 sites where pumping with the objective of aquifer restoration has been implemented for periods of 2 to 12 years, and (2) recent theoretical and modeling studies. The reduction of aquifer concentrations is the primary indicator of effectiveness of groundwater extraction. However, other indicators of effectiveness such as plume containment, mass reduction, and achievement of specific cleanup goals were also components of the evaluation. Based on our review of performance records and recent theoretical studies, the following can be concluded regarding the use of groundwater pumping for aquifer restoration: (1) Pumping is effective for contaminant mass reduction, plume containment and extraction of groundwater for point-of-use treatment. Its use for attaining these objectives should be encouraged. (2) Groundwater pumping is ineffective for restoring aquifers to health-based levels. This reality needs to be explicitly recognized by regulators. (3) The primary contributors to the ineffectiveness of pumping in meeting cleanup goals are the time-dependent decrease in the rate of desorption of contaminants from contaminated soils and the existence of immobile contaminants either in the non-aqueous phase or trapped in zones of low permeability. (4) Remedial time frames of 2 years to 30 years were predicted at the sites reviewed. Regulators currently maintain that 20 to 40 years may be needed to reach health-based cleanup goals. However, recent modeling studies estimate pump and treat time frames of 100 to 1000 years. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The effect of industrial effluent stream on the groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasar, A.; Ahmad, N.; Chaudhry, M.N.; Sarwar, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of the industrial wastewater stream on the groundwater. Wastewater was characterized in terms of inorganic and organic constituents. Inorganic constituents included Na/sup +/, Ca/sup 2+/ K/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2-/ coupled with heavy metal elements such as, Cd, Cr, Pb, Mn, Cu, Ni, Fe and In. Organic load of the stream was determined in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD/sub 5/) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH/sub 3/-N) contents. Other characteristics were pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS). The correlation coefficients between quality parameter pairs of stream water and groundwater were determined to ascertain the source of groundwater contamination. At station 1, BOD/sub 5/ and COD contents were 20 times and Cr concentration was 10 times higher than the permissible limits for stream water [1]. Contents of these parameters reflected the level of industrial and domestic pollution coming from India. However, large variations in the levels of these parameters at down stream sites of the drain were characteristic of type and nature of industrial effluents and domestic sewage joining the stream. Analysis results of more than one hundred groundwater samples from shallow and deep wells around the drain showed that groundwater of shallow aquifers was contaminated due to drain water. A comparison of the contents of these parameters in shallow wells with WHO standards showed that some parameters such as turbidity, TDS, Na/sup +/, F -and heavy metals like Cr were found higher than the permissible limits. (author)

  18. The effects of radiogenic heat on groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddoes, R.J.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of radiogenic heat released by a nuclear waste repository on the groundwater flow in the neighbouring rock mass is reviewed. The report presents an overview of the hydrogeologic properties of crystalline rocks in the Canadian Shield and also describes the mathematical theory of groundwater flow and heat transfer in both porous media and fractured rock. Numerical methods for the solution of the governing equations are described. A number of case histories are described where analyses of flow systems have been performed both with and without radiogenic heat sources. A number of relevant topics are reviewed such as the role of the porous medium model, boundary conditions and, most importantly, the role of complex coupled processes where the effects of heat and water flow are intertwined with geochemical and mechanical processes. The implications to radioactive waste disposal are discussed

  19. Theoretical evaluation of matrix effects on trapped atomic levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.P.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-06-01

    We suggest a theoretical model for calculating the matrix perturbation on the spectra of atoms trapped in rare gas systems. The model requires the ''potential curves'' of the diatomic system consisting of the trapped atom interacting with one from the matrix and relies on the approximation that the total matrix perturbation is a scalar sum of the pairwise interactions with each of the lattice sites. Calculations are presented for the prototype systems Na in Ar. Attempts are made to obtain ab initio estimates of the Jahn-Teller effects for excited states. Comparison is made with our recent Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopic (MIS) data. 10 refs., 3 tabs

  20. Modeling Studies on Microbial Effects on Groundwater Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikatsu Tochigi; Hideki Yoshikawa; Mikazu Yui

    2007-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a model to predict microbial effects on the performance of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. As a first step, the effects of microbes on groundwater chemistry have been evaluated with the numerical code 'MINT', using data collected from the borehole HDB-6 in the Horonobe underground research laboratory (URL) in Japan. The MINT code models biochemistry and geochemical equilibrium, with consideration of transport of solute and microbial activity. The MINT code simulates the activities of six major groups of microbes, classified by their metabolism as 'aerobic', 'denitrifying', 'manganese reducing', 'iron reducing', 'sulfate reducing' and 'methanogenic'. The specific activity of each of these groups will depend on the redox potential (Eh) of the groundwater. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the consequences of changes in groundwater composition on the effects of microbial activity. This indicates that the activities of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and methanogens are relatively high. The concentration of dissolved methane produced by such microbial activity is seen to be influenced by sulfate concentration. Based on the observed data from Horonobe URL, the concentration in oxygen is relatively high and the activity of denitrifying bacteria is the highest of the major six groups of microbes. This can, however, be attributable to chemical / microbial contamination of the groundwater during sampling. The modeling results indicate that the concentration of dissolved oxygen and nitrate ion should be quickly reduced by microbial metabolism, reducing the redox potential to a level low enough for active methano-genesis to commence. Such assessment can be important to evaluate the reliability of sampling and measurement techniques for sensitive geochemical parameters in general - and microbiology in particular. (authors)

  1. Matrix effects in biological mass spectrometry imaging: identification and compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Stevens, Susan L; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model to examine matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization MSI (nano-DESI MSI). This is achieved by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) species to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard supplied at a constant rate with the nano-DESI solvent. The use of MCAO model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain enables immediate comparison of matrix effects within one ion image. Furthermore, significant differences in sodium and potassium concentrations in the ischemic region in comparison with the healthy tissue allowed us to distinguish between two types of matrix effects. Specifically, we discuss matrix effects originating from variations in alkali metal concentrations and matrix effects originating from variations in the molecular composition of the tissue. Compensation for both types of matrix effects was achieved by normalizing the signals corresponding to endogenous PC to the signals of the standards. This approach, which does not introduce any complexity in sample preparation, efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  2. MTBE: effects on soil and groundwater resources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, James J; Guertin, Jacques; Herron, Christy

    2001-01-01

    ... Properties of MTBE); Dr. Jacques Guertin, Toxicologist/ Chemist (Toxicity, Health Effects, and Taste and Odor Thresholds of MTBE; Appendix I, Toxicity of MTBE: Human Health Risk Calculations); Fred Stanin, Hydrogeologist (Transport and Fate of MTBE in the Environment); Dr. Paul Fahrenthold, Remediation Engineer/Chemist (Detection and Treatment of M...

  3. Earthquake effects on groundwater systems: an introductory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents an introductory review of the potential effects of earthquakes on groundwater systems with respect to the performance of underground repositories for radioactive waste in Britain. An approach to modelling these effects within the scope of general environmental simulation codes is presented. The relevant literature is reviewed and it is concluded that, although pertinent information exists, no clear relationship between seismic intensity and the degree of fracturing has been established. Recommendations are made for further work on fracture development to complement existing research into the effects of long-term changes on the integrity of radioactive waste disposal facilities. (author)

  4. Effects of groundwater pumping in the lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. Elliott

    2012-01-01

    USGS developed a groundwater-flow model of the Upper Floridan aquifer in lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin in southwest Georgia and adjacent parts of Alabama and Florida to determine the effect of agricultural groundwater pumping on aquifer/stream flow within the basin. Aquifer/stream flow is the sum of groundwater outflow to and inflow from streams, and is an important consideration for water managers in the development of water-allocation and operating plans. Specifically, the model was used to evaluate how agricultural pumping relates to 7Q10 low streamflow, a statistical low flow indicative of drought conditions that would occur during seven consecutive days, on average, once every 10 years. Argus ONETM, a software package that combines a geographic information system (GIS) and numerical modeling in an Open Numerical Environment, facilitated the design of a detailed finite-element mesh to represent the complex geometry of the stream system in the lower basin as a groundwater-model boundary. To determine the effects on aquifer/stream flow of pumping at different locations within the model area, a pumping rate equivalent to a typical center-pivot irrigation system (50,000 ft3/d) was applied individually at each of the 18,951 model nodes in repeated steady-state simulations that were compared to a base case representing drought conditions during October 1999. Effects of nodal pumping on aquifer/stream flow and other boundary flows, as compared with the base-case simulation, were computed and stored in a response matrix. Queries to the response matrix were designed to determine the sensitivity of targeted stream reaches to agricultural pumping. Argus ONE enabled creation of contour plots of query results to illustrate the spatial variation across the model area of simulated aquifer/streamflow reductions, expressed as a percentage of the long-term 7Q10 low streamflow at key USGS gaging stations in the basin. These results would enable water managers

  5. Effect of Domestic Waste Leachates on Quality Parameters of Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jiya MUSA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Water is an elixir of life. Percolating groundwater provides a medium through which wastes particularly organics can undergo degradation into simpler substances through biochemical reactions involving dissolution, hydrolysis, oxidation and reduction processes. Ground water samples in and around dumpsite and landfills located in Kubuwa were studied to assess the effect of wastewater leachates on groundwater resources in the particular area. Groundwater samples were collected from 5 different bore-wells in and around relative distances from dumpsites. EC values ranged between 30 and 138 µS/cm, TDS ranged between 95 mg/L and 120 mg/L, SS ranged between 10 and 23 mg/L while that of the evening ranged between 11 and 15 mg/L, nitrate values ranged between 0.18 to 0.80 mg/L for the early morning samples while the late evening samples which ranged between 0.25 and 0.43 mg/L, while concentration of Sulphate in the morning water sample ranged between 168 and 213 mg/L while that of the evening ranged between 20 and 45 mg/L. The government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria should create landfills and dumpsites far away from residential homes and better still recycling plants should be put in place to recycle the various forms of waste products from homes.

  6. Semiclassical droplet states in matrix quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Rodriguez, Ivan D.

    2008-01-01

    We derive semiclassical ground state solutions that correspond to the quantum Hall states earlier found in the Maxwell-Chern-Simons matrix theory. They realize the Jain composite-fermion construction and their density is piecewise constant as that of phenomenological wave functions. These results support the matrix theory as a possible effective theory of the fractional Hall effect. A crucial role is played by the constraint limiting the degeneracy of matrix states: we find its explicit gauge invariant form and clarify its physical interpretation

  7. Effects of ductile matrix failure in three dimensional analysis of metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Full three dimensional numerical cell model analyses are carried out for a metal reinforced by short fibers, to study the development of ductile matrix failure. A porous ductile material model is used to describe the effect of the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence. In each case studied...... a rounded vertex on the yield surface. The full three dimensional model is used to study effects of deviations from equal transverse tension in directions perpendicular to the fibers. (C) 1998 Acta Metallurgica Inc....

  8. Effects of geological structures on groundwater flow and quality in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis and field observations revealed that the north–south dykes act as a barrier of groundwater while the west–east oriented structures behave as a carrier of groundwater. Both quality and quantity of groundwater is different on the upstream and downstream sides of the dyke. Hence, it is conclusive that the west–east ...

  9. Mining wastewater management and its effects on groundwater and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, A; Ozdemir, S

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale mining activities have a huge impact on the environment. Determination of the size of the effect and monitoring it is vital. In this study, risk assessment studies in mining areas and the effect of mining on groundwater and ecosystems were investigated. Best management practices and risk assessment steps were determined, especially in areas with huge amounts of mining wastewater. The pollution of groundwater and its reaching humans is a risk of major importance. Our study showed, using many cases with different parameters and countries, that the management of mining wastewater is vital. Environmental impact assessments and monitoring studies must be carried out before operation and at the closure of the mine. Policies must be in place and ready to apply. Factors of climate, geology, ecology and human health must be considered over a long period. Currently, only the developed countries are applying policies and paying attention to the risk. International assessments and health risk assessments should be carried out according to international standards.

  10. Overview of CSNI separate effects tests validation matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksan, N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Auria, F.D. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); Glaeser, H. [Gesellschaft fuer anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit, (GRS), Garching (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed separate effects test (SET) Validation Matrix for thermal-hydraulic system codes has been established by a sub-group of the Task Group on Thermal Hydraulic System Behaviour as requested by the OECD/NEA Committee on Safety of Nuclear Installations (SCNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behaviour. The construction of such a Matrix is an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data for code validation, assessment and improvement and also for quantitative code assessment with respect to quantification of uncertainties to the modeling of individual phenomena by the codes. The methodology, that has been developed during the process of establishing CSNI-SET validation matrix, was an important outcome of the work on SET matrix. In addition, all the choices which have been made from the 187 identified facilities covering the 67 phenomena will be investigated together with some discussions on the data base.

  11. Theoretical evaluation of matrix effects on trapped atomic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, G.P.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-06-01

    We suggest a theoretical model for calculating the matrix perturbation on the spectra of atoms trapped in rare gas systems. The model requires the ''potential curves'' of the diatomic system consisting of the trapped atom interacting with one from the matrix and relies on the approximation that the total matrix perturbation is a scalar sum of the pairwise interactions with each of the lattice sites. Calculations are presented for the prototype systems Na in Ar. Attempts are made to obtain ab initio estimates of the Jahn-Teller effects for excited states. Comparison is made with our recent Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopic (MIS) data. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Very deep hole concept. Thermal effects on groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, Niko; Grundfelt, Bertil; Wiborgh, Marie [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    ,055 nodes. The results of the calculations were evaluated using tracking of particle starting in different positions in the deposition holes. The travel times for these particles to the surface were calculated. The particle tracking was performed for individual time steps assuming that the conditions of that time step remained constant throughout the particle travel times. This is of course not true, in particular as the calculated travel times are much longer that the duration of the heat pulse from the deposited spent fuel. A more refined variant of the grid including 1,245,680 finite elements corresponding to 2,525,744 nodes was tested in order to verify that the discretisation used was adequate. In this case, all elements inside the repository area and those closest to this area were refined by a factor of two in each of the three dimensions. The elements constituting the boreholes were left unchanged. The results of this test show that both the flow pattern and the calculated Darcy velocities are significantly affected by the disretisation while the calculated particle travel times were little influenced. Because of the little difference of travel times and due to the fact that the computational times of the larger grid were hard to manage within a reasonable project schedule, it was decided to use the smaller grid for the calculations. A large number of calculations were performed in which the sensitivity of the results with respect to different combinations of surface hydraulic gradients, heat output from the deposited spent fuel and fracture zone orientations was tested. In general, the calculated travel times for the particles are extremely long, in the order of 1-100 Myrs. The thermal output from the spent fuel is insufficient to alter the stability of the near-stagnant saline groundwater present at depth in the rock. However, the performed sensitivity analysis showed effects on the Darcy velocities, flow field and calculated hypothetical travel times, but the

  13. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  14. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport

  15. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Statistical analysis of effective singular values in matrix rank determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinides, Konstantinos; Yao, Kung

    1988-01-01

    A major problem in using SVD (singular-value decomposition) as a tool in determining the effective rank of a perturbed matrix is that of distinguishing between significantly small and significantly large singular values to the end, conference regions are derived for the perturbed singular values of matrices with noisy observation data. The analysis is based on the theories of perturbations of singular values and statistical significance test. Threshold bounds for perturbation due to finite-precision and i.i.d. random models are evaluated. In random models, the threshold bounds depend on the dimension of the matrix, the noisy variance, and predefined statistical level of significance. Results applied to the problem of determining the effective order of a linear autoregressive system from the approximate rank of a sample autocorrelation matrix are considered. Various numerical examples illustrating the usefulness of these bounds and comparisons to other previously known approaches are given.

  17. Effects of Population Growth and Climate Variability on Sustainable Groundwater in Mali, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lutz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is increasingly relied on as a source of potable water in developing countries, but factors such as population growth, development, and climate variability, pose potential challenges for ongoing sustainable supply. The effect of these factors on the groundwater system was considered in four scenarios using a numerical model to represent the Bani area of Mali, West Africa. By 2040, population growth, climate variability, and development as urbanization, agriculture, and industry creates scenarios in which groundwater extraction is an increasingly larger percentage of the groundwater system. Consumption from agriculture and industry increases extraction rates from less than 1 to 3.8% of mean annual precipitation, which will likely affect the groundwater system. For instance, concentrated pumping in local areas may result in water level declines. The results of this study contribute to an ongoing evaluation of sustainable groundwater resources in West Africa.

  18. Groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Das, Bhaskar; Chatterjee, Amit; Das, Dipankar; Nayak, Biswajit; Pal, Arup; Chowdhury, Uttam Kumar; Ahmed, Sad; Biswas, Bhajan Kumar; Sengupta, Mrinal Kumar; Hossain, Md. Amir; Samanta, Gautam; Roy, M. M.; Dutta, Rathindra Nath; Saha, Khitish Chandra; Mukherjee, Subhas Chandra; Pati, Shyamapada; Kar, Probir Bijoy; Mukherjee, Adreesh; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-06-01

    During a 28-year field survey in India (1988-2016), groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects were registered in the states of West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar and Uttar Pradesh in the Ganga River flood plain, and the states of Assam and Manipur in the flood plain of Brahamaputra and Imphal rivers. Groundwater of Rajnandgaon village in Chhattisgarh state, which is not in a flood plain, is also arsenic contaminated. More than 170,000 tubewell water samples from the affected states were analyzed and half of the samples had arsenic >10 μg/L (maximum concentration 3,700 μg/L). Chronic exposure to arsenic through drinking water causes various health problems, like dermal, neurological, reproductive and pregnancy effects, cardiovascular effects, diabetes mellitus, diseases of the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems, and cancers, typically involving the skin, lungs, liver, bladder, etc. About 4.5% of the 8,000 children from arsenic-affected villages of affected states were registered with mild to moderate arsenical skin lesions. In the preliminary survey, more than 10,000 patients were registered with different types of arsenic-related signs and symptoms, out of more than 100,000 people screened from affected states. Elevated levels of arsenic were also found in biological samples (urine, hair, nails) of the people living in affected states. The study reveals that the population who had severe arsenical skin lesions may suffer from multiple Bowens/cancers in the long term. Some unusual symptoms, such as burning sensation, skin itching and watering of eyes in the presence of sun light, were also noticed in arsenicosis patients.

  19. Modelling climate change effects on a Dutch coastal groundwater system using airborne electromagnetic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faneca Sànchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The forecast of climate change effects on the groundwater system in coastal areas is of key importance for policy makers. The Dutch water system has been deeply studied because of its complex system of low-lying areas, dunes, land won to the sea and dikes, but nowadays large efforts are still being done to find out the best techniques to describe complex fresh-brackish-saline groundwater dynamic systems. In this paper, we describe a methodology consisting of high-resolution airborne electromagnetic (EM measurements used in a 3-D variable-density transient groundwater model for a coastal area in the Netherlands. We used the airborne EM measurements in combination with borehole-logging data, electrical conductivity cone penetration tests and groundwater samples to create a 3-D fresh-brackish-saline groundwater distribution of the study area. The EM measurements proved to be an improvement compared to older techniques and provided quality input for the model. With the help of the built 3-D variable-density groundwater model, we removed the remaining inaccuracies of the 3-D chloride field and predicted the effects of three climate scenarios on the groundwater and surface water system. Results showed significant changes in the groundwater system, and gave direction for future water policy. Future research should provide more insight in the improvement of data collection for fresh-brackish-saline groundwater systems as it is of high importance to further improve the quality of the model.

  20. Effect of Groundwater Pumping on Seawater Intrusion in Coastal Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sherif

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Many aquifers around the globe are located in coastal areas and are thus subjected to the seawater intrusion phenomenon. The growth of population in coastal areas and the conjugate increase in human, agricultural, and industrial activities have imposed an increasing demand for freshwater. This increase in water demand is often covered by extensive pumping of fresh groundwater, causing subsequent lowering of the water table (or piezometric head and upsetting the dynamic balance between freshwater and saline water bodies. The classical result of such a development is seawater intrusion. This paper presents a review for the seawater intrusion phenomenon in coastal aquifers. The effect of pumping activities on the seawater intrusion in the Nile Delta aquifer of Egypt is investigated. It was concluded that any additional pumping should be located in the middle Delta and avoided in the eastern and western sides of the Delta.

  1. Effects of geological structures on groundwater flow and quality in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geological and structural influences on groundwater flow and quality were evaluated in the present study in the hardrock regions of Tirunelveli District, southern India. Groundwater is a major source of freshwater in this region to cater to the requirements of domestic and agricultural activity, as there are no surface water ...

  2. The Effects of Leachate on Groundwater in Ota Industrial Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compositions of landfill leachate and groundwater pollution were studied at industrial sites landfill, which are located at Ota, Nigeria. The leachate was sampled at 5 different locations at the landfill, and at 15 and 20 m downstream of the landfill. Groundwater samples were collected from 10 different sources to study the ...

  3. Effects of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijweide, P.J.; Burger, E.H.; van Delft, J.L.; Kawilarange-de Haas, E.W.M.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Mellink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification was studied in vitro. Metatarsal bones of 14- to 17-day-old embryonic mice were dissected and cultured under various conditions. Prior to culture, half of the metatarsal bones received absorbed doses of 1.0 to 30.0 Gy γ radiation. Their paired counterparts served as controls. Irradiation inhibited longitudinal growth and calcification of the cartilage matrix during culture. In addition, a number of histological changes were noted. The inhibition of matrix calcification appeared to be due to an inhibition of the intracellular calcium accumulation. The formation of extracellular calcification foci and the growth of the calcified area already present at the moment of explanation were not inhibited during culture

  4. Matrix-Bound Nanovesicles Recapitulate Extracellular Matrix Effects on Macrophage Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihel, Luai; Bartolacci, Joseph G; Dziki, Jenna L; Vorobyov, Tatiana; Arnold, Brooke; Scarritt, Michelle E; Pineda Molina, Catalina; LoPresti, Samuel T; Brown, Bryan N; Naranjo, Juan Diego; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-11-01

    The early macrophage response to biomaterials has been shown to be a critical and predictive determinant of downstream outcomes. When properly prepared, bioscaffolds composed of mammalian extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to promote a transition in macrophage behavior from a proinflammatory to a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phenotype, which in turn has been associated with constructive and functional tissue repair. The mechanism by which ECM bioscaffolds promote this phenotypic transition, however, is poorly understood. The present study shows that matrix-bound nanovesicles (MBV), a component of ECM bioscaffolds, are capable of recapitulating the macrophage activation effects of the ECM bioscaffold from which they are derived. MBV isolated from two different source tissues, porcine urinary bladder and small intestinal submucosa, were found to be enriched in miRNA125b-5p, 143-3p, and 145-5p. Inhibition of these miRNAs within macrophages was associated with a gene and protein expression profile more consistent with a proinflammatory rather than an anti-inflammatory/regulatory phenotype. MBV and their associated miRNA cargo appear to play a significant role in mediating the effects of ECM bioscaffolds on macrophage phenotype.

  5. Numerical groundwater-flow modeling to evaluate potential effects of pumping and recharge: implications for sustainable groundwater management in the Mahanadi delta region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sasmita; Jha, Madan K.

    2017-12-01

    Process-based groundwater models are useful to understand complex aquifer systems and make predictions about their response to hydrological changes. A conceptual model for evaluating responses to environmental changes is presented, considering the hydrogeologic framework, flow processes, aquifer hydraulic properties, boundary conditions, and sources and sinks of the groundwater system. Based on this conceptual model, a quasi-three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was designed using MODFLOW to simulate the groundwater system of Mahanadi River delta, eastern India. The model was constructed in the context of an upper unconfined aquifer and lower confined aquifer, separated by an aquitard. Hydraulic heads of 13 shallow wells and 11 deep wells were used to calibrate transient groundwater conditions during 1997-2006, followed by validation (2007-2011). The aquifer and aquitard hydraulic properties were obtained by pumping tests and were calibrated along with the rainfall recharge. The statistical and graphical performance indicators suggested a reasonably good simulation of groundwater flow over the study area. Sensitivity analysis revealed that groundwater level is most sensitive to the hydraulic conductivities of both the aquifers, followed by vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining layer. The calibrated model was then employed to explore groundwater-flow dynamics in response to changes in pumping and recharge conditions. The simulation results indicate that pumping has a substantial effect on the confined aquifer flow regime as compared to the unconfined aquifer. The results and insights from this study have important implications for other regional groundwater modeling studies, especially in multi-layered aquifer systems.

  6. Monitoring effects of river restoration on groundwater with radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehn, Eduard

    2007-01-01

    The restoration of the perialpine river Toess in a floodplain of northern Switzerland (Linsental) included the removal of bank reinforcements and tracer studies in the river and in oberservation wells of the adjacent alluvial groundwater. The river water is continuously recharging the aquifer system and the groundwater is used extensively as drinking water. Radon activity concentrations of freshly infiltrated groundwater are interpreted as radon groundwater age between the river and a well. A first flood after the restoration operations resulted in a widening of the river bed and in a reduction of the flow distance to the wells. Sixteen days after a second flood, the results of radon measurements were compared with those from before the restoration. The radon age of the groundwater between the river and the wells decreased, probably as a result of the reduction of the flow distances. Concentrations of autochthonous and coliform bacteria increased after the restoration operation and even more one day after the first flood. Thus the findings on the bacteria corroborate the interpretation of the radon concentrations. The restoration has not yet reduced the quality of the groundwater, which is pumped for drinking water. The study is contributing to the solution of land-use conflicts between river restoration and the supply of drinking water from the alluvial groundwater. (orig.) [de

  7. Thermal effect of climate change on groundwater-fed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick; Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater temperature changes will lag surface temperature changes from a changing climate. Steady state solutions of the heat-transport equations are used to identify key processes that control the long-term thermal response of springs and other groundwater discharge to climate change, in particular changes in (1) groundwater recharge rate and temperature and (2) land-surface temperature transmitted through the vadose zone. Transient solutions are developed to estimate the time required for new thermal signals to arrive at ecosystems. The solution is applied to the volcanic Medicine Lake highlands, California, USA, and associated springs complexes that host groundwater-dependent ecosystems. In this system, upper basin groundwater temperatures are strongly affected only by recharge conditions. However, as the vadose zone thins away from the highlands, changes in the average annual land-surface temperature also influence groundwater temperatures. Transient response to temperature change depends on both the conductive time scale and the rate at which recharge delivers heat. Most of the thermal response of groundwater at high elevations will occur within 20 years of a shift in recharge temperatures, but the large lower elevation springs will respond more slowly, with about half of the conductive response occurring within the first 20 years and about half of the advective response to higher recharge temperatures occurring in approximately 60 years.

  8. Effect of matrix cracking and material uncertainty on composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, P.; Umesh, K.; Ganguli, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laminated composite plate model based on first order shear deformation theory is implemented using the finite element method. Matrix cracks are introduced into the finite element model by considering changes in the A, B and D matrices of composites. The effects of different boundary conditions, laminate types and ply angles on the behavior of composite plates with matrix cracks are studied. Finally, the effect of material property uncertainty, which is important for composite material on the composite plate, is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Probabilistic estimates of damage detection reliability in composite plates are made for static and dynamic measurements. It is found that the effect of uncertainty must be considered for accurate damage detection in composite structures. The estimates of variance obtained for observable system properties due to uncertainty can be used for developing more robust damage detection algorithms.

  9. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping...... the per- formance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile...... and efficiency of the engine. A new regenerator with three differently designed matrix sections that amplified the first mode of oscillation and reduced the second improved the e?ciency of the engine from the current 32.9 to 33.2% with a 3% decrease in power output. An efficiency of 33.0% was achievable...

  10. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegard; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping the performance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile while the second mode bended the ends of the axial matrix temperature profile when gas flowed into the regenerator with a temperature significantly different from the matrix temperature. The first mode of oscillation improved the efficiency of the engine but the second mode reduced both the work output and efficiency of the engine. A new regenerator with three differently designed matrix sections that amplified the first mode of oscillation and reduced the second improved the efficiency of the engine from the current 32.9 to 33.2% with a 3% decrease in power output. An efficiency of 33.0% was achievable with uniform regenerator matrix properties

  11. Streamflow depletion by wells--Understanding and managing the effects of groundwater pumping on streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Paul M.; Leake, Stanley A.

    2012-11-02

    Groundwater is an important source of water for many human needs, including public supply, agriculture, and industry. With the development of any natural resource, however, adverse consequences may be associated with its use. One of the primary concerns related to the development of groundwater resources is the effect of groundwater pumping on streamflow. Groundwater and surface-water systems are connected, and groundwater discharge is often a substantial component of the total flow of a stream. Groundwater pumping reduces the amount of groundwater that flows to streams and, in some cases, can draw streamflow into the underlying groundwater system. Streamflow reductions (or depletions) caused by pumping have become an important water-resource management issue because of the negative impacts that reduced flows can have on aquatic ecosystems, the availability of surface water, and the quality and aesthetic value of streams and rivers. Scientific research over the past seven decades has made important contributions to the basic understanding of the processes and factors that affect streamflow depletion by wells. Moreover, advances in methods for simulating groundwater systems with computer models provide powerful tools for estimating the rates, locations, and timing of streamflow depletion in response to groundwater pumping and for evaluating alternative approaches for managing streamflow depletion. The primary objective of this report is to summarize these scientific insights and to describe the various field methods and modeling approaches that can be used to understand and manage streamflow depletion. A secondary objective is to highlight several misconceptions concerning streamflow depletion and to explain why these misconceptions are incorrect.

  12. Assessing the effects of urbanization and climate change on groundwater management in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, S.; Zheng, C.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater is expected to be more vulnerable in the future due to climate change coupled with rapid urbanization. Thus, protecting future groundwater resources under the impact of urbanization and climate change is necessary towards more sustainable groundwater resource development. This study is intended to shed lights on how water managers may plan for the adverse effects of urbanization and climate change on groundwater quality. A new approach is presented in which the groundwater vulnerability under future climate change scenarios is employed as a constraint to urban expansion. An original form of the Land Transformation Model (LTM) and a revised LTM simulation are applied to model the urbanization. The results indicated that there would be a notable and uneven urban growth between 2010 and 2050. Future groundwater vulnerability is expected to shift significantly under future climate change scenarios. The results of the revised LTM project more urban expansion in the central regions of China, while those of the original LTM project urban expansion in throughout China, although the two projections have the same areas of expansion. The urban expansion simulated by the original LTM follows the historical trend under the drivers of socioeconomic, political and geographic factors. However, the revised LTM drives the urban expansion to the regions with relatively lower groundwater vulnerability, in contrast to the historical trend. This study demonstrates that the integration of LTM and future groundwater vulnerability in the urban planning can better protect the groundwater resource and promote more sustainable socioeconomic development. The methodology developed in this study provides water managers and city planners a useful groundwater management tool for mitigating the risks associated with rapid urbanization and climate change.

  13. Physical Experiment and Numerical Simulation of the Artificial Recharge Effect on Groundwater Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficiency of utilizing water resources in arid areas, the mechanism of artificial recharge effecting on groundwater reservoir was analyzed in this research. Based on a generalized groundwater reservoir in a two-dimensional sand tank model, different scenarios of the infiltration basin location and recharge intensity are designed to study how to improve the efficiency of groundwater reservoir artificial recharge. The effective storage capacity and the effective storage rate are taken as the main parameters to analyze the relation between recharge water volume and storage capacity. By combining with groundwater flow system theory, FEFLOW (Finite Element subsurface FLOW system is adopted to set up the groundwater numerical model. It is used to verify the experiment results and to make deep analysis on the rule of water table fluctuations and groundwater movement in the aquifer. Based on the model, different scenarios are designed to examine the combined effect of recharge intensity and intermittent periods. The research results show that: the distance between infiltration basin and pumping well should be shortened appropriately, but not too close; increasing recharge intensity helps to enlarge the effective storage capacity, but it can also reduce the effective storage rate, which goes against the purpose of effective utilization of water resources; and, the recharge intensity and recharge duration should be given full consideration by the actual requirements when we take the approach of intermittent recharge to make a reasonable choice.

  14. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Huang

    Full Text Available Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  15. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  16. Effect of sewage irrigation on groundwater and vegetable crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.

    2009-01-01

    Lahore produces wastewater at a rate of 18.52 m3/sec. In Lahore, three percent of the untreated sewage is being used for the harvesting of all seasonal crops, including sugarcane cauliflower, cabbage, potato, carrots and radish. The untreated wastewater being used contained on an average BOD of 187mg/l, along with a wide array of pathogens. Groundwater contamination by bacteria depends upon the rate of removal of pathogens by the soil. There has been deterioration in the groundwater quality with continuous sewage irrigation. Such water showed higher contamination parameters. (author)

  17. Simulating the effect of climate extremes on groundwater flow through a lakebed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdi, Makhan L.; Lee, Terrie M.; Swancar, Amy; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater exchanges with lakes resulting from cyclical wet and dry climate extremes maintain lake levels in the environment in ways that are not well understood, in part because they remain difficult to simulate. To better understand the atypical groundwater interactions with lakes caused by climatic extremes, an original conceptual approach is introduced using MODFLOW-2005 and a kinematic-wave approximation to variably saturated flow that allows lake size and position in the basin to change while accurately representing the daily lake volume and three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow responses in the basin. Daily groundwater interactions are simulated for a calibrated lake basin in Florida over a decade that included historic wet and dry departures from the average rainfall. The divergent climate extremes subjected nearly 70% of the maximum lakebed area and 75% of the maximum shoreline perimeter to both groundwater inflow and lake leakage. About half of the lakebed area subject to flow reversals also went dry. A flow-through pattern present for 73% of the decade caused net leakage from the lake 80% of the time. Runoff from the saturated lake margin offset the groundwater deficit only about half of that time. A centripetal flow pattern present for 6% of the decade was important for maintaining the lake stage and generated 30% of all net groundwater inflow. Pumping effects superimposed on dry climate extremes induced the least frequent but most cautionary flow pattern with leakage from over 90% of the actual lakebed area.

  18. Groundwater-ocean interaction and its effects on coastal ecological processes - are there groundwater-dependant ecosystems in the coastal zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, T. C.

    2013-05-01

    Hydrological land-ocean connectivity is an important driver of coastal ecosystems. Rivers are obvious and visible pathways for terrestrial runoff. The critical role of surface water discharge from rivers to coastal ecosystems has been well documented. Hidden from view, 'downstream' effects of coastal (supra-tidal, intertidal and submarine) groundwater discharge are far less well understood. Whilst hydrological and geochemical processes associated with coastal groundwater discharge have received an increasing amount of scientific attention over the past decade or so, the effects of groundwater flow on productivity, composition, diversity and functioning of coastal ecosystems along the world's shorelines have received little attention to date. Coastal groundwater discharge includes both terrestrial (fresh) groundwater fluxes and the recirculation of seawater through sediments, analogous to hyporheic flow in rivers. I will present an overview over relevant coastal hydrological processes, and will illustrate their ecological effects on examples from diverse tropical coastal ecosystems, e.g. (1) perennial fresh groundwater discharge from coastal sand dune systems permitting growth of freshwater-dependent vegetation in the intertidal zone of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia), (2) recirculation of seawater through mangrove forest floors directly affecting tree health and providing a pathway for carbon export from these ecosystems, (3) the local hydrology of groundwater-fed coastal inlets on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula affecting the movement behaviour of and habitat use by the queen conch Strombus gigas, an economically important species in the Caribbean region. These examples for hydrological-ecological coupling in the coastal zone invite the question if we should not consider these coastal ecosystems to be groundwater-dependent, in analogy to groundwater-dependency in freshwater aquatic systems.

  19. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoshan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  20. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaoshan.

    1995-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the open-quotes Fasselclose quotes TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids

  1. Effect of seasonal drawdown variations on groundwater quality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... sources peculiar to emerging African cities. Key words: Shallow well, pollution, water level, ... groundwater contamination within the region of interest. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study area ... were covered with cork to prevent spillage and contamination and were kept in the laboratory at 4°C before the ...

  2. Metal matrix composites for sustainable lotus-effect surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Hejazi, Vahid; Nyong, Aniedi E; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2011-12-06

    The lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. However, such surfaces require micropatterning, which is extremely vulnerable to even small wear rates. This limits the applicability of the lotus effects to situations when wear is practically absent. To design sustainable superhydrophobic surfaces, we suggest using metal matrix composites (MMCs) with hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. Such surfaces, if properly designed, provide roughness and heterogeneity needed for superhydrophobicity. In addition, they are sustainable, since when the surface layer is deteriorated and removed due to wear, hydrophobic reinforcement and roughness remains. We present a model and experimental data on wetting of MMCs. We also conducted selected experiments with graphite-reinforced MMCs and showed that the contact angle can be determined from the model. In order to decouple the effects of reinforcement and roughness, the experiments were conducted for initially smooth and etched matrix and composite materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Competing effects of groundwater withdrawals and climate change on water availability in semi-arid India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sishodia, R. P.; Shukla, S.

    2017-12-01

    India, a global leader in groundwater use (250 km3/yr), is experiencing groundwater depletion. There has been a 130-fold increase in number of irrigation wells since 1960. Anticipated future increase in groundwater demand is likely to exacerbate the water availability in the semi-arid regions of India. Depending on the direction of change, future climate change may either worsen or enhance the water availability. This study uses an integrated hydrologic modeling approach (MIKE SHE MIKE 11) to compare and combine the effects of future (2040-2069) increased groundwater withdrawals and climate change on surface and groundwater flows and availability for an agricultural watershed in semi-arid south India. Modeling results showed that increased groundwater withdrawals in the future resulted in reduced surface flows (25%) and increased frequency and duration (90 days/yr) of well drying. In contrast, projected future increase in rainfall (7-43%) under the changed climate showed increased groundwater recharge (15-67%) and surface flows (9-155%). Modeling results suggest that the positive effects of climate change may enhance the water availability in this semi-arid region of India. However, in combination with increased withdrawals, climate change was shown to increase the well drying and reduce the water availability especially during dry years. A combination of management options such as flood to drip conversion, energy subsidy reductions and water storage can support increased groundwater irrigated area in the future while mitigating the well drying. A cost-benefit analysis showed that dispersed water storage and flood to drip conversion can be highly cost-effective in this semi-arid region. The study results suggest that the government and management policies need to be focused towards an integrated management of demand and supply to create a sustainable food-water-energy nexus in the region.

  4. Relationship between the matrix effect and the physicochemical properties of analytes in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Kanju; Kudo, Keiko; Hayashida, Makiko; Kurisaki, Emiko; Niitsu, Hisae; Terada, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon "matrix-induced chromatographic response enhancement" (matrix effect) causes quantitative errors in gas chromatography (GC) analyses. This effect varies according to the analyte nature, matrix type and concentration, and GC-system parameters. By focusing on the physicochemical properties of analytes, a predictive model was developed for the matrix effect using quantitative structure-property relationships. Experimental values of the matrix effect were determined for 58 compounds in a serum extract obtained from solid-phase extraction as the matrix. Eight molecular descriptors were selected, and the matrix-effect model was developed by multiple linear regression. The developed model predicted values for the matrix effect without any further experimental measurements. It also indicated that the molecular polarity (particularly H-bond donors) and volume of the analyte increase the matrix effect, while hydrophobicity and increasing number of nonpolar carbon atoms in the analyte decrease the matrix effect. The model was applied to the analysis of barbiturates. The predicted values indicated that N-methylation decreases the matrix effect, and the relative predicted values were effective for the selection of an internal standard. The obtained insight into the matrix effect and the prediction data will be helpful for developing quantitative analysis strategies.

  5. Field evidence of groundwater ridging in a slope of a granite watershed without the capillary fringe effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Shin'ya; Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Yamakawa, Yosuke; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2014-04-01

    The controls on the rapid mobilization and runoff of pre-event water are an important issue in hillslope hydrology. One of the mechanisms involved is groundwater ridging, based on the capillary fringe effect. The typical conditions for groundwater ridging to occur are as follows: (1) the slope consists of fine- to medium-textured materials with a large extent of the tension-saturated zone, (2) the slope gradient is low, and (3) the initial groundwater level is high. Where these three conditions are met, a further condition, (4) a small amount of rainwater, would then be enough to trigger groundwater ridging. In this study, we detail groundwater ridge formation in the bedrock layers of Akakabe Watershed (Japan) as recorded by detailed field observations using tensiometers and bedrock boreholes under conditions violating the above. The study site consisted of materials showing almost no tension-saturated zone and had a relatively high gradient (22°). Moreover, the initially high groundwater level did not always generate a groundwater ridge, and a large total rainfall (>160 mm) was required to trigger groundwater ridging. Hence the conventional mechanism cannot explain the groundwater ridging at the field site studied here. It seems that the smaller distance from the groundwater table to the ground surface and the higher hydraulic conductivity in the downslope areas compared to the upslope areas caused a more rapid and larger groundwater level rise in the downslope areas, which accounted for the observed groundwater ridging. This study demonstrated that a groundwater ridge can be formed in the absence of the capillary fringe effect and that bedrock groundwater can contribute to storm runoff generation in headwater catchments under the influence of groundwater ridging.

  6. Groundwater recharge in desert playas: current rates and future effects of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Owen P.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2018-01-01

    Our results from playas, which are topographic low areas situated in closed-catchments in drylands, indicated that projected climate change in Southwestern USA would have a net positive impact over runon and groundwater recharge beneath playas. Expected increased precipitation variability can cause up to a 300% increase in annual groundwater recharge beneath playas. This increase will overshadow the effect of decreased precipitation amount that could cause up to a 50% decrease in recharge beneath playas. These changes could have a significant impact on groundwater and carbon storage. These results are important given that groundwater resources in Southwestern USA continue to decline due to human consumption outpacing natural recharge of aquifers. Here, we report on groundwater recharge rates ranging from less than 1 mm to greater than 25 mm per year beneath desert playas. Playas located in larger and steeper catchments with finer-textured soils had the highest rates of recharge. Vegetation cover had no effect on recharge beneath playas. We modeled catchment runoff generation and found that the amount of runon a playa receives annually strongly correlated to the rate of groundwater recharge beneath that playa. Runon occurred during precipitation events larger than 20 mm and increased linearly with events above that threshold.

  7. Do Groundwater Management Plans Work? A statistical evaluation of the effectiveness of groundwater management plans towards achieving water supply and environmental objectives under a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, E.; Peterson, T. J.; Costelloe, J. F.; Western, A. W.; Carrara, E.

    2017-12-01

    Regulation of groundwater through the use of management plans is becoming increasingly prevalent as global groundwater levels decline. But plans are seldom systematically and quantitatively assessed for effectiveness. Instead, the state of an aquifer is commonly considered a proxy for plan effectiveness despite a lack of casaulity. Groundwater managers face myraid challenges such as finite resources, conflicting uses and the uncertainty inherent in any groundwater investigation. Groundwater models have been used to provide insights into what may happen to the aquifer under various levels of stress. Generally, these models simulate the impact of predefined stresses for a certain time-span. However, this is not how management occurs in reality. Managers only see a fraction of the aquifer and use this limited knowledgeto make aquifer-wide decisions. Also, management changes over time in response to aquifer state, and groundwater management plans commonly contain trigger levels in monitoring wells that prompt management intervention. In this way there is a feedback between the aquifer state and management that is rarely captured by groundwater management models. To capture this management/aquifer feedback, groundwater management was structured as a systems control problem, and using this framework, a testability assessment rubric developed. The rubric was applied to 15 Australian groundwater management plans and 47% of plans were found to be testable. To numerically quantify the effectiveness of groundwater managment, the impact of extraction restrictions was probabilistically assessed by simulating "the act of management" of a simple unconfined groundwater system using MODFLOW and Flopy. Water managers were privy only to head levels in a varying number of grid cells assigned as monitoring wells, and used that limited information to make allocation decisions at each time step. Extraction rates for each simulated management period were determined based upon the observed

  8. A synopsis of climate change effects on groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerdon, Brian D.

    2017-12-01

    Six review articles published between 2011 and 2016 on groundwater and climate change are briefly summarized. This synopsis focuses on aspects related to predicting changes to groundwater recharge conditions, with several common conclusions between the review articles being noted. The uncertainty of distribution and trend in future precipitation from General Circulation Models (GCMs) results in varying predictions of recharge, so much so that modelling studies are often not able to predict the magnitude and direction (increase or decrease) of future recharge conditions. Evolution of modelling approaches has led to the use of multiple GCMs and hydrologic models to create an envelope of future conditions that reflects the probability distribution. The choice of hydrologic model structure and complexity, and the choice of emissions scenario, has been investigated and somewhat resolved; however, recharge results remain sensitive to downscaling methods. To overcome uncertainty and provide practical use in water management, the research community indicates that modelling at a mesoscale, somewhere between watersheds and continents, is likely ideal. Improvements are also suggested for incorporating groundwater processes within GCMs.

  9. Cost Effective Instrumentation for Developing Autonomous Groundwater Monitoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, T. M.; Garmire, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Despite a relatively poor understanding of Hawaiian groundwater systems, the State of Hawaii depends almost exclusively on groundwater for its public water supply. Ike Wai, an NSF funded project (EPSCoR Program Award OIA #1557349) at the University of Hawaii, aims to develop new groundwater models for Hawaii's aquifers, including water quality and transport processes. To better understand aquifer properties such as capacity and hydraulic conductivity, we are developing well-monitoring instruments that can autonomously record water parameters such as conductivity, temperature, and hydraulic head level, with sampling frequencies on the order of minutes. We are currently exploring novel methods and materials for solving classical design problems, such as applying dielectric spectroscopy techniques for measuring salinity, and using recycled materials for producing custom cable assemblies. System components are fabricated in house using rapid prototyping (e.g. 3D printing, circuit board milling, and laser cutting), and traditional manufacturing techniques. This approach allows us to produce custom components while minimizing development cost, and maximizing flexibility in the overall system's design.

  10. Effect of matrix granulation and wax coating on the dissolution rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disintegrating) granules consisting of paracetamol (drug) and acrylatemethacrylate copolymer, a matrix forming material. The effect of coating the matrix granules with wax on the drug release profiles was also investigated. The objective was to ...

  11. Effects of stormwater infiltration on quality of groundwater beneath retention and detention basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D.; Charles, E.G.; Baehr, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    Infiltration of storm water through detention and retention basins may increase the risk of groundwater contamination, especially in areas where the soil is sandy and the water table shallow, and contaminants may not have a chance to degrade or sorb onto soil particles before reaching the saturated zone. Groundwater from 16 monitoring wells installed in basins in southern New Jersey was compared to the quality of shallow groundwater from 30 wells in areas of new-urban land use. Basin groundwater contained much lower levels of dissolved oxygen, which affected concentrations of major ions. Patterns of volatile organic compound and pesticide occurrence in basin groundwater reflected the land use in the drainage areas served by the basins, and differed from patterns in background samples, exhibiting a greater occurrence of petroleum hydrocarbons and certain pesticides. Dilution effects and volatilization likely decrease the concentration and detection frequency of certain compounds commonly found in background groundwater. High recharge rates in storm water basins may cause loading factors to be substantial even when constituent concentrations in infiltrating storm water are relatively low.

  12. Effects of groundwater-flow paths on nitrate concentrations across two riparian forest corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiran, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater levels, apparent age, and chemistry from field sites and groundwater-flow modeling of hypothetical aquifers collectively indicate that groundwater-flow paths contribute to differences in nitrate concentrations across riparian corridors. At sites in Virginia (one coastal and one Piedmont), lowland forested wetlands separate upland fields from nearby surface waters (an estuary and a stream). At the coastal site, nitrate concentrations near the water table decreased from more than 10 mg/L beneath fields to 2 mg/L beneath a riparian forest buffer because recharge through the buffer forced water with concentrations greater than 5 mg/L to flow deeper beneath the buffer. Diurnal changes in groundwater levels up to 0.25 meters at the coastal site reflect flow from the water table into unsaturated soil where roots remove water and nitrate dissolved in it. Decreases in aquifer thickness caused by declines in the water table and decreases in horizontal hydraulic gradients from the uplands to the wetlands indicate that more than 95% of the groundwater discharged to the wetlands. Such discharge through organic soil can reduce nitrate concentrations by denitrification. Model simulations are consistent with field results, showing downward flow approaching toe slopes and surface waters to which groundwater discharges. These effects show the importance of buffer placement over use of fixed-width, streamside buffers to control nitrate concentrations.

  13. Identify the Effective Wells in Determination of Groundwater Depth in Urmia Plain Using Principle Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Babaei Hessar

    2017-06-01

    observations (n, here it is the number of years. So, for each well there are a 10 * 10 matrix. It should be noted in monitoring adjacent wells to a specific well, its dataset is not used. To quantify the effect of each well according to the number of its participation in the analysis and frequency of its effectiveness, each well is ranked. In the next step, the ineffective wells were recognized and eliminated using both the variation coefficient and Error criteria. Following, the procedure will be discussed. Results Discussion: In this study, at first step using PCA technique wells were identified with a more than 0.9 correlation coefficient. Then each well ranked based on the relative importance and according to the specified thresholds, the variation coefficient and error of monitoring was estimated. The wells remain in threshold 1 led to the lowest variation coefficient, considered as effective wells in the evaluation of aquifer parameters. By eliminating ineffective wells at each threshold, the variation coefficient is reduced because of the elimination of wells with a greater difference in water depth compared to the average of whole wells. To check the certainty of obtained results, the error criteria were calculated for each threshold. According to the results, both variation coefficient and standard error of monitoring in threshold 1 come to be at least. Thus, 12 wells remain in the threshold 1 are considered as the important wells in monitoring the water table of plain Urmia. Monitoring error for these 12 wells is equal to 5.1 % which is negligible and can be introduced as index wells in sampling and estimation of groundwater table in plain Urmia. Using this method, instead measurements of water table in 51 wells it can be performed exclusively in the 12 wells. Conclusion: Due to reduction of precipitation and unauthorized uses of groundwater resources, water table monitoring is very important in the accurate management of these resources. Because of extensive

  14. Simulation of groundwater flow and effects of groundwater irrigation on stream base flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska, 1895-2055-Phase Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Peterson, Steven M.; Fienen, Michael N.

    2010-01-01

    Regional groundwater-flow simulations for a 30,000-square-mile area of the High Plains aquifer, referred to collectively as the Elkhorn-Loup Model, were developed to predict the effects of groundwater irrigation on stream base flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska. Simulations described the stream-aquifer system from predevelopment through 2005 [including predevelopment (pre-1895), early development (1895-1940), and historical development (1940 through 2005) conditions] and future hypothetical development conditions (2006 through 2033 or 2055). Predicted changes to stream base flow that resulted from simulated changes to groundwater irrigation will aid development of long-term strategies for management of hydrologically connected water supplies. The predevelopment through 2005 simulation was calibrated using an automated parameter-estimation method to optimize the fit to pre-1940 groundwater levels and base flows, 1945 through 2005 decadal groundwater-level changes, and 1940 through 2005 base flows. The calibration results of the pre-1940 period indicated that 81 percent of the simulated groundwater levels were within 30 feet of the measured water levels. The results did not indicate large areas of simulated groundwater levels that were biased too high or too low, indicating that the simulation generally captures the regional trends. Calibration results using 1945 through 2005 decadal groundwater-level changes indicated that a majority of the simulated groundwater-level changes were within 5 feet of the changes calculated from measured groundwater levels. Simulated groundwater-level rises generally were smaller than measured rises near surface-water irrigation districts. Simulated groundwater-level declines were larger than measured declines in several parts of the study area having large amounts of irrigated crops. Base-flow trends and volumes generally were reproduced by the simulation at most sites. Exceptions include downward trends of simulated

  15. Regional Analysis of the Effects of Oil and Gas Development on Groundwater Resources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, M. K.; McMahon, P. B.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Ball, L. B.; Gillespie, J. M.; Shimabukuro, D.; Taylor, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The California State Water Resources Control Board is collaborating with the U.S. Geological Survey to implement a Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) to assess potential interactions between oil/gas stimulation treatment and groundwater resources. The effects of stimulation on groundwater resources will be difficult to distinguish from the effects of other past or present components of oil and gas development. As a result, the RMP is designed to provide an overall assessment of the effects of oil and gas development on groundwater quality. During 2016-17, the study is focused on selected priority oilfields in the eastern and western portions of the San Joaquin Valley in Kern County to: (1) produce three-dimensional (3D) salinity maps, (2) characterize the chemical composition of groundwater and produced water, and (3) identify the extent to which fluids from oil and gas development may be moving into protected (total dissolved solids less than 10,000 milligrams per liter) groundwater at regional scales. Analysis of available salinity data near oil/gas fields indicates there are regional patterns to salinity depth profiles; however, data gaps between the depths of water and oil/gas wells are common. These results provide a foundation for more detailed oilfield-scale salinity mapping, which includes geophysical methods (borehole, surface, and airborne) to fill data gaps. The RMP sampling-well networks are designed to evaluate groundwater quality along transects from oil/gas fields into adjacent aquifers and consist of existing wells supplemented by monitoring-well installation in priority locations identified by using 3D visualization of hydrogeologic data. The analytes include constituents with different transport characteristics such as dissolved gases, inorganic components (brines), and petroleum compounds. Analytes were selected because of their potential usefulness for understanding processes and pathways by which fluids from oilfield sources reach groundwater.

  16. Empirical method for matrix effects correction in liquid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigoda de Leyt, Dora; Vazquez, Cristina

    1987-01-01

    A simple method for the determination of Cr, Ni and Mo in stainless steels is presented. In order to minimize the matrix effects, the conditions of liquid system to dissolve stainless steels chips has been developed. Pure element solutions were used as standards. Preparation of synthetic solutions with all the elements of steel and also mathematic corrections are avoided. It results in a simple chemical operation which simplifies the method of analysis. The variance analysis of the results obtained with steel samples show that the three elements may be determined from the comparison with the analytical curves obtained with the pure elements if the same parameters in the calibration curves are used. The accuracy and the precision were checked against other techniques using the British Chemical Standards of the Bureau of Anlysed Samples Ltd. (England). (M.E.L.) [es

  17. Potential effects of existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals on water levels and natural groundwater discharge in Snake Valley and surrounding areas, Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2017-04-14

    Several U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) agencies are concerned about the cumulative effects of groundwater development on groundwater resources managed by, and other groundwater resources of interest to, these agencies in Snake Valley and surrounding areas. The new water uses that potentially concern the DOI agencies include 12 water-right applications filed in 2005, totaling approximately 8,864 acre-feet per year. To date, only one of these applications has been approved and partially developed. In addition, the DOI agencies are interested in the potential effects of three new water-right applications (UT 18-756, UT 18-758, and UT 18-759) and one water-right change application (UT a40687), which were the subject of a water-right hearing on April 19, 2016.This report presents a hydrogeologic analysis of areas in and around Snake Valley to assess potential effects of existing and future groundwater development on groundwater resources, specifically groundwater discharge sites, of interest to the DOI agencies. A previously developed steady-state numerical groundwater-flow model was modified to transient conditions with respect to well withdrawals and used to quantify drawdown and capture (withdrawals that result in depletion) of natural discharge from existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals. The original steady-state model simulates and was calibrated to 2009 conditions. To investigate the potential effects of existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals on the groundwater resources of interest to the DOI agencies, 10 withdrawal scenarios were simulated. All scenarios were simulated for periods of 5, 10, 15, 30, 55, and 105 years from the start of 2010; additionally, all scenarios were simulated to a new steady state to determine the ultimate long-term effects of the withdrawals. Capture maps were also constructed as part of this analysis. The simulations used to develop the capture maps test the response of the system, specifically the reduction of natural

  18. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  19. Enhancing Effective Stakeholder Participation in Local Groundwater Sustainability Planning through Technical Assistance in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, C.; Christian-Smith, J.; Dobbin, K.; Cullen, K.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will share content from UCS's new publication, Getting Involved in Groundwater; A Guide to Effective Engagement in California's Groundwater Sustainability Plans, as well as lessons learned from collaborating with community organizations to provide technical assistance to Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) board members and stakeholders in the San Joaquin Valley on Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) development. California's Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) mandates extensive stakeholder engagement, presenting an opportunity for unincorporated, low-income communities that have historically been affected by but not included in water decisions. However, implementation requires a concerted, thoughtful effort. Through technical assistance and strategic outreach, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) is working to ensure stakeholder engagement in GSP development is robust, diverse, and supported by the best science available. UCS created the GSP stakeholder engagement guide to equip GSA members, scientists and interested community members to meaningfully engage in the GSP development process. The guide serves as a technical primer on SGMA's GSP process and as a resource for understanding groundwater management in California. The guide is just one component of a larger effort to overcome barriers to effective engagement in sustainable groundwater management, especially those presented by technical information. In April, UCS co-hosted a technical assistance workshop for GSA and advisory committee members in Visalia, CA with the Community Water Center (CWC), a local environmental justice non-profit. The workshop was well received and UCS and the CWC were invited to host a second workshop in June. To deepen this engagement and provide one-on-one technical assistance, UCS developed a program to match relevant water experts in the UCS Science Network with GSA members or involved community members in need of specific technical support

  20. Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating groundwater flow and contaminant transport at a former uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. We estimated effects of temporal and spatial variability in evapotranspiration (ET) on recharge and discharge within a groundwater model domain (GMD) as part of this evaluation. We used remote sensing algorithms and precipitation (PPT) data to estimate ET and the ET/PPT ratios within the 3531 hectare GMD. For the period from 2000 to 2012, ET and PPT were nearly balanced (129 millimeters per year [mm yr-1] and 130 mm yr-1, respectively; ET/PPT = 0.99). However, seasonal and annual variability in ET and PPT were out of phase, and spatial variability in vegetation differentiated discharge and recharge areas within the GMD. Half of ET occurred during spring and early summer when PPT was low, and about 70% of PPT arriving in fall and winter was discharged as plant transpiration in the spring and summer period. Vegetation type and health had a significant effect on the site water balance. Plant cover and ET were significantly higher (1) during years of lighter compared to years of heavier grazing pressure, and (2) on rangeland protected from grazing compared to rangeland grazed by livestock. Heavy grazing increased groundwater recharge (PPT > ET over the 13-year period). Groundwater discharge (ET > PPT over the 13-year period) was highest in riparian phreatophyte communities but insignificant in desert phreatophyte communities impacted by heavy grazing. Grazing management in desert upland and phreatophyte communities may result in reduced groundwater recharge, increased groundwater discharge, and could be used to influence local groundwater flow.

  1. Crash test for groundwater recharge models: The effects of model complexity and calibration period on groundwater recharge predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Christian; Von Freyberg, Jana; Schrimer, Maria

    2016-04-01

    An important question in recharge impact studies is how model choice, structure and calibration period affect recharge predictions. It is still unclear if a certain model type or structure is less affected by running the model on time periods with different hydrological conditions compared to the calibration period. This aspect, however, is crucial to ensure reliable predictions of groundwater recharge. In this study, we quantify and compare the effect of groundwater recharge model choice, model parametrization and calibration period in a systematic way. This analysis was possible thanks to a unique data set from a large-scale lysimeter in a pre-alpine catchment where daily long-term recharge rates are available. More specifically, the following issues are addressed: We systematically evaluate how the choice of hydrological models influences predictions of recharge. We assess how different parameterizations of models due to parameter non-identifiability affect predictions of recharge by applying a Monte Carlo approach. We systematically assess how the choice of calibration periods influences predictions of recharge within a differential split sample test focusing on the model performance under extreme climatic and hydrological conditions. Results indicate that all applied models (simple lumped to complex physically based models) were able to simulate the observed recharge rates for five different calibration periods. However, there was a marked impact of the calibration period when the complete 20 years validation period was simulated. Both, seasonal and annual differences between simulated and observed daily recharge rates occurred when the hydrological conditions were different to the calibration period. These differences were, however, less distinct for the physically based models, whereas the simpler models over- or underestimate the observed recharge depending on the considered season. It is, however, possible to reduce the differences for the simple models by

  2. Groundwater availability mediates the ecosystem effects of an invasion of Prosopis pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Bruce D; Hughes, R Flint; Ostertag, Rebecca

    Groundwater levels in arid environments are dropping worldwide due to human extraction, and precipitation events are predicted to become rarer and more intense in many arid areas with global climate change. These changes will likely alter both primary productivity and plant–soil nutrient cycles. To better understand the nature of such alterations, we examined effects of groundwater availability on plant–soil nitrogen (N) cycling in areas invaded by the N-fixing phreatophyte, Prosopis pallida, on the dry leeward coast of Hawai‘i Island. Our aims were to quantify effects of groundwater availability to P. pallida on rates of litterfall N inputs and accretion in soils and to quantify effects of groundwater availability on N mineralization and leaching rates of inorganic N under natural rainfall conditions and simulated rain events. Stem water δ18O values indicate that P. pallida trees in lowland plots accessed shallow groundwater, while in upland plots they relied solely on rainfall. During drought periods, P. pallida at upland plots experienced water stress, evidenced by lower stem water potentials, higher water-use efficiency, and lower predawn photosynthetic performance than at lowland plots. Prosopis pallida basal area was 5.3 times greater at lowland plots, and these plots exhibited 17 times higher carbon (C), 24 times higher N, and 35 times higher phosphorus (P) additions via litterfall, indicating that productivity of this phreatophyte was decoupled from rainfall where groundwater was present. Total N mass in soils was 4.7 times greater where groundwater was accessible, supporting the case that groundwater access increased N2 fixation at a stand level. In contrast, N mineralization and leaching losses from soils, though substantially greater in lowland relative to upland areas, were strongly controlled by rainfall. Results provide clear examples of how invasive species with particular functional attributes (i.e., N-fixing phreatophytes) exploit otherwise

  3. Potential effects of groundwater and surface water contamination in an urban area, Qus City, Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Fathy; Khalil, Ramadan

    2018-05-01

    The potential effects of anthropogenic activities, in particular, unsafe sewage disposal practices, on shallow groundwater in an unconfined aquifer and on surface water were evaluated within an urban area by the use of hydrogeological, hydrochemical, and bacteriological analyses. Physicochemical and bacteriological data was obtained from forty-five sampling points based on33 groundwater samples from variable depths and 12 surface water samples. The pollution sources are related to raw sewage and wastewater discharges, agricultural runoff, and wastewater from the nearby Paper Factory. Out of the 33 groundwater samples studied, 17 had significant concentrations of NO3-, Cl- and SO42-, and high bacteria counts. Most of the water samples from the wells contained high Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr. The majority of surface water samples presented high NO3- concentrations and high bacteria counts. A scatter plot of HCO3- versus Ca indicates that 58% of the surface water samples fall within the extreme contamination zone, while the others are within the mixing zone; whereas 94% of groundwater samples showed evidence of mixing between groundwater and wastewater. The bacteriological assessment showed that all measured surface and groundwater samples contained Escherichia coli and total coliform bacteria. A risk map delineated four classes of contamination, namely, those sampling points with high (39.3%), moderate (36.3%), low (13.3%), and very low (11.1%) levels of contamination. Most of the highest pollution points were in the middle part of the urban area, which suffers from unmanaged sewage and industrial effluents. Overall, the results demonstrate that surface and groundwater in Qus City are at high risk of contamination by wastewater since the water table is shallow and there is a lack of a formal sanitation network infrastructure. The product risk map is a useful tool for prioritizing zones that require immediate mitigation and monitoring.

  4. The effect of chronic periodontitis on serum levels of matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A complex network of chemokines and pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is involved in the initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main enzymes responsible for matrix degradation, are important for periodontal tissue destruction, but their activity can be inhibited by tissue ...

  5. Iodine dispersion and effects on groundwater chemistry following a release to a peat bog, Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Thibault, D.H.; Smith, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The migration and behaviour of I was investigated in a sphagnum bog on the precambrian Shield in eastern Manitoba, Canada. A 6 M solution of K1 was released at the base of the bog to simulate a pulse discharge of contaminated groundwater from a fracture in the granitic rock. A network of piezometer tubes was used to monitor the dispersion of the I and the groundwater chemistry over 1 year. Cores of peat were also taken for analysis to supplement the groundwater data and to investigate the sorption of I. The introduced I dispersed 2 m horizontally and 1 m vertically within a month. After this, the system stabilized and further migration was insignificant. The pattern of I dispersion indicated that the bog hydrology was very complex with flow directions changing substantially with depth. The groundwater concentrations of the major cations rose in response to the mass action effect of K displacing them from reaction sites in the peat. Humic materials in the groundwater decreased in size after the KI release and returned to their pre-release conformation one month later. The geometric mean soil distribution coefficient value, K d , for I in the bog was 1.361/kg, but it was strongly related to pore water concentration. Thus, a single K d value was insufficient for describing the system. (author)

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Veterinary Antibiotics on Denitrification in Groundwater: A Microcosm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary antibiotics in groundwater may affect natural microbial denitrification process. A microcosm study was conducted to evaluate the influence of sulfamethazine and chlortetracycline at different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L on nitrate reduction in groundwater under denitrifying condition. Decrease in nitrate removal and nitrite production was observed with the antibiotics. Maximum inhibition of nitrate removal was observed after seven days of incubation with 0.01 mg/L sulfamethazine (17.0% and 1.0 mg/L chlortetracycline (15.4%. The nitrite production was inhibited with 1.0 mg/L sulfamethazine to 82.0% and chlortetracycline to 31.1%. The initial/final nitrate concentrations indicated that 0.01 mg/L sulfamethazine and 1.0 mg/L chlortetracycline were most effective in inhibiting activity of denitrifying bacteria in groundwater. After 12 days of incubation, the sulfamethazine biodegradation was observed whereas chlortetracycline was persistent. Sulfamethazine and chlortetracycline in groundwater could inhibit the growth and capability of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria, thereby threatening nitrate pollution in groundwater.

  7. Water scarcity, groundwater and base flow in Dutch catchments: effects of climate and human impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, D. M. D.; van Ek, R.; Kuijper, M. J. M.

    2012-04-01

    During recent years (2003, 2006 en 2008) water boards in the Netherlands have had to cope with drought and water scarcity. Because of human impacts in the area, like groundwater abstraction and extensive drainage, the upper parts of streams run dry during low precipitation periods. The lack of water is a risk for the environmental flow needs of the streams. In addition, agricultural areas encounter problems due to low groundwater levels and limited availability of water for spray irrigation. Such problems are likely to occur more frequent in the future, because of increasing frequency of dry spells, reduced water intake possibilities from large rivers and a higher demand for water for agriculture and other land use functions. Several studies have been carried out to investigate the possibilities for structural improvement of groundwater and base flow conditions, thereby improving the situation of agriculture and ecology (Hendriks et al., 2010; Kuijper et al., 2012). The effects of both climate change and unsustainable use of water resources on base flow were assessed at various scales. For this purpose, spatially distributed groundwater models with fine meshed grids (25x25 m) were used to simultaneously assess the effects of climate and human impacts on both groundwater conditions and surface water discharge. Climatic effects were assessed by comparison of meteorologically dry and average years, as well as through climate scenarios from the Royal Dutch Weather Service (KNMI). Human impacts were assessed by modeling various scenarios with reduced or increased drainage and groundwater abstraction, including a scenario of the undisturbed situation. Also, the impact of stream morphology was studied. The suitability of a new modeling approach (Van der Velde et al., 2009), allowing a fast assessment of discharge with high accuracy, was tested to improve discharge simulations from groundwater models. Model results show that extensive drainage systems have a large impact

  8. Effective medium theory for elastic matrix composites containing dispersed particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhon, M.S.; Metz, R.J.; Freed, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new, effective medium theory to study the wave propagation and mechanical properties of a composite system with dispersed particulates. One main emphasis here is in formulating the theory and in analyzing the structure of the contribution of the fillers to the elastic response. By constructing the elastic propagator (whose fluid mechanical counterpart is known as the Oseen tensor), we show that an analogy between the theoretical description of the particulate system and of suspension rheology exists when the former corresponds to a high-rigidity solid matrix (or, analogously, when the Poisson ratio is close to 1/2) in steady state. The effective Lame constants for this case are derived by combining this analogy with the theory developed by Freed and Muthukumar for the rheology of a suspension of spheres. The analogy is also useful in our new prediction of the phenomenon of elastic screening, the possible existence of a cutoff frequency below which elastic waves cannot propagate in the filler system

  9. Disentangling urban habitat and matrix effects on wild bee species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie K. Fischer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In face of a dramatic decline of wild bee species in many rural landscapes, potential conservation functions of urban areas gain importance. Yet effects of urbanization on pollinators, and in particular on wild bees, remain ambiguous and not comprehensively understood. This is especially true for amenity grassland and extensively managed wastelands within large-scale residential housing areas. Using Berlin as a study region, we aimed to investigate (a if these greenspaces are accepted by wild bee assemblages as foraging habitats; (b how assemblage structure of bees and individual bee species are affected by different habitat (e.g., management, flower density and urban matrix variables (e.g., isolation, urbanization; and (c to what extent grassland restoration can promote bees in urban environments. In summer 2012, we collected 62 bee species belonging to more than 20% of the taxa known for Berlin. Urbanization significantly affected species composition of bees; 18 species were affiliated to different levels of urbanization. Most bee species were not affected by any of the environmental variables tested, and urbanization had a negative effect only for one bee species. Further, we determined that restoration of diverse grasslands positively affected bee species richnesss in urban environments. We conclude that differently structured and managed greenspaces in large-scale housing areas can provide additional foraging habitats and refuges for pollinators. This supports approaches towards a biodiversity friendly management within urban regions and may be of particular importance given that anthropogenic pressure is increasing in many rural landscapes.

  10. Chemical Decellularization Methods and Its Effects on Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Akbari Zahmati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Extracellular matrix (ECM produced by tissue decellularization processes as a biological scaffold due to its unique properties compared to other scaffolds for migration and implantation of stem cells have been used successfully in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the last years. The objective of this manuscript was to provide an overview of the chemical decellularization methods, evaluation of decellularized ECM and the potential effect of the chemical decellularization agents on the biochemical composition. Methods: We searched in Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. The literature search was done by using the following keywords: “ECM, biologic scaffold, decellularization, chemical methods, tissue engineering.” We selected articles have been published from 2000 to 2016, and 15 full texts and 97 abstracts were reviewed. Results:Employing an optimization method to minimize damage to the ECM ultrastructure as for a result of the lack of reduction in mechanical properties and also the preservation of essential proteins such as laminin, fibronectin, Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, growth factor is required. Various methods include chemical, physical and enzymatic technics were studied. However, on each of these methods can have undesirable effects on ECM. Conclusion: It is suggested that instead of the Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS which have high strength degradation, we can use zwitterionic separately or in combination with SDS. Tributyl phosphate (TBP due to its unique properties can be used in decellularization process.

  11. Surface motion in the Western Coastal Plain of Taiwan after removal of groundwater withdrawal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Ching, K.

    2011-12-01

    The widespread groundwater pumping was proposed to obscure the tectonic signals expected from the blind thrust faults in the metropolitan Los Angeles. In Taiwan, the tip of westward propagated frontal blind thrust has been suggested to be located beneath the Western Coastal Plain by analyses of the horizontal GPS velocities and the geological uplift rates due to the convergence between the Philippine Sea and the Eurasian plates. However, the serious land subsidence has been consistently occurred in the Western Coastal Plain because of the artificial groundwater pumping for the development of agriculture in western Taiwan. The most significant subsidence rate is observed up to 109.4 mm/yr. The effect of groundwater pumping may disturb the pattern of the horizontal velocities caused by the movement of blind thrust. As a result, ignoring the groundwater withdrawal effects will make misunderstandings on the assessment of location and kinematic characteristics of the blind thrust in western Taiwan by analysis of horizontal velocities only. In this study, to obtain a reasonable horizontal velocity field for evaluating the fault behavior in western Taiwan, we therefore used more than 704 precise leveling measurements and 20 continuous GPS observations between 2000 and 2008 in the Western Coastal Plain of Taiwan to estimate and correct the effects of groundwater pumping. The contour of land subsidence rates in the Western Coastal Plain show a concentric-circle-like pattern with the peak subsidence rates of over 800 and 900 mm/yr at the northeastern and center area of the plain. Next, we will invert the vertical velocities for the land subsidence rate resulted from the groundwater withdrawal, using a dislocation model in an elastic half-space material. The accuracy of this dislocation model will also be assessed in this study. Then the corrections of horizontal velocities will be provided from this model to help us understand the reliable tectonic signals.

  12. To study the effects of groundwater contamination in Kasur due to Nallah Rohi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghumman, A.R.; Shamim, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater contamination is a worldwide known problem. Pakistan, being a developing country, is also facing the problem created by groundwater pollution. Disposal of domestic wastes and agricultural treatments has been reported to be a considerable factor for causing the pollution, especially the groundwater contamination. In the rural areas of Pakistan, latrines and septic tanks have become common because of the advancement in the living standards. All of the domestic wastes is disposed off into the ponds or nearby passing streams. In the similar fashion, drains in the big and well developed cities of Pakistan lead the domestic waste, along with the industrial waste, into the passing by streams, canals and rivers. All of such disposed off waste is untreated because of the lack of legislation and its improper implementation. The contaminated water affects the health of human beings and also destroys the crops when this water is used for irrigation. So this paper deals with the effects and condition of the disposal of the harmful chemicals, which ultimately through seepage reach the groundwater and make it hazardous. Also, the lateral distances of the contaminated groundwater were found out. For experimentation, major city of Kasur which is in the vicinity of Nullah Rohi, was selected. All the wastes including both the industrial as well as domestic, of the whole area, is disposed off into the Nullah. The percolation of the harmful chemicals and its mixing with groundwater has resulted in the hazardous effects on the inhabitants of the area on the irrigation land as well. So the water in the vicinity, at different locations was tested and the degree of contamination and the lateral distances of contaminated water were also worked out. (author)

  13. Effect of Organic Matter on Cr(VI Removal from Groundwaters by Fe(II Reductive Precipitation for Groundwater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gröhlich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its toxicity, Cr(VI is undesirable in groundwater. Its chemical reduction to Cr(III species, followed by precipitation is the most widely practiced treatment technique for the removal of Cr(VI from polluted waters. The resulting Cr(III species present low solubility, is much less toxic, and can be subsequently removed either by precipitation, or by adsorption onto iron oxy-hydroxides and co-precipitation. The effects of several parameters, such as the pH value of water to be treated, the applied Fe(II dose, and the presence of appropriate mineral surfaces, are well investigated and understood. However, the impact of the presence of humic acids (HAs in this process has only been considered by rather few studies. The main aim of this study was to determine the effect of humic substances on Fe(II reductive precipitation of Cr(VI within a pH range relevant for drinking water treatment. Jar test experiments were performed, using artificial groundwater of defined composition and initial Cr(VI concentration 100 μg/L, ferrous sulphate dosages 0.25–2 mg Fe(II/L, and pH values 6.5–8. It was found that Cr(VI and total chromium (Cr(total can be reliably removed in the absence of HAs in the tested pH range with the addition of Fe(II dosage of 1 mg Fe(II/L. Further on, the results indicated that the reduction of Cr(VI is only slightly affected by the presence of HAs. However, increased residual total Cr concentrations were found at lower Fe(II dosages and/or higher pH values. Additionally, the removal of the Cr(III species formed during Cr(VI reduction was strongly inhibited by the presence of HAs under the examined experimental conditions, since residual concentrations higher than 60 μg/L were determined. The results of this study will have implications to the ongoing discussion of a new, stricter, European Union regulation limit, regarding the presence of total chromium in drinking water.

  14. Modelling climate change effects on a dutch coastal groundwater system using airborne electromagnetic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneca S̀anchez, M.; Gunnink, J.L.; Baaren, E.S. van; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Siemon, B.; Auken, E.; Elderhorst, W.; Louw, P.G.B. de

    2012-01-01

    The forecast of climate change effects on the groundwater system in coastal areas is of key importance for policy makers. The Dutch water system has been deeply studied because of its complex system of low-lying areas, dunes, land won to the sea and dikes, but nowadays large efforts are still being

  15. Groundwater availability mediates the ecosystem effects of an invasion of Prosopis pallida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce D. Dudley; Flint Hughes; Rebecca Ostertag

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater levels in arid environments are dropping worldwide due to human extraction, and precipitation events are predicted to become rarer and more intense in many arid areas with global climate change. These changes will likely alter both primary productivity and plant–soil nutrient cycles. To better understand the nature of such alterations, we examined effects...

  16. The influence of electrospray ion source design on matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Helen; Kittlaus, Stefan; Kempe, Günther; Hemmerling, Christlieb; Alder, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates to which extent the design of electrospray ion sources influences the susceptibility to matrix effects (MEs) in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For this purpose, MEs were measured under comparable conditions (identical sample extracts, identical LC column, same chromatographic method and always positive ion mode) on four LC-MS/MS instrument platforms. The instruments were combined with five electrospray ion sources, viz. Turbo Ion Spray, Turbo V(TM) Source, Standard ESI, Jet Stream ESI and Standard Z-Spray Source. The comparison of MEs could be made at all retention times because the method of permanent postcolumn infusion was applied. The MEs ascertained for 45 pesticides showed for each electrospray ion source the same pattern, i.e. the same number of characteristic signal suppressions at equivalent retention times in the chromatogram. The Turbo Ion Spray (off-axis geometry), Turbo V(TM) Source (orthogonal geometry) and the Standard Z-Spray Source (double orthogonal geometry) did not differ much in their susceptibility to MEs. The Jet Stream ESI (orthogonal geometry) reaches a higher sensitivity by an additional heated sheath gas, but suffers at the same time from significantly stronger signal suppressions than the comparable Standard ESI (orthogonal geometry) without sheath gas. No relation between source geometry and extent of signal suppression was found in this study. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Characteristics of matrix structures and their effects on project success

    OpenAIRE

    Schnetler, Rohann; Steyn, Herman; Van Staden, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of matrix structures and their relationships with drivers of project success, such as communication, collaboration, and trust between project team members. Matrix characteristics that were expected to correlate positively with project success mostly did correlate with the success drivers. However, characteristics expected to impact negatively on project success did not show such significant correlations; some even correlated positively with success ...

  18. Forecasting the effects of EU policy measures on the nitrate pollution of groundwater and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, R.; Kreins, P.; Tetzlaff, B.; Wendland, F.

    2009-04-01

    The fundamental objectives of the European Union-Water Framework Directive and the EU Groundwater Directive are to attain a good status of water and groundwater resources in the member states of the EU by 2015. Following the implementation time table, the EU member States carried out a review about the qualitative and quantitative status for all river basins in the EU. For river basins, whose good status cannot be guaranteed by 2015, catchment wide operational plans and measurement programs are to be drafted and implemented until 2009. In the river basin district Weser, Germany, which comprises a catchment area of ca. 49.000 km2, the achievement of the good status is unclear, or rather unlikely for 63% of the groundwater bodies. Inputs from diffuse sources and most of all nitrogen losses from agriculturally used land have been identified as the main reasons for exceeding the groundwater threshold value for nitrate (50 mg/l) and for failing the „good qualitative status" of groundwater in 2015. For this reason the drafting and implementation of measurement programs in the Weser basin are primarily focused on nitrate. The achievement of good qualitative status of groundwater bodies entails a particular challenge especially for large river basins as the complex ecological, hydrological, hydrogeological and agro-economic relationships have to be considered simultaneously. Integrated large scale agroeconomic- hydrologic models are powerful tools to analyze the actual pollution loads and "hot spot" areas and to predict the temporal and spatial effects of reduction measures. We used the interdisciplinary model network REGFLUD to predict the nitrogen intakes into groundwater and the nitrogen losses to surface waters by different pathways at the regional scale using an area differentiated approach. The model system combines the agro-economic model RAUMIS for estimating nitrogen surpluses from agriculture and the hydrological models GROWA/DENUZ/WEKU for describing the

  19. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  20. The effect of modeled recharge distribution on simulated groundwater availability and capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, F D; Pool, D R; Leake, S A

    2015-01-01

    Simulating groundwater flow in basin-fill aquifers of the semiarid southwestern United States commonly requires decisions about how to distribute aquifer recharge. Precipitation can recharge basin-fill aquifers by direct infiltration and transport through faults and fractures in the high-elevation areas, by flowing overland through high-elevation areas to infiltrate at basin-fill margins along mountain fronts, by flowing overland to infiltrate along ephemeral channels that often traverse basins in the area, or by some combination of these processes. The importance of accurately simulating recharge distributions is a current topic of discussion among hydrologists and water managers in the region, but no comparative study has been performed to analyze the effects of different recharge distributions on groundwater simulations. This study investigates the importance of the distribution of aquifer recharge in simulating regional groundwater flow in basin-fill aquifers by calibrating a groundwater-flow model to four different recharge distributions, all with the same total amount of recharge. Similarities are seen in results from steady-state models for optimized hydraulic conductivity values, fit of simulated to observed hydraulic heads, and composite scaled sensitivities of conductivity parameter zones. Transient simulations with hypothetical storage properties and pumping rates produce similar capture rates and storage change results, but differences are noted in the rate of drawdown at some well locations owing to the differences in optimized hydraulic conductivity. Depending on whether the purpose of the groundwater model is to simulate changes in groundwater levels or changes in storage and capture, the distribution of aquifer recharge may or may not be of primary importance. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. The role of groundwater in the effect of climatic warming on stream habitat of brook trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Freshwater fisheries are linked to climate through the variables of water temperature, water quality and water quantity. These three ecosystem linkages provide a basis for assessments of potential impacts of climate change on fisheries resources. A characteristic of fisheries resources, whether it be the size or distribution of fish populations, or a measure of yield, which can be related to climate through one or more of these linkages, is a useful tool with which to forecast the effects of climate change. A stream population of brook trout is a coldwater fisheries resource that is linked to climate by groundwater. Stream dwelling brook trout at low altitudes rely heavily on groundwater discharge in summer to maintain low stream temperature. Groundwater temperature tracks mean annual air temperature due to the insulative effect of the lower troposphere on the surface of the earth. The effect of elevated groundwater temperature on the stream habitat of brook trout was investigated in two brook trout streams north of Toronto, Ontario, with an energy balance stream temperature model, calibrated to both streams to simulate maximum water temperature observed in the brook trout zones. Simulated maximum summer temperatures from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies scenario reduced the brook trout zones by up to 42%. 17 refs., 2 figs

  2. An Effect Analysis of Comprehensive Treatment of Groundwater Over-Exploitation in Cheng’an County, Hebei Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Shao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive treatment project of groundwater over-exploitation in Hebei Province has been implemented for more than a year, and the effect of exploitation restriction is in urgent need of evaluation. This paper deals with Cheng’an County of Hebei Province as the research subject. Based on collected hydro-meteorological, socioeconomic, groundwater, and other related data, together with typical regional experimental research, this study generates the effective precipitation–groundwater exploitation (P-W curve and accompanying research methods, and calculates the quantity of groundwater exploitation restriction. It analyzes the target completion status of groundwater exploitation restriction through water conservancy measures and agricultural practices of the groundwater over-exploitation comprehensive treatment project that was implemented in Cheng’an County in 2014. The paper evaluates the treatment effect of groundwater over-exploitation, as well as provides technical support for the effect evaluation of groundwater exploitation restriction of agricultural irrigation in Cheng’an County and relevant areas.

  3. Effects of road salts on groundwater and surface water ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Road salts are a growing environmental concern in urban watersheds. We examined groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) dynamics of Na+ and Cl− in Minebank Run (MBR), an urban stream in Maryland, USA. We observed an increasing salinity trend in this restored stream. Current baseflow salinity does not exceed water quality recommendations, but rapid “first flush” storm flow was approximately one-third that of seawater. Comparisons between the upstream and downstream study reaches suggest that a major interstate highway is the primary road salt source. A heavily used road parallels most of MBR and was an additional source to GW concentrations, especially the downstream right bank. A baseflow synoptic survey identified zones of increased salinity. Downstream piezometer wells exhibited increases in salt concentrations and there was evidence that Na+ is exchanging Ca2+ and Mg2+ on soils. SW salt concentrations were generally elevated above GW concentrations. Salinity levels persisted at MBR throughout the year and were above background levels at Bynum Run, a nearby reference stream not bisected by a major highway, suggesting that GW is a long-term reservoir for accumulating road salts. Chronic salinity levels may be high enough to damage vegetation and salinity peaks could impact other biota. Beneficial uses and green infrastructure investments may be at risk from salinity driven degradation. Therefore, road salt may represent an environmental risk that could af

  4. Surface deformation in the Western Coastal Plain of Taiwan after removal of groundwater withdrawal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Ching, K.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of widespread groundwater pumping has been proposed to be able to obscure the tectonic signals resulted from the movement of blind thrust faults, such as the metropolitan Los Angeles. In Taiwan, the tip of westward-propagating frontal blind thrust has been suggested to be located beneath the Western Coastal Plain by analyses of the horizontal GPS velocities and the geological uplift rates due to the convergence between the Philippine Sea and the Eurasian plates. However, the serious land subsidence has been consistently occurred in the Western Coastal Plain because of the artificial groundwater pumping for the development of agriculture. The most significant subsidence rate is observed up to 109.4 mm/yr. This effect may disturb the pattern of the surface horizontal velocities caused by the movement of blind thrust. As a result, ignoring the groundwater withdrawal effects will make misunderstandings on the assessment of location and kinematic characteristics of the blind thrust in western Taiwan by analysis of horizontal velocities only. In this study, to obtain a reasonable horizontal velocity field for evaluating the fault behavior in western Taiwan, we therefore used more than 704 precise leveling measurements and 20 continuous GPS observations between 2000 and 2008 in the Western Coastal Plain of Taiwan to estimate and correct the effects of groundwater pumping from horizontal velocities. The distribution of subsidence rates in this area shows a concentric-circle-like pattern with the peak subsidence rates of over 80 and 90 mm/yr at the northeastern and center area of the plain. Next, we will invert the vertical velocities for the land subsidence rate resulted from the groundwater withdrawal, using a dislocation model and a tentative mogi-source model in an elastic half-space material. The accuracy of these tentative models will also be assessed in this study. Then the corrections of horizontal velocities will be provided from this model to help us

  5. Economic Effects of Legislative Framework Changes in Groundwater Use Rights for Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Prosperi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In most countries, groundwater resource is a public good, and the entitlement of use rights by the public authority to final users differs according to a country-specific legislative framework. In Italy, groundwater extraction has been regulated through non-tradable private licenses. At present, the public authority needs to reform the current legislative framework, in order to comply with the Water Framework Directive, aimed at the enhancement of the efficiency of the resource use. This research analyzes the effects of reforming the current framework based on non-tradable use rights, by comparing two different liberalization scenarios: an intra-sector market, and a regional market. Although positive economic benefits are generally expected from the liberalization of use rights at aggregated level, we want to analyze whether effects of the legislative framework causes uneven changes on some farm groups. The empirical case study refers to the Fortore river basin (South of Italy, where groundwater covers about 50–80% of current needs, and informal (though illegal water markets across neighbor farmers already exist. From the findings, there is no evidence that the exchange liberalization of groundwater use rights leads to gains in terms of the value added and the farmer’s revenue. In addition, in the case of an auction system regulated by the public authority, farmers whose water productivity is higher may be able to gain, while others may suffer some losses. In this case, resistances from farmers’ associations towards the legislative framework reform may arise.

  6. Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faunt, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faunt, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Drought analysis using SPI index and its effects on groundwater resources in East of Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, A.; Mirbagheri, B.; Kheiri, A.

    2010-09-01

    Drought is universally acknowledged as a phenomenon associated with scarcity of water. Drought varies with regard to the time of occurrence, duration, intensity, and extent of the area affected from year to year. Ground water, which is found in aquifers below the surface of the Earth, is one of the Nation's most important natural resources. Droughts, seasonal variations in rainfall, and pumping affect the height of the underground water levels. The overall objective of this study is to apply a quantitative index namely SPI (Standardized Precipitation Index) to measure the drought conditions in the east region of Kermanshah, Iran during the last 30 years. To do this, different indices were considered to determine the drought conditions such as the longest period of drought, the number of months faced to drought and total drought magnitudes(DM). To evaluate the likely effects of drought on groundwater resources, first the relationship between them was shown graphically and then the correlation was calculated. The results of the research indicated that, among all mentioned indices, total drought magnitudes is a better index showing the drought condition in the region. The results on drought effects on groundwater resources using the correlation coefficient also showed that the droughts will have significant effect on ground water discharge. An analysis of the distribution of droughts showed that for droughts with short periods, the deficit in the groundwater discharge is smaller than in the recharge. While for droughts with long periods, the deficit in the groundwater discharge is larger than in the recharge. Key words: Drought Magnitude, SPI, Groundwater, Kermanshah

  9. Exposure to multiple metals from groundwater-a global crisis: geology, climate change, health effects, testing, and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Erika; Frisbie, Seth; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the global extent of naturally occurring toxic metals in groundwater. Adverse health effects attributed to the toxic metals most commonly found in groundwater are reviewed, as well as chemical, biochemical, and physiological interactions between these metals. Synergistic and antagonistic effects that have been reported between the toxic metals found in groundwater and the dietary trace elements are highlighted, and common behavioural, cultural, and dietary practices that are likely to significantly modify health risks due to use of metal-contaminated groundwater are reviewed. Methods for analytical testing of samples containing multiple metals are discussed, with special attention to analytical interferences between metals and reagents. An overview is presented of approaches to providing safe water when groundwater contains multiple metallic toxins.

  10. Effect of matrix wettability CO2 assisted gas-oil garvity drainage in naturally fractured reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerighasrodashti, A.; Farajzadeh, R.; Shojai Kaveh, N.; Suicmez, S.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Bruining, J.

    2015-01-01

    The wettability behavior of the matrix block is one of the major factors controlling the effectiveness of the employed EOR methods in NFRs. Water injection in NFRs with mixed-wet or effectively oil-wet matrix blocks usually results in low oil recoveries. In this case, gas injection is considered to

  11. Scale Dependence of the Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient : Evidence and Preliminary Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.H. Liu; Y. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The exchange of solute mass (through molecular diffusion) between fluid in fractures and fluid in the rock matrix is called matrix diffusion. Owing to the orders-of-magnitude slower flow velocity in the matrix compared to fractures, matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured rock, and therefore is an important process for a variety of problems, including remediation of subsurface contamination and geological disposal of nuclear waste. The effective matrix diffusion coefficient (molecular diffusion coefficient in free water multiplied by matrix tortuosity) is an important parameter for describing matrix diffusion, and in many cases largely determines overall solute transport behavior. While matrix diffusion coefficient values measured from small rock samples in the laboratory are generally used for modeling field-scale solute transport in fractured rock (Boving and Grathwohl, 2001), several research groups recently have independently found that effective matrix diffusion coefficients much larger than laboratory measurements are needed to match field-scale tracer-test data (Neretnieks, 2002; Becker and Shapiro, 2000; Shapiro, 2001; Liu et al., 2003,2004a). In addition to the observed enhancement, Liu et al. (2004b), based on a relatively small number of field-test results, reported that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient might be scale dependent, and, like permeability and dispersivity, it seems to increases with test scale. This scale-dependence has important implications for large-scale solute transport in fractured rock. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the enhancement of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, the potential scale dependence and its mechanisms are not fully investigated at this stage. The major objective of this study is to again demonstrate (based on more data published in the literature than those used in Liu et al. [2004b]) the potential scale dependence of the effective

  12. Characterization of bacterial diversity in contaminated groundwater using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Misty S; Santos, Inês C; Carlton, Doug D; Stigler-Granados, Paula; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Schug, Kevin A

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater is a major source for drinking water in the United States, and therefore, its quality and quantity is of extreme importance. One major concern that has emerged is the possible contamination of groundwater due to the unconventional oil and gas extraction activities. As such, the impacts of exogenous contaminants on microbial ecology is an area to be explored to understand what are the chemical and physical conditions that allow the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria and to find alternatives for water treatment by identifying organic-degrading bacteria. In this work, we assess the interplay between groundwater quality and the microbiome in contaminated groundwaters rich in hydrocarbon gases, volatile organic and inorganic compounds, and various metals. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were identified, increasing the risk for consumption of and exposure to these contaminated groundwaters. Additionally, antimicrobial tests revealed that many of the identified bacteria were resistant to different antibiotics. The MALDI-TOF MS results were successfully confirmed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, proving the accuracy of this high-throughput method. Collectively, these data provide a seminal understanding of the microbial populations in contaminated groundwater overlying anthropogenic activities like unconventional oil and gas development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of climate change on groundwater: observed and forecasted trends on Italian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doveri, Marco; Menichini, Matia; Provenzale, Antonello; Scozzari, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater represents the main source of water supply at global level. In Italy, as well as in most European countries, water needs are mainly covered by groundwater exploitation. The reliance on this resource is continuously growing, given the key role that groundwater plays for mitigating the climate change/variability and for addressing the significant increase in the global water demand. Despite this, and unlike surface waters, groundwater bodies have not been widely studied, and there is a general paucity of quantitative information, especially in relation to climate change. Although groundwater systems are more resilient to climate change than surface waters, they are affected both directly and indirectly. The estimation of the entity of these effects is mandatory for a reliable management of this crucial resource. The analysis of hydro-meteorological data over a few decades highlights that also the Italian territory is experiencing a change of the climate regime. Besides the increase of mean annual temperature, observed in particular since the early 1980s, longer and more frequent drought periods have been registered, as well as an increase of extreme events characterized by heavy rainfall. It is also noticeable a decrease in total rainfall, that is much more evident in the period from January to June. In addition to the reduced yearly inputs from precipitation, such trends determine also a lower snow accumulation and earlier snow melt in mountain areas, a general increase of evapotranspiration rates and an increased runoff fraction of the effective rainfall amount. As flood hydrographs of several major Italian rivers (e.g., Po, Brenta and Arno rivers) confirm, evident effects concern surface water resources. The main observed phenomena consist in the decline of mean annual discharge, the increase of extreme events with high discharge concentrated in short periods, and longer and earlier periods of low base flow. Impacts on groundwater recharge are not well

  14. Matrix Effects in the Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method of Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H-C; Lin, D-L; McCurdy, H H

    2013-03-01

    Matrix effects are dependent on biological fluid, ionization type, and sample preparation method. Although matrix effects are observed for both ionization types, ESI is especially susceptible, while APCI has proved to be less vulnerable. Sample preparation method has a clear influence on matrix effects as does, in particular, the choice of internal standard. When matrix effects result in severe ion suppression or enhancement of the target analyte by co-eluting residual components, they are typically located in isolated regions of the chromatogram. Postcolumn infusion and postextraction addition methods have been developed for the assessments of matrix effects. Approaches used for eliminating, minimizing, or compensating for matrix effects include improved sample preparation and chromatographic separation, sample dilution, and the utilization of internal standards. Matrix effects may not always be fully circumventable because a perfectly consistent matrix does not exist, but they can be significantly minimized and largely compensated for by various approaches, such as standard addition, matrixmatched calibration, and the use of isotopic analogs of the analytes as internal standards. Copyright © 2013 Central Police University.

  15. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, Lames D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  16. Economic and Water Supply Effects of Ending Groundwater Overdraft in California's Central Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Nelson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss1art7Surface water and groundwater management are often tightly linked, even when linkage is not intended or expected. This link is especially common in semi-arid regions, such as California. This paper summarizes a modeling study on the effects of ending long-term overdraft in California’s Central Valley, the state’s largest aquifer system. The study focuses on economic and operational aspects, such as surface water pumping and diversions, groundwater recharge, water scarcity, and the associated operating and water scarcity costs. This analysis uses CALVIN, a hydro-economic optimization model for California’s water resource system that suggests operational changes to minimize net system costs for a given set of conditions, such as ending long-term overdraft. Based on model results, ending overdraft might induce some major statewide operational changes, including large increases to Delta exports, more intensive conjunctive-use operations with increasing artificial and in-lieu recharge, and greater water scarcity for Central Valley agriculture. The statewide costs of ending roughly 1.2 maf yr-1 of groundwater overdraft are at least $50 million per year from additional direct water shortage and additional operating costs. At its worst, the costs of ending Central Valley overdraft could be much higher, perhaps comparable to the recent economic effects of drought. Driven by recent state legislation to improve groundwater sustainability, ending groundwater overdraft has important implications statewide for water use and management, particularly in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. Ending Central Valley overdraft will amplify economic pressure to increase Delta water exports rather than reduce them, tying together two of California’s largest water management problems.

  17. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2001-01-01

    In the calculation of non-leptonic weak decay rates, a "mismatch" arises when the QCD evolution of the relevant weak hamiltonian down to hadronic scales is performed in unquenched QCD, but the hadronic matrix elements are then computed in (partially) quenched lattice QCD. This mismatch arises

  18. Effect of groundwater recycle system on nitrate load distribution in an agricultural island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J.; Onodera, S. I.; Jin, G.; Saito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Matsumori, K.

    2016-12-01

    As one of the major elements for crops, nitrogen directly affects the agricultural production. However, the excess application of fertilizers leads to a lot of environmental problems such as groundwater and surface water contamination. Especially, groundwater contamination by nitrate (NO3-) has been an important issue in agriculture areas. Ikuchijima Island, located on the Seto Inland Sea of western Japan is one of the most famous and important agricultural island in Japan, with citrus groves cover 42% of the island. Groundwater is one of important water resources in the area because of low annual rainfall and relatively high risk of drought in the area. To maintain and improve crop yields, nitrogen fertilizer is applied over the whole year at a rate of 2,400 kg ha-1 yr-1. Consequently, most of the groundwater of the agricultural area are significantly contaminated by NO3-, and are considered in "eutrophic" condition. Therefore, the recycle of high NO3- groundwater to the irrigation on the catchment scale is effective strategy for saving both fertilizer usage and groundwater resource in the area. In this study, we estimated nitrogen load from the catchments in Ikuchijima Island using the SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model. Especially, we tried to simulate the effect of reducing fertilizer application on nitrogen load assumed the recycle of NO3- in groundwater. The results showed that NO3- loads were highest near the coastal areas, which is related to the distribution of citrus farms. 42% of nitrogen load was from citrus farms in the north region of the island, and it ups to 60 % in the south region. It indicates fertilizer is the major source of nitrogen load in the island. Higher average nitrogen loadings also occurred in high density of residential area. The total nitrogen load from whole island was estimated to be 82507kg/year when the annual nitrogen fertilizer application is 240kg/ha/year. However, it decreased to 42548kg/year when the fertilizer

  19. Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Effects of Ground-Water Irrigation on Base Flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Steven M.; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Saunders, Amanda T.; Bradley, Jesse R.

    2008-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture is vital to the livelihood of communities in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins in Nebraska, and ground water is used to irrigate most of the cropland. Concerns about the sustainability of ground-water and surface-water resources have prompted State and regional agencies to evaluate the cumulative effects of ground-water irrigation in this area. To facilitate understanding of the effects of ground-water irrigation, a numerical computer model was developed to simulate ground-water flow and assess the effects of ground-water irrigation (including ground-water withdrawals, hereinafter referred to as pumpage, and enhanced recharge) on stream base flow. The study area covers approximately 30,800 square miles, and includes the Elkhorn River Basin upstream from Norfolk, Nebraska, and the Loup River Basin upstream from Columbus, Nebraska. The water-table aquifer consists of Quaternary-age sands and gravels and Tertiary-age silts, sands, and gravels. The simulation was constructed using one layer with 2-mile by 2-mile cell size. Simulations were constructed to represent the ground-water system before 1940 and from 1940 through 2005, and to simulate hypothetical conditions from 2006 through 2045 or 2055. The first simulation represents steady-state conditions of the system before anthropogenic effects, and then simulates the effects of early surface-water development activities and recharge of water leaking from canals during 1895 to 1940. The first simulation ends at 1940 because before that time, very little pumpage for irrigation occurred, but after that time it became increasingly commonplace. The pre-1940 simulation was calibrated against measured water levels and estimated long-term base flow, and the 1940 through 2005 simulation was calibrated against measured water-level changes and estimated long-term base flow. The calibrated 1940 through 2005 simulation was used as the basis for analyzing hypothetical scenarios to evaluate the effects of

  20. Effect of temporal averaging of meteorological data on predictions of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batalha Marcia S.

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of infiltration and groundwater recharge are critical for many hydrologic, agricultural and environmental applications. Anticipated climate change in many regions of the world, especially in tropical areas, is expected to increase the frequency of high-intensity, short-duration precipitation events, which in turn will affect the groundwater recharge rate. Estimates of recharge are often obtained using monthly or even annually averaged meteorological time series data. In this study we employed the HYDRUS-1D software package to assess the sensitivity of groundwater recharge calculations to using meteorological time series of different temporal resolutions (i.e., hourly, daily, weekly, monthly and yearly averaged precipitation and potential evaporation rates. Calculations were applied to three sites in Brazil having different climatological conditions: a tropical savanna (the Cerrado, a humid subtropical area (the temperate southern part of Brazil, and a very wet tropical area (Amazonia. To simplify our current analysis, we did not consider any land use effects by ignoring root water uptake. Temporal averaging of meteorological data was found to lead to significant bias in predictions of groundwater recharge, with much greater estimated recharge rates in case of very uneven temporal rainfall distributions during the year involving distinct wet and dry seasons. For example, at the Cerrado site, using daily averaged data produced recharge rates of up to 9 times greater than using yearly averaged data. In all cases, an increase in the time of averaging of meteorological data led to lower estimates of groundwater recharge, especially at sites having coarse-textured soils. Our results show that temporal averaging limits the ability of simulations to predict deep penetration of moisture in response to precipitation, so that water remains in the upper part of the vadose zone subject to upward flow and evaporation.

  1. Experimental study of the effect of shallow groundwater table on soil thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianmei; Zhao, Lin; Zeng, Yijian; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-03-01

    In plains areas with semi-arid climates, shallow groundwater is one of the important factors affecting soil thermal properties. In this study, soil temperature and water content were measured when groundwater tables reached 10 cm, 30 cm, and 60 cm depths (Experiment I, II, and III) by using sensors embedded at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm for 5 days. Soil thermal properties were analyzed based on the experimental data using the simplified de Vries model. Results show that soil water content and temperature have fluctuations that coincide with the 24 h diurnal cycle, and the amplitude of these fluctuations decreased with the increase in groundwater table depth. The amplitude of soil water content at 5 cm depth decreased from 0.025 m3·m-3 in Experiment II to 0.01 m3·m-3 in Experiment III. Moreover, it should be noted that the soil temperature in Experiment III gradually went up with the lowest value increasing from 26.0°C to 28.8°C. By contrast, the trends were not evident in Experiments I and II. Results indicate that shallow groundwater has a "cooling" effect on soil in the capillary zone. In addition, calculated values of thermal conductivity and heat capacity declined with the increasing depth of the groundwater table, which is consistent with experimental results. The thermal conductivity was stable at a value of 2.3W·cm-1·K-1 in Experiment I. The average values of thermal conductivity at different soil depths in Experiment II were 1.82W·cm-1·K-1, 2.15W·cm-1·K-1, and 2.21W·cm-1·K-1, which were always higher than that in Experiment III.

  2. The effects of uninsulated sewage tanks on groundwater. A case study in an eastern Hungarian settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mester Tamás

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In our study we attempt to demonstrate the effects of uninsulated sewage tanks, which are the most important sources of contamination in settlements without sewage systems, on groundwater quality. We compared the results of measurements carried out before and one and a half years after the construction of the sewage system. We established 3 m deep monitoring wells within a 25 m radius of a sewage tank, which were then sampled, and the level of groundwater was recorded. The 3D model constructed on the basis of the saturated zone shows that the effluent wastewater formed a groundwater level dome with a height of more than 1 m. After the sewage tank was taken out of use the difference between the highest and lowest groundwater levels decreased to a few centimetres. In our study we investigated the spatial distribution of NH4+ (ammonium. Using the 3D model we were able to precisely determine the volume of water bodies with different levels of contamination. In an approximately 25 m3 water body, in the immediate environment of a sewage tank in use we detected NH4+ at a concentration which was characteristic of undiluted wastewater (>90 mg·dm−3. After the sewage tank was taken out of use, the concentration in its immediate environment decreased by more than 50%, although almost everywhere in the modelled area concentrations were measured above the limit value. Based on the above, we can conclude that the cleaning process has started, but the complete decontamination of the groundwater will take several years.

  3. Simulation of the effects of ground-water withdrawals and recharge on ground-water flow in Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket Island basins, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Barlow, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of changing patterns of ground-water pumping and aquifer recharge on the surface-water and ground-water hydrologic systems were determined for the Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket Island Basins. Three-dimensional, transient, ground-water-flow modelS that simulate both freshwater and saltwater flow were developed for the f1ow cells of Cape Cod which currently have large-capacity public-supply wells. Only the freshwater-flow system was simulated for the Cape Cod flow cells where public-water supply demands are satisfied by small-capacity domestic wells. Two- dimensional, finite-difference, change models were developed for Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island to determine the projected drawdowns in response to projected in-season pumping rates for 180 days of no aquifer recharge. Results of the simulations indicate very little change in the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface from predevelopment flow conditions to projected ground-water pumping and recharge rates for Cape Cod in the year 2020. Results of change model simulations for Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island indicate that the greatest impact in response to projected in-season ground-water pumping occurs at the pumping centers and the magnitude of the drawdowns are minimal with respect to the total thickness of the aquifers.

  4. Tidal Effects on Groundwater in a Very Small Tropical Island: A Study on the Groundwater Resources of Pag-asa Island, Kalayaan Island Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ong

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pag-asa Island, with its very small land area and low relief, has a very limited fresh water supply occurring as a thin freshwater lens. Climate, topography, vegetation, lithology, human abstractions, and tides affect the volume of the freshwater lens. Topographic and hydrogeologic surveys, coupled with a 72-hour groundwater-monitoring program were done to assess the effects of tides on the freshwater lens.Groundwater parameters measured in wells during the monitoring program include variations in water table depths, specific electrical conductivity (SEC, and temperature. Changes in these parameters were then correlated with the observed variations of the tides.The groundwater levels oscillate with the tides at varying amplitudes. The hydraulic properties of the lithologies making up the island's aquifer influence the amplitude of the oscillations. Groundwater level oscillations are least in the reef materials and greatest in the sandy materials where it is nearly simultaneous with the tidal variations. High electrical conductivity values are marked in wells built near the coasts and in sandy materials.The average annual precipitation is approximately 2,020 mm. Based on empirical studies, the estimated sustainable yield for small tropical islands is 6% of the lowest annual rainfall or about 20,300 m3/yr for Pag-asa Island.

  5. Beneficial effects of exercise on subendothelial matrix stiffness are short-lived.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Julie; Bordeleau, Francois; Miller, Joseph; Watkins, Hannah; Modi, Shweta; Ma, Jenny; Azar, Julian; Putnam, David; Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2018-03-12

    Aerobic exercise helps to maintain cardiovascular health in part by mitigating age-induced arterial stiffening. However, the long-term effects of exercise regimens on aortic stiffness remain unknown, especially in the intimal extracellular matrix layer known as the subendothelial matrix. To examine how the stiffness of the subendothelial matrix changes following exercise cessation, mice were exposed to an 8-week swimming regimen followed by an 8-week sedentary rest period. Whole vessel and subendothelial matrix stiffness were measured after both the exercise and rest periods. After swimming, whole vessel and subendothelial matrix stiffness decreased, and after 8 weeks of rest, these values returned to baseline. Within the same time frame, the collagen content in the intima layer and the presence of advanced glycation end products in the whole vessel were also affected by the exercise and the rest periods. Overall, our data indicate that consistent exercise is necessary for maintaining compliance in the subendothelial matrix.

  6. Compensation of matrix effects in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of pesticides using a combination of matrix matching and multiple isotopically labeled internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, Tomoyuki; Katsuhara, Miki; Nakajima, Masahiro

    2017-11-17

    In the multi-residue analysis of pesticides using GC-MS, the quantitative results are adversely affected by a phenomenon known as the matrix effect. Although the use of matrix-matched standards is considered to be one of the most practical solutions to this problem, complete removal of the matrix effect is difficult in complex food matrices owing to their inconsistency. As a result, residual matrix effects can introduce analytical errors. To compensate for residual matrix effects, we have developed a novel method that employs multiple isotopically labeled internal standards (ILIS). The matrix effects of ILIS and pesticides were evaluated in spiked matrix extracts of various agricultural commodities, and the obtained data were subjected to simple statistical analysis. Based on the similarities between the patterns of variation in the analytical response, a total of 32 isotopically labeled compounds were assigned to 338 pesticides as internal standards. It was found that by utilizing multiple ILIS, residual matrix effects could be effectively compensated. The developed method exhibited superior quantitative performance compared with the common single-internal-standard method. The proposed method is more feasible for regulatory purposes than that using only predetermined correction factors and is considered to be promising for practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fracture behaviour of hybrid glass matrix composites: thermal ageing effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, D. N.; Atiq, S.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2003), s. 177-1185 ISSN 1359-835X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : glass matrix * hybrid composites * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.131, year: 2003 http://www.sciencedirect.com

  8. Jain states in a matrix theory of the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Rodriguez, Ivan D.

    2006-01-01

    The U(N) Maxwell-Chern-Simons matrix gauge theory is proposed as an extension of Susskind's noncommutative approach. The theory describes D0-branes, nonrelativistic particles with matrix coordinates and gauge symmetry, that realize a matrix generalization of the quantum Hall effect. Matrix ground states obtained by suitable projections of higher Landau levels are found to be in one-to-one correspondence with the expected Laughlin and Jain hierarchical states. The Jain composite-fermion construction follows by gauge invariance via the Gauss law constraint. In the limit of commuting, 'normal' matrices the theory reduces to eigenvalue coordinates that describe realistic electrons with Calogero interaction. The Maxwell-Chern-Simons matrix theory improves earlier noncommutative approaches and could provide another effective theory of the fractional Hall effect

  9. Differential effect of extracellular matrix derived from papillary and reticular fibroblasts on epidermal development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, David; Rietveld, Marion; Mahé, Christian; Saintigny, Gaëlle; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2017-06-01

    Papillary and reticular fibroblasts have different effects on keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects are caused by differential secretion of soluble factors or by differential generation of extracellular matrix from papillary and reticular fibroblasts. To study the effect of soluble factors, keratinocyte monolayer cultures were grown in papillary or reticular fibroblast-conditioned medium. To study the effect of extracellular matrix, keratinocytes were grown on papillary or reticular-derived matrix. Conditioned medium from papillary or reticular fibroblasts did not differentially affect keratinocyte viability or epidermal development. However, keratinocyte viability was increased when grown on matrix derived from papillary, compared with reticular, fibroblasts. In addition, the longevity of the epidermis was increased when cultured on papillary fibroblast-derived matrix skin equivalents compared with reticular-derived matrix skin equivalents. The findings indicate that the matrix secreted by papillary and reticular fibroblasts is the main causal factor to account for the differences in keratinocyte growth and viability observed in our study. Differences in response to soluble factors between both populations were less significant. Matrix components specific to the papillary dermis may account for the preferential growth of keratinocytes on papillary dermis.

  10. Polypropylene-rubber blends:1. the effect of matrix properties on the impact behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, A.; van der Wal, A.; Mulder, J.J.; Oderkerk, J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of matrix properties, i.e. crystallinity and molecular weight, on the impact behaviour of polypropylene–EPDM blends was studied. The blends were made on a twin-screw extruder. The impact strength was determined as a function of temperature, using a notched Izod impact test. The matrix

  11. Temperature distribution by the effect of groundwater flow in an aquifer thermal energy storage system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, B.

    2005-12-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) can be a cost-effective and renewable energy source, depending on site-specific thermohydraulic conditions. To design an effective ATES system, the understanding of thermohydraulic processes is necessary. The heat transfer phenomena of an aquifer heat storage system are simulated with the scenario of heat pump operation of pumping and waste water reinjection in a two layered confined aquifer model having the effect of groundwater movement. Temperature distribution of the aquifer model is generated, and hydraulic heads and temperature variations are monitored at both wells during simulation days. The average groundwater velocities are determined with two assumed hydraulic gradients set by boundary conditions, and the effect of groundwater flow are shown at the generated thermal distributions at three different depth slices. The generated temperature contour lines at the hydraulic gradient of 0.001 are shaped circular, and the center is moved less than 5 m to the east in 365 days. However at the hydraulic gradient of 0.01, the contour centers of the east well at each depth slice are moved near the east boundary and the movement of temperature distribution is increased at the lower aquifer. By the analysis of thermal interference data between two wells the efficiency of a heat pump operation model is validated, and the variation of heads is monitored at injection, pumping and stabilized state. The thermal efficiency of the ATES system model is represented as highly depended on groundwater flow velocity and direction. Therefore the hydrogeologic condition for the system site should be carefully surveyed.

  12. Simulation of the effects of rainfall and groundwater use on historical lake water levels, groundwater levels, and spring flows in central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Roehl, Edwin A.; Conrads, Paul; Daamen, Ruby C.; Petkewich, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Mgal/d in 2000. The change in groundwater-use trend in the early 1980s and the following period of relatively slight trend is attributable to the concomitant effects of increasing public-supply withdrawals and decreasing use of water by the phosphate industry and agriculture. On the basis of available historical data and exploratory analyses, empirical lake water-level, groundwater-level, and spring-flow models were developed for 22 lakes, 23 wells, and 6 springs. Input time series consisting of various frequencies and frequency-band components of daily rainfall (1942 to 2008) and monthly total groundwater use (1957 to 2008) resulted in hybrid signal-decomposition artificial neural network models. The final models explained much of the variability in observed hydrologic data, with 43 of the 51 sites having coefficients of determination exceeding 0.6, and the models matched the magnitude of the observed data reasonably well, such that models for 32 of the 51 sites had root-mean-square errors less than 10 percent of the measured range of the data. The Central Florida Artificial Neural Network Decision Support System was developed to integrate historical databases and the 102 site-specific artificial neural network models, model controls, and model output into a spreadsheet application with a graphical user interface that allows the user to simulate scenarios of interest. Overall, the data-mining analyses indicate that the Floridan aquifer system in central Florida is a highly conductive, dynamic, open system that is strongly influenced by external forcing. The most important external forcing appears to be rainfall, which explains much of the multiyear cyclic variability and long-term downward trends observed in lake water levels, groundwater levels, and spring flows. For most sites, groundwater use explains less of the observed variability in water levels and flows than rainfall. Relative groundwater-use impacts are greater during droughts, however, and long-term trends

  13. Effects of groundwater pumping on the sustainability of a mountain wetland complex, Yosemite National Park, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cooper

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Study Region: We analyzed the effects of groundwater pumping on a mountain wetland complex, Yosemite National Park, California, USA. Study Focus: Groundwater pumping from mountain meadows is common in many regions of the world. However, few quantitative analyses exist of the hydrologic or ecological effects of pumping. New Hydrological Insights for the Region: Daily hydraulic head and water table variations at sampling locations within 100 m of the pumping well were strongly correlated with the timing and duration of pumping. The effect of pumping varied by distance from the pumping well, depth of the water table when the pumping started, and that water year's snow water equivalent (SWE. Pumping in years with below average SWE and/or early melting snow pack, resulted in a water table decline to the base of the fen peat body by mid summer. Pumping in years with higher SWE and later melting snowpack, resulted in much less water level drawdown from the same pumping schedule. Predictive modeling scenarios showed that, even in a dry water year like 2004, distinct increases in fen water table elevation can be achieved with reductions in pumping. A high water table during summers following low snowpack water years had a more significant influence on vegetation composition than depth of water table in wet years or peat thickness, highlighting the impact of water level drawdown on vegetation. Keywords: Fen, Groundwater pumping, Modeling, Mountain meadow, Water table, Wetlands

  14. Effects of dynamic matrix remodelling onen massemigration of fibroblasts on collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Dutton, J Craig; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2017-10-01

    Fibroblast migration plays a key role during various physiological and pathological processes. Although migration of individual fibroblasts has been well studied, migration in vivo often involves simultaneous locomotion of fibroblasts sited in close proximity, so-called ' en masse migration', during which intensive cell-cell interactions occur. This study aims to understand the effects of matrix mechanical environments on the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions during en masse migration of fibroblasts on collagen matrices. Specifically, we hypothesized that a group of migrating cells can significantly deform the matrix, whose mechanical microenvironment dramatically changes compared with the undeformed state, and the alteration of the matrix microenvironment reciprocally affects cell migration. This hypothesis was tested by time-resolved measurements of cell and extracellular matrix movement during en masse migration on collagen hydrogels with varying concentrations. The results illustrated that a group of cells generates significant spatio-temporal deformation of the matrix before and during the migration. Cells on soft collagen hydrogels migrate along tortuous paths, but, as the matrix stiffness increases, cell migration patterns become aligned with each other and show coordinated migration paths. As cells migrate, the matrix is locally compressed, resulting in a locally stiffened and dense matrix across the collagen concentration range studied. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. The Effect of Fiber Architecture on Matrix Cracking in Sic/sic Cmc's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2005-01-01

    Applications incorporating silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites (CMC's) will require a wide range of fiber architectures in order to fabricate complex shape. The stress-strain response of a given SiC/SiC system for different architectures and orientations will be required in order to design and effectively life-model future components. The mechanism for non-linear stress-strain behavior in CMC's is the formation and propagation of bridged-matrix cracks throughout the composite. A considerable amount of understanding has been achieved for the stress-dependent matrix cracking behavior of SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix systems containing melt-infiltrated Si. This presentation will outline the effect of 2D and 3D architectures and orientation on stress-dependent matrix-cracking and how this information can be used to model material behavior and serve as the starting point foe mechanistic-based life-models.

  16. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... surface water–groundwater interactions on heterogeneous behaviour of stream temperature....

  17. Chemical and isotopic seismic precursory signatures in deep groundwater: Cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, D.V.; Nagabhushanam, P.

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory hydrochemical studies were initiated in Koyna, India, to examine the chemical changes in the deep groundwater due to seismic activity, 2 months before the occurrence of a M 5.1 earthquake on 14th March 2005. A few deep wells (100–250 m), out of a dozen, recorded hydrochemical anomalies induced by this earthquake, and the anomalies continued for the next 3 months. Periodical hydrochemical data of one of the wells indicated a linear increase in Cl − , SO 4 2- , F − and depleted δ 18 O from August 2006 to March 2009, though there is no long term change in groundwater level (except short duration seasonal change). The observed linear change is hypothesised as an effect of aquifer response to seismic stress related to an impending earthquake of M ⩾ 5. The observed temporal change in different chemical concentrations projected linearly to the levels of March 2005 and estimated the time of the impending earthquake (the same as that of March 2005 event) as 2011/12. Further, the time projection also made based on exponential increase in hydrochemistry after 3/2009, advanced the possible time window to 2010/11. This hypothesis was realized on 12 December 2009 with an earthquake of M 5.1. Even the simple arithmetic mean of the 45-a earthquake (M > 5) history of Koyna indicates a recurrence time of ∼5.4 a. To account for the observed temporal hydrochemical changes, a model, based on mixing of two aquifer waters caused by seismic stress, was proposed. Hourly monitoring of electrical conductivity (EC) of groundwater also recorded conductivity changes induced by the M 5.1 earthquake on 12th December 2009. A very important observation that emerges from this study is that the cyclic change in subsurface stress leads to earthquakes. Continuous monitoring of EC may be helpful in visualizing the effect of tectonic forces on groundwater chemistry.

  18. Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix as an Effective Reducing Agent and Stabilizer during Reception of Silver Nanoparticles in Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Semenyuk, Nataliya; Kostiv, Ulyana; Dudok, Galyna; Nechay, Jaroslav; Skorokhoda, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix as an effective reducing agent and stabilizer during reception of silver nanoparticles in composites is substantiated. The influence of various factors on patterns of obtaining silver nanoparticles and their size.

  19. Effect of particulate matrix inhibitors on microstructure and properties of 2-D carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlomak, P.; Takano, Shigeru; Wright, M.A.; Ju, Chien-Ping.

    1991-01-01

    Extended-life applications of structural carbon-carbon (C-C) composites involve multiple periods of operation in high-temperature oxidizing environments and as such require a reliable oxidation protection system (OPS). Advanced OPS's generally consist of an external ceramic coating combined with an in-depth matrix inhibitor. This work investigated the effects produced by particulate inhibitors doped on the matrix on the microstructure of 2D, PAN fiber-pitch matrix C-C's. Boron and zirconium-based particulate inhibitors were added to the matrix material prior to heat treatment. A process was developed to assure a uniform distribution of the inhibitors. Oxidation behavior of such matrix-inhibited composites was evaluated using isothermal oxidation tests. 5 refs

  20. Effect of clayey groundwater on the dissolution rate of SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass at 70 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Echave, T.; Tribet, M.; Jollivet, P.; Marques, C.; Gin, S.; Jégou, C.

    2018-05-01

    To predict the long-term behavior of high-level radioactive waste glass, it is necessary to study aqueous dissolution of the glass matrix under geological repository conditions. The present article focuses on SON68 (an inactive surrogate of the R7T7 glass) glass alteration in synthetic clayey groundwater at 70 °C. Experiments in deionized water as reference were also performed in the same conditions. Results are in agreement with those of previous studies showing that magnesium present in the solution is responsible for higher glass alteration. This effect is transient and pH-dependent: Once all the magnesium is consumed, the glass alteration rate diminishes. Precipitation of magnesium silicate of the smectite group seems to be the main factor for the increased glass alteration. A pH threshold of 7.5-7.8 was found, above which precipitation of these magnesium silicates at 70 °C is possible. TEM observations reveal that magnesium silicates grow at the expense of the passivating gel, which partly dissolves, forming large pores which increase mass transfer between the reacting glass surface and the bulk solution.

  1. Effect of groundwater on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kassir, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results of a parametric study performed to investigate the effect of pore water in saturated soils on the response of nuclear containment structures to seismic motions. The technique employed uses frequency domain algorithm which incorporates impedances for both dry and saturated soils into an SSI model. A frequency domain time history analysis is carried out using the computer code CARES for a typical PWR containment structure. Structural responses presented in terms of floor response spectra indicate that considering the presence of the pore water in soils could benefit the design of massive nuclear containment structures

  2. Characteristics of Leachate and Their Effect on Shallow Groundwater Quality (Case Study : TPA Cipayung, Depok)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastuti, Atika; Hartono, Djoko M.; Moersidik, Setyo S.; Gusniani, Irma

    2018-03-01

    The problems arising from landfill activity is leaked leachate that is not absorbed well into leachate stabilization pond which furthermore contaminates shallow groundwater around landfill, include Cipayung landfill. The aims of this study is to determine the characteristics of leachate and their effect on shallow groundwater quality around landfill based on temperature, pH, Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Nitrogen (TN), Mercury (Hg), and fecal coliform. Data were analyzed based on leachate samples at influent point, effluent point, and 7 sampling points of residents’s well with distance variation every 100 meters within 300 meters radius having leachate stabilization pond as benchmark. According to the standard of Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry law No. 59 of 2016, the results showed that leachate quality was still above the standard of BOD, COD, and Total Nitrogen parameters; 4178.0 mg/L, 70556.0 mg/L and 373.3 mg/L for influent point, and 3142.0 mg/L, 9055.2 mg/L, and 350 mg/L for the effluent point. Pollution Index of shallow groundwater is between lightly and moderately contaminated. This study showed that the further the distance between sampling point and leachate stabilization pond is, the lower the Polution Index is.

  3. Effect of Climate Change and Transaction Costs on Performance of a Groundwater Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, H. F.; Brown, C.

    2017-12-01

    With surface water resources becoming increasingly stressed, groundwater extraction, much of it unmanaged, has increased globally. Incentive-based policies, such as the cap-and-trade system, have been shown to be useful in the context of groundwater management. Previous research has shown that optimal groundwater markets (i.e. incentives-based policy) outperforms water quotas (command and control policy) with regards to both economic and environmental outcomes. In this work, we investigate whether these advantages of a water market over water quotas hold when assumptions of perfect information are violated due to climate change and hydrogeologic heterogeneity. We also assess whether the benefits of a cap-and-trade system outweigh the costs of implementing it, and how changes in future climate affect the performance a cap-and trade system. We use a sub-basin of the Republican River Basin, overlying the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of the United States, as a case study. We develop a multi-agent system model where individual benefits of each self-interested agent are maximized subject to bounds on irrigation requirements and water use permits. This economic model is coupled with a calibrated physically based groundwater model for the study region. Results show that permitting farmers to trade results in increased economic benefits and reduced environmental violations. However, the benefits of trading are dependent on the total allocations and the resulting level of water demand. We quantify third party impacts and environmental externalities for different water allocations, and highlight the unequal distributional effects of uniform water allocations resulting in `winners' and `losers'. The study reveals that high transaction costs can reduce the efficiency of the cap-and-trade system even below that of water quotas. Future changes in climate are shown to significantly influence the dynamics of the water market, and emphasize the need to address climate

  4. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L; Miller, Richard S

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Review of Irradiation Effects on Organic-Matrix Insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    This review assesses the data base on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation to determine whether organic electric insulation systems can be used in the toroidal field (TF) magnets of next generation fusion devices such as ITER* and TPX*. Owing to the difficulties of testing insulation under fusion reactor conditions, there is a considerable mismatch between the ITER requirements and the data that are currently available. For example, nearly all of the high-dose (5 x 10 7 to 10 8 Gy) data obtained on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation employed gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, or reactor irradiation with a fast neutron fluence far below 10 23 /m 2 , the fluence expected for the insulation at the TF magnets, as set forth in ITER conceptual design documents. Also, the neutron spectrum did not contain a very high energy (E (ge) 5 MeV) component. Such data underestimate the actual damage that would be obtained with the neutron fluence and spectrum expected at a TF magnet. Experiments on a polyimide (Kapton) indicate that gamma or electron doses or mixed gamma and neutron reactor doses would have to be downgraded by a factor of up to ten to simulate fusion neutron doses. Even when neutrons did constitute a significant portion of the total dose, B-containing E-glass reinforcement was often used; therefore, excess damage from the 10 B + n → 7 Li + α reaction occurred near the glass-epoxy interface. This problem can easily be avoided by substituting B-free glass (R, S, or T types)

  6. A Review of Irradiation Effects on Organic-Matrix Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.J.

    1993-06-01

    This review assesses the data base on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation to determine whether organic electric insulation systems can be used in the toroidal field (TF) magnets of next generation fusion devices such as ITER* and TPX*. Owing to the difficulties of testing insulation under fusion reactor conditions, there is a considerable mismatch between the ITER requirements and the data that are currently available. For example, nearly all of the high-dose (5 x 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} Gy) data obtained on epoxy and polyimide matrix insulation employed gamma irradiation, electron irradiation, or reactor irradiation with a fast neutron fluence far below 10{sup 23}/m{sup 2}, the fluence expected for the insulation at the TF magnets, as set forth in ITER conceptual design documents. Also, the neutron spectrum did not contain a very high energy (E {ge} 5 MeV) component. Such data underestimate the actual damage that would be obtained with the neutron fluence and spectrum expected at a TF magnet. Experiments on a polyimide (Kapton) indicate that gamma or electron doses or mixed gamma and neutron reactor doses would have to be downgraded by a factor of up to ten to simulate fusion neutron doses. Even when neutrons did constitute a significant portion of the total dose, B-containing E-glass reinforcement was often used; therefore, excess damage from the {sup 10}B + n {yields} {sup 7}Li + {alpha} reaction occurred near the glass-epoxy interface. This problem can easily be avoided by substituting B-free glass (R, S, or T types).

  7. On matrix diffusion: formulations, solution methods and qualitative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Sánchez-Vila, Xavier; Benet, Inmaculada; Medina, Agustín; Galarza, Germán; Guimerà, Jordi

    Matrix diffusion has become widely recognized as an important transport mechanism. Unfortunately, accounting for matrix diffusion complicates solute-transport simulations. This problem has led to simplified formulations, partly motivated by the solution method. As a result, some confusion has been generated about how to properly pose the problem. One of the objectives of this work is to find some unity among existing formulations and solution methods. In doing so, some asymptotic properties of matrix diffusion are derived. Specifically, early-time behavior (short tests) depends only on φm2RmDm / Lm2, whereas late-time behavior (long tracer tests) depends only on φmRm, and not on matrix diffusion coefficient or block size and shape. The latter is always true for mean arrival time. These properties help in: (a) analyzing the qualitative behavior of matrix diffusion; (b) explaining one paradox of solute transport through fractured rocks (the apparent dependence of porosity on travel time); (c) discriminating between matrix diffusion and other problems (such as kinetic sorption or heterogeneity); and (d) describing identifiability problems and ways to overcome them. RésuméLa diffusion matricielle est un phénomène reconnu maintenant comme un mécanisme de transport important. Malheureusement, la prise en compte de la diffusion matricielle complique la simulation du transport de soluté. Ce problème a conduit à des formulations simplifiées, en partie à cause de la méthode de résolution. Il s'en est suivi une certaine confusion sur la façon de poser correctement le problème. L'un des objectifs de ce travail est de trouver une certaine unité parmi les formulations et les méthodes de résolution. C'est ainsi que certaines propriétés asymptotiques de la diffusion matricielle ont été dérivées. En particulier, le comportement à l'origine (expériences de traçage courtes) dépend uniquement du terme φm2RmDm / Lm2, alors que le comportement à long terme

  8. Seismic effects on bedrock and underground constructions. A literature survey of damage on constructions; Changes in groundwater levels and flow; Changes in chemistry in groundwater and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeshoff, Kennert.

    1989-06-01

    This report is a literature review of direct and indirect effects of earthquakes on underground constructions as tunnels, caverns and mines. The direct damage will cause vibrations, shaking and displacement, which may lead to partial or total destruction of the underground facility. Damage caused by shaking has been reported in several studies, and several hundreds of events have been reported both from mines and tunnels. These reports are mainly from active earthquake areas. There are very few reports of damage caused by displacements on an existing fault. The damage, which may be severe, is generally concentrated to the vicinity of the fault zone. The report also includes a review of the effects caused by earthquakes on groundwater level, flow, pressure, chemistry and constituents in the ground. Such changes are mainly reported from studies in wells near active faults. The interesting coupling of changes in groundwater characteristics around an underground construction is, unfortunately, very seldom reported. The groundwater level and pressure changes are discussed in Chapter 4. The bases for this part of the review is taken from the Alaska earthquake 1964. Other observations are reported from wells and reservoirs located near existing faults. Changes of the geochemistry in groundwater and soil gases are reviewed in Chapter 4. The mechanisms of seismochemical anomalies are discussed and examples of short and long term monitoring are given from USA, Soviet Union and China. Gases in ground water and soil is reported in Chapter 5. Radon is so far one of the most studied species and its variation in short, medium and long term with seismic activity is rather well understood. Other gases or isotopes that have been studied include helium, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, argon and methane, radium and uranium. The paper also includes same statements for repository design based on the result of the review. (81 refs.)

  9. Identification of nitrate sources in groundwater using a stable isotope and 3DEEM in a landfill in Northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhifei [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yang, Yu; Lian, Xinying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Jiang, Yonghai, E-mail: jyhai203@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xi, Beidou [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Gansu 730070 (China); Peng, Xing [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); and others

    2016-09-01

    The groundwater was sampled in a typical landfill area of the Northeast China. Coupled stable isotope and three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3DEEM) were applied to dentify diffused NO{sub 3}{sup −} inputs in the groundwater in this area. The results indicated that combined with the feature of groundwater hydrochemistry and three-dimensional fluorescence technology can effectively identify the nitrate pollution sources. The nitrate was derived from manure and sewage by δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O–NO{sub 3}{sup −} values of groundwater in the different periods. The excitation–emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was further evidence of groundwater DOM mainly which comes from the landfill. The protein-like was very significant at the sampling points near the landfill (SPNL), but only fulvic acid-like appeared at downstream of the landfill groundwater sampling points (DLGSP) in the study area. Partial denitrification processes helped to attenuate nitrate concentration in anaerobic environment. - Highlights: • We used stable isotope and 3DEEM to evaluate of nitrate sources. • Groundwater hydrochemistry was used to assess groundwater recharge. • The degradation process of organic matters was assessed using 3DEEM in groundwater. • This approach is a effective tool for trace to the nitrate sources in groundwater.

  10. Identification of nitrate sources in groundwater using a stable isotope and 3DEEM in a landfill in Northeast China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhifei; Yang, Yu; Lian, Xinying; Jiang, Yonghai; Xi, Beidou; Peng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The groundwater was sampled in a typical landfill area of the Northeast China. Coupled stable isotope and three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3DEEM) were applied to dentify diffused NO 3 − inputs in the groundwater in this area. The results indicated that combined with the feature of groundwater hydrochemistry and three-dimensional fluorescence technology can effectively identify the nitrate pollution sources. The nitrate was derived from manure and sewage by δ 15 N and δ 18 O–NO 3 − values of groundwater in the different periods. The excitation–emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was further evidence of groundwater DOM mainly which comes from the landfill. The protein-like was very significant at the sampling points near the landfill (SPNL), but only fulvic acid-like appeared at downstream of the landfill groundwater sampling points (DLGSP) in the study area. Partial denitrification processes helped to attenuate nitrate concentration in anaerobic environment. - Highlights: • We used stable isotope and 3DEEM to evaluate of nitrate sources. • Groundwater hydrochemistry was used to assess groundwater recharge. • The degradation process of organic matters was assessed using 3DEEM in groundwater. • This approach is a effective tool for trace to the nitrate sources in groundwater.

  11. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for FracturedRock: Results From Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-03-28

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solutetransport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey onthe effective matrix diffusion coefficient, Dem, a key parameter fordescribing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty fieldtracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selectedfor study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale Dem valueswere calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature orby reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed dataindicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor FD(defined as the ratio of Dem to the lab-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient [Dem]of the same tracer) is generally larger than one,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the fieldis comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at therock-core scale. This larger value could be attributed to the manymass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous,fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend towardsystematic increase in the emDFmDDF value with observation scale,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely tobe statistically scale dependent. The FD value ranges from 1 to 10,000for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the FD valuevaries by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differingdegrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition,the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivitygenerally increases with observation scale, which is consistent withprevious studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications forassessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transportevents in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminantremediation.

  12. FIELD-SCALE EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR FRACTURED ROCK: RESULTS FROM LITERATURE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Q.; Hui-Hai Liu; Molz, F.J.; Zhang, Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solute transport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey on the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, D m e , a key parameter for describing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty field tracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selected for the study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale D m e values were calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature or by reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed data indicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor F D (defined as the ratio of D m e to the lab-scale matrix diffusion coefficient [D m ] of the same tracer) is generally larger than one, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the field is comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at the rock-core scale. This larger value can be attributed to the many mass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous, fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend toward systematic increase in the F D value with observation scale, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely to be statistically scale dependent. The F D value ranges from 1 to 10,000 for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the F D value varies by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differing degrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition, the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivity generally increases with observation scale, which is consistent with previous studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications for assessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transport events in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminant remediation

  13. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is significant for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To investigate the shallow groundwater effect under bare soil conditions, we numerically exposed two soil profiles to identical metrological forcing. One of the profiles had shallow groundwater. The different responses that the two profiles manifested were inspected regarding soil moisture, temperature and energy balance at the land surface. The findings showed that the two profiles differed in three aspects: the absorbed and emitted amounts of energy, the portioning out of the available energy and the heat fluency in the soil. We concluded that due to their lower albedo, shallow groundwater areas reflect less shortwave radiation and consequently get a higher magnitude of net radiation. When potential evaporation demand is sufficiently high, a large portion of the energy received by these areas is consumed for evaporation. This increases the latent heat flux and reduces the energy that could have heated the soil. Consequently, lower magnitudes of both sensible and ground heat fluxes are caused to occur. The higher soil thermal conductivity in shallow groundwater areas facilitates heat transfer between the top soil and the subsurface, i.e. soil subsurface is more thermally connected to the atmosphere. For the reliability of remote sensors in detecting shallow groundwater effect, it was concluded that this effect can be sufficiently clear to be detected if at least one of the following conditions occurs: high potential evaporation and high contrast between day and night temperatures. Under these conditions, most day and night hours are suitable for shallow groundwater depth detection.

  14. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  15. Biotransformation and adsorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products by activated sludge after correcting matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu; Li, Bing; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2016-02-15

    This study reported significant suppressive matrix effects in analyses of six pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in activated sludge, sterilized activated sludge and untreated sewage by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative matrix evaluation on selected PPCPs supplemented the limited quantification data of matrix effects on mass spectrometric determination of PPCPs in complex environment samples. The observed matrix effects were chemical-specific and matrix-dependent, with the most pronounced average effect (-55%) was found on sulfadiazine in sterilized activated sludge. After correcting the matrix effects by post-spiking known amount of PPCPs, the removal mechanisms and biotransformation kinetics of selected PPCPs in activated sludge system were revealed by batch experiment. Experimental data elucidated that the removal of target PPCPs in the activated sludge process was mainly by biotransformation while contributions of adsorption, hydrolysis and volatilization could be neglected. High biotransformation efficiency (52%) was observed on diclofenac while other three compounds (sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin) were partially biotransformed by ~40%. The other two compounds, trimethoprim and carbamazepine, showed recalcitrant to biotransformation of the activated sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of the drug-matrix on the stability of enalapril maleate in tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, M M; Abdelah, M K; Badwan, A A; Jaber, A M

    2001-07-01

    The chemical stability of enalapril maleate in tablet dosage forms consisting of different formulation excipients has been studied in this work. The influence of various parameters such as heat, moisture, light and the drug-matrix was investigated. The degradation of enalapril maleate has been followed by using an HPLC method, which was demonstrated to be specific, stability indicating, accurate and precise. The degradation kinetics of enalalpril maleate in phosphate buffer solutions of pH values in the range of 2.2-10.5 were observed to be psuedo first order throughout the whole pH range studied. Enalapril maleate alone showed high stability for temperature under dry and humid conditions, however it became unstable when mixed with the drug-matrix in its tablet formulations and exposed to the same conditions. The pathway of degradation of enalapril maleate was found to be pH dependent. The extent of degradation of two different enalapril maleate tablet formulations (product A of a basic drug-matrix and product B of an acidic drug-matrix) has been investigated. The degree of degradation of the product with acidic matrix was significantly less than that of the basic matrix under same temperature and humidity conditions. In fact, diketopiperazine and enalaprilat degradants were mainly associated with the degradation of the product with the acidic matrix and that with the basic matrix, respectively. Dry enalapril maleate powder showed some photolysis, which was more significant with daylight (3.3%) compared with that under UV light (0.2%). Although the product with the acidic matrix showed some photolysis but the effect was not pronounced and the % recovery of enalapril was almost complete and within the acceptable experimental errors. However, the product with the basic matrix showed almost no response for photolysis.

  17. Effects of Projected Future Climate Change on Groundwater Recharge and Storage for Two Coastal Aquifers in Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is expected to pose a significant threat to water resources in the future. Guanacaste Province, located in northwestern Costa Rica, has a unique climate that is influenced by the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea, as well as the Central Cordillera mountain range. Although the region experiences a marked rainy season between May and November, the hot, dry summers often stress water resources. Climate change projections suggest increased temperatures and reduced precipitation for the region, which will further stress water supplies. This study focuses on the effects of climate change on groundwater resources for two coastal aquifers, Potrero and Brasilito. The UZF model package coupled with the finite difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW were used to evaluate the effect of climate change on groundwater recharge and storage. A potential evapotranspiration model was used to estimate groundwater infiltration rates used in the MODFLOW model. Climate change projections for temperature, precipitation, and sea level rise were used to develop climate scenarios, which were compared to historical data. Preliminary results indicate that climate change could reduce future recharge, especially during the dry season. Additionally, the coastal aquifers are at increased risk of reduced storage and increased salinization due to the reductions in groundwater recharge and sea level rise. Climate change could also affect groundwater quality in the region, disrupting the ecosystem and impairing a primary source of drinking water.

  18. Effect of volcanic dykes on coastal groundwater flow and saltwater intrusion: A field-scale multiphysics approach and parameter evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, J.-C.; Wilson, C.; Ofterdinger, U.; González-Quirós, A.

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic dykes are common discrete heterogeneities in aquifers; however, there is a lack of field examples of, and methodologies for, comprehensive in situ characterization of their properties with respect to groundwater flow and solute transport. We have applied an integrated multiphysics approach to quantify the effect of dolerite dykes on saltwater intrusion in a coastal sandstone aquifer. The approach involved ground geophysical imaging (passive magnetics and electrical resistivity tomography), well hydraulic testing, and tidal propagation analysis, which provided constraints on the geometry of the dyke network, the subsurface saltwater distribution, and the sandstone hydrodynamic properties and connectivity. A three-dimensional variable-density groundwater model coupled with a resistivity model was further calibrated using groundwater and geophysical observations. A good agreement of model simulations with tide-induced head fluctuations, geophysically derived pore water salinities, and measured apparent resistivities was obtained when dykes' hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and effective porosity are respectively about 3, 1, and 1 orders of magnitude lower than the host aquifer. The presence of the dykes results in barrier-like alterations of groundwater flow and saltwater intrusion. Preferential flow paths occur parallel to observed dyke orientations. Freshwater inflows from upland recharge areas concentrate on the land-facing side of the dykes and saltwater penetration is higher on their sea-facing side. This has major implications for managing groundwater resources in dyke-intruded aquifers, including in coastal and island regions and provides wider insights on preferential pathways of groundwater flow and transport in highly heterogeneous aquifer systems.

  19. Coupling surface water (Delft3D) to groundwater (MODFLOW) in the Bay-Delta community model: the effect of major abstractions in the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, D.; Ball, S. M.; Van der Wegen, M.; Verkaik, J.; van Dam, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a coupled groundwater-surface water model for the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento Valley that consists of a combination of a spatially-distributed groundwater model (Modflow) based on the USGS Central Valley model(1) and the Flexible Mesh (FM) surface water model of the Bay Area(2). With this coupled groundwater-surface water model, we assessed effects of climate, surface water abstractions and groundwater pumping on surface water and groundwater levels, groundwater-surface water interaction and infiltration/seepage fluxes. Results show that the effect of climate (high flow and low flow) on surface water and groundwater is significant and most prominent in upstream areas. The surface water abstractions cause significant local surface water levels decrease (over 2 m), which may cause inflow of bay water during low flow periods, resulting in salinization of surface water in more upstream areas. Groundwater level drawdown due to surface water withdrawal is moderate and limited to the area of the withdrawals. The groundwater pumping causes large groundwater level drawdowns (up to 0.8 m) and significant changes in seepage/infiltration fluxes in the model. However, the effect on groundwater-surface water exchange is relatively small. The presented model instrument gives a sound first impression of the effects of climate and water abstraction on both surface water and groundwater. The combination of Modflow and Flexible Mesh has potential for modelling of groundwater-surface water exchange in deltaic areas, also in other parts of the world. However, various improvements need to be made in order to make the simulation results useful in practice. In addition, a water quality aspect could be added to assess salinization processes as well as groundwater-surface water aspects of water and soil pollution. (1) http://ca.water.usgs.gov/projects/central-valley/central-valley-hydrologic-model.html (2) www.d3d-baydelta.org

  20. Anthropogenic effects on the subsurface thermal and groundwater environments in Osaka, Japan and Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamano, Makoto; Onodera, Shin-ichi; Kaneko, Shinji; Yoshikoshi, Akihisa

    2009-04-15

    Anthropogenic effects in both Osaka and Bangkok were evaluated to compare the relationships between subsurface environment and the development stage of both cities. Subsurface thermal anomalies due to heat island effects were found in both cities. The Surface Warming Index (SWI), the departure depth from the steady geothermal gradient, was used as an indicator of the heat island effect. SWI increases (deeper) with the magnitude of heat island effect and the elapsed time starting from the surface warming. Distributions of subsurface thermal anomalies due to the heat island effect agreed well with the distribution of changes in air temperature due to the same process, which is described by the distribution of population density in both Osaka and Bangkok. Different time lags between groundwater depression and subsidence in the two cities was found. This is attributed to differences in hydrogeologic characters, such as porosity and hydraulic conductivity. We find that differences in subsurface degradations in Osaka and Bangkok, including subsurface thermal anomalies, groundwater depression, and land subsidence, depends on the difference of the development stage of urbanization and hydrogeological characters.

  1. The Effect of Nodular Cast Iron Metal Matrix on the Wear Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gumienny

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of the nodular cast iron metal matrix composition on the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance. Nodular cast iron with different metal matrix obtained in the rough state and ADI were tested. To research of abrasive and adhesive wear the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides and without this component were chosen. The influence of the carbides amount for cast iron wear resistance was examined. It was found, that the highest abrasive ...

  2. Thermal exposure effects on the mechanical properties of a polycrystalline alumina fiber/aluminum matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of thermal exposures and elevated test temperature on the mechanical properties of a unidirectional polycrystalline alumina fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite were investigated. Test temperatures up to 590 K and 2500 hours exposures at 590 K did not significantly affect fiber dominated properties but did severely degrade matrix dominated properties. Fiber strength, degraded by the fabrication process, was restored by post fabrication thermal exposures. Possible degradation mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Antibiotic residues in liquid manure from swine feedlot and their effects on nearby groundwater in regions of North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yongxing; Huang, Hongkun; Ren, Tianzhi

    2018-02-09

    A survey was conducted in regions of North China to better understand the effect of antibiotic residue pollution from swine feedlots to nearby groundwater environment. A total of nine experimental sites located in the regions of Beijing, Hebei, and Tianjin were selected to analyze the presence of residues of 11 most commonly used antibiotics, including tetracyclines (TCs), fluoroquinolones (FQNs), sulfonamides (SAs), macrolides, and fenicols, by using liquid chromatography spectrometry. The three most common antibiotics were TCs, FQNs, and SAs, with mean concentrations of 416.4, 228.8, and 442.4 μg L -1 in wastewater samples; 19.9, 11.8, and 0.3 μg L -1 in groundwater samples from swine feedlots; and 29.7, 14.0, and 0 μg L -1 in groundwater samples from villages. Ordination analysis revealed that the composition and distribution of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (AGRs) were similar in groundwater samples from swine feedlots and villages. FQNs and TCs occurred along the path from wastewater to groundwater at high concentrations and showed correlations with ARGs, with a strong correlation between FQN resistance gene (qnrA) copy number. FQN concentration was also found (P < 0.01) in wastewater and groundwater in villages (P < 0.01). Therefore, antibiotics discharged from swine feedlots through wastewater could disseminate into surrounding groundwater environments together with ARG occurrence (i.e., qnrA, sulI, sulII, tetG, tetM, and tetO). Overall, this study suggests that the spread of veterinary antibiotics from swine feedlots to groundwater environments should be highly attended and controlled by restricting excess antibiotic usage or improving the technology of manure management.

  4. The effects of drainage on groundwater quality and plant species distribution in stream valley meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Diggelen, R. van; Wassen, M.J.; Wiersinga, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Conditions in fen meadows in Dutch stream valleys are influenced by both deep (Ca2+-rich) and shallow (Ca2+-poor) groundwater flows. The distribution patterns of phreatophytic (groundwater-influenced) plant species showed distinct relationships with the distribution of different groundwater types.

  5. Effects of matrix moisture on gas diffusion and flow in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhejun Pan; Luke D. Connell; Michael Camilleri; Leo Connelly [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Ian Wark Laboratory

    2010-11-15

    Gas production from coal is a complex process whereby gas, initially adsorbed in the coal matrix, desorbs and diffuses through the matrix into the cleat and eventually flows through the cleat system into a production well or a drainage borehole. Hence, the gas production rate is mainly controlled by the gas diffusivity in the matrix and gas permeability in the cleat system. Moisture in the coal matrix has significant impact on gas adsorption capacity and would also play a key role in desorption and migration of gas. However, how moisture affects gas desorption and diffusion in the coal matrix is still poorly understood. In this work, experimental study is performed to investigate effects of moisture on gas sorption rate for an Australian coal. Coal seam gases, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}, are used in the study. The experimental results show that moisture content in the matrix has significant impact on the gas sorption rate and the impact of moisture content on the diffusion rate is stronger for CH{sub 4} than CO{sub 2}. Moreover, the impact of moisture on gas diffusivity in pores with different size is different, suggested from the modelling results using the bidisperse approach. Furthermore, moisture in coal matrix would cause coal swelling/shrinkage and mechanical properties change that could impact on coal permeability under reservoir conditions. Experimental measurements of coal matrix swelling and Young's modulus on the same coal sample show that matrix moisture content has significant impact on those properties and may have significant implications on coalbed methane recovery and CO{sub 2} storage in coal. 35 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Effects of Airflow Induced by Rainfall on Shallow Groundwater Table Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yong Ge; Sun, Dong Mei; Feng, Ping; Semprich, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    An investigation of groundwater table fluctuations induced by rainfall should consider interactions between the liquid and gas phases in soils. In this study, a water-air two-phase flow model was initially verified by simulating an infiltration experiment. It was then employed to model the interactions between liquid and gas phases regarding actions of airflow on the groundwater table and the fluctuations of the phreatic level and water level in the well induced by rainfall. The effects of airflo7w caused by rainfall on phreatic level fluctuations were also studied quantitatively by comparing the results obtained using the proposed model with those obtained from a water single-phase flow model. The simulation results show that in addition to actual recharge, compressed airflow in unsaturated zones causes the phreatic level to increase, but the rise in the phreatic level is lower than that in the pore-air pressure head in unsaturated zones due to the mitigation of capillary fringe. The existence of airflow enhances the phreatic level rise during and after rainfall. In addition, the water level in the well, pushed by the phreatic level fluctuations, varies similarly to the phreatic level, but it experiences somewhat delayed and slightly attenuated. The Lisse effect precisely reflects the phreatic level fluctuations before actual recharge. Furthermore, the fluctuations in the phreatic level and water level in the well and the contributions of airflow to phreatic level fluctuations are affected by many factors: rain intensity, initial moisture, overlying aquitard, groundwater table depths, and screen depths of the well. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  7. Analysis of Climate Change Effects on Baseflow Index and Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Severe water shortages have been observed globally and the damage from climate change is predicted to increase consistently. Especially, groundwater which accounts for 95% of water resources that ecosystems rely on is very important. In order to protect the health of ecosystems from groundwater, research on climate change adaptation is necessary. This research aims at analyzing the effects of baseflow on Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems(GDEs) through Baseflow Index(BFI) utilizing run-off discharge according to the climate change. In order to analyze the effects on GDEs, Nakdong basin was selected for demonstration. So as to compute the baseflow in the basin, Soil and Water Assessment Tool(SWAT) was employed. This research compared and analyzed distribution of BFI over the past 30 years and expected BFI in connection with climate change. RCP 8.5 provided by IPCC was utilized and the result showed that changes of BFI in four periods, P1(1980-2009), F1(2010-2039), F2(2040-2069) and F3(2070-2099), varied according to weather conditions. So as to analyze the correlation between baseflow each period and GDEs, this research employed ecosystems health index and carried out correlation analysis according to each GDEs. Analysis showed that correlation between baseflow and Benthic Macro-invertebrate(BMI) was over R2 0.7 and correlation to the rest was low. This means BMI prove to be sensitive in BFI. The purpose of this research is to figure out the characteristics of baseflow about the impact of climate change and analyze the impact of baseflow on GDEs through the correlation analysis between baseflow and ecosystems health index. BMI has high correlation to baseflow and the rest do not. Generally, however, GDEs are hugely inter-related to water so that baseflow which accounts for over 40 percent cannot be excluded. Therefore, based on this research, management system on baseflow ought to be established with more endeavors to protect and preserve ecosystems.

  8. Assessing the effects of climate change on groundwater resources in a runoff-dominated watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, L. R.; Hevesi, J. A.; Niswonger, R. G.; Nishikawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater will play an important role for sustainable water supplies in the future. Integrated hydrologic models can be used to assess the current and future availability of the surface-water and groundwater resources. The integrated hydrologic model GSFLOW was used to simulate the transient hydrologic processes in the Santa Rosa Plain (SRP) watershed, California, USA. The 680-square-kilometer Santa Rosa Plain watershed is characterized by forested drainages in the mountains bordering a developed alluvial plain that includes a network of natural and engineered stream channels. Runoff is derived solely from rainfall and streamflow in the watershed exhibits a strong seasonal variation with the largest flows occur during November through February. Spatial variability in climate is influenced by topography, proximity to the Pacific Ocean, and storm trajectory. Groundwater flow is influenced by topography, structure, complex geology, spatial and temporal variation in recharge, and pumping for urban, agricultural, and rural demands. The model was calibrated using available daily climate and streamflow records and well hydrographs for a continuous daily simulation period from water year 1976 through 2009. Projected 100-year (2000-2100) climate conditions developed from selected available General Circulation Model results consisting of spatially distributed daily precipitation and air temperature estimates will be incorporated into the calibrated GSFLOW model. The transient simulation results from the coupled model will be used to evaluate the potential effects of climate change on water resources within the watershed. Future agricultural demand will be estimated by running GSFLOW in decoupled PRMS-mode to simulate irrigation deficiency for each of the selected future climate scenarios. Future municipal and rural water demand will be estimated from population projections in the watershed. The effects of climate change on the groundwater system will be evaluated by

  9. Effect of inclusion geometry and matrix properties on rolling contact fatigue of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyfour, R. W.

    2000-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is aimed at studying the effect of inclusion geometry and matrix property on rolling contact fatigue of steel. Rolling contact has been stimulated in laboratory using a twin-disc machine and an on-line crack detection system. It has been shown that soft inclusions, although normally considered harmless, can be good sites for crack initiation and suitable paths for crack propagation. Enough evidence has been given to show that if inclusions can be maintained spherical, they may not affect rolling contact fatigue life. The mechanical properties of the matrix play an important role in helping or hindering the deformation of soft inclusions. Strong matrix around the inclusion makes it less likely for spherical shaped inclusions to transform to stringers, and as a result, preserves the geometry of inclusion. However, soft matrix enables deforming the inclusion and raises the stress concentration at the inclusion edges. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs. 2 tabs

  10. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  11. [Optimization of matrix formulation of effective parts cataplasm of Pogostemon cablin by uniform design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Gen; Zou, Yu-Fan; Chen, Yu-Zhen

    2008-03-01

    To optimize the matrix formulation of the effective part Cataplasm of Pogostemon Cablin. The optimal preparation prescription was selected by U17 (17(11)) uniform design,and the tacking strength, cohesive strength and transdermal speed constant were used as test indexes. The equations of three test indexes were established by SPSS. With analysis of the contribution of factors by SPSS regression, the optimal matrix formulation was acquired. The optimal matrix formulation is carbopol U10-NoveriteTM7s-glycerine-sorbitol-kaolin-citric acid-aluminum trichloride (1.0:5.0:20:2.0:2.0:0.25:0.2). The matrix has good adhesive property, proper drug release rate, desirable hemocompatibility with the extractions of Pogostemon cablin.

  12. The effects of governance modes on the energy matrix of Andean countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Guillaume, E-mail: gfontaine@flacso.org.e [Latin American Faculty for Social Sciences (FLACSO), Research Laboratory on Governance, Quito (Ecuador)

    2011-05-15

    This article addresses the consequences of different modes of energy governance on the energy matrix. Energy governance is understood as a regulation system of the energy related interplays between the State, the society and the economy. The energy matrix is a useful instrument for comparative policy analysis, since it informs us about production and consumption trends, by sources and sectors. Our central argument is that energy governance follows two different patterns, one hierarchical and the other cooperative, that are not necessarily determined by the initial factors allocation, and produce different effects on the energy matrix. Hierarchical governance is based on centralized decision-making and State-centered development, while co-governance is based on decentralized decision-making and market-oriented development. To develop this argument, we compare the energy matrix from the five Andean countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia).

  13. Effect of fillers on parameters of dry and swollen polymer matrix networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojčeva-Radovanović Blaga

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nano- and micro- particle size of SiO2 on dry and swollen parameter network of the polymer matrix blends of acrylontrile-butadiene (NBR and chlorosulphonated polyethylene (CSM such as: volume and mass degree of swelling Rv and Rw; volume fraction of NBR-CSM polymer matrix in swollen gel V2 elasticity modulus G; interaction parameter between NBR-CSM polymer matrix and solvent λ and crossiinking density ν, was tested. The influence of nano-and micro- particle size of SiO2 on physical and mechanical properties, as well as effectiveness volume ratio of filiers in NBR-CSM polymer matrix at 300% elongation was tested using Einstein-Quth-Gold equation. The Kraus equation for swelling test of NBR-CSM polymer matrix containing nano- and micro- particle size of SiO2. Test results have shown that a greater interaction of nano-particie size of SiO2 with NBR-CSM polymer matrix, and possible chemical bonding, than the one of micro-silica was a consequence of a greater contact area. This results in better physical and mechanical properties.

  14. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David

    2005-08-01

    , leading to decreased water activity in the clay. Introduced ions enter the swelling pressure-inducing volume in the clay. Swelling pressure is systematically reduced at all clay densities by interaction with saline fluids. SKB believes that if the buffer density exceeds 1.9 Mg/m 3 , the functional requirements for the swelling pressure to exceed 1 MPa will be fulfilled, even with groundwater salinities equivalent to 3 M NaCl. Similarly, the functional requirement for buffer hydraulic conductivity of 10 -12 m/s will also be fulfilled if the buffer density is greater than 1.8 Mg/m 3 , and with NaCl equivalent salinity equal to 3M (∼175 g/l TDS). A review of work carried out elsewhere related to the swelling of montmorillonitic clays shows that the mechanistic understanding of such processes is less well advanced than that presented by SKB. Backfill materials are even more susceptible to loss of swelling pressure in saline groundwaters. SKB is currently studying several different designs for tunnel and repository backfill. With regard to salinity effects, they state that a hydraulic conductivity of 10 -10 m/s and a swelling pressure > 0.1 MPa at a groundwater TDS of 35 g/l is the target for this assessment. According to the results of the Backfill and Plug test, the 'concept A' backfill (SKB's current reference backfill concept) had a density of 1.7 Mg/m 3 , a hydraulic conductivity of 4x10 -10 m/s, a compressibility of 30 MPa and a swelling pressure of 0.15 - 0.2 MPa (all with a groundwater salinity of 1.2 % NaCl). These values are deemed acceptable by SKB, except for the slightly too high hydraulic conductivity. However, it should be noted that SKB had to increase the proportion of clay in the mixture from 15 % to 30 % to achieve these properties. SKB continues its research in this area in conjunction with Posiva to assess different backfill formulations. Research on tunnel backfilling in Canada suggests that an initial density of at least 0.9 Mg/m 3 is required to

  15. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Quintessa Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    external electrolyte solution enter the clay volume, leading to decreased water activity in the clay. Introduced ions enter the swelling pressure-inducing volume in the clay. Swelling pressure is systematically reduced at all clay densities by interaction with saline fluids. SKB believes that if the buffer density exceeds 1.9 Mg/m{sup 3}, the functional requirements for the swelling pressure to exceed 1 MPa will be fulfilled, even with groundwater salinities equivalent to 3 M NaCl. Similarly, the functional requirement for buffer hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -12} m/s will also be fulfilled if the buffer density is greater than 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3}, and with NaCl equivalent salinity equal to 3M ({approx}175 g/l TDS). A review of work carried out elsewhere related to the swelling of montmorillonitic clays shows that the mechanistic understanding of such processes is less well advanced than that presented by SKB. Backfill materials are even more susceptible to loss of swelling pressure in saline groundwaters. SKB is currently studying several different designs for tunnel and repository backfill. With regard to salinity effects, they state that a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -10} m/s and a swelling pressure > 0.1 MPa at a groundwater TDS of 35 g/l is the target for this assessment. According to the results of the Backfill and Plug test, the 'concept A' backfill (SKB's current reference backfill concept) had a density of 1.7 Mg/m{sup 3}, a hydraulic conductivity of 4x10{sup -10} m/s, a compressibility of 30 MPa and a swelling pressure of 0.15 - 0.2 MPa (all with a groundwater salinity of 1.2 % NaCl). These values are deemed acceptable by SKB, except for the slightly too high hydraulic conductivity. However, it should be noted that SKB had to increase the proportion of clay in the mixture from 15 % to 30 % to achieve these properties. SKB continues its research in this area in conjunction with Posiva to assess different backfill formulations. Research on tunnel

  16. Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Silicate Matrix for Applications in Effective Media Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Jerman, Miloš; Reiterman, Pavel; Černý, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Silicate materials have an irreplaceable role in the construction industry. They are mainly represented by cement-based- or lime-based materials, such as concrete, cement mortar, or lime plaster, and consist of three phases: the solid matrix and air and water present in the pores. Therefore, their effective thermal conductivity depends on thermal conductivities of the involved phases. Due to the time-consuming experimental determination of the effective thermal conductivity, its calculation by means of homogenization techniques presents a reasonable alternative. In the homogenization theory, both volumetric content and particular property of each phase need to be identified. For porous materials the most problematic part is to accurately identify thermal conductivity of the solid matrix. Due to the complex composition of silicate materials, the thermal conductivity of the matrix can be determined only approximately, based on the knowledge of thermal conductivities of its major compounds. In this paper, the thermal conductivity of silicate matrix is determined using the measurement of a sufficiently large set of experimental data. Cement pastes with different open porosities are prepared, dried, and their effective thermal conductivity is determined using a transient heat-pulse method. The thermal conductivity of the matrix is calculated by means of extrapolation of the effective thermal conductivity versus porosity functions to zero porosity. Its practical applicability is demonstrated by calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a three-phase silicate material and comparing it with experimental data.

  17. Groundwater sustainability strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; VanderSteen, Jonathan; Sophocleous, Marios A.; Taniguchi, Makoto; Alley, William M.; Allen, Diana M.; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater extraction has facilitated significant social development and economic growth, enhanced food security and alleviated drought in many farming regions. But groundwater development has also depressed water tables, degraded ecosystems and led to the deterioration of groundwater quality, as well as to conflict among water users. The effects are not evenly spread. In some areas of India, for example, groundwater depletion has preferentially affected the poor. Importantly, groundwater in some aquifers is renewed slowly, over decades to millennia, and coupled climate–aquifer models predict that the flux and/or timing of recharge to many aquifers will change under future climate scenarios. Here we argue that communities need to set multigenerational goals if groundwater is to be managed sustainably.

  18. Effects of recent climate variability on groundwater levels in eastern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Schrader, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Water-level fluctuations in wells completed in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in eastern Arkansas were compared to variability in annual precipitation, an indicator of climate variability. The wettest year on record in Little Rock, Arkansas, occurred in 2009 with 81.79 inches of precipitation compared to an average of 47.1 inches per year. In contrast, 2005 and 2010 were the 7th and 14th driest years on record with 34.55 and 36.52 inches per year, respectively. This variability in precipitation was reflected in water-level altitude changes between 2004 and 2008 and 2006 and 2010. Generally, drier conditions between 2004 and 2008 led to an average decline in water levels of 1.62 feet, whereas wetter conditions between 2006 and 2010 led to an average rise in water levels of 1.36 feet. Drier periods likely resulted in less recharge compared to wetter periods. Groundwater use from the alluvial aquifer peaked in 2000 and has since declined, in part, because of conservation measures and substantial reduction in aquifer saturated thickness. Groundwater-flow model results showed some areas of the alluvial aquifer simulated as dry in 2010, indicating a reduced capacity of the alluvial aquifer to produce water in those areas. Additional factors affecting groundwater use include the types of crops grown in an area and the availabitiliy of crop subsidies. Real-time continuous water-level measurements in wells allow for a more accurate assessment of the effect of variability in precipitation and water use than periodic water-level measurements.

  19. Effect of carbonat on the solubility of neptunium in natural granitic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B. Y.; Oh, J. Y.; Yun, J. I.; Baik, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the solubility of neptunium (Np) in the deep natural groundwater of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). According to a Pourbaix diagram (pH-E h diagram) that was calculated using the geochemical modeling program PHREEQC 2.0, the redox potential and the carbonate ion concentration both control the solubility of neptunium. The carbonate effect becomes pronounced when the total carbonate concentration is higher than 1.5x10 -2 M at E h = -200 mV and the pH value is 10. Given the assumption that the solubility-limiting stable solid phase is Np(OH) 4 (am) under the reducing condition relevant to KURT, the soluble neptunium concentrations were in the range of 1x10 -9 M to 3x10 -9 M under natural groundwater conditions. However, the solubility of neptunium, which was calculated with the formation constants of neptunium complexes selected in an OECD-NEA TDB review, strongly deviates from the value measured in natural groundwater. Thus, it is highly recommended that a prediction of neptunium solubility is based on the formation constants of ternary Np(IV) hydroxo-carbon ato complexes, even though the presence of those complexes is deficient in terms of the characterization of neptunium species. Based on a comparison of the measurement sand calculations of geochemical modeling, the formation constants for the 'upper limit' of the Np(IV) hydroxo-carbonato complexes, namely Np(OH) y (CO 3 ) z 4-y-2z , were appraised as follows: log K .deg. 122 = -3.0±0.5 for Np(OH) 2 (CO 3 ) 2 2- , log K .deg. 131 =-5.0±0.5 for Np(OH) 3 (CO 3 ) - , and log K .deg. 141 = -6.0±0.5 for Np(OH) 4 (CO 3 ) 2-

  20. Quantifying effects of humans and climate on groundwater resources through modeling of volcanic-rock aquifers of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzoll, K.; Izuka, S. K.; Nishikawa, T.; Fienen, M. N.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The volcanic-rock aquifers of Kauai, Oahu, and Maui are heavily developed, leading to concerns related to the effects of groundwater withdrawals on saltwater intrusion and streamflow. A numerical modeling analysis using the most recently available data (e.g., information on recharge, withdrawals, hydrogeologic framework, and conceptual models of groundwater flow) will substantially advance current understanding of groundwater flow and provide insight into the effects of human activity and climate change on Hawaii's water resources. Three island-wide groundwater-flow models were constructed using MODFLOW 2005 coupled with the Seawater-Intrusion Package (SWI2), which simulates the transition between saltwater and freshwater in the aquifer as a sharp interface. This approach allowed relatively fast model run times without ignoring the freshwater-saltwater system at the regional scale. Model construction (FloPy3), automated-parameter estimation (PEST), and analysis of results were streamlined using Python scripts. Model simulations included pre-development (1870) and current (average of 2001-10) scenarios for each island. Additionally, scenarios for future withdrawals and climate change were simulated for Oahu. We present our streamlined approach and preliminary results showing estimated effects of human activity on the groundwater resource by quantifying decline in water levels, reduction in stream base flow, and rise of the freshwater-saltwater interface.

  1. Monitoring groundwater: optimising networks to take account of cost effectiveness, legal requirements and enforcement realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, A.; Spray, C.

    2013-12-01

    The quality of monitoring networks and modeling in environmental regulation is increasingly important. This is particularly true with respect to groundwater management, where data may be limited, physical processes poorly understood and timescales very long. The powers of regulators may be fatally undermined by poor or non-existent networks, primarily through mismatches between the legal standards that networks must meet, actual capacity and the evidentiary standards of courts. For example, in the second and third implementation reports on the Water Framework Directive, the European Commission drew attention to gaps in the standards of mandatory monitoring networks, where the standard did not meet the reality. In that context, groundwater monitoring networks should provide a reliable picture of groundwater levels and a ';coherent and comprehensive' overview of chemical status so that anthropogenically influenced long-term upward trends in pollutant levels can be tracked. Confidence in this overview should be such that 'the uncertainty from the monitoring process should not add significantly to the uncertainty of controlling the risk', with densities being sufficient to allow assessment of the impact of abstractions and discharges on levels in groundwater bodies at risk. The fact that the legal requirements for the quality of monitoring networks are set out in very vague terms highlights the many variables that can influence the design of monitoring networks. However, the quality of a monitoring network as part of the armory of environmental regulators is potentially of crucial importance. If, as part of enforcement proceedings, a regulator takes an offender to court and relies on conclusions derived from monitoring networks, a defendant may be entitled to question those conclusions. If the credibility, reliability or relevance of a monitoring network can be undermined, because it is too sparse, for example, this could have dramatic consequences on the ability of a

  2. Effect to groundwater recharge caused by land use change, comparative filed observation in forest and grassland watersheds, Southwestern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, K.; Shimada, J.; Tanaka, N.

    2011-12-01

    City of Kumamoto and their surrounding area are totally supported by the local groundwater as their tap water source, which is quite unique as comparing to the other large cities in Japan because Japanese large cities are mostly supplied by the surface water which is relatively easy to access for their tap water. Because of this, prefecture government of the Kumamoto City has much concern about the sustainable use of groundwater resources for their future generations. In Japan, for the sustainable use of groundwater resources, the forestation in the groundwater recharge area believed to increase the groundwater recharge to the local groundwater aquifer. It is true that the forestation surely works to reduce the direct runoff rate during the flooding period and also works to maintain a bit higher base flow rate during the low flow period than without forestation. However, the effect to the groundwater recharge rate by the forestation is not well understood because of the increase of evapo-transpiration by the tree itself. In order to understand the change of the groundwater recharge rate by the forestation, a paired catchments field observation has been conducted in two adjacent forest (0.088km2) and grassland (0.14km2) watersheds at the western foot of Mt. Aso known as recharge area of major local aquifer of Kumamoto region. The study sites are located at 32°53'N, 130°57'E with elevation ranging from 500 to 800m. The forest watershed consists mainly of around 30 year aged Japanese cypress plantations surrounded by Japanese cedar and mixture forest. The grassland watershed consists mainly of pasture and Japanese silver grass. Both catchments develop on the mountain foot slope consists of the Aso-2 pyroclastic sediments. As for the hydrometric observation system for each catchments, parshall flume runoff weir for the river discharge, meteoric tower for the evapo-transpiration monitoring purpose, and precipitation gage are installed to calculate groundwater recharge

  3. Insulin-like growth factor I has independent effects on bone matrix formation and cell replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, J.M.; Centrella, M.; Canalis, E.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on bone matrix synthesis and bone cell replication were studied in cultured 21-day-old fetal rat calvariae. Histomorphometry techniques were developed to measure the incorporation of [2,3- 3 H]proline and [methyl- 3 H]thymidine into bone matrix and bone cell nuclei, respectively, using autoradiographs of sagittal sections of calvariae cultured with IGF-I, insulin, or vehicle for up to 96 h. To confirm an effect on bone formation, IGF-I was also studied for its effects on [ 3 H]proline incorporation into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and noncollagen protein and on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into acid-precipitable material (DNA). IGF-I at 10(-9)-10(-7) M significantly increased the rate of bone matrix apposition and CDP after 24 h by 45-50% and increased cell labeling by 8-fold in the osteoprogenitor cell zone, by 4-fold in the osteoblast cell zone, and by 2-fold in the periosteal fibroblast zone. Insulin at 10(-9)-10(-6) M also increased matrix apposition rate and CDP by 40-50%, but increased cell labeling by 2-fold only at a concentration of 10(-7) M or higher and then only in the osteoprogenitor cell zone. When hydroxyurea was added to IGF-I-treated bones, the effects of IGF-I on DNA synthesis were abolished, but the increase in bone matrix apposition induced by IGF-I was only partly diminished. In conclusion, IGF-I stimulates matrix synthesis in calvariae, an effect that is partly, although not completely, dependent on its stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis

  4. Investigation of the effect of groundwater flow in a complex hydraulic situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Szilvia; Balogh, Viktor; Tóth, Ádám; Mádl-Szönyi, Judit

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater flow systems are the subsurface elements of the hydrologic cycle, thus they have an important effect on surface water bodies and surface water-groundwater interaction processes. Moreover, groundwater flow systems are not simple, different driving forces govern and form different regimes with different behaviour. Their effects on surface systems differs, respectively. Based on this consideration, the characterization of the subsurface flow regimes and their operating mechanisms are crucial for the understanding of hydrological problems and situations at the surface. The Great Hungarian Plain can be handled as a natural laboratory, where several geological mechanisms act as groundwater driving forces. As a result, two main flow regimes, a gravity-driven, unconfined, and a confined, overpressured system could be separated (Tóth and Almási, 2001). The recharge and water budget of the systems, their spatial distribution, and their surface discharge features influence the possibilities of water withdrawal from them, their effect on the surface water bodies, vegetation, soil mechanisms and salinization etc. Numerical modelling with COMSOL Multiphysics was carried out for the Duna-Tisza Interfluve area of the Great Hungarian Plain, to characterize the two main flow regimes at three different scales. The aim of the study was to understand the flow distribution and their surface discharge character in quantitative way. The simulation was based on the understanding of the systems' operation from preproduction hydraulic head and pressure data analysis by Mádl-Szönyi and Tóth (2009). These data could serve as basis for the validation of the model. The results were interpreted and discussed focusing on the flow systems' possible influence on the surface salinization, lake water - groundwater interactions, inland water problems, land-use planning. It could be revealed that overpressured system is concentrated in the deep basin and the overpressure maintains

  5. Groundwater-flow model and effects of projected groundwater use in the Ozark Plateaus Aquifer System in the vicinity of Greene County, Missouri - 1907-2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent and historical periods of rapid growth have increased the stress on the groundwater resources in the Ozark aquifer in the Greene County, Missouri area. Historical pumpage from the Ozark aquifer has caused a cone of depression beneath Springfield, Missouri. In an effort to ease its dependence on groundwater for supply, the city of Springfield built a pipeline in 1996 to bring water from Stockton Lake to the city. Rapid population growth in the area coupled with the expanding cone of depression raised concern about the sustainability of groundwater as a resource for future use. A groundwater-flow model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Greene County, Missouri, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to assess the effect that increased groundwater demand is having on the long-term availability of groundwater in and around Greene County, Missouri. Three hydrogeologic units were represented in the groundwater-flow model: the Springfield Plateau aquifer, the Ozark confining unit, and the Ozark aquifer. The Springfield Plateau aquifer is less than 350 feet thick in the model area and generally is a low yield aquifer suitable only for domestic use. The Ozark aquifer is composed of a more than 900-foot thick sequence of dolomite and sandstone in the model area and is the primary aquifer throughout most of southern Missouri. Wells open to the entire thickness of the Ozark aquifer typically yield 1,000 gallons per minute or more. Between the two aquifers is the Ozark confining unit composed of as much as 98 feet of shale and limestone. Karst features such as sinkholes, springs, caves, and losing streams are present in both aquifers, but the majority of these features occur in the Springfield Plateau aquifer. The solution-enlarged fracture and bedding plane conduits in the karst system, particularly in the Springfield Plateau aquifer, are capable of moving large quantities of groundwater through

  6. Effects of groundwater regulation on aquifer-system compaction and subsidence in the Houston-Galveston Region, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Turco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence has been a primary concern in the Houston area for many years. Since 1906, about 4 m of subsidence has occurred in the coastal areas, with a broad area of about 2 m of subsidence existing today throughout most of the Houston Area. In 1975, as a result of area residents and local governments becoming increasingly alarmed by the continued impact of subsidence on economic growth and quality of life in the region, the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District was created by the 64th Texas Legislature as an underground water conservation district with the mission to provide for the regulation of the withdrawal of groundwater to control subsidence. Over its nearly 40 years of existence, the District has developed substantial data sets providing the foundation for its regulatory plan. The District's regulatory plan allows groundwater users an amount of annual groundwater based on a percentage of an individual permitee's total water demand. The management of the groundwater resources within the District has involved significant coordination with regional ground and surface water suppliers; ongoing interaction with other state and local regulatory bodies; analysis of accurate and up to date predictions on water usage; the enforcement of disincentives to those who rely too heavily on groundwater and a commitment to practicing and promoting water conservation. Areas nearest the Gulf of Mexico coast have completed the conversion to alternative (other than groundwater water sources, consequently the effective stress on the aquifer has decreased and subsidence rates have been reduced. Areas within the District further inland are currently proceeding through the conversion process, and subsidence has continued in those areas as development of the groundwater resources has continued.

  7. Simulating the effect of water management decisions on groundwater flow and quality in the Kyzylkum Irrigation Scheme, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudascher, R. M.; Marti, B. S.; Siegfried, T.; Wolfgang, K.; Anselm, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Kyzylkum Irrigation Scheme lies north of the Chardara reservoir on the banks of the river Syr Darya in South Kazakhstan. It was designed as a model Scheme and developed to a size of 74'000 ha during Soviet times for rice and cotton production. However, since the 1990s only very limited funds were available for maintenance and as a result, problems like water logging and salinization of soils and groundwater are now omnipresent in the scheme. The aim of this study was to develop a numerical groundwater flow model for the region in Modflow and to evaluate the effect of various infrastructure investments on phreatic evaporation (a major driver for soil salinization). Decadal groundwater observation data from 2011 to 2015 were used to calibrate the annual model and to validate the monthly model. Scenarios simulated were (partial) lining of main and/or secondary and tertiary canal system, improvement of drainage via horizontal canals or pumps, combinations of these and a joint groundwater-surface-water use scenario. Although the annual average model is sufficient to evaluate the yearly water balance, the transient model is a prerequisite for analysing measures against water logging and salinization, both of which feature strong seasonality. The transient simulation shows that a combination of leakage reduction (lining of canals) and drainage improvement measures is needed to lower the groundwater levels enough to avoid phreatic evaporation. To save water, joint surface water and groundwater irrigation can be applied in areas where groundwater salinity is low enough but without proper lining of canals, it is not sufficient to mitigate the ongoing soil degradation due to salinization and water logging.

  8. Groundwater recharge in suburban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam: effect of decreasing surface-water bodies and land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Do, An Thuan; Canh, Vu Duc; Nga, Tran Thi Viet; Funabiki, Ayako; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    Over-exploited groundwater is expected to remain the predominant source of domestic water in suburban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. In order to evaluate the effect on groundwater recharge, of decreasing surface-water bodies and land-use change caused by urbanization, the relevant groundwater systems and recharge pathways must be characterized in detail. To this end, water levels and water quality were monitored for 3 years regarding groundwater and adjacent surface-water bodies, at two typical suburban sites in Hanoi. Stable isotope (δ18O, δD of water) analysis and hydrochemical analysis showed that the water from both aquifers and aquitards, including the groundwater obtained from both the monitoring wells and the neighboring household tubewells, was largely derived from evaporation-affected surface-water bodies (e.g., ponds, irrigated farmlands) rather than from rivers. The water-level monitoring results suggested distinct local-scale flow systems for both a Holocene unconfined aquifer (HUA) and Pleistocene confined aquifer (PCA). That is, in the case of the HUA, lateral recharge through the aquifer from neighboring ponds and/or irrigated farmlands appeared to be dominant, rather than recharge by vertical rainwater infiltration. In the case of the PCA, recharge by the above-lying HUA, through areas where the aquitard separating the two aquifers was relatively thin or nonexistent, was suggested. As the decrease in the local surface-water bodies will likely reduce the groundwater recharge, maintaining and enhancing this recharge (through preservation of the surface-water bodies) is considered as essential for the sustainable use of groundwater in the area.

  9. FIELD-SCALE EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR FRACTURED ROCK:RESULTS FROM LITERATURE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Q. Zhou; Hui-Hai Liu; F.J. Molz; Y. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2005-04-08

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solute transport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey on the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, D{sub m}{sup e}, a key parameter for describing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty field tracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selected for the study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale D{sub m}{sup e} values were calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature or by reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed data indicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor F{sub D} (defined as the ratio of D{sub m}{sup e} to the lab-scale matrix diffusion coefficient [D{sub m}] of the same tracer) is generally larger than one, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the field is comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at the rock-core scale. This larger value can be attributed to the many mass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous, fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend toward systematic increase in the F{sub D} value with observation scale, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely to be statistically scale dependent. The F{sub D} value ranges from 1 to 10,000 for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the F{sub D} value varies by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differing degrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition, the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivity generally increases with observation scale, which is consistent with previous studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications for assessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transport events in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal

  10. Histological effects of enamel matrix derivative on exposed dental pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Bajić Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Direct pulp capping procedure is a therapeutic application of a drug on exposed tooth pulp in order to ensure the closure of the pulp chamber and to allow the healing process to take place. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the histological effects of Emdogain® on exposed tooth pulp of a Vietnamese pig (Sus scrofa verus. Methods. The study comprised 20 teeth of a Vietnamese pig. After class V preparation on the buccal surfaces of incisors, canines and first premolars, pulp was exposed. In the experimental group, the perforations were capped with Emdogain® (Straumann, Basel, Switzerland, while in the control group pulp capping was performed with MTA® (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN, USA. All cavities were restored with glass-ionomer cement (GC Fuji VIII, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. The observational period was 28 days, after which the animal was sacrificed and histological preparations were made. A light microscope was used to analyze dentin bridge formation, tissue reorganization and inflammation, and the presence of bacteria in the pulp. Results. The formation of dentin bridge was observed in the experimental and control groups. Inflammation of the pulp was mild to moderate in both groups. Angiogenesis and many odontoblast-like cells, responsible for dentin bridge formation, were observed. Necrosis was not observed in any case, nor were bacteria present in the pulp. Conclusion. Histological analysis indicated a favorable therapeutic effect of Emdogain® Gel in direct pulp capping of Vietnamese pigs. Pulp reaction was similar to that of MTA®. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON172026

  11. Effects of climate change on groundwater dependent vegetation. Uncertainties in a changing environment.:A case study in the Kleine Nete basin, Belgium.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Daele, Toon; Dams, Jef; Salvadore, Elga; Batelaan, Okke

    2011-01-01

    Most climate scenarios predict an increase in potential evapotranspiration and an increase in seasonal differences in precipitation for the northwest European region. The combination of changes in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration influences the groundwater system. As a result the vegetation types that strongly depend on groundwater levels and seepage will change also.The possible effects of climate change on groundwater dependent vegetation was modelled through a chain of climat...

  12. Interaction of groundwater and fresh basalt fissure surfaces and its effect on the migration of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Bowers, D.L.; Gerding, T.J.; Fried, S.M.; Wilbur, C.K.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments are being performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL): (1) to identify interactions of radionuclides and repository components that effect nuclide migration, and (2) to assess changes in nuclide migration caused by modifications expected upon aging of the waste, clay backfill, and rock. The experiments are conducted with radioactive borosilicate glass, bentonite and mechanically fissured basalt rock in flowing water analogous to their configuration in a breach of a nuclear waste repository. Changes undergone by the groundwater as it passed through the fissure include: (1) drop in pH from 10 to 8, (2) loss of suspended particulate, and (3) loss of dissolved/suspended U, Np, and Pu. These effects, also studied as functions of radiation dose and of laboratory aging of the repository components, are related to the predicted long-term performance of a nuclear waste repository

  13. Analyzing the effects of geological and parameter uncertainty on prediction of groundwater head and travel time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Xin; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jørgensen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainty of groundwater model predictions has in the past mostly been related to uncertainty in the hydraulic parameters, whereas uncertainty in the geological structure has not been considered to the same extent. Recent developments in theoretical methods for quantifying geological uncertainty...... have made it possible to consider this factor in groundwater modeling. In this study we have applied the multiple-point geostatistical method (MPS) integrated in the Stanford Geostatistical Modeling Software (SGeMS) for exploring the impact of geological uncertainty on groundwater flow patterns...... for a site in Denmark. Realizations from the geostatistical model were used as input to a groundwater model developed from Modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water model (MODFLOW) within the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) modeling environment. The uncertainty analysis was carried out...

  14. Effects of Changing Meteoric Precipitation Patterns on Groundwater Temperature in Karst Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, A E; Macpherson, G L; Covington, M D

    2017-03-01

    Climate predictions indicate that precipitation patterns will change and average air temperatures will increase across much of the planet. These changes will alter surface water and groundwater temperatures which can significantly affect the local and regional environment. Here, we examine the role of precipitation timing in changes to groundwater temperature in carbonate-karst aquifers using measured groundwater level and temperature data from the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research Site, Kansas. We demonstrate that shifts to increased cool-season precipitation may mitigate the increases in groundwater temperature produced by increases in average annual air temperature. In karst, the solution-enlarged conduits allow faster and focused recharge, and the recharge-event temperature can strongly influence the groundwater temperature in the aquifer. Our field data and analysis show that predictions of future groundwater conditions in karst aquifers need to consider changes in precipitation patterns, in addition to changes to average annual air temperature. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  15. [Effects of groundwater level on chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of Tamarix hispida in lower reaches of Tarim River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng-gang; Li, Wei-hong; Ma, Jian-xin; Ma, Xiao-dong

    2010-07-01

    Based on the monitoring data of groundwater level at the typical sections in lower reaches of Tarim River, three survey plots nearby the ecological monitoring wells with groundwater depths > 6 m were selected to investigate the chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of Tamarix hispida and its photosynthetic activity of PSII under effects of different groundwater depths. With increasing groundwater depth, the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as actual photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light (phi(PSII)), electron transport rate (ETR), and photochemistry quenching (q(p)) of T. hispida decreased, while the non-photochemistry quenching (q(N), NPQ) and the yield for dissipation by down-regulation (Y(NPQ)) increased remarkably, and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) maintained an optimum value. All the results suggested that the PSII photosynthetic activity of T. hispida under drought stress declined with increasing groundwater depth, and the greater excess energy could result in more risk of photo-inhibition. However, the good adaptability and drought tolerance of T. hispida could make its PSII not seriously damaged, though the drought stress actually existed.

  16. The Virgin River Tamarisk Defoliation by Diorhabda carinulata: It's Effects on Evapotranspiration Rates and Groundwater Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueki, S.; Healey, J. M.; Acharya, K.

    2013-12-01

    Saltcedar (tamarisk; Tamarix spp) has become the most widespread invasive plant species in the western United States. Waterways and their corridors have evolved into mono-species stands of saltcedar. Chemical and mechanical methods of tamarisk eradication have been partially effective and prove to be expensive and cause irrepressible damage to natural resources. In the late 1960s, biological control program began in order to reduce the risk of damaging native plants. In 2001, Diorhabda elongate (leaf beetles) was released for open field tests followed by other releases in several locations in the western United States. One of the successful releases occurred in St. George, UT along the Virgin River in 2006. The last few years has seen establishment of large scale populations in the lower Virgin River. Eddy covariance (EC) tower including groundwater monitoring well was set up along the Virgin River near Mesquite, NV in 2010 to monitor effects of tamarisk defoliation on evapotranspiration (ET). Initial 2010 data (pre-beetle) established a baseline for characterization of tamarisk ET and groundwater consumption prior to defoliation of tamarisk. The beetles arrived at the site in late 2010 and established a healthy population at the growing season of 2011. 2010 data compared to the episodic herbivore events, observed at the site in 2011 and 2012, clearly show the direct impact of tamarisk defoliation. The results show that the post-defoliation ET values along with magnitude of diurnal fluctuations, found in the water level record, decreased compared to the pre-defoliation values. However, magnitude of the effects of defoliation seemed to be dependent on growth stage of tamarisk at the time of defoliation. Also, the defoliation periods are short lived as tamarisk quickly recovered and establish new growth. In 2012, the defoliation occurred twice since tamarisk re-foliated quickly after the first defoliation by late summer before beetles started overwintering

  17. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, L.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Manjon-Collado, G.; Colmenero-Sujo, L.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Cano-Jimenez, A.; Rodriguez-Pineda, A.; Davila-Rangel, I.; Quirino-Torres, L.; Herrera-Peraza, E. F.

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222 Rn, 226 Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from -1 . Generally, radium activity concentration was -1 , with some exceptions; in spring water of San Diego de Alcala, in contrast, the value reached ∼5.3 Bq l -1 . Radon activity concentration obtained throughout the state was from 1.0 to 39.8 Bq l -1 . A linear correlation between uranium and radon dissolved in groundwater of individual wells was observed near Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 μSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality. (authors)

  18. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, L; Montero-Cabrera, M E; Manjón-Collado, G; Colmenero-Sujo, L; Rentería-Villalobos, M; Cano-Jiménez, A; Rodríguez-Pineda, A; Dávila-Rangel, I; Quirino-Torres, L; Herrera-Peraza, E F

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222Rn, 226Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 microSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality.

  19. Regional Cumulative Effects Groundwater Management Associated with Large Resource Development Projects: Integrating Adaptive Management with Monitoring and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, J.; Fennell, J.; Scott, M.

    2011-12-01

    We will present a systematic approach to cumulative effects groundwater management predicated on an integration of traditional tools and the necessary intimate connection between modelling, monitoring and adaptive management, which includes an inventory and gap analysis of available data, consideration for system dynamics in the context of climate variability and change, an assessment of aquifer vulnerability, and consideration for potential future development and overall associated risk to groundwater resources and connected receptors. In our experience, a systematic approach to cumulative effects groundwater management is key to addressing complex challenges associated with large resource development projects, with effects of these projects to aquifer systems often occurring at regional scales and possibly enduring over long time horizons. The principal goal for the groundwater management framework is to manage groundwater resources in a sustainable manner and protect it from over-use. However, proper balances with economic and community objectives need to be taken into account, emphasizing the need for stakeholder engagement in the overall process. Through an understanding of inter-relationships between natural resource and other objectives, legislation, policies and programs across various sectors goals can be developed to achieve the best overall long-term benefits for society and the environment, while minimizing conflicts. The principal goal of monitoring is to evaluate past and current conditions and address data gaps. Long-term monitoring can also be used to improve the hydrogeologic conceptualization of a region. The role of numerical modelling is to quantify the understanding of groundwater flow systems in a region, address uncertainty in this understanding, to quantify potential regional cumulative impacts of current and future development, to provide recommendations for future monitoring locations and targets and for assessing the effectiveness of

  20. Negative and matrix-dependent effects of dispersal corridors in an experimental metacommunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aström, Jens; Pärt, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are well-known phenomena in ecology, and the use of corridors is one suggested remedy to ameliorate community disassembly. Most experiments of landscape structure, however, do not consider matrix quality and environmental conditions, despite their potential to affect both landscape permeability and population densities. For the first time in fragmented landscapes, we simultaneously investigated the effects of local disturbance, dispersal corridors, matrix quality, and environmental stress, as well as their interactions, on species richness and abundance. We used a natural micro-ecosystem of bryophyte patches with microarthropods as a model system. Contrary to expectations, there were no negative responses to fragmentation of large continuous habitats. Surprisingly, connecting fragmented patches with dispersal corridors had negative effects on the abundance and species richness of the most species-rich group, oribatid mites. It had also negative effects on the abundance of collembolans and predatory mites in landscapes with complex matrix, which was also generally detrimental. Environmental stress was detrimental for all taxa but interacted with matrix type for oribatid species richness and juvenile oribatid abundance. Our results indicate that interactions can strongly alter community responses to common explanatory factors such as fragmentation, disturbance, connectivity, and environmental quality. Future studies of metacommunity dynamics need to consider the potential for such interactions in order to produce robust predictions of spatially structured landscapes.

  1. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  2. The effect of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers on release profiles of diclofenac sodium from matrix tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Imamul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that Diclofenac could be successfully prepared using an appropriate amount of Methocel K15 MCR® and CA in the form of matrix tablets with similar dissolution profile of patent product Voltaren SR® . The type of polymers used was found to induce a profound effect on release rate and mechanism.

  3. A general X-ray fluorescence spectrometric technique based on simple corrections for matrix effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruidhof, H.

    1978-01-01

    The method reported, which is relatively simple and generally applicable for most materials, involves a combination of borax fusion with matrix effect corrections. The latter are done with algorithms, which are derived from the intensity formulae, together with empirical coefficients. (Auth.)

  4. The Progressive Discipline Matrix and Its Effects on Discipline in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vincent L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method case study was to determine the effectiveness of the progressive discipline matrix in high schools in one Tennessee school district. The further intent was to investigate how discipline practices influenced the perceptions of teachers and administrators. Findings from quantitative data stated that progressive…

  5. New angular quadrature sets: effect on the conditioning number of the LTSN two dimensional transport matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, Eliete Biasotto; Romero, Debora Angrizano

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to utilize a new angular quadrature sets based on Legendre and Chebyshev polynomials, and to analyse their effects on the number of LTS N matrix conditioning for the problem of discrete coordinates of neutron transport with two dimension cartesian geometry with isotropic scattering, and an energy group, in non multiplicative homogenous domains

  6. Stimulatory effects of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) on fibronectin matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastino, Alexandra K; Greco, Todd M; Mathias, Rommel A; Cristea, Ileana M; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds that form via non-enzymatic glycation of proteins throughout our lifespan and at a higher rate in certain chronic diseases such as diabetes. AGEs contribute to the progression of fibrosis, in part by stimulating cellular pathways that affect gene expression. Long-lived ECM proteins are targets for non-enzymatic glycation but the question of whether the AGE-modified ECM leads to excess ECM accumulation and fibrosis remains unanswered. In this study, cellular changes due to AGE accretion in the ECM were investigated. Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins in a decellularized fibroblast ECM was achieved by incubating the ECM in a solution of methylglyoxal (MGO). Mass spectrometry of fibronectin (FN) isolated from the glycated matrix identified twenty-eight previously unidentified MGO-derived AGE modification sites including functional sites such as the RGD integrin-binding sequence. Mesangial cells grown on the glycated, decellularized matrix assembled increased amounts of FN matrix. Soluble AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) also stimulated FN matrix assembly and this effect was reduced by function-blocking antibodies against the receptor for AGE (RAGE). These results indicate that cells respond to AGEs by increasing matrix assembly and that RAGE is involved in this response. This raises the possibility that the accumulation of ECM during the progression of fibrosis may be enhanced by cell interactions with AGEs on a glycated ECM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the sample matrix on measurement uncertainty in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, P.; Brueggemann, L.; Wennrich, R.

    2005-01-01

    The estimation of measurement uncertainty, with reference to univariate calibration functions, is discussed in detail in the Eurachem Guide 'Quantifying Uncertainty in Analytical Measurement'. The adoption of these recommendations to quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) involves basic problems which are above all due to the strong influence of the sample matrix on the analytical response. In XRF-analysis, the proposed recommendations are consequently applicable only to the matrix corrected response. The application is also restricted with regard to both the matrices and analyte concentrations. In this context the present studies are aimed at the problems to predict measurement uncertainty also with reference to more variable sample compositions. The corresponding investigations are focused on the use of the intensity of the Compton scattered tube line as an internal standard to assess the effect of the individual sample matrix on the analytical response relatively to a reference matrix. Based on this concept the estimation of the measurement uncertainty of an analyte presented in an unknown specimen can be predicted in consideration of the data obtained under defined matrix conditions

  8. Simulation of groundwater flow and hydrologic effects of groundwater withdrawals from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in the Pinelands of southern New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Emmanuel; Nicholson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system is an important source of present and future water supply in southern New Jersey. Because this unconfined aquifer system also supports sensitive wetland and aquatic habitats within the New Jersey Pinelands (Pinelands), water managers and policy makers need up-to-date information, data, and projections that show the effects of potential increases in groundwater withdrawals on these habitats. Finite-difference groundwater flow models (MODFLOW) were constructed for three drainage basins (McDonalds Branch Basin, 14.3 square kilometers (km2); Morses Mill Stream Basin, 21.63 km2; and Albertson Brook Basin, 52.27 km2) to estimate the effects of potential increases in groundwater withdrawals on water levels and the base-flow portion of streamflow, in wetland and aquatic habitats. Three models were constructed for each drainage basin: a transient model consisting of twenty-four 1-month stress periods (October 2004 through September 2006); a transient model to simulate the 5- to 10-day aquifer tests that were performed as part of the study; and a high-resolution, steady-state model used to assess long-term effects of increased groundwater withdrawals on water levels in wetlands and on base flow. All models were constructed with the same eight-layer structure. The smallest horizontal cell dimensions among the three model areas were 150 meters (m) for the 24-month transient models, 10 m for the steady-state models, and 3 m for the transient aquifer-test models. Boundary flows of particular interest to this study and represented separately are those for wetlands, streams, and evapotranspiration. The final variables calibrated from both transient models were then used in steady-state models to assess the long-term effects of increased groundwater withdrawals on water levels in wetlands and on base flow. Results of aquifer tests conducted in the three study areas illustrate the effects of withdrawals on water levels in wetlands and on base

  9. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-10-01

    One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water

  10. The effects of model complexity and calibration period on groundwater recharge simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Christian; Van Freyberg, Jana; Schirmer, Mario

    2017-04-01

    A significant number of groundwater recharge models exist that vary in terms of complexity (i.e., structure and parametrization). Typically, model selection and conceptualization is very subjective and can be a key source of uncertainty in the recharge simulations. Another source of uncertainty is the implicit assumption that model parameters, calibrated over historical periods, are also valid for the simulation period. To the best of our knowledge there is no systematic evaluation of the effect of the model complexity and calibration strategy on the performance of recharge models. To address this gap, we utilized a long-term recharge data set (20 years) from a large weighting lysimeter. We performed a differential split sample test with four groundwater recharge models that vary in terms of complexity. They were calibrated using six calibration periods with climatically contrasting conditions in a constrained Monte Carlo approach. Despite the climatically contrasting conditions, all models performed similarly well during the calibration. However, during validation a clear effect of the model structure on model performance was evident. The more complex, physically-based models predicted recharge best, even when calibration and prediction periods had very different climatic conditions. In contrast, more simplistic soil-water balance and lumped model performed poorly under such conditions. For these models we found a strong dependency on the chosen calibration period. In particular, our analysis showed that this can have relevant implications when using recharge models as decision-making tools in a broad range of applications (e.g. water availability, climate change impact studies, water resource management, etc.).

  11. Effect of salinity of groundwater on the geotechnical properties of some Egyptian clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Abu zeid

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the effect of salinity of groundwater on some properties of clayey soil. Properties obtained from tests carried out on samples mixed with water containing different salt contents are compared with those obtained from tests carried out on samples mixed with pure water (tap water. The tested samples were taken from the site of the Faculty of Engineering in Qena, South Valley University. Two sets of samples of the clay soil were tested. One was mixed with pure water (pure water clay soil and the other was mixed with salty water added to it in ratios ranging from 20% to 80% (clay soil mixed with salt. The test results showed the effect of groundwater salinity on the tested samples. The plasticity index decreased from 26 for pure water clay soil to 24.96 for clay soil mixed with 80% salt. The coefficient of consolidation increased from 0.00196 for pure water clay soil to 0.002744 for clay soil mixed with 80% salt. The California bearing ratio increased from 9.75% for pure water clay soil to 10.15% for clay soil mixed with 80% salt. The optimum moisture content increased from 14.25% for pure water clay soil to 16.5% for clay soil mixed with 100% salt. Decrease in the maximum dry density is observed for clay soil mixed with salty when compared with pure water clay soil. A marked decrease was noticed for the value of the unconfined compressive strength. All the tests were carried out in the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Lab, Faculty of Engineering in Qena, South Valley University.

  12. Effectiveness of airborne multispectral thermal data for karst groundwater resources recognition in coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Stefano; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo; Santini, Federico; Pascucci, Simone

    2013-04-01

    and the retrieving of accurate sea surface temperatures (SST) allowed us to detect and identify thermal anomalies related to coastal and submarine karst springs. In particular, the preprocessing for both MIVIS and TASI-600 sensors was carried out as follows: (a) radiometric calibration of the raw data by using the RADCORR software provided by ITRES (Canada) and the application of a new correction tool for blinking pixel correction, developed by CNR (Italy); (b) atmospheric compensation of the TIR data by applying the ISAC (In-Scene Atmospheric Compensation) algorithm [7]; (c) calibration to temperature by separating temperature and emissivity according to the methods described by [8]. This study points out that considerable water resources are dispersed into the sea, through karst springs and such water resources could be effectively protected in artificial way against the salting sea water influence and exploited for human local uses. The obtained preliminary results are encouraging, even though suitable integration approaches also with the classical geophysical investigation techniques have to be improved for rapid and cost-effective karst groundwater resources detection and monitoring. Table 1. Characteristics of sensors used for this study. Spectral Region Bands Spectral Resolution Spectral Range IFOV Spatial Resolution MIVISVNIR-SWIR LWIR 92 10 90-500 nm 340-540 nm 0.4÷12.7 μm 8.2÷12.7 μm 2.0 mrad3 m TASI LWIR 32 100 nm 8.0÷11.5 μm 1.2 mrad1 m References Jemcov, I. 2007. Water supply potential and optimal exploitation capacity of karst aquifer systems. Environm. Geol., vol. 51, 767-773. Bakalowicz, M. 2005. Karst groundwater: a challenge for new resources. Hydrogeology Journal, vol. 13, pp. 148-160. Milanovic, S. 2007. Hydrogeological characteristics of some deep siphonal springs in Serbia and Montenegro karst. Environmental Geology, vol 51, p.p. 755-759. Avanzi, G., Palombo, A., Pignatti, S. 2006. MIVIS image geocoding experience on merging position

  13. 238U-series radionuclides in Finnish groundwater-based drinking water and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterbacka, P.

    2005-09-01

    The thesis deals with the occurrence of 238 U-series radionuclides and particle-bound 210 Pb and 210 Po in Finnish groundwater-based drinking water, methods used for removing 234 U, 238 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po, and the annual effective doses caused by 238 U-series radionuclides in drinking water. In order to reduce radiation exposure and avoid high doses, it is important to examine the activity levels of natural radionuclides in groundwater. In this work, the activity concentrations of radon ( 222 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), uranium ( 238 U and 234 U), lead ( 210 Pb) and polonium ( 210 Po) were determined from 472 private wells, which were selected randomly from across Finland. On the basis of the results, the activity concentrations in groundwater and the radiation exposure from drinking water of people living outside the public water supply in Finland was specified. The efficiency of 238 U, 234 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po removal from drinking water was examined at ten private homes. In order to obtain accurate results and correct estimates of effective doses, attention was paid to the sampling of 222 Rn and 210 Pb, and the determination of 210 Pb. The results revealed that the median activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were as much as ten times higher in drilled wells than in wells dug in soil. The average activity concentration of 222 Rn in drilled wells was 460 Bq/l and in dug wells 50 Bq/l. The highest activity concentrations were found in Southern Finland. In addition, occasional high activity concentrations were found all over Finland. The average activity concentrations of 234 U and 238 U in drilled wells were 0.35 and 0.26 Bq/l and in dug wells 0.020 and 0.015 Bq/l, respectively. The spatial distribution of 234 U, 238 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po was essentially similar to that of 222 Rn. In contrast to other natural radionuclides, the highest 226 Ra activity concentrations were found in coastal areas, since drilled well water near the sea has a higher salinity

  14. Matrix effect on the analysis of amphenicols in fish by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, L. R.; Tette, P. A. S.; Evangelista, W. P.; Fernandes, C.; Glória, M. B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix effect is an important parameter to be investigated during the development and validation of a method for the quantitative determination of contaminants in food. The objective of this study was to evaluate the matrix effect, through statistical tests, in the quantification of amphenicols in fish by HPLC-MS/MS. The study was performed by comparing the standard curves prepared in solvent solutions and in a fish sample previously known to be free of amphenicols. Since matrix effect was observed for the three analytes, calibration curves for quantification of chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol and florfenicol should be constructed using the matrix.

  15. Effects of groundwater abstraction on two keystone tree species in an arid savanna national park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Shadwell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In arid systems with no surface water, deep boreholes in ephemeral river beds provide for humans and animals. With continually increasing infrastructure development for tourism in arid wildlife parks such as the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in southern Africa, we ask what effects increased abstraction may have on large trees. Large trees in arid savannas perform essential ecosystem services by providing food, shade, nesting sites and increased nutrients for many other plant and animal species and for this are regarded as keystone species. Methods We determine seasonal fluctuations in the water table while also determining the water source for the dominant large tree species in the Auob and Nossob rivers in the Park. We also determine the extent to which these trees are physiologically stressed using leaf δ13C, xylem pressure potentials, specific leaf area and an estimate of canopy death. We do this both upstream and downstream of a low water use borehole in the Auob River and a high water use borehole in the Nossob River. Results Our results show that the trees are indeed using deep groundwater in the wet season and that this is the same water used by people. In the dry season, trees in the Auob downstream of the active borehole become detached from the aquifer and use more isotopically enriched soil water. In the Nossob in the dry season, all trees use isotopically enriched soil water, and downstream of the active borehole use stomatal regulation to maintain leaf water potentials. These results suggest that trees in the more heavily utilised Nossob are under more water stress than those trees in the Auob but that trees in both rivers demonstrate physiological adaptation to the changes in available water with smaller heavier leaves, no significant canopy dieback and in the dry season in the Nossob stomatal regulation of leaf water potentials. Discussion An increase in abstraction of groundwater particularly at the Nossob borehole may

  16. Effects of groundwater abstraction on two keystone tree species in an arid savanna national park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwell, Eleanor; February, Edmund

    2017-01-01

    In arid systems with no surface water, deep boreholes in ephemeral river beds provide for humans and animals. With continually increasing infrastructure development for tourism in arid wildlife parks such as the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in southern Africa, we ask what effects increased abstraction may have on large trees. Large trees in arid savannas perform essential ecosystem services by providing food, shade, nesting sites and increased nutrients for many other plant and animal species and for this are regarded as keystone species. We determine seasonal fluctuations in the water table while also determining the water source for the dominant large tree species in the Auob and Nossob rivers in the Park. We also determine the extent to which these trees are physiologically stressed using leaf δ 13 C, xylem pressure potentials, specific leaf area and an estimate of canopy death. We do this both upstream and downstream of a low water use borehole in the Auob River and a high water use borehole in the Nossob River. Our results show that the trees are indeed using deep groundwater in the wet season and that this is the same water used by people. In the dry season, trees in the Auob downstream of the active borehole become detached from the aquifer and use more isotopically enriched soil water. In the Nossob in the dry season, all trees use isotopically enriched soil water, and downstream of the active borehole use stomatal regulation to maintain leaf water potentials. These results suggest that trees in the more heavily utilised Nossob are under more water stress than those trees in the Auob but that trees in both rivers demonstrate physiological adaptation to the changes in available water with smaller heavier leaves, no significant canopy dieback and in the dry season in the Nossob stomatal regulation of leaf water potentials. An increase in abstraction of groundwater particularly at the Nossob borehole may cause an additional draw down of the water table adding

  17. Approaches to characterizing biogeochemistry effects of groundwater and surface water interaction at the riparian interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater-surface water interaction (GSI) in riparian ecosystems strongly influences biological activity that controls nutrient flux and processes. Shallow groundwater in riparian zones is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for solutes, and a target for ...

  18. Effects of climate change on coastal groundwater systems: A modeling study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, Gualbert; Van Baaren, Esther S.; De Louw, Perry G.B.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change in combination with increased anthropogenic activities will affect coastal groundwater systems throughout the world. In this paper, we focus on a coastal groundwater system that is already threatened by a relatively high seawater level: the low‐lying Dutch Delta. Nearly one third of

  19. Hydrogeological controls on spatial patterns of groundwater discharge in peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Hare

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Peatland environments provide important ecosystem services including water and carbon storage, nutrient processing and retention, and wildlife habitat. However, these systems and the services they provide have been degraded through historical anthropogenic agricultural conversion and dewatering practices. Effective wetland restoration requires incorporating site hydrology and understanding groundwater discharge spatial patterns. Groundwater discharge maintains wetland ecosystems by providing relatively stable hydrologic conditions, nutrient inputs, and thermal buffering important for ecological structure and function; however, a comprehensive site-specific evaluation is rarely feasible for such resource-constrained projects. An improved process-based understanding of groundwater discharge in peatlands may help guide ecological restoration design without the need for invasive methodologies and detailed site-specific investigation. Here we examine a kettle-hole peatland in southeast Massachusetts historically modified for commercial cranberry farming. During the time of our investigation, a large process-based ecological restoration project was in the assessment and design phases. To gain insight into the drivers of site hydrology, we evaluated the spatial patterning of groundwater discharge and the subsurface structure of the peatland complex using heat-tracing methods and ground-penetrating radar. Our results illustrate that two groundwater discharge processes contribute to the peatland hydrologic system: diffuse lower-flux marginal matrix seepage and discrete higher-flux preferential-flow-path seepage. Both types of groundwater discharge develop through interactions with subsurface peatland basin structure, often where the basin slope is at a high angle to the regional groundwater gradient. These field observations indicate strong correlation between subsurface structures and surficial groundwater discharge. Understanding these general patterns

  20. Hydrogeological controls on spatial patterns of groundwater discharge in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Danielle K.; Boutt, David F.; Clement, William P.; Hatch, Christine E.; Davenport, Glorianna; Hackman, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Peatland environments provide important ecosystem services including water and carbon storage, nutrient processing and retention, and wildlife habitat. However, these systems and the services they provide have been degraded through historical anthropogenic agricultural conversion and dewatering practices. Effective wetland restoration requires incorporating site hydrology and understanding groundwater discharge spatial patterns. Groundwater discharge maintains wetland ecosystems by providing relatively stable hydrologic conditions, nutrient inputs, and thermal buffering important for ecological structure and function; however, a comprehensive site-specific evaluation is rarely feasible for such resource-constrained projects. An improved process-based understanding of groundwater discharge in peatlands may help guide ecological restoration design without the need for invasive methodologies and detailed site-specific investigation. Here we examine a kettle-hole peatland in southeast Massachusetts historically modified for commercial cranberry farming. During the time of our investigation, a large process-based ecological restoration project was in the assessment and design phases. To gain insight into the drivers of site hydrology, we evaluated the spatial patterning of groundwater discharge and the subsurface structure of the peatland complex using heat-tracing methods and ground-penetrating radar. Our results illustrate that two groundwater discharge processes contribute to the peatland hydrologic system: diffuse lower-flux marginal matrix seepage and discrete higher-flux preferential-flow-path seepage. Both types of groundwater discharge develop through interactions with subsurface peatland basin structure, often where the basin slope is at a high angle to the regional groundwater gradient. These field observations indicate strong correlation between subsurface structures and surficial groundwater discharge. Understanding these general patterns may allow resource

  1. Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; de Groot, Lisette; Dupont, Didier; Feeney, Emma; Ipsen, Richard; Lecerf, Jean Michel; Mackie, Alan; McKinley, Michelle C; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Rémond, Didier; Risérus, Ulf; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Tholstrup, Tine; Weaver, Connie; Astrup, Arne; Givens, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Foods consist of a large number of different nutrients that are contained in a complex structure. The nature of the food structure and the nutrients therein (i.e., the food matrix) will determine the nutrient digestion and absorption, thereby altering the overall nutritional properties of the food. Thus, the food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation. The evidence for a dairy matrix effect was presented and discussed by an expert panel at a closed workshop, and the following consensus was reached: 1 ) Current evidence does not support a positive association between intake of dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e., stroke and coronary heart disease) and type 2 diabetes. In contrast, fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, generally show inverse associations. 2 ) Intervention studies have indicated that the metabolic effects of whole dairy may be different than those of single dairy constituents when considering the effects on body weight, cardiometabolic disease risk, and bone health. 3 ) Different dairy products seem to be distinctly linked to health effects and disease risk markers. 4 ) Different dairy structures and common processing methods may enhance interactions between nutrients in the dairy matrix, which may modify the metabolic effects of dairy consumption. 5 ) In conclusion, the nutritional values of dairy products should not be considered equivalent to their nutrient contents but, rather, be considered on the basis of the biofunctionality of the nutrients within dairy food structures. 6 ) Further research on the health effects of whole dairy foods is warranted alongside the more traditional approach of studying the health effects of single nutrients. Future diet assessments and recommendations should carefully consider the evidence of the effects of whole foods alongside the evidence of the effects of individual nutrients. Current knowledge gaps and

  2. Fuzzy spaces, the M(atrix) model and the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabali, Dimitra; Nair, V.P.; Randjbar-Daem, S.

    2004-06-01

    This is a short review of recent work on fuzzy spaces in their relation to the M(atrix) theory and the quantum Hall effect. We give an introduction to fuzzy spaces and how the limit of large matrices is obtained. The complex projective spaces CP k , and to a lesser extent spheres, are considered. Quantum Hall effect and the behavior of edge excitations of a droplet of fermions on these spaces and their relation to fuzzy spaces are also discussed. (author)

  3. Examining the effect of EVS spending on HCAHPS scores: a value optimization matrix for expense management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Deirdre; Stalley, Samantha; Williams, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Value-Based Purchasing program has now linked patient care experience rating to hospital revenue reimbursement, thereby establishing a key relationship between revenue cycle management and the patient experience. However, little data exist on the effect of hospital resource spending on patient HCAHPS ratings. This article examines environmental services (EVS) expenses and HCAHPS ratings on hospital cleanliness and overall patient experience ratings to determine how these variables are related. No linear relationship between EVS expense spending and HCAHPS ratings was found, but post hoc analysis identified a matrix that differentiated on hospital cleanliness ratings and overall EVS spending. A value score was calculated for each quadrant of the matrix, and it was determined that organizational value derives from management of expense spending rather than pursuit of high HCAHPS scores. A value optimization matrix is introduced, and its four quadrants are described. With increased emphasis on subjective patient experience measures attached to financial consequences, leaders in the healthcare industry must understand the link between expense management and HCAHPS performance. This study has shown that effective operations are derived from the efficient use of resources and are supported by strong leadership, strategic management, and a culture of patient-centered achievement. The capacity of healthcare organizations to identify their unique costs-to-outcomes balance through the value optimization matrix will help provide them with a means to ensure that optimal value is extracted from all expense spending.

  4. Time-dependent methods to evaluate the effects of urban sprawl on groundwater quality: a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Stevenazzi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater resources are threatened worldwide with unknown and unpredictable fate, due to non-stationarity and change of water cycle dynamics, and increasing demand resulting from population growth and economic expansion. Thus, practical actions, strategies and solutions are necessary to ensure the short-term and long-term provision of adequate, affordable, accessible and safe freshwater supply to meet the needs of the growing human population and ecosystems. Since the mid-1950s, Europe is experiencing the phenomenon of urban sprawl, characterized by an unplanned incremental urban development, no more tied with population growth (EEA 2006. Impacts of urban sprawl threaten both the natural and rural environments and the quality of life for people living in cities, with worsening of air quality, and surface- and groundwater quality and quantity. For the protection of groundwater, the European Union issued a series of Directives (Water Framework Directive, 2000/60/EC; Groundwater Directive, 2006/118/EC that require member states to achieve a good chemical status of their groundwater bodies and the identification of areas where groundwater suffers increasing trends in contaminant concentrations. In order to cope with EU Directives, a time-dependent approach for groundwater vulnerability assessment is developed to account for both the recent status of groundwater contamination and its evolution in the Po Plain area of Lombardy Region (northern Italy. Such approach takes the advantages of a Bayesian spatial statistical method to assess groundwater vulnerability and satellite scatterometer data to delineate urban areas and monitor their evolution. The proposed approach can determine potential impacts of contamination events on groundwater quality, if policies are maintained at the status quo or if new measures are implemented for safeguarding groundwater resources.

  5. Effects of aged sorption on pesticide leaching to groundwater simulated with PEARL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2017-01-15

    Leaching to groundwater is an important element of the regulatory risk assessment of pesticides in western countries. Including aged sorption in this assessment is relevant because there is ample evidence of this process and because it leads to a decrease in simulated leaching. This work assesses the likely magnitude of this decrease for four groundwater scenarios used for regulatory purpose in the EU (from the UK, Portugal, Austria and Greece) and for ranges of aged-sorption parameters and substance properties using the PEARL model. Three aged-sorption parameters sets were derived from literature, representing approximately 5th, 50th and 95th percentile cases for the magnitude of the effect of aged sorption on leaching concentrations (called S, M and L, respectively). The selection of these percentile cases was based only on the f NE parameter (i.e. the ratio of the aged sorption and the equilibrium sorption coefficients) because leaching was much more affected by the uncertainty in this parameter than by the uncertainty in the desorption rate coefficient of these sites (k d ). For the UK scenario, the annual flux concentration of pesticide leaching at 1m depth decreased by typically a factor of 5, 30 and >1000 for the S, M and L parameter sets, respectively. This decrease by a factor of 30 for the M parameter set appeared to be approximately valid also for the other three scenarios. Decreasing the Freundlich exponent N from 0.9 into 0.7 for the M parameter set, increased this factor of 30 into a factor of typically 1000, considering all four scenarios. The aged-sorption sites were close to their equilibrium conditions during the leaching simulations for two of the four scenarios (for all substances considered and the M parameter set), but this was not the case for the other two scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Macroinvertebrate community responses to hydrological controls and groundwater abstraction effects across intermittent and perennial headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James C; House, Andy; Punchard, Neil; Hannah, David M; Wilding, Nicholas A; Wood, Paul J

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent rivers comprise a significant proportion of river networks globally and their spatial extent is predicted to increase with rising water abstraction pressures. Despite this, the ecological implications of hydrological modifications within intermittent rivers have received limited research attention. This paper examines macroinvertebrate assemblages across intermittent and perennial sections of headwater streams within the Hampshire Avon catchment (United Kingdom) over a five-year period. The composition of faunal assemblages was quantified in relation to four hydrological metrics: the duration of flowing conditions, the geographical proximity to the nearest perennial source along each watercourse (two observed flow parameters) and two modelled groundwater abstraction influences. The results highlight that macroinvertebrate communities inhabiting sites which dry periodically and are positioned at greater distances (>c. 2.5km) above the perennial source (the most upstream point of permanent flow within a given year) possessed the highest conservation values. These sites supported species that are rare in many areas of Europe (e.g. Ephemeroptera: Paraletophlebia werneri) or with limited geographical distribution across the United Kingdom (e.g. Trichoptera: Limnephilus bipunctatus). A range of faunal community diversity indices were found to be more sensitive to the antecedent flow duration and distance from the perennial source, rather than any effects of groundwater abstraction. Taxonomic richness responded most strongly to these observed flow parameters and varied more markedly with the distance from the perennial source compared to the antecedent flow duration. Several taxa were significantly associated with the observed flow parameters, particularly those predominantly inhabiting perennially flowing systems. However, the distance that such fauna could migrate into intermittent reaches varied between taxa. This research demonstrates the overriding

  7. Hydrogeology and its effect on reactivation of saline groundwater by pumping wells in a dinosaur track site, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, H.; Yeo, I.

    2011-12-01

    A dinosaur track fossil site in Korea is located near the lake that used to be part of the ocean before a seawall was built. It was excavated as deep as 3.2 m below the ground surface, which causes the site to submerge with heavy rainfall in the summer. Water in the excavated site is slightly salty, which accelerates the deterioration of dinosaur tracks. The pumping wells and facilities have been operating to lower the water level when the water level rises in the rainy season. Hydrogeological investigation was undertaken to characterize the hydrogeology, a source of saline water, and further its possible reactivation by groundwater pumping. Slug tests revealed that hydraulic conductivity (K) ranged in the order of 10-5 to 10-7 m/s, which indicated that the site is very heterogeneous and groundwater flow takes place predominantly through a limited number of permeable sedimentary layers. The vertical EC (electrical conductivity) profiles also confirmed that the wells with a higher K have more transition zones at which EC sharply changes due to the existence of groundwater flow. The vertical EC profiles at the monitoring wells showed that groundwater, the EC of which is as high as that of nearby sea water (30 mS/cm), is located as deep as about 20 m below the surface. The high saline water is thought to have intruded into the site when the lake with EC of about 3 mS/cm used to be part of the ocean. At the well with a high K, saline water higher than 10 mS/cm is found within even less than 10 m below the surface. The EC monitoring over one year showed that shallow groundwater becomes more saline with time. To investigate the effect of the groundwater extraction on the rise of salinity, pumping tests were conducted, while groundwater level and the vertical EC profile were monitored. An increase of EC was observed at both the pumping well and the wells with a high K, which confirmed that the pumping facility in the site causes groundwater with high salinity to rise up

  8. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Diffusion of 14C into Nevada Test Site Carbonate Aquifer Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Hershey; William Howcroft; Paul W. Reimus

    2003-03-01

    Determination of groundwater flow velocities at the Nevada Test Site is important since groundwater is the principal transport medium of underground radionuclides. However, 14C-based groundwater velocities in the carbonate aquifers of the Nevada Test Site are several orders of magnitude slower than velocities derived from the Underground Test Area regional numerical model. This discrepancy has been attributed to the loss or retardation of 14C from groundwater into the surrounding aquifer matrix making 14C-based groundwater ages appear much older. Laboratory experiments were used to investigate the retardation of 14C in the carbonate aquifers at the Nevada Test Site. Three sets of experiments were conducted evaluating the diffusion of 14C into the carbonate aquifer matrix, adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the pore surfaces of the carbonate matrix, and adsorption and/or isotopic exchange onto the fracture surfaces of the carbonate aquifer. Experimental results a nd published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities from the Lower Carbonate Aquifer were applied to a 14C retardation model. The model produced an extremely wide range of retardation factors because of the wide range of published aquifer matrix and fracture porosities (over three orders of magnitude). Large retardation factors suggest that groundwater with very little measured 14C activity may actually be very young if matrix porosity is large relative to the fracture porosity. Groundwater samples collected from highly fractured aquifers with large effective fracture porosities may have relatively small correction factors, while samples from aquifers with a few widely spaced fractures may have very large correction factors. These retardation factors were then used to calculate groundwater velocities from a proposed flow path at the Nevada Test Site. The upper end of the range of 14C correction factors estimated groundwater velocities that appear to be at least an order of magnitude too high compared

  9. Preliminary investigation of the effects of sea-level rise on groundwater levels in New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, David M.; Mullaney, John R.; Stone, Janet R.; Skinner, Brian J.; Ramlow, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Global sea level rose about 0.56 feet (ft) (170 millimeters (mm)) during the 20th century. Since the 1960s, sea level has risen at Bridgeport, Connecticut, about 0.38 ft (115 mm), at a rate of 0.008 ft (2.56 mm + or - 0.58 mm) per year. With regional subsidence, and with predicted global climate change, sea level is expected to continue to rise along the northeast coast of the United States through the 21st century. Increasing sea levels will cause groundwater levels in coastal areas to rise in order to adjust to the new conditions. Some regional climate models predict wetter climate in the northeastern United States under some scenarios. Scenarios for the resulting higher groundwater levels have the potential to inundate underground infrastructure in lowlying coastal cities. New Haven is a coastal city in Connecticut surrounded and bisected by tidally affected waters. Monitoring of water levels in wells in New Haven from August 2009 to July 2010 indicates the complex effects of urban influence on groundwater levels. The response of groundwater levels to recharge and season varied considerably from well to well. Groundwater temperatures varied seasonally, but were warmer than what was typical for Connecticut, and they seem to reflect the influence of the urban setting, including the effects of conduits for underground utilities. Specific conductance was elevated in many of the wells, indicating the influence of urban activities or seawater in Long Island Sound. A preliminary steady-state model of groundwater flow for part of New Haven was constructed using MODFLOW to simulate current groundwater levels (2009-2010) and future groundwater levels based on scenarios with a rise of 3 ft (0.91 meters (m)) in sea level, which is predicted for the end of the 21st century. An additional simulation was run assuming a 3-ft rise in sea level combined with a 12-percent increase in groundwater recharge. The model was constructed from existing hydrogeologic information for the

  10. Exploring parameter effects on the economic outcomes of groundwater-based developments in remote, low-resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Adam; Adar, Eilon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater is often the most or only feasible safe drinking water source in remote, low-resource areas, yet the economics of its development have not been systematically outlined. We applied AWARE (Assessing Water Alternatives in Remote Economies), a recently developed Decision Support System, to investigate the costs and benefits of groundwater access and abstraction for non-networked, rural supplies. Synthetic profiles of community water services (n = 17,962), defined across 13 parameters' values and ranges relevant to remote areas, were applied to the decision framework, and the parameter effects on economic outcomes were investigated. Regressions and analysis of output distributions indicate that the most important factors determining the cost of water improvements include the technological approach, the water service target, hydrological parameters, and population density. New source construction is less cost-effective than the use or improvement of existing wells, but necessary for expanding access to isolated households. We also explored three financing approaches - willingness-to-pay, -borrow, and -work - and found that they significantly impact the prospects of achieving demand-driven cost recovery. The net benefit under willingness to work, in which water infrastructure is coupled to community irrigation and cash payments replaced by labor commitments, is impacted most strongly by groundwater yield and managerial factors. These findings suggest that the cost-benefit dynamics of groundwater-based water supply improvements vary considerably by many parameters, and that the relative strengths of different development strategies may be leveraged for achieving optimal outcomes.

  11. Matrix effect on paralytic shellfish toxins quantification and toxicity estimation in mussels exposed to Gymnodinium catenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, M J; Vale, C; Mota, A M; Rodrigues, S M; Costa, P R; Simões Gonçalves, M L S

    2010-12-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins were quantified in whole tissues of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to blooms of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum in Portuguese coastal waters. A validated liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection, involving pre-chromatographic oxidation was used to quantify carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl and decarbamoyl toxins. In order to test for any matrix effect in the quantification of those toxins, concentrations obtained from solvent and matrix matched calibration curves were compared. A suppression of the fluorescence signal was observed in mussel extract or fraction in comparison to solvent for the compounds dcGTX2 + 3, GTX2 + 3 and GTX1 + 4, while an enhancement was found for C1 + 2, dcSTX, STX, B1, dcNEO and NEO. These results showed that a matrix effect varies among compounds. The difference of concentrations between solvent and matrix matched calibration curves for C1 + 2 (median = 421 ng g⁻¹) exceeded largely the values for the other quantified compounds (0.09-58 ng g⁻¹). Those differences were converted into toxicity differences, using Oshima toxicity equivalence factors. The compounds C1 + 2 and dcNEO were the major contributors to the differences of total toxicity in the mussel samples. The differences of total toxicity were calculated in ten mussel samples collected during a 10-week blooming period in Portuguese coastal lagoon. Values varied between 53 and 218 µg STX equivalents kg⁻¹. The positive differences mean that the estimated toxicity using solvent calibration curves exceed the values taking into account the matrix. For the toxicity interval 200-800 µg STX equivalents kg⁻¹ an increase was found between 44 and 28%.

  12. Reconnoitering the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and surface energy balance using MODIS and SEBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of observing shallow groundwater depth and areal extent using satellite measurements can support groundwater models and vast irrigation systems management. Moreover, these measurements can help to include the effect of shallow groundwater on surface energy balance within land surface models and climate studies, which broadens the methods that yield more reliable and informative results. To examine the capacity of MODIS in detecting the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and the surface energy balance in an area within Al-Balikh River basin in northern Syria, we studied the interrelationship between in-situ measured water table depths and land surface temperatures measured by MODIS. We, also, used the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS to calculate surface energy fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, and inspected their relationships with water table depths. We found out that the daytime temperature increased while the nighttime temperature decreased when the depth of the water table increased. And, when the water table depth increased, net radiation, latent and ground heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation decreased, while sensible heat flux increased. This concords with the findings of a companion paper (Alkhaier et al., 2012. The observed clear relationships were the result of meeting both conditions that were concluded in the companion paper, i.e. high potential evaporation and big contrast in day-night temperature. Moreover, the prevailing conditions in this study area helped SEBS to yield accurate estimates. Under bare soil conditions and under the prevailing weather conditions, we conclude that MODIS is suitable for detecting the effect of shallow groundwater because it has proper imaging times and adequate sensor accuracy; nevertheless, its coarse spatial resolution is disadvantageous.

  13. Reconnoitering the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and surface energy balance using MODIS and SEBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaier, F.; Su, Z.; Flerchinger, G. N.

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of observing shallow groundwater depth and areal extent using satellite measurements can support groundwater models and vast irrigation systems management. Moreover, these measurements can help to include the effect of shallow groundwater on surface energy balance within land surface models and climate studies, which broadens the methods that yield more reliable and informative results. To examine the capacity of MODIS in detecting the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface temperature and the surface energy balance in an area within Al-Balikh River basin in northern Syria, we studied the interrelationship between in-situ measured water table depths and land surface temperatures measured by MODIS. We, also, used the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) to calculate surface energy fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, and inspected their relationships with water table depths. We found out that the daytime temperature increased while the nighttime temperature decreased when the depth of the water table increased. And, when the water table depth increased, net radiation, latent and ground heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation decreased, while sensible heat flux increased. This concords with the findings of a companion paper (Alkhaier et al., 2012). The observed clear relationships were the result of meeting both conditions that were concluded in the companion paper, i.e. high potential evaporation and big contrast in day-night temperature. Moreover, the prevailing conditions in this study area helped SEBS to yield accurate estimates. Under bare soil conditions and under the prevailing weather conditions, we conclude that MODIS is suitable for detecting the effect of shallow groundwater because it has proper imaging times and adequate sensor accuracy; nevertheless, its coarse spatial resolution is disadvantageous.

  14. Groundwater circulation and utilisation in an unconfined carbonate system - revealing the potential effect of climate change and humankind activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Ádám; Mádl-Szönyi, Judit

    2016-04-01

    Characteristics of gravitational groundwater flow systems in carbonate regions were presented by Mádl-Szönyi & Tóth (2015) based on theoretical considerations, identification and classification of groundwater flow-related field phenomena and numerical simulation. It was revealed that the changes of flow pattern in carbonate framework attributed to groundwater utilization and/or climate change are more apparent due to the effective hydraulic conductivity of carbonates. Consequently, natural or artificial disturbances of water level propagate farther, deeper and faster in carbonates than in siliciclastic basins. These changes could result in degradation and reorganization of hierarchical flow systems, modification of recharge and discharge areas and even alteration of physicochemical parameters (Mádl-Szönyi & Tóth, 2015). This paper presents the application of the gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept to the hydrogeologically complex thick carbonate system of the Transdanubian Range, Hungary, depicting the flow pattern of the area and to a practical problem of a local study area, conflicts of interest of water supply and water use of a golf course. The question is how will the natural discharge on the golf course be influenced by the planned karst drinking water production well. In addition, the effects of climate change on this conflict were evaluated. We demonstrate the importance of the understanding the appropriate scale in karst studies and illustrate how the gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept can help to determine it. For this purpose, the hydrogeological conditions of the study site were examined at different scales. The goals were to define the appropriate scale and reveal the effects of tectonic structures; and give prognoses for the possible impact of a planned drinking water well and climate change on the golf course based on numerical simulation. The study also showed the low geothermal potential of the area.

  15. Wetland Groundwater Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Greg

    1993-01-01

    This technical note summarizes hydrologic and hydraulic (H AND H) processes and the related terminology that will likely be encountered during an evaluation of the effect of ground-water processes on wetland function...

  16. Study of the matrix effect on the PIXE quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredients in different formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejjani, Alice; Noun, Manale; Soueidan, Maher; Della-Negra, Serge; Abi-Fadel, Edmond; Roumie, Mohammad; Nsouli, Bilal

    2017-09-01

    While Particle Induced X-ray Emission technique (PIXE) is an accurate technique to quantify Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API's) via the analysis of their heteroatoms, each drug (formulation) may require a specific quantification procedure due to its distinct matrix composition. The commercial Fludinium® drug, which has two active ingredients Clidinium Bromide (C22H26NO3Br) and Dihydrochloride Trifluoperazine (C21H24N3F3S. 2HCl) has been taken as a case study in this work. Different amounts of its API's and its placebo were mixed to provide various formulations. The matrix effect on the quantification of the three heteroatoms (chlorine, sulfur and bromine) related to the above API's in different formulations has been studied. In fact, chlorine which is in its hydrochloride form in the API was not eventually considered for calculation due to its instability under beam. The calculation of bromine amount via its Kα or its Lα rays was found to be independent of the matrix composition and it was rapidly done by simple comparison to an external standard. However, the calculation of sulfur, via its Kα, was highly dependent on the matrix composition. Therefore, to achieve an accurate quantification a more sophisticated calculation method was used by means of the GUPIX code.

  17. The effect of tomatine on metastasis related matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in breast cancer cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelken, Besra Özmen; Balcı, Tuğçe; Süslüer, Sunde Yılmaz; Kayabaşı, Çağla; Avcı, Çığır Biray; Kırmızıbayrak, Petek Ballar; Gündüz, Cumhur

    2017-09-05

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women and metastasis is the cause of morbidity and mortality in patients. In the development of metastasis, the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has a very important role in tumor development. MMP-2 and MMP-9 work together for extracellular matrix (ECM) cleavage to increase migration. Tomatine is a secondary metabolite that has a natural defense role against plants, fungi, viruses and bacteria that are synthesized from tomato. In additıon, tomatine is also known that it breaks down the cell membrane and is a strong inhibitor in human cancer cells. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the effect of tomatine on cytotoxicity, apoptosis and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition in MCF-7 cell lines. Human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) was used as a cell line. In MCF-7 cells, the IC 50 dose of tomatine was determined to be 7.07μM. According to the control cells, apoptosis increased 3.4 fold in 48thh. Activation of MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-9\\NGAL has been shown to decrease significantly in cells treated with tomatine by gelatin zymography compared to the control. As a result, matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell proliferation were suppressed by tomatine and this may provide support in treatment methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of copper ions on interaction of UV radiation with methacrylic matrix – EPR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewska, Alina; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Dobosz, Bernadeta; Mrozińska, Justyna; Kruczyński, Zdzisław

    2013-01-01

    The role of metal ions introduced to polymer matrix in the photochemical degradation of material is not fully understood. In this paper, we considered the effect of copper ions on the photochemical changes in Methafilcon A after UV-irradiation. The presence of methacrylic acid in the structure of Methafilcon A increases the loading capacity of these ions. In result, there is observed the production much more radicals after UV-irradiation than in pure matrix, without copper ions. When the time of UV-exposure increases, the EPR signal of trapped Cu(II) ions in the material decreases. This proves the transformation of Cu(II) to a diamagnetic state of stable Cu(I)-intermediates or copper oxides. Simultaneously, in the first 5-min of UV-irradiation there is observed a rapid increase in intensity of the radical signal, which disappears when the exposure time is extended. This mechanism of radical generating is quite different than for Methafilcon A matrix without copper ions. - Highlights: • The carboxyls in matrix of polymer increase the loading capacity of Cu ions. • There is produced much more radicals in Methafilcon A with Cu ions than without them. • The carboxyls coordinated with copper ions play a key role in UV-degradation process

  19. The effect of Littorella uniflora on nutrients in a groundwater fed lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Daniela Oliveira; Vinther, Hanne Fogh; Krüger, Laila

    ongoing field studies indicate that Littorella uniflora clearly stimulate nitrification within the rhizosphere. Internal nitrate peaks formed within the sediments, in both the discharge and recharge zones of the lake. These peaks ranged from 0,009 to 0,47mg NO3-N L-1 in the discharge zone; and from 0......Lake Hampen is a Lobelia lake situated high up in the Jutland ridge and which lies close to the groundwater boundary. This means that the groundwater flow between the aquifer and the lake is not constant. Lake Hampen has a large discharge zone where the groundwater flows from the aquifer...

  20. Procedure for Matrix Effect Reduction in Metal Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eshaikh, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    A procedure for matrix effect reduction is proposed to enhance the precision of quantitative analysis of metal alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This procedure is based on a number of successive steps in order to correct the signal fluctuations caused by plasma interaction and the matrix effect. The first step is the selection of optimum parameter settings of the detection system, such as laser power, delay time, and focal distance. The second step is the estimation of the absolute or relative values of impurities on the basis of the internal standard calibration. The third step is the analysis of the metal basis of the alloy used as an internal standard, which requires spectrum averaging, whole integral spectrum normalization, and self-absorption correction. Three sets of metal-based alloys (aluminum, steel, and copper) are used in this investigation as reference standards for calibration and validation. Successive improvements of the quality of calibration curves are observed during the proposed procedure.

  1. Correlation effects in R-matrix calculations of electron-F2 elastic scattering cross sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarana, Michal; Horácek, Jirí

    2007-10-21

    Correlation effects are studied in electron scattering off the fluorine molecule. Fixed-nuclei approximation R-matrix calculations of the elastic collision cross sections are presented for a set of internuclear distances at three levels of correlation. The aim of this work is to study the role of electronic correlation on the properties of the 2Sigmau resonance. The Feshbach-Fano R-matrix method of resonance-background separation is used to study the effect of inclusion of various levels of correlation on the energy and width of the 2Sigmau resonance. Data required for construction of the nonlocal resonance model (construction of a discrete state and its coupling to the continuum) which allows the calculation of inelastic processes such as dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation [W. Domcke, Phys. Rep. 208, 97 (1991)] including the correlation are presented.

  2. Gay guys using gay language: friendship, shared values and the intent-context-effect matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Mark; Wignall, Liam; Morris, Max

    2016-12-01

    This article draws on in-depth interviews with 35 openly gay male undergraduates from four universities in England to develop an understanding of the changing nature of language related to homosexuality. In addition to finding a diminution in the prevalence of homophobic language, we demonstrate that participants maintain complex and nuanced understandings of phrases that do not use homophobic pejoratives, such as 'that's so gay'. The majority of participants rejected the notion that these phrases are inherently homophobic, instead arguing that the intent with which they are said and the context in which they are used are vital in understanding their meaning and effect. We conceptualize an intent-context-effect matrix to understand the interdependency of these variables. Highlighting the situated nature of this matrix, we also demonstrate the importance of the existence of shared norms between those saying and hearing the phrase when interpreting such language. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  3. Hydrogeological characterization and environmental effects of the deteriorating urban karst groundwater in a karst trough valley: Nanshan, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongjun; Cao, Min; Yuan, Daoxian; Zhang, Yuanzhu; He, Qiufang

    2018-02-01

    The unique hydrogeology of karst makes the associated groundwater respond quickly to rainfall events and vulnerable to anthropogenic pollutions. In this study, high-frequency monitoring of spring discharge, temperature, electrical conductivity (EC) and pH, along with monthly hydrochemical and microbial analyses, was undertaken at the outlet of Laolondong karst underground river in Nanshan, southwestern China. The aim was to explore the environmental effects of the catchment's urban area on the karst groundwater resources. The monitoring data of a tracer test and the response of discharge to rainfall events demonstrate that conduits and narrow fissures coexist in the Laolongdong karst aquifer. The EC, Na+, Cl- and SO4 2- values (840 μS/cm, 33.7, 38.6 and 137.2 μg/L, respectively), along with high concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria, at the outlet indicate considerable urban pollution in this area. The contaminants sulfate and nitrate showed different relationships with discharge and EC in different stages of a rainfall event. This behavior provided information about aquifer structure and the influence of transport properties. Meanwhile, the hydrological processes of groundwater flow could be modified by urbanization and result in increasing magnitude of urban floods in the underground river. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids introduced by urbanization not only impact the karst groundwater quality, but also result in a significant perturbation to the carbon cycling system in the karst area.

  4. Effects of experimental parameters on the sorption of cesium, strontium, and uranium from saline groundwaters onto shales: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Case, F.I.; O'Kelley, G.D.

    1988-11-01

    This report concerns an extension of the first series of experiments on the sorption properties of shales and their clay mineral components reported earlier. Studies on the sorption of cesium and strontium were carried out on samples of Chattanooga (Upper Dowelltown), Pierre, Green River Formation, Nolichucky, and Pumpkin Valley Shales that had been heated to 120/degree/C in a 0.1-mol/L NaCl solution for periods up to several months and on samples of the same shales which had been heated to 250/degree/C in air for six months, to simulate limiting scenarios in a HLW repository. To investigate the kinetics of the sorption process in shale/groundwater systems, strontium sorption experiments were done on unheated Pierre, Green River Formation, Nolichucky, and Pumpkin Valley Shales in a diluted, saline groundwater and in 0.03-mol/L NaHCO 3 , for periods of 0.25 to 28 days. Cesium sorption kinetics tests were performed on the same shales in a concentrated brine for the same time periods. The effect of the water/rock (W/R) ratio on sorption for the same combinations of unheated shales, nuclides, and groundwaters used in the kinetics experiments was investigated for a range of W/R ratios of 3 to 20 mL/g. Because of the complexity of the shale/groundwater interaction, a series of tests was conducted on the effects of contact time and W/R ratio on the pH of a 0.03-mol/L NaHCO 3 simulated groundwater in contact with shales. 8 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs

  5. Matrix effect study in the determination of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates in sewage sludge samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Samuel; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Ballesteros, Oscar; Navalón, Alberto; Vílchez, José L; Verge, Coral; De Ferrer, Juan A

    2011-04-01

    We propose a study of the matrix effect in the determination of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) in sewage sludge samples. First, a rapid, selective and sensitive method is proposed. The method involves two stages: the extraction of the compound from the samples and analysis by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Three different techniques of extraction (microwave-assisted extraction, Soxhlet, and ultrasounds) were compared, and microwave-assisted extraction was selected as the best suited for our purpose. Microwave-assisted extraction allows reducing the extraction time (25 min compared with 12 h for conventional Soxhlet extraction) and solvent waste (25 ml of methanol compared with 200 ml for Soxhlet or more than 50 ml for the ultrasonic procedure). Absence of matrix effect was evaluated with two standards (2ØC(8:0) and 2ØC(16:0) ) that are not commercial; therefore, neither of them was detected in sewage sludge samples and they showed similar environmental behavior (adsorption and precipitation) to LAS (C(11:0) -C(13.0) ), which allow us to evaluate the matrix effect. Validation was carried out by a recovery assay, and the method was applied to samples from different sources; therefore, they had different compositions. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  6. Effects of natural attenuation processes on groundwater contamination caused by abandoned waste sites in Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerndorff, Helmut; Kühn, Stephan; Minden, Thomas; Orlikowski, Dagmar; Struppe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this research project is to identify, characterize and quantify natural attenuation (NA) processes in groundwater affected by emissions of abandoned waste disposal sites in Berlin-Kladow/Gatow, Germany. It is part of the funding priority called KORA established by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) to explore the extent to which NA can be used for remedial purposes for varied forms of soil and groundwater contamination. Information on the emission behaviour of individual parameters is generated on the basis of hydrogeochemical comparison of 20 years old and new data. Using groundwater-modelling and CFC-analysis, information on the transport and retention of pollutants in groundwater is compiled. The microbial colonization of contaminated aquifers is characterized by molecular biological methods [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)] to differentiate between contaminated and not contaminated zones.

  7. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... exhibits three distinct thermal regimes within a 2 km reach length due to two major interactions. An energy balance model is used to simulate the instream temperature and to quantify the effect of these interactions on the stream temperature. This research demonstrates the effect of reach level small scale...

  8. Virus removal during groundwater recharge: effects of infiltration rate on adsorption of poliovirus to soil.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, J M; Landry, E F; Beckwith, C A; Thomas, M Z

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the influence of infiltration rate on poliovirus removal during groundwater recharge with tertiary-treated wastewater effluents. Experiments were conducted at a uniquely designed, field-situated test recharge basin facility through which some 62,000 m3 of sewage had been previously applied. Recharge at high infiltration rates (75 to 100 cm/h) resulted in the movement of considerable numbers of seeded poliovirus to the groundwater. Moderately reduced infiltr...

  9. BeachWin: Modelling groundwater effects on swash sediment transport and beach profile changes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, L.; Barry, D. A.; Pattiaratchi, C. B.; Masselink, G.

    2002-01-01

    Field and laboratory observations have shown that a relatively low beach groundwater table enhances beach accretion. These observations have led to the beach dewatering technique (artificially lowering the beach water table) for combating beach erosion. Here we present a process-based numerical model that simulates the interacting wave motion on the beach, coastal groundwater flow, swash sediment transport and beach profile changes. Results of model...

  10. Estimation of the effect of soil texture on nitrate-nitrogen content in groundwater using optical remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witheetrirong, Yongyoot; Tripathi, Nitin Kumar; Tipdecho, Taravudh; Parkpian, Preeda

    2011-08-01

    The use of chemical fertilizers in Thailand increased exponentially by more than 100-fold from 1961 to 2004. Intensification of agricultural production causes several potential risks to water supplies, especially nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3) (-)-N) pollution. Nitrate is considered a potential pollutant because its excess application can move into streams by runoff and into groundwater by leaching. The nitrate concentration in groundwater increases more than 3-fold times after fertilization and it contaminates groundwater as a result of the application of excess fertilizers for a long time. Soil texture refers to the relative proportion of particles of various sizes in a given soil and it affects the water permeability or percolation rate of a soil. Coarser soils have less retention than finer soils, which in the case of NO(3) (-)-N allows it to leach into groundwater faster, so there is positive relationship between the percentage of sands and NO(3) (-)-N concentration in groundwater wells. This study aimed to estimate the effect of soil texture on NO(3) (-)-N content in groundwater. Optical reflectance data obtained by remote sensing was used in this study. Our hypothesis was that the quantity of nitrogen leached into groundwater through loam was higher than through clay. Nakhon Pathom province, Thailand, was selected as a study area where the terrain is mostly represented by a flat topography. It was found that classified LANDSAT images delineated paddy fields as covering 29.4% of the study area, while sugarcane covered 10.4%, and 60.2% was represented by "others". The reason for this classified landuse was to determine additional factors, such as vegetation, which might directly affect the quantity of NO(3) (-)-N in soil. Ideally, bare soil would be used as a test site, but in fact, no such places were available in Thailand. This led to an indirect method to estimate NO(3) (-)-N on various soil textures. Through experimentation, it was found that NO(3) (-)-N measured

  11. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow, resource optimization, and potential effects of prolonged drought for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Derek W.; Kunkel, Christopher D.; Peterson, Steven M.; Traylor, Jonathan P.

    2015-08-13

    A hydrogeological study including two numerical groundwater-flow models was completed for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area of central Oklahoma. One numerical groundwater-flow model, the Citizen Potawatomi Nation model, encompassed the jurisdictional area and was based on the results of a regional-scale hydrogeological study and numerical groundwater flow model of the Central Oklahoma aquifer, which had a geographic extent that included the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area. The Citizen Potawatomi Nation numerical groundwater-flow model included alluvial aquifers not in the original model and improved calibration using automated parameter-estimation techniques. The Citizen Potawatomi Nation numerical groundwater-flow model was used to analyze the groundwater-flow system and the effects of drought on the volume of groundwater in storage and streamflow in the North Canadian River. A more detailed, local-scale inset model was constructed from the Citizen Potawatomi Nation model to estimate available groundwater resources for two Citizen Potawatomi Nation economic development zones near the North Canadian River, the geothermal supply area and the Iron Horse Industrial Park.

  12. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-04-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite (δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  13. EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF BASALT TEXTILE REINFORCED CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Valentová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the analysis of a ceramic matrix composite, more specifically the plain weave textile fabric composite made of basalt fibers embedded into the pyrolyzed polysiloxane matrix. Attention is paid to the determination of effective elastic properties of the yarn via homogenization based on the Mori-Tanaka averaging scheme and the 1st order numerical homogenization method adopting a suitable representative computational model. The latter approach is then employed to simulate the response of the yarn when loaded beyond the elastic limits. The required mechanical properties of individual material phases are directly measured using nanoindentation with in-build scanning probe microscopy. Applicability of the proposed computational methodology is supported by the analysis of a unidirectional fibrous composite, representing the yarn, subjected to a macroscopically uniform strain.

  14. The effects of urbanization on groundwater quantity and quality in the Zahedan aquifer, southeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, E.; Mackay, R.; Warner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the impacts of urban growth on groundwater quality and quantity in the Zahedan aquifer, which is the sole source of water supply for the city of Zahedan, Iran. The investigation is based on the collection of available historical data, supplemented by field and laboratory investigations. Groundwater levels in 40 wells were measured in December 2000. In addition, 102 water samples were taken in two periods during November and December 2000. Of these, 43 samples were analyzed for major ions, 32 samples were analyzed for nitrogen and phosphorus and the remainder for bacteriological contamination. The water level data show that there has been a general decline since 1977 due to over-abstraction. The magnitude of this decline has reached about 20 m in some places. However, in one area over the same period, a rise of about 3 m has been observed. This occurs as a result of the local hydrogeological conditions of shallow bedrock and relatively low permeability materials down stream of this area that limits the flow of groundwater towards the northeastern part of the aquifer. The general fall in groundwater levels has been accompanied by a change in the direction of the groundwater flow and an overall reduction of the areal extent of the saturated region of the aquifer. The city now has a serious problem such that even if the abstracted groundwater is rationed, water is not available for long periods because the demand far exceeds the supply. The heavy impact of urbanization on the groundwater quality is shown through the observed high nitrate (up to 295 mg/l as nitrate) and high phosphorus values (about 0.1 mg/l as P). Significant changes in the chloride concentration are also observed in two areas: increasing from 100 mg/l to 1,600 mg/l and from 2,000 mg/l to 4,000 mg/l, respectively. Furthermore, the bacteriological investigations show that 33 percent of the 27 collected groundwater samples are positive for total coliform and 11 percent of the

  15. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens

  16. The effect of Emdogain on ectopic bone formation in tubes of rat demineralized dentin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Yoshihiko; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Inoue, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    Emdogain (EMD) is made from enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) from the tooth germ of swine and propylene glycol alginate (PGA) as a matrix. The function of EMD is known to differentiate cells of the dental follicle into cementoblasts. However, little is known about the effect of EMD on mesenchymal cells in other tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether EMD has the ability to induce hard tissue when applied with or without demineralized dentin matrix. Half of the dentin tubes prepared from rat incisors were demineralized by treatment with 0.6 N hydrochloric acid for 3 h. EMD or PGA was injected into the demineralized or non-demineralized dentin tubes, which were then transplanted into rectus abdominis muscles. Untreated dentin tubes were also transplanted as a control. Animals were killed at 7, 14 and 21 days after the implantation. Non-demineralized dentin tubes with or without EMD or PGA did not form any hard tissue. In the demineralized group, chondrogenesis in the PGA groups occurred earlier than in the EMD groups. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in the demineralized group with PGA at day 14 was the highest. The expression of osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNAs was higher in all groups at 21 days compared with 7 or 14 days. These results suggest that neither EMD nor PGA has the ability to induce hard tissue and that EMPs contained within EMD might aggregate on the dentin surface and inhibit the effect of the demineralized dentin matrix.

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and glass leaching as related to the NNWSI repository site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.; Bates, J.; Ebert, W.; Gerding, T.

    1986-05-01

    To address the effect of ionizing radiation on groundwater chemistry and waste form durability, NNWSI is performing an extensive set of experiments as a function of dose rate (2 x 10 5 , 1 x 10 4 , 1 x 10 3 , and 0 rad/h). The results of the tests done at 2 x 10 5 rad/h have been reported, while the 1 x 10 3 and 0 rad/h tests are in progress. This paper presents an overview of the results of the tests done at 1 x 10 4 rad/h and discusses the relevance of these tests to repository conditions. An interpretation of the results relating to the manner by which the glass waste form corrodes is presented elsewhere. A complete discussion of the effect of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and waste form durability will be presented when the series of experiments are complete

  18. Groundwater salinity at Olkiluoto and its effects on a spent fuel repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.

    2000-06-01

    The Olkiluoto island rose from the Baltic Sea 2500 to 3000 years ago. The layered sequence of groundwaters can be related to climatic and shoreline changes from modern tune through former Baltic stages to the deglaciation phase about 10 000 years ago and even to preglacial times. Fresh groundwater is found to the depth of about 150 metres, brackish between 100 and 400 metres, deeper groundwaters are saline. At the depth of 500 meters, the content of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) varies between 10 and 25 g/l. The most saline waters at depths greater than 800 metres have TDS values between 30 and 75 g/l. These deep saline waters seem to have been undisturbed during the most recent glaciation and even much longer in the past. Today fresh water infiltrating at the surface gradually displaces brackish and saline groundwater in the bedrock. Due to the still ongoing postglacial land uplift, Olkiluoto is likely to become an inland site with brackish or fresh groundwater at the depth of 500 metres within the next 10 000 years. During the construction and operation phases groundwater will be drawn into the repository from the surrounding bedrock. As a consequence, more saline groundwaters, presently laying 100 to 200 metres below the repository level, may rise to the disposal level. After the closing of the repository the salinity distribution will gradually return towards the natural state. During the glacial cycle groundwater salinity may increase, for example, during freezing of groundwater into permafrost, when dissolved solids concentrate in the remaining water phase, and in a situation where deep saline groundwaters from under the centre of the glacier are pushed to the upper parts of the bedrock at the periphery of the glacier. The most significant open issue related to saline groundwater is the performance of the tunnel backfill which in the BS-3 concept has been planned to consist of a mixture of crushed rock and 10-30% of bentonite. Saline groundwater may

  19. The effect of contaminated groundwater on tree growth: A tree-ring analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, D.C.; Loehle, C.

    1990-10-01

    A study was conducted on the effect of contaminated groundwater seepage on tree growth downslope from F- and H-Area seepage basins of the Savannah River Site. Trees in wetlands along Four Mile Creek began to show localized stress and mortality in the late 1970s. Extreme winter temperatures and high rainfall were ruled out as potential causal factors of tree stress. Drought was shown to affect trees in both contaminated and uncontaminated zones, but trees in uncontaminated areas exhibit better recovery after drought than trees in contaminated areas. Pollution-mediated alteration of soil acidity and aluminum, sodium, and heavy metal concentrations likely acted to predispose trees to decline, with severe drought acting as the trigger for decline initiation and tree death. Thus, a moderate pollution loading, not sufficient to cause visible damage of itself, may create conditions in which sudden, severe decline could result from natural stresses. This mechanism of forest decline is common, and should be considered in evaluations of the impact of pollution on wetland forest systems. 28 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  20. [Mutual Effect on Determination of Gibberellins and Glyphosate in Groundwater by Spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, a spectrophotometry method for the simultaneous determination of gibberellins (GA3) and glyphosate in groundwater was established and optimized. In addition, the mutual effect on simultaneous determination of GA3 and glyphosate was studied. Based on the experiment, good linearity (R2 > 0.99) was obtained for GA3 in the range of 0-20 and 0-100 µg and for glyphosate in the range of 0-8 and 5-15 µg. The method's detection limit (MDL) of GA3 and glyphosate was 0.48 and 0.82 µg, respectively; and the recovery rates of 15 to 150 µg GA3 and 3 to 10 µg glyphosate in all samples at a spiked level were 71.3% ± 1.9% and 98.4% ± 8.1%, respectively. No obvious influence of glyphosate (0-100 mg · L(-1)) on the recovery rates of GA3 was observed, but the presence of glyphosate could cause slight determination precision decrease of GA3. Meanwhile, adding 2 mg · L(-1) GA3 can increase the recovery rate of glyphosate.

  1. Identifying Effective Policy and Technologic Reforms for Sustainable Groundwater Management in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, K.; Zekri, S.; Karimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oman has gone through three decades of efforts aimed at addressing groundwater over-pumping and the consequent seawater intrusion. Example of measures adopted by the government since the 1990's include a vast subsidy program of irrigation modernization, a freeze on drilling new wells, delimitation of several no-drill zones, a crop substitution program, re-use of treated wastewater and construction of recharge dams. With no major success through these measures, the government laid the ground for water quotas by creating a new regulation in 1995. Nevertheless, groundwater quotas have not been enforced to date due to the high implementation and monitoring costs of traditional flow meters. This presentation discusses how sustainable groundwater management can be secured in Oman using a suit of policy and technologic reforms at a reasonable economic, political and practical cost. Data collected from farms with smart meters and low-cost wireless smart irrigation systems have been used to propose sustainable groundwater withdrawal strategies for Oman using a detailed hydro-economic model that couples a MODFLOW-SEAWAT model of the coastal aquifers with a dynamic profit maximization model. The hydro-economic optimization model was flexible to be run both as a social planner model to maximize the social welfare in the region, and as an agent-based model to capture the behavior of farmers interested in maximizing their profits independently. This flexibility helped capturing the trade-off between the optimality of the social planner solution developed at the system's level and its practicality (stability) with respect to the concerns and behaviors of the profit-maximizing farmers. The idetified promising policy and technolgical reforms for Oman include strict enforcement of groundwater quotas, smart metering, changing crop mixes, improving irrigation technologies, and revising geographical distribution of the farming activities. The presentation will discuss how different

  2. Effects of uranium-mining releases on ground-water quality in the Puerco River Basin, Arizona and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wirt, Laurie; Lopes, T.J.; Ferguson, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Shallow ground water beneath the Puerco River of Arizona and New Mexico was studied to determine the effects of uranium-mining releases on water quality. Ground-water samples collected from 1989 to 1991 indicate that concentrations of dissolved uranium have decreased. Most samples from the alluvial aquifer downstream from Gallup, New Mexico, met with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels for gross alpha, gross beta, and radium and the proposed maximum contaminant level for uranium.

  3. Analytical quality assurance in veterinary drug residue analysis methods: matrix effects determination and monitoring for sulfonamides analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Rübensam, Gabriel; Jank, Louise; Barreto, Fabiano; Peralba, Maria do Carmo Ruaro; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Silvia Díaz-Cruz, M; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    In residue analysis of veterinary drugs in foodstuff, matrix effects are one of the most critical points. This work present a discuss considering approaches used to estimate, minimize and monitoring matrix effects in bioanalytical methods. Qualitative and quantitative methods for estimation of matrix effects such as post-column infusion, slopes ratios analysis, calibration curves (mathematical and statistical analysis) and control chart monitoring are discussed using real data. Matrix effects varying in a wide range depending of the analyte and the sample preparation method: pressurized liquid extraction for liver samples show matrix effects from 15.5 to 59.2% while a ultrasound-assisted extraction provide values from 21.7 to 64.3%. The matrix influence was also evaluated: for sulfamethazine analysis, losses of signal were varying from -37 to -96% for fish and eggs, respectively. Advantages and drawbacks are also discussed considering a workflow for matrix effects assessment proposed and applied to real data from sulfonamides residues analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological function evaluation and effects of laser micro-pore burn-denatured acellular dermal matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youlai; Zeng, Yuanlin; Xin, Guohua; Zou, Lijin; Ding, Yuewei; Duyin, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    In the field of burns repairs, many problems exist in the shortage of donor skin, the expense of allograft or xenograft skin, temporary substitution and unsatisfactory extremity function after wound healing. Previous studies showed that burn-denatured skin could return to normal dermis formation and function. This study investigates the application of laser micro-pore burn-denatured acellular dermis matrix (DADM) from an escharotomy in the repair of burn wounds and evaluates the biological properties and wound repair effects of DADM in implantation experiments in Kunming mice. Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) Kunming mice were used in this study. A deep II° burn wound was created on the dorsum of the mice by an electric heated water bath. The full-thickness wound tissue was harvested. The necrotic tissue and subcutaneous tissue were removed. The denatured dermis was preserved and treated with 0.25% trypsin, 0.5% Triton X-100. The DADM was drilled by laser micro-pore. The biological properties and grafting effects of laser micro-pore burn-DADM were evaluated by morphology, cytokine expression levels and subcutaneous implantation experiments in Kunming mice. We found statistical significance (Ppore burn-DADM (experimental group) compared to the control group (no laser micro-pore burn-DADM). Cytokine expression level was different in the dermal matrixes harvested at various time points after burn (24h, 48h, 72h and infected wound group). Comparing the dermal matrix from 24h burn tissue to infected wound tissue, the expression level of IL-6, MMP-24, VE-cadherin and VEGF were decreased. We found no inflammatory cells infiltration in the dermal matrix were observed in both experimental and control groups (24h burn group), while the obviously vascular infiltration and fiber fusion were observed in the experimental group after subcutaneous implantation experiments. There was better bio-performance, low immunogenicity and better dermal incorporation after treated by laser

  5. Investigation of particle shape and size effects in SERS using T-matrix calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Rufus; Le Ru, Eric C

    2009-09-14

    The influence of particle size and shape effects on average and punctual surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) is investigated using exact T-matrix electrodynamic calculations of silver and gold spheroids over a large parameter space. This study extends the conventional treatment of these effects within the frameworks of the electrostatics approximation, its generalizations, or Mie theory for spheres. It confirms the qualitative features of these approaches, but provides in addition quantitative predictions of SERS EFs in the case of large non-spherical particles, where the lightning-rod effect (shape effect) and radiation damping (size effect) operate simultaneously. Finally, the localization effect at large SERS EF (hot-spots) is shown to be dictated only by shape, not size, in the case of metallic spheroids at the dipolar localized surface plasmon resonance.

  6. Alternative calibration techniques for counteracting the matrix effects in GC-MS-SPE pesticide residue analysis - a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimayi, Cornelius; Odusanya, David; Mtunzi, Fanyana; Tsoka, Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of application of four different multivariate calibration techniques, namely matrix-matched internal standard (MMIS), matrix-matched external standard (MMES), solvent-only internal standard (SOIS) and solvent-only external standard (SOES) on the detection and quantification of 20 organochlorine compounds from high, low and blank matrix water sample matrices by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled to solid phase extraction (SPE). Further statistical testing, using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) by applying MANOVA, T-tests and Levene's F tests indicates that matrix composition has a more significant effect on the efficiency of the analytical method than the calibration method of choice. Matrix effects are widely described as one of the major sources of errors in GC-MS multiresidue analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistics proved that the matrix-matched internal standard calibration was the best approach to use for samples of varying matrix composition as it produced the most precise average mean recovery of 87% across all matrices tested. The use of an internal standard calibration overall produced more precise total recoveries than external standard calibration, with mean values of 77% and 64% respectively. The internal standard calibration technique produced a particularly high overall standard deviation of 38% at 95% confidence level indicating that it is less robust than the external standard calibration method which had an overall standard error of 32% at 95% confidence level. Overall, the matrix-matched external standard calibration proved to be the best calibration approach for analysis of low matrix samples which consisted of the real sample matrix as it had the most precise recovery of 98% compared to other calibration approaches for the low-matrix samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of aging hardening on in situ synthesis magnesium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuqing; Liao Lihua; Ma Naiheng; Wang Haowei

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composites reinforced with TiC particulates was synthesized using in situ synthesis technique. The result of XRD revealed the presence of TiC in precursor blocks and TiC/AZ91 composites. Effect of aging hardening on the composites was described using Brinell hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the aging hardening peak of TiC/AZ91 composite appeared earlier comparatively with that of AZ91 magnesium alloy. And the appearance of aging hardening peak was earlier under the higher aging temperature such as 200 deg. C. The precipitating behavior of Mg 17 Al 12 phase in AZ91 alloy and TiC/AZ91 composites was described. Little discontinuous was discovered in the composites, and the amount of continuous precipitate in the composite matrix is smaller comparatively to that of AZ91 alloy. These results were analyzed with the fine grain size, much more interface between TiC and magnesium and high-density dislocation in magnesium matrix, which was contributed to the addition of TiC particulates

  8. Effect of a one-step self-etch adhesive on endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolonio, Fabianni M; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Angeloni, Valeria; Scaffa, Polliana M C; Santi, Spartaco; Saboia, Vicente de Paulo A; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of the hybrid layer created in dentin by dentin adhesives is caused by enzyme activities present within the dentin matrix that destroy unprotected collagen fibrils. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a one-step self-etch adhesive system on dentinal matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 4 (MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively) using in situ zymography and an enzymatic activity assay. The null hypothesis tested was that there are no differences in the activities of dentinal MMPs before and after treatment with a one-step adhesive system. The MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in dentin treated with the one-step adhesive, Adper Easy Bond, were quantified using an enzymatic activity assay system. The MMP activities within the hybrid layer created by the one-step adhesive tested were also evaluated using in situ zymography. The enzymatic assay revealed an increase in MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities after treatment with adhesive. In situ zymography indicated that gelatinolytic activity is present within the hybrid layer created with the one-step self-etch adhesive. The host-derived gelatinases were localized within the hybrid layer and remained active after the bonding procedure. It is concluded that the one-step self-etch adhesive investigated activates endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 with the dentin matrix, which may cause collagen degradation over time. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Combined effect of matrix cracking and stress-free edge on delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Obrien, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the stress-free edge on the growth of local delaminations initiating from a matrix crack in (0 sub 2/90 sub 4) sub s and (+ or - 45.90 sub 4) sub s glass epoxy laminates is investigated using 3-D finite element analysis. The presence of high interlaminar normal stresses at the intersection (corner) of the matrix crack with the stress-free edge, suggests that a mode I delamination may initiate at the corners. The strain energy release rates (G) were calculated by modeling a uniform through-width delamination and two inclined delaminations at 10.6 deg and 45 deg to the matrix crack. All components of G have high values near the free edges. The mode I component of G is high at small delamination length and becomes zero for a delamination length of one-ply thickness. The total G values near the free edge agreed well with previously derived closed form solution. The quasi-3D solutions agreed well with the 3-D interior solutions.

  10. Natural organics in groundwaters and their potential effect on contaminant transport in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Bachinski, D.B.; Richer, D.

    1996-07-01

    Naturally occurring organics in groundwaters of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) of southern Manitoba and of the Atikokan Research Area of northwestern Ontario were investigated to assess their potential role in radionuclide transport within granite fractures of the Canadian Shield. A survey of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, carried out to determine the variability in the organic content of these groundwaters, showed average concentrations in WRA deep groundwaters of 0.8 ± 0.1 mg/L for Fracture Zone 2, 0.8 ± 0.4 mg/L for near-vertical fractures, and 2.3 ± 0.8 mg/L for deeper saline groundwater. Surface waters and near-surface groundwaters had significantly higher DOC with 29.2 ± 0.6 mg/L in streams from the East Swamp. The DOC consisted mainly of hydrophilic neutral compounds 60 to 75%, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids 23 to 39%, along with very small amounts of hydrophobic bases and neutrals, and hydrophilic bases. The average complexing capacity of natural organics in WRA deep groundwaters was calculated to be 6.7 x 10 -6 eq/L. The ability of these organics to complex radionuclides was tested using conditional stability constants from the literature for humic complex formation with trivalent, tetravalent, pentavalent and hexavalent actinides. The chemistries of Np(V) and U(VI) were predicted to be dominated by inorganic complexes and not significantly affected by organics. Accurate predictions for AM(III) and Th(IV) could not be made since the literature contains a wide range in values of stability constants for humic complexes with these elements. Surface waters and near-surface groundwaters in many areas of the Canadian Shield contain enough humics to complex a significant fraction of dissolved actinides. Radiocarbon ages of humics from WRA groundwater varied between 3600 and 6200 years before present, indicating that a component of humic substances in deep groundwaters must originate from near-surface waters. 54 refs., 15 tabs., 5

  11. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC/RBSN composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, James D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  12. Indicative effects of climate change on groundwater levels in Estonian raised bogs over 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lode

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of 50-year (1962–2011 monthly air temperature and precipitation data indicated substantial climate change in the locations of two raised bogs (Linnusaare and Männikjärve in central-east Estonia. During recent years the cross-year winter air temperature increased by 1.7 ºC, while the cold-season precipitation increased by 4 mm. The fluctuation amplitude of temperature and precipitation values decreased. Snow depth proved to be the most sensitive variable to winter warming, followed by groundwater levels together with mean and maximum soil frosts. Long-term groundwater levels on the domes of the bogs and in the forested/treed lagg areas were 0.3−0.4 m and 0.4−0.8 m below the soil surface, respectively. Warming caused changes in groundwater level amplitude of 3−22 cm in the bog domes and 3−14 cm in the forested lagg zones. The lowest groundwater levels in ridge-pool ecotopes at Männikjärve rose by 6−10 cm (i.e. these ecotopes became wetter; but the incidence of low groundwater levels increased in most ecotopes, indicating a more general trend towards drier conditions in the bog.

  13. Investigation of Effects of Material Architecture on the Elastic Response of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop methods for quantifying the effects of the microstructural variations of woven ceramic matrix composites on the effective properties and response of the material, a research program has been undertaken which is described in this paper. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, CVI SiC/SiC, composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents and collect relevant statistics such as within ply tow spacing. This information was then used to build two dimensional finite element models that approximated the observed section geometry. With the aid of geometrical models generated by the microstructural characterization process, finite element models were generated and analyses were performed to quantify the effects of the microstructure and its variation on the effective stiffness and areas of stress concentration of the material. The results indicated that the geometry and distribution of the porosity appear to have significant effects on the through-thickness modulus. Similarly, stress concentrations on the outer surface of the composite appear to correlate to regions where the transverse tows are separated by a critical amount.

  14. Simulation of groundwater flow and analysis of the effects of water-management options in the North Platte Natural Resources District, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Steven M.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Vrabel, Joseph; Ryter, Derek W.

    2015-08-12

    The North Platte Natural Resources District (NPNRD) has been actively collecting data and studying groundwater resources because of concerns about the future availability of the highly inter-connected surface-water and groundwater resources. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the North Platte Natural Resources District, describes a groundwater-flow model of the North Platte River valley from Bridgeport, Nebraska, extending west to 6 miles into Wyoming. The model was built to improve the understanding of the interaction of surface-water and groundwater resources, and as an optimization tool, the model is able to analyze the effects of water-management options on the simulated stream base flow of the North Platte River. The groundwater system and related sources and sinks of water were simulated using a newton formulation of the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional groundwater model, referred to as MODFLOW–NWT, which provided an improved ability to solve nonlinear unconfined aquifer simulations with wetting and drying of cells. Using previously published aquifer-base-altitude contours in conjunction with newer test-hole and geophysical data, a new base-of-aquifer altitude map was generated because of the strong effect of the aquifer-base topography on groundwater-flow direction and magnitude. The largest inflow to groundwater is recharge originating from water leaking from canals, which is much larger than recharge originating from infiltration of precipitation. The largest component of groundwater discharge from the study area is to the North Platte River and its tributaries, with smaller amounts of discharge to evapotranspiration and groundwater withdrawals for irrigation. Recharge from infiltration of precipitation was estimated with a daily soil-water-balance model. Annual recharge from canal seepage was estimated using available records from the Bureau of Reclamation and then modified with canal

  15. The anti-inflammatory effects of matrix metalloproteinase-3 on irreversible pulpitis of mature erupted teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eba, Hisanori; Murasawa, Yusuke; Iohara, Koichiro; Isogai, Zenzo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Misako

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in extracellular matrix degradation and the modulation of cell behavior. These proteinases have also been implicated in tissue repair and regeneration. Our previous studies have demonstrated that MMP-3 elicits stimulatory effects on the proliferation and the migration of endothelial cells as well as anti-apoptotic effects on these cells in vitro. In addition, we found that MMP-3 enhanced the regeneration of lost pulp tissue in a rat incisor pulp injury model. However, continuously erupting rodent incisors exhibit significantly different pulp organization compared with mature erupted teeth. Therefore, we have further extended these studies using a canine irreversible pulpitis model to investigate the effects of MMP-3. In this study, the crowns of the canine mature premolars were removed and the pulp tissues were amputated. The amputated pulp tissues remained exposed for 24 or 72 hours to induce mild or severe irreversible pulpitis, respectively, followed by sealing of the cavities. In both models, the whole pulp tissues became necrotic by day 14. In this mild pulpitis model, the regeneration of pulp tissue with vasculature and nerves was observed until 14 days after sealing with MMP-3, followed by extracellular matrix formation in the regenerated pulp tissues until day 28. The treatment with MMP-3 resulted in a decrease in the number of macrophage and antigen-presenting cells and a significant inhibition of IL-6 expression on day 3. The inhibition of MMP-3 activity abolished these anti-inflammatory effects. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that MMP-3 was involved in the modification of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated proteins and hyaluronan (SHAP-HA) complexes possibly through the degradation of versican. These results demonstrate that MMP-3 can act as an anti-inflammatory agent and suggest that MMP-3 might represent a useful therapy for the treatment of mild irreversible pulpitis.

  16. The anti-inflammatory effects of matrix metalloproteinase-3 on irreversible pulpitis of mature erupted teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisanori Eba

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are involved in extracellular matrix degradation and the modulation of cell behavior. These proteinases have also been implicated in tissue repair and regeneration. Our previous studies have demonstrated that MMP-3 elicits stimulatory effects on the proliferation and the migration of endothelial cells as well as anti-apoptotic effects on these cells in vitro. In addition, we found that MMP-3 enhanced the regeneration of lost pulp tissue in a rat incisor pulp injury model. However, continuously erupting rodent incisors exhibit significantly different pulp organization compared with mature erupted teeth. Therefore, we have further extended these studies using a canine irreversible pulpitis model to investigate the effects of MMP-3. In this study, the crowns of the canine mature premolars were removed and the pulp tissues were amputated. The amputated pulp tissues remained exposed for 24 or 72 hours to induce mild or severe irreversible pulpitis, respectively, followed by sealing of the cavities. In both models, the whole pulp tissues became necrotic by day 14. In this mild pulpitis model, the regeneration of pulp tissue with vasculature and nerves was observed until 14 days after sealing with MMP-3, followed by extracellular matrix formation in the regenerated pulp tissues until day 28. The treatment with MMP-3 resulted in a decrease in the number of macrophage and antigen-presenting cells and a significant inhibition of IL-6 expression on day 3. The inhibition of MMP-3 activity abolished these anti-inflammatory effects. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that MMP-3 was involved in the modification of serum-derived hyaluronan-associated proteins and hyaluronan (SHAP-HA complexes possibly through the degradation of versican. These results demonstrate that MMP-3 can act as an anti-inflammatory agent and suggest that MMP-3 might represent a useful therapy for the treatment of mild irreversible pulpitis.

  17. Numerical simulation of the effect of groundwater salinity on artificial freezing wall in coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Liu, Quan

    2017-04-01

    During the engineering projects with artificial ground freezing (AFG) techniques in coastal area, the freezing effect is affected by groundwater salinity. Based on the theories of artificially frozen soil and heat transfer in porous material, and with the assumption that only the variations of total dissolved solids (TDS) impact on freezing point and thermal conductivity, a numerical model of an AFG project in a saline aquifer was established and validated by comparing the simulated temperature field with the calculated temperature based on the analytic solution of rupak (reference) for single-pipe freezing temperature field T. The formation and development of freezing wall were simulated with various TDS. The results showed that the variety of TDS caused the larger temperature difference near the frozen front. With increasing TDS in the saline aquifer (1 35g/L), the average thickness of freezing wall decreased linearly and the total formation time of the freezing wall increased linearly. Compared with of the scenario of fresh-water (<1g/L), the average thickness of frozen wall decreased by 6% and the total formation time of the freezing wall increased by 8% with each increasing TDS of 7g/L. Key words: total dissolved solids, freezing point, thermal conductivity, freezing wall, numerical simulation Reference D.J.Pringel, H.Eicken, H.J.Trodahl, etc. Thermal conductivity of landfast Antarctic and Arctic sea ice[J]. Journal of Geophysical Research, 2007, 112: 1-13. Lukas U.Arenson, Dave C.Sego. The effect of salinity on the freezing of coarse- grained sand[J]. Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 2006, 43: 325-337. Hui Bing, Wei Ma. Laboratory investigation of the freezing point of saline soil[J]. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 2011, 67: 79-88.

  18. The effect of surface-groundwater interaction on dissolved organic carbon transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Natalie; Boano, Fulvio; Arnon, Shai

    2014-05-01

    The preservation and improvement of water quality in streams is a challenging task, limited by our partial understanding of the coupling between biogeochemical and hydrological processes occurring in stream ecosystems. High potential for biogeochemical activity is found in the hyporheic zone, the saturated sediments where surface water and ground water mixes and degradation activities occur. The aim of the study was to quantifythe effect of losing and gaining flow conditions on the degradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Experiments were conducted in a recirculating flume that is equipped with a drainage system that enables the control on losing and gaining fluxes. The degradation of DOC under losing and gaining conditions was studied by spiking the water with benzoic acid and monitoring the decrease in DOC concentration in the bulk water over time using an online UV/Vis spectrophotometer. In addition, the spatial and temporal change in oxygen concentrations within the benthic biofilm was measured using a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode. Preliminary results showed that DOC degradation rate was faster under higher overlying water velocity, due to enhanced delivery of DOC to the biofilm. Under both gaining and losing conditions, the DOC degradation was slower than under neutral condition, probably as a consequence of the reduction of the hyporheic exchange zone. Series of oxygen profiles under losing conditions showed a complete depletion of oxygen within the first 3 millimeters of sediment. In contrast, oxygen profiles under gaining condition showed a incomplete consumption of oxygen (usually within 1 mm), followed by an increase in the concentration of oxygen deeper in the sediments due to the upward flow of oxygenated groundwater. The results suggest that the size of the active aerobic region within the hyporheic zone is changing dynamically with the flow conditions. The effect of flow conditions on redox zonation in the hyporheic zone is expected to

  19. The effect of aeration on the removal of wastewater-derived pharmaceutical residues from groundwater - a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Victoria; Duennbier, Uwe; Massmann, Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    Several studies on waste- or drinking water treatment processes as well as on groundwater have recently shown that some pharmaceutical residues (PRs) are redox-sensitive. Hence, their (bio)degradation depends on the redox conditions prevalent in the aquifer. Groundwater, providing raw water for drinking water production, is often anoxic and aeration is a widespread treatment method applied mainly to eliminate unwanted iron and manganese from the water. As a side-effect, aeration may trigger the elimination of PRs. Within the present study the influence of aeration on the fate of a number of wastewater derived analgesics and their residues as well as several antimicrobial compounds was investigated. For this purpose, anoxic groundwater was transferred into stainless steel tanks, some of which were aerated while others were continuously kept anoxic. Results prove that the degradation of six phenazone type compounds is dependent on oxygen availability and compounds are efficiently removed under oxic conditions only. Concerning the antimicrobials, doxycycline and trimethoprim were better removed during aeration, whereas a slightly improved removal under anoxic conditions was observed for clindamycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin. The study provides first laboratory proof of the redox-sensitivity of several organic trace pollutants. In addition, results demonstrate that aeration is an effective treatment for the elimination of a number of wastewater derived PRs.

  20. Effect of land-applied biosolids on surface-water nutrient yields and groundwater quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Harden, Stephen L.; Gurley, Laura N.; Rogers, Shane W.

    2015-01-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater biosolids is the most common method of biosolids management used in North Carolina and the United States. Biosolids have characteristics that may be beneficial to soil and plants. Land application can take advantage of these beneficial qualities, whereas disposal in landfills or incineration poses no beneficial use of the waste. Some independent studies and laboratory analysis, however, have shown that land-applied biosolids can pose a threat to human health and surface-water and groundwater quality. The effect of municipal biosolids applied to agriculture fields is largely unknown in relation to the delivery of nutrients, bacteria, metals, and contaminants of emerging concern to surface-water and groundwater resources. Therefore, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDENR) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the 319 Nonpoint Source Program to better understand the transport of nutrients and bacteria from biosolids application fields to groundwater and surface water and to provide a scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the current regulations.

  1. Matrix effects in thermal lens spectrometry: influence of salts, surfactants, polymers and solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we present an overall view of the matrix effects that can change or alter the signal in thermal lens spectrometry and we report the main works published in this field. The addition of salts, surfactants and polymers in aqueous solutions or the use of solvent mixtures is often needed in a variety of applications either to enhance the sensitivity of the thermal lens method or more generally because such media are required in the separation process prior to thermal lens detection. In most cases, matrix effects result in small changes in the thermo-optical properties of the solution and small signal variations. However, most important signal alterations can arise from the Soret effect. In binary mixtures as well as in solutions with macromolecular species which are initially homogeneous, the temperature gradient will induce the migration of molecules and the formation of a concentration gradient. This results in the formation of a concentration-dependent refractive index gradient which adds to the temperature-dependent refractive index gradient and contributes to the formation of a new signal. This effect can seriously alter the analytical signal and lead to erroneous interpretation of the experimental data. In contrast, time-resolved measurements can help in separating both signal components and have allowed to derive mass-diffusion times and mass-diffusion coefficients for a variety of micelles and polymers.

  2. Hydraulic evaluation of the groundwater conditions at Finnsjoen. The effects on dilution in a domestic well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, C.L.; Bystroem, J.; Eriksson, Aa.; Holmen, J.; Haitjema, H.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is presently performing a safety analysis study, SKB 91, for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The study is carried out for a generic repository located to the Finnsjoen area, which is one of SKBs oldest study-areas. An important part of the safety analysis is the dose calculations. Radionuclides can be transported to the biosphere via the sea, a lake, and via extraction of groundwater from drilled or dug wells. Thus, an important scenario to study is the dilution of radionuclides in a domestic well drilled in the future close to the repository. The present study is discussing; * Localization, drilling and construction of wells. * Specific capacities and chloride content of the rock mass and wells found in the Finnsjoe are. * Risk areas for future drilled wells. * Dilution in future wells drilled in fracture zones or in the hard rock in the vicinity of the repository. The evaluations show that a well pumping 6 m 3 /day, located in a fracture zone or in the rock mass, has no influence on the local groundwater flow system except for the very vicinity of the well. Consequently, a well may be drilled in the hard rock without any risk of pumping groundwater that has passed the repository. Wells may also be located anywhere in fracture zones, except for in the very discharge area, without any risk of getting groundwater affected by the repository. Modelling indicate that a well drilled in the discharge area for contaminated groundwater, may collect all groundwater from the repository. However, this is based on assumptions of homogeneous continuous fracture zones with a high hydraulic conductivity compared to the rock mass, which will give rise to a concentrated discharge area. (44 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.) (au)

  3. Environmental legacy of an underground gas well blowout: long-term effects of gas and brine leakage on groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schout, Gilian; Hartog, Niels; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; Griffioen, Jasper

    2017-04-01

    In 1965, a catastrophic underground blowout occurred during the drilling of a gas well in the village of Sleen, the Netherlands. The blowout led to the uncontrolled release of large amounts of natural gas and saline groundwater. Now, 50 years later, a number of nearby groundwater monitoring have been sampled to study the long term effects of this event on the groundwater composition of the overlying freshwater aquifers. The findings are used as an analogue for studying the potential adverse effects of hydraulic fracturing on groundwater quality. In total, 27 samples were taken and analysed for dissolved gas molecular and isotopic composition, major ion chemistry, water isotopes and stable chlorine isotope ratios. The resulting data show that concentrations of dissolved methane are still strongly elevated compared to background samples in a plume downstream of the blowout location. Isotopic data reveals the thermogenic nature of this plume; all samples with methane concentrations greater than 10 mg/l (n=12) had δC-CH4 values greater than -30‰ (VPDB), characteristic of thermogenic methane. The maximum distance at which thermogenic methane is observed is at approximately 500 meter downstream of the centre of the blowout. The progressive enrichment of both δ13C-CH4 and δ2D-CH4, that is observed with distance from the well and decreasing methane concentrations, presents strong evidence for the role of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) in limiting the spread of the dissolved methane plume. Low sulphate and increased Fe(II) and Mn(II) concentrations indeed suggest that multiple AOM pathways are involved in the natural attenuation of the dissolved methane plume. Chlorine concentrations were only elevated in a subset of wells in close proximity to the blowout location, indicating that the present-day effects of brine migration are minimal. Nevertheless, elevated Na/Cl ratio's in multiple wells reveal that freshening of the aquifer is still on-going. In summary, this

  4. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process....... The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...

  5. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  6. MODEL FOR CALCULATING EFFECTIVE PARAMETERS OF MATRIX COMPOSITES FROM BI-ISOTROPIC PARTICLES WITH REGARD MULTIPLE REFLECTIONS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Erofeenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculation of the effective material parameters of matrix composites, consisting of magnetodielectric conducting matrix with a set of bi-isotropic spherical fractions, is developed. Under the calculations of parameters, taking into account a multiple scattering of the field between particles, a new type of addition theorems, connecting basic spherical electromagnetic fields relating to different particles, is used. The developed method allows to calculate the effective parameters for the composites with sufficiently dense ensemble of the fractions.

  7. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  8. Improvement on detectability of early ischemic changes for acute stroke using nonenhanced computed tomography: Effect of matrix size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Akio, E-mail: a-ogura@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital (Japan); Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University (Japan); Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University (Japan); Maeda, Fumie [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has recently been reported that intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator improves the clinical outcome after acute stroke. Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging method used to determine the indication for thrombolysis. However, detection of early ischemic change often results in an increase in local radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of decreased matrix size and use of a noise reduction filter were evaluated. Materials and methods: The low contrast resolution was compared for different matrix sizes and imaging filters using a contrast-detail phantom. In addition, early ischemic change in clinical images with matrix sizes of 256 x 256 and 128 x 128 processed using three imaging filters (Gaussian, smoothing, and unsharp mask) from 11 patients within 3 h of stroke onset was evaluated by seven radiologists in a blind manner. Results: The use of images with a matrix size of 256 x 256 and processed with the Gaussian filter increased the detection of early signs of acute stroke. Conclusions: This study was performed to determine whether the converted matrix size and use of imaging filters could improve the detectability of early ischemic change on CT images in acute stroke. To reduce the dose of radiation exposure for patients, it was effective to use an optimal noise reduction filter and reasonable matrix size. In particular, changing the matrix size to 256 x 256 was the most effective for detection of early ischemic change in examinations using clinical images.

  9. The Effect of Stochastically Varying Creep Parameters on Residual Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Constituent properties, along with volume fraction, have a first order effect on the microscale fields within a composite material and influence the macroscopic response. Therefore, there is a need to assess the significance of stochastic variation in the constituent properties of composites at the higher scales. The effect of variability in the parameters controlling the time-dependent behavior, in a unidirectional SCS-6 SiC fiber-reinforced RBSN matrix composite lamina, on the residual stresses induced during processing is investigated numerically. The generalized method of cells micromechanics theory is utilized to model the ceramic matrix composite lamina using a repeating unit cell. The primary creep phases of the constituents are approximated using a Norton-Bailey, steady state, power law creep model. The effect of residual stresses on the proportional limit stress and strain to failure of the composite is demonstrated. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using a normal distribution for the power law parameters and the resulting residual stress distributions were predicted.

  10. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of damage in ceramic matrix composites: Effects of weaves and feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Mordasky, Matt; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a class of high temperature materials with better damage tolerance properties compared to monolithic ceramics. The improved toughness is attributed to weak interface coating between the fiber and the matrix that allows for crack deflection and fiber pull-out. Thus, CMCs have gained consideration over monolithic materials for high temperature applications such as in gas turbines. The current standard fiber architecture for CMCs is a harness satin (HS) balanced weave (5HS and 8HS); however, other architectures such as uni-weave materials (tape layup) are now being considered due to fiber placement control and higher fiber volume fraction in the tensile loading direction. Engineering components require additional features in the CMC laminates, such as holes for attachments. Past work has shown that acoustic emission could differentiate the effect of changing interface conditions due to heat treatment effects. The focus of the present work is to investigate the effects of different weaves and the presence of a feature on damage behavior of CMCs as observed via acoustic emission technique. The results of the tensile testing with acoustic emission monitoring will be presented and discussed.

  12. Study of complex matrix effect on solid phase microextraction for biological sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruifen; Xu, Jianqiao; Zhu, Fang; Luan, Tiangang; Zeng, Feng; Shen, Yong; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-09-11

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) has become a useful tool for in vivo monitoring the behavior of environmental organic pollutants in biological species due to its simplicity, relatively non-invasive, and cost-effective manner. However, the complex matrices in biological samples could significantly influence the extraction kinetic, and bias the quantification result. In this study, we investigated the effect of complex matrix on the extraction kinetic of SPME for biological sample analysis. Two sample matrices, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and agarose gel with BSA were used to simulate the biological fluid and tissue. Results showed that the addition of BSA significantly enhanced the mass transfer of organic compounds onto SPME fiber in both PBS buffer and gel sample. Enhancement factors ranging from 1.3 to 27, and 2.0 to 80 were found for all selected polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PBS buffer and agarose gel with BSA concentration of 0.1-5%, respectively. Then, an improved theoretical model was applied to quantify the observed enhancement effect, and the result showed that the predicted sampling time constant agreed well with the experimental one in complex matrix. Furthermore, a simplified equation was proposed for the real biological sample analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Groundwater animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurice, Louise; Bloomfield, John; Robertson, Anne; Allen, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater animals are adapted to live in environments with no light and limited nutrients, They can provide insights into fundamental questions of evolution, ecology and biodiversity. They also have an important role to play in informing the reconstruction of past changes in geomorphology and climate, and can be used for characterising aquifers. The BGS is undertaking a systematic survey of selected areas and lithologies in the UK where groundwater animals have not been inves...

  14. Environmental life cycle assessment of permeable reactive barriers: effects of construction methods, reactive materials and groundwater constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Mark S H; Lo, Irene M C

    2011-12-01

    The effects of the construction methods, materials of reactive media and groundwater constituents on the environmental impacts of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The PRB is assumed to be installed at a simulated site contaminated by either Cr(VI) alone or Cr(VI) and As(V). Results show that the trench-based construction method can reduce the environmental impacts of the remediation remarkably compared to the caisson-based method due to less construction material consumption by the funnel. Compared to using the zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) and quartz sand mixture, the use of the Fe(0) and iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) mixture can reduce the environmental impacts. In the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) in groundwater, the environmental impacts generated by the reactive media were significantly increased because of the higher usage of Fe(0). The environmental impacts are lower by using the Fe(0) and IOCS mixture in the groundwater with NOM, compared with using the Fe(0) and quartz sand mixture. Since IOCS can enhance the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and As(V), the usage of the Fe(0) can be reduced, which in turn reduces the impacts induced by the reactive media.

  15. Effect of Borehole Material on Analytical Solutions of the Heat Transfer Model of Ground Heat Exchangers Considering Groundwater Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwoo Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater flow is one of the most important factors for the design of a ground heat exchanger (GHEX since the thermal environment of the ground around the buried GHEX is significantly affected by heat convection due to the groundwater flow. Several preceding studies have been conducted to develop analytical solutions to the heat transfer model of GHEX with consideration of groundwater flow. One of these solutions is the combined heat transfer model of conduction and convection. However, the developed combined analytical models are inapplicable to all of the configurations of ordinary GHEXs because these solutions assume that the inner part of the borehole is thermally inert or consists of the same material as that of the surrounding ground. In this paper, the applicability of the combined solid cylindrical heat source model, which is the most suitable to energy piles until now, was evaluated by performing a series of numerical analyses. In the numerical analysis, the inner part of the borehole was modeled as two different materials (i.e., permeable ground formation and impermeable fill such as concrete to evaluate applicability of the analytical solution along with different diameter-length (D/L ratios of borehole. In a small value of the D/L ratio, the analytical solution to the combined heat transfer model is in good agreement with the result of numerical analysis. On the other hand, when increasing the D/L ratio, the analytical solution significantly overestimates the effect of groundwater flow on the heat transfer of GHEXs because the analytical solution disregards the existence of the impermeable region in the borehole. Consequently, such tendency is more critical in the GHEX with a large D/L ratio such as large-diameter energy piles.

  16. Modeling groundwater/surface-water interactions in an Alpine valley (the Aosta Plain, NW Italy): the effect of groundwater abstraction on surface-water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefania, Gennaro A.; Rotiroti, Marco; Fumagalli, Letizia; Simonetto, Fulvio; Capodaglio, Pietro; Zanotti, Chiara; Bonomi, Tullia

    2018-02-01

    A groundwater flow model of the Alpine valley aquifer in the Aosta Plain (NW Italy) showed that well pumping can induce river streamflow depletions as a function of well location. Analysis of the water budget showed that ˜80% of the water pumped during 2 years by a selected well in the downstream area comes from the baseflow of the main river discharge. Alluvial aquifers hosted in Alpine valleys fall within a particular hydrogeological context where groundwater/surface-water relationships change from upstream to downstream as well as seasonally. A transient groundwater model using MODFLOW2005 and the Streamflow-Routing (SFR2) Package is here presented, aimed at investigating water exchanges between the main regional river (Dora Baltea River, a left-hand tributary of the Po River), its tributaries and the underlying shallow aquifer, which is affected by seasonal oscillations. The three-dimensional distribution of the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer was obtained by means of a specific coding system within the database TANGRAM. Both head and flux targets were used to perform the model calibration using PEST. Results showed that the fluctuations of the water table play an important role in groundwater/surface-water interconnections. In upstream areas, groundwater is recharged by water leaking through the riverbed and the well abstraction component of the water budget changes as a function of the hydraulic conditions of the aquifer. In downstream areas, groundwater is drained by the river and most of the water pumped by wells comes from the base flow component of the river discharge.

  17. Effect of hydrochemical conditions in transport properties of viruses in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghi, G.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311482392

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of virus removal in subsurface environments is pivotal for assessing the risk of viral contamination of drinking water wells and to adequately protect groundwater resources. Laboratory and field experiments are necessary to obtain values for kinetic parameters needed to describe virus

  18. Groundwater recharge in desert playas: current rates and future effects of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our results from playas, which are topographic low areas situated in closed-catchments in drylands, indicated that projected climate change in Southwestern USA would have a net positive impact over runon and groundwater recharge beneath playas. Expected increased precipitation variability can cause ...

  19. Effects of an open Waste dump-site on groundwater quality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of the quality of groundwater around an open dump-site was carried out using borehole water samples collected from two points each, close to the dump-site and a control point outside the vicinity. Analysis showed that with the exception of temperature and salinity, which were not significantly different ...

  20. Effect of hydrocarbon-contaminated fluctuating groundwater on magnetic properties of shallow sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ameen, N. N.; Klueglein, N.; Appel, E.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kappler, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2014), s. 442-460 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13042 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * magnetic susceptibility * groundwater table fluctuation * hydrocarbon contamination * magnetite formation Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  1. Effect of harsh or mild extraction of soil on pesticide leaching to groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Jos J.T.I.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide- soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such

  2. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  3. Groundwater thermal-effective injection systems in shallow aquifers: possible alternatives to vertical water wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Stefano; Taddia, Glenda; Cerino Abdin, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Urbanized areas have environmental features that may influence the development of low-enthalpy geothermal systems and the choice of the most suitable among the available (roughly earth-coupled closed-loop and groundwater open-loop type). In particular, if compared to less anthropized areas, some characteristic urban elements require particular attention: underground extensive use, contamination of groundwater, interference between the systems, authorization procedures and planning restrictions, the competition with cogeneration systems and the impact on emissions of pollutants. In this general context, the increasing implementation in several areas of the world of the open-loop groundwater heat pumps technology which discharge into the aquifer for cooling and heating buildings, could potentially cause, even in the short term, a significant environmental impact associated with thermal interference with groundwater, particularly in the shallow aquifers. The discharge of water at different temperatures compared to baseline (warmer in summer and colder in winter) poses a number of problems in relation to the potential functionality of many existing situations of use of the groundwater (drinking water wells, agricultural, industrial, etc.). In addition, there may be cases of interference between systems, especially in the more densely urbanized areas. Appropriate hydrogeological investigations should be performed for the characterization of the main hydrogeological parameters of the subsoil at the considered site in order to minimize the environmental impact of discharges into aquifers. The current Italian legislation related to withdrawals and discharges into aquifers designs a framework suitable for the protection of groundwater and induce deciding the best configuration of the plant with a case by case approach. An increased contact area between the dispersant system and the ground makes it possible to affect a greater volume of aquifer and, consequently, reduce the

  4. Integrated experimental and modeling assessment of potential effects of gas leakages on groundwater composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Schäfer, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    pyrite content, oxygen dissolution kinetics, groundwater composition including the carbonate buffer, and diffusive and advective transport parameters. The results of site-scale multiphase reactive transport modeling revealed the expected spatial distribution of redox-sensitive species such as oxygen, pyrite, and sulfate in an aquifer following a leakage. The changes in concentration of sulfate, dissolved oxygen, and H+ observed in the lab-scale experiments were qualitatively reproduced by the models applying the same boundary conditions on a site-scale. This integrated study acknowledged that the combination of experiments and models is a powerful tool to prognose the geochemical consequences of gas leakage on site scale. However, it is yet unknown how the passivation would be effected if the carbonate buffer depleted on the long term and under what circumstances a transition from the passivating pyrite oxidation process to the non-passivating process observed for instance in acid mine drainage setups occurs. These restrictions mark the limits of validity of our experimental and modeling concept. This conclusion suggests the feasibility of the presented integrated approach also when evaluating comparable scenarios on methane and hydrogen storage based on experimental results gathered similarly[2]. [1]Berta et al. Environ Earth Sci (2016) 75:1175, DOI 10.1007/s12665-016-5985-7. [2]Berta et al. First Break (2015) 33,93-95, ISSN 1365-2397. This work is part of the ANGUS+ project funded by the BMBF-FK03EK3022.

  5. Moderate effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain Gel) on Porphyromonas gingivalis growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Clemens; Jawor, Przemyslaw; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Hägewald, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the antibacterial effects of Emdogain Gel or its constituents on the growth of the suspected periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. The effects of the proteins of enamel matrix derivative (EMD), the commercial product Emdogain Gel or its vehicle propylene glycol alginate (PGA) (Straumann, Switzerland) on P. gingivalis growth were determined by two methods: broth dilution assay (BDA) and agar diffusion assay (ADA). BDA-Emdogain Gel inhibited moderately the growth of P. gingivalis, whereas EMD showed no effect. The PGA vehicle inhibited the growth completely. ADA-Emdogain Gel resulted in some inhibition in growth but was not significantly different from control. EMD revealed no zone of inhibition. PGA demonstrated statistically significant zones of inhibition. Emdogain Gel shows moderate antibacterial activities against P. gingivalis. These properties seem to be due to the PGA component of the gel preparation.

  6. Approaches to groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.; Klavetter, E.; Peters, R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project is to estimate the groundwater travel time at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether the site complies with the criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 CFR 60.113 (a). The numerical standard for performance in these criteria is based on the groundwater travel time along the fastest path of likely radionuclide transport from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment. The concept of groundwater travel time as proposed in the regulations, does not have a unique mathematical statement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ambiguities associated with the regulatory specification of groundwater travel time, two different interpretations of groundwater travel time, and the effect of the two interpretations on estimates of the groundwater travel time

  7. Effects of patch size and type of coffee matrix on ithomiine butterfly diversity and dispersal in cloud-forest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Sandra B; Kattan, Gustavo H

    2009-08-01

    Determining the permeability of different types of landscape matrices to animal movement is essential for conserving populations in fragmented landscapes. We evaluated the effects of habitat patch size and matrix type on diversity, isolation, and dispersal of ithomiine butterflies in forest fragments surrounded by coffee agroecosystems in the Colombian Andes. Because ithomiines prefer a shaded understory, we expected the highest diversity and abundance in large fragments surrounded by shade coffee and the lowest in small fragments surrounded by sun coffee. We also thought shade coffee would favor butterfly dispersal and immigration into forest patches. We marked 9675 butterflies of 39 species in 12 forest patches over a year. Microclimate conditions were more similar to the forest interior in the shade-coffee matrix than in the sun-coffee matrix, but patch size and matrix type did not affect species richness and abundance in forest fragments. Furthermore, age structure and temporal recruitment patterns of the butterfly community were similar in all fragments, independent of patch size or matrix type. There were no differences in the numbers of butterflies flying in the matrices at two distances from the forest patch, but their behavior differed. Flight in the sun-coffee matrix was rapid and directional, whereas butterflies in shade-coffee matrix flew slowly. Seven out of 130 recaptured butterflies immigrated into patches in the shade-coffee matrix, and one immigrated into a patch surrounded by sun coffee. Although the shade-coffee matrix facilitated movement in the landscape, sun-coffee matrix was not impermeable to butterflies. Ithomiines exhibited behavioral plasticity in habitat use and high mobility. These traits favor their persistence in heterogeneous landscapes, opening opportunities for their conservation. Understanding the dynamics and resource requirements of different organisms in rural landscapes is critical for identifying management options that

  8. Food Matrix Effects of Polyphenol Bioaccessibility from Almond Skin during Simulated Human Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Mandalari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to quantify the rate and extent of polyphenols released in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT from natural (NS and blanched (BS almond skins. A dynamic gastric model of digestion which provides a realistic simulation of the human stomach was used. In order to establish the effect of a food matrix on polyphenols bioaccessibility, NS and BS were either digested in water (WT or incorporated into home-made biscuits (HB, crisp-bread (CB and full-fat milk (FM. Phenolic acids were the most bioaccessible class (68.5% release from NS and 64.7% from BS. WT increased the release of flavan-3-ols (p < 0.05 and flavonols (p < 0.05 from NS after gastric plus duodenal digestion, whereas CB and HB were better vehicles for BS. FM lowered the % recovery of polyphenols, the free total phenols and the antioxidant status in the digestion medium, indicating that phenolic compounds could bind protein present in the food matrix. The release of bioactives from almond skins could explain the beneficial effects associated with almond consumption.

  9. Correlation effects beyond coupled cluster singles and doubles approximation through Fock matrix dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rahul; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-11-28

    We present an accurate single reference coupled cluster theory in which the conventional Fock operator matrix is suitably dressed to simulate the effect of triple and higher excitations within a singles and doubles framework. The dressing thus invoked originates from a second-order perturbative approximation of a similarity transformed Hamiltonian and induces higher rank excitations through local renormalization of individual occupied and unoccupied orbital lines. Such a dressing is able to recover a significant amount of correlation effects beyond singles and doubles approximation, but only with an economic n 5 additional cost. Due to the inclusion of higher rank excitations via the Fock matrix dressing, this method is a natural improvement over conventional coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles approximation, and this method would be demonstrated via applications on some challenging systems. This highly promising scheme has a conceptually simple structure which is also easily generalizable to a multi-reference coupled cluster scheme for treating strong degeneracy. We shall demonstrate that this method is a natural lowest order perturbative approximation to the recently developed iterative n-body excitation inclusive coupled cluster singles and doubles scheme [R. Maitra et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074103 (2017)].

  10. Food Matrix Effects of Polyphenol Bioaccessibility from Almond Skin during Simulated Human Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalari, Giuseppina; Vardakou, Maria; Faulks, Richard; Bisignano, Carlo; Martorana, Maria; Smeriglio, Antonella; Trombetta, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to quantify the rate and extent of polyphenols released in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) from natural (NS) and blanched (BS) almond skins. A dynamic gastric model of digestion which provides a realistic simulation of the human stomach was used. In order to establish the effect of a food matrix on polyphenols bioaccessibility, NS and BS were either digested in water (WT) or incorporated into home-made biscuits (HB), crisp-bread (CB) and full-fat milk (FM). Phenolic acids were the most bioaccessible class (68.5% release from NS and 64.7% from BS). WT increased the release of flavan-3-ols (p digestion, whereas CB and HB were better vehicles for BS. FM lowered the % recovery of polyphenols, the free total phenols and the antioxidant status in the digestion medium, indicating that phenolic compounds could bind protein present in the food matrix. The release of bioactives from almond skins could explain the beneficial effects associated with almond consumption. PMID:27649239

  11. Correlation effects beyond coupled cluster singles and doubles approximation through Fock matrix dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Rahul; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-11-01

    We present an accurate single reference coupled cluster theory in which the conventional Fock operator matrix is suitably dressed to simulate the effect of triple and higher excitations within a singles and doubles framework. The dressing thus invoked originates from a second-order perturbative approximation of a similarity transformed Hamiltonian and induces higher rank excitations through local renormalization of individual occupied and unoccupied orbital lines. Such a dressing is able to recover a significant amount of correlation effects beyond singles and doubles approximation, but only with an economic n5 additional cost. Due to the inclusion of higher rank excitations via the Fock matrix dressing, this method is a natural improvement over conventional coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles approximation, and this method would be demonstrated via applications on some challenging systems. This highly promising scheme has a conceptually simple structure which is also easily generalizable to a multi-reference coupled cluster scheme for treating strong degeneracy. We shall demonstrate that this method is a natural lowest order perturbative approximation to the recently developed iterative n-body excitation inclusive coupled cluster singles and doubles scheme [R. Maitra et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074103 (2017)].

  12. Decadal variations in groundwater quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Søren; Postma, Dieke; Thorling, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years of groundwater quality monitoring in a sandy aquifer beneath agricultural fields showed large temporal and spatial variations in major ion groundwater chemistry, which were linked closely to the nitrate (NO3) content of agricultural recharge. Between 1988 and 2013, the NO3 content...... loading. Agriculture thus is an important determinant of major ion groundwater chemistry. Temporal and spatial variations in the groundwater quality were simulated using a 2D reactive transport model, which combined effects of the historical NO3 leaching and denitrification, with dispersive mixing...

  13. Effect of metallic iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 doped with a radioactive alpha emitter in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jegou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Jouan, Gauthier; Peuget, Sylvain; Martin, Christelle

    2017-12-01

    In the hypothesis of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological nuclear waste repository, interactions between the fuel mainly composed of UO2 and its environment must be understood. The dissolution rate of the UO2 matrix, which depends on the redox conditions on the fuel surface, will have a major impact on the release of radionuclides into the environment. The reducing conditions expected for a geological disposal situation would appear to be favorable as regards the solubility and stability of the UO2 matrix, but may be disturbed on the surface of irradiated fuel. In particular, the local redox conditions will result from a competition between the radiolysis effects of water under alpha irradiation (simultaneously producing oxidizing species like H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing species like H2, hydrogen) and those of redox active species from the environment. In particular, Fe2+, a strongly reducing aqueous species coming from the corrosion of the iron canister or from the host rock, could influence the dissolution of the fuel matrix. The effect of iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 was thus investigated under the conditions of the French disposal site, a Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation chosen by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), here tested under alpha irradiation. For this study, UO2 fuel pellets doped with a radioactive alpha emitter (238/239Pu) were leached in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater (representative of the French waste disposal site groundwater) in the presence of a metallic iron foil to simulate the steel canister. The pellets had varying levels of alpha activity, in order to modulate the concentrations of species produced by water radiolysis on the surface and to simulate the activity of aged spent fuel after 50 and 10,000 years of alpha radioactivity decay. The experimental data showed that whatever the sample alpha radioactivity, the presence of iron inhibits the oxidizing dissolution of

  14. Modeling the Effects of Interfacial Characteristics on Gas Permeation Behavior of Nanotube-Mixed Matrix Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehrazi, Ehsan; Sharif, Alireza; Omidkhah, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Mohammad

    2017-10-25

    Theoretical approaches that accurately predict the gas permeation behavior of nanotube-containing mixed matrix membranes (nanotube-MMMs) are scarce. This is mainly due to ignoring the effects of nanotube/matrix interfacial characteristics in the existing theories. In this paper, based on the analogy of thermal conduction in polymer composites containing nanotubes, we develop a model to describe gas permeation through nanotube-MMMs. Two new parameters, "interfacial thickness" (a int ) and "interfacial permeation resistance" (R int ), are introduced to account for the role of nanotube/matrix interfacial interactions in the proposed model. The obtained values of a int , independent of the nature of the permeate gas, increased by increasing both the nanotubes aspect ratio and polymer-nanotube interfacial strength. An excellent correlation between the values of a int and polymer-nanotube interaction parameters, χ, helped to accurately reproduce the existing experimental data from the literature without the need to resort to any adjustable parameter. The data includes 10 sets of CO 2 /CH 4 permeation, 12 sets of CO 2 /N 2 permeation, 3 sets of CO 2 /O 2 permeation, and 2 sets of CO 2 /H 2 permeation through different nanotube-MMMs. Moreover, the average absolute relative errors between the experimental data and the predicted values of the proposed model are very small (less than 5%) in comparison with those of the existing models in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where such a systematic comparison between model predictions and such extensive experimental data is presented. Finally, the new way of assessing gas permeation data presented in the current work would be a simple alternative to complex approaches that are usually utilized to estimate interfacial thickness in polymer composites.

  15. Effect of Collagen Matrix Saturation on the Surface Free Energy of Dentin using Different Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Leopoldina de Fátima Dantas; Souza, Samilly Evangelista; Sampaio, Aline Araújo; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; da Silva, Wander José; Del Bel Cur, Altair A; Hebling, Josimeri

    2015-07-01

    The surface free energy of conditioned-dentin is one of the factors that interfere with monomeric infiltration of the interfibrillar spaces. Saturation of the tooth matrix with different substances may modulate this energy and, consequently, the wettability of the dentin. To evaluate the influence of different substances used to saturate conditioned-dentin on surface free energy (SFE) of this substrate. Dentin blocks (4 × 7 × 1 mm, n = 6/ group), obtained from the roots of bovine incisors, were etched using phosphoric acid for 15 seconds, rinsed and gently dried. The surfaces were treated for 60 seconds with: ultra-purified water (H20-control); ethanol (EtOH), acetone (ACT), chlorhexidine (CHX), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The tooth surfaces were once again dried with absorbent paper and prepared for SFE evaluation using three standards: water, formamide and bromonaphthalene. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Dunnet's tests (a = 0.05) were applied to the data. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was the only substance that caused a change to the contact angle for the standards water and formamide, while only EtOH influenced the angles formed between formamide and the dentin surface. None of the substances exerted a significant effect for bromonaphtha-lene. In comparison to the control, only EDTA and NaOCl altered both polar components of the SFE. Total SFE was increased by saturation of the collagen matrix by EDTA and reduced when NaOCl was used. Saturation of the collagen matrix by EDTA and EtOH changed the surface free energy of the dentin. In addition, the use of NaOCl negatively interfered with the properties evaluated. The increase of surface free energy and wettability of the dentin surface would allow higher penetration of the the adhesive system, which would be of importance to the clinical success of resin-dentin union.

  16. Groundwater and climate change research scoping study

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, C.R.; Cheetham, M.; Guha, P.

    2006-01-01

    This scoping study has reviewed much of the published literature in the field of climate change and groundwater research. Whilst it is not exhaustive with regard to groundwater quality issues, most of the published literature relating to climate change and groundwater resources, particularly in the UK, is covered. Further work is required to identify current research needs relating to the effects of climate change on groundwater quality. The study of the effects of climate chan...

  17. Potential effects of groundwater pumping on water levels, phreatophytes, and spring discharges in Spring and Snake Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in Nevada and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Keith J.; Plume, Russell W.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing hydrologic effects of developing groundwater supplies in Snake Valley required numerical, groundwater-flow models to estimate the timing and magnitude of capture from streams, springs, wetlands, and phreatophytes. Estimating general water-table decline also required groundwater simulation. The hydraulic conductivity of basin fill and transmissivity of basement-rock distributions in Spring and Snake Valleys were refined by calibrating a steady state, three-dimensional, MODFLOW model of the carbonate-rock province to predevelopment conditions. Hydraulic properties and boundary conditions were defined primarily from the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) model except in Spring and Snake Valleys. This locally refined model was referred to as the Great Basin National Park calibration (GBNP-C) model. Groundwater discharges from phreatophyte areas and springs in Spring and Snake Valleys were simulated as specified discharges in the GBNP-C model. These discharges equaled mapped rates and measured discharges, respectively. Recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and transmissivity were distributed throughout Spring and Snake Valleys with pilot points and interpolated to model cells with kriging in geologically similar areas. Transmissivity of the basement rocks was estimated because thickness is correlated poorly with transmissivity. Transmissivity estimates were constrained by aquifer-test results in basin-fill and carbonate-rock aquifers. Recharge, hydraulic conductivity, and transmissivity distributions of the GBNP-C model were estimated by minimizing a weighted composite, sum-of-squares objective function that included measurement and Tikhonov regularization observations. Tikhonov regularization observations were equations that defined preferred relations between the pilot points. Measured water levels, water levels that were simulated with RASA, depth-to-water beneath distributed groundwater and spring discharges, land-surface altitudes, spring discharge at

  18. Chemometrics and theoretical approaches for evaluation of matrix effect in laser ablation and ionization of metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shudi; Zhang, Bochao [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); Hang, Wei, E-mail: weihang@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University (China); Huang, Benli [Department of Chemistry, The MOE Key Lab of Spectrochemical Analysis & Instrumentation, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University (China)

    2015-05-01

    Matrix effect is one of the shortcomings of direct solid analysis which makes the quantitative analysis a great challenge. All of the physical properties of solid and laser parameters could make contributions to the matrix effect. For better understanding and controlling laser ablation process, it is of great importance to investigate how and to what extent these factors would affect matrix effect, through simulation and chemometrics works. In this study, twenty-three solid standards of six types of metal matrices were analyzed, including aluminum, copper, iron, nickel, tungsten and zinc. The influence of laser pulse duration was investigated by applying nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers to a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. After relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) of each element in different matrices were calculated, they were combined with the physical property values of the matrices to form a dataset which was analyzed by the chemometrics tool of orthogonal partial least-squares (OPLSs). The S-plot result reveals that thermal properties of solid play vital roles in the matrix effect induced by ns-laser ablation, while fs-laser could significantly reduce the thermal effect. Additionally, a theoretical model was figured out to simulate the RSCs by combining the laser–solid interaction process and plasma expansion process. The model prediction shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result, revealing that the model could reasonably explain the process of matrix effect. - Highlights: • Matrix effect is one of the obstacles in direct solid analysis. • RSCs combined with physical properties were analyzed by chemometrics tool. • S-plot reveals thermal property playing vital role in matrix effect in ns-laser ablation. • Theoretical model was built to simulate RSCs. • Model prediction of RSCs shows a relatively close agreement with experimental result.

  19. Strong matrix effect in low-energy He+ ion scattering from carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, S.N.; Van den Oetelaar, L.C.A.; Brongersma, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    In low-energy ion scattering the contribution of neutralization processes to the scattered ion yield is very important in quantification. Neutralization of low-energy (1-3.5 keV) He + ions by carbon is found to be much stronger for graphitic than for carbidic carbon. The ion fraction for graphitic carbon for 2.5 keV 3 He + scattering over 136 is about 60 times lower than that for carbidic carbon. For the 4 He + isotope the effect is even larger. Such a strong matrix effect for one element has not been measured before in low-energy (1-3.5 keV) inert-gas ion scattering. The neutralization behaviour is discussed in terms of a special quasi-resonant neutralization process for graphite. ((orig.))

  20. Effect of the glass transition temperature on alpha-amylase activity in a starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Panyoyai, Naksit; Small, Darryl M; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    This study optimises a protocol for the estimation of α-amylase activity in a condensed starch matrix in the vicinity of the glass transition region. Enzymatic activity on the vitrified starch system was compared with that of a reference substrate, maltodextrin. The activity was assayed as the rate of release of reducing sugar using a dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The condensed carbohydrate matrices served the dual purpose of acting as a substrate as well as producing a pronounced effect on the ability to enzymatic hydrolysis. Activation energies were estimated throughout the glass transition region of condensed carbohydrate preparations based on the concept of the spectroscopic shift factor. Results were used to demonstrate a considerable moderation by the mechanical glass transition temperature, beyond the expected linear effect of the temperature dependence, on the reaction rate of starch hydrolysis by α-amylase in comparison with the low-molecular weight chain of maltodextrin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Phonon-interference resonance effects by nanoparticles embedded in a matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Shiga, Takuma; Han, Haoxue; Ju, Shenghong; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-12-01

    We report an unambiguous phonon resonance effect originating from germanium nanoparticles embedded in silicon matrix. Our approach features the combination of the phonon wave-packet method with atomistic dynamics and the finite element method rooted in continuum theory. We find that multimodal phonon resonance, caused by destructive interference of coherent lattice waves propagating through and around the nanoparticle, gives rise to sharp and significant transmittance dips, blocking the lower-end frequency range of phonon transport that is hardly diminished by other nanostructures. The resonance is sensitive to the phonon coherent length, where the finiteness of the wave-packet width weakens the transmittance dip even when coherent length is longer than the particle diameter. Further strengthening of transmittance dips is possible by arraying multiple nanoparticles, which gives rise to the collective vibrational mode. Finally, it is demonstrated that these resonance effects can significantly reduce thermal conductance in the lower-end frequency range.

  2. Effect of nano size 3% wt TaC particles dispersion in two different metallic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, U.U.; Oliveira, L.A.; Souza, C.P.; Menezes, R.C.; Furukava, M.; Torres, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This work studies the characteristics of two different metallic matrixes composites, ferritic and austenitic steels, reinforced with 3% wt nano size tantalum carbide by powder metallurgy. The starting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of the nano sized carbide dispersion on the matrix microstructures and its consequences on the mechanical properties were identified. The preliminary results showed that the sintering were influenced by morphology and the distribution of carbide and the alloys. (author)

  3. Groundwater fluxes in a shallow seasonal wetland pond: The effect of bathymetric uncertainty on predicted water and solute balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Cook, Peter G.; Brunner, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The successful management of groundwater dependent shallow seasonal wetlands requires a sound understanding of groundwater fluxes. However, such fluxes are hard to quantify. Water volume and solute mass balance models can be used in order to derive an estimate of groundwater fluxes within such systems. This approach is particularly attractive, as it can be undertaken using measurable environmental variables, such as; rainfall, evaporation, pond level and salinity. Groundwater fluxes estimated from such an approach are subject to uncertainty in the measured variables as well as in the process representation and in parameters within the model. However, the shallow nature of seasonal wetland ponds means water volume and surface area can change rapidly and non-linearly with depth, requiring an accurate representation of the wetland pond bathymetry. Unfortunately, detailed bathymetry is rarely available and simplifying assumptions regarding the bathymetry have to be made. However, the implications of these assumptions are typically not quantified. We systematically quantify the uncertainty implications for eight different representations of wetland bathymetry for a shallow seasonal wetland pond in South Australia. The predictive uncertainty estimation methods provided in the Model-Independent Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis software (PEST) are used to quantify the effect of bathymetric uncertainty on the modelled fluxes. We demonstrate that bathymetry can be successfully represented within the model in a simple parametric form using a cubic Bézier curve, allowing an assessment of bathymetric uncertainty due to measurement error and survey detail on the derived groundwater fluxes compared with the fixed bathymetry models. Findings show that different bathymetry conceptualisations can result in very different mass balance components and hence process conceptualisations, despite equally good fits to observed data, potentially leading to poor management

  4. Effects of matrix types on formation and transformation of energy-accumulating substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; Fang, Z; Long, X; Tang, R; Di, S

    2016-12-30

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) has been widely used in wastewater treatment. In this study, a laboratory investigation of activated sludge in A/O-SBR reactor was conducted to probe the effects of the matrix types on EBPR polyphosphate, intracellular polysaccharide, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) formation and transformation. There is a decrease in anaerobic condition and an increase in aerobic condition for the intracellular glycogen of sodium propionate matrix and sodium acetate matrix. While the intracellular glycogen of glucose matrix shows a decreasing tendency in both anaerobic and aerobic reaction process. Sodium acetate matrix is beneficial to the formation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), but the content of PHB is relatively small. PHB and poly-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHV) contents in PHA are quite similar in both anaerobic and aerobic reactions with a PHB/PHV ratio of 0.83-1.45. The synthesis of PHV and PHB is mainly in the initial anaerobic stage (0 h - 1 h). Glucose matrix is helpful to the formation of PHV. The content of polymphosphorus shows an increasing tendency in both anaerobic and aerobic stages, suggesting that glucose matrix acclimation of the reactor favors the formation of polymphosphorus.

  5. Interactive effects of LPS and dentine matrix proteins on human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Eidt, A; Wölflick, M; Lindner, S R; Schweikl, H; Hiller, K-A; Buchalla, W; Galler, K M

    2018-01-29

    To investigate the combinatorial effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and extracted dentine matrix proteins (eDMP) on regenerative and inflammatory responses in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Culture media were supplemented with several concentrations of LPS, eDMP and combinations of both. Cell viability was assessed over 1 week by MTT assay; cell survival was evaluated after 24 h and 7 days by flow cytometry. The expression of mineralization-associated marker genes was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). To analyse the inflammatory response, secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) was quantified in the initial and the late phase of cell culture by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data were treated nonparametrically and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to compare all experimental groups (α = 0.05). Whereas LPS had no impact on viability, eDMP led to a concentration-dependent decrease, which was significant after 7 days (P ≤ 0.024). A moderate decline of cell survival induced by LPS was detected after 48 h (P ≤ 0.026), whereas eDMP was able to reverse this effect. eDMP alone caused increased expression of tested marker genes, LPS had no regulatory effect. Combined eDMP and LPS induced an upregulation of collagen type I and osteocalcin, whereas expression levels of dentine matrix acidic phosphoprotein and dentine sialophosphoprotein were similar to the control. IL-6-secretion was increased by LPS over time. eDMP markedly elevated initial production of IL-6 (P ≤ 0.002), but suppressed LPS-induced cytokine production in the later phase. Lipopolysaccharide did not affect cell viability but interfered with odontoblast-like cell differentiation of DPSCs. Proteins from the dentine matrix may have a protective effect, attenuate the detrimental impact of LPS and thus play an important role during pulp repair. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effect of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) on ex vivo dental plaque vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, A; Auschill, T M; Donos, N; Brecx, M; Arweiler, N B

    2001-11-01

    A common clinical observation following surgical periodontal therapy with an enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) is the improved healing of the soft tissues and the limited inflammation of the operated areas. These clinical observations are empirical and difficult to explain. One of the factors influencing the early wound healing might be a potential antimicrobial effect of Emdogain. To investigate the effect of Emdogain on the vitality of ex vivo supragingival dental plaque and to compare this effect to that of a standard 0.2% chlorhexidine solution. 24 patients suffering from adult periodontitis were included in the study. At the beginning of the experiment, all participants were given a professional tooth cleaning. For the following 4 days, they had to refrain from any kind of oral hygiene measures. At day 5, from each of the volunteers, a voluminous plaque biofilm sample was taken with a sterile curette from the vestibular surfaces of the 1st lower molars and divided into 5 equal parts. Each part was mounted with 5 microl of the following solutions: (1) NaCl, (2) enamel matrix derivative dissolved in water (EMD), (3) enamel matrix derivative dissolved in the vehicle (Emdogain), (4) vehicle (propylene glycol alginate, PGA), (5) 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX). After a reaction time of 2 min the test solutions were sucked off, and subsequently the biofilm was stained with a fluorescence dye. The vitality of the plaque flora after the treatments was evaluated under the fluorescence microscope (VF%). Plaque samples treated with NaCl showed a mean vitality of 76.8+/-8%. The EMD, Emdogain, PGA and CHX showed VF values of 54.4+/-9.2, 21.4+/-10.6%, 19.6+/-11.6% and 32.3+/-11.8%, respectively. Emdogain, PGA and CHX showed statistically highly significant reductions (pEmdogain and PGA were found to be statistically significantly different compared to CHX (pEmdogain might have an antibacterial effect on the vitality of the ex vivo supragingival dental plaque flora.

  7. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hua; Wang Chengguo; Zhang Shan; Lin Xue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H 2 SO 4 , KClO 3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  8. Modeling Optical Properties of Polluted Dust and its Morphological Effects by T-Matrix Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Yang, P.; Brooks, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms largely contribute to regional or global aerosol loads, influence radiative energy budget, and air quality, and cause atmospheric environmental, public health problems. As dusts are transported long distances, aerosols such as black carbon can pollute the air mass along the transport path. Two mixing processes, externally and semi-externally (sticking) mixing may substantially affect the single-scattering and radiative properties of polluted dust particles compared to the unpolluted counterparts. This study focuses on quantifying the changes in the optical properties of dust aerosols due to black carbon contamination. The dust model we use is an irregular polyhedron, which is in good agreement with the laboratory measurement. The black carbon model is spherules aggregate defined with a cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm. Specifically, we define the degree of pollution in terms of two variables, the adhesion degree of pollutants and their mixing ratios, since both can alter the optical properties of polluted dust in different ways. By applying the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix Method (II-TM), we obtain the scattering phase matrix and other optical properties of dust aerosols with different degrees of contamination. Furthermore, the morphological effects on the optical properties of polluted dust are quantified by considering different fractal dimensions of black carbon as particles age. The overall changes due to different degrees of pollution by black carbon are investigated at various wavelengths.

  9. Effect of matrix pretreatment on the supercritical CO2 extraction of Satureja montana essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanović-Vratnica Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different matrix pretreatment of winter savory(Satureja montana L. on the supercritical CO2(SC-CO2 extraction - yield, composition and antimicrobial activity of extracts and essential oil (EO was investigated. Herb matrix was submitted to conventional mechanical grinding, physical disruption by fast decompression of supercritical and subcritical CO2 and physical disruption by mechanical compression. The analyses of the essential oil obtained by SC-CO2 extraction and hydrodistillation were done by GC/FID method. Major compounds in winter savory EO obtained by SC-CO2 extraction and hydrodistillation were: thymol (30.4-35.4% and 35.3%, carvacrol (11.5-14.1% and 14.1%, γ-terpinene (10.2-11.4% and 9.1% and p-cymene (8.3-10.1% and 8.6%, respectively. The gained results revealed that physical disruption of essential oils glands by fast CO2 decompression in supercritical region (FDS achieved the highest essential oil yield as well as highest content of thymol, carvacrol and thymoquinone. Antimicrobial activity of obtained winter savory SC-CO2 extracts was the same (FDS or weaker compared to essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation.

  10. Large Magnetovolume Effect Induced by Embedding Ferromagnetic Clusters into Antiferromagnetic Matrix of Cobaltite Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ping; Lin, Xiaohuan; Koda, Akihiro; Lee, Sanghyun; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Torii, Shuki; Yonemura, Masao; Mochiku, Takashi; Sagayama, Hajime; Itoh, Shinichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Wang, Yinxia; Kadono, Ryosuke; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Materials that show negative thermal expansion (NTE) have significant industrial merit because they can be used to fabricate composites whose dimensions remain invariant upon heating. In some materials, NTE is concomitant with the spontaneous magnetization due to the magnetovolume effect (MVE). Here the authors report a new class of MVE material; namely, a layered perovskite PrBaCo 2 O 5.5+ x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.41), in which strong NTE [β ≈ -3.6 × 10 -5 K -1 (90-110 K) at x = 0.24] is triggered by embedding ferromagnetic (F) clusters into the antiferromagnetic (AF) matrix. The strongest MVE is found near the boundary between F and AF phases in the phase diagram, indicating the essential role of competition between the F-clusters and the AF-matrix. Furthermore, the MVE is not limited to the PrBaCo 2 O 5.5+ x but is also observed in the NdBaCo 2 O 5.5+ x . The present study provides a new approach to obtaining MVE and offers a path to the design of NTE materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Effect of a glassy gellan/polydextrose matrix on the activity of α-D-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Small, Darryl M; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-06-05

    An investigation of the ability of the enzyme α-D-glucosidase to act on the substrate 4-nitrophenyl α-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG) while embedded in glassy carbohydrate matrices (deacylated gellan with polydextrose and polydextrose alone) is presented. Physicochemical characterisation of the matrices was achieved using the techniques of modulated differential scanning calorimetry, small deformation dynamic oscillation on shear, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. A UV-vis spectrophotometric procedure was adapted for the analysis of the activity of α-D-glucosidase in hydrolysing pNPG in the condensed carbohydrate systems. In order to derive a relationship between the structural properties of the matrix and the enzymatic activity, mechanical spectra were recorded using the combined framework of the Williams, Landel and Ferry equation with the time-temperature superposition principle. Theoretical modelling and experimental observations strongly argue for a pronounced effect of the gelling polysaccharide/co-solute mixture on enzymatic activity near the mechanical Tg of the matrix. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Advances in Groundwater Remediation: Achieving Effective In Situ Delivery of Chemical Oxidants and Amendments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegrist, Robert L.; Crimi, Michelle; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of soil and groundwater by organic chemicals represents a major environmental problem in urban areas throughout the United States and other industrialized nations. In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) has emerged as one of several viable methods for remediation of organically contamina...... delivery of treatment fl uids, with an emphasis on chemical oxidants and amendments, which can help achieve cleanup goals and protect groundwater and associated drinking water resources....... ) delivered into the subsurface using injection wells, probes, or other techniques. A continuing challenge for ISCO, as well as other in situ remediation technologies, is how to achieve in situ delivery and obtain simultaneous contact between treatment fl uids, such as oxidants and amendments, and the target...

  13. Satellite data analysis for identification of groundwater salinization effects on coastal forest for monitoring purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barbarella

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the phreatic aquifer below the San Vitale pinewood (Ravenna, Italy, natural and anthropogenic land subsidence, the low topography and the artificial drainage system have led to widespread saltwater intrusion. Since changes in the groundwater concentration induce variations in the vegetation properties, recognizable by different spectral bands, a comparison between satellite images, ASTER and Worldview-2, was made using the NDVI. The aim was to identify the portions of pinewood affected by salinization through a procedure that could reduce the expensive and time consuming ground monitoring campaigns. Moreover, the Worldview-2 high resolutions were used to investigate the Thermophilic Deciduous Forest (TDF spectral behaviour without the influence of the allochthonous Pinus pinea species that is scattered throughout the pinewood. The NDVI, calculated with traditional bands, identified the same stressed areas using both satellite data. Instead, the new Red-Edge band of the Worldview-2 image allowed a greater correlation between NDVI and groundwater salinity.

  14. A simulation-based approach for designing effective field-sampling programs to evaluate contamination risk of groundwater supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, R.; Voss, C.I.

    1996-01-01

    An approach to model discrimination and network design for evaluation of groundwater contamination risk is proposed and demonstrated by application to a site in a glaciofluvial aquifer in Sweden. The approach consists of first hypothesizing alternative conceptual models of hydrogeology at the site on the basis of both quantitative data and qualitative information. The conceptual models are then expressed as two-dimensional numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport, and model attributes controlling risk to the water supply are determined by simulation. Model predictions of response to a specific field test are made with each model that affects risk. Regions for effective measurement networks are then identified. Effective networks are those that capture sufficient information to determine which of the hypothesized models best describes the system with a minimum of measurement points. For the example site in Sweden, the network is designed such that important system parameters may be accurately estimated at the same time as model discrimination is carried out. The site in Vansbro, Sweden, consists of a water-supply well in an esker separated (by 300m) from a wood preservation and treatment area on the esker flank by only a narrow inlet of a bordering stream. Application of the above-described risk analysis shows that, of all the hydrologic controls and parameters in the groundwater system, the only factor that controls the potential migration of wood-treatment contaminants to the well is whether the inlet's bed is pervious, creating a hydraulic barrier to lateral contaminant transport. Furthermore, the analysis localizes an area near the end of the inlet wherein the most effective measurements of drawdown would be made to discriminate between a permeable and impermeable bed. The location of this optimal area is not obvious prior to application of the above methodology.

  15. Sustainable groundwater management in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Steven P.; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Faunt, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses data collection, modeling tools, and scientific analysis to help water managers plan for, and assess, hydrologic issues that can cause “undesirable results” associated with groundwater use. This information helps managers understand trends and investigate and predict effects of different groundwater-management strategies.

  16. A second-generation ionic liquid matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix for effective mass spectrometric analysis of biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthod, Alain; Crank, Jeffrey A; Rundlett, Kimber L; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2009-11-01

    A second generation ionic liquid matrix (ILM), N,N-diisopropylethylammonium alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (DEA-CHCA), was developed for the characterization of polar biodegradable polymers. It is compared with five solid matrices typically used for the characterization of these polymers and one other new ILM. It is shown that use of the ILM, DEA-CHCA, allows maximum signal with minimum laser intensity which minimizes polymer degradation. In these conditions, the DEA-CHCA ILM is able to assist in the ionization of analytes in an efficient but soft manner. These qualities produce spectra that allow an accurate and sensitive determination of the number average molecular weights, weight average m.w., and polydispersity index of labile polar polymers. With such polymers, many solid matrices produce spectra showing extensive polymer degradation leading to the underestimation of molecular weights. The distribution of intact analyte peaks obtained with the ILM DEA-CHCA allows for identification of the fine structure of complex copolymers. ILMs were much less susceptible to effects of extraction delay times on molecular weight determination than were solid matrices. The liquid nature of the matrix is an important reason for the outstanding results obtained for labile analyte polymers. No comparable results could be obtained with any known solid matrices or other ILMs. In many cases, the manufacturers' listed molecular weights and polydispersity measurements for biodegradable polymers are determined by size-exclusion chromatography and the data obtained by that method may differ considerably from the high-precision matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) results presented here. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF FAULTS ON GROUNDWATER FLOW FOR THE YUCCA FLAT BASIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, R. P.; Fryer, W.

    2009-12-01

    The permeability changes resulting from finely comminuted material in fault cores and the fractured and brecciated rock in fault damage zones allows faults to channelize groundwater flow along the plane of the fault. The efficiency of faults as permeability structures depends on fault zone width, fault offset, depth at which the fault developed, type of faulted rock, extent of secondary mineralization, and fault orientation within current stress field. Studies of faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, indicate that fault zone width and brecciation increase with fault offset, that faulted welded tuff is more permeable than nonwelded or bedded tuff, and that non-hydrothermal secondary mineralization commonly diminishes fracture permeability. These results are applied to the groundwater conceptual flow model for Yucca Flat (YF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Yucca Flat contains Tertiary volcanic rocks similar to thoise at Yucca Mountain deposited on Paleozoic carbonate rocks whose thickness is increased by local thrust-faults. The YF basin contains north-striking normal faults and is bordered by southwest-striking strike-slip faults to the south and east. Fault permeability values derived from faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain suggests that major normal faults in Yucca Flat potentially manifest permeability values along the fault plane equal to the highest values determined for volcanic aquifers. Numerous minor faults not assigned specific permeability values are assumed to imbue the basin with a hydraulic anisotropy favoring fault-parallel flow. In this scenario groundwater flows generally from north to south in the Yucca Flat basin, even as the head gradient is primarily towards the centrally located Yucca Fault, which acts as the main subsurface drainage feature within the basin. Studies show that the regional stress field has rotated clockwise such that southwest-striking strike-slip faults are currently under tension. In this scenario these

  18. Effects of hydraulic frac fluids and formation waters on groundwater microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Martin; Jimenez, Nuria

    2017-04-01

    Shale gas is being considered as a complementary energy resource to other fossil fuels. Its exploitation requires using advanced drilling techniques and hydraulic stimulation (fracking). During fracking operations, large amounts of fluids (fresh water, proppants and chemicals) are injected at high pressures into the formations, to create fractures and fissures, and thus to release gas from the source rock into the wellbore. The injected fluid partly remains in the formation, while up to 40% flows back to the surface, together with reservoir waters, sometimes containing dissolved hydrocarbons, high salt concentrations, etc. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential impacts of frac or geogenic chemicals, frac fluid, formation water or flowback on groudnwater microbial communities. Laboratory experiments under in situ conditions (i.e. at in situ temperature, high pressure) were conducted using groundwater samples from three different locations. Series of microcosms containing R2 broth medium or groundwater spiked with either single frac chemicals (including biocides), frac fluids, artificial reservoir water, NaCl, or different mixtures of reservoir water and frac fluid (to simulate flowback) were incubated in the dark. Controls included non-amended and non-inoculated microcosms. Classical microbiological methods and molecular analyses were used to assess changes in the microbial abundance, community structure and function in response to the different treatments. Microbial communities were quite halotolerant and their growth benefited from low concentrations of reservoir waters or salt, but they were negatively affected by higher concentrations of formation waters, salt, biocides or frac fluids. Changes on the microbial community structure could be detected by T-RFLP. Single frac components like guar gum or choline chloride were used as substrates, while others like triethanolamine or light oil distillate hydrogenated prevented microbial growth in

  19. Effects of the Chernobyl accident on radioactive contamination of groundwater utilized for water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugai, D.A.; Shestopalov, V.M.; Rudenko, Y.F.; Onischenko, I.P.; Gudzenko, I.P.; Bublyas, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    According to the notions of classic hydrogeology, the groundwaters of deep-laying aquifers were considered to be safely protected against various external contaminants, due to high sorption properties of aeration zone soils, regional distribution of aquitards, and very long periods of ground water formation. Contamination of upper subsurface aquifer and a part of artesian aquifers is exclusively significant in Chernobyl exclusion zone characterized by high levels of surface contamination with radionuclides

  20. Effect of the extent of well purging on laboratory parameters of groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reka Mathe, Agnes; Kohler, Artur; Kovacs, Jozsef

    2017-04-01

    Chemicals reaching groundwater cause water quality deterioration. Reconnaissance and remediation demands high financial and human resources. Groundwater samples are important sources of information. Representativity of these samples is fundamental to decision making. According to relevant literature the way of sampling and the sampling equipment can affect laboratory concentrations measured in samples. Detailed and systematic research on this field is missing from even international literature. Groundwater sampling procedures are regulated worldwide. Regulations describe how to sample a groundwater monitoring well. The most common element in these regulations is well purging prior to sampling. The aim of purging the well is to avoid taking the sample from the stagnant water instead of from formation water. The stagnant water forms inside and around the well because the well casing provides direct contact with the atmosphere, changing the physico-chemical composition of the well water. Sample from the stagnant water is not representative of the formation water. Regulations regarding the extent of the purging are different. Purging is mostly defined as multiply (3-5) well volumes, and/or reaching stabilization of some purged water parameters (pH, specific conductivity, etc.). There are hints for sampling without purging. To define the necessary extent of the purging repeated pumping is conducted, triplicate samples are taken at the beginning of purging, at one, two and three times well volumes and at parameter stabilization. Triplicate samples are the means to account for laboratory errors. The subsurface is not static, the test is repeated 10 times. Up to now three tests were completed.

  1. Methane emissions from western Canadian peatland lakes: assessing interactive effects of groundwater connectivity and permafrost thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, M. A.; Riechert, C.; Estop Aragones, C.; Broder, T.; Bastviken, D.; Knorr, K. H.; Olefeldt, D.

    2017-12-01

    Rising temperatures and the submergence of recently thawed permafrost into lakes has been identified as a major driver of methane (CH4) emissions in northern regions. Lakes on the vast Taiga Plains in western Canada represent a vital unknown with respect to CH4 fluxes and their sensitivity to permafrost thaw. The Taiga Plains has several characteristics that could influence magnitude and controls on lake CH4 emissions in comparison to other regions, including high soil organic carbon stores, distinct permafrost history, and complex groundwater interactions that influence availability of terminal electron acceptor concentrations among lakes. The goal of this research is to describe the similarities and differences in processes governing lake CH4 emissions between western Canada and other northern regions. We carried out biweekly diffusive and ebullition flux measurements and monitored sediment redox profiles from two lakes near the border between Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The two lakes differ in contributions of surface water and groundwater inputs, respectively. Floating chamber-based fluxes were measured leading from the edges to the centers of the lakes from ice-out in early May until ice-cover in the fall. Preliminary redox profile analyses suggest the groundwater-fed lake has extremely high concentrations of sulfides (>200 µmol L-1) down to a depth of 30 cm, while the surface water lake has little to no sulfide, but high concentrations of reduced iron (>200 µmol L-1 ). Despite high sulfide concentrations in the sediments, the groundwater-fed lake had generally higher diffusive fluxes compared to the surface water lake, but there were no differences between the center and along the actively collapsing thermokarst edges. However, ebullition fluxes were highest from a recently thawed lake edge compared to the center of the lake and stable, non-thaw influenced edges. The results of this project will help improve current regional CH4 models by

  2. Effect of reducing groundwater on the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose TP

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laboratory batch sorption experiments were used to investigate variations in the retardation behavior of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Water-rock compositions were designed to simulate subsurface conditions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS, where a suite of radionuclides were deposited as a result of underground nuclear testing. Experimental redox conditions were controlled by varying the oxygen content inside an enclosed glove box and by adding reductants into the testing solutions. Under atmospheric (oxidizing conditions, radionuclide distribution coefficients varied with the mineralogic composition of the sorbent and the water chemistry. Under reducing conditions, distribution coefficients showed marked increases for 99Tc (from 1.22 at oxidizing to 378 mL/g at mildly reducing conditions and 237Np (an increase from 4.6 to 930 mL/g in devitrified tuff, but much smaller variations in alluvium, carbonate rock, and zeolitic tuff. This effect was particularly important for 99Tc, which tends to be mobile under oxidizing conditions. A review of the literature suggests that iodine sorption should decrease under reducing conditions when I- is the predominant species; this was not consistently observed in batch tests. Overall, sorption of U to alluvium, devitrified tuff, and zeolitic tuff under atmospheric conditions was less than in the glove-box tests. However, the mildly reducing conditions achieved here were not likely to result in substantial U(VI reduction to U(IV. Sorption of Pu was not affected by the decreasing Eh conditions achieved in this study, as the predominant sorbed Pu species in all conditions was expected to be the low-solubility and strongly sorbing Pu(OH4. Depending on the aquifer lithology, the occurrence of reducing conditions along a groundwater flowpath could potentially contribute to the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides 99Tc and 237Np, which are commonly identified as long-term dose contributors in the risk

  3. Current and future groundwater withdrawals: Effects, management and energy policy options for a semi-arid Indian watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sishodia, Rajendra P.; Shukla, Sanjay; Graham, Wendy D.; Wani, Suhas P.; Jones, James W.; Heaney, James

    2017-12-01

    Effects of future expansion/intensification of irrigated agriculture on groundwater and surface water levels and availability in a semi-arid watershed were evaluated using an integrated hydrologic model (MIKE SHE/MIKE 11) in conjunction with biophysical measurements. Improved water use efficiency, water storage, and energy policy options were evaluated for their ability to sustain the future (2035) increased groundwater withdrawals. Three future withdrawal scenarios (low = 20, medium = 30, high = 50 wells/100 km2/year) based on the historical rate of growth of irrigation wells were formulated. While well drying from falling groundwater levels was limited to drought and consecutive below average rainfall years, under the current (2015) withdrawals, significant increases in frequency and duration (17-97 days/year) of well drying along with 13-26% (19-37 mm) reductions in surface flows were predicted under the future withdrawals. Higher (27-108%) energy demands of existing irrigation pumps due to declining groundwater levels and reduced hydroelectric generation due to decreased surface flows would create a vicious water-food-energy nexus in the future. Crop failure, one of the main causes of farmers' emotional distress and death in the region, is predicted to exacerbate under the future withdrawal scenarios. Shift to negative net recharge (-63 mm) and early and prolonged drying of wells under the high scenario will reduce the groundwater availability and negatively affect crop production in more than 60% and 90% of cropped areas in the Rabi (November-February) and summer (March-May) seasons, respectively during a drought year. Individual and combined demand (drip irrigation and reduced farm electricity subsidy) and supply (water storage) management options improved groundwater levels and reduced well drying by 55-97 days/year compared to business-as-usual management under the high scenario. The combined management (50% drip conversion, 50% reduction in subsidy, and

  4. Analysis of tomato matrix effect in pesticide residue quantification through QuEChERS and single quadrupole GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Domínguez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of pesticide in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. matrix using Gas Chromatography hyphenated to Mass Spectrometry detector (GC/MS can affect the sensitivity of the analysis by enhancement or suppression of their chromatography response, the percentages of recoveries and leading to errors in the quantification of the pesticides. In this study, the matrix effect was investigated using nine pesticides, and "Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe" (QuEChERS-GC/MS analytical technique was validated for pesticides multiresidue analysis. The matrix effect was determined using not statistical and statistical procedures including ANOVA, with similar results. Strong negative matrix effect was found for the pesticides trifluralin, 4,4'-DDT, and permethrin, resulting in the increment of the chromatogram background and a decrease in their detection responses. Contrary, an enhancement induced by the matrix presence was obtained for carbaryl and azinphos methyl, showing a positive medium matrix effect. While, dimethoate, simazine, 4,4'-DDE, and iprodione did not exhibit matrix effect. The detection limits (LOD obtained, varied from 0.003 to 0.1 mg kg-1. Reproducibility was less than 20% for each pesticide. Recoveries were found to be between 71% and 121%, except for dimethoate, carbaryl, and azinphos methyl which reached values lower than 70%. Recoveries relative standard deviations were less than 22%. QuEChERS-GC/MS technique was used for evaluation of fresh commercial tomatoes samples, detecting carbaryl in all of them, but in concentration levels lower than the maximum residue limits according to regulations of Codex.

  5. Simulated effects of increased groundwater withdrawals in the Cave Springs area, Hixson, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Connor J.

    2014-01-01

    Concern for future water supplies in Tennessee has grown in recent years as a result of increased awareness of competing needs, the impact of droughts, and the need for more water to support growing populations. The U.S. Geological Survey conducts investigations to improve the knowledge about interactions of geology, climate, humans, and ecosystems with the water cycle, which is critical to understanding and optimizing water availability. The Hixson Utility District in Hamilton County, Tennessee, uses groundwater resources in the Cave Springs area as a water supply, withdrawing water from two well fields located at Cave Springs and Walkers Corner. Historically, Hixson Utility District has withdrawn about 5 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) at the Cave Springs well field and between 2 and 3 Mgal/d at the Walkers Corner well field. To assess the capacity of the groundwater resources in the Cave Springs area to meet future demands, four different scenarios of increased groundwater withdrawals were analyzed using computer model simulations.

  6. Estimation of nearshore groundwater discharge and its potential effects on a fringing coral reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ariel C; Watanabe, Atsushi; Nadaoka, Kazuo; Motooka, Shunsuke; Herrera, Eugene C; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2011-04-01

    Radon (²²²Rn) measurements were conducted in Shiraho Reef (Okinawa, Japan) to investigate nearshore submarine groundwater discharge (SGD(nearshore)) dynamics. Estimated average groundwater flux was 2-3 cm/h (maximum 7-8 cm/h). End-member radon concentration and gas transfer coefficient were identified as major factors influencing flux estimation accuracy. For the 7-km long reef, SGD(nearshore) was 0.39-0.58 m³/s, less than 30% of Todoroki River's baseflow discharge. SGD(nearshore) was spatially and temporally variable, reflecting the strong influence of subsurface geology, tidal pumping, groundwater recharge, and hydraulic gradient. SGD(nearshore) elevated nearshore nitrate concentrations (0.8-2.2 mg/l) to half of Todoroki River's baseflow NO₃⁻-N (2-4 mg/L). This increased nearshore Chl-α from 0.5-2 μg/l compared to the typically low Chl-α (< 0.1-0.4 μg/l) in the moat. Diatoms and cyanobacteria concentrations exhibited an increasing trend. However, the percentage contributions of diatoms and cyanobacteria significantly decreased and increased, respectively. SGD may significantly induce the proliferation of cyanobacteria in nearshore reef areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Groundwater effects on diversity and abundance of lagoonal seagrasses in Kenya and on Zanzibar Island (East Africa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Hemminga, M.A.; Tack, J.F.; Mateo, M.A.; Marbà, N.; Mtolera, M.; Stapel, J.; Verheyden, A.; Van Daele, T.

    2002-01-01

    Seagrass species diversity and abundance were studied in East African back-reef lagoons with contrasting groundwater-outflow rates. The selection of the lagoons was based on a groundwater flow model. A total of 10 seagrass species was observed at all sites together. Sites with a higher groundwater

  8. COVARIANCE CORRECTION FOR ESTIMATING GROUNDWATER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-15

    Jan 15, 2015 ... covariance matrix by a semi-positive definite correlation matrix element-wise. Every zero element of the correlation matrix causes the corresponding element of the product matrix to be zero. This can be as effective as increasing the ensemble size, when the ensemble is small [12;. 13]. Using such a method ...

  9. Groundwater and surface-water interaction and effects of pumping in a complex glacial-sediment aquifer, phase 2, east-central Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Jack R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Carlson, Carl S.

    2015-12-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Framingham, Massachusetts, has investigated the potential of proposed groundwater withdrawals at the Birch Road well site to affect nearby surface water bodies and wetlands, including Lake Cochituate, the Sudbury River, and the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in east-central Massachusetts. In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey developed a Phase 1 numerical groundwater model of a complex glacial-sediment aquifer to synthesize hydrogeologic information and simulate potential future pumping scenarios. The model was developed with MODFLOW-NWT, an updated version of a standard USGS numerical groundwater flow modeling program that improves solution of unconfined groundwater flow problems. The groundwater model and investigations of the aquifer improved understanding of groundwater–surface-water interaction and the effects of groundwater withdrawals on surface-water bodies and wetlands in the study area. The initial work also revealed a need for additional information and model refinements to better understand this complex aquifer system.

  10. The differences in matrix effect between supercritical fluid chromatography and reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to ESI/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svan, Alfred; Hedeland, Mikael; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt E

    2018-02-13

    For many sample matrices, matrix effects are a troublesome phenomenon using the electrospray ionization source. The increasing use of supercritical fluid chromatography with CO 2 in combination with the electrospray ionization source for MS detection is therefore raising questions: is the matrix effect behaving differently using SFC in comparison with reversed phase LC? This was investigated using urine, plasma, influent- and effluent-wastewater as sample matrices. The matrix effect was evaluated using the post-extraction addition method and through post-column infusions. Matrix effect profiles generated from the post-column infusions in combination with time of flight-MS detection provided the most valuable information for the study. The combination of both qualitative and semi-quantitative information with the ability to use HRMS-data for identifying interfering compounds from the same experiment was very useful, and has to the authors' knowledge not been used this way before. The results showed that both LC and SFC are affected by matrix effects, however differently depending on sample matrix. Generally, both suppressions and enhancements were seen, with a higher amount of enhancements for LC, where 65% of all compounds and all sample matrices were enhanced, compared to only 7% for SFC. Several interferences were tentatively identified, with phospholipids, creatinine, and metal ion clusters as examples of important interferences, with different impact depending on chromatographic technique. SFC needs a different strategy for limiting matrix interferences, owing to its almost reverse retention order compared to RPLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of 3-D Visualization of Groundwater Modeling for Water Resource Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, J. L.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2006-12-01

    The rise of 3-D visualization hardware and software technology provides important opportunities to advance scientific and policy research. Although the petroleum industry has used immersive 3-D technology since the early 1990's for the visualization of geologic data among experts, there has been little use of this technology for decision making. The Decision Theater at ASU is a new facility using immersive visualization technology designed to combine scientific research at the university with policy decision making in the community. I document a case study in the use of 3-D immersive technology for water resource management in Arizona. Since the turn of the 20th century, natural hydrologic processes in the greater Phoenix region (Salt River Valley) have been shut down via the construction of dams, canals, wells, water treatment plants, and recharge facilities. Water from rivers that once naturally recharged the groundwater aquifer have thus been diverted while continuing groundwater outflow from wells has drawn the aquifer down hundreds of feet. MODFLOW is used to simulate groundwater response to the different water management decisions which impact the artificial and natural inflow and outflow. The East Valley Water Forum, a partnership of water providers east of Phoenix, used the 3-D capabilities of the Decision Theater to build visualizations of the East Salt River Valley groundwater system based on MODFLOW outputs to aid the design of a regional groundwater management plan. The resulting visualizations are now being integrated into policy decisions about long term water management. I address challenges in visualizing scientific information for policy making and highlight the roles of policy actors, specifically geologists, computer scientists, and political decision makers, involved in designing the visualizations. The results show that policy actors respond differently to the 3-D visualization techniques based on their experience, background, and objectives

  12. Matrix effects in the X-ray flourescence analysis of zinc-lead ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the present paper several mathematical procedures for overcoming matrix effects in the X-ray flourescence analysis of zinc-lead ores varying widely in composition are examined. Some new intensity correction equations are derived using the theory of X-ray flourescence. Experiments were carried out on a high resolution Si/Li/ spectrometer and also on portable single-channel analyzer with proportional counter, using 238 Pu and 55 Fe radioisotope sources. For separation of overlapping spectral lines recorded with a proportional counter, the single edge filter method and pre-calibration is proposed. Multiple regression is applied for the calculation of influence coefficients and estimation of errors of determinations. The present results show that the equations derived in this paper allow zinc, lead and iron in ores to be determined with relatively high accuracy. (author)

  13. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  14. The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behaviour of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Y.; Ozdin, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behavior of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium composites produced by liquid metallurgy was investigated under different sizes of SiC grits at a fixed speed. The results show that the wear loss of composite was considerably lower than that of aluminium alloy. The wear loss increased linearly with sliding distance for both materials, but indicating a considerable difference. It increased with increasing SiC abrasive particles. Moreover, SEM examination indicates that abrasive wear observed for the matrix alloy. The depth of wear grooves decreased with decreasing the abrasive particle size and load. For the composites, wear surfaces were found to be a quite smooth indicating that no abrasive grooves appeared

  15. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  16. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold C., E-mail: harold.steinacker@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-15

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  17. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold C. Steinacker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  18. XRF Analysis of mineralogical matrix effects and differences between pulverized and fused ferromanganese slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA ZIVANOVIC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination and analysis is only as good as the sample preparation that preceded it. Even the most sophisticated analysis is worthless if it follows sloppy sampling and poor preparation. Whether one does plasma emission, infrared or X-ray fluorescence or another spectroscopic technique, it is essential to get reproducible and accurate analysis. This paper shows the effect of mineralogical matrix differences in quantitative measurements by XRF of the main elements (Al, Ca, Mg, Si, Mn and K as oxides of ferromanganese alloy slag. Fused and pulverized slag show a significant difference in XRF microstructure, micro heterogeneity and mineralogy although the results of measurements between pulverized and fused slag, expressed as a percentage of the main elements, is not different. Other analytical techniques such as ICP-OES and classical gravimetric and titrimetric were also used for checking the XRF calibration accuracy

  19. CD14+ monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ding; Chen, Ke; Du, Wei Ting; Han, Zhi-Bo; Ren, He; Chi, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Here, the effect of CD14 + monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion capacities of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) as an important soluble mediator. CD14 + monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, either exogenously added or produced by CD14 + monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE 2 by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE 2 expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14 + monocytes and partially restored CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  20. Effects of reclaimed water matrix on fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgen, L K; Zheng, W

    2016-08-01

    Reclaimed water is increasingly used to supplement water resources. However, reclaimed water has a complex matrix, which includes emerging chemical contaminants, that is introduced to the soil when this water is used for irrigation. The effects of microbial activity, dissolved matter, nutrients, and particulate matter in reclaimed water on half-life of 11 pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in soil were investigated with 7 treatment waters, namely swine lagoon effluent (either unaltered, sterilized, or filtered and sterilized) and nanopure water (either unaltered or with added nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium). The extractable residues of the parent PPCPs were measured over 35 d. Lagoon microbial activity was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) related to increased half-life of 4 PPCPs (carbamazepine, fluoxetine, ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole) by 14-74%, and to decreased half-life of 3 others (caffeine, gemfibrozil, naproxen) by 13-25%. The presence of lagoon dissolved matter was significantly correlated with a 20-110% increase in half-life for 6 PPCPs (caffeine, estrone, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen, triclocarban). However, lagoon particulate matter was significantly correlated with 9-52% decrease in half-life for these same compounds, as well as trimethoprim. The levels of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium in the lagoon effluent were not significantly related to half-life for most PPCPs, except caffeine. Overall, specific components of reclaimed water matrix had different effects on the soil half-lives of PPCPs, suggesting that the composition of reclaimed water needs to be considered when evaluating PPCP fate after land application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Hormones on the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Inhibitors in Bovine Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hwan Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteases and protease inhibitors play key roles in most physiological processes, including cell migration, cell signaling, and cell surface and tissue remodeling. Among these, the matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs pathway is one of the most efficient biosynthetic pathways for controlling the activation of enzymes responsible for protein degradation. This also indicates the association of MMPs with the maturation of spermatozoa. In an attempt to investigate the effect of MMP activation and inhibitors in cultures with various hormones during sperm capacitation, we examined and monitored the localization and expression of MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-2 and TIMP-3, as well as their expression profiles. Matured spermatozoa were collected from cultures with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and Lutalyse at 1 h, 6 h, 18 h, and 24 h. ELISA detected the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 in all culture media, regardless of medium type (FSH-supplemented fertilization Brackett-Oliphant medium (FFBO, LH-supplemented FBO (LFBO, or Lutalyse-supplemented FBO (LuFBO. TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expression patterns decreased in LFBO and LuFBO. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in FBO and FFBO progressively increased from 1 h to 24 h but was not detected in LFBO and LuFBO. The localization and expression of TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 in sperm heads was also measured by immunofluorescence analysis. However, MMPs were not detected in the sperm heads. MMP and TIMP expression patterns differed according to the effect of various hormones. These findings suggest that MMPs have a role in sperm viability during capacitation. In conjunction with hormones, MMPs play a role in maintaining capacitation and fertilization by controlling extracellular matrix inhibitors of sperm.

  2. Hydrologic conditions in urban Miami-Dade County, Florida, and the effect of groundwater pumpage and increased sea level on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The extensive and highly managed surface-water system in southeastern Florida constructed during the 20th Century has allowed for the westward expansion of urban and agricultural activities in Miami-Dade County. In urban areas of the county, the surface-water system is used to (1) control urban flooding, (2) supply recharge to production well fields, and (3) control seawater intrusion. Previous studies in Miami-Dade County have determined that on a local scale, leakage from canals adjacent to well fields can supply a large percentage (46 to 78 percent) of the total groundwater pumpage from production well fields. Canals in the urban areas also receive seepage from the Biscayne aquifer that is derived from a combination of local rainfall and groundwater flow from Water Conservation Area 3 and Everglades National Park, which are west of urban areas of Miami-Dade County.

  3. Evaluation of the effective equivalent dose in the general public due to the discharge of uranium in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Jacomino, V.M.F.

    1989-12-01

    Some facilities available at IPEN-CNEN/SP may discharge uranium in their liquid effluents. The uranium contents of these effluents are analyzed by photometry or fluorimetry, and according to the results obtained a decision is made, by the Environmental Monitoring Division, upon their discharge to the environment. In 1988 a total activity of 3.66x10 9 Bq of uranium was discharge in a volume of approximately 30 m 3 . The effective equivalent dose in the general public was evaluated by making a conservative assumption that all the liquid effluents containing uranium are discharged directly to the soil reaching the groundwater. The dose calculation was carried out by using a generic model which described the transport of radionuclides in the groundwater. In order to be conservative it was also assumed that the critical pathway is the direct in gestion of water through hypothetical wells around the Institute. Conservative assumptions were also made in the characterization of the local aquifer parameters such as vertical and longitudinal dispersivity, effective porosity of the soil, hydraulic conductivity etc., in roder to overestimate the effective equivalent dose. The result obtained, of 5.3x10 -10 mSv/a is far below the dose limit for the public adopted by the Radiological Protection Board. The derived limit for the discharge was also evaluated, using the same model, giving a result of 3.6x10 13 Bq/a. (author) [pt

  4. Brain Mapping-Based Model of Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Effects on Connectivity in the Pain Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carmen; Oertel, Bruno G; Felden, Lisa; Kell, Christian A; Nöth, Ulrike; Vermehren, Johannes; Kaiser, Jochen; Deichmann, Ralf; Lötsch, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoids receive increasing interest as analgesic treatments. However, the clinical use of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) has progressed with justified caution, which also owes to the incomplete mechanistic understanding of its analgesic effects, in particular its interference with the processing of sensory or affective components of pain. The present placebo-controlled crossover study therefore focused on the effects of 20 mg oral THC on the connectivity between brain areas of the pain matrix following experimental stimulation of trigeminal nocisensors in 15 non-addicted healthy volunteers. A general linear model (GLM) analysis identified reduced activations in the hippocampus and the anterior insula following THC administration. However, assessment of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) revealed that the effects of THC first consisted in a weakening of the interaction between the thalamus and the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2). From there, dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was employed to infer that THC attenuated the connections to the hippocampus and to the anterior insula, suggesting that the reduced activations in these regions are secondary to a reduction of the connectivity from somatosensory regions by THC. These findings may have consequences for the way THC effects are currently interpreted: as cannabinoids are increasingly considered in pain treatment, present results provide relevant information about how THC interferes with the affective component of pain. Specifically, the present experiment suggests that THC does not selectively affect limbic regions, but rather interferes with sensory processing which in turn reduces sensory-limbic connectivity, leading to deactivation of affective regions.

  5. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    INTEGRATION OF HYDROGEOPHYSICAL AND REMOTE SENSING DATA IN THE. ASSESSMENT OF GROUNDWATER POTENTIAL OF THE BASEMENT COMPLEX. TERRAIN OF EKITI STATE, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA. 1. 2. 3. 4. Bayowa O.G., Olorunfemi M.O., Akinluyi F.O., and Ademilua O.L. 1Department of Earth ...

  6. Response of deep groundwater to land use change in desert basins of the Trans-Pecos region, Texas, USA: Effects on infiltration, recharge, and nitrogen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wendy Marie; Böhlke, John Karl; Sharp, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the effects of anthropogenic processes on groundwater in arid regions can be complicated by thick unsaturated zones with long transit times. Human activities can alter water and nutrient fluxes, but their impact on groundwater is not always clear. This study of basins in the Trans-Pecos region of Texas links anthropogenic land use and vegetation change with alterations to unsaturated zone fluxes and regional increases in basin groundwater NO3−concentrations. Median increases in groundwater NO3− (by 0.7–0.9 mg-N/l over periods ranging from 10 to 50+ years) occurred despite low precipitation (220–360 mm/year), high potential evapotranspiration (~1570 mm/year), and thick unsaturated zones (10–150+ m). Recent model simulations indicate net infiltration and groundwater recharge can occur beneath Trans-Pecos basin floors, and may have increased due to irrigation and vegetation change. These processes were investigated further with chemical and isotopic data from groundwater and unsaturated zone cores. Some unsaturated zone solute profiles indicate flushing of natural salt accumulations has occurred. Results are consistent with human-influenced flushing of naturally accumulated unsaturated zone nitrogen as an important source of NO3− to the groundwater. Regional mass balance calculations indicate the mass of natural unsaturated zone NO3− (122–910 kg-N/ha) was sufficient to cause the observed groundwater NO3− increases, especially if augmented locally with the addition of fertilizer N. Groundwater NO3− trends can be explained by small volumes of high NO3− modern recharge mixed with larger volumes of older groundwater in wells. This study illustrates the importance of combining long-term monitoring and targeted process studies to improve understanding of human impacts on recharge and nutrient cycling in arid regions, which are vulnerable to the effects of climate change and increasing human reliance on dryland ecosystems.

  7. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  8. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  9. A plea for simultaneously considering matrix quality and local environmental conditions when analysing landscape impacts on effective dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflüger, Femke J; Balkenhol, Niko

    2014-05-01

    Landscape genetics has tremendous potential for enhancing our understanding about landscape effects on effective dispersal and resulting genetic structures. However, the vast majority of landscape genetic studies focus on effects of the landscape among sampling locations on dispersal (i.e. matrix quality), while effects of local environmental conditions are rather neglected. Such local environmental conditions include patch size, habitat type or resource availability and are commonly used in (meta-) population ecology and population genetics. In our opinion, landscape genetic studies would greatly benefit from simultaneously incorporating both matrix quality and local environmental conditions when assessing landscape effects on effective dispersal. To illustrate this point, we first outline the various ways in which environmental heterogeneity can influence different stages of the dispersal process. We then propose a three-step approach for assessing local and matrix effects on effective dispersal and review how both types of effects can be considered in landscape genetic analyses. Using simulated data, we show that it is possible to correctly disentangle the relative importance of matrix quality vs. local environmental conditions for effective dispersal. We argue that differentiating local and matrix effects in such a way is crucial for predicting future species distribution and persistence, and for optimal conservation decisions that are based on landscape genetics. In sum, we think it is timely to move beyond purely statistical, pattern-oriented analyses in landscape genetics and towards process-oriented approaches that consider the full range of possible landscape effects on dispersal behaviour and resulting gene flow. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  11. Application of the effective Fisher matrix to the frequency domain inspiral waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The Fisher matrix (FM) has been generally used to predict the accuracy of the gravitational wave parameter estimation. Although the limitation of the FM has been well known, it is still mainly used due to its very low computational cost compared to the Monte Carlo simulations. Recently, Rodriguez et al (2013 Phys. Rev. D 88 084013) performed Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations using a frequency domain inspiral waveform model (TaylorF2) for nonspinning binary systems with total masses M⩽20M ⊙ , and they found systematic differences between the predictions from FM and MCMC for M>10M ⊙ . On the other hand, an effective Fisher matrix (eFM) was recently introduced by Cho et al (2013 Phys. Rev. D 87 24004). The eFM is a semi-analytic approach to the standard FM, in which the derivative is taken of a quadratic function fitted to the local overlap surface. In this work, we apply the eFM method to the TaylorF2 waveform for nonspinning binary systems with a moderately high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR∼15) and find that the eFM can reproduce the MCMC error bounds in Rodriguez et al well, even for high masses. By comparing the eFM standard deviation directly with the 1-σ confidence interval of the marginalized overlap that approximates the MCMC posterior distribution, we show that the eFM can be acceptable in all mass regions for the estimation of the MCMC error bounds. We also investigate the dependence on the signal strength. (paper)

  12. The Land-Use Legacy Effect: Groundwater mechanisms behind ecosystem responses to land use/cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. L.; Kendall, A. D.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    While many studies have linked land use/land cover (LULC) to aquatic ecosystem responses, only a few have linked the dynamics of changing LULC to water quality through a mechanistic understanding of flow paths and travel times. The Huron River Watershed, along with most of the rest of of Michigan has undergone extensive LULC change over the past century, shifting from a primarily agricultural to a suburban landscape, and includes sites that cover a range of historical LULC trajectories. We coupled a multi-temporal GIS database of LULC data (circa 1800, 1880, 1938, 1955, 1968, 1978, 1995, and 2006) with a model of groundwater flow paths to create a "Legacy Map" of LULC for each 109x109m model cell in the study area. We then investigate relationships between time-varying LULC and lake water chemistry, ranging from nutrients to conservative ions, using multiple linear regression over a range of spatial scales. Our study illustrates that there are large areas where there may be a temporal mismatch between LULC of the current landscape and LULC expressed in the lake via water chemistry. Specifically, watershed areas that have long groundwater pathways may be delivering water more representative of historical LULC than current LULC. Moreover, some water chemistry variables (SRP, Cl, Na) have stronger links to current LULC and others (NH4) have a stronger link to legacy LULC. This study highlights the important role that "groundwatersheds" play in linking the landscape to aquatic systems. We then zoom out to apply this concept to Michigan's Lower Peninsula to show the extent that groundwatersheds and surface watersheds are also spatially mismatched. These two perspectives suggest a need to consider both groundwater legacies and groundwatersheds in nutrient management and watershed planning.

  13. Effects of Changes in Irrigation Practices and Aquifer Development on Groundwater Discharge to the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve near Salinas, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1990, about 75 acres of black mangroves have died in the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve near Salinas, Puerto Rico. Although many factors can contribute to the mortality of mangroves, changes in irrigation practices, rainfall, and water use resulted in as much as 25 feet of drawdown in the potentiometric surface of the aquifer in the vicinity of the reserve between 1986 and 2002. To clarify the issue, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, conducted a study to ascertain how aquifer development and changes in irrigation practices have affected groundwater levels and groundwater flow to the Mar Negro area of the reserve. Changes in groundwater flow to the mangrove swamp and bay from 1986 to 2004 were estimated in this study by developing and calibrating a numerical groundwater flow model. The transient simulations indicate that prior to 1994, high irrigation return flows more than offset the effect of reduced groundwater withdrawals. In this case, the simulated discharge to the coast in the modeled area was 19 million gallons per day. From 1994 through 2004, furrow irrigation was completely replaced by micro-drip irrigation, thus eliminating return flows and the simulated average coastal discharge was 7 million gallons per day, a reduction of 63 percent. The simulated average groundwater discharge to the coastal mangrove swamps in the reserve from 1986 to 1993 was 2 million gallons per day, compared to an average simulated discharge of 0.2 million gallons per day from 1994 to 2004. The average annual rainfall for each of these periods was 38 inches. The groundwater discharge to the coastal mangrove swamps in the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve was estimated at about 0.5 million gallons per day for 2003-2004 because of higher than average annual rainfall during these 2 years. The groundwater flow model was used to test five alternatives for increasing

  14. Hydrogeochemical effects of groundwater mining of the Sierra de Crevillente Aquifer (Alicante, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Bosch, A.; Morell, I.; Andreu, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    The groundwater mining of the Crevillente aquifer (southeastern Spain) has resulted in the progressive deterioration of water quality, with particularly significant increases in chloride, sulfate, and sodium. The possibility of a vertical hydrochemical zoning is deduced that would require examining the importance of the geometry and lithology (evaporitic materials) in the salinization process. The time of water-rock contact (residence time) and dilution by infiltration of rainwater also influences the hydrogeochemistry of the aquifer. The hydrochemical data are useful in defining the conceptual model of the aquifer, completely karstified with relative homogeneity.

  15. Use of toxicity assays for evaluating the effectiveness of groundwater remediation with Fenton’s reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Christophersen, Mette

    evaluates in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using modified Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + chelated Fe2+) as a groundwater remedy. Three injections were performed over a period to test treatment efficacy. Performance monitoring samples were collected from two depths both prior to and during treatment, and analyzed...... treatment with Fenton’s reagent the toxicity had increased and now needed 7100 times dilution to reduce toxicity to the LC10 probably due to mobilization of metals. It is concluded that toxicity assay is a useful tool for evaluating samples from contaminated sites and that toxicity assays and chemical...

  16. Low-temperature matrix effects on orientational motion of Methyl radical trapped in gas solids: Angular tunneling vs. libration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Yurij A.; Zelenetckii, Ilia A.; Benetis, Nikolas P.

    2018-05-01

    EPR investigation of the lineshape of matrix -isolated methyl radical, CH3, spectra recorded in solid N2O and CO2 was carried out. Reversible temperature-dependent line width anisotropy was observed in both matrices. This effect is a fingerprint of the extra-slow radical rotation about the in-plane C2 axes. The rotation was found to be anisotropic and closely correlated to the orientational dynamics of the matrix molecules. It was suggested that a recently discovered "hoping precession" effect of matrix molecules in solid CO2 is a common feature of matrices of the linear molecules CO, N2O, and CO2. A new low-temperature matrix effect, referred to as "libration trap", was proposed which accounts for the changing CH3 reorientational motion about the radical C3-axis from rotation to libration. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the EPR satellites produced by these nonrotating-but librating methyls was presented. This allowed for a rough estimation of the rotation hindering potential due to correlation mismatch between the radical and the nearest matrix molecules' librations.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF GROUNDWATER HYDROCHEMISTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... The residual sodium carbonate shows that 18.2%, 13.6% and 15.9% of the samples are suitable, marginal and unsuitable water respectively ... groundwater in the host rock, the ambient temperature and pH, chemical ..... lagoon and the transitional effects on the lacustrine ichthyofaunal diversity. African J. of ...

  18. Effect Of Neutron Activation Factor On The Physico-Chemical Properties Of Hydrophilic And Hydrophobic Polymer Formulation Of Matrix Tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Ijang; Bohari Yaacob; Nordiana, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    This study was to investigate effect of neutron activation on the physicochemical properties and in vitro dissolution of sustained-release matrix tablets. The tablets incorporation of Samarium oxide (Sm 2 O 3 ) and were compared before and after irradiation with thermal neutron for 5 minutes at 1.2 x 10 12 neutron cm -2 s -1 . The neutron activation factor did not influence the compression properties of the tablets. The dissolution tests showed that irradiation increased the release of the model drug ketoprofen from the tablets. This effect might be explained by polymer degradation. Incorporation of Sm 2 O 3 in the matrix tablets did not influence the release. (author)

  19. Work plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory groundwater program: Continuous groundwater collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The continuous collection of groundwater data is a basic and necessary part of Lockeheed Martin Energy Systems' ORNL Environmental Restoration Area-Wide Groundwater Program. Continuous groundwater data consist primarily of continually recorded groundwater levels, and in some instances, specific conductivity, pH, and/or temperature measurements. These data will be collected throughout the ORNL site. This Work Plan (WP) addresses technical objectives, equipment requirements, procedures, documentation requirements, and technical instructions for the acquisition of the continuous groundwater data. Intent of this WP is to provide an approved document that meets all the necessary requirements while retaining the flexibility necessary to effectively address ORNL's groundwater problems

  20. A Monte Carlo simulation method for assessing biotransformation effects on groundwater fuel hydrocarbon plume lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNab, W.W. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Biotransformation of dissolved groundwater hydrocarbon plumes emanating from leaking underground fuel tanks should, in principle, result in plume length stabilization over relatively short distances, thus diminishing the environmental risk. However, because the behavior of hydrocarbon plumes is usually poorly constrained at most leaking underground fuel tank sites in terms of release history, groundwater velocity, dispersion, as well as the biotransformation rate, demonstrating such a limitation in plume length is problematic. Biotransformation signatures in the aquifer geochemistry, most notably elevated bicarbonate, may offer a means of constraining the relationship between plume length and the mean biotransformation rate. In this study, modeled plume lengths and spatial bicarbonate differences among a population of synthetic hydrocarbon plumes, generated through Monte Carlo simulation of an analytical solute transport model, are compared to field observations from six underground storage tank (UST) sites at military bases in California. Simulation results indicate that the relationship between plume length and the distribution of bicarbonate is best explained by biotransformation rates that are consistent with ranges commonly reported in the literature. This finding suggests that bicarbonate can indeed provide an independent means for evaluating limitations in hydrocarbon plume length resulting from biotransformation. (Author)

  1. The link between employee attitudes and employee effectiveness: Data matrix of meta-analytic estimates based on 1161 unique correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Mackay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a correlation matrix of meta-analytic estimates between various employee job attitudes (i.e., Employee engagement, job satisfaction, job involvement, and organizational commitment and indicators of employee effectiveness (i.e., Focal performance, contextual performance, turnover intention, and absenteeism. The meta-analytic correlations in the matrix are based on over 1100 individual studies representing over 340,000 employees. Data was collected worldwide via employee self-report surveys. Structural path analyses based on the matrix, and the interpretation of the data, can be found in “Investigating the incremental validity of employee engagement in the prediction of employee effectiveness: a meta-analytic path analysis” (Mackay et al., 2016 [1].

  2. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  3. Hydrogeological framework, numerical simulation of groundwater flow, and effects of projected water use and drought for the Beaver-North Canadian River alluvial aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Derek W.; Correll, Jessica S.

    2016-01-14

    This report describes a study of the hydrology, hydrogeological framework, numerical groundwater-flow models, and results of simulations of the effects of water use and drought for the Beaver-North Canadian River alluvial aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma. The purpose of the study was to provide analyses, including estimating equal-proportionate-share (EPS) groundwater-pumping rates and the effects of projected water use and droughts, pertinent to water management of the Beaver-North Canadian River alluvial aquifer for the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

  4. Effect of sea-level rise and climate change on groundwater salinity and agro-hydrology in a low coastal region of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuyt, L.C.P.M.; Kabat, P.; Postma, J.; Pomper, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Scenario studies were carried out to predict the effects of doubled carbon dioxide levels, a 1 °C temperature increase and a 1.2 m sea level rise on seepage, groundwater and crop production. Climatic change was simulated, showing increased precipitation. Simulation of effects of sea level rise on

  5. Considering the potential effect of faulting on regional-scale groundwater flow: an illustrative example from Australia's Great Artesian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerdon, Brian D.; Turnadge, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic head measurements in the Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia, began in the early 20th century, and despite subsequent decades of data collection, a well-accepted smoothed potentiometric surface has continually assumed a contiguous aquifer system. Numerical modeling was used to produce alternative potentiometric surfaces for the Cadna-owie-Hooray aquifers with and without the effect of major faults. Where a fault created a vertical offset between the aquifers and was juxtaposed with an aquitard, it was assumed to act as a lateral barrier to flow. Results demonstrate notable differences in the central portion of the study area between potentiometric surfaces including faults and those without faults. Explicitly considering faults results in a 25-50 m difference where faults are perpendicular to the regional flow path, compared to disregarding faults. These potential barriers create semi-isolated compartments where lateral groundwater flow may be diminished or absent. Groundwater management in the GAB relies on maintaining certain hydraulic head conditions and, hence, a potentiometric surface. The presence of faulting has two implications for management: (1) a change in the inferred hydraulic heads (and associated fluxes) at the boundaries of regulatory jurisdictions; and (2) assessment of large-scale extractions occurring at different locations within the GAB.

  6. Groundwater flood or groundwater-induced flood?

    OpenAIRE

    Robins, N.S.; Finch, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of ‘groundwater flood’ events have been recorded over the Chalk aquifer in southern England since the 1994 occurrence at Chichester, Sussex. Reporting of this event and subsequent groundwater floods indicates that there are two types of groundwater flood event. Type 1 is the true groundwater flood in which the water table elevation rises above the ground elevation, and Type 2 occurs when intense groundwater discharge via bourne springs and highly permeable shallow horizons discharges...

  7. CD14{sup +} monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ding, E-mail: qqhewd@gmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin (China); Chen, Ke, E-mail: chenke_59@hotmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin (China); Du, Wei Ting, E-mail: duwtpumc@yahoo.com.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Han, Zhi-Bo, E-mail: zhibohan@hotmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin (China); Ren, He, E-mail: knifesharp2000@hotmail.com [National Engineering Research Center of Cell Products, AmCellGene Co. Ltd, TEDA, Tianjin (China); Chi, Ying, E-mail: caizhuying@hotmail.com [The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); TEDA Life and Technology Research Center, Institute of Hematology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, TEDA, Tianjin (China); and others

    2010-09-10

    Here, the effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) secretion capacities of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) as an important soluble mediator. CD14{sup +} monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1{beta}, either exogenously added or produced by CD14{sup +} monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE{sub 2} by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE{sub 2} expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes and partially restored CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  8. Evaluating the effect of sampling and spatial correlation on ground-water travel time uncertainty coupling geostatistical, stochastic, and first order, second moment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.W.; LaVenue, A.M.; McNeish, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Ground-water travel time predictions at potential high-level waste repositories are subject to a degree of uncertainty due to the scale of averaging incorporated in conceptual models of the ground-water flow regime as well as the lack of data on the spatial variability of the hydrogeologic parameters. The present study describes the effect of limited observations of a spatially correlated permeability field on the predicted ground-water travel time uncertainty. Varying permeability correlation lengths have been used to investigate the importance of this geostatistical property on the tails of the travel time distribution. This study uses both geostatistical and differential analysis techniques. Following the generation of a spatially correlated permeability field which is considered reality, semivariogram analyses are performed upon small random subsets of the generated field to determine the geostatistical properties of the field represented by the observations. Kriging is then employed to generate a kriged permeability field and the corresponding standard deviation of the estimated field conditioned by the limited observations. Using both the real and kriged fields, the ground-water flow regime is simulated and ground-water travel paths and travel times are determined for various starting points. These results are used to define the ground-water travel time uncertainty due to path variability. The variance of the ground-water travel time along particular paths due to the variance of the permeability field estimated using kriging is then calculated using the first order, second moment method. The uncertainties in predicted travel time due to path and parameter uncertainties are then combined into a single distribution

  9. The Effect Of Land Cover/Land Use On Groundwater Resources In Southern Egypt (Luxor Area): Remote Sensing And Field Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faid, A.M.; Hinz, E.A.; Montgomery, H.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of land cover/land use on groundwater can be critical. Land cover / land use maps give an early warning for planners and developers to protect groundwater resources from depletion and preserve its sustain ability. These land cover / land use maps can be used for the planning of groundwater development to prevent the deterioration of the aquifer. The Research Institute for Groundwater of Egypt (RIGW) has carried out hydrogeological studies in 1990 to evaluate the potentiality of groundwater in Luxor area in southern Egypt close to the Nile valley. The region is characterized by a rapid and continuous increase in land reclamation and development on the fringes which surround the already heavily cultivated land within the Nile valley. This presented a need for continuous monitoring and information updating over a vast region in a short time and at a reasonable cost. This study illustrates how remote sensing techniques can be effectively used for monitoring changes in land cover / land use in an effort to aid groundwater management. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data collected in 1984 and 2000 were processed and analyzed over the study area to produce land cover/land use maps. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) technique is used for Landsat TM images of to quantify areas which are covered by vegetation. Results indicated significant increase in cultivated areas. Remote sensing results are compared with iso-piezo metric maps and iso-salinity maps that were produced in 1984 and 2000. Comparison of these maps indicates groundwater depletion and salinity increase from 1984 to 2000. We relate this to the increase of the area being cultivated

  10. The combined use of chemical and isotopic information to model the effects of stormwater infiltration on groundwater quality in an urban fractured rock aquifer, Auckland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.R.; Hong, Y.S.; Reeves, R.; Sheppard, D.; Roberts, K.; Viljevac, Z.; Smaill, A.

    2002-01-01

    Disposal of storm water in the Mt Eden area of Auckland, New Zealand, is via 'soak holes' drilled directly into the top of fractured basalt. Although this method of disposal has been used for at least 60 years, its sustainability with respect to groundwater quality has not been addressed. The groundwater has relatively low concentrations of dissolved heavy metals, although total metals are higher suggesting that the metals are bound to mobile particulates within the aquifer. PAH concentrations are also low in the aquifer, although sampling after rainfall events show small increases in PAH. Tritium measurements of the groundwater showed that all of the groundwater south of Chamberlin Park is less than 2 years old. This area has many soak holes. The data suggest that infiltration is very rapid and occurs throughout the area almost simultaneously after rainfall events. One well north of Chamberlin Park, where soak holes are absent has an age of 47 years ± 2 years. The groundwater here is low in dissolved oxygen and appears to be slow moving. CFC measurements indicate that all wells sampled south of Chamberlin Park are contaminated by excess CFCs. However, this result indicates rapid recharge from the surface via storm water. The same well north of Chamberlin Park that was dated using tritium, also has a CFC age of approximately 30 years. Thus, CFC dating may be useful in urban areas that are separated from atmospheric contamination by confining beds or slow circulation. A Kohonen self-organising feature maps (KSOFM) neural network was used to analyse the effect on storm water infiltration on groundwater quality, and determine the inter-relationship of the groundwater quality variables. The model shows that where the land use type is industrial or residential with many soak holes, there is a strong correlation of increased concentrations of heavy metals and storm water infiltration. (author)

  11. Effect of phytoremediation on concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmeyer, James E.; Effinger, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site near Charleston, South Carolina, USA, have been monitored since the installation of a phytoremediation system of hybrid poplar trees in 1998. Between 2000 and 2014, the concentrations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene (BT&N) in groundwater in the planted area have decreased. For example, in the monitoring well containing the highest concentrations of BT&N, benzene concentrations decreased from 10,200 µg/L to less than 4000 µg/L, toluene concentrations decreased from 2420 µg/L to less than 20 µg/L, and naphthalene concentrations decreased from 6840 µg/L to less than 3000 µg/L. Concentrations of BT&N in groundwater in all wells were observed to be lower during the summer months relative to the winter months of a particular year during the first few years after installing the phytoremediation system, most likely due to increased transpiration and contaminant uptake by the hybrid poplar trees during the warm summer months; this pathway of uptake by trees was confirmed by the detection of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene in trees during sampling events in 2002, and later in the study in 2012. These data suggest that the phytoremediation system affects the groundwater contaminants on a seasonal basis and, over multiple years, has resulted in a cumulative decrease in dissolved-phase contaminant concentrations in groundwater. The removal of dissolved organic contaminants from the aquifer has resulted in a lower demand on dissolved oxygen supplied by recharge and, as a result, the redox status of the groundwater has changed from anoxic to oxic conditions. This study provides much needed information for water managers and other scientists on the viability of the long-term effectiveness of phytoremediation in decreasing groundwater contaminants and increasing dissolved oxygen at sites contaminated by benzene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  12. Drug-releasing shape-memory polymers - the role of morphology, processing effects, and matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischke, Christian; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) have gained interest for temporary drug-release systems that should be anchored in the body by self-sufficient active movements of the polymeric matrix. Based on the so far published scientific literature, this review highlights three aspects that require particular attention when combining SMPs with drug molecules: i) the defined polymer morphology as required for the shape-memory function, ii) the strong effects that processing conditions such as drug-loading methodologies can have on the drug-release pattern from SMPs, and iii) the independent control of drug release and degradation by their timely separation. The combination of SMPs with a drug-release functionality leads to multifunctional carriers that are an interesting technology for pharmaceutical sciences and can be further expanded by new materials such as thermoplastic SMPs or temperature-memory polymers. Experimental studies should include relevant molecules as (model) drugs and provide a thermomechanical characterization also in an aqueous environment, report on the potential effect of drug type and loading levels on the shape-memory functionality, and explore the potential correlation of polymer degradation and drug release.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibitory effects of an octameric oligopeptide isolated from abalone Haliotis discus hannai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Ryu, Bomi; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Young-Mog; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Won Sun; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Geun Hyung; Je, Jae-Young; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2013-11-01

    Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) is a marine gastropod, and an important fishery and food industrial resource that is massively maricultured in Asia, Africa, Australia and America. However, its health benefits have rarely been studied for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical application. In this study, the purified abalone oligopeptide (AOP) with anti-matrix metalloproteinases (anti-MMPs) effects was isolated from the digests of abalone intestine using recycle HPLC with a JAI W253 column and an OHpak SB-803 HQ column. The AOP was identified as Ala-Glu-Leu-Pro-Ser-Leu-Pro-Gly (MW=782.4 Da) with a de novo peptide sequencing technique using a tandem mass spectrometer. The AOP exhibited a specific inhibitory effect against MMP-2/-9 activity and attenuated protein expression of p50 and p65 in the human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells, dose-dependently. The results presented illustrate that the AOP could inhibit MMP-2/-9 expression in HT1080 cells via the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB)-mediated pathway. This data suggest that the AOP from H. discus hannai intestine may possess therapeutic and preventive potential for the treatment of MMPs-related disorders such as angiogenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dielectric Matrix Formulation of Correlation Energies in the Random Phase Approximation: Inclusion of Exchange Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussard, Bastien; Rocca, Dario; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2016-05-10

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case, the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed, and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the computational efficiency; a discussion on the numerical quadrature made on the frequency variable is also provided. A series of test calculations on atomic correlation energies and molecular reaction energies shows that exchange effects are instrumental for improvement over direct RPA results.

  15. Combined effect of photobiomodulation with a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor on the rate of relapse in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kyung-A; Anderson, Stephanie; Kang, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Su-Jung

    2016-03-01

    To investigate combined effect of photobiomodulation with a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor on the relapse rate in relation to MMP expression in rats. Fifty-two rats were divided into four groups according to the treatment modality: control group, irradiation group, doxycycline group, and irradiation with doxycycline group. During a relapse period of 5 days after orthodontic movement, maxillary central incisors were treated by low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as a photobiomodulation and/or doxycycline as a synthetic MMP inhibitor. Relapse rate was evaluated in association with MMP expression at the gene and protein levels. Relapse rates were increased by LLLT (1.57-fold) and decreased by doxycycline (0.83-fold) compared with the control, showing positive correlation with the levels of expression for all MMPs in the periodontal ligament (PDL). LLLT concomitant with doxycycline administration resulted in no significant differences of relapse rate and MMP expression from the control. The combined effect of photobiomodulation with an MMP inhibitor around the relapsing teeth proved to be antagonistic to PDL remodeling activity during relapse. This study suggests a basis for developing a novel biologic procedure targeting the MMP-dependent PDL remodeling to control the relapse rate.

  16. Proliferative effects of apical, but not basal, matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in polarized MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrell, Permila C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; Fingleton, Barbara; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2005-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is primarily expressed in glandular epithelium. Therefore, its mechanism of action may be influenced by its regulated vectorial release to either the apical and/or basolateral compartments, where it would act on its various substrates. To gain a better understanding of where MMP-7 is released in polarized epithelium, we have analyzed its pattern of secretion in polarized MDCK cells expressing stably transfected human MMP-7 (MDCK-MMP-7), and HCA-7 and Caco2 human colon cancer cell lines. In all cell lines, latent MMP-7 was secreted to both cellular compartments, but was 1.5- to 3-fold more abundant in the basolateral compartment as compared to the apical. However, studies in the MDCK system demonstrated that MMP-7 activity was 2-fold greater in the apical compartment of MDCK-MMP-7 HIGH -polarized monolayers, which suggests the apical co-release of an MMP-7 activator. In functional assays, MMP-7 over-expression increased cell saturation density as a result of increased cell proliferation with no effect on apoptosis. Apical MMP-7 activity was shown to be responsible for the proliferative effect, which occurred, as demonstrated by media transfer experiments, through cleavage of an apical substrate and not through the generation of a soluble factor. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of MMP-7 secretion in relation to its mechanism of action when expressed in a polarized epithelium

  17. Effects of carbonation, irradiation and temperature onto strontium immobilization into a cementitious matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Nes, G.; Arbel-Haddad, M.; Chomat, L.; Poyet, S.; Mace, N.; Hossepied, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the decoupled effects of carbonation, irradiation and temperature on strontium immobilization in a CEM-I cement matrix are described. After 6 months of treatment, mineralogical characterization (X-ray diffraction - XRD and thermogravimetric analysis - TGA), leaching tests (according to ANSI.ANS-16.1 standard method) and sorption experiments were carried out. The mineralogical evolution was shown to be similar for samples submitted to irradiation at atmospheric conditions or carbonation at a controlled temperature of 40 C. degrees. The main mineralogical change during these two treatments is the formation of calcium carbonate; calcite is detected at the sample surface and the two carbonate metastable phases (aragonite and vaterite) in the depth of the sample. Although it was not possible to identify, by the techniques used, the association of Sr with any specific cementitious phase present in the investigated samples, the leaching results showed that the fraction of Sr leached from samples exposed to carbonation during their degradation process, was approximately 6 times lower compared to the corresponding samples degraded under inert conditions. The sorption experiments onto the hydrated cement paste show a small but significant retention of Sr in these matrices without allowing a possible identification of the phase responsible for the retention. Post leaching mineralogical characterization is to be performed in order to study the effect of the leaching process on the sample mineralogy and to locate the binding sites of the Sr ions within the cementitious paste. (authors)

  18. Chondroprotective effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in conjunction with hypoxia on bovine cartilage-matrix synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Eraj Humayun; Pan-Pan, Chong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Azhar Bin; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue specifically adapted to a specific niche with a low oxygen tension (hypoxia), and the presence of such conditions is a key factor in regulating growth and survival of chondrocytes. Zinc deficiency has been linked to cartilage-related disease, and presence of Zinc is known to provide antibacterial benefits, which makes its inclusion attractive in an in vitro system to reduce infection. Inclusion of 1% zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) in poly octanediol citrate (POC) polymer cultured in hypoxia has not been well determined. In this study we investigated the effects of ZnONP on chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis cultured under normoxia (21% O2 ) and hypoxia (5% O2 ). We report an upregulation of chondrocyte proliferation and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (S-GAG) in hypoxic culture. Results demonstrate a synergistic effect of oxygen concentration and 1% ZnONP in up-regulation of anabolic gene expression (Type II collagen and aggrecan), and a down regulation of catabolic (MMP-13) gene expression. Furthermore, production of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF-1A) in response to hypoxic condition to regulate chondrocyte survival under hypoxia is not affected by the presence of 1% ZnONP. Presence of 1% ZnONP appears to act to preserve homeostasis of cartilage in its hypoxic environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of bioaugmentation on enhanced reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater - a comparison of three sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Durant, Neal D.; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2014-01-01

    Microcosm studies investigated the effects of bioaugmentation with a mixed Dehalococcoides (Dhc)/Dehalobacter (Dhb) culture on biological enhanced reductive dechlorination for treatment of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and chloroethenes in groundwater at three Danish sites. Microcosms were amended...... with lactate as electron donor and monitored over 600 days. Experimental variables included bioaugmentation, TCA concentration, and presence/absence of chloroethenes. Bioaugmented microcosms received a mixture of the Dhc culture KB-1 and Dhb culture ACT-3. To investigate effects of substrate concentration......, microcosms were amended with various concentrations of chloroethanes (TCA or monochloroethane [CA]) and/or chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE], or 1,1-dichloroethene [1,1-DCE]). Results showed that combined electron donor addition and bioaugmentation stimulated dechlorination of TCA...

  20. Effects of 1992 farming systems on ground-water quality at the management systems evaluation area near Princeton, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.; Lamb, J.A.; Dowdy, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) program was a multiscale, interagency initiative to evaluate the effects of agricultural systems on water quality in the midwest corn belt. The primary objective of the Minnesota MSEA was to evaluate the effects of ridge-tillage practices in a corn and soybean farming system on ground-water quality. The 65-hectare Minnesota MSEA was located in the Anoka Sand Plain near the town of Princeton, Minnesota. Three fanning systems were evaluated: corn-soybean rotation with ridge-tillage (areas B and D), sweet corn-potato rotation (areas A and C), and field corn in consecutive years (continuous corn; area E). Water samples were collected four different times per year from a network of 22 multiport wells and 29 observation wells installed in the saturated zone beneath and adjacent to the cropped areas.

  1. Prospective Effects of Statin in Repression of Matrix Metalloproteinases Activities in Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, A.M.; Sallam, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies had been committed that HMG-CoA (3-Hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) may exert a pleotropic effects attributed to mechanisms independent of their conventional hypolipidaemic effects. Meantime, inadequate studies have been sustained these independence mechanisms in regard to regulation and signal transduction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Sprague Dawley male albino rats were given by gavage atorvastatin; a synthetic form of statins, at a dose of I mg/kg body weight/day for 7 successive days before starting irradiation and 15 successive days during and along the exposure to γ-radiation. Rats were exposed to fractionated whole body gamma radiation, delivered as 1 Gy every other day up to total dose of 8 Gy. Quantitative assay of gelatinolytic zymographic analysis of serum and hepatic tissues showed that exposure to γ rays yields a marked significant increase in the activities of both pro-MMP-9 and active MMP-9 (92 and 86 kDa), as well as pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 (72 and 66 kDa), respectively. Administration of atorvastatin has significantly lowered the MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymatic activity in y-irradiated rats, Conclusion: the present study demonstrated that irradiation of rats led to up regulation of enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in their pro- and active forms. Administration of atorvastatin exerted defensive effects on γ irradiated rats via down regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Moreover, atorvastatin may be applied to minimize radiation-induced oxidative damage and attenuate the side effects of radiotherapy. However, these results observed in rats need to be confirmed in other experimental models

  2. Prospective Effects of Statin in Repression of Matrix Metalloproteinases Activities in Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, A.M.; Sallam, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies had been committed that HMG-CoA (3-Hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) may exert a pleotropic effects attributed to mechanisms independent of their conventional hypolipidaemic effects. Meantime, inadequate studies have been sustained these independence mechanisms in regard to regulation and signal transduction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Sprague Dawley male albino rats were given by gavage atorvastatin; a synthetic form of statins, at a dose of I mg/kg body weight/day for 7 successive days before starting irradiation and 15 successive days during and along the exposure to γ-radiation. Rats were exposed to fractionated whole body gamma radiation, delivered as 1 Gy every other day up to total dose of 8 Gy. Quantitative assay of gelatinolytic zymographic analysis of serum and hepatic tissues showed that exposure to γ rays yields a marked significant increase in the activities of both pro-MMP-9 and active MMP-9 (92 and 86 kDa), as well as pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 (72 and 66 kDa), respectively. Administration of atorvastatin has significantly lowered the MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymatic activity in y-irradiated rats, Conclusion: the present study demonstrated that irradiation of rats led to up regulation of enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in their pro- and active forms. Administration of atorvastatin exerted defensive effects on γ irradiated rats via down regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Moreover, atorvastatin may be applied to minimize radiation-induced oxidative damage and attenuate the side effects of radiotherapy. However, these results observed in rats need to be confirmed in other experimental models

  3. Groundwater Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Llamas

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The groundwaters released through springs constituted a basic element for the survival and progressive development of human beings. Man came to learn how to take better advantage of these waters by digging wells, irrigation channels, and galleries. Nevertheless, these activities do not require cooperation nor the collective agreement of relatively large groups of people, as in the case of creating the necessary structures to take advantage of the resources of surfacewaters. The construction and operation of these structures was a powerful factor in the birth of an urban or civil society – the designated water civilizations. The difference between people taking advantage of groundwater, quasi-individually, and those of surface water, where people work in a group, has continued to the present day. Whereas earlier, this difference did not bring about any special problems, the technological advances of this century, especially theturbine pump, have led to a spectacular increase in the use of roundwater. This advance has significantly contributed to reducing hunger in the world and has provided potable water in developing countries. However, the almost generalized lack of planning and control in the exploitation of these groundwaters reflects that they are little or badly understood by the managers of water policy in almost every country. As such, problems have occurred which have often become exaggerated, giving rise to water-myths. These problems, though, should be addressed if the aim is the sustainable usage of surface water as well as groundwater. To counter any misconceptions and to seek solutions to the problems, distinct plans of action can be highlighted: educating the public; fomenting a system of participative management and decisive support for the communities of users of subterranean waters; integrating a sufficient number of experts in hydrology in the various water management organizations;and assuring transparency of the data on

  4. Groundwater Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Ramón Llamas; Emilio Custodio

    1999-01-01

    The groundwaters released through springs constituted a basic element for the survival and progressive development of human beings. Man came to learn how to take better advantage of these waters by digging wells, irrigation channels, and galleries. Nevertheless, these activities do not require cooperation nor the collective agreement of relatively large groups of people, as in the case of creating the necessary structures to take advantage of the resources of surfacewaters. The construction a...

  5. Groundwater systems

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, A.M.; Foster, S.S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater is a vulnerable resource. As schemes are developed to pump out huge quantities of water, and with the advent of particularly persistent contaminants, the resource needs to be protected and managed (see Table 2.1). Despite groundwater’s pivotal role in sustaining ecosystems and providing water supply, the resource is still poorly understood, and hence poorly managed, in many parts of the world. When things go wrong, the damage can be lasting or even permanent. For examp...

  6. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of oral MMI270B (CGS 27023A), a novel matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A.L.M. Eskens (Ferry); N.C. Levitt; A. Sparreboom (Alex); L. Choi; R. Mather; J. Verweij (Jaap); A.L. Harris

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMMI270B is a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) with in vitro and in vivo activity. To exert optimal target inhibition, MMPI must be given chronically, and therefore, oral bioavailability is important. We analyzed the effect of food intake on AUC0-8

  7. Stimulation of matrix formation in rabbit chondrocyte cultures by ascorbate. 1. Effect of ascorbate analogs and beta-aminopropionitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G C; Wei, X Q; McDevitt, C A; Lane, B P; Sokoloff, L

    1988-01-01

    The most consistent effects of 0.2 mM L-ascorbate on monolayer cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes were a diversion of incorporated radiosulfate into a pericellular matrix and enhancement of cell proliferation. Only with certain batches of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was there a cell-for-cell increase of proteoglycan synthesis. These actions increased as the cell inoculum rose from 0.5 to 2 x 10(5) cells/T25 flask. Maximal effects of ascorbate and D-isoascorbate were found over a range of 0.05-0.2 mM. L-Dehydroascorbic acid was less effective than either, and no stimulatory action was exerted by L-cysteine, glutathione, dithiothreitol, methylene blue, or phenazine methosulfate. Ascorbate increased the hypro:pro ratio of newly synthesized proteins. beta-Aminopropionitrile (1 mM) reduced the proportion of [3H]hydroxyproline and [35S]O4-proteoglycans in the ascorbate-supplemented matrix 31 and 7%, respectively. In corresponding electronmicrographs, the number of pericellular filaments was reduced. We conclude: (a) Ascorbate has a general anabolic effect on chondrocytes in culture and enhances matrix assembly through mechanisms other than its redox function; (b) deposition of proteoglycans in the matrix is not simply the result of mechanical entrapment by allysine- or hydroxyallysine-derived cross-linking of collagen; and (c) contradictory reports on the subject result from variations in the serum employed, inoculum density, and concentration of ascorbate.

  8. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  9. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber-Matrix Adhesion on Polymeric Nanocomposite Properties—Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Lafdi

    2008-01-01

    carbon nanocomposite. Carbon nanofibers were subjected to electrochemical oxidation in 0.1 M nitric acid for varying times. The strength of adhesion between the nanofiber and an epoxy matrix was characterized by flexural strength and modulus. The surface functional groups formed and their concentration of nanofibers showed a dependence on the degree of oxidation. The addition of chemical functional groups on the nanofiber surface allows them to physically and chemically adhere to the continuous resin matrix. The chemical interaction with the continuous epoxy matrix results in the creation of an interphase region. The ability to chemically and physically interact with the epoxy region is beneficial to the mechanical properties of a carbon nanocomposite. A tailored degree of surface functionalization was found to increase adhesion to the matrix and increase flexural modulus.

  10. Matrix changes and side effects induced by electrokinetic treatment of porous and particulate materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry

    Transport of ions in an applied electric field holds many applications within both civil and environmental engineering, e.g. for removal of chlorides from concrete to hinder reinforcement corrosion, remediation of heavy metals from soils and other waste materials and recently for desalination...... electrodialytic remediation and the impact on the implementation of soil remediation, e.g. concerning the toxicity of residualsoluble Al in the soil matrix.Electrokinetic treatment was carried out as electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of three particulate matrices (soils and clay) and electrochemical desalination......H, chemical and porosity changes of the matrix during ED. In EDR it is not crucial to avoid matrix changes as in ED, but it is important to know which matrix changes are taking place, as these may influence the overall remediation result. In addition, the overall toxicity of the soil must not increase during...

  11. The effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) on bone formation: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathe, F.; Junker, R.; Chesnutt, B.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the question, if and to what extent enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) [EMD]) promotes the regeneration of bone. The influence of combinations with other biomaterials was additionally evaluated. Twenty histomorphometric studies were included in this systematic

  12. In vitro model to study the effects of matrix stiffening on Ca2+handling and myofilament function in isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deel, Elza D; Najafi, Aref; Fontoura, Dulce; Valent, Erik; Goebel, Max; Kardux, Kim; Falcão-Pires, Inês; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2017-07-15

    This paper describes a novel model that allows exploration of matrix-induced cardiomyocyte adaptations independent of the passive effect of matrix rigidity on cardiomyocyte function. Detachment of adult cardiomyocytes from the matrix enables the study of matrix effects on cell shortening, Ca 2+ handling and myofilament function. Cell shortening and Ca 2+ handling are altered in cardiomyocytes cultured for 24 h on a stiff matrix. Matrix stiffness-impaired cardiomyocyte contractility is reversed upon normalization of extracellular stiffness. Matrix stiffness-induced reduction in unloaded shortening is more pronounced in cardiomyocytes isolated from obese ZSF1 rats with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction compared to lean ZSF1 rats. Extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffening is a key element of cardiac disease. Increased rigidity of the ECM passively inhibits cardiac contraction, but if and how matrix stiffening also actively alters cardiomyocyte contractility is incompletely understood. In vitro models designed to study cardiomyocyte-matrix interaction lack the possibility to separate passive inhibition by a stiff matrix from active matrix-induced alterations of cardiomyocyte properties. Here we introduce a novel experimental model that allows exploration of cardiomyocyte functional alterations in response to matrix stiffening. Adult rat cardiomyocytes were cultured for 24 h on matrices of tuneable stiffness representing the healthy and the diseased heart and detached from their matrix before functional measurements. We demonstrate that matrix stiffening, independent of passive inhibition, reduces cell shortening and Ca 2+ handling but does not alter myofilament-generated force. Additionally, detachment of adult cultured cardiomyocytes allowed the transfer of cells from one matrix to another. This revealed that stiffness-induced cardiomyocyte changes are reversed when matrix stiffness is normalized. These matrix stiffness-induced changes in cardiomyocyte

  13. Effect of matrix metalloproteinase-21 (572C/T) polymorphism on HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, HariOm; Samani, Dharmesh; Nambiar, Nayana; Ghate, Manisha V; Gangakhedkar, R R

    2018-04-01

    Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a presumed reason for the development of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The coding region polymorphism in MMP-21 572C/T gene may have a potential functional effect on ECM remodeling. Hence, we aimed to examine the association of MMP-21 polymorphism with the modulation of HAND severity and its prevalence in HIV-infected and healthy individuals. Genotyping of MMP-21 572C/T polymorphism was performed by PCR-RFLP in total 150 HIV-infected individuals, 50 with HAND, 100 without HAND and 150 healthy controls. MMP-21 572TT genotype was predominantly higher in HAND patients compared with no HAND (OR = 1.63, p = 0.57). MMP-21 572T allele was associated with reduce risk for HAND severity (OR = 0.50, p = 0.04). Similarly, MMP-21 572TT genotype underrepresented in HIV-infected individuals compared to healthy controls (3.0% vs 6.7%, OR = 0.27, p = 0.08). MMP-21 572CT genotype and early HIV disease stage showed a higher risk for the advancement of HIV disease with marginal significance (OR = 1.89, p = 0.07). MMP-21 572CT genotype increased the risk for the modulation of HAND severity in tobacco users (OR = 1.98, p = 0.43). MMP-21 572CT genotype among tobacco and alcohol users showed elevated risk for the development of HAND in HIV-infected individuals (OR = 2.30, p = 0.15; OR = 1.86, p = 0.23). Similarly, MMP-21 572TT genotype enhanced the risk for the development of HAND in tobacco users (OR = 3.48, p = 0.40). In conclusion, the presence of coding region 572T allele may have protection for HAND severity. MMP-21 572C/T polymorphism and tobacco and alcohol usage may facilitate the development of HAND. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exploring Phylogenetic Relationships within Myriapoda and the Effects of Matrix Composition and Occupancy on Phylogenomic Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rosa; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Myriapods, including the diverse and familiar centipedes and millipedes, are one of the dominant terrestrial arthropod groups. Although molecular evidence has shown that Myriapoda is monophyletic, its internal phylogeny remains contentious and understudied, especially when compared to those of Chelicerata and Hexapoda. Until now, efforts have focused on taxon sampling (e.g., by including a handful of genes from many species) or on maximizing matrix size (e.g., by including hundreds or thousands of genes in just a few species), but a phylogeny maximizing sampling at both levels remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed 40 Illumina transcriptomes representing 3 of the 4 myriapod classes (Diplopoda, Chilopoda, and Symphyla); 25 transcriptomes were newly sequenced to maximize representation at the ordinal level in Diplopoda and at the family level in Chilopoda. Ten supermatrices were constructed to explore the effect of several potential phylogenetic biases (e.g., rate of evolution, heterotachy) at 3 levels of gene occupancy per taxon (50%, 75%, and 90%). Analyses based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian mixture models retrieved monophyly of each myriapod class, and resulted in 2 alternative phylogenetic positions for Symphyla, as sister group to Diplopoda + Chilopoda, or closer to Diplopoda, the latter hypothesis having been traditionally supported by morphology. Within centipedes, all orders were well supported, but 2 deep nodes remained in conflict in the different analyses despite dense taxon sampling at the family level. Relationships among centipede orders in all analyses conducted with the most complete matrix (90% occupancy) are at odds not only with the sparser but more gene-rich supermatrices (75% and 50% supermatrices) and with the matrices optimizing phylogenetic informativeness or most conserved genes, but also with previous hypotheses based on morphology, development, or other molecular data sets. Our results indicate that a high percentage of ribosomal

  15. Some effects of enamel matrix proteins on wound healing in the dento-gingival region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Jan L; Lindhe, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate by clinical means the effect of enamel matrix proteins on the healing of a soft tissue wound produced by periodontal pocket instrumentation. The study was performed as an intra-individual, longitudinal trial of 3 weeks duration with a double-masked, split-mouth, placebo-controlled and randomized design. The patient material was comprised of 28 subjects with moderately advanced, chronic periodontitis. Each patient presented with 3 sites in each of 2 jaw quadrants with a probing pocket depth (PPD) of >or=5 mm and bleeding following pocket probing (BoP). Baseline examination, including assessments of plaque, gingival inflammation, PPD, BoP and root dentin sensitivity, was carried out one week after oral hygiene instruction and careful self-performed plaque control. All experimental sites were scaled and root planed, and the soft tissue wall of the pocket was curetted to remove the pocket epithelium and adjacent granulation tissue. The site was carefully irrigated with saline. When the bleeding from the pocket had ceased, a 24% EDTA gel was applied in the site and retained for 2 min. This was followed by careful irrigation with saline. Left and right jaw quadrants were then randomized to subgingival application of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) or vehicle-control. All sites were re-examined after 1, 2 and 3 weeks. In addition, a visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to score the degree of post-treatment discomfort. The primary endpoints of treatment success were defined as (i) pocket closure (PPD Emdogain at 1 week and at 2% of the control sites (p=0.001). At 2 weeks, the corresponding figures were 25% versus 12% (p =0.028). Absence of BoP was at 1 week 57% for the Emdogain treated sites compared to 35% for the control sites (p=0.003). At 2 weeks, this endpoint was reached in 73% and 59% of the test and control sites, respectively (p=0.051). In terms of the endpoint defined for probing pocket depth, PPD Emdogain treated

  16. Effect of a high temperature cycle on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of the SPF/DB cycle on continuous SiC fiber-reinforced Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite's matrix, fiber, and matrix-fiber interface. The fibers in question, designated SCS-6, have a carbon core and thin, carbon-rich surface. The fatigue endurance limit at 50,000 cycles for the SPF/DB specimens was 50 percent lower than for the as-fabricated material. The substantial changes in tensile strength, fatigue life, and fracture-surface appearance due to the SPF-DB cycle are explained by a difference in the failure mechanisms due to SPF/DB-induced changes in the fiber/matrix interface strength.

  17. THE EFFECT OF TYPE ZEOLITE ON THE GAS TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF POLYIMIDE-BASED MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The permeation rates of O2, N2, CO2 and CH4 has been studied for polyimide-polyethersulfone (PI/PES blends-zeolite mixed matrix membranes synthesized in our laboratory. The study investigated the effect of zeolite loading and different zeolite type on the gas separation performance of these mixed matrix membranes. Frequency shifts and absorption intensity changes in the FTIR spectra of the PI/PES blends as compared with those of the pure polymers indicate that there is a mixing of polymer blends at the molecular level. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of pure and PI/PES blends membranes have showed one unique glass transition temperature that supports the miscible character of the PI/PES mixture. The PI/PES-zeolite 4A mixed matrix membrane with 25 wt % zeolite loading produced the highest O2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivity of around 7.45 and 46.05, respectively.

  18. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) on Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, J.; Fages, E.; Balart, R.; Fenollar, O.; Boronat, T.

    2010-06-01

    In the last years, a remarkable increase in the use of nanoparticles as fillers of polymer materials has been detected. It is mainly due to the excellent properties that these materials can provide when added to polymer matrices as a consequence of the high specific surface, so that, small additions can lead to a remarkable increase in overall properties. Small additions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a polypropylene matrix promote an increase in mechanical and thermal performance. Presence of CNTs leads to formation of interlock points with polypropylene chains and this has a positive effect on mechanical properties; thus an increase in elastic modulus and tensile strength are obtained for relatively small amounts of CNTs in the 1-3 wt.%. Regarding thermal properties, it is important to note that a remarkable increase of thermal stability is detected at medium temperatures (oxidation onset measured by differential scanning calorymetry) and high temperatures (degradation measured by thermogravymetric analysis). So, we can conclude that the use of small additions of CNTs is a useful technique to improve polypropylene performance from both technical and economical point of view since good balanced properties are obtained. Furthermore, the cost of these nanoparticles has decreased considerably in the last years and.

  19. Histologic evaluation of effectiveness of Enamel Matrix Derivative in surgical defect of sheep tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Nejad M.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: The aim of the present study was the histological evaluation of Enamel Matrix Derivative (EMD effectiveness for regeneration of periodontal defects. EMD activates cementum synthesis, PDL and bone during the maturation stage of follicole. In this research, EMD was used in surgical defects of premolar teeth in four adult sheep. Muccoperiosteal flap was reflected in buccal site of teeth. The buccal bone plate was removed from mesial to distal in 4 mm depth. After eliminating the cementum by bur and its etching, EMD was applied on exposed dentine and flap was sutured. In opposite sites of those teeth (control sites the same process was performed without etching. After 100 days, sheep were sacrificed and histological study through light microscopic was performed on black sections of operation sites. The results showed that in test sites, regeneration of cementum and bone was 62/5% and 42/5-50% respectively. But in control sites regeneration of cementum and bone was 37.5% and 32/5-42/5% respectively. Also the migration of junctional epithelium in control sites was 8-10% more than test sites. The important point is that in test sites, cementum was completely attached to undermining dentine. But, in control sites, the gap between cementum and dentine was visible. As a result, this study suggests that EMD promotes periodontal regeneration, and EMD application is a successful achievement in regenerative periodontal therapy.

  20. Effects of Mutations on Structure–Function Relationships of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warispreet Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 is one of the most widely studied enzymes involved in collagen degradation. Mutations of specific residues in the MMP-1 hemopexin-like (HPX domain have been shown to modulate activity of the MMP-1 catalytic (CAT domain. In order to reveal the structural and conformational effects of such mutations, a molecular dynamics (MD study was performed of in silico mutated residues in the X-ray crystallographic structure of MMP-1 complexed with a collagen-model triple-helical peptide (THP. The results indicate an important role of the mutated residues in MMP-1 interactions with the THP and communication between the CAT and the HPX domains. Each mutation has a distinct impact on the correlated motions in the MMP-1•THP. An increased collagenase activity corresponded to the appearance of a unique anti-correlated motion and decreased correlated motions, while decreased collagenase activity corresponded both to increased and decreased anti-correlated motions.

  1. Matrix Effects on the Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins under Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Podsędek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red cabbage is, among different vegetables, one of the major sources of anthocyanins. In the present study an in vitro digestion method has been used to assay the influence of the physiological conditions in the stomach and small intestine, as well as faecal microflora on anthocyanins stability in red cabbage and anthocyanin-rich extract. The recovery of anthocyanins during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was strongly influenced by food matrix. The results showed that other constituents present in cabbage enhanced the stability of anthocyanins during the digestion. The amount of anthocyanins (HPLC method and antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP assays strongly decreased after pancreatic-bile digestion in both matrices but total phenolics content (Folin-Ciocalteu assay in these digestions was higher than in initial samples. Incubation with human faecal microflora caused further decline in anthocyanins content. The results obtained suggest that intact anthocyanins in gastric and products of their decomposition in small and large intestine may be mainly responsible for the antioxidant activity and other physiological effects after consumption of red cabbage.

  2. Effects of Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size on the Performance of Stone Matrix Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the performance of hot mix asphalt (HMA in service life is closely related to a proper aggregate gradation. A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effects of nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS on the performance of stone matrix asphalt (SMA. The volumetric characteristics and performance properties obtained from wheel tracking tests, permeability test, beam bending test, contabro test are compared for SMA mixes with different NMAS. The results indicated that voids in mineral aggregate (VMA and voids filled with asphalt (VFA of SMA mixtures increased with a decrease of aggregate size in aggregate gradation. SMA30 had the lowest optimum asphalt content among all the mixtures. Increase of NMAS contributed to improvement of the rutting resistance of SMA mixtures. However, a decrease of NMAS showed better cracking and raveling resistance. Permeability rate of SMA was primarily affected by the air voids (AV and break point sieve, but was also sensitive to aggregate gradation to some extent, with reduced NMAS corresponding to less permeability rate. Based on the test results, SMA5 and SMA13 are suggested to be used as a water-proof layer in bridge deck pavement, and SMA20 and SMA30 are suggested to be used as binder course in asphalt pavement, which needs to possess superior rutting resistance at high temperature.

  3. Effects of SiC on Properties of Cu-SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, G. Celebi; Altinsoy, I.; Ipek, M.; Zeytin, S.; Bindal, C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper was focused on the effects of particle size and distribution on some properties of the SiC particle reinforced Cu composites. Copper powder produced by cementation method was reinforced with SiC particles having 1 and 30 μm particle size and sintered at 700 °C. SEM studies showed that SiC particles dispersed in copper matrix homogenously. The presence of Cu and SiC components in composites were verified by XRD analysis technique. The relative densities of Cu-SiC composites determined by Archimedes' principle are ranged from 96.2% to 90.9% for SiC with 1 μm particle size, 97.0 to 95.0 for SiC with 30 μm particle size. Measured hardness of sintered compacts varied from 130 to 155 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size, 188 to 229 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size. Maximum electrical conductivity of test materials was obtained as 80.0% IACS (International annealed copper standard) for SiC with 1 μm particle size and 83.0% IACS for SiC with 30 μm particle size.

  4. Elastase effect on the extracellular matrix of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kispert, J.; Mogayzel, P.J. Jr.; Pratt, C.A.; Toselli, P.; Wolfe, B.L.; Faris, B.; Franzblau, C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of porcine pancreatic elastase on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cell cultures was monitored both chemically and ultrastructurally. Initially, the elastin appeared as non-coalesced material closely associated with filaments, presumably microfibrils. The insoluble elastin accumulated in the ECM of cells in culture for 6 weeks accounted for 40-45% of the total protein. After exposure to elastase for 30-60 minutes, the elastin content was reduced to 14-20%. The reduction in the total protein content of the cultures after elastase treatment was due primarily to the loss of elastin. Although the amino acid compositions of the elastin isolated from cultures both before and after elastase treatment were similar, there were striking ultrastructural differences in the amorphous elastin. The elastin assumed a mottled appearance after elastase exposure, similar to that seen in in vivo emphysema models. Pulse experiments with 3 H-valine demonstrated an increase in protein synthesis by the cells 20 hours after elastase exposure, suggesting the potential for elastin repair. The use of this culture system will aid in clarifying the role of elastolysis in pulmonary and vascular injuries

  5. Thermal shock cycling effect on the mechanical behavior of epoxy matrix-woven flax fabric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, G. C.; Chalkias, D. A.; Koutsomitopoulou, A. F.

    2018-02-01

    Thermal fatigue occurs in many engineering constructions, made of polymeric composites, during several applications. Due to the structural heterogeneity of composite materials the fatigue damage after large cyclic temperature variation is complex. It is important to examine thermal fatigue, studying the parameters affecting the process and if possible, describe their effect through mathematical equations in order to predict the properties degradation of the fatigued composites. In the present investigation epoxy matrix-woven flax fabric composites were fabricated and subsequently submitted to thermal shock cycling. Next, their mechanical behavior was studied through quasi-static 3-point bending tests. Thermal shock cycling experiments, of a maximum number of 200 thermal cycles, were performed, each cycle consisted of a 10 minutes exposure of composite specimens in an oven at 50 °C, followed by an abrupt exposure of the same specimens in a freezer for another 10 minutes at -20 °C. From the entire study, it was found that there is a certain number of cycles above which damage increases rapidly, reaching a plateau where saturation of micro-damage is attained. Finally, it is worth to mentioning that all experimental results were accurately predicted by applying the RPM model (Residual Property Model), a semi-analytical predictive model developed by the corresponding author.

  6. Effect of kudiezi injection on stent thrombosis and matrix metalloproteinase in patients with PCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhihui; Zhang Jing; Xing Yue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Kudiezi injection on stent thrombosis and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) and thromboxane B 2 (TXB2) in elderly patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and investigate the mechanism of Kudiezi on the decrease of stent thrombosis. Methods: Forty elderly patients were divided into two groups (Kudiezi group and control group) after PCI. Kudiezi were administered into patients in Kudiezi group and the patients in control group were treated with regular medication. The angioraphic and clinic follow-up outcomes of 40 elderly patients with PCI there retrospectively analyze. Stent thrombosis (ST) was confirmed by angiography. The levels MMPs and TXB2 in Kudiezi group (n=20) and control group (n=20) were determined before stent implantation and after 6 months. Major cardiac events (restenosis, cardiac death, myocardiac infarction, revasculation) were observed during follow-up. Results: The levels of MMPs and TXB2 in Kudiezi and control group decreased significantly after PCI. The levels of MMPs and TXB2 in Kudiezi group were less than that in control group after PCI. The levels of MMPs and TXB 2 in all patients group were significantly different between pre-procedure and post-procedure (P 2 . (authors)

  7. Effect of enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) on bone defects in rabbit tibias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelini, Roberto; Scarano, Antonio; Piattelli, Maurizio; Andreana, Sebastiano; Covani, Ugo; Quaranta, Alessandro; Piattelli, Adriano

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain, Biora, AB, Malmö, Sweden) on bone healing. Ten New Zealand rabbits, weighing about 2.5 kg, were used. One 8-mm bone defect was created in each tibia. The defect on the right leg was filled with Emdogain, whereas the defect on the opposite leg was left unfilled as control. A total of 20 defects were created. Five rabbits each were killed at 4 and 8 weeks with an overdose of Tanax. Block sections containing the defects were retrieved and the specimens processed for light microscopy examination. The slides were stained with acid and basic fuchsin and toluidine blue. Histologically, no differences were noted in both groups at each observation period; in the test group, remnants of the implanted Emdogain were not present at 4 weeks. Newly formed bone was detectable in both groups at all observation times. At 8 weeks, both groups showed mature bone, and in the test group the material implanted was not visible. No inflammatory cells were visible in both groups. In conclusion, our results indicate that Emdogain implanted in bone defects is fully resorbed after 4 to 8 weeks and does not adversely affect bone formation.

  8. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in the Neurovascular Protective Effects of Angiotensin Antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauheed Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity have been identified as key mediators of early vascular damage after ischemic stroke. Somewhat surprisingly, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 blocker, candesartan, has been shown to acutely increase MMP activity while providing neurovascular protection. We aimed to determine the contribution of MMP and nitrative stress to the effects of angiotensin blockade in experimental stroke. Methods. Wistar rats (n = 9–14/group; a total of 99 were treated in a factorial design with candesartan 1 mg/kg IV, alone or in combination with either a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, FeTPPs, 30 mg/kg IP or GM6001 50 mg/kg IP (MMP inhibitor. Neurological deficit, infarct, size and hemorrhagic transformation (HT were measured after 3 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and 21 h of reperfusion. MMP activity and nitrotyrosine expression were also measured. Results. Candesartan reduced infarct size and HT when administered alone (P=0.0011 and in combination with FeTPPs (P=0.0016. GM6001 did not significantly affect HT when administered alone, but the combination with candesartan caused increased HT (P<0.0001 and worsened neurologic score (P=0.028. Conclusions. Acute administration of candesartan reduces injury after stroke despite increasing MMP activity, likely by an antioxidant mechanism.

  9. Matrix Effects on the Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins under Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsędek, Anna; Koziołkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Red cabbage is, among different vegetables, one of the major sources of anthocyanins. In the present study an in vitro digestion method has been used to assay the influence of the physiological conditions in the stomach and small intestine, as well as faecal microflora on anthocyanins stability in red cabbage and anthocyanin-rich extract. The recovery of anthocyanins during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was strongly influenced by food matrix. The results showed that other constituents present in cabbage enhanced the stability of anthocyanins during the digestion. The amount of anthocyanins (HPLC method) and antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP assays) strongly decreased after pancreatic-bile digestion in both matrices but total phenolics content (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) in these digestions was higher than in initial samples. Incubation with human faecal microflora caused further decline in anthocyanins content. The results obtained suggest that intact anthocyanins in gastric and products of their decomposition in small and large intestine may be mainly responsible for the antioxidant activity and other physiological effects after consumption of red cabbage. PMID:24575407

  10. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Groundwater temperature estimation and modeling using hydrogeophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, F.; Lesparre, N.; Hermans, T.; Dassargues, A.; Klepikova, M.; Kemna, A.; Caers, J.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater temperature may be of use as a state variable proxy for aquifer heat storage, highlighting preferential flow paths, or contaminant remediation monitoring. However, its estimation often relies on scarce temperature data collected in boreholes. Hydrogeophysical methods such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) may provide more exhaustive spatial information of the bulk properties of interest than samples from boreholes. If a properly calibrated DTS reading provides direct measurements of the groundwater temperature in the well, ERT requires one to determine the fractional change per degree Celsius. One advantage of this petrophysical relationship is its relative simplicity: the fractional change is often found to be around 0.02 per degree Celcius, and represents mainly the variation of electrical resistivity due to the viscosity effect. However, in presence of chemical and kinetics effects, the variation may also depend on the duration of the test and may neglect reactions occurring between the pore water and the solid matrix. Such effects are not expected to be important for low temperature systems (<30 °C), at least for short experiments. In this contribution, we use different field experiments under natural and forced flow conditions to review developments for the joint use of DTS and ERT to map and monitor the temperature distribution within aquifers, to characterize aquifers in terms of heterogeneity and to better understand processes. We show how temperature time-series measurements might be used to constraint the ERT inverse problem in space and time and how combined ERT-derived and DTS estimation of temperature may be used together with hydrogeological modeling to provide predictions of the groundwater temperature field.

  12. Effects of interface formation kinetics on the microstructural properties of wear-resistant metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilo, S.; Just, Ch.; Badisch, E.; Wosik, J.; Danninger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The dissolution reaction kinetics and the formation of intermediate layers of tungsten carbides in Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrices were studied in liquid-phase sintering with well-defined temperature/time relationship. → The internal intermediate layer formation, close to the original primary tungsten carbide showed diffusion-controlled kinetic (∼t 0.5 ), whereas the outside layer thickness formation, proportional to the processing time (∼t), was formed by the subsequent eutectic reaction of the Ni-(Cr)-B-Si matrix with the WC/W 2 C component. → Cr-addition in the matrix highly influences the inner layer thickness caused probably by increasing the C-diffusion rate, whereas the outer layer thickness was not dependent on the initial Cr-content in the matrix. Generally, the Cr-addition in the Ni-based matrix increased the hardness and elastic modulus of the intermediate phases along the carbide/matrix interface. → The different microstructure gradients are depended mainly on the interface growth kinetics. → The intermediate layers are hard phases (carbides, borides or carbo-borides). → The hardness of the carbide/matrix interface area is significantly lower as the hardness of the original primary tungsten carbides. - Abstract: Hard-particle metal-matrix composites (MMC) are generally used to increase the lifetime of machinery equipment exposed to severe wear conditions. Depending on the manufacturing technology, dissolution reactions of hard phases undergo different temperature/time profiles during processing affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of the MMCs. Therefore, quantification of the carbide dissolution effects on the microstructure and micro-mechanical properties is the key to success in the development and optimisation of MMCs. Dissolution kinetics of WC/W 2 C in Ni-based matrices were determined in the liquid-sintering with a well-defined temperature/time profile. Microscopic evaluation of the samples showed two

  13. Matrix effect in guava multiresidue analysis by QuEChERS method and gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Jhonyson Arruda Carvalho; Silva, Renata de Oliveira; Lima, Cleidiane Gomes; Milhome, Maria Aparecida Liberato; do Nascimento, Ronaldo Ferreira

    2016-05-15

    "Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe" (QuEChERS)-GC/MS analytical technique was used to evaluated matrix effect of twenty-two pesticides in guava. Validation parameters (selectivity, linearity, LOD, LOQ, accuracy and precision) were determined for multiresidue analysis. Statistical test (t-student) was applied to the coefficients of the curves obtained for the guava matrix. The matrix effect (ME) for each pesticide was evaluated through the study of slope ratios obtained of solvent and guava matrix curves. Most of the compounds had positive ME. The rates of recovery were satisfactory (73.97-119.38%), with a coefficient of variation (CV) less than 20%. Analysis of commercial guava samples showed the presence of 5 types of pesticides residues at levels ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mg·kg(-1). The results reveal the presence of unauthorized pesticides for cultivation of guava. This data can assist government agencies to ensure food security. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effectiveness of Matrix Treatment to Relapse prevention and Increase Self-Efficacy in People Withdrawing Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Ghasemnezhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the prevalence of narcotic substances and their effect on mental health of society people, it is important to pay attention the matter and adopt an approach for its treatment. The research objective is to examine the effectiveness of matrix treatment on prevent relapsing and increase self-efficacy in people withdrawing methamphetamine. In a quasi-experimental design, methamphetamine users who referred to addiction treatment centers on west of Gilanin 2015 and were eligible for involving criteria completed theself efficacy questionnaire. Then among those who got low scores on this questionnaire, there were randomly selected 30 patients that were divided into experimental and control groups (15 patients for each group. The experimental group was treated for 18 weeks and two sessions per week (36 sessions using matrix therapeutic model. The control group remained on waiting list. Both groups completed self-efficacy questionnaire at baseline, end and 90 days later (follow-up stage with urine test. The control group remained on waiting list and there were assigned only common drug treatment in the withdrawal centers. The research data was analyzed using covariance analysis and SPSS22 software. The results showed efficiency of matrix treatment method in preventing relapse and increasing self-efficacy for people withdrawal methamphetamine, which this difference was statistically significant (p<0.5. Matrix-based treatmentis effective for relapse prevention and increasing self-efficacy for people withdrawal methamphetamine.

  15. Investigation of cholesterol bias due to a matrix effect of external quality assurance samples: how true is your cholesterol method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Carel J; Klingberg, Sandra; Johnson, Leslie; Park, Rodney; Wilgen, Urs; Ungerer, Jacobus P J

    2012-11-01

    Comparability of cholesterol measurement is clinically required and external quality assurance (EQA) programmes are important to verify the trueness of routine methods. We developed a gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (GC-IDMS) total cholesterol assay to investigate the cause of a suspected matrix-related negative bias with the Beckman Coulter enzymatic method discovered in an EQA programme. The GC-IDMS method was calibrated with certified reference material and verified against a secondary reference method. Bias between the GC-IDMS and Beckman Coulter methods was estimated according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocol EP9-A2 with 40 clinical samples. At clinically important decision levels, no significant bias was demonstrated on patients' samples (all results within a ±3% limit). A matrix effect confined to the EQA material that affected the Beckman Coulter total cholesterol method was confirmed. The GC-IDMS method is suitable as a higher order total cholesterol method in a routine clinical laboratory. Matrix effects defeat the objectives of EQA schemes by preventing the verification of trueness. Given the importance of obtaining a true cholesterol result without systematic error, we recommend that EQA material without matrix effects should be used.

  16. Synergistic Effects of Physical Aging and Damage on Long-Term Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, L. Cate

    1999-01-01

    The research consisted of two major parts, first modeling and simulation of the combined effects of aging and damage on polymer composites and secondly an experimental phase examining composite response at elevated temperatures, again activating both aging and damage. For the simulation, a damage model for polymeric composite laminates operating at elevated temperatures was developed. Viscoelastic behavior of the material is accounted for via the correspondence principle and a variational approach is adopted to compute the temporal stresses within the laminate. Also, the effect of physical aging on ply level stress and on overall laminate behavior is included. An important feature of the model is that damage evolution predictions for viscoelastic laminates can be made. This allows us to track the mechanical response of the laminate up to large load levels though within the confines of linear viscoelastic constitutive behavior. An experimental investigation of microcracking and physical aging effects in polymer matrix composites was also pursued. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of aging on damage accumulation, in ten-ns of microcracking, and the impact of damage on aging and viscoelastic behavior. The testing was performed both at room and elevated temperatures on [+/- 45/903](sub s) and [02/903](sub s) laminates, both containing a set of 90 deg plies centrally located to facilitate investigation of microcracking. Edge replication and X-ray-radiography were utilized to quantify damage. Sequenced creep tests were performed to characterize viscoelastic and aging parameters. Results indicate that while the aging times studied have limited ]Influence on damage evolution, elevated temperature and viscoelastic effects have a profound effect on the damage mode seen. Some results are counterintuitive, including the lower strain to failure for elevated temperature tests and the catastrophic failure mode observed for the [+/- 45/9O3](sub s), specimens. The

  17. Effects of recharge and discharge on delta2H and delta18O composition and chloride concentration of high arsenic/fluoride groundwater from the Datong Basin, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Su, Chunli; Duan, Mengyu

    2013-02-01

    To better understand the effects of recharge and discharge on the hydrogeochemistry of high levels of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F) in groundwater, environmental isotopic composition (delta2H and delta18O) and chloride (Cl) concentrations were analyzed in 29 groundwater samples collected from the Datong Basin. High arsenic groundwater samples (As > 50 micog/L) were found to be enriched in lighter isotopic composition that ranged from -92 to -78 per thousand for deuterium (delta2H) and from -12.5 to -9.9 per thousand for oxygen-18 (delta18O). High F-containing groundwater (F > 1 mg/L) was relatively enriched in heavier isotopic composition and varied from -90 to -57 per thousand and from -12.2 to -6.7 per thousand for delta2H and delta18O, respectively. High chloride concentrations and delta18O values were primarily measured in groundwater samples from the northern and southwestern portions of the study area, indicating the effect of evaporation on groundwater. The observation of relatively homogenized and low delta18O values and chloride concentrations in groundwater samples from central part of the Datong Basin might be a result of fast recharge by irrigation returns, which suggests that irrigation using arsenic-contaminated groundwater affected the occurrence of high arsenic-containing groundwater in the basin.

  18. Fast methods for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wanzen; Baer, Roi; Saravanan, Chandra; Shao Yihan; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Fast and effective algorithms are discussed for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials. These algorithms lead to a significant speed-up in computer time by reducing the number of matrix multiplications required to roughly twice the square root of the degree of the polynomial. A few numerical tests are presented, showing that evaluation of matrix functions via polynomial expansions can be preferable when the matrix is sparse and these fast resummation algorithms are employed

  19. Effects of Resistance Training on Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Skeletal Muscles and Blood Circulation During Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo V. de Sousa Neto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex, multifactorial process characterized by the accumulation of deleterious effects, including biochemical adaptations of the extracellular matrix (ECM. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 12 weeks of resistance training (RT on metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 activity in skeletal muscles and, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the blood circulation of young and old rats. Twenty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 7 per group: young sedentary (YS; young trained (YT, old sedentary (OS, and old trained (OT. The stair climbing RT consisted of one training session every 2 other day, with 8–12 dynamic movements per climb. The animals were euthanized 48 h after the end of the experimental period. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was measured by zymography. There was higher active MMP-2 activity in the lateral gastrocnemius and flexor digitorum profundus muscles in the OT group when compared to the OS, YS, and YT groups (p ≤ 0.001. Moreover, there was higher active MMP-2 activity in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in the OT group when compared to the YS and YT groups (p ≤ 0.001. The YS group presented lower active MMP-2 activity in the soleus muscle than the YT, OS, OT groups (p ≤ 0.001. With respect to active MMP-2/9 activity in the bloodstream, the OT group displayed significantly reduced activity (p ≤ 0.001 when compared to YS and YT groups. In conclusion, RT up-regulates MMP-2 activity in aging muscles, while down-regulating MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the blood circulation, suggesting that it may be a useful tool for the maintenance of ECM remodeling.

  20. Ground-water flow and simulated effects of development in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River in Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, David E.; Herman, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model was used to characterize ground-water