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Sample records for groundnut complementary foods

  1. Production of maize-bambara groundnut complementary foods fortified pre-fermentation with processed foods rich in calcium, iron, zinc and provitamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvere, Peter O; Onyekwere, Eucharia U; Ngoddy, Patrick O

    2010-03-15

    Maize-bambara groundnut complementary foods are deficient in calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin A. Food-to-food fortification could be cheaper, safer and more easily adopted by local communities compared to the use of chemically pure compounds and vitamins to enrich such foods. Maize-bambara groundnut complementary foods fortified for iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin A by blending with a multi-mix (1.41:1:2.25, w/w) of processed roselle calyces, cattle bones, and red palm oil in a 1:2.1 (w/w) ratio showed significant increases in calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin A contents of 3.26-4.225, 0.083-0.134 and 0.015-0.017 g kg(-1) and 4855.3-7493.7 microgRE kg(-1), respectively. The maize-bambara groundnut foods had calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin A contents that satisfy the proposed nutrient requirements for infants. Only the maize-bambara groundnut and maize-bambara groundnut malt fermented by backslopping [(MB)(b) and (MB(m))(b)] containing red palm oil emulsified with Brachystegia eurycoma had calcium contents significantly (P < 0.05) higher than Nutrend, a complementary food produced by Nestle (Nigeria) PLC. These products are from raw materials produced in commercial quantities by rural farmers using household level technologies which the rural and urban poor can more easily access in order to reduce micronutrient malnutrition.

  2. Health promoting properties of Alternanthera brasiliana leaves and Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces used in fortification of maize-bambara groundnut malt and maize-cowpea malt complementary foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attaugwu, R.N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the chemical and antioxidant properties of Alternanthera brasiliana leaves and Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces used in iron and zinc fortification of maizebambara groundnut malt and maize-cowpea malt complementary foods. A. brasiliana leaves and H. sabdariffa calyces were freshly harvested, dried at 50oC for 48 hours and analyzed for the relevant chemical components and antioxidant activities. The vitamin A content was 6996 and 745.6 μgRE/kg while the vitamin C was 238.26 and 294.78 mg/kg respectively. The aqueous extracts of A. brasiliana and H. sabdariffa calyces contained 509.5 mg/kg and 5234.72 mg/kg of alkaloids, 1545 mg/kg and 384 mg/kg of anthocyanins, 767.3 and 235.83 mg/kg of carotenoids, 14,702.8 and 26,428.3 mg/kg of phenols, 1043.5 and 897.63 mg/kg steroids and 462.0 mg/kg and 1006.5 mg/kg of flavonoids respectively. A. brasiliana and H. sabdariffa extracts had concentration-dependent DPPH activity with IC50 of 1.76 mg/ml and 5.745 mg/ml, nitric oxide scavenging activity with IC50 of 0.675 mg/ml and 3.976 mg/ml while the ferric reducing power had an absorbance range of 0.5 – 0.982 and 0.959 – 0.986 respectively. The study revealed that A.brasiliana leaves and H. sabdariffa calyces contain components that will impact positively on the health of the infants when used to formulate complementary foods.

  3. Home-based practices of complementary foods improvement are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items related to the early and current breastfeeding patterns and the mode of complementary feeding were recorded by interview of the mothers. Fortified cereals were defined as home-based improved flours by mixing “soumbala,” fishmeal, toasted groundnut, or several of these local foods with cereal. Soumbala is a ...

  4. Nematode parasites of groundnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundnut is the common name for several leguminous plant species producing seed that mature underground, including Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean), Hausa groundnut (Macrotyloma geocarpum), and peanut (Arachis spp.). Hausa groundnut is cultivated as a food crop primarily in West Africa and t...

  5. BASED COMPLEMENTARY FOODS USING GERMINAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-08-08

    Aug 8, 2010 ... Malnutrition affects physical growth, morbidity, mortality, cognitive development, reproduction, and ... malnutrition. Development of complementary foods is guided by nutritional value, acceptability, availability and affordability of raw materials, and simplicity of food processing ... (Memmert, Germany) at 55. 0.

  6. Consumer awareness and acceptability of bambara groundnut as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adewumi Toyin Oyeyinka

    willingness to use the bambara groundnut in complementary feeding if it was accessible, affordable, and beneficial to health. Conclusion:Bambara ... major cause of deaths in children globally1 and is a concern in most developing ... nutritional status of infants and children.12 Animal food sources, which are expensive, are ...

  7. Aspergillus and aflatoxin in groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) and groundnut cake in Eastern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important cash and food crop in eastern Ethiopia. The lack of awareness and data on Aspergillus and aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and groundnut food products in the area are lacking. Therefore, this study was conducted to: i) assess major Aspergillus spec...

  8. FORMULATION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOOD USING AMARANTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsigereda

    complementary food is composed of starchy cereals (maize, sorghum, teff), tubers and/or root crops (enset, potatoes, sweet potatoes). These are sources of non-heme iron which is affected by phytate. Sources of heme iron and of the meat-fish-poultry factor that improves iron absorption are from meat only. Despite a large ...

  9. Sweet potato-based complementary food for infants in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagloh, Francis Kweku; Hardacre, Allan; Mutukumira, Anthony N; Weber, Janet L; Brough, Louise; Coad, Jane

    2012-03-01

    In low-income countries, most infants are given cereal-based complementary foods prepared at the household level. Such foods are high in phytate, which limits the bioavailability of nutrients, including iron, calcium, zinc, and in some cases proteins, which are crucial to the development of infants. To compare the levels of macronutrients (protein, fat, and carbohydrate), gross energy, and fructose in sweet potato-based (denoted ComFa) formulations and enriched Weanimix (dehulled maize-dehulled soybean-groundnut blend with fish powder and sugar incorporated). The phytate level was also compared. A composite flour of sweet potato and soybeans containing fish powder was processed by oven toasting as a home-based complementary food. Another blend containing skim milk powder was processed by extrusion cooking or roller drying as industrial-based prototypes. The macronutrient composition and the levels of fructose and phytate were determined in the ComFa formulations and enriched Weanimix. The ComFa formulations and the enriched Weanimix met the stipulated values in the Codex Alimentarius Commission standard for energy (400 kcal/100 g), protein (15 g/100 g), and fat (10 to 25 g/100 g) for complementary food, with the exception of the industrial-based ComFa formulations, which satisfied 83% of the protein requirement (15 g/100 g). The ComFa formulations had a quarter of the phytate level of enriched Weanimix. The fructose level in the sweet potato-based complementary foods was more than five times that in enriched Weanimix. The sweet potato-based formulations were superior to enriched Weanimix as complementary foods for infants in low-income countries, based on the fructose (which makes the porridge naturally sweet) and phytate levels.

  10. Orange-fleshed sweet potato-based infant food is a better source of dietary vitamin A than a maize-legume blend as complementary food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagloh, Francis Kweku; Coad, Jane

    2014-03-01

    White maize, which is widely used for complementary feeding and is seldom fortified at the household level, may be associated with the high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency among infants in low-income countries. The nutrient composition of complementary foods based on orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and cream-fleshed sweet potato (CFSP), maize-soybean-groundnut (Weanimix), and a proprietary wheat-based infant cereal (Nestlé Cerelac) were assessed using the Codex Standard (CODEX STAN 074-1981, Rev. 1-2006) specification as a reference. Additionally, the costs of OFSP complementary food, CFSP complementary food, and Weanimix production at the household level were estimated. Phytate and polyphenols, which limit the bioavailability of micronutrients, were assessed. Energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients listed as essential composition in the Codex Standard were determined and expressed as energy or nutrient density. All the formulations met the stipulated energy and nutrient densities as specified in the Codex Standard. The beta-carotene content of OFSP complementary food exceeded the vitamin A specification (60 to 180 microg retinol activity equivalents/100 kcal). All the formulations except Weanimix contained measurable amounts of ascorbic acid (> or = 32.0 mg/100 g). The level of phytate in Weanimix was highest, about twice that of OFSP complementary food. The sweet potato-based foods contained about twice as much total polyphenols as the cereal-based products. The estimated production cost of OFSP complementary food was slightly higher (1.5 times) than that of Weanimix. OFSP complementary food is a good source of beta-carotene and would therefore contribute to the vitamin A requirements of infants. Both OFSP complementary food and Weanimix may inhibit iron absorption because of their high levels of polyphenols and phytate, respectively, compared with those of Nestlé Cerelac.

  11. Biodiverse food solutions to enhance complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen; Parlesak, Alexandr; Greiner, Ted

    2016-01-01

    that lipidbased nutrient supplements (LNS) and ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) may thus be ineffective, de Pee advocates research to improve compliance, assuming effectiveness has been demonstrated. We highlight four additional problems: inappropriateness, cost, lack of sustainability and potential adverse...... effects. In conclusion, all UN agencies have joint responsibility to help Member States achieve their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which create the opportunity to link sustainability and dietary diversity. The Convention on Biological Diversity (WHO 2015) illustrates how dietary diversity can...... help combat global malnutrition by using practical solutions that can be rolled out as public health strategies. Culturally-sensitive, cost-effective, sustainable complementary foods have the potential to increase nutrition security and sovereignty, reduce poverty, hunger and levels of chronic...

  12. Adoption of Enriched Local Complementary Food in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locally processed complementary foods, appropriately enriched can complement breast milk and traditional foods during the nutritionally vulnerable periods of a child life. The study therefore examines the adoption of enriched local complementary foods in Osun State Nigeria. Structured interview schedule was used to ...

  13. Acceptance of a complementary food prepared with yellow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-13

    Jun 13, 2014 ... Keywords: provitamin A-biofortified maize, vitamin A deficiency, complementary feeding, consumer acceptance. Acceptance of a complementary food prepared with yellow, provitamin ..... maize is of better quality, subsequently overshadowing that of yellow maize. Nutrition education on the health benefits of.

  14. Crayfish-Bambara Groundnut W

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    days with Nutrend (a commercial weaning food used as reference diet) and processed sweet potato-crayfish- soyabean/bambara ... The results obtained with diet 3 (sweat potato – bambara groundnut mixture) and diet 5 (sweat potato – soya bean mixture) ..... sensitivities of muscle (e.g. heart muscle) and liver tissues to the ...

  15. Selection of complementary foods based on optimal nutritional values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Partho; Mardinogulu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    ), riboflavin (similar to[4-10] folds) and ascorbic acid (foods were markedly lower. In order to extend the search for foods that includes similar dietary constituents as human milk, we designed a strategy of screening 8654 foods. 12 foods were identified and these foods......Human milk is beneficial for growth and development of infants. Several factors result in mothers ceasing breastfeeding which leads to introduction of breast-milk substitutes (BMS). In some communities traditional foods are given as BMS, in others they are given as complementary foods during...... weaning. Improper food selection at this stage is associated with a high prevalence of malnutrition in children under 5 years. Here we listed the traditional foods from four continents and compared them with human milk based on their dietary contents. Vitamins such as thiamine (similar to[2-10] folds...

  16. Nutrient composition of Cirina forda (Westwood)-enriched complementary foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Oladejo Thomas; Daboh, Oladele Olatunji

    2013-01-01

    Dried Cirina forda (Westwood) larva is widely marketed, cheap, and commonly consumed in Southwestern Nigeria. Its powder was used in enriching two commonly used complementary food staples (maize and sorghum) as a source of protein and essential micronutrients in complementary foods for infants and young children. Samples of soaked and dried sorghum and maize flours and C. forda powder were prepared, and C. forda powder was added to the dried soaked maize and sorghum flours at 5, 10, and 15% (w/w) inclusion levels and analyzed for proximate, mineral, and antinutrient compositions using standard methods of AOAC. One hundred grams of C. forda larva contained 52.6 g of protein, 16.8 g of lipids, 2.6 g of ash, 268.67 mg of calcium, 5.64 mg of iron, and 15.00 mg of zinc, and yielded 458.40 kcal energy with 4.40 mg of trypsin inhibitor. Sorghum and maize flours contained 9.2 and 8.3 g of protein, respectively. Addition of C. forda at 5, 10, and 15% levels to fermented sorghum and maize flours significantly increased both micro- and macronutrients of the complementary foods (p iron, and zinc in formulating nutrient-dense complementary foods. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Chemical, sensory and rheological properties of porridges from processed sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnam, N M

    2001-01-01

    The chemical, sensory and rheological properties of porridges made from blends of sprouted sorghum, bambara groundnuts and fermented sweet potatoes were examined. Sorghum and bambara groundnuts were sprouted for 48 h while sweet potatoes were fermented for the same period. Blends were formulated from the processed ingredients in the ratio of 60:40:0, 57:42:1, 55:44:1 and 52:46:2 (protein basis) of sorghum, bambara groundnuts and sweet potatoes. Porridges were prepared from the composite flours and the traditional sorghum complementary food. Standard assay methods were used to evaluate the flours for nutrient composition. The porridges were also tested for sensory properties and viscosity. Processing increased the levels of most of the nutrients evaluated. Relative to the sorghum traditional complementary food, the composite flours had higher levels of lipids, protein, ash, crude fiber and minerals (p < 0.05). The porridges from the composite flours were generally liked slightly by the panelists and were about seven times less viscous than the porridge from the traditional sorghum complementary food. Use of the composite flours, particularly the 52:46:2 blend, as a traditional complementary food should be encouraged in Nigeria especially with the increasing cost of commercial complementary foods.

  18. A DIFFERENTIATED APPROACH TO THE INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY BABY FOOD

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    E. I. Kondrat'eva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions of organization of rational feeding of children in the first year of life with the use of industrial production of weaning foods are discussed. The article provides guidance on the timing and sequence of the introduction of complementary baby food in healthy children and children with alimentary disorders. The sequence of individual products and administration of individual meals depends on the health status, nutritional status of the child and the state of his digestive system. In the diet of the child should be used food and meals of industrial production, made of raw materials of high quality which meet the stringent hygienic requirements for safety parameters and have guaranteed by chemical composition. The article presents data on practical advice on the introduction of feeding in the Centre of breast feeding support and management of Tomsk.

  19. Development of fortified dried broken rice as a complementary food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitpan, Monthana; Chavasit, Visith; Kongkachuichai, Ratchanee

    2005-12-01

    Commercially produced dried broken rice is widely used to prepare complementary foods for Thai infants, and it is both convenient and acceptable to persons from all socioeconomic classes. However, inadequate levels of calcium, iron, thiamine, and folate are common in complementary foods for breastfed infants. We developed dried broken rice fortified with these nutrients at levels recommended by the 2001 guidelines of the World Health Organization. The fortification process involved predrying broken rice at 90 degrees C for 1 hour, soaking in a nutrient solution (2:1 ratio of rice to solution), and drying at 70 degrees C for 1 hour and 50 minutes. Calcium lactate or calcium lactate gluconate was the calcium source, and ferrous sulfate, ferrous lactate, or ferric sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) was the iron source. The vitamin sources were thiamine hydrochloride and folic acid. The product contained 40 mg of calcium, 5.3 mg of iron, 0.08 mg of thiamine, and 11 microg of folate per 20-g serving. Approximately 5% and 10% of calcium and iron, respectively, were lost during processing, with a thiamine loss of approximately 13%, and a folate loss ranging from 17% to 23%. The thiamine loss during accelerated storage (42 degrees C for three months) was not significant (p > .05). NaFeEDTA was the most appropriate iron fortificant because it provided prolonged product stability and high in vitro dialyzability.

  20. PRODUCTION ANALYSIS OF GROUNDNUT, ( ARACHIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production analysis of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) was carried out in Ezeagu local government Area of Enugu State. This was done by randomly sampling 105 groundnut farmers from seven autonomous communities in the local government area. The overall aim was to determine, specifically the profitability of groundnut ...

  1. Studies on the production of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) tempe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, E N; Uneze, R; Barimalaa, I S; Achinewhu, S C

    1999-01-01

    Bambara groundnut, an indigenous African legume, was subjected to fermentation by three strains of Rhizopus. One strain B. arrhizus could not ferment the substrate. Mycelial penetration and binding was good when strains NRRL 2710 (R. oligosporus) and NRRL 1477 (R. stolonifer) were used. Fermentation by both strains resulted in increases of pH, moisture, protein and fat while total carbohydrate decreased by 50%. Sensory evaluation showed that bambara groundnut tempes rated similar (p>0.5) in taste and texture and higher (p<0.05) in color and flavor than soybean tempe. Bambara groundnut would be an acceptable food product in the diet as a good protein supplement.

  2. Effects of animal source food and micronutrient fortification in complementary food products on body composition, iron status, and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Jutta Kloppenborg Heick; Touch, Bunthang; Chhoun, Chamnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor nutritional quality of complementary foods often limits growth. Animal source foods, such as milk or meat, are often unaffordable. Local affordable alternatives are needed. Objective: We evaluate the efficacy of 2 newly developed, rice-based complementary food products: WinFood (WF...... foods. The dietary role of edible spiders needs to be further explored. This trial was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN19918531....

  3. Nutrient Adequacy of Complementary Foods Fed to Infants 6-24 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the nutrient adequacy of complementary foods fed to children in Osun State, Nigeria. Method: A cross sectional study was carried out to investigate the nutrient content of complementary foods in Osun State. Stratified random sampling procedure was used to select 299 mothers with children between ...

  4. INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS AND FOOD ALLERGIES: NEW STUDIES AND MODERN CLINICAL GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted  to the issues  of introducing  complementary  foods  as prevention  of atopy  and diet therapy in children with food allergy. Food sensibilization,  as a rule, is the initial link of allergy manifestations.  It represents  the first step of the so-called atopic  march,  followed  by  possible  development  of more  severe,  including  respiratory,  manifestations.  Considering  the  fact  that allergic diseases  are currently one of the most common pathologies with a growing tendency,  the correct choice of foods and the timely introduction of complementary foods are relevant, especially for children with hereditary tainted allergies. These products should be as safe as possible, should not cause sensibilization and at the same time should provide the child with the necessary macroand micronutrients. The publication provides an overview of the most relevant studies conducted in this field as well as a modern approach based on evidence-based  medicine and presented in the clinical guidelines on food allergy in children developed and approved by the professional association «Union of Pediatricians of Russia».

  5. Consumer awareness and acceptability of bambara groundnut as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the consumer awareness and acceptability of bambara groundnut as a protein source and to assess its potential for use in complementary feeding. Design: Cross-sectional study using a mixed-methods approach. Setting: The study took place at Gcumisa Clinic located at Swayimane, uMshwathi ...

  6. Possibilities of dietary diversification of complementary foods in children with a family history of allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zavyalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experience of complementary feeding in children with manifestations of food allergy. The 4-day food rotation diet proposed by a group of authors from the Children’s Health Research Center (2009 for children 3 years of age and older has been used. The diet has been modified for babies of the first year of life who have manifestations of polyvalent food allergy, which could maximally extend the range of foods and minimize the clinical manifestations of food allergy.It is concluded that to diversify the range of complementary foods, it is appropriate to use the 4-day food rotation diet designed by a group of authors from the Children’s Health Research Center; the first complementary foods should include specialized commercial infant formulas proven to be hypoallergenic.

  7. Assessment of Adoption Gaps in Management of Aflatoxin Contamination of Groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G. D. S.; Popat, M. N.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major impediments for diversification of groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.) as food crop is aflatoxin contamination. The study was conducted with an objective to assess the adoption gaps in aflatoxin management practices of groundnut (AMPG) and the farmer's characteristics influencing these gaps. The study used an expost-facto…

  8. Young children feeding and Zinc levels of complementary foods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition among young children in Cameroon starts during complementary feeding or the transition period. Last nutritional surveys indicated high prevalence of protein energy malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia and Vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6 to 59 months. No data on appropriate feeding and zinc content in ...

  9. Acceptability of Complementary Foods That Incorporate Moringa oleifera Leaf Powder Among Infants and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Laurene; Nyarko, Ruth; Asante, Matilda; Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda

    2018-03-01

    Moringa oleifera leaf powder (MLP) is a nutrient-rich and readily available food resource that has the potential to improve the micronutrient quality of complementary foods in developing countries. To investigate the acceptability of complementary foods fortified with MLP. Moringa oleifera leaf powder was fed to infants either as part of a cereal-legume complementary food blend (MCL-35 g) or by sprinkling as a food supplement (MS-5 g) on infant's usual foods. Mother-infant pairs (n = 18 for the MCL-35 g group and n = 16 for the MS-5 g group) attending regular weight monitoring sessions were recruited to participate in the acceptability trial. The study consisted of an initial tasting session after which mothers were to feed the assigned foods to their infants for 14 days. Mothers rated color, odor, taste, and overall liking of the complementary foods using a 5-point hedonic scale. Primary outcome was the proportion of test porridge consumed. On the tasting day, MCL-35 g group infants consumed an average of 64.27% ± 25.02 of the test porridge offered, whereas MS-5 g group infants consumed an average of 66.43% ± 29.09. During the 14-day period, median percent daily consumption for MCL-35 g was 71.5% of the daily recommended intake, whereas median percent daily consumption for MS-5 g was 86.2%. We conclude that complementary foods incorporating Moringa oleifera leaf powder either as part of a cereal-legume complementary food blend (MCL-35 g) or when sprinkled as a food supplement (MS-5 g) on infant's usual foods were well accepted.

  10. Timing of introduction of complementary food: short- and long-term health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyrembel, Hildegard

    2012-01-01

    Complementary food is needed when breast milk (or infant formula) alone is no longer sufficient for both nutritional and developmental reasons. The timing of its introduction, therefore, is an individual decision, although 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding can be recommended for most healthy term infants. The new foods are intended to 'complement' ongoing breastfeeding with those dietary items whose intake has become marginal or insufficient. Both breastfeeding and complementary feeding can have direct or later consequences on health. The evaluation of consequences of both early and late introduction of complementary food can neither disregard the effect of breastfeeding compared to formula feeding nor the composition or quality of the complementary food. Possible short-term health effects concern growth velocity and infections, and possible long-term effects may relate to atopic diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, obesity and neuromuscular development. On the basis of the currently available evidence, it is impossible to exactly determine the age when risks related to the start of complementary feeding are lowest or highest for most of these effects, with the possible exception of infections and early growth velocity. The present knowledge on undesirable health effects, however, is mainly based on observational studies, and although some mechanisms have been proposed, further prospective studies have to clarify these unsolved issues. Even less evidence on the consequences of the timing of complementary food introduction is available for formula-fed infants. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Role of Complementary Food Products in Formation of the Proper Eating Behavior in Infants

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    N. M. Bogdanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation results of an impact of various patterns of the introduction of complementary food products on the eating behavior formation, motor function of the gastrointestinal tract and nutritional status of infants are presented. 50 children of the main group received the manufactured complementary food, 46 children of the control group were fed by home-made products. Children in groups were matched by sex, age, and weight-height criteria. The criteria for tolerance of the introduced products were appetite changes, refusal to eat the product, condition of the skin and visible mucous membranes, occurrence or worsening of posseting, colics, flatulence, changes in frequency and consistency of the stool. The period of adaptation to the introduced complementary food products ran within normal findings in most children of both groups. It is shown that the use of the manufactured content-balanced complementary food, as well as the optimal algorithm of their introduction ensure the «levelling» of indices of children's condition of flesh. In addition, by the end of the third month of receiving complementary food products almost all existing syndromes of functional disorders of the digestive system were completely arrested, except for posseting syndrome. The introduction of the studied complementary food products reduced more than twofold the incidence of this syndrome. Food intolerance reactions occurred with almost equal frequency in children of both groups, but they were lighter in the main group. Thus, the use of the studied complementary products in the food ration of infants provides the «leveling» of indices of condition of flesh, normalization of the gastrointestinal tract functions, allows to create the proper eating behavior and reduces the risk of intestinal tract colonization by pathological species of microorganisms.

  12. Screening for anti-nutritional compounds in complementary foods and food aid products for infants and young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Nanna; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Sørensen, Hilmer

    2013-01-01

    -nutrient exposure in Europe. Contents of minerals (iron, zinc and calcium), in which absorption or utilisation is affected by anti-nutrients, were analysed. Thirty-six products representing foods used in food aid programmes, local blended foods, fortified instant porridges and 'baby foods' were analysed......A range of compounds with negative nutritional impact - 'anti-nutrients' - are found in most plant foods. The contents of anti-nutrients in processed foods depend on the ingredients and processing. Anti-nutrients in complementary foods for children can have a negative impact on nutritional status....... The aim of this study was to screen complementary foods from developing countries for the anti-nutritional compounds, phytate, polyphenols, inhibitors of trypsin and chymotrypsin, and lectins. Commercial products based on whole grain cereals were included as a 'worst-case' scenario for anti...

  13. Complementary Foods and Flavor Experiences: Setting the Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Mennella, Julie A.; Trabulsi, Jillian C.

    2012-01-01

    Increased fruit and vegetable consumption early in life may lead to life-long intake of fruits and vegetables, which in turn may be beneficial for weight control and other health outcomes in later life. Although health officials worldwide recommend delaying solid foods until 6 months of age, younger infants often receive solid food, which may affect later obesity rates. The timing of introduction to solid foods is important both nutritionally and developmentally and may affect acceptance of f...

  14. Fortified complementary foods with or without alpha-amylase treatment increase hemoglobin but do not reduce breast milk intake of 9-mo-old Zambian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owino, Victor O; Kasonka, Lackson M; Sinkala, Moses M; Wells, Jonathan K; Eaton, Simon; Darch, Tegan; Coward, Andrew; Tomkins, Andrew M; Filteau, Suzanne M

    2007-10-01

    Malnutrition in late infancy in developing countries may result from poor-quality complementary foods that displace breast milk. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of fortified complementary blends of different energy densities on growth, hemoglobin concentrations, and breast milk intake of 9-mo-old Zambian infants. Infants were randomly assigned at 6 mo of age to receive for 3 mo a fortified blend of maize, beans, bambaranuts, and groundnuts [Chilenje Baby Mix (CBM); energy density: 68 kcal/100 g; n = 37] or a similar blend with alpha-amylase (CBMA; energy density: 106 kcal/100 g; n = 44). Cross-sectional data were obtained at 9 mo for a control group of infants (n = 69) not given the diets. Breast milk intake was measured by using the dose-to-the-mother deuterium dilution technique. No differences in weight or length z scores, all of which were within normal ranges, were seen between groups at 9 mo. Percentage fat mass was significantly (P = 0.01) greater in the infants in both the CBM (23.2 +/- 2.7%) and CBMA (23.4 +/- 2.5%) groups than in the control group (21.6 +/- 2.6%). Hemoglobin concentrations were significantly (P = 0.03) greater in both intervention groups (CBM group: 104 +/- 12 g/L: CBMA group: 103 +/- 12 g/L) than in the control group (98 +/- 14 g/L). Breast milk intake was not significantly (P = 0.87) different between groups (CBM group: 614 +/- 271 g/d; CBMA group: 635 +/- 193 g/d; control group: 653 +/- 221 g/d). The study foods improved hemoglobin concentrations without reducing breast milk intake and may be used to improve the nutritional status of infants in developing countries.

  15. Escherichia coli contamination of child complementary foods and association with domestic hygiene in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Sarker Masud; Kwong, Laura; Rahman, Musarrat Jabeen; Ercumen, Ayse; Pickering, Amy J; Ghosh, Probir K; Rahman, Md Zahidur; Das, Kishor Kumar; Luby, Stephen P; Unicomb, Leanne

    2017-05-01

    To determine the frequency and concentration of Escherichia coli in child complementary food and its association with domestic hygiene practices in rural Bangladesh. A total of 608 households with children 4 h (APR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5, 4.2), in compounds where water was unavailable in the food preparation area (APR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.6, 4.2), where ≥1 fly was captured in the food preparation area (APR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.6), or where the ambient temperature was high (>25-40 °C) in the food storage area (APR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 4.4). Interventions to keep stored food covered and ensure water availability in the food preparation area would be expected to reduce faecal contamination of complementary foods. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pregravid body mass index is associated with early introduction of complementary foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ushma J; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy H; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether women who entered pregnancy overweight or obese were less likely to follow American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for introducing complementary foods to infants after 4 months of age. In addition, we explored whether psychological factors accounted for any of the effect of pregravid body mass index on age of complementary food introduction. A prospective cohort study from 2001 to 2005 that recruited pregnant women between 15 to 20 gestational weeks with follow-up through 12 months postpartum from University of North Carolina hospitals (n=550). Multinomial models were used to estimate relative risk ratios. The outcome was age of complementary food introduction, categorized as younger than 4 months of age, 4 to 6 months, and 6 months or later (referent). Maternal body mass index was categorized as underweight (psychological factors measured during pregnancy (depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety). More than a third of the study population (35.7% of 550) entered pregnancy overweight/obese. The majority of participants (75.3%) introduced foods to their infants between 4 and 6 months of age. Compared with normal-weight women, those who were overweight/obese before pregnancy were more likely (relative risk ratios=2.22 [95% CI 1.23 to 4.01]) to introduce complementary foods before the infant was 4 months old, adjusting for race, education, and poverty status. Depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety did not account for any of the effect of pregravid overweight/obesity on early food introduction. The results suggest that overweight and obese women are more likely to introduce complementary foods early and that psychological factors during pregnancy do not influence this relationship. Future studies need to explore why overweight/obese women are less likely to meet the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for the introduction of complementary food. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Knowledge about food classification systems and value attributes provides insight for understanding complementary food choices in Mexican working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Oliveros, Maria Guadalupe; Bisogni, Carole A; Frongillo, Edward A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about mothers' perceptions of food classification and values about complementary feeding is necessary for designing educational and food supply interventions targeted to young children. To determine classification, attributes, and consumption/preparation routines of key complementary foods, 44 mothers of children foods, we conducted free-listings, pile-sort, and food attributes exercises. Hierarchical clustering showed that mothers identified nine classes of key foods, including milk derivatives, complements, junk food, infant products, chicken parts, and other meats. From multidimensional scaling, mothers used three primary classification systems: food groups, food introduction stages, and food processing. Secondary classification systems were healthy-junk, heavy-light, hot-cold, good-bad fat, and main dish-complement. Child health and nutrition, particularly vitamin content, were salient attributes. Fruits and vegetables were preferred for initiating complementary feeding on the second month of age. Consumption of guava, mango, and legumes, however, was associated with digestive problems (empacho). Red meats were viewed as cold-type, heavy, and hard, not suitable for young children, but right for toddlers. Chicken liver was considered nutritious but dirty and bitter. Egg and fish were viewed as a vitamin source but potentially allergenic. Mothers valued vitamin content, flavor, and convenience of processed foods, but some were suspicious about expiration date, chemical and excessive sugar content and overall safety of these foods. Mothers' perceptions and values may differ from those of nutritionists and program designers, and should be addressed when promoting opportune introduction of complementary foods in social programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MODERN COMPLEMENTARY FOODS IN THE PREVENTION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES: PROSPECTIVE STUDY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. E. Borovik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rate allergenic properties of the complementary food line based on grains, fruits/vegetables and meat in the diet of infants (0–1 years old. Methods: The study included children aged 4–6 months with natural, mixed or artificial feeding, who had not received any complementary food before. The children were almost healthy or had a burdened allergic history. Complementary foods (porridge, vegetable puree, meat puree and fruit puree were administered basing on an individual plan depending on age, nutritional status and nature of feces. Tolerability of products and dynamics of mass-height and laboratory parameters were evaluated. At the beginning and at the end of the study, capillary blood was taken to determine the content of hemoglobin in red blood cells (MCH, the equivalent of hemoglobin in reticulocytes (RetHe, iron, ferritin, prealbumin, and specific E class immunoglobulin (IgE to the proteins in cow's and goat milk, apples, pears, prunes, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, rice, maize, buckwheat, turkey meat, and rabbit meat (quantitative allergy diagnostics using an express method. In addition, a scatological study was performed. Results: 60 healthy children received complementary foods based on grains, fruits/vegetables and meat on a step-by-step basis. The level of specific IgE to food allergens in all children under the study was within normal range (0–135 IU/ml both initially and after the administration of all the complementary foods studied. Conclusion: The investigated complementary foods have a low sensitizing potential, including in children with a burdened allergic history. This allows us to describe them as hypoallergenic products.

  19. Household-level technologies to improve the availability and preparation of adequate and safe complementary foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Patience; Tomkins, Andrew

    2003-03-01

    Plant-based complementary foods are the main source of nutrients for many young children in developing countries. They may, however, present problems in providing nutritionally adequate and safe diets for older infants and young children. The high starch content leads to low-nutrient diets that are bulky and dense, with high levels of antinutritive factors such as phytates, tannins, lectins, and enzyme inhibitors. Phytates impair mineral bioavailability, lectins interfere with intestinal structure, and enzyme inhibitors inhibit digestive enzymes. In addition, there is often microbial contamination, which leads to diarrhea, growth-faltering, and impaired development, and the presence of chemical contaminants may lead to neurological disease and goiter. The fact that some fruits containing carotenoids are only available seasonally contributes to the vulnerability of children receiving predominantly plant-based diets. Traditional household food technologies have been used for centuries to improve the quality and safety of complementary foods. These include dehulling, peeling, soaking, germination, fermentation, and drying. While modern communities tend to reject these technologies in favor of more convenient fast-food preparations, there is now a resurgence of interest in older technologies as a possible means of improving the quality and safety of complementary foods when the basic diet cannot be changed for economic reasons. This paper describes the biology, safety, practicability, and acceptability of these traditional processes at the household or community level, as well as the gaps in research, so that more effective policies and programs can be implemented to improve the quality and safety of complementary foods.

  20. 171 Adoption of Enriched Local Complementary Food in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... blended with legumes to give the protein portion of the diet (Lartey et al. 1999). Often such foods are introduced to mothers, made available and methods of preparation are taught in either hospital during antenatal care or in the communities. Adoption of innovation is defined as a point of decision to make ...

  1. Nutritive value of three potential complementary foods based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of the study were to formulate composite blends (weaning foods) based on locally available cereals and legumes, to chemically evaluate their nutrient values, and compare with those of a proprietary formula and recommended daily allowance (RDA). The study is part of the effort to provide home-based ...

  2. Formulation of a complementary food fortified with broad beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate nutrient intake, especially of protein and micronutrients, enhances growth of children and decreases susceptibility to disease. Major contributing factors to malnutrition among infants and children are low purchasing power of the family resulting in poor quality foods. A cross-sectional and laboratory-based study ...

  3. Farmers' perception on the effects of climate change on groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers' perception on the effects of climate change on groundnut production in Obi Local Government Area of Benue. ... Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences ... Farmers perceived high rainfall, temperature and spread of pests and diseases among others, as the greatest adverse effects of climate change. Some of the ...

  4. profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO,. 2004) reported that groundnut is grown on 26.4 ... A. H. Bathon, Department of Agricultural Economic and Extension, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, P.M.B. 2076 Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria. ..... forms tried were the linear, exponential and semi- logarithm functions.

  5. Foliar disease assessment of groundnut ( Arachis hypogea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogea L.) is an important food and oil legume but its commercial production is often limited to some regions in Nigeria due to attack by pests ... rust) and insect pest damage under natural infection during the 2012 and 2013 cropping seasons in the forest/savanna transition agroecology of Osun State.

  6. Vitamin-fortified complementary foods for infant nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kodentsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diet of modern nursing women consisting of natural foods is adequate for the consumption of energy and sometimes excessively caloric can not to provide the organism with the necessary amounts of vitamins. The content of vitamins in breast milk of insufficiently supplied women is less than in nursing mothers, adequate supply of vitamins. The needs of the growing breast-fed child by women with multivitamin deficiency can not to satisfied by means breast milk. Based on the analysis of the vitamin status of pregnant and lactating women, as well as the content of vitamins in breast milk of mothers with various vitamins sufficiency conclusion for inclusion in the diet of infants enriched with vitamins and minerals weaning cereal-based products (cereals had been made. Vitamin and mineral supplements or vitamin enriched foods must be included in the diet to maintain the vitamin status of lactating women. 

  7. Introducing complementary foods in the first year of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tandoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of solid foods is a fundamental step in the development of an individual. There are many implications that weaning contains not only on a nutritional plan, but also on the contingent and long-term health of an individual. Over time this nutritional passage has evolved through the acquisition of new knowledge about maturation of anatomical and neurosensory structures involved in all the phases of such a complex process. The understanding of a maturing taste of infant and cultural changes is another key to understand the evolution of introduction of solid foods in infants. What is contained in this text encapsulates thus the evolutionary path of weaning in recent years, showing current trends in the light of cultural changes and new scientific acquisitions.

  8. Profitability Analysis of Groundnuts Processing in Maiduguri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the profitability of groundnuts processing in Maiduguri Metropolitan Council of Borno State. The specific objectives of the study were to examine the socioeconomic characteristics of groundnut processors, estimate the costs and returns in groundnut processing and determine the return on investment in ...

  9. Breast milk and complementary food intake in Brazilian infants according to socio-economic position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romulus-Nieuwelink, J.C.; Doak, C.M.; Albernaz, E.; Victora, C.G.; Haisma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. (a) To compare breast milk and complementary food intake between breast-fed infants from high and low socio-economic status (SES) aged 8 months of age; (b) To compare these intakes with PAHO/WHO recommendations. Methods. Cross-sectional, community-based study in Pelotas, Brazil. Breast

  10. Dietary characteristics of complementary foods offered to Guatemalan infants vary between urban and rural settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneman, A.; Hernandez, L.; Campos, R.; Vossenaar, M.; Solomons, N.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare the dietary variety, diversity, and origins of complementary foods given to urban and rural Guatemalan infants in the second semester of life. Dietary intake from a total of 128 infants of both sexes, aged 6.0 to 12.0 months on admission, from

  11. Vitamin D toxicity of dietary origin in cats fed a natural complementary kitten food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Crossley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary This case series describes two young sibling cats and an additional unrelated cat, from two separate households, that developed hypercalcaemia associated with hypervitaminosis D. Excessive vitamin D concentrations were identified in a natural complementary tinned kitten food that was fed to all three cats as part of their diet. In one of the cases, there was clinical evidence of soft tissue mineralisation. The hypercalcaemia and soft tissue mineralisation resolved following withdrawal of the affected food and medical management of the hypercalcaemia. Relevance and novel information This case series demonstrates the importance of obtaining a thorough dietary history in patients presenting with hypercalcaemia and the measurement of vitamin D metabolites when investigating such cases. Complementary foods may have the potential to induce nutritional toxicity even when fed with complete, nutritionally balanced diets.

  12. Introduction of complementary foods in Sweden and impact of maternal education on feeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg, Sofia; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Brekke, Hilde K

    2017-04-01

    To describe the introduction of complementary foods in a population-based cohort in relation to recommendations and explore the possible impact of maternal education on infant feeding practices. Prospective data from the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort study were used. The ABIS study invited all infants born in south-east Sweden during October 1997-October 1999 (n 21 700) to participate. A questionnaire was completed for 16 022 infants. During the infants' first year parents continuously filed in a diary covering introduction of foods. Sweden. Infants (n 9727) with completed food diaries. Potatoes, vegetables, fruits/berries and porridge were the foods first introduced, with a median introduction between 19 and 22 weeks, followed by introduction of meat, cow's milk, follow-on formula and sour milk/yoghurt between 24 and 27 weeks. Early introduction of any food, before 16 weeks, occurred for 27 % of the infants and was more common in infants of mothers with low education. Overall, potatoes (14·7 %), vegetables (11·1 %), fruits/berries (8·5 %), porridge (7·4 %) and follow-on formula (2·7 %) were the foods most frequently introduced early. The majority of infants (≥70 %) were introduced to potatoes, vegetables, fruits/berries and porridge during concurrent breast-feeding, but introduction during concurrent breast-feeding was less common in infants of mothers with low education. Most infants were introduced to complementary foods timely in relation to recommendations. Low maternal education was associated with earlier introduction of complementary foods and less introduction during concurrent breast-feeding. Still, the results indicated exposure to fewer foods at 12 months in infants of mothers with low education.

  13. Screening for anti-nutritional compounds in complementary foods and food aid products for infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Nanna; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Sørensen, Hilmer; Rasmussen, Søren Kjaersgaard; Briend, André; Yang, Zhenyu; Huffman, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    A range of compounds with negative nutritional impact - 'anti-nutrients' - are found in most plant foods. The contents of anti-nutrients in processed foods depend on the ingredients and processing. Anti-nutrients in complementary foods for children can have a negative impact on nutritional status. The aim of this study was to screen complementary foods from developing countries for the anti-nutritional compounds, phytate, polyphenols, inhibitors of trypsin and chymotrypsin, and lectins. Commercial products based on whole grain cereals were included as a 'worst-case' scenario for anti-nutrient exposure in Europe. Contents of minerals (iron, zinc and calcium), in which absorption or utilisation is affected by anti-nutrients, were analysed. Thirty-six products representing foods used in food aid programmes, local blended foods, fortified instant porridges and 'baby foods' were analysed. The content of minerals indicated that the fortification of a number of products did not meet the declared levels of iron, zinc and calcium. The phytate content ranged from 68 to 1536 mg/100 g, confirming a persistent problem of high levels of phytate in processed cereal- and legume-based products. The phytate : Fe molar ratio exceeded the recommended level of <1.0 in 32 of the 36 products. The total polyphenols varied from 1.3 to 9.3 mg gentisic acid equivalents g(-1) . Screening low-molecular weight soluble polyphenols may be more relevant in complementary foods than total polyphenolic compounds. Trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors and lectins were found in residual amounts in most products, indicating efficient degradation by heat processing. However, young infants and malnourished children may have reduced pancreatic function, and upper limits for residual trypsin inhibitors are needed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Timing and Determinants of the Introduction of Complementary Foods in Kuwait: Results of a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jane A; Dashti, Manal; Al-Sughayer, Mona; Edwards, Christine A

    2015-08-01

    The early introduction of complementary foods is common in Middle Eastern countries but little is known about the determinants of this practice in this region. This prospective cohort study conducted from October 2007 to October 2008 investigated the determinants of the very early (before 17 weeks) introduction of complementary foods in Kuwait and compared rates of this practice against rates reported in the mid-1990s. A total of 373 women were recruited from maternity hospitals in Kuwait City and followed to 26 weeks postpartum. Data on complementary feeding practices were available from 303 women. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association of very early introduction of complementary foods with infant sex and maternal characteristics including age, years of education, employment intentions at 6 months postpartum, parity, prepregnancy body mass index, and prepregnancy smoking status. All infants had received complementary foods by 26 weeks of age, with 30.4% receiving complementary foods before 17 weeks of age. Women born in other Arabic countries were less likely to introduce complementary foods before 17 weeks (adjusted odds ratio [adj OR] = 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.73) than women born in Kuwait. Women who were exclusively formula feeding at 6 weeks postpartum were less likely to introduce complementary foods before 17 weeks (adj OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.23-0.71) than women who were still breastfeeding. Compared to the mid-1990s, fewer infants in Kuwait were receiving complementary foods before 17 weeks. Nevertheless, all infants had received complementary foods by 6 months of age. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Iron Bioavailability and Provitamin A from Sweet Potato- and Cereal-Based Complementary Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Amagloh, Francis Kweku; Coad, Jane

    2015-09-18

    Iron and vitamin A deficiencies in childhood are public health problems in the developing world. Introduction of cereal-based complementary foods, that are often poor sources of both vitamin A and bioavailable iron, increases the risk of deficiency in young children. Alternative foods with higher levels of vitamin A and bioavailable iron could help alleviate these micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to compare iron bioavailability of β-carotene-rich sweet potato-based complementary foods (orange-flesh based sweet potato (OFSP) ComFa and cream-flesh sweet potato based (CFSP) ComFa with a household cereal-based complementary food (Weanimix) and a commercial cereal (Cerelac ® ), using the in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Iron bioavailability relative to total iron, concentrations of iron-uptake inhibitors (fibre, phytates, and polyphenols), and enhancers (ascorbic acid, ß-carotene and fructose) was also evaluated. All foods contained similar amounts of iron, but bioavailability varied: Cerelac ® had the highest, followed by OFSP ComFa and Weanimix, which had equivalent bioavailable iron; CFSP ComFa had the lowest bioavailability. The high iron bioavailability from Cerelac ® was associated with the highest levels of ascorbic acid, and the lowest levels of inhibitors; polyphenols appeared to limit sweet potato-based food iron bioavailability. Taken together, the results do not support that CFSP- and OFSP ComFa are better sources of bioavailable iron compared with non-commercial/household cereal-based weaning foods; however, they may be a good source of provitamin A in the form of β-carotene.

  16. What are the beliefs of pediatricians and dietitians regarding complementary food introduction to prevent allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Sara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timing of complementary food introduction is controversial. Providing information on the timing of dietary introduction is crucial to the primary prevention of food allergy. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers dietary recommendations that were updated in 2008. Objective Identify the recommendations that general pediatricians and registered dietitians provide to parents and delineate any differences in counselling. Methods A 9-item survey was distributed to pediatricians and dietitians online and by mail. Information on practitioner type, gender, length of practice and specific recommendations regarding complementary food introduction and exposure was collected. Results 181 surveys were returned with a 54% response rate from pediatricians. It was not possible to calculate a meaningful dietitian response rate due to overlapping email databases. 52.5% of all respondents were pediatricians and 45.9% were dietitians. The majority of pediatricians and dietitians advise mothers that peanut abstinence during pregnancy and lactation is unnecessary. Dietitians were more likely to counsel mothers to breastfeed their infants to prevent development of atopic dermatitis than pediatricians. Hydrolyzed formulas for infants at risk of developing allergy were the top choice of formula amongst both practitioners. For food allergy prevention, pediatricians were more likely to recommend delayed introduction of peanut and egg, while most dietitians recommended no delay in allergenic food introduction. Conclusions In the prophylaxis of food allergy, pediatricians are less aware than dietitians of the current recommendation that there is no benefit in delaying allergenic food introduction beyond 4 to 6 months. More dietitians than pediatricians believe that breastfeeding decreases the risk of atopic dermatitis. Practitioners may benefit from increased awareness of current guidelines.

  17. ON STORED GROUNDNUT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-06-06

    Jun 6, 2010 ... In the USA, diatomaceous earths are 'Generally Recognised as Safe' by the. US Food and Drug Administration and are registered for use as food additives [14]. Studies on the effectiveness of diatomaceous earths have been reported. Insecto, a diatomaceous earth formulation containing 86.7% armophous ...

  18. Preferences for groundnut products among urban residents in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ting; Florkowski, Wojciech J; Klepacka, Anna M; Sarpong, Daniel B; Resurreccion, Anna V A; Chinnan, Manjeet S; Ekielski, Adam

    2018-01-01

    The present study identifies factors influencing preferences for common groundnut products using information about product perceptions from residents in Ghana's cities collected in 2011. In Ghana, domestically produced groundnuts, processed into a variety of groundnut products, are a vital source of protein and other nutrients. Response summaries provide insights about the eating frequency of various products, whereas a bivariate ordered probit model identifies factors influencing preferences for groundnut paste and roasted groundnuts. Attributes such as taste, protein content and healthfulness are important for roasted groundnuts, whereas aroma, taste and protein content are associated with a preference for groundnut paste. Large households prefer paste, whereas the less educated and those from households with children prefer roasted groundnuts. Adding a child (4-12 years old) increases probability of 'liking very much' roasted groundnuts and an additional adult at home changes that probability regarding groundnut paste. College-educated consumers prefer groundnut paste less than those with less education. Consumers from Tamale and Takoradi prefer roasted groundnuts and groundnut paste more than Accra households. Taste and protein content are attributes of groundnut paste and roasted groundnuts preferred by consumers. Location is a significant factor shaping preference for roasted groundnuts and groundnut paste. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by pediatric food-allergic patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Taiji; Shimojo, Naoki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Kurihara, Kazuyuki; Hoshioka, Akira; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Ito, Komei; Fujisawa, Takao; Kameda, Makoto; Suehiro, Yutaka; Ogura, Hideo; Shibata, Rumiko; Suzuki, Shuichi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ikeda, Masanori; Kohno, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    In developed countries, increasing food allergy prevalence and concern regarding food allergies have been reported. Although the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of allergic diseases has increased in some Western countries, the actual proportion and patterns of CAM use for pediatric food allergies in Japan are still unknown. Fourteen allergy centers in Japan participated in the study using a questionnaire survey regarding the use of CAM by pediatric patients. A diagnosis of food allergy was made at each hospital by pediatric allergists. Surveys were completed by parents/guardians, and data were collected for a total of 962 pediatric food-allergic patients. Overall, 8.4% of the participants used CAM to treat a food allergy. The major CAM therapies used were herbal teas (22.2%), including several Japanese herbal teas, Chinese herbal medicine (18.5%) and lactic acid bacteria (16%). Among the participants using CAM to treat food allergy, 13.6% thought that the CAM being used was very effective, while 11.1% of participants thought that CAM caused some type of side effect. Our study is the first large-scale national survey regarding the use of CAM in pediatric patients with food allergies in Japan. Unlike in the USA, which has a higher rate of CAM use (17%), approximately 8.4% of food-allergic patients used CAM in Japan. Interestingly, the major types of CAM used in Japan differed from those used in the USA. Cultural differences and food customs may affect the use of CAM. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Inheritance of fresh seed dormancy in groundnut

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... Subspecies fastigiata which includes the Spanish and. Valencia market types are the most preferred groundnut in the semi-arid tropics, which accounts for about 60% of the world's groundnut production area. Sprouting in this sub-species, which occurs before harvest and sometimes beyond, contributes ...

  1. Cryopreservation of embryonic axes of groundnut ( Arachis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An efficient cryopreservation protocol was developed for groundnut embryonic axes using vitrification technique. Embryonic axes obtained from seeds of four groundnut genotypes were dehydrated in Plant Vitrification Solution (PVS2) solution for different durations (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) before plunged into liquid nitrogen ...

  2. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  3. Composition and variation of fatty acids among groundnut cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) contain approximately 44-56% oil made up of fatty acids. Oleic and linoleic acids comprise about 80% of fatty acids in groundnuts. Groundnuts with >80% oleic are beneficial health-wise and also improve groundnut quality, flavour, and extended shelf-life, which is beneficial to traders.

  4. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Megan; Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Smith, Powell

    2015-11-11

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  5. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Migliozzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  6. Maternal Knowledge of Nutrition, Problem-Solving Abilities and the Introduction of Complementary Foods into Infants' Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Chantelle Nobile; Drotar, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify variables (maternal knowledge and problem-solving ability) associated with the early introduction of complementary foods (i.e. foods other than breastmilk or formula) into infants diets. Ninety-eight primarily African-American mothers who presented to an urban, ambulatory care clinic in the Midwest…

  7. The effect of replacing Fish meal with 10% of Groundnut cake in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth, food conversion efficiency and survival of H. longifilis fed diets with varying levels of protein in which 10% of fish meal was replaced with groundnut cake were studied for 84 days. Fish fed the diet containing 44.17% crude protein showed the best weight gain, specific growth rate, food conversion ratio and efficiency.

  8. Proximate Composition Energy Content And Sensory Properties Of Complementary Foods Produced From Blends Of Sorghum And African Yam Bean Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available the proximate composition energy content and sensory properties of complementary foods prepared from sorghum and African yam bean flour blends were investigated. The sorghum flour SF was blended with African yam bean flour AYBF in the ratios of 9010 8020 7030 6040 and 5050 and used for the production of complementary foods. The complementary foods produced were evaluated for proximate composition energy content and sensory qualities using standard methods. The proximate composition of the samples showed that the protein content of the complementary foods increased gradually with increased level of African yam bean flour addition from 8.64 in 9010 SF AYBF to 13.44 in 5050 SF AYBF samples while carbohydrate decreased. In the same vein the energy content of the samples also increased with increased supplementation with African yam bean flour from 368.84KJ100g in 9010 SF AYBF to 382.98KJ100g in 5050 SF AYBF. The sensory evaluation carried out on different samples of complementary food after reconstitution into gruels with boiling water showed that the formulation prepared from 100 sorghum flour used as control was most acceptable by the judges and also differed significantly pamp88040.05 from the other samples in flavour texture and taste. However the sample fortified with 50 African yam bean flour was scored highest in colour.

  9. Assessment of Tolerability and Safety of Monocomponent Complementary Food Products in the Diet of Infants With Risk for Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with burdened allergological history and/or having preliminary allergy manifestations need the effective prevention of allergy from the first months of life.Objective: Our aim was to assess the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of monocomponent complementary food products in the diet of infants with high risk for allergic diseases.Methods: Tolerability, safety, and efficacy of monocomponent complementary food products (vegetable puree, fruit juices, and after 6 months — meat sauce were studied in a singlecentre, prospective, comparative study. The symptoms of indigestion, skin allergy symptoms were registered, the results of coprological research and immunogenicity of complementary food products were assessed.Results: The study included 200 children in the age from 5 months from the risk group of allergy developing. Children were divided into 4 groups of 50 people. It was found that complementary food products were well tolerated and assimilated by children, did not cause skin and gastrointestinal allergic reactions in healthy children with risk of allergy developing. Food antigens of complementary food components (pumpkin, rabbit meat, turkey meat, apples, pears, plums were characterized by low immunogenicity: the level of specific IgE to the specified products did not change in blood serum and remained at a low level at the beginning and at the end of the study (ranging from 0.01 to 0.03 kE/l.Conclusion: Studied complementary food products (vegetable-, fruit- and meat-based can be used in the diet of children with high risk for allergy.

  10. Meat as an early complementary food for infants: implications for macro- and micronutrient intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Nancy F

    2007-01-01

    Optimal complementary feeding is recognized to be critical for prevention of infectious morbidity and mortality and for optimal growth and development. The nutrients which become limiting in human milk after approximately 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding are predictable based on the dynamic composition of human milk and the physiology of infant nutritional requirements. Iron and zinc are two micronutrients for which the concentrations in human milk are relatively independent of maternal intake, and for which the older infant is most dependent on complementary foods to meet requirements. Traditional feeding practices, including reliance on cereals and plant-based diets, do not complement these recognized gaps in human milk. Meats or cellular animal proteins are richer sources of these critical minerals as well as other essential nutrients. Yet, cellular animal proteins are often introduced only late in infancy in developed countries, and may be only rarely consumed by young children in developing countries. Plant-based diets result in a predominance of energy from carbohydrates, often including highly refined carbohydrates that are also likely to have a high glycemic index. This pattern of macronutrient intake is contrary to that of the period when the human genome evolved, and may influence the metabolic profile in young children, especially under conditions of nutritional abundance.

  11. New complementary foods in the diet of breast-fed and bottle-fed infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kaznacheev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the physical development and health status of babies receiving goat’s milk-based formula “Bibikasha”.Patients and methods. An open-label uncontrolled trial was conducted in 47 babies aged 5 to 6.5 months. Their weight and height changes, neuropsychological development, and the skin were assessed. The incidence of acute respiratory diseases, the manifestations of dyspepsia, and number of bowel movement a day were estimated; fecal macroscopy, microbiological examination, and complete blood count were carried out. The data were statistically processed using Statistica Advanced.Results. At complementary feeding, there was constipation and hard stools in approximately 20% the infants in the study group and fecal opportunistic bacteria in 63.8%. When eating Bibikasha, the number of infants with opportunistic pathogenic bacteria reduced by 3 times and hard stools and constipation disappeared completely. During their follow-up, none of the babies developed anemia, acute respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases; weight gain rates and psychomotor development were age-appropriate, indicating their harmonious development.Conclusion. Bibikasha used as a complementary food has a positive effect on a baby’s health and contributes to the prevention of nutrition-related diseases. Adding Bibikasha to the diet of infants with constipation normalizes their bowel function

  12. Optimization of the nutrient content and protein quality of cereal-legume blends for use as complementary foods in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Devika J; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Ghosh, Shibani A

    2014-09-01

    Nutritionally adequate complementary foods made from locally available ingredients are of high priority in developing countries, including Ghana. The majority of complementary foods in these countries are cereal-based and are unable to meet the nutrient intakes recommended by the World Health Organization. To evaluate the nutrient content and protein quality of local cereal-legume blends for complementary foods against recommendations and to determine the quantities of additional ingredients required to meet needs by using linear programming. Nine cereal-legume combinations (maize, sorghum, or millet combined with cowpea, peanut, or soybean) and koko (a traditional Ghanaian maize-based complementary food) were evaluated based on the macronutrient targets for a daily ration of complementary food for the age group 12 to 24 months: 264 kcal, 6.5 g of protein, and 8.2 to 11.7 g of fat. Protein quality was assessed by the Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score (PDCAAS). Linear programming was then used to determine the amounts of additional oil, sugar, and lysine needed to meet macronutrient requirements. No traditional cereal-legume food met all complementary food macronutrient requirements on its own. Cereal-legume blends made with peanut or cowpeas were low in quality protein, while those with soybean were low in fat. Lysine was the limiting amino acid (PDCAAS 0.50 to 0.82) in all blends. Adding lysine increased utilizable protein by 1% to 10% in soybean blends, 35% to 40% in peanut blends, and 14% to 24% in cowpea blends. Peanut-maize, peanut-millet, and all soybean-cereal blends were able to meet macronutrient targets; most micronutrients remained below recommended levels. Traditional cereal-legume blends made from locally available ingredients do not meet energy, quality protein, and fat recommendations for complementary foods; however, such complementary food blends may be optimized to meet nutrient requirements by using linear programming as a tool to

  13. Groundnut (Arachis Hypogaea L. Cultivation in Türkiye and Osmaniye Peanut as a Geographical Indication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güven Şahin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. whose fatherland is South America outshines with its several aspects at agricultural field. First of all, even though the almost all of the harvest is consumed as food, since the seeds of this plant includes pretty much amount of oil, they constitute a highyl important raw material. The reason why demand of people for groundnut has been increasing as years go by, is the great quality degree of the oil handled and its benefits for human health. Another significant feature of this plant is that, as a member of bean family it has the ability of providing nitrogene fixation. From this point of view, groundnut is considered as the most essential plant of crop rotation technique. Most of the groundnut -also known as “araşit” in Türkiye- growth is done in Mediterranean Region, especially the zone of Adana. In our country, almost all of the harvest handled is consumed as sustenance in addition to that, remarkable increases are observed in the production of the plant mentioned above; furthermore by the year 2011, Türkiye has become the most important producer at his territory. In Türkiye, Osmaniye is now the center of groundnut generation and therefore the city is identical with its product. This could widely be understood from that the plant is secured by geographical indication patent in the name of “Groundnut of Osmaniye”. In that research, the main scope is agricultural geography and the highlighted topics are botanical properties, planting and the disrribution and commerce of the recommendations about the requirements follow. Moreover, the groundnut of Osmaniye, in terms of geographical indication is reconized to the reader

  14. Melon ( Cucumismelo ) and Groundnut ( Arachishypogaea ) peel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cucumismelo)(MPE) and Groundnut (Arachishypohaea) peel extracts (GPE) at room temperature has been investigated using weight loss method. Inhibition efficiencies of 94.40% and 92.64% for2M HCl concentration was observed for GPE ...

  15. Complementary feeding: study on prevalence of food intake in two health centers of São Paulo city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioni, D M; Latorre, M do R; Szarfarc, S C; de Souza, S B

    2001-06-01

    The infant feeding practices in the first year of life are of fundamental importance for their growth and development. This study was carried out aiming at checking on the prevalence of food intake by the infants during their first year of life. One-hundred-and-seventy-five children aged up to one year, attended to in two Health Centers of São Paulo city, Brazil, participated in this study. Their feeding practices, obtained through the status quo approach, were analyzed through multiple logistic regression models, using curves of prevalence for complementary food consumption. Fruit was the first solid food to be part of the infant diet, followed by vegetables, cereal, meat and/or eggs and, beans. Animal-protein-containing source foods (meat and eggs) entered the diet much later, being consumed by practically all children only at the end of their first year of life. The early introduction of complementary foods into the infant diet was made evident. The introduction of solid foods to complement breastfeeding is started with low-calorie density foods, in disagreement with the recommendations for Brazilian children. Results of this paper disclose a need for having programmatic actions in health education being carried out, in special those regarding exclusive breastfeeding promotion and orientation on the adequate introduction of complementary feeding.

  16. Development of an improved local-ingredient-based complementary food and technology transfer to rural housewives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Hermann Z; Traoré, Tahirou; Zèba, Augustin; Tiemtoré, Saïdou; Dramaix-Wilmet, Michèle; Hennart, Philippe; Donnen, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    Food technology transfer to rural households, based on local ingredients, is a relevant and sustainable strategy to ensure better nutrition of young children. Objective. To develop an improved mush based on local ingredients and evaluate the potential for transferring its technology to rural housewives. We developed a flour-based food using Alicom software and performed laboratory trials to evaluate its actual nutritional quality. Then we recruited housewives from each of the 27 project villages and trained them in flour production and mush preparation twice daily, 6 days a week, for 26 weeks. Mush was sampled during the training session and at weeks 4, 12, and 22 and evaluated for actual flow distance and dry matter content, which served to estimate energy density and iron and zinc contents. The laboratory trials reported average energy densities of 103 kcal/l00 g, iron contents of 2.6 mg/100 kcal, and zinc contents of 1.2 mg/100 kcal. The average (+/- SD) energy densities of the mush samples obtained during the training session and at weeks 4, 12, and 22 were 103.0 +/- 5.6, 103.3 +/- 5.2, 107.9 +/- 11.5, and 101.3 +/- 8.7 kcal/100 g, respectively. The average iron contents were 2.3 +/- 0.5, 2.3 +/- 0.5, 2.6 +/- 0.3, and 1.8 +/- 0.8 mg/ 100 kcal, respectively, and the average zinc contents were 1.6 +/- 0.1, 1.6 +/- 0.1, 1.7 +/- 0.1, and 1.6 +/- 0.2 mg/100 kcal. Developing a suitable complementary food from local ingredients and educating households in nutrition and use of local products are feasible. Such education should come with measures aimed at improving the accessibility of some ingredients to ensure feasibility and sustainability.

  17. Aflatoxin contamination in cereals and legumes to reconsider usage as complementary food ingredients for Ghanaian infants: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Atongbiik Achaglinkame

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cereals and legumes, being the major staples of many African communities, frequently used for complementary foods for infants and young children. However, aflatoxin contamination is a threatening issue in these staples and its negative effects on human health, most especially infants and young children, are very alarming. Thus, this review sought to highlight the risk of aflatoxin contamination in cereals and legumes so as to reconsider their usage in complementary feeding. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity/moisture, soil properties, type and length of storage as well as nutrient composition of the food produce greatly influence fungal growth and aflatoxin production in cereals and legumes. Consumption of such contaminated food ingredients could expose many infants and young children to poor growth and development. Nonetheless, the toxin, though seemingly inevitable, can be minimized if not curbed completely through awareness creation/education, good agricultural practices and proper storage practices. Moreover, consumption of root and tuber crops such as sweetpotato, especially the orange-fleshed sweetpotato, can be a sustainable approach to reduce aflatoxin ingestion in children. Thus, to control the adverse effects of aflatoxin in infants and young children, cereal-legume blends could be substituted with root and tuber-based blends in complementary feeding. Keywords: Cereal-legume blends, Complementary foods, Aflatoxin, Infant health, Roots and tubers

  18. Sources of Pod Yield Losses in Groundnut in the Northern Savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) has gained prominence as a food and cash crop due to its increasing importance, both in the domestic and export markets. Its products, such as oil and cake, are for both domestic and industrial uses. However, farm level yields in Ghana have remained as low as 800 kg/ha compared to ...

  19. Fortification of Complementary Foods: A Review of Products and Program Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Lynnette M; Osendarp, Saskia J M; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Fortified complementary foods (FCF) and home fortificants - single-sachet micronutrient powders (MNP) or small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) to be added to a child's food immediately before consumption - have been shown to be efficacious to improve the micronutrient status and some functional outcomes in children 6-23 months of age. The objective of this chapter is to describe and discuss the latest advances related to the composition and delivery of FCF products, including home and commercial fortification. For FCF and MNPs, there is guidance to ensure that products are safe and aligned with recommendations. Impact, however, can be achieved only if adequate attention is paid to program design and implementation, including the choice of the delivery platform, and ensuring availability, accessibility, acceptability, coverage, and utilization by the target population. Well-targeted programs such as social protection programs, health services, community-based vendors (referred to as market based), child health weeks, and emergency programs have all been used as delivery platforms for FCF and MNPs. To date, guidance for formulation and programmatic experience with the distribution of SQ-LNS is limited. An in-depth understanding of the local context and culture, and the design and implementation of program components, including behavior change interventions that respond to those, can increase program coverage and product utilization. Using rigorous process evaluation would permit to adapt programs to increase their potential for impact, strengthen the evidence related to how programs work, and allow the development of program guidance to increase effective implementation. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. genetics of resistance to groundnut rosette virus disease abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2014-02-03

    Feb 3, 2014 ... Groundnut rosette virus disease is caused by synergyistic interaction of three viral agents, namely, groundnut rosette virus (GRV), its satelitte RNA (Sat RNA) and groundnut rosette assistor virus (GRAV). GRAV plays an important role in aiding aphid transmission, alongside the other two viral components.

  1. Chemical composition of groundnut, Arachis hypogaea (L) landraces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... Groundnut production and utilization in Ghana has tripled in the last decade due to its high nutritive value and the number of uses it ... supplement the dietary requirements of humans and farm animals. Groundnut seeds ... preference for high quality edible oils in Ghana and the desire to increase groundnut ...

  2. Aspergillus and aflatoxin in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and groundnut cake in Eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdi; Chala, Alemayehu; Dejene, Mashilla; Fininsa, Chemeda; Hoisington, David A; Sobolev, Victor S; Arias, Renee S

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess major Aspergillus species and aflatoxins associated with groundnut seeds and cake in Eastern Ethiopia and evaluate growers' management practices. A total of 160 groundnut seed samples from farmers' stores and 50 groundnut cake samples from cafe and restaurants were collected. Fungal isolation was done from groundnut seed samples. Aspergillus flavus was the dominant species followed by Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxin analyses of groundnut seed samples were performed using ultra performance liquid chromatography; 22.5% and 41.3% of samples were positive, with total aflatoxin concentrations of 786 and 3135 ng g -1 from 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 samples, respectively. The level of specific aflatoxin concentration varied between 0.1 and 2526 ng g -1 for B 2 and B 1 , respectively. Among contaminated samples of groundnut cake, 68% exhibited aflatoxin concentration below 20 ng g -1 , while as high as 158 ng g -1 aflatoxin B 1 was recorded. The study confirms high contamination of groundnut products in East Ethiopia.

  3. Nutritional Quality Assessment of Complementary Foods Produced from Fermented and Malted Quality Protein Maize Fortified with Soybean Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiose Sumbo H.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition of varying degrees has been associated with feeding infants with unwholesome and poor quality complementary foods. Therefore, the aim of this study was to produce complementary foods from quality protein maize (QPM using the processes of malting and fermentation. The resulting flour was blended with processed soy bean flour at a ratio of 70:30 (maize: soybean. The nutritional qualities of the complementary foods were assessed biologically using animal feeding experiment to determine the growth rate, feed intake, protein quality parameters, haematological properties and rehabilitation potentials. The results showed that the protein efficiency ratio (PER and food efficiency ratio of the malted QPM fortified with soybean were 2.44 and 0.24, respectively, which was the highest among the formulated diets and compared favourably with casein (2.5 and commercial diet (2.3. The QPM-based diets had a better biological value (<60% and true dig stibility (<60% than the products from normal maize. The packed cell volume of the samples ranged between 23.00 (basal and 46.00% (soy fermented normal maize. The QPM-based diets enhanced the quick recovery of protein starved/depleted animals better than the NM-based diets. Moreover, the addition of soybean further boosted the ability of the diet to rehabilitate the animals. The best result was seen in the group of rats fed with soy-malted QPM. The use of QPM in complementary food formulation gave better results and could alleviate the problem of protein and energy malnutrition, thereby reducing the mortality rate among infants.

  4. Complementary foods consumed by 6-12-month-old rural infants in South Africa are inadequate in micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mieke

    2005-06-01

    To determine the nutrient composition of complementary foods consumed by 6-12-month-old South African infants. Nutrient intake was determined for infants who were recruited to participate in a randomised controlled trial using a single 24-hour dietary recall. Infants aged 6-12 months (n=475) residing in The Valley of a Thousand Hills, a rural area in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Energy and protein intakes from complementary foods were adequate. Infants who consumed infant products (commercially available fortified infant cereals/ready-to-eat canned baby foods/formula milk powder) had significantly higher intakes of calcium, iron, zinc, vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and vitamin C than infants who did not consume any infant products. For infants who consumed infant cereals (n=142), these cereals provided 51% of total iron intake. Infant cereals provided more than 25% of total intake for magnesium, thiamine, niacin and vitamin B12. For infants consuming ready-to-eat canned baby foods (n=77), these products contributed less than 15% of total intake for all the micronutrients. The nutrient density of the complementary diet was less than half the desired density for calcium, iron and zinc. Animal products were consumed by 17% of infants, 26% consumed dairy products and 18% consumed vitamin-A-rich fruit and vegetables during the 24-hour recall period. The nutrient composition of complementary foods among rural South African infants was inadequate, especially for iron, zinc and calcium. Strategies should be developed to improve the nutritional quality of their diets.

  5. Nutrient Content And Acceptability Of Snakehead-Fish (Ophiocephalus Striatus) And Pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) Based Complementary Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratna Noer, Etika; Candra, Aryu; Panunggal, Binar

    2017-02-01

    Poor nutrient-dense complementary foods is one of the common factors contributed for decline growth pattern in children. Snakehead-fish and Pumpkin Complementary Feeding (SPCF) base on locally food can help to reduce child malnutrition. Specifically, high protein and vitamin A in SPCF may improve immunity and nutrition status of malnutrition children. This study aimed to formulate low-cost, nutritive value and acceptable of SPCF on malnutrition children in coastal area. Carbohydrate content was determined by difference, protein by Kjeldahl, betacaroten by spectofotometri and sensory evaluation using a five point hedonic scale. Fe and zinc was determined by AAS. There is an effect of the substitution of snake-head fish flour and yellow pumpkin flour toward the nutrient content and the acceptability

  6. Use of deuterium oxide to measure breast milk intake in children aged 7-12 months receiving complementary foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed-Kanashiro, H.

    2000-01-01

    In the present study we performed a pilot study using deuterium oxide method to determine the breast-milk intake in children 7-12 months of age receiving complementary food. This is applied to a community efficacy study to determine the effects on total energy and nutrient intake and on breast-milk consumption of an intensive education intervention using locally available, culturally acceptable complementary foods. We determined the washout period for the deuterium finding a value of 21 days for the mother and child. This measurement was performed using the infrared spectrometer of the Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional and compared with the values obtained with the IR Mass Spectrometer of INTA Chile. The test weighing was conduced on 14 children and compared with the values obtained using the deuterium methodology. Our result suggest that the breast milk intake determined by the weighing test was lower with regard to the value obtained with the deuterium methodology. (author)

  7. Maternal prepregnant body mass index, duration of breastfeeding, and timing of complementary food introduction are associated with infant weight gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Michaelsen, Kim F; Rasmussen, Kathleen M

    2004-01-01

    these associations among 3768 mother-infant dyads from the Danish National Birth Cohort. RESULTS: In multiple regression analyses, increasing maternal prepregnant BMI, decreasing durations of breastfeeding, and earlier complementary food introduction were associated with increased infant weight gain. An interaction......). In this sample, prepregnant obesity (BMI > or = 30.0), short durations of breastfeeding, and earlier introduction of complementary food were associated with 0.7 kg of additional weight gain during infancy. CONCLUSIONS: Infant weight gain is associated with maternal prepregnant BMI and with an interaction between......BACKGROUND: Women who are overweight or obese before pregnancy breastfeed for shorter durations than do normal-weight women. These shorter durations may place infants of overweight and obese women at risk of not receiving the benefits of breastfeeding, which may include a reduced risk of overweight...

  8. EFFICIENT INTRODUCTION OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND PREDISPOSITION TO ALLERGIC REACTIONS FOR PREVENTION OF ATOPIC MARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kamaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of allergic diseases grows constantly. Realization of genetic defects to the disease depends of impact of environment and contacts with different allergens. Prophylactic dietary avoidance is important to prevent debut of the atopic dermatitis and secondary exacerbations of the disease. Terms and preferable sequence of complementary food introduction are discussed for breast-fed and formula-fed infants; advantages of ready-made industrial products of infant meals are proved. The gradual outreach of infant’s taste spectrum and increasing step by step of load on infant’s intestine can become serious hedge for the atopic march and important measure of prevention of allergic rhinitis and asthma.Key words: atopic march, dietetics, complementary foods, prevention of allergies, children.

  9. Responsive feeding and child interest in food vary when rural Malawian children are fed lipid-based nutrient supplements or local complementary food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Mäkinen, Samppa; Ashorn, Ulla; Cheung, Yin Bun; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Bentley, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Caregiver and child behaviours during feeding have been used to measure responsiveness, which has been recognised as important for child growth and development. The aims of this study were to understand how caregiver and child behaviours differ when feeding lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) vs. local complementary food and to detect associations between behaviours and child interest in food. Sixteen moderately underweight 6-17-month-old Malawian children receiving 50 g/day of supplementary LNS for 12 weeks were videotaped during LNS (n = 32) and local complementary feeding (n = 28) episodes. Behaviours were coded at the level of the intended bite (1674 total bites). The analysis used regression models adjusted for within-subject correlation. Caregivers were less likely to allow children to self-feed and more likely to use physical pressure during LNS vs. complementary food bites. Positive caregiver verbalization was infrequent and did not differ by type of food. Higher odds of accepting a bite were associated with the bite containing LNS, odds ratio (OR) 3.05; 90% confidence interval (CI) (1.98, 4.71), the child self-feeding, OR 5.70; 90% CI (2.77, 11.69), and positive caregiver verbalization, OR 2.46; 90% CI (1.26, 4.80), while lower odds of acceptance were associated with negative child verbalization during feeding, OR 0.27; 90% CI (0.17, 0.42). In this sample, caregivers used more responsive feeding practices during bites of local complementary food and were more controlling when feeding LNS. Responsive caregiver behaviours predicted child acceptance of food. These results could be used to design interventions in Malawi to improve responsive feeding practices in general and during LNS use. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The role of complementary foods in the psychomotor development of a baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Yatsyshina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the impact of complementary feeding on the psychomotor development of a baby. It describes possible psychomotor developmental disorders due to inadequate feeding of an infant during the first year of life.

  11. A review of phytate, iron, zinc, and calcium concentrations in plant-based complementary foods used in low-income countries and implications for bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Rosalind S; Bailey, Karl B; Gibbs, Michelle; Ferguson, Elaine L

    2010-06-01

    Plant-based complementary foods often contain high levels of phytate, a potent inhibitor of iron, zinc, and calcium absorption. This review summarizes the concentrations of phytate (as hexa- and penta-inositol phosphate), iron, zinc, and calcium and the corresponding phytate:mineral molar ratios in 26 indigenous and 27 commercially processed plant-based complementary foods sold in low-income countries. Phytate concentrations were highest in complementary foods based on unrefined cereals and legumes (approximately 600 mg/100 g dry weight), followed by refined cereals (approximately 100 mg/100 g dry weight) and then starchy roots and tubers (source foods and/or fortification with minerals. Dephytinization, either in the household or commercially, can potentially enhance mineral absorption in high-phytate complementary foods, although probably not enough to overcome the shortfalls in iron, zinc, and calcium content of plant-based complementary foods used in low-income countries. Instead, to ensure the World Health Organization estimated needs for these minerals from plant-based complementary foods for breastfed infants are met, dephytinization must be combined with enrichment with animal-source foods and/or fortification with appropriate levels and forms of mineral fortificants.

  12. Reactions of bambara groundnut accessions to photoperiods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two light-controlled experiments conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, the effects of six photoperiods (8, 10, 12, 14, 16 hours and natural photoperiod) on growth and flower induction in six accessions of bambara groundnut ...

  13. Mutation breeding in groundnut in Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.H.; Chandra Mouli

    1978-01-01

    Mutation breeding in groundnut was initiated with a view to develop improved cultures for increasing production in India, which contributes over 33 percent to the world groundnut production. More than 50 mutants were isolated-influencing almost all features of a groundnut plant. Cytological M 1 variants produced more mutants and in advanced generations. Some mutants showed interesting genetic behaviour, while others exhibited differential expression in different seasons leading to masking of mutant characters. In addition, mutants having economically useful characters, such as large kernel size and increased yielding potential were also isolated. Using these and other mutants new Trombay Groundnut (TG) varieties were developed which had large kernels suitable for export trade, improved oil content and increased yields. Among them TG-17 was unique for its extreme fastigiata character leading to flowering at all nodes and reduced number of vegetative branches. Demonstrations of TG-varieties for high yielding potential, on the fields of cultivators were successful. Because of increasing demand for the seed, a seed multiplication programme was initiated in 1974-1975 in collaboration with a private organisation. Starting with one ton seed more than 2000 tons of seed was produced till the end of 1977 and distributed for cultivation in the current year. (author)

  14. susceptibility of some kersting's groundnut landrace cultivars

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT: Seeds of five different landrace cultivars of Kersting's groundnut, Macrotyloma geocarpum. (Harms) Marechal and Baudet, obtained from northern Ghana, were evaluated for their suscep- tibility to infestation and damage by the pulse beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fab. The com- pletely randomized design ...

  15. Improving bambara groundnut productivity using gamma irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times efforts are being made to improve the productivity of bambara groundnut. Studies were initiated (i) to characterise and evaluate landraces and to select superior ones for irradiation, (ii) to induce genetic variation through gamma irradiation and (iii) to use biotechnological approaches to shorten the generation ...

  16. RESOURCE USE EFFICIENCY OF GROUNDNUT PRODUCTION IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    2012-09-28

    Sep 28, 2012 ... farmers under rain-fed conditions with limited inputs). Nigeria was the third ... processed into or included as an ingredient in a wide range of other products which includes groundnut paste .... therefore, be made in the quantity of inputs used and costs in production process to restore r = I. The values of MVP ...

  17. Evaluation of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) genotypes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early and late leaf spots caused by Cercospora arachidicola Hori and Cercospora personatum (Berk. & Curt.) Deighton are among the major biotic constraints to groundnut production in sub-saharan Africa. A two-year screening experiment was conducted in 2001 and 2002 at the Institute of Agricultural Research for ...

  18. Phosphoglucose isomerase polymorphism in cultivated groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Horizontal starch gel electrophoresis was used to study one of the enzymes involved in glycolysis, Phosphoglucose isomerase subunits (PGI) (EC 5.3.1.9), in the cultivated groundnut, Arachis hypogaea, and some of its wild relatives. Two gene loci specifying PGI were detected. The more anodal locus, Pgi-1, was ...

  19. Point‐of‐sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catherine; Sweet, Lara; Khin, Mengkheang; Ndiaye Coly, Aminata; Sy Gueye, Ndeye Yaga; Adhikary, Indu; Dhungel, Shrid; Makafu, Cecilia; Zehner, Elizabeth; Huffman, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In order to assess the prevalence of point‐of‐sale promotions of infant and young child feeding products in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; Dakar Department, Senegal; and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, approximately 30 retail stores per site, 121 in total, were visited. Promotional activity for breastmilk substitutes (BMS) and commercially produced complementary foods in each site were recorded. Point‐of‐sale promotion of BMS occurred in approximately one‐third of sampled stores in Phnom Penh and Dakar Department but in 3.2% and 6.7% of stores in Kathmandu Valley and Dar es Salaam, respectively. Promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was highly prevalent in Dakar Department with half of stores having at least one promotion, while promotions for these products occurred in 10% or less of stores in the other three sites. While promotion of BMS in stores is legal in Senegal, it is prohibited in Cambodia without prior permission of the Ministry of Health/Ministry of Information and prohibited in both Nepal and Tanzania. Strengthening legislation in Senegal and enforcing regulations in Cambodia could help to prevent such promotion that can negatively affect breastfeeding practices. Key messages Even in countries such as Cambodia, Nepal and Tanzania where point‐of‐sale promotion is restricted, promotions of BMS were observed (in nearly one‐third of stores in Phnom Penh and less than 10% in Dar es Salaam and Kathmandu).Limited promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was evident (less than 10% of stores had a promotion for such foods), except in Dakar Department, where promotions were found in half of stores.Efforts are needed to strengthen monitoring, regulation and enforcement of restrictions on the promotion of BMS.Manufacturers and distributors should take responsibility for compliance with national regulations and global policies pertaining to the promotion of breastmilk substitutes. PMID:27061961

  20. Point-of-sale promotion of breastmilk substitutes and commercially produced complementary foods in Cambodia, Nepal, Senegal and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champeny, Mary; Pereira, Catherine; Sweet, Lara; Khin, Mengkheang; Ndiaye Coly, Aminata; Sy Gueye, Ndeye Yaga; Adhikary, Indu; Dhungel, Shrid; Makafu, Cecilia; Zehner, Elizabeth; Huffman, Sandra L

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess the prevalence of point-of-sale promotions of infant and young child feeding products in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Kathmandu Valley, Nepal; Dakar Department, Senegal; and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, approximately 30 retail stores per site, 121 in total, were visited. Promotional activity for breastmilk substitutes (BMS) and commercially produced complementary foods in each site were recorded. Point-of-sale promotion of BMS occurred in approximately one-third of sampled stores in Phnom Penh and Dakar Department but in 3.2% and 6.7% of stores in Kathmandu Valley and Dar es Salaam, respectively. Promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was highly prevalent in Dakar Department with half of stores having at least one promotion, while promotions for these products occurred in 10% or less of stores in the other three sites. While promotion of BMS in stores is legal in Senegal, it is prohibited in Cambodia without prior permission of the Ministry of Health/Ministry of Information and prohibited in both Nepal and Tanzania. Strengthening legislation in Senegal and enforcing regulations in Cambodia could help to prevent such promotion that can negatively affect breastfeeding practices. Even in countries such as Cambodia, Nepal and Tanzania where point-of-sale promotion is restricted, promotions of BMS were observed (in nearly one-third of stores in Phnom Penh and less than 10% in Dar es Salaam and Kathmandu). Limited promotion of commercially produced complementary foods was evident (less than 10% of stores had a promotion for such foods), except in Dakar Department, where promotions were found in half of stores. Efforts are needed to strengthen monitoring, regulation and enforcement of restrictions on the promotion of BMS. Manufacturers and distributors should take responsibility for compliance with national regulations and global policies pertaining to the promotion of breastmilk substitutes. © 2016 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition

  1. Acceptability of complementary foods and breads prepared from zinc-fortified cereal flours among young children and adults in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, G J; Lo, N Ba; Hess, S Y; Guiro, A T; Wade, S; Ndiaye, N F; Guinard, J-X; Brown, K H

    2011-01-01

    We completed a series of studies to assess the acceptability of zinc-fortified, cereal-based complementary foods and zinc-fortified wheat breads. Young children and their caregivers completed acceptability tests with complementary foods fortified with iron only (60 mg iron as ferrous fumarate per kilogram cereal flour), or the same level of iron and zinc (240 mg zinc as zinc oxide per kilogram cereal flour), and the caregivers completed triangle taste tests to compare the same products. A separate group of adult participants completed acceptability tests with wheat breads fortified with iron and folic acid (15 mg iron as ferrous fumarate per kilogram flour and 1.5 mg folic acid per kilogram flour) or the same levels of iron-folic acid and 2 levels of zinc (63 mg zinc or 126 mg zinc as zinc oxide per kilogram flour). Finally, a threshold test was administered to another group of adult participants to compare nonfortified wheat bread to breads fortified with zinc in 80 mg increments ranging from 80 to 400 mg zinc as zinc oxide per kilogram flour. All products were acceptable when compared to non-zinc-fortified equivalents, and were well liked by the respective participants. For the triangle tests, caregivers were not able to detect significant differences between products. For threshold tests, adult participants detected differences in breads prepared from fortified wheat flour at 80 mg, 160 mg, and 320 mg zinc per kilogram flour, but not at 240 mg and 400 mg zinc per kilogram flour, respectively, when compared to nonfortified bread equivalents. Zinc fortification of cereal flours in the ranges of fortification that were tested does not adversely affect the acceptability of complementary foods and breads prepared from these flours. Practical Application: Fortification of staple food products is a low-cost approach to deliver additional micronutrients (including zinc) to large segments of a population. Determining the acceptability of products fortified with zinc is

  2. Some quality attributes of complementary food produced from flour blends of orange flesh sweetpotato, sorghum, and soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebunoluwa Kehinde Alawode

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the chemical, functional, and sensory attributes of orange flesh sweetpotato, sorghum, and soybean during storage. Orange flesh sweetpotato flour, sorghum flour, and soybean flour were blended together at four different ratios of 40:40:20, 30:50:20, 20:60:20, and 10:70:20, respectively, while 100% sorghum flour was used as control. The five flour blends were used to prepare complementary foods, and sensory attributes of foods were determined using a nine point hedonic scale. The flour blend with the highest overall acceptability score was packaged in a high density polyethylene bag and stored for the period of eight weeks. During storage, the functional properties and the chemical properties of the flour blend were determined every two weeks. The result obtained for the sensory properties of the complementary food shows that the sample 40:40:20 was accepted by the panellists. The functional properties of the blend during storage ranged from 0.57 to 0.60 g/mL, 69 to 86%, 3.74 to 4.19 g/g, 2.82 to 3.12%, and 77.50 to 94.50% for bulk density, dispersibility, swelling power, solubility, and water absorption capacity, respectively, while the chemical analysis ranged from 7.11 to 9.40%, 1.02 to 3.59% and 0.05 to1.28 meq/kg for moisture, free fatty acids, and peroxide value, respectively. The study showed that the flour blend of 40:20:40 had the most preferred functional properties and complementary food produced from it had best attributes in terms of taste, colour, viscosity, and overall acceptability.

  3. Effects of animal source food and micronutrient fortification in complementary food products on body composition, iron status, and linear growth: a randomized trial in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skau, Jutta K H; Touch, Bunthang; Chhoun, Chamnan; Chea, Mary; Unni, Uma S; Makurat, Jan; Filteau, Suzanne; Wieringa, Frank T; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Ritz, Christian; Wells, Jonathan C; Berger, Jacques; Friis, Henrik; Michaelsen, Kim F; Roos, Nanna

    2015-04-01

    Poor nutritional quality of complementary foods often limits growth. Animal source foods, such as milk or meat, are often unaffordable. Local affordable alternatives are needed. We evaluate the efficacy of 2 newly developed, rice-based complementary food products: WinFood (WF) with small fish and edible spiders and WinFood-Lite (WF-L) fortified with small fish, against 2 existing fortified corn-soy blend products, CSB+ (purely plant based) and CSB++ (8% dried skimmed milk). In total, 419 infants aged 6 mo were enrolled in this randomized, single-blinded study for 9 mo, designed primarily to assess increments in fat-free mass by a deuterium dilution technique and change in plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. Secondary endpoints were changes in anthropometric variables, including knee-heel length. Data were analyzed by the intention-to-treat approach. There was no difference in fat-free mass increment in WF or WF-L compared with CSB+ [WF: +0.04 kg (95% CI: -0.20, 0.28 kg); WF-L: +0.14 kg (95% CI: -0.10, 0.38 kg)] or CSB++ [WF: -0.03 kg (95% CI: -0.27, 0.21 kg); WF-L: +0.07 kg (95% CI: -0.18, 0.31 kg)] and no effect on iron status. The 1.7-mm (95% CI: -0.1, 3.5 mm) greater increase in knee-heel length in WF-L than in CSB+ was not significant. No difference was found between the locally produced products (WF and WF-L) and the CSBs. Micronutrient fortification may be necessary, and small fish may be an affordable alternative to milk to improve complementary foods. The dietary role of edible spiders needs to be further explored. This trial was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN19918531. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Nutritional value of locally produced foods and potential for developing age-appropriate complementary foods for children under 2 years of age in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Kodio, Joseph; Iknane, Akory Ag; Sodjinou, Roger

    2010-09-01

    Promotion of dietary diversity using locally available nutritious foods is an effective approach in low-income areas to improve the quality of young children's diet and, hence, their growth and development. To identify the nutritional values of locally acceptable, feasible, affordable, and sustainable foods and develop a number of recipes that could be used to complement effectively nutrient intakes provided through breastfeeding to children 6 to 23 months of age in Bandiagara, Mali. Structured questionnaires were used to obtain lists of all locally available foods during village assembly meetings and identify the food basket of households and child feeding practices during interviews with mothers and fathers. The nutritional values of the foods were estimated, and the Malian food composition table was used to identify the combinations that would result in the most nutritious recipes. Breastfeeding was widely practiced, but the rate of exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life was extremely low (7%). The practice of early introduction of water and complementary foods was a problem. Forty recipes for improved dishes, including puddings, drinks and juices, purees, salads, and soups, were proposed. The nutritional values of the 10 most nutritious of these recipes, the types and quantities of the ingredients, and the method of preparation of each recipe are described. Locally produced indigenous foods in rural Mali were used to develop energy- and nutrient-dense complementary foods for children. Further research is needed to test the short- and long-term effects of consuming these dishes on the nutritional status of children 6 to 23 months of age in Mali.

  5. Contribution of complementary foods to the total daily water needs of urban Guatemalan infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneman, A.; Campos, R.; Hernandez, L.; Palma, A.V.; Vossenaar, M.; Solomons, N.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Estimates of adequate intake (AI) for water only became available in 2005. The daily water AI for 6-12-month-old infants of both sexes is 800 mL. The present study aimed to estimate the water intake of urban infants receiving both breast milk and complementary feeding (CF) and to compare

  6. Evaluation of allium and its seasoning on toxigenic, nutritional, and sensorial profiles of groundnut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kasi; Anandaraj, K; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh A

    2014-04-01

    Mitigation of xerophilic storage fungi-associated aflatoxin threat in culinary oil will be a new technology advantage to food industries. Groundnut oil isolate Aspergillus flavus MTCC 10680 susceptibility to Allium species (A. sativum L., A. cepa L., and A. cepa var. aggregatum) extracts, composition, and in silico confirmation of extract's phytoconstituent aflatoxin synthesis inhibition were determined. The behavior of seasoning carrier medium groundnut oil in the presence of Allium was also determined. All the Allium species extracts exhibited concentration dependent in vitro inhibition on mycelial biomass, radial growth, and toxin elaboration. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of 28, 16, and 9 compounds in the extracts of A. sativum, A. cepa, A. cepa var. aggregatum, respectively. The Allium phytocostituents-like hexadecanoic acid, 5-Octanoyl-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-pyrimidinetrione, Guanosine, and so on, showed higher binding energy with aflatoxin synthesis key enzyme ver1. Allium seasoning increased the typical nutty odor of the groundnut oil with sweet aroma note as well as intensification of pale yellow color. Allium seasoning exhibited the highest aflatoxin detoxification and aroma development without any nutritional loss. Culinary oil Allium seasoning has anti-aflatoxin and food additive potential for use in food industries. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and maize in Zambia: observed and potential concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachapulula, P W; Akello, J; Bandyopadhyay, R; Cotty, P J

    2017-06-01

    The aims of the study were to quantify aflatoxins, the potent carcinogens associated with stunting and immune suppression, in maize and groundnut across Zambia's three agroecologies and to determine the vulnerability to aflatoxin increases after purchase. Aflatoxin concentrations were determined for 334 maize and groundnut samples from 27 districts using lateral-flow immunochromatography. Seventeen per cent of crops from markets contained aflatoxin concentrations above allowable levels in Zambia (10 μg kg -1 ). Proportions of crops unsafe for human consumption differed significantly (P Aflatoxin in groundnut (39 μg kg -1 ) and maize (16 μg kg -1 ) differed (P = 0·032). Poor storage (31°C, 100% RH, 1 week) increased aflatoxin in safe crops by over 1000-fold in both maize and groundnut. The L morphotype of Aspergillus flavus was negatively correlated with postharvest increases in groundnut. Aflatoxins are common in Zambia's food staples with proportions of unsafe crops dependent on agroecology. Fungal community structure influences contamination suggesting Zambia would benefit from biocontrol with atoxigenic A. flavus. Aflatoxin contamination across the three agroecologies of Zambia is detailed and the case for aflatoxin management with atoxigenic biocontrol agents provided. The first method for evaluating the potential for aflatoxin increase after purchase is presented. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Modelling Bambara Groundnut Yield in Southern Africa: Towards a Climate-Resilient Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, A. S.; Walker, S.; Ruane, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Current agriculture depends on a few major species grown as monocultures that are supported by global research underpinning current productivity. However, many hundreds of alternative crops have the potential to meet real world challenges by sustaining humanity, diversifying agricultural systems for food and nutritional security, and especially responding to climate change through their resilience to certain climate conditions. Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilised African legume, is an exemplar crop for climate resilience. Predicted yield performances of Bambara groundnut by AquaCrop (a crop-water productivity model) were evaluated for baseline (1980-2009) and mid-century climates (2040-2069) under 20 downscaled Global Climate Models (CMIP5-RCP8.5), as well as for climate sensitivities (AgMIPC3MP) across 3 locations in Southern Africa (Botswana, South Africa, Namibia). Different land - races of Bambara groundnut originating from various semi-arid African locations showed diverse yield performances with diverse sensitivities to climate. S19 originating from hot-dry conditions in Namibia has greater future yield potential compared to the Swaziland landrace Uniswa Red-UN across study sites. South Africa has the lowest yield under the current climate, indicating positive future yield trends. Namibia reported the highest baseline yield at optimum current temperatures, indicating less yield potential in future climates. Bambara groundnut shows positive yield potential at temperatures of up to 31degC, with further warming pushing yields down. Thus, many regions in Southern Africa can utilize Bambara groundnut successfully in the coming decades. This modelling exercise supports decisions on genotypic suitability for present and future climates at specific locations.

  9. Nutritional, physicochemical, and functional properties of protein concentrate and isolate of newly-developed Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterreneaL.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke, Olaposi R; Adiamo, Oladipupo Q; Fawale, Olumide S

    2018-01-01

    Bambara groundnut is an indigenous African vegetable grown mainly for human food and animal feed due to its high protein content. Different factors like varieties and origin can influence the chemical composition of Bambara groundnut cultivars. Therefore, the aims of this study are to produce defatted flour and protein concentrate from newly developed Bambara groundnut cultivars [Accessions No: TVSU 5 - Bambara Groundnut White (BGW) and TVSU 146 - Bambara Groundnut Brown (BGB)] and compare their nutritional, physicochemical, and functional properties with market sample [Bambara groundnut commercial (BGC)]. Higher protein content was observed in BGW (20.73%) and BGB (20.14%) as compared to BGC (18.50%). Also, the fat and ash contents of BGB and BGW were higher than that of BGC. Also, the new varieties were found to contain higher levels of some essential fatty acids such as linoleic and linolenic acids. The concentration of thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic, ascorbic acids, pyrodoxine, alpha tocopherol, and vitamin K were also significantly higher in the two new varieties. The new varieties were good sources of magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, sodium, and potassium. The oil and water absorption and swelling capacities of whole, defatted, and protein concentrate flour of the new varieties increase with increase in temperature. The defatted flour and protein concentrate of brown Bambara groundnut was found to exhibit high emulsifying activity and stability at different pH's and salt concentrations. The new varieties possess significantly higher foaming capacity and stability than the commercial variety. The results obtained from this study have shown the potential for the industrial and household use of the new Bambara groundnut cultivars into shelf stable protein products and could be a useful ingredient in food formulations.

  10. Food variety in commercial and homemade complementary meals for infants in Germany. Market survey and dietary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesch, Christina M; Stimming, Madlen; Foterek, Kristina; Hilbig, Annett; Alexy, Ute; Kersting, Mathilde; Libuda, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Already infants do not meet the recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake although the complementary feeding period offers the possibility to expose the infant to a variety of flavours from fruits and vegetables. The objective of the present analysis was to identify differences in the vegetable variety in commercial vs. homemade complementary meals and to describe fish and meat variety in these meals in dietary practice in Germany. A further objective was to provide an overview of the food variety in commercial complementary vegetable-potato-meat/fish meals available on the German baby food market in 2012. 3-day weighed dietary records from the German DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study were used to describe the fish and meat variety and to compare the vegetable variety in commercial and homemade meals using a vegetable variety score (VegVS). The online data base 'Nutrichild' served to describe the food variety on the market. The vegetable variety was low in homemade as well as in commercial meals without any differences in total variety at 6 and 9months of age. At 12months of age infants fed with commercial meals got a higher vegetable variety than those fed with homemade meals. In homemade and commercial meals most often carrot was used, whereas other vegetables were far below this frequency. In both meals, poultry and beef were most often used whereas fish meals were rarely offered. The market survey showed the same low vegetable variety and low fish offer as the results of the DONALD study. The data show that it is necessary to promote the advantages of a vegetable variety and fish consumption in Germany, already in early infancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Infant and young child feeding in the Peruvian Amazon: the need to promote exclusive breastfeeding and nutrient-dense traditional complementary foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Marion L; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Tuesta, Irma; Kuhnlein, Harriet V

    2011-07-01

    The study objective was to understand the role of traditional Awajún foods in dietary quality and the potential impacts on growth of Awajún infants and young children 0-23 months of age. Research took place in April and May of 2004, along the Cenepa River in six Awajún communities. Anthropometry estimated nutritional status for 32 infants (0-23 months). Repeat dietary recalls and infant feeding histories were completed with 32 mothers. Adequacy of the complementary foods was compared with World Health Organization guidelines. Anthropometry indicated a high prevalence of stunting (39.4% of infants and young children), with nutritional status declining with age. Half of the Awajún mothers practised exclusive breastfeeding. Dietary recalls and infant food histories suggested that many of the infants were getting adequate nutrition from complementary foods and breastfeeding; however, there was variation in breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices among the mothers. Complementary feeding for young children 12-23 months generally met nutrient recommendations, but mean intakes for iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin A were inadequate in infants 6-11 months. Traditional foods provided 85% of energy and were more nutrient dense than market foods. Appropriate infant and complementary feeding was found among some women; however, given the range of feeding practices and introduction of market foods, health promotion targeting infant and young child feeding is warranted. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Alterations in subspecific characters of groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouli, C.; Patil, S.H.; Kale, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recombination of beneficial characters associated in the cultivars of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea, L.) belonging to the two subspecies hypogaea and fastigiata had little success in conventional breeding programme. The cultures of ssp. hypogaea have the desirable characters for the crop improvement viz; various growth habits, profuse branching, large pod, seed dormancy and stress tolerance. Sequential flowering, early maturity, compact fruiting habit and high kernel outturn are the other useful characters present in ssp. fastigiata cultures. Mutation research in a popular variety, Spanish Improved belonging to ssp. fastigiata led to the selection of various mutants. One among the mutants had large pod, a characteristic of hypogaea ssp. Hybridization among the mutants and improved cultivars as well as radiation treatment of selected cultures resulted in the isolation of cultures having not only combinations and alterations of characters in both subspecies, but also modifications. These cultures are classified into major groups and their significance in the groundnut improvement is discussed. (author)

  13. Thrombocytopenia as an adverse effect of complementary and alternative medicines, herbal remedies, nutritional supplements, foods, and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Derek J; George, James N; Terrell, Deirdra R

    2010-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a well-recognized adverse effect of many drugs. However, the association of thrombocytopenia with complementary/alternative medicines, herbal remedies, nutritional supplements, foods, and beverages has been rarely described, except for reports of thrombocytopenia caused by quinine-containing beverages. To systematically identify all published reports of thrombocytopenia associated with these substances and to assess the evidence supporting their causal association with thrombocytopenia. Eleven databases were searched to identify relevant published reports. A priori criteria were defined for article selection and assessment. Each selected article was independently assessed by the three authors to document the presence of the criteria and determine the level of evidence for a causal association of the reported substance with thrombocytopenia. Twenty-seven articles were identified that reported the occurrence of thrombocytopenia with 25 substances (other than quinine). However, only six articles describing five substances (cow's milk, cranberry juice, Jui [Chinese herbal tea], Lupinus termis bean, and tahini [pulped sesame seeds]) reported clinical data supporting definite evidence of a causal association with thrombocytopenia. Four articles provided probable evidence for four additional substances, and five articles provided possible evidence for five additional substances. In the remaining articles, the association with thrombocytopenia was unlikely or the articles were excluded from review. Reports of thrombocytopenia describing definite or probable evidence for an association of a complementary/alternative medicines, herbal remedies, nutritional supplements, foods, and beverages are rare. Whether the occurrence of thrombocytopenia with these substances is uncommon or unrecognized is unknown.

  14. Use of deuterium oxide to measure breast-milk intake in children aged 7 to 12 months receiving complementary foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed-Kanashiro, H.

    1999-01-01

    The present study is being conducted to pilot the use of the deuterium oxide method for the measurement of breast-milk intake in children 7 - 12 months of age receiving complementary foods. This will be applied to a community efficacy study to determine the effects on total energy and nutrient intake and on breast-milk consumption of an intensive education intervention using locally available, culturally acceptable complementary foods. In order to apply the methodology to this evaluation the washout period of deuterium from the mother and the child after the administration of a dose to the mother is being determined and the comparison of this methodology with the test weighing technique for breast-milk intake. The measurement of deuterium oxide using the infrared spectrometer of the Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional [IIN] is being compared with the IR Mass Spectrometer of INTA Chile. During the present period we have conducted a pilot study to measure breast-milk intake using deuterium oxide in 9 mother-child pairs of children aged 7 - 11 months of age; samples of saliva have been taken for analyses. One child has completed the 28 days of the study and 8 children are in process. Test weighing for 48 hours has been conducted on 5 children; unadjusted breast-milk intake ranges from 589 to 682 g per 24 hours. The samples are awaiting analysis for deuterium oxide. (author)

  15. Sodium, sugar, and fat content of complementary infant and toddler foods sold in the United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Joyce; Cogswell, Mary E; Bates, Marlana; Yuan, Keming; Scanlon, Kelley S; Pehrsson, Pamela; Gunn, Janelle P; Merritt, Robert K

    2017-06-01

    Background: As part of a healthy diet, limiting intakes of excess sodium, added sugars, saturated fat, and trans fat has been recommended. The American Heart Association recommends that children aged determine commercial complementary infant-toddler food categories that were of potential concern because of the sodium, added sugar, saturated fat, or trans fat content. Design: Nutrition label information (e.g., serving size, sodium, saturated fat, trans fat) for 1032 infant and toddler foods was collected from manufacturers' websites and stores from May to July 2015 for 24 brands, which accounted for >95% of infant-toddler food sales. The presence of added sugars was determined from the ingredient list. Reference amount customarily consumed (RACC) categories were used to group foods and standardize serving sizes. A high sodium content was evaluated on the basis of the Upper Intake Level for children aged 1-3 y and the number of potential servings per day ([i.e., 1500 mg/7 servings (>210 mg/RACC)], a sodium amount >200 mg/100 g, or a mean sodium density >1000 mg/1000 kcal. Results: In 2015, most commercial infant-only vegetables, fruit, dinners, and cereals were low in sodium, contained no saturated fat, and did not contain added sugars. On average, toddler meals contained 2233 mg Na/1000 kcal, and 84% of the meals had >210 mg Na/RACC (170 g), whereas 69% of infant-toddler savory snacks had >200 mg Na/100 g. More than 70% of toddler meals, cereal bars and breakfast pastries, and infant-toddler grain- or dairy-based desserts contained ≥1 sources of added sugar. Approximately 70% of toddler meals contained saturated fat (mean: 1.9 g/RACC), and no commercial infant-toddler foods contained trans fats. Conclusion: Most commercial toddler meals, cereal bars and breakfast pastries, and infant-toddler snacks and desserts have high sodium contents or contain added sugars, suggesting a need for continued public health efforts to support parents in choosing complementary foods

  16. Proximate composition and functional properties of four cultivars of bambara groundnut (Voandezeia subterranea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onimawo, I A; Momoh, A H; Usman, A

    1999-01-01

    Proximate composition and selected functional properties of four cultivars of bambara groundnut (Voandezeia subterranea Thoura) were ascertained. Crude protein ranged from 17.5 to 21.1 percent; crude fat 7.3-8.5 percent; total ash 4-5 percent; crude fiber 1.8-2.0 percent; carbohydrate and moisture content for the different cultivars were 53.0-60.8 percent and 7.5-12.3 percent, respectively. The results of functional property determinations indicated that the bulk density ranged from 0.65 to 0.75 g/ml; water binding capacity 2.1-2.9 g/2g sample; oil binding capacity 0.9-1.6 g/2g sample; emulsifying activity 55.1-60.0 percent and emulsifying stability 10-12 percent. The results show that bambara groundnut has great potential for incorporation into various human foods where it could provide useful plant proteins.

  17. Profitability and Econimic Efficientcy of Groundnut Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been a remarkable reduction in the contribution of groundnut to Nigeria's foreign exchange earnings since the discovery of petroleum resources. There is need to re-position this valuable crop to assume its rightfull position in the nation's economy. Thus, this study assessed the profitability of groundnut production ...

  18. genetics of resistance to groundnut rosette virus disease abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Groundnut Rosette Virus disease (GRD) has long been regarded a major limiting biotic constraint to groundnut production in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The disease is caused by a complex of three viral components that interact in a synergistic fashion resulting into severe crop losses. A study was conducted to better ...

  19. Genetics of resistance to groundnut rosette virus disease. | Kayondo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut Rosette Virus disease (GRD) has long been regarded a major limiting biotic constraint to groundnut production in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The disease is caused by a complex of three viral components that interact in a synergistic fashion resulting into severe crop losses. A study was conducted to better ...

  20. Nitrogen effects on maize yield following groundnut in rotation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotating maize (Zea mays L.) with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) has been proposed as a way to maintain soil fertility and prevent maize productivity declines in the smallholder cropping systems of sub-humid Zimbabwe. Field experiments with fertilizer-N on maize in rotation with groundnut were conducted at three ...

  1. An Investigation Into the Use of Groundnut as Fine Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut shells were used to replace ne aggregate at 0, 5, 15, 25, 50 and 75% replacement levels. The e ects of the groundnut shells on the workability of fresh concrete were determined by the slump and compacting factor value tests. Compressive strengths and density values of the concrete cubes were evaluated at 28 ...

  2. The replacement value of groundnut cake with cooked Bambara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy five day-old Anak 2000 broiler chicks were randomly allotted to five dietary treatments 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in which groundnut cake (GNC) was replaced by cooked bambara groundnut meal (CBGM) at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% levels of inclusion for both starter and finisher phases. Replacement levels of cooked bambara ...

  3. determination of some physical properties of three groundnut varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    groundnuts. Three varieties of groundnuts namely ICGV-SM-93523, RMP-9 and RMP- 12 were collected and some of the physical properties, such as weight, angle of repose, coefficient of friction, bulk density, size, shape and moisture content were determined. The angle of repose for the three varieties was found to range ...

  4. The Effect of Consuming Groundnuts on Serum Testosterone Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The rats fed on 25% groundnuts showed insignificant difference in mean lipids and testosterone p>0.05. The 75% groundnuts fed rats had significantly lower total cholesterol, higher high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and higher testosterone p<0.05, an insignificantly higher low density lipoprotein-cholesterol plus ...

  5. Mixed cropping of groundnuts and maize in East Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van W.C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed cropping of groundnuts and maize in East Java was studied by means of a survey of farming practice and by field experiments. The influence of different sowing times and plant density of maize on the development and yield of groundnuts and maize were the main topics in this thesis. Plant

  6. Response of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (l.) Verdc.) to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soils in Botswana are known to be poor in phosphorus. Information is lacking on the P requirements of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) in Botswana soils and soil moisture can also limit P uptake. Elsewhere the response of bambara groundnut to P fertilization is contradictory. The effects of phosphorus (P) ...

  7. Groundnut-Corn Starch Blend- A Response Surface Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cookie bars were produced from mixtures of cassava and groundnut flours with cornstarch as binder. Box-Behnken response surface design for k=3 was used to study the effects of experimental variables for cassava flour (25-75%), groundnut flour (25-75%) and corn starch (5-15%). Effects of the experimental variables on ...

  8. Water use characteristics of a bambara groundnut ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bambara groundnut is slow to establish and this has negative implications for total water use. Consideration of bambara groundnut as a water-efficient crop for dry areas will benefit from an understanding of water use efficiency and water use characteristics during establishment. We investigated whether there is an ...

  9. Breeding in bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper shows how different strategies have been combined to establish the basis of a strategic breeding programme in bambara groundnut. The paper also illustrates the use of landraces in the bambara groundnut breeding programme, as an example of the contribution that landraces can make to increasing ...

  10. PICS bags safely store unshelled and shelled groundnuts in Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baributsa, D; Baoua, I B; Bakoye, O N; Amadou, L; Murdock, L L

    2017-05-01

    We conducted an experiment in Niger to evaluate the performance of hermetic triple layer (Purdue Improved Crop Storage- PICS) bags for the preservation of shelled and unshelled groundnut Arachis hypogaea L. Naturally-infested groundnut was stored in PICS bags and woven bags for 6.7 months. After storage, the average oxygen level in the PICS bags fell from 21% to 18% (v/v) and 21%-15% (v/v) for unshelled and shelled groundnut, respectively. Identified pests present in the stored groundnuts were Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) and Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens). After 6.7 months of storage, in the woven bag, there was a large increase in the pest population accompanied by a weight loss of 8.2% for unshelled groundnuts and 28.7% for shelled groundnut. In PICS bags for both shelled and unshelled groundnuts, by contrast, the density of insect pests did not increase, there was no weight loss, and the germination rate was the same compared to that recorded at the beginning of the experiment. Storing shelled groundnuts in PICS bags is the most cost-effective way as it increases the quantity of grain stored.

  11. Reactions of some Confectionery Groundnut Accessions to Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigations were conducted at four locations in Ghana during 2011 growing season to evaluate some confectionery groundnut accessions reactions to plant parasitic nematodes infection. Sixteen groundnut accessions were evaluated at Fumesua, Wenchi, Ejura and Atebubu in a 4 x 4 lattice design with three replications ...

  12. development of a motorized kneader for groundnut oil extraction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Preliminary studies showed that groundnut seeds contain 42% to 52% oil, and most of the world groundnut processing is done for that oil. It is a desirable cooking and salad oil, because of its quality, containing about 80% unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoneic acids and so much protein [2]. The traditional use of ...

  13. Breastfeeding, infant formula, and introduction to complementary foods - comparing data obtained by questionnaires and health visitors' reports to weekly short message service text messages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Signe; Buhl, Susanne; Husby, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    of the present analysis was to compare data on infant nutrition, that is, breastfeeding, use of infant formula, and introduction to complementary foods, obtained by four different methods. We assumed that weekly short message service (SMS) questions were the most reliable method, to which the other methods were...... weeks, and the mean age when introduced to complementary foods from 19 to 21 weeks. The mean duration of any breastfeeding was 33 weeks across methods. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the weekly SMS questions, the self-administered questionnaires and the health visitors' reports resulted in a greater...... proportion of mothers with an unknown breastfeeding status, a longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding and later introduction to complementary foods, while the duration of any breastfeeding did not differ....

  14. Food and Crime Fiction: Two Complementary Approaches to the Vietnamese Past in Tran-Nhut's Les travers du docteur Porc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Do

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With a series of detective novels set in 17th century Dai-Viet that showcase the traditions, beliefs and customs of an exotic culture, in which the food and food habits of the Vietnamese people play a prominent role, Thanh-Van Tran-Nhut, an engineer-turned-novelist of Vietnamese origins, has carved a niche for herself in the popular crime fiction market in France. This paper focuses on the novel Les Travers du Docteur Porc, in which Doctor Porc, forensic investigator and gourmand extraordinaire, adopts the mantle of chief detective from Tran-Nhut’s usual protagonist, the loyal mandarin Tan. In this movement, we argue, the author has shaped two different but complementary approaches to her birth-country’s turbulent past that coalesce in the gargantuan figure of the (politically unencumbered doctor and connoisseur of Vietnamese cuisine. Whereas the process of ‘solving the crime’ can be read as an attempt to seek answers and restore order in the wake of senseless bloodshed, it is food, we contend, that emerges, not only as a source of pleasure, succour and stability, but as a cultural heritage that war and upheaval failed to destroy.

  15. Identification of traditional foods with public health potential for complementary feeding in Western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinyuru, John N,; Konyole, Silvenus O.; Kenji, Glaston M.

    2012-01-01

    cruentus L. was found to be consumed as a leafy vegetable while another variety, Amaranthus hybridus L. was found to be consumed as a grain. Four species of winged termites, a grasshopper, black ant and dagaa fish were also identified. Twelve of the traditional foods were found to be associated...

  16. Lactation Consultant Support from Late Pregnancy with an Educational Intervention at 4 Months of Age Delays the Introduction of Complementary Foods in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Sonya L; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Gray, Andrew R; Churcher, Barbara; Davies, Rhondda S; Newlands, Alana; Galland, Barbara C; Sayers, Rachel M; Lawrence, Julie A; Taylor, Barry J; Taylor, Rachael W

    2015-07-01

    Although the WHO recommends that complementary feeding in infants should begin at 6 mo of age, it often begins before this in developed countries. Our objective was to determine whether lactation consultant (LC) support, with educational resources given at 4-mo postpartum, can delay the introduction of complementary foods until around 6 mo of age. A total of 802 mother-infant pairs were recruited from the single maternity hospital serving Dunedin, New Zealand (59% response rate) and randomly assigned to the following: 1) usual care (control group); 2) infant sleep education intervention (Sleep); 3) food, activity, and breastfeeding intervention (FAB); or 4) combination (both) intervention (Combo). Certified LCs delivered 3 intervention sessions (late pregnancy and 1-wk and 4-mo postpartum). The 4-mo contact used educational resources focused on developmental readiness for complementary foods. Age when complementary foods were introduced was obtained from repeated interviews (monthly from 3- to 27-wk postpartum). A total of 49.5% and 87.2% of infants received complementary foods before 5 and 6 mo of age, respectively. There was evidence of group differences in the number of infants introduced to complementary foods before 5 mo (P = 0.006), with those receiving support and resources (FAB and Combo groups combined; 55.6%) more likely to wait until at least 5 mo compared with controls (control and Sleep groups combined; 43.3%) (OR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.08, 2.16). However, there was no evidence they were more likely to wait until 6 mo of age (P = 0.52). Higher maternal age, higher parity, and a less positive attitude toward breastfeeding were positively associated, and drinking alcohol during pregnancy was negatively associated, with later age of introduction of complementary foods. Providing an LC and educational resources at 4-mo postpartum to predominantly well-educated, mainly European, women can delay the introduction of complementary foods until 5 mo of age, but not

  17. Construction of a genetic linkage map and QTL analysis in bambara groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nariman Salih; Redjeki, Endah Sri; Ho, Wai Kuan; Aliyu, Siise; Mayes, Katie; Massawe, Festo; Kilian, Andrzej; Mayes, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous underutilized legume that has the potential to improve food security in semi-arid Africa. So far, there are a lack of reports of controlled breeding populations that could be used for variety development and genetic studies. We report here the construction of the first genetic linkage map of bambara groundnut using a F3 population derived from a "narrow" cross between two domesticated landraces (Tiga Nicuru and DipC) with marked divergence in phenotypic traits. The map consists of 238 DArT array and SSR based markers in 21 linkage groups with a total genetic distance of 608.3 cM. In addition, phenotypic traits were evaluated for a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis over two generations. A total of 36 significant QTLs were detected for 19 traits. The phenotypic effect explained by a single QTL ranged from 11.6% to 49.9%. Two stable QTLs were mapped for internode length and growth habit. The identified QTLs could be useful for marker-assisted selection in bambara groundnut breeding programmes.

  18. Nutrition education and introduction of broad bean-based complementary food improves knowledge and dietary practices of caregivers and nutritional status of their young children in Hula, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negash, Canaan; Belachew, Tefera; Henry, Carol J; Kebebu, Afework; Abegaz, Kebede; Whiting, Susan J

    2014-12-01

    Nutritious complementary foods are needed in countries where undernutrition and stunting are major problems, but mothers may be reluctant to change from traditional gruels. To test whether a recipe-based complementary feeding education intervention would improve knowledge and practice of mothers with young children in Hula, Ethiopia. A baseline survey of 200 eligible, randomly selected mother-child pairs gathered data on sociodemographic characteristics, food security status, knowledge and practices concerning complementary feeding, food group intakes of children aged 6 to 23 months by 24-hour recalls, and children's anthropometric measurements. Twice a month for 6 months, women in the intervention group received an education session consisting of eight specific messages using Alive and Thrive posters and a demonstration and tasting of a local barley and maize porridge recipe containing 30% broad beans. The control group lived in a different area and had no intervention. At 6 months, knowledge and practice scores regarding complementary feeding were significantly improved (p nutrition education over 6 months that included demonstration of a local porridge recipe with broad beans added improved the complementary feeding practices of caregivers and the nutritional status of their young children.

  19. Popularization of groundnut varieties through BARC-UASD collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudan, K.; Nadaf, H.L.; Hanchinal, R.R.; Krishna Naik, L.; Motagi, B.N.; Biradar Patil, N.K.; Hunje, Ravi; D'Souza, S.F.; Badigannavar, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    To boost the productivity of groundnut, farmers need to have an access to improved seeds of the right variety, at the right time, at the right place, at an affordable price. The awareness and benefits of the improved varieties and quality seeds of groundnut was carried out by carefully planned co-ordinated educational systems such as field trials, demonstrations, field days, training farmers, interface meetings through the well established network of the University and mass media promotional tools. The BARC-UASD collaboration led to the popularization of BARC groundnut varieties like TAG-24, TG-26, TPG-41 and TDG-39 among the farming community of north Karnataka. (author)

  20. Sweetpotato-based complementary food would be less inhibitory on mineral absorption than a maize-based infant food assessed by compositional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagloh, Francis Kweku; Brough, Louise; Weber, Janet L; Mutukumira, Anthony N; Hardacre, Allan; Coad, Jane

    2012-12-01

    The availability of micronutrients from sweetpotato-based complementary foods (CFs): oven-toasted and roller-dried ComFa, and from a maize-based infant food, enriched Weanimix, was compared using phytate/mineral molar ratios, polyphenols and β-carotene levels. The phytate/calcium, iron and zinc molar ratios of approximately 0.17, 1 and 15 predict better absorption of calcium, iron and zinc respectively. Generally, the sweetpotato-based CFs had at least half the phytate/mineral ratios of enriched Weanimix. The phytate/iron ratio in both the sweetpotato- and the maize-based CFs was greater than 1. Only the ComFa formulations had phytate/zinc ratio lower than 15. The level of polyphenol (iron inhibitor) was similar for the formulations. Only the sweetpotato-based CFs contained measurable levels of β-carotene, a possible iron enhancer. The lower phytate/mineral ratios and the β-carotene level of the sweetpotato-based CFs suggest that calcium, iron and zinc absorption could be better from them than from the maize-based infant food.

  1. Evaluating the skill of seasonal weather forecasts in predicting aflatoxin contamination of groundnut in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brak, B.; Challinor, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of toxic secondary metabolites produced by some strains of a number of species within Aspergillus section Flavi, contaminate a range of crops grown at latitudes between 40N° and 40S° of the equator. Digestion of food products derived from aflatoxin-contaminated crops may result in acute and chronic health problems in human beings. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa in particular have seen large percentages of the human population exposed to aflatoxin. A recent study showed that over 98% of subjects in West Africa tested positive for aflatoxin biomarkers. According to other research, every year 250,000 people die from hepato-cellular carcinoma related causes due to aflatoxin ingestion in parts of West Africa. Strict aflatoxin levels set by importing countries in accordance with the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) also impair the value of agricultural trade. Over the last thirty years this has led to a reduction of African exports of groundnut by 19% despite the consumption of groundnut derived food products going up by 209%. The occurrence of aflatoxin on crops is strongly influenced by weather. Empirical studies in the US have shown that pre-harvest, aflatoxin contamination of groundnuts is induced by conditions of drought stress in combination with soil temperatures between 25°C and 31°C. Post-harvest, aflatoxin production of stored, Aspergillus-contaminated groundnuts is exacerbated in conditions where relative humidity is above 83%. The GLAM crop model was extended to include a soil temperature subroutine and subroutines containing pre- and post-harvest aflatoxin algorithms. The algorithms used to estimate aflatoxin contamination indices are based on findings from multiple empirical studies and the pre-harvest aflatoxin model has been validated for Australian conditions. Hence, there was sufficient scope to use GLAM with these algorithms to answer the foremost research question: Is the

  2. Optimization of a phytase-containing micronutrient powder with low amounts of highly bioavailable iron for in-home fortification of complementary foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troesch, B.; Egli, I.; Zeder, C.; Hurrell, R.F.; Pee, de S.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In-home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient powders containing low amounts of iron may be potentially safer than powders containing high amounts of iron. However, low iron doses have little nutritional effect, unless iron absorption is high. Objective: The objective

  3. Aflatoxin B1 levels in groundnut products from local markets in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M C; Matumba, Limbikani; Kanenga, Kennedy; Siambi, Moses; Waliyar, Farid; Maruwo, Joseph; Machinjiri, Norah; Monyo, Emmanuel S

    2017-05-01

    In Zambia, groundnut products (milled groundnut powder, groundnut kernels) are mostly sold in under-regulated markets. Coupled with the lack of quality enforcement in such markets, consumers may be at risk to aflatoxin exposure. However, the level of aflatoxin contamination in these products is not known. Compared to groundnut kernels, milled groundnut powder obscures visual indicators of aflatoxin contamination in groundnuts such as moldiness, discoloration, insect damage or kernel damage. A survey was therefore conducted from 2012 to 2014, to estimate and compare aflatoxin levels in these products (n = 202), purchased from markets in important groundnut growing districts and in urban areas. Samples of whole groundnut kernels (n = 163) and milled groundnut powder (n = 39) were analysed for aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA). Results showed substantial AFB 1 contamination levels in both types of groundnut products with maximum AFB 1 levels of 11,100 μg/kg (groundnut kernels) and 3000 μg/kg (milled groundnut powder). However, paired t test analysis showed that AFB 1 contamination levels in milled groundnut powder were not always significantly higher (P > 0.05) than those in groundnut kernels. Even for products from the same vendor, AFB 1 levels were not consistently higher in milled groundnut powder than in whole groundnut kernels. This suggests that vendors do not systematically sort out whole groundnut kernels of visually poor quality for milling. However, the overall contamination levels of groundnut products with AFB 1 were found to be alarmingly high in all years and locations. Therefore, solutions are needed to reduce aflatoxin levels in such under-regulated markets.

  4. Productivity of Cassava, Sorghum and Groundnut Intercrop Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity of Cassava, Sorghum and Groundnut Intercrop Using Poultry Manure with Chemical Fertilizer Replacement Combinations. II Ibeawuchi, CI Duruigbo, LU Ihenacho, GO Ihejirika, MO Ofor, OP Obilo, JC Obiefuna ...

  5. Two-dimensional partitioning of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    YCA) was evaluated using a groundnut, (Arachis hypogaea L.) crop at four plant population densities or five thinning intensities (%) after flowering. The experiments were carried out during the 1989/90 cropping season at the University of ...

  6. Developmental Readiness of Normal Full Term Infants To Progress from Exclusive Breastfeeding to the Introduction of Complementary Foods: Reviews of the Relevant Literature Concerning Infant Immunologic, Gastrointestinal, Oral Motor and Maternal Reproductive and Lactational Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Audrey J., Ed.; Morrow, Ardythe L., Ed.

    This review of the developmental readiness of normal, full-term infants to progress from exclusive breastfeeding to the introduction of complementary foods is the result of the international debate regarding the best age to introduce complementary foods into the diet of the breastfed human infant. After a list of definitions, four papers focus on:…

  7. Determination of Some Physical Properties of Three Groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coefficient of friction averaged 0.56 on wood and 0.41 on galvanized steel for the three varieties of groundnut pods. The moisture contents of the pods, seeds and shells were found to be 7.4%, 6.4% and 11.3% (wet basis) on the average respectively. The results also showed that groundnut pods and seeds were neither ...

  8. The performance characteristics of groundnut ( Arachis hypogea , L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethyl-esters were blended with automotive gas oil at (0 to 20%) mix with 5% increment of groundnut ethyl-esters to produce biodiesel. The performance of a 2.46 kW diesel engine was evaluated using the groundnut biodiesel at five loading conditions (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of full load). Automotive gas oil was used as ...

  9. Modelling the canopy development of bambara groundnut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunaratne, A.S.; Azam-Ali, S.N.; Al-Shareef, I.

    2010-01-01

    Canopy development of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) is affected by temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiod. The quantification of these documented effects by means of a suitable crop model, BAMGRO is presented in this paper. Data on canopy development from five growth...... chamber, four glasshouse and three field experiments were analyzed to calibrate and validate the BAMGRO model to produce simulations for temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiodic effect on two contrasting landraces; Uniswa Red (Swaziland) and S19-3 (Namibia). The daily initiation rate of new...... leaves is calculated by means of a Gaussian function and is altered by temperature stress, drought stress, photoperiod and plant density. The rate in dead leaf number is dependent upon the maximum senescence fraction which can be explained by physiological maturity, mutual shading, temperature stress...

  10. Seed morphology and early development of yhe groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staritsky, G.

    1973-01-01

    The morphogenesis of groundnut plants from an age of 0 to 21 days is described. The opinion that flower primordia are present in groundnut seeds is not confirmed. Further observations prove that the early development of the groundnut is less fixed than former conceptions about the structure of the

  11. Aflatoxins and fumonisins contamination of home-made food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Weanimix is an important food for children in Ghana. Mothers are trained to prepare homemade weanimix from beans, groundnuts and maize for their infants. Groundnuts and maize are prone to aflatoxin contamination while fumonisin contaminates maize. Aflatoxin, is produced by the Asperguillus fungi while ...

  12. Agro-Science Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PC USER

    world is suffering due to insufficient and imbalance diet (Rasul et al., ... Protein intake can be augmented with vegetable proteins obtained from ... grown among the rural poor and are largely accepted traditional food in the developing regions of the world. One of such legumes is the bambara groundnut. Bambara groundnut ...

  13. Bacteriological And Nutritional Analysis Of Groundnut Cake Sold In An Open Market In Samaru Zaria-Kaduna State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacteriological and nutritional analysis of groundnut cake powder sold in open market at Samaru-Zaria was studied. The samples collected from four zones of the study area were analysed for possible microbiological contamination and its nutritional quality. The results indicated a microbial load of 1.93 x 105 cfug and 1.94 x 105 cfug for zones A and B respectively 1.01 x 105 cfug for zone C and 2.37 x 105 cfug for zone D. The bacterial isolates found to be associated with the groundnut cake powder in this study included Klebsiella oxytoca Staphylococcus aureus Bacillus cereus E. coli P. aeruginosa and Streptococcus feacalis. The nutrients content of the sample included carbohydrates 55.15 moisture 12.65 lipid 15.40 protein 12.60 ash 3.95 and crude fibre 0.25. Groundnut cake sold in the study area is highly contaminated with bacteria except for samples from zone C which is within the Food and Drugs Agency FDA recommendation of 1.0 x 105cfuml as allowable microbial contamination for food. The high level of microbial contamination is a serious cause for concern as it may trigger epidemics. However the product is highly nutritious.

  14. Bacterial populations in complementary foods and drinking-water in households with children aged 10-15 months in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung'u, Jacqueline K; Boor, Kathryn J; Ame, Shaali M; Ali, Nadra S; Jackson, Anna E; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2009-02-01

    Bacteria were quantified in samples of drinking-water and in two porridges prepared for infant-feeding [fortified instant soy-rice porridge (SRP) and cooked porridge (Lishe bora, LB)] in 54 households. Bacterial numbers were measured again after the porridges had been held at room temperature for four hours (T4). Findings were benchmarked against bacterial numbers in traditional complementary foods sampled from 120 households. Total bacteria, coliform, and Enterobacteriaceae counts were enumerated using Petrifilm. The mean log bacterial numbers were the lowest for LB at TO (2.24 +/- 0.84 cfu/g aerobic counts) and the highest for SRP at T4 (4.63 +/- 0.56 cfu/g aerobic counts). The total bacteria, coliform and Enterobacteriaceae counts were higher at T4 than at T0 for LB (p 0.999) different from traditional foods, the coliform and Enterobacteriaceae counts were significantly higher in SRP4 than in traditional foods (p<0.001). It is, therefore, recommended that food safety concerns be addressed when improving complementary foods.

  15. Beyond landraces: developing improved germplasm resources for underutilized species - a case for Bambara groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Siise; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2014-10-01

    The potential for underutilized crops (also known as minor, neglected or orphan crops) to improve food and nutrition security has been gaining prominence within the research community in recent years. This is due to their significance for diversified agricultural systems which is a necessary component of future agriculture to address food and nutritional security concerns posed by changing climate and a growing world population. Developing workable value chain systems for underutilized crop species, coupled with comparative trait studies with major crops, potentially allows us to identify suitable agricultural modalities for such species. Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.), an underutilized leguminous species, is of interest for its reported high levels of drought tolerance in particular, which contributes to environmental resilience in semi-arid environments. Here, we present a synopsis of suitable strategies for the genetic improvement of Bambara groundnut as a guide to other underutilized crop species. Underutilized crops have often been adapted over thousands of years in particular regions by farmers and largely still exist as landraces with little or no genetic knowledge of key phenotypic traits. Breeding in these species is fundamentally different to breeding in major crops, where significant pedigree structures and history allow highly directed improvement. In this regard, deploying new integrated germplasm development approaches for variety development and genetic analysis, such as multi-parent advance generation inter-crosses (MAGIC), within breeding programmes of underutilized species will be important to be able to fully utilize such crops.

  16. Sevin residues in groundnut varieties and the effect of commercial processing procedures on the fate of 14C sevin in groundnut oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, M.G.; Murthy, N.B.K.; Raghu, K.

    1980-01-01

    Groundnut varieties, Spanish Improved, J-11, TG-8 and TG-9 were sprayed with sevin (1-Naphthyl, N-methylcarbamate) at the recommended field dose. The oil extracted from harvested groundnut kernel did not show any detectable residues as sevin. Crude groundnut oil, when fortified with 14 C sevin, and the oil subjected to commercial processing techniques of alkali refining and bleaching, removed nearly 67% of the total 14 C radioactivity initially added. (author)

  17. Improvement of bambara groundnut production using induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoatey, H.M.; Klu, G.Y.P.

    1997-01-01

    Induction of variation in bambara groundnut using gamma radiation has been tried before. However, no mutants with the desired determinate flowering habit and synchronous pod maturity were obtained. This project is aimed at: conducting a nationwide exploration exercise to collect germplasm of bambara groundnut for agronomic evaluation with respect to flowering and fruiting characteristics and their effects on yield; and, applying the technique of mutation induction to create variability (if this is not found in the germplasm to be collected) from which mutants with determinate flowering and fruiting habit may be selected for use in breeding. 6 refs

  18. Effects of Animal-Source Foods and Micronutrient-Fortification Complementary Foods on Body Composition, Linear Growth, Iron Status – the WinFood Project in Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhoun, Chamnan; Kloppenborg Heick Skau, Jutta; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine; Friis, Henrik; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Roos, Nanna; Touch, Bunthang; Chea, Mary; Wieringa, Frank; Berger, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: The nutritional quality of CF in developing countries is often insufficient to sustain optimal growth. The Winfood project evaluated the efficacy of two new, processed rice-fish based CF with local ASF in Cambodia: non-fortified ‘WinFood’ (WF) with 14% by dry-weight ASF from small-sized fish (Esomus longimanus and Paralaubuca typus) and edible spiders (Haplopelma sp.); an adjusted ‘lite’ WinFood (WF-L) with 10% by dry-weight ASF from small-sized fish of mixed species, and fortified with minerals and vitamins. The products were precooked by extrusion. The WF-products were compared with two standard products from World Food Programme: Corn-Soy-Blend (CSB+) and CSB++ (8% by dry-weight skimmed-milk powder), in a single-blinded randomized trial. Methods: 419 Cambodian infants at age 6 months were randomized to daily rations of one of the four products for nine months period. BC (deuterium dilution) and iron status (serum ferritin and hemoglobin) were measured before and after intervention; and anthropometry (knee-heel-length, length, weight, MUAC, head circumference and skinfolds) monthly. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat. Results: Among 358 children completing the study, no significant difference in BC between the groups where found, but knee-heel length increments differed (P = 0.046: WF-L: 3.6 cm, CSB++: 3.6 cm, WF: 3.5 cm, CSB+: 3.4 cm), suggesting that micronutrient-fortified products with 8-10% ASF (CSB++ and WF-L) promoted better linear growth than products without fortification or ASF. Knee-heel and total length increment was significantly higher in the highest food compliance quartile compared to the lowest, across food groups. There were no differences in ferritin and hemoglobin concentration. There was higher prevalence of anemic children in the WF group. Conclusion: Products with ASF (milk or small fish) and micronutrient premix resulted in slightly better linear growth. Small fish is a cheap ASF with high potential

  19. Simulated effects of home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient powders on risk of inadequate and excessive intakes in West Gojjam, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Zeweter; Haki, Gulelat Desse; Baye, Kaleab

    2018-01-01

    Home fortification of complementary foods (CFs) with multiple micronutrient powders (MNPs) is being scaled up in various countries, but little is known about the prevailing complementary feeding practices and the type and nutrient gaps to be filled with MNPs. The present study evaluated the complementary feeding practices of young children and simulated the risk of inadequate and excessive intakes associated with home fortification with MNPs. We have assessed the sociodemographic status, anthropometry, and complementary feeding practices of young children (N = 122) in Mecha district, rural Ethiopia. Using a 2-day, quantitative 24-hr recall, usual intakes of energy, protein, iron, zinc, and calcium were estimated. The risks of inadequate and excessive iron and zinc intakes with or without home fortification scenarios were assessed. The simulations considered intakes from CFs assuming average breast milk contributions and additional nutrients provided by the MNPs. Stunting was highly prevalent (50%) and was associated with a lower dietary diversity (P = .009) and nutrient intakes from the CFs. Median energy, zinc, and calcium intakes were below the estimated needs from CFs; protein needs were met. Median dietary iron intake appeared adequate, but 76%, 95% CI [68%, 84%], of children had inadequate intake (assuming low bioavailability), whereas another 8%, 95% CI: [3%, 13%], had excessive intakes. Simulation of daily and alternative day's fortification with MNP decreased the prevalence of inadequate iron and zinc intake but significantly increased the risk of excessive intakes that remained unacceptably high for iron (>2.5%). Untargeted MNP interventions may lead to excessive intakes, even in settings where poor complementary feeding practices are prevalent. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. On-Farm Demonstrations with a Set of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs Proved Cost-Effective in Reducing Pre-Harvest Aflatoxin Contamination in Groundnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraju Parimi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin contamination in groundnut is an important qualitative issue posing a threat to food safety. In our present study, we have demonstrated the efficacy of certain good agricultural practices (GAPs in groundnut, such as farmyard manure (5 t/ha, gypsum (500 kg/ha, a protective irrigation at 90 days after sowing (DAS, drying of pods on tarpaulins after harvest in farmers’ fields. During 2013–2015, 89 on-farm demonstrations were conducted advocating GAPs, and compared with farmers’ practices (FP plots. Farmers’ awareness of GAPs, and knowledge on important aspects of groundnut cultivation, were also assessed during our experimentation in the selected villages under study. Pre-harvest kernel infection by Aspergillus flavus, aflatoxin contamination, and pod yields were compared in GAPs plots, vis-à-vis FP plots. The cost of cultivation in both the plots was calculated and compared, based on farmer’s opinion surveys. Results indicate kernel infections and aflatoxins were significantly lower, with 13–58% and 62–94% reduction, respectively, in GAPs plots over FP. Further, a net gain of around $23 per acre was realized through adoption of GAPs by farmers besides quality improvement of groundnuts. Based on our results, it can be concluded that on-farm demonstrations were the best educative tool to convince the farmers about the cost-effectiveness, and adoptability of aflatoxin management technologies.

  1. The Effects Of Replacing Groundnut Cake With Cottonseed Cake On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of replacing groundnut cake (GNC) with cottonseed cake (CSC) at 0, 50 and 100% levels in starter and finisher diets on broiler performance, carcass characteristics and gut morphology were evaluated in a 56 - day feeding trial. Average daily feed intake, average daily weight gain, and feed/gain ratio were ...

  2. Yield stability of some groundnut accessions in northern Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yield stability of 12 groundnut accessions mainly developed by ICRISAT and two check varieties were tested in multilocational trials covering four locations in northern Ghana during the 1994, 1996, and 1997 cropping seasons. The trial for each year was arranged in a randomized complete block design with four ...

  3. Effects of substituting groundnut cake with acacia seed kernel meal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effects of replacing groundnut cake (GNC) with Acacia nilotica seed kernel meal (ASKM) in the diets of broilers and the effects of such on ... Serum metabolites were not affected by the treatment except alkaline phosphatasc and billirubin that were significantly (P < 0.05) lowered by 20% inclusion of ...

  4. Groundnut Market Participation in the Upper West Region of Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intensity of market participation. The results showed that about fifty-three percent of the output of groundnuts was sold in the region within the production year, which indicated a moderate commercialisation index. The results also indicated that marital status, output, mobile phone ownership, credit access, access to market ...

  5. Profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut is an important cash crop and a good source of vegetable oil to resource-poor farmers. The study examined the Profitability of Groundnut–based Cropping Systems among farmers in Hong Local Government Area of Adamawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers were ...

  6. The effects of Groundnut, Spices, Monosodium Glutamate and Salt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was intended to determine the effect of salt, groundnut, monosodium glutamate and spices, especially in combinations as used in Yaji, on the histology of the brain. The rats were divided into nine (9) groups (A – I) of eight rats (8) each. Groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, constituted the test groups whereas group I ...

  7. Energy partitioning for growth by rabbits fed groundnut and stylo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty eight crossbred (California X New Zealand White) rabbits were used to evaluate energy partitioning of rabbits fed forages supplemented with concentrate. The rabbits were randomly allocated to three treatments consisting of sole Stylosanthes hamata (stylo),sole Arachis hypogea (groundnut) haulms and 50:50 mixture ...

  8. Performance of broiler chickens fed on lima bean, groundnut and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental diets were formulated using lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus Linn) groundnut (Arachis hypogeae Linn) and soybean (Glacin max Linn) mixed in varying proportions to supply 23% crude protein (CP) for starter and 20% crude protein (CP) for finisher diets. Proximate analysis of the diets revealed a generally lower ...

  9. Performance of five bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted in 2007 in Wenchi in the Transition agroecology of Ghana to determine the effect of sowing dates on the yield of bambara groundnut landraces namely; Burkina, NAV 4, NAV Red, Black eye, Tom, Mottled Red and Ada. Sowings were done in a factorial arrangement in a randomized complete ...

  10. Composition and variation of fatty acids among groundnut cultivars

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Composition and variation of fatty acids among groundnut cultivars. 299 treatment of inflamatory disease. Nutricion. Hospitalaria 21:28-41. Gupta, S.K. 2011. Technological innovations in major world oil crops (1 Ed.). Newyork: Springer. pp. 123-150. Hassan, F.U. and Ahmed, M. 2012. Oil and fatty acid composition of peanut ...

  11. Economic evaluation of soil fertility management in groundnut fields ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides the economic evaluation of soil fertility replenishing technologies (use of inorganic fertilizers, organic manure, and rhizobium inoculant) that were tested and recommended. Data on groundnut technologies used, yields, resource availability and use, and farmers' characteristics were collected through ...

  12. Enhancing rural economies: women in groundnut marketing in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incomes for rural women are generally low and continue to dwindle. For women living in rural Northern Ghana, a major source of income and therefore economic sustenance is groundnut production. The empirical findings of this study conducted in Kalbeo, a peri-urban Community Institutional Mapping (CIM) and ...

  13. Shelf Life Extension of Toasted Groundnuts through the Application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate edible coatings containing 20% glycerol in extending the shelf life of toasted groundnut during ambient (27 ± 1oC) storage for 14 days was studied. Chemical indices of oxidative rancidity and sensory parameters were evaluated using standard procedures. Moisture ...

  14. Evaluation of resistance of the groundnut seed beetle, Caryedon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the level of resistance of different strains of the groundnut seed beetle, Caryedon serratus against some synthetic insecticides formulas and to compare their biodemographic parameters. Methodology and results: The insecticides tests were done in three localities of Senegal (Mpal, ...

  15. Assessing the Productive Efficiency ofBambara Groundnut and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    perimental design was a randomised complete block with four replications. Treatments were al- located to .... sation of solar radiation favoured an intercrop combination where the population of Bambara . groundnut was high or at least equal to that of. R eprod u ced by Sabin et G atew ay u n d er licen ce gran ted by th e P u.

  16. Microbiological screening of street-vended groundnut cake, Kulikuli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogea) and its popular derivative snack-product, kulikuli are particularly prone to contamination by a wide variety of toxigenic microorganisms due to its high nutritive content. Peanuts are rich in calories and contain many nutrients, minerals, antioxidants, and vitamins that are essential for optimum.

  17. Nitrogen credits from cowpea, soybean, groundnut and Mucuna to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    zone of Ghana to quantify nitrogen credits to maize from early (65–105 days) and medium/late-matur- ing (80–120days) grain legumes (cowpea, soybean, and groundnut), and from Mucuna cover crop. The design was a split plot in randomized complete block with three nitrogen levels (0, 45, 90 kg Nha-") applied to maize ...

  18. Nitrogen effects on maize yield following groundnut in rotation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-04

    Jul 4, 2007 ... Nitrogen effects on maize yield following groundnut in rotation on smallholder farms in sub-humid Zimbabwe. Peter Jeranyama1*, Stephen. R. Waddington2, Oran. B. Hesterman3 and Richard. R. Harwood4. 1South Dakota State University, 224 SAG, Plant Science Department, Box 2207A Brookings, SD ...

  19. 4718 Volume 11 No. 2 March 2011 EFFECT OF GROUNDNUT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... This study was undertaken to establish the potential use of conventional defatted groundnut flour in place of Tunkusa in making a better quality and shelf - stable Kilishi. The yield, quality and storage stability of the product were evaluated using standard assay techniques. Yield was estimated as the ratio of ...

  20. Utilisation of enzyme supplemented groundnut cake based diets by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 300, twenty weeks old laying hens were used in a feeding trial to evaluate the utilisation of Peanut meal popularly called groundnut cake (GNC) based diets supplemented with enzymes by laying hens. Five dietary treatments were formulated to meet standard nutrient requirements of layers viz: 1. maize- soya ...

  1. Variation in nodulation and growth of groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving biological nitrogen fixation through legume nodulating bacteria (LNB) inoculation requires knowledge on the abundance and effectiveness of indigenous population in the ferralsols. Nodulation of groundnut was examined under pots experiment in four location sites of the Humid-forest zone: Bertoua in the East; ...

  2. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships among 105 Bambara groundnuts (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.) accessions from Kenya were evaluated using 12 microsatellite markers. The Bambara landraces were collected from farmers in the western ...

  3. aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus in groundnut seeds across India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... including decaying plant and animal debris under field conditions. The mycotoxins produced by ... groundnut growing regions of India and 38 seed samples were collected from National and State seed ... Aflatoxin from 100 g of seed samples was extracted following the procedure explained by Kumar et al.

  4. Growth, phenological and yield responses of a bambara groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of irrigation levels and seed coat colour on growth, development, yield and water-use efficiency of local bambara groundnut landrace selections were evaluated under a rain shelter. Emergence was slow, although variation was indicated between landraces. Limited water availability was shown to lower stomatal ...

  5. Effects of Dietary Substitution of Rubber Seed Cake for Groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred (300) five weeks old, Anak broilers were used in a 4-week experiment to determine the effect of dietary substitution of rubber seed cake for groundnut cake on the performance of broilers at the finisher phase. Graded levels of rubber seed cake (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) substituted corresponding levels of ...

  6. Microbiology of natural fermentation of cowpea and groundnut for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditionally, locustbean is fermented naturally for dawadawa production. Scarcity of locustbean indicated a need for using other legumes as substitutes for producing dawadawa. The feasibility of using cowpea and groundnut was therefore investigated. The microorganisms associated with natural fermentation of cowpea ...

  7. Response of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (l.) Verdc.) to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response in the pot experiment may indicate a 'starter P effect', whereas lack of response in the field may indicate unavailability of applied P to bambara groundnut. These aspects are discussed in this paper. UNISWA Research Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology Vol. 4 (2) 2000: pp 202-207 ...

  8. Farmer led multiplication of rosette resistant groundnut varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    sure way to provide poor farmers with access to improved varieties, practices, knowledge and information required for ... sustainable, and appropriate, especially for resource poor farmers. In view of this situation this project promotes farmer- led multiplication of rosette resistant Groundnuts varieties .... appropriate solutions.

  9. Effects of partial replacement of soyabean meal or groundnut cake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    160 unsexed Nera day old chicks were weighed and randomly divided into 8 experimental groups such that there were 2 replicates of 10 birds each per diet. Eight diets were formulated for the starter and finisher phases. The first four diets had groundnut cake as the protein source and were gradually replaced by sunflower ...

  10. Evaluation of nutritional quality of groundnut ( Arachis Hypogaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil, fatty acids, protein, oleic/linoleic (O/L) acid ratio, iodine value and free soluble sugars were studied in 20 groundnut varieties grown in Ghana to determine their nutritional quality and to inform endusers which variety to choose for maximum benefit. Results indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in oil content among ...

  11. Profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in Hong local government area of Adamawa state, Nigeria. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information ...

  12. Mechanical Oil Expression from Groundnut ( Arachid hypogaea L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Building on past research, this present study was conducted to investigate the effects of some processing factors on the yield and quality of groundnut oil using a spring-controlled hydraulic press. In this research, a 2 x 4 factorial experiment under Completely Randomized Design (CRD) was used to study the effects of 2 ...

  13. Effects of Groundnut Husk Ash-blended Cement on Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The empirical investigation reported the effects of chemicals on the properties of concrete with cement partially replaced with Groundnut Husk Ash (GHA). The principal characteristic measured was the compressive strength of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete and OPC/GHA concrete after curing in three chemical ...

  14. Growth and yield components of some groundnut ( Arachis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (BlCMV) is a major virus, infecting legumes with attendant huge losses. Cultivation of resistant varieties is the most effective and sustainable control strategy. Therefore, some groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) cultivars were evaluated against BlCMV in Minna, Southern Guinea savanna zone of ...

  15. Photosynthetic gas exchange and chlorophyll in Bambara groundnut

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated the response of two Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) landraces sourced from contrasting environments to periods of water deficit initiated at vegetative stage. The two landraces AHM-753 and Bogor, from Namibia and Indonesia, respectively, were grown in pots and irrigation was ...

  16. Phosphorus levels in shoots of bambara groundnut in Botswana soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramolemana, G.M.; Keltjens, W.G.; Wessel, M.; Maphanyane, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    The critical phosphorus (P) concentration and range of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) plants were determined from a sand culture experiment at Botswana College of Agriculture. Twelve P levels (0.207-159 mg P pot(-1)) were used for growing the plants for 78 days (early podding stage) and the

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity in bambara groundnut [ Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess genetic diversity among 100 selected bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] landraces from a diverse geographic area of Tanzania. Eleven informative AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 49 scorable polymorphic amplification ...

  18. In vitro culture of Bambara groundnut [ Vigna subrerranea (L.) Verdc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A technique was developed to induce callus formation and differentiation using leaf, petiole and root explants from Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.]. The combinations and concentrations of different growth regulators were shown to be critical factors in the frequency of callus formation, as well as, in the ...

  19. Seed quality characteristics of a bambara groundnut ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L.) is an underutilised African legume that fits the same ecological niche as Arachis hypogea. It is still cultivated using landraces and little is known about their seed quality. The current study evaluated seed quality characteristics (viability and vigour) of a local landrace on the basis of ...

  20. Variability between local and exotic Bambara groundnut landraces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine landraces of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.), seven from the Botswana collection and one each from Zimbabwe and Tanzania, were evaluated to exploit the variability between them. The results indicate that four landraces namely GABC, TSHC, BOTR and DIPC were early, maturing within 120 days ...

  1. Degradation of Crude Protein in Groundnut Cake, Guinea Grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three West African dwarf rams fitted with rumen cannula, were used in a completely randomized design for degradation of crude protein (CP) of groundnut cake (GNC), Panicum maximum, rumen epithelial scraping (RES), and diets containing increasing levels of RES. Concentrate diets were formulated such that 0% (A), ...

  2. Germination of several groundnut cultivars in relation to incidence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment is concerned with the germination of nine cultivars of groundnut grown in Nigeria in relation to incidence of fungi. The cultivars were NHK 5V8, NUTII 288, Samnut 10, 11, 21, 22, 23, 24 and MK 373. Germination potential was assessed after 10 days of planting in petri-dishes. Parameters such as seedling ...

  3. Field response of groundnut (Arachis hypogea L.) cultivars to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted in Abeokuta, South Western Nigeria, to evaluate the growth and yield response of three groundnut cultivars to inoculation with mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae) and phosphorus (P) fertilization in 2003 and 2004 planting seasons. The design was split-split plot in randomized complete ...

  4. Growth and Phosphorus Uptake Responses of Bambara Groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza on growth and nutrient uptake by bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) grown in two acid soils (Basachia series, a Haplustox and Udu series, a Gleyic Luvisol) was investigated in a phytotron. The aim was to determine the extent of infection in the roots of V. subterranea plants by ...

  5. profitability of groundnut-based cropping systems among farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundnut is an important cash crop and a good source of vegetable oil to resource-poor farmers. The study examined the Profitability of Groundnut–based Cropping Systems among farmers in Hong Local Government Area of. Adamawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, the socio-economic characteristics of the farmers were ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FORRESTER

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The existence of genetic diversity in germplasm collections is crucial for cultivar development. Genetic relationships among 105 Bambara groundnuts (Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.) accessions from Kenya were evaluated using 12 microsatellite markers. The Bambara landraces were collected from farmers ...

  7. SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS AFFECTING GROUNDNUT PRODUCTION IN SABONGARI LOCAL GOVERNMENT OF KADUNA STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Usman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut an important oil seed crop provides significant sources of cash through the sales of seed, cakes, oil and haulms. Groundnut plays an important role in the diets of rural populations. Groundnut pod yields from farmer’s field are low, averaging about 800 kg per ha, less than one-third the potential yield of 3000 kg per ha. This large gap is of concern and in view of this, the study was carried out to assess the socio economic characteristics of groundnut farmers, determine the level of profitability of groundnut production, the resource use efficiency as well as to find out problems encountered in groundnut production in Sabon-gari local government area. Seventy-nine farmers involved in groundnut production were randomly selected from the various farms located within the local government area. Data were collected using primary and secondary sources. To examine the profitability of groundnut production, the gross margin and cost benefit analysis were carried out. The result of the study shows that experienced farmers are less involved in groundnut production and most groundnut farmers are engaged in other form of businesses. The cost, availability, and lack of technical knowledge of inputs requirements are responsible for poor use of the inputs. Labour, fertilizer, seed and herbicides are all over utilized except insecticide which is underutilized. Among the problems encountered in groundnut production in the study are lacks of capital and extension services. These two problems accounted for over 78% of the problem of groundnut in the study area. It is therefore recommended that government and research institutes should strengthen extension services to deliver improved technologies to the farmers. Farmers are also advised to source for loans through cooperatives, banks and other available sources at low charges and the procedure for loan should be made simple to enable farmers’ access loans so that groundnut production can be improved.

  8. The use of linear programming to determine whether a formulated complementary food product can ensure adequate nutrients for 6- to 11-month-old Cambodian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skau, Jutta K H; Bunthang, Touch; Chamnan, Chhoun; Wieringa, Frank T; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A; Roos, Nanna; Ferguson, Elaine L

    2014-01-01

    A new software tool, Optifood, developed by the WHO and based on linear programming (LP) analysis, has been developed to formulate food-based recommendations. This study discusses the use of Optifood for predicting whether formulated complementary food (CF) products can ensure dietary adequacy for target populations in Cambodia. Dietary data were collected by 24-h recall in a cross-sectional survey of 6- to 11-mo-old infants (n = 78). LP model parameters were derived from these data, including a list of foods, median serving sizes, and dietary patterns. Five series of LP analyses were carried out to model the target population's baseline diet and 4 formulated CF products [WinFood (WF), WinFood-Lite (WF-L), Corn-Soy-Blend Plus (CSB+), and Corn-Soy-Blend Plus Plus (CSB++)], which were added to the diet in portions of 33 g/d dry weight (DW) for infants aged 6-8 mo and 40 g/d DW for infants aged 9-11 mo. In each series of analyses, the nutritionally optimal diet and theoretical range, in diet nutrient contents, were determined. The LP analysis showed that baseline diets could not achieve the Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) for thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, vitamin B-12, calcium, iron, and zinc (range: 14-91% of RNI in the optimal diets) and that none of the formulated CF products could cover the nutrient gaps for thiamin, niacin, iron, and folate (range: 22-86% of the RNI). Iron was the key limiting nutrient, for all modeled diets, achieving a maximum of only 48% of the RNI when CSB++ was included in the diet. Only WF and WF-L filled the nutrient gap for calcium. WF-L, CSB+, and CSB++ filled the nutrient gap for zinc (9- to 11-mo-olds). The formulated CF products improved the nutrient adequacy of complementary feeding diets but could not entirely cover the nutrient gaps. These results emphasize the value of using LP to evaluate special CF products during the intervention planning phase. The WF study was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN19918531.

  9. Association between full breastfeeding, timing of complementary food introduction, and iron status in infancy in Germany: results of a secondary analysis of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libuda, Lars; Hilbig, Annett; Berber-Al-Tawil, Seda; Kalhoff, Hermann; Kersting, Mathilde

    2018-03-01

    Considering the low content in breast milk breastfed infants might be at particular risk for depleted iron stores after the first months of life. This study evaluates the association of the mode of milk feeding and the timing of complementary food (CF) introduction with parameters of iron status in term healthy infants in Germany. In this secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, parents recorded all foods consumed by their infants from the age of 8 weeks onwards. Mothers were advised on the German food-based dietary guidelines for infants. Accordingly, CF was introduced between the fifth and seventh month of age. Blood samples were taken at 4 and at 10 months of age for analyses of iron status parameters. Iron depletion was defined as serum ferritin intake was lower in breastfed infants (n = 50) than in formula fed (n = 23) with decreasing differences during the course of infancy. At 10 months of age, most iron parameters were not associated with the mode of milk feeding or the timing of CF introduction. At this age, the iron depletion prevalence was >34% without general differences according to the mode of milk feeding or the timing of CF introduction. The high prevalence of depleted iron stores observed in both breastfed and formula-fed infants illustrates the need for further studies to improve our understanding of the optimal iron intake and sensitive parameters of iron status in infancy.

  10. The Correlation between Providing Complementary Food and Breast-Feeding with the Growth and Development of Children under the Age of Five Years Old (6-24 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Cahya Rahmadiyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A toddler is a group on the stage of human development that is vulnerable to the risk affecting their health specifically about their growth and development. Providing the appropriate nutrition to toddlers during this risky age of 6 to 24 months is crucial in promoting a proper growth and development. The proper nourishment for toddlers at the age of 6 to 24 months includes breast-feeding and complimentary solid foods. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the specific characteristics of a family or a household and the provision of complementary feeding about the growth and development of children (6-24 months in the village of Curug Cimanggis, Depok. This study used a descriptive correlational, cross-sectional approach using a sample that consisted of 102 children aged 6-24 months, which were collected using a proportional cluster sampling. Based on the Chi Square test, the researchers found no correlation between the provision of complementary feeding with a child’s growth and development. This is because breast-feeding as the source of nourishment is still the major factor that directly influences the growth and development of any toddler between the age of 6-24 months. However, by applying better financial management in conjunction with the ability to modify the practices of how families feed their toddlers, a family may raise and nurture their toddlers so they may grow according to the proper stages of development. The results of this study are expected to serve as an input in improving toddlers’ health care concerning their growth and development by promoting the importance of providing the appropriate complimentary food by the proper guidelines while continuing to breast feed toddlers between the age of 6 to 24 months.

  11. Optimization of a phytase-containing micronutrient powder with low amounts of highly bioavailable iron for in-home fortification of complementary foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troesch, Barbara; Egli, Ines; Zeder, Christophe; Hurrell, Richard F; de Pee, Saskia; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2009-02-01

    In-home fortification of complementary foods with micronutrient powders containing low amounts of iron may be potentially safer than powders containing high amounts of iron. However, low iron doses have little nutritional effect, unless iron absorption is high. The objective was to maximize iron absorption from a low-iron micronutrient powder for in-home fortification by testing combinations of iron as NaFeEDTA, ascorbic acid, and a microbial phytase active at gut pH. In addition, a recently proposed enhancer of iron absorption, L-alpha-glycerophosphocholine (GPC), was tested. In 6 separate iron-absorption studies using a crossover design, women (n = 101) consumed whole-maize porridge fortified with 3 mg stable isotope-labeled FeSO4 or NaFeEDTA with different combinations of enhancers added to the meals at the time of consumption. Incorporation of iron isotopes into erythrocytes 14 d later was measured. The addition of phytase when iron was present as either NaFeEDTA or FeSO4, with or without ascorbic acid, significantly increased iron absorption. The combined addition of phytase, ascorbic acid, and NaFeEDTA resulted in an absorption of 7.4%, compared with an absorption of 1.5% from FeSO4 without enhancers in the same meal (P iron absorption from NaFeEDTA, and the addition of calcium did not significantly inhibit iron absorption from NaFeEDTA in the presence of ascorbic acid. The addition of L-alpha-glycerophosphocholine did not significantly increase iron absorption. Optimization of the micronutrient powder increased iron absorption from a highly inhibitory meal approximately 5-fold. This approach may allow for effective, untargeted in-home fortification of complementary foods with low amounts of highly bioavailable iron.

  12. Complementary Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Bent

    2009-01-01

    by an alternative concept that more adequately describes the realities of what adherents of ‘parallel languages' can hope for. The new concept I have dubbed ‘complementary languages' (komplementær­sproglighed). I will explain this concept in the following and contrast it both with ‘parallel languages...

  13. Biological and water-use efficiencies of sorghum-groundnut intercrop

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to compare water-use efficiency of sole crops and intercrops, 2 experiments were conducted in 2 consecutive years with sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) and groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) on a loamy, Grossarenic Paleudult. In a randomized block, split-plot design, sorghum (SS), groundnut (GG), ...

  14. The genotoxic effect of lead and zinc on bambara groundnut ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of lead and zinc treatments on the chromosomes of bambara groundnut was investigated. The seeds of bambara groundnut were placed in Petri dishes in three replicates and allowed to germinate for five days in different concentrations: 25, 50 and 100 mg/L of both lead and zinc nitrates while the control group ...

  15. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. in groundnut fields in central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, N.C.; Mendes, R.; Kruijt, M.; Raaijmakers, J.

    2012-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important legume crop in Vietnam and many other countries worldwide. Stem and pod rot, caused by the soil-borne fungus Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., is a major yield limiting factor in groundnut cultivation. To develop sustainable measures to control

  16. Potential of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) milk as a probiotic beverage-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murevanhema, Yvonne Y; Jideani, Victoria A

    2013-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterraenea (L.) verdc) (BGN) is a legume; its origin have been traced back to Africa, and it is the third important legume; however, it is one of the neglected crops. It is highly nutritious, and has been termed a complete food. Its seed consist of 49%-63.5% carbohydrate, 15%-25% protein, 4.5%-7.4% fat, 5.2%-6.4% fiber, 3.2%-4.4% ash and 2% mineral compared to whole fresh cow milk 88% moisture, 4.8% carbohydrate, 3.2% proteins, 3.4% fat, 0.7% ash, and 0.01% cholesterol. Its chemical composition is comparable to that of soy bean. Furthermore, BGN has been reported to be a potential crop, owing to its nutritional composition, functional properties, antioxidant potential, and a drought resistant crop. Bambara groundnut milk (BGNM) had been rated higher in acceptability than milk from other legumes like soybean and cowpea. Probiotics have been defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer a health benefit on the host. These benefits have been reported to be therapeutic, suppressing the growth and activity in conditions like infectious diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. The nutritional profile of BGNM is high enough to sustain the growth of probiotics. BGNs are normally boiled and salted, eaten as a relish or roasted, and eaten as a snack. Hence, BGNM can also be fermented with lactic acid bacteria to make a probiotic beverage that not only increase the economic value of the nutritious legume but also help in addressing malnutrition.

  17. High Awareness but Low Coverage of a Locally Produced Fortified Complementary Food in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyvraz, Magali; Rohner, Fabian; Konan, Amoin G; Esso, Lasme J C E; Woodruff, Bradley A; Norte, Augusto; Adiko, Adiko F; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Aaron, Grant J

    2016-01-01

    Poor complementary feeding practices among infants and young children in Côte d'Ivoire are major contributing factors to the country's high burden of malnutrition. As part of a broad effort to address this issue, an affordable, nutritious, and locally produced fortified complementary food product was launched in the Côte d'Ivoire in 2011. The objective of the current research was to assess various levels of coverage of the program and to identify coverage barriers. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted among caregivers of children less than 2-years of age living in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Four measures of coverage were assessed: "message coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver ever heard of the product?), "contact coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver ever fed the child the product?), "partial coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver fed the child the product in the previous month?), and "effective coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver fed the child the product in the previous 7 days?). A total of 1,113 caregivers with children between 0 and 23 months of age were interviewed. Results showed high message coverage (85.0%), moderate contact coverage (37.8%), and poor partial and effective coverages (8.8% and 4.6%, respectively). Product awareness was lower among caregivers from poorer households, but partial and effective coverages were comparable in both poor and non-poor groups. Infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices were generally poor and did not appear to have improved since previous assessments. In conclusion, the results from the present study indicate that availability on the market and high awareness among the target population is not sufficient to achieve high and effective coverage. With market-based delivery models, significant efforts are needed to improve demand. Moreover, given the high prevalence of malnutrition and poor IYCF practices, additional modes of delivering IYCF interventions and improving IYCF practices should be considered.

  18. Nutrient composition of premixed and packaged complementary foods for sale in low- and middle-income countries: Lack of standards threatens infant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, William A; Nene, Marc D; Bell, Winnie

    2017-10-01

    Premixed flours for infant porridge are increasingly produced and sold in developing countries to complement continued breastfeeding. Such complementary food (CF) products have known efficacy against malnutrition in children from 6 to 24 months of age, but ingredient ratios and production processes may vary. This study provides the first systematic measurement of their actual nutrient composition. We purchased samples of 108 premixed CF products in 22 low- and middle-income countries, and commissioned blind laboratory measurement of each product's macronutrients and micronutrients. We compared measured contents to nutrient claims on their packaging and to CF standards from the Codex Alimentarius, the Super Cereal Plus product used in nutrition assistance programs, and the Lutter and Dewey (2003) recommendations, as well as our own modeled nutrient requirements for a healthy breastfed child. Actual densities are significantly different from nutrient claims for protein (p = .013) and fat (p = .000). Only 15% of samples met two of the three benchmarks for fat, 32% met the most stringent protein standard, while only 22% met them for iron, and 21% for zinc. The median healthy child consuming breast milk plus enough of these solid foods to meet energy needs would experience deficits of zinc at 6 months, iron at 6 and 9 months, and dietary fat from 12 months of age. In summary, premixed CF products can provide adequate nutrient density but usually do not, revealing the need and opportunity for independent monitoring and quality assurance to help grain millers making premixed foods maintain uniform ingredient ratios and production practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Reinbott

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3-23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, and retinol binding protein (RBP were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored.Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%. Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin.Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young children.German Clinical Trials

  20. Age at first introduction to complementary foods is associated with sociodemographic factors in children with increased genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrén Aronsson, Carin; Uusitalo, Ulla; Vehik, Kendra; Yang, Jimin; Silvis, Katherine; Hummel, Sandra; Virtanen, Suvi M; Norris, Jill M

    2015-10-01

    Infant's age at introduction to certain complementary foods (CF) has in previous studies been associated with islet autoimmunity, which is an early marker for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Various maternal sociodemographic factors have been found to be associated with early introduction to CF. The aims of this study were to describe early infant feeding and identify sociodemographic factors associated with early introduction to CF in a multinational cohort of infants with an increased genetic risk for T1D. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young study is a prospective longitudinal birth cohort study. Infants (N = 6404) screened for T1D high risk human leucocyte antigen-DQ genotypes (DR3/4, DR4/4, DR4/8, DR3/3, DR4/4, DR4/1, DR4/13, DR4/9 and DR3/9) were followed for 2 years at six clinical research centres: three in the United States (Colorado, Georgia/Florida, Washington) and three in Europe (Sweden, Finland, Germany). Age at first introduction to any food was reported at clinical visits every third month from the age of 3 months. Maternal sociodemographic data were self-reported through questionnaires. Age at first introduction to CF was primarily associated with country of residence. Root vegetables and fruits were usually the first CF introduced in Finland and Sweden and cereals were usually the first CF introduced in the United States. Between 15% and 20% of the infants were introduced to solid foods before the age of 4 months. Young maternal age (<25 years), low educational level (<12 years) and smoking during pregnancy were significant predictors of early introduction to CF in this cohort. Infants with a relative with T1D were more likely to be introduced to CF later. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Acceptability of amaranth grain-based nutritious complementary foods with dagaa fish (Rastrineobola argentea) and edible termites (Macrotermes subhylanus) compared to ‘Corn-Soy-Blend Plus’ among young children/mothers dyads in Western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konyole, Silvenius O.; Kinyuru, John N.; Owuor, Bethwell O.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed acceptability of two flours and porridges of complementary foods based on germinated grain amaranth and maize with or without edible termites and dagaa small fish named "Winfood Classic" (WFC) and "Winfood Lite" (WFL), respectively, compared to Corn Soy Blend Plus (CSB+) among mothers...

  2. Molecular Responses of Groundnut (Arachis hypogea L. to Zinc Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. John De Britto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants and their toxicity is a problem of increasing significance for ecological, evolutionary and environmental reasons. The interference of germination related proteins by heavy metals has not been well documented at the proteomic and genomic level. In the current study, molecular responses of germinating groundnut seeds were investigated under Zinc stress. The SDS-PAGE showed the preliminary changes in the polypeptides patterns under Zinc stress. Restriction digestion banding pattern of EcoRI and Hind III enzymes showed distinct banding pattern in the treated plants.

  3. Radiation-induced instability at the virescent locus in groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.H.; Mouli Chandra

    1975-01-01

    A new case of instability induced in groundnut by γ-irradiation was classified as a variegated mutation according to its phenotypic expression. The mutant was isolated in M 2 generation and segregated for 50% virescents in subsequent generations. Studies on the phenotypic and genetic behaviour of the mutant suggested that (i) a mutation was induced v-locus and its unstable expression further mutated to a stable recessive condition, i.e., virescence, (ii) another mutation for gametophyte of Vsup(m) factor through the pollen, (iii) test crosses indicated that the variegation was controlled by a nuclear gene and not by plasmon. (author)

  4. SSR markers associated to early leaf spot disease resistance through selective genotyping and single marker analysis in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adama Zongo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important oilseed and food crop of the world. Breeding for disease resistance is one of major objectives in groundnut breeding. Early leaf spot (ELS is one of the major destructive diseases worldwide and in West Africa, particularly in Burkina Faso causing significant yield losses. Conventional breeding approaches have been employed to develop improved varieties resistant to ELS. Molecular dissection of resistance traits using QTL analysis can improve the efficiency of resistance breeding. In the present study, an ELS susceptible genotype QH243C and an ELS resistant genotype NAMA were crossed and the F2 population genotypic and F3 progenies phenotypic data were used for marker-trait association analysis. Parents were surveyed with 179 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers out of which 103 SSR markers were found to be polymorphic between the parents. These polymorphic markers were utilized to genotype the F2 population followed by marker-trait analysis through single marker analysis (SMA and selective genotyping of the population using 23 resistant and 23 susceptible genotypes. The SMA revealed 13 markers while the selective genotyping method identified 8 markers associated with ELS resistance. Four markers (GM1911, GM1883, GM1000 and Seq13E09 were found common between the two trait mapping methods. These four markers could be employed in genomics-assisted breeding for selection of ELS resistant genotypes in groundnut breeding.

  5. Gamma-ray-induced bold seeded early maturing groundnut selections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoharan, V.; Thangavelu, S.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: ''Chico'' is an early maturing (85-90 days) erect groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotype utilised in groundnut improvement to incorporate earliness in high yielding varieties. Though it has high shelling out-turn, its yield potential is low since it has small seeds. Mutation breeding was started with the objective of improving the seed size. In a preliminary experiment, dry seeds were treated with 20, 30, 40 or 50 kR of gamma rays. The M 1 generation was grown during the post rainy season of 1988-1989. The M 2 generation was planted as individual plant progeny rows during the rainy season of 1989. 105 progeny rows were studied, the total number of M 2 plants being 1,730. All the M 2 plants were harvested 90 days after sowing. Seven mutants with bold seed size were obtained. The mutants had 100 kernel weight ranging from 22.2 to 40.4 g compared to 21.1 g of control. The study is in progress. (author)

  6. High Awareness but Low Coverage of a Locally Produced Fortified Complementary Food in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Leyvraz

    Full Text Available Poor complementary feeding practices among infants and young children in Côte d'Ivoire are major contributing factors to the country's high burden of malnutrition. As part of a broad effort to address this issue, an affordable, nutritious, and locally produced fortified complementary food product was launched in the Côte d'Ivoire in 2011. The objective of the current research was to assess various levels of coverage of the program and to identify coverage barriers. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted among caregivers of children less than 2-years of age living in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Four measures of coverage were assessed: "message coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver ever heard of the product?, "contact coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver ever fed the child the product?, "partial coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver fed the child the product in the previous month?, and "effective coverage" (i.e., has the caregiver fed the child the product in the previous 7 days?. A total of 1,113 caregivers with children between 0 and 23 months of age were interviewed. Results showed high message coverage (85.0%, moderate contact coverage (37.8%, and poor partial and effective coverages (8.8% and 4.6%, respectively. Product awareness was lower among caregivers from poorer households, but partial and effective coverages were comparable in both poor and non-poor groups. Infant and young child feeding (IYCF practices were generally poor and did not appear to have improved since previous assessments. In conclusion, the results from the present study indicate that availability on the market and high awareness among the target population is not sufficient to achieve high and effective coverage. With market-based delivery models, significant efforts are needed to improve demand. Moreover, given the high prevalence of malnutrition and poor IYCF practices, additional modes of delivering IYCF interventions and improving IYCF practices should be considered.

  7. Complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fewtrell, Mary; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    . Allergenic foods may be introduced when CF is commenced any time after 4 months. Infants at high risk of peanut allergy (those with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both) should have peanut introduced between 4 and 11 months, following evaluation by an appropriately trained specialist. Gluten may be introduced...... between 4 and 12 months, but consumption of large quantities should be avoided during the first weeks after gluten introduction and later during infancy. All infants should receive iron-rich CF including meat products and/or iron-fortified foods. No sugar or salt should be added to CF and fruit juices...

  8. IMPACT OF MONOCROTOPHOS AND NEEM OIL MIXTURE ON DEFOLIATOR MANGMENT IN GROUNDNUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SAHAYARAJ

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The integrated effect of intercropping, a synthetic pesticide (monocrotopas (M and neem based biopesticide (neem oil - 2% (NO on three-groundnut defoliators damage and also the groundnut production was studied. The monocrotopas and neem oil combination was found to be very effective in reducing the defoliator infestation. Defoliator’s incidence was signifi cantly higher in untreated plots, resulting in signifi cantly lower yield (1539.03 Kg h-1. The groundnut yield was increased (2011.18 Kg h-1 when monocrotophos and neem oil mixture was applied than monocrotophos (1877.77 Kg h-1 and control categories. The estimated avoidable groundnut and black gram yield loss were lower in monocrotopas.

  9. FUNGI ISOLATED FROM GROUNDNUTS IN SOME LOCATIONS OF WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.s. DHARMAPUTRA

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and ninety eight groundnut samples were collected from freshly harvested groundnuts (FHG, farmer storage systems (FSS, middlemen warehouses (MW, wholesalers (WS and retailer sample (RS during the dry and wet seasons from Cidolog, Cianjur, Sukabumi and Bogor, West Java, Indonesia, in 1990/1991. The moisture content (m.c., intactness of kernels, and the percentages of groundnut kernels infected by each species of fungi were analyzed. In genera, the m.c. of the samples collected during the dry season was lower than of those collected during the wet season. Also, the m.c. of samples collected from FHG, FSS and MW was higher than of those collected from WS and RS. The m.c. of samples collected from FHG was the highest (12.5-45.75%, but the percentages of damaged kernels were the lowest (2.5-13.8%, because the samples were shelled manually. A total of 25 species of fungi were isolated from samples collected from the 4 localities. They were Acremonium strictum, Aspergillus candidus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. ochraceus, A. tamarii, A. wentii, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Cladosporium cladosporioides, C. sphaerospermum, Eumtium chevalieri, E. repens, E. rubrum, Fusarium equiseti, F. longipes, F. oxysporum, F. semitectum, Mucor sp., Papulaspora sp., Pestalotia sp., Penicillium aethiopicum, P. citrinum, Rhizapus sp., R. stolonifer and Syncephalastrum sp. The predominant fungi in samples collected from Cidolog and Sukabumi during the dry season were Aspergillus wentii, while those collected from Cianjur and Bogor were A. niger. The percentages of kernels infected by A. wentii in samples collected from Cidolog and Sukabumi were between 30-100% and 36-100%, respectively, while those of kernels infected by A. nigerin samples collected from Cianjur and Bogor were between 34-93% and 14-98%, respectively. The predominant fungi in samples collected from each location during the wet season were A. flavus. The percentage of kernels infected by the fungus in

  10. A Delivery Model for Home Fortification of Complementary Foods with Micronutrient Powders: Innovation in the Context of Vietnamese Health System Strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Adding micronutrient powders (MNP to complementary foods at the point of preparation (home fortification can improve micronutrient status of young children. Ensuring sustained access to MNPs at scale, however, remains challenging in many countries. The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN partnered with the National Institute of Nutrition (NIN in Vietnam to pioneer the distribution of a locally-produced MNP, provided for sale through the public health system with counseling on optimal infant and young child feeding practices by trained health workers. Different packaging options were available to adapt to caregivers’ disposable income. During the six-month pilot, 1.5 million sachets were sold through 337 health centers across four provinces, targeting children 6–59 months of age. Sales were routinely monitored, and a cross-sectional survey in 32 communes for caregivers (n = 962 and health staff (n = 120 assessed MNP coverage and compliance, five months after the start of distribution. A total of 404 caregivers among the 962 caregivers surveyed (i.e., 42% had visited the health center in the past year. Among them, 290 caregivers had heard about the product and a total of 217caregivers had given the MNP to their child at least once, representing a conversion rate from product awareness to product trial of 74.8%. The effective coverage (i.e., consumption of ≥3 sachets/child/week was 11.5% among the total surveyed caregivers and reached 27.3% amongst caregivers who visited health centers in the previous month. The MNP purchase trends showed that the number of sachets bought by caregivers was positively correlated with the wealth index. The pilot showed that providing MNPs for sale in packs of various quantities, combined with infant and young child feeding (IYCF counseling at the health center, is effective for groups accessing the health system.

  11. Implementation of a programme to market a complementary food supplement (Ying Yang Bao) and impacts on anaemia and feeding practices in Shanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Yaohua; Zhang, Shuaiming; Huang, Jian; Yang, Zhenyu; Huo, Junsheng; Chen, Chunming

    2011-10-01

    In China, a full fat soy powder mixed with multiple micronutrient powders (Ying Yang Bao (YYB)) was developed, and the efficacy of YYB was shown in controlling anaemia and improving child growth and development. However, prior to 2008, there was no sustainable way to provide YYB to vulnerable populations, except through free distribution by the government. This study was to test the concept of public-private partnership (PPP) to deliver YYB and to evaluate the effectiveness of marketing YYB through PPP. Programme activities included development of a complementary food supplement (CFS) national standard, product concept test, product development and marketing, behavior change communication, monitoring and evaluation. Baseline and end-line surveys were used to evaluate product awareness, purchasing and the impacts of the project on anaemia and feeding practices. A Chinese CFS standard was approved. Caregivers and their 6- to-24-month-old children participated in the baseline (n=226) and the end-line survey (n=221). A concept test at the baseline survey showed that 78% of caregivers were willing to buy YYB at 0.1 USD. After developing the product and implementing the intervention for 8 months, 59.6% of surveyed caregivers purchased YYB. While not significant, the prevalence of anaemia was marginally lower at the end line (28.8%) than at the baseline (36.2%). For those purchasing YYB, the risk of anaemia was significantly reduced by 87% of odds (Pend-line survey found that feeding practices had improved significantly following the intervention. An enabling policy and regulatory environment in which CFSs are defined and parameters for appropriate marketing are identified as a prerequisite for marketing YYB or other nutritious CFS. Public and private advocacy and marketing could successfully increase awareness of YYB and access and use through market channels. The YYB project may be effective for reducing anaemia and improving feeding practices. © 2011 Blackwell

  12. Effect of Home-Based Complementary Food Fortification on Prevalence of Anemia Among Infants and Young Children Aged 6 to 23 Months in Poor Rural Regions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Junsheng; Sun, Jing; Fang, Zheng; Chang, Suying; Zhao, Liyun; Fu, Ping; Wang, Jie; Huang, Jian; Wang, Lijuan; Begin, France; Hipgrave, David B; Ma, Guansheng

    2015-12-01

    Following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, the Chinese government instituted an infant and young and child nutrition program that included promotion of in-home fortification of complementary food with ying yang bao (YYB), a soy-based powder containing iron, 2.5 mg as iron-EDTA and 5 mg as ferrous fumarate, and other micronutrients. Ying yang bao was provided to participating families in 8 poor rural counties in Sichuan, Shaanxi, and Gansu provinces by the Ministry of Health. We assessed hemoglobin levels among infants and young children (IYC) aged 6 to 23 months at baseline in May 2010 (n = 1290) and during follow-up in November 2010 (n = 1142), May 2011 (n = 1118), and November 2011 (n = 1040), using the Hemocue method. Interviewers collected basic demographic information and child feeding practices from the children's caretakers. Altitude-adjusted hemoglobin level averaged 10.8 g/dL, and total anemia prevalence was 49.5% at baseline. Average hemoglobin was 11.3 g/dL at 6 months, 11.6 g/dL at 12 months, and 11.7 g/dL at 18 months after introduction of YYB. Moderate anemia (hemoglobin: 70-99 g/dL) decreased from 20.3% at baseline to 7.5%, 5.8%, and 7.3% after 6, 12, and 18 months of home fortification, respectively (P anemia (hemoglobin: 100-110 g/dL) decreased from 29.0% to 16.7%, 18.1%, and 15.4%, respectively (P infants aged 6 to 23 months, 95% had regularly been fed YYB during the observation period. Regression analysis showed that the duration of YYB consumption and number of sachets consumed per week correlated positively with hemoglobin levels and negatively with anemia rates. Home food fortification with YYB is feasible and effective for nutrition promotion among IYC in high-risk regions of China. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Effectiveness of community-based complementary food supplement (Yingyangbao distribution in children aged 6-23 months in poor areas in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    Full Text Available Poor growth and micronutrient deficiency mainly attack older infants and young children. Some countries have adopted clinically effective measures to combat malnutrition, but the compliance and improvement in efficacy of intervention vehicles in national programs require evaluation.Baseline and follow-up cross-sectional surveys were conducted before and after a nutrition intervention program in 3 national poverty counties in China. Soybean-based complementary food supplements called Yingyangbao (YYB in Chinese and training materials on child feeding were distributed to households with children aged 6-23 months for 18 months. Representative children were selected by probability proportional to size sampling methods to assess compliance of YYB and the intervention efficacy. A questionnaire was designed to collect data on basic characteristics of children, breastfeeding, 24-hour dietary intake, and consumption and appetite of YYB. Anthropometrics and hemoglobin were measured in the field, and anemia prevalence was evaluated. Venous blood was drawn from children aged 12-35 months to evaluate micronutrient status. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for children's anemia.Of the children involved in the follow-up survey (n = 693, the P50 (P25, P75 intake of YYB was 6.7 (3.5, 7.0 sachets weekly, and 54.7% of the children liked the taste of YYB. Compared with the baseline situation (n = 823, the proportion of children fed a diverse diet and foods rich in iron or vitamin A increased (P < 0.01 in the follow-up study. The prevalence of stunting and underweight decreased (P < 0.05, the prevalence of anemia decreased from 28.0% to 19.9% (P < 0.01, and the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency decreased from 26.8% to 15.4% (P < 0.01. For children aged 12-23 months, those who liked YYB and consumed 6 or more sachets of YYB weekly were at lower risk for anemia (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.90, P < 0.05, but the risk of stunting was associated

  14. Pattern of partitioning of photosynthates during pod development in groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Aruna; Reddy, K.J.; Sirohi, G.S.; Sengupta, U.K.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the distribution pattern of 14 C-labelled photosynthates from branches to various plant parts during pod development in a groundnut cultivar. It was observed that during initial stage of pod development, the incorporation of 14 CO 2 by the plant was low and only a small fraction of it was translocated to other plant parts. The distribution of photosynthates was mainly to the vegetative organs and roots at this stage. Both incorporation of 14 CO 2 as well as its translocation increased during peak pod developmental stage and most of the translocated assimilates were recovered from the pods. Main shoot and branch at the basal node appeared to be the main source of assimilate supply to the pods while the upper branches supplied to other vegetative parts of the plant. Main shoot showed comparatively better efficiency of partitioning of photosynthates than any other branch of the plant. (auth.)

  15. Mutation induction for genetic variability in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathirana, R.; Wijewickrama, P.J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A mutation induction experiment using 60 Co gamma irradiation was initiated in 1980 in order to improve the yield potential and adaptability of Groundnut cultivars to seasons of cultivation and cropping patterns. A considerable genetic variation was found in the M 2 generation. The response to selection was different in the two cultivars, with Vietnam showing better response than GN 13. The seed size, pod yield, number of pods per plant and the number of seeds per pod showed better response to selection than the shelling percentage and the number of primary branches in both varieties. Several advanced mutant lines out-yielded the parent varieties and the national check in replicated variety evaluation experiments conducted for two seasons. (author)

  16. Nutrient composition of five varieties of commonly consumed Nigerian groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayo, G. O.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The nutrient composition of the five major varieties of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. commonly consumed in the south-western part of Nigeria was investigated. Raw dryshelled samples were analyzed for proximate (moisture, ash, protein, fat, fiber and carbohydrate, ‘vitamins’ (β-carotene, thiamine, niacin and tocopherol and minerals (Na, K, Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Se, Co, Al, As, Cd and Pb. Results showed that the groundnuts had 4.12-9.26% moisture, 2.77-3.31% ash, 24.26-26.35% protein, 45.41-48.14% fat, 2.51-2.94% fiber and 15.90-17.75% carbohydrate. All the varieties analyzed showed β-carotene (63.32-65.35mg/100g, thiamin (0.73-0.98mg/100g, niacin (14.00-16.03mg/100g and tocopherol (18.62-21.07mg/100g activities; with boro red having significantly (P P> Mg> Ca> Mn> Cu> Na> Zn> Fe> Al> Se in most of the varieties. Boro red also had the highest elemental contents in most of the minerals analyzed. Thus, these groundnuts can be considered useful foodstuffs in minimizing proteinenergy malnutrition (PEM and micronutrient deficiencies in Nigeria. However, the boro red variety is most recommended. The outcome of this research is a contribution to the food composition table.Se ha investigado la composición en nutrientes de las cinco principales variedades de maní (Arachis hypogaea L. de consumo habitual en la parte sur-occidental de Nigeria. A las muestras crudas con cáscara y secas se les analizó su composición proximal (humedad, ceniza, proteína, grasa, fibra e hidratos de carbono, vitaminas (β-caroteno, tiamina, niacina y tocoferol y minerales (Na, K, Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Se, Co, Al, As, Cd y Pb. Los resultados mostraron que el maní tenía entre 4.12 - 9.26% de humedad, 2.77- 3.31% de cenizas, 24.26 - 26.35% de proteína, 45.41 - 48.14% de materia grasa, 2.51 - 2.94% de fibra y 15.90 -17.75% de carbohidratos. Todas las variedades analizadas contenían β-caroteno (63.32-65.35mg/100g, tiamina (0.73-0.98mg/100g, niacina (14

  17. A household-level sweet potato-based infant food to complement vitamin A supplementation initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagloh, Francis K; Hardacre, Allan; Mutukumira, Anthony N; Weber, Janet L; Brough, Louise; Coad, Jane

    2012-10-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa is high in spite of vitamin A supplementation programmes among children in most countries. Plant-based complementary foods remain the key source of nutrients in addition to breast milk for infants in lower income countries. Cereal-legume blends are superior in protein and energy densities compared with maize, millet or sorghum-only porridge. However, unfortified cereal-legume and cereal-only porridges are low in vitamin A. A household-level sweet potato-based infant food, rich in vitamin A, has been developed to complement vitamin A supplementation initiatives in Sub-Saharan Africa. A composite flour containing sweet potato, soybean, soybean oil and fishmeal was processed as complementary food by oven toasting (denoted oven-toasted ComFa). The oven-toasted ComFa and enriched Weanimix (processed from dehulled maize, dehulled soybean, groundnut and fishmeal) were assessed for suitability as complementary food based on the nutrient composition using specifications in the Codex Standard (CS) as a reference. The sweet potato-based formulation and enriched Weanimix met the energy, protein, fructose and fat specifications but barely met the amino acid score as indicated in the CS. However, only the oven-toasted ComFa met the calcium and almost half the vitamin A levels as specified in the CS. Oven-toasted ComFa was slightly lower in energy, protein and fat by a difference not greater than 4.0% but was higher by more than 100% in fructose and vitamin A levels. Therefore, the sweet potato-based complementary food is likely to support vitamin A supplementation initiatives in low-income countries better than the cereal-based formulation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A six-month intervention with two different types of micronutrient-fortified complementary foods had distinct short- and long-term effects on linear and ponderal growth of vietnamese infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phu, Pham V.; Hoan, Nguyen V.; Salvignol, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Traditional complementary foods (CF) with a low nutrient density have been implicated in growth faltering, stunting, and other adverse outcomes in children. The efficacy of 2 types of locally produced, micronutrient-fortified CF to prevent stunting of infants living in rural Vietnam was evaluated....... In a village-randomized controlled study, 426 infants, 5 mo of age, received for 6 mo a fortified CF, either as an instant flour (FF) or a food complement (FC) in village canteens, or traditional CF at home (C). After 6 mo of intervention, weight, length, length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) and weight-for-age Z...

  19. In Vitro Seeds Germination and Seedling Growth of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koné, Mongomaké; Koné, Tchoa; Silué, Nakpalo; Soumahoro, André Brahima; Kouakou, Tanoh Hilaire

    2015-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous grain legume. It occupies a prominent place in the strategies to ensure food security in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of an efficient in vitro regeneration system, a prerequisite for genetic transformation application, requires the establishment of optimal conditions for seeds germination and plantlets development. Three types of seeds were inoculated on different basal media devoid of growth regulators. Various strengths of the medium of choice and the type and concentration of carbon source were also investigated. Responses to germination varied with the type of seed. Embryonic axis (EA) followed by seeds without coat (SWtC) germinated rapidly and expressed a high rate of germination. The growth performances of plantlets varied with the basal medium composition and the seeds type. The optimal growth performances of plants were displayed on half strength MS basal medium with SWtC and EA as source of seeds. Addition of 3% sucrose in the culture medium was more suitable for a maximum growth of plantlets derived from EA.

  20. In Vitro Seeds Germination and Seedling Growth of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongomaké Koné

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. is an indigenous grain legume. It occupies a prominent place in the strategies to ensure food security in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of an efficient in vitro regeneration system, a prerequisite for genetic transformation application, requires the establishment of optimal conditions for seeds germination and plantlets development. Three types of seeds were inoculated on different basal media devoid of growth regulators. Various strengths of the medium of choice and the type and concentration of carbon source were also investigated. Responses to germination varied with the type of seed. Embryonic axis (EA followed by seeds without coat (SWtC germinated rapidly and expressed a high rate of germination. The growth performances of plantlets varied with the basal medium composition and the seeds type. The optimal growth performances of plants were displayed on half strength MS basal medium with SWtC and EA as source of seeds. Addition of 3% sucrose in the culture medium was more suitable for a maximum growth of plantlets derived from EA.

  1. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... diversified diet with frequent intake of foods from all food groups for at least four food groups per day, at least four meals in a day and with continued breast- feeding (WHO, 2008). Inappropriate complementary feeding practices such as untimely introduction of complementary foods, improper frequency for.

  2. Parental concerns about complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives:To investigate and analyze differences in parental concerns during earlier and later phases of complementary feeding.Subject/methods:Eight focus group interviews were conducted with 45 mothers of children aged 7 or 13 months. Deductive and inductive coding procedures were...... applied in the analysis.Results:There were marked differences in mothers' health concerns in early and in later phases of complementary feeding. In the early phase, feeding a child healthy food was an unquestioned and self-evident practice. The child's food was a specific category, separated from the rest....... Contested and partly contradictory practices resulted, including conscious acceptance of some intake of sugar and unhealthy fats. Perceived relevance of nutritional guidelines on complementary feeding was high in the early phase but declined later.Conclusion:Mothers' concerns and practices in the feeding...

  3. Complementary and alternative medical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Steven C

    2008-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medical therapies include herbs, acupuncture, and mind-body therapies. This review highlights the findings of recently published studies of complementary and alternative medical therapies and epilepsy, and provides an update of the US Food and Drug Administration's role in regulating herbal products. Complementary and alternative medical therapies are often tried by patients with epilepsy, frequently without physician knowledge. Many modalities have been evaluated in patients with epilepsy, though methodological issues preclude any firm conclusions of efficacy or safety. Some herbal medicines have been shown experimentally to have mechanisms of action relevant to epilepsy and promising actions in animal models. There is currently a paucity of credible evidence to support the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies in patients with epilepsy. Herbal medicines traditionally used for epilepsy and compounds isolated from them, as well as other herbal medicines and their constituent compounds that have been shown experimentally to have mechanisms of action relevant to epilepsy, should undergo further preclinical evaluation with a view towards clinical development under the new US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Additional studies of other, nonherbal complementary and alternative medical therapies are also warranted based on anecdotal observations or pilot studies that suggest a favorable risk-benefit ratio.

  4. Complementary Feeding Practices And Nutrient Intake From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and 12-18 months of age, the daily nutrient intakes were 88%, 121% and 94% for energy; 33%, 52% and 59% for iron and 30%, 33% and 38% for calcium, respectively. Fortification of complementary foods is necessary to meet infants' needs for iron and calcium. Keywords: Complementary feeding, infants, iron, Zambia.

  5. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM), a new broad-based journal, is founded on two key tenets: To publish exciting research in all areas of applied medicinal plants, Traditional medicines, Complementary Alternative Medicines, food and agricultural technologies, and ...

  6. Prevalance of aflatoxin contamination in maize and groundnut in Ghana: Population structure, distribution, and toxigenicity of the causal agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination in maize and groundnut is perennial in Ghana with substantial health and economic burden on the population. The present study examined for the first time the prevalence of aflatoxin contamination in maize and groundnut in major producing regions across three agroecological zo...

  7. Occurrence of aflatoxins and aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus spp. associated with groundnut production in subsistence farming systems in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ncube, E.; Flett, B.C.; Waalwijk, C.; Viljoen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Author: Ncube, E. Flett, B.C. Waalwijk, C. Viljoen, A. Vol 27 Issue 2 Publication: 2010 Page: 195-198 : Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus spp. in groundnut kernels. Forty-six groundnut samples were collected from subsistence farmers in three provinces of South

  8. Physicochemical and micro-structural properties of flours, starch and proteins from two varieties of legumes: bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptso, Kuaté Giscard; Njintang, Yanou Nicolas; Nguemtchouin, Mbouga Marie Goletti; Scher, Joël; Hounhouigan, Joseph; Mbofung, Carl Moses

    2015-08-01

    This work is part of a large study aimed to evaluate the potential of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) flour as starting raw material for the preparation of a widely cherished legume-based food product known as koki. Towards this objective, the flours from two varieties of bambara groundnut along with their respective starch and protein isolates were analyzed for some physicochemical and microstructural properties. It was observed that bambara flour contained appreciable amount of proteins (24.0-25.5 g/100 g), carbohydrates (57.9-61.7 g/100 g), fiber (3.45-3.68 g/100 g) and ash (3.65-3.85 g/100 g) with marginal differences between both varieties. The properties of starch and proteins isolated from the flours were different from one variety to another. In particular the starch granules of the white variety were larger (size range 10-35 μm) and polygonal while those from the black variety were smaller (size range 6-15 μm) and spherical in shape. In addition, the peak of gelatinization temperature was higher for white variety (81.7 °C) than for black variety (77.5 °C). The gelatinization temperature and the enthalpy of gelatinization of starch in the flours were systematically lower than for the starch isolates, suggesting an interaction of starch with other components on the gelatinization process.

  9. Oil synthesis and composition in developidng cotyledons of groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Niranjan; Srivastava, K.N.; Sharma, N.D.; Mehta, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Oil synthesis in groundnut mutants TG-1 and TG-16 along with its parent Spanish Improved was studied during kernel development. Dry weight, oil and protein content increased progressively with kernel development. Acetate 2- 14 C incorporation in lipids increased in both the mutants during development, while in parent it increased up to 95 day stage and then showed a decline at maturity. However, during development the rate of incorporation per kernel was lower in parent than mutants. Polar lipids decreased while non-polar lipids increased during development both in parent as well as mutants. Fatty acid composition of the oil differed between mutants and also from the parent during development. TG-16 had higher oleic and lower linoleic than parent Spanish Improved while TG-1 had intermediate oleic acid levels. During development, palmitate decreased slightly in parent while in TG-1 and TG-16, the decrease at maturity was lesser than the parent. The other fatty acid present in minor amounts, showed variation which was neither characteristic of the variety nor of any stage. Results, thus indicate developmental differences with respect to oil content and quality between mutant and parent. (author). 21 refs

  10. Complementary feeding: a critical window of opportunity from six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Animal food products are the only foods that contains enough iron, zinc, calcium and riboflavin to supply daily requirements for complementary feeding, while being low in antinutrients.39. Infants have a great need for iron, because of rapid growth and depleted iron stores. Therefore, complementary foods.

  11. Structure and functional properties of starch and flour from bambarra groundnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyarat Sirivongpaisal

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Structure and functional properties of starch and flour from Bambarra groundnut (Voandzeia Subterranea were investigated. The bambarra groundnut flour contained 58.38% of carbohydrate, 15.48 % of protein, 7.90% of fat, 4.19% of ash and 2.54% of fiber content. The starch isolated by the alkaline method had low content of protein (0.61%, fat (0.44% ash (0.47% and fiber (0.60%. Amylose content of bambarra groundnut starch was 21.67%. The starch granule shape appeared to be oval and round having an average diameter of 31.11 mm. X-ray diffraction pattern of the starch granules revealed an A-type with 43.69% of crystallinity. Thermal transition temperature of the starch assessed by DSC was 71.69oC at onset (T0 and gelatinisation enthalphy (DH was 11.73 J/g. Water and oil absorption capacity of bambarra groundnut starch were 1.67 and 1.01 ml/g, respectively. Bambarra groundnut starch showed a two-stage swelling pattern indicating a fairly restricted swelling starch. The pasting properties of the starch showed pasting temperature, breakdown and setback of 77.7oC, 170 BU, 220 BU, respectively. The starch showed similar pasting characteristics at the pH range 4.6 to 7.0. Compared with bambarra groundnut flour, the starch exhibited higher swelling power, breakdown and setback, but lower gelatinisation temperature, pasting temperature, water and oil absorption capacity.

  12. Gasification of ‘Loose’ Groundnut Shells in a Throathless Downdraft Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aondoyila Kuhe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, gasification potential of biomass residue was investigated using a laboratory scale throatless downdraft gasifier. Experimental results of groundnut shell was gasified in the throatless downdraft gasifier to produce a clean gas with a calorific value of around 5.92 MJ/Nm3 and a combustible fraction of 45% v/v. Low moisture (8.6% and ash content (3.19% are the main advantages of groundnut shells for gasification. It is suggested that gasification of shell waste products is a clean energy alternative to fossil fuels. The product gas can be used efficiently for heating and possible usage in internal combustion engines.

  13. Climate variability and sustainable food production: Insights from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past two decades have seen invigorated debates on the causal link between climate variability and food crop production. This study[1] extends the debate further by investigating how climate variability has affected the production of four specific food crops: maize, millet, rice, and groundnuts in north-eastern Ghana.

  14. Locally processed roasted-maize-based weaning foods fortified with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tom Brown (roasted-maize porridge) is one of the traditional weaning foods in Ghana. As an effort by the Ministry of Health to enhance the nutrient content of this lownutrient- density weaning food, a product called weanimix, which is Tom Brown fortified with legumes (cowpeas or soybeans and groundnuts), was introduced ...

  15. Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Insoluble Dietary Fiber Isolated from Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea [L.] Verdc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedericks, Claudine F; Jideani, Victoria A

    2015-09-01

    Bambara groundnut (BGN) is a widely cultivated legume with a rich nutritional profile, yet despite its many benefits it still remains underutilized. To highlight its potential value, 4 BGN varieties-brown, red, black eye, and brown eye were subjected to sequential enzymatic treatments followed by centrifugation to obtain the insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) fraction. The IDFs were vacuum-dried and evaluated for color, hydration properties, fat absorption, polyphenolic compounds, neutral sugars, and uronic acids. An optimized white bread formulation was also determined using brown BGN-IDF in an optimal (IV) mixture design. Three mixture components constrained at lower and upper limits (water: 57% to 60%, yeast: 2.3% to 5.3%, and BGN-IDF: 7% to 10%) were evaluated for their effects on responses of specific loaf volume, gumminess, chewiness, and resilience of the loaves. All BGN-IDFs differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) across all color parameters. Polyphenols were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest in red and brown BGN-IDFs. Arabinose/galactose (31.04% to 37.12%), xylose (16.53% to 27.30%), and mannose (14.48% to 22.24%) were the major sugars identified. Swelling capacity was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest for brown eye BGN-IDF (7.72 ± 0.49 mL/g). Water retention capacity ranged from 1.63 to 2.01 g water/g dry weight. Fat absorption for red BGN-IDF differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the best optimal white bread formulation enriched with brown BGN-IDF was established with numerical optimization at 59.5% water, 4.3% yeast, and 8.5% BGN-IDF. Overall positive physicochemical and functional properties were observed for BGN-IDFs, and it was shown that an optimal white bread enriched with BGN-IDF could be produced. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Local food-based complementary feeding recommendations developed by the linear programming approach to improve the intake of problem nutrients among 12-23-month-old Myanmar children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Lwin Mar; Fahmida, Umi; Htet, Min Kyaw; Utomo, Budi; Firmansyah, Agus; Ferguson, Elaine L

    2016-07-01

    Poor feeding practices result in inadequate nutrient intakes in young children in developing countries. To improve practices, local food-based complementary feeding recommendations (CFR) are needed. This cross-sectional survey aimed to describe current food consumption patterns of 12-23-month-old Myanmar children (n 106) from Ayeyarwady region in order to identify nutrient requirements that are difficult to achieve using local foods and to formulate affordable and realistic CFR to improve dietary adequacy. Weekly food consumption patterns were assessed using a 12-h weighed dietary record, single 24-h recall and a 5-d food record. Food costs were estimated by market surveys. CFR were formulated by linear programming analysis using WHO Optifood software and evaluated among mothers (n 20) using trial of improved practices (TIP). Findings showed that Ca, Zn, niacin, folate and Fe were 'problem nutrients': nutrients that did not achieve 100 % recommended nutrient intake even when the diet was optimised. Chicken liver, anchovy and roselle leaves were locally available nutrient-dense foods that would fill these nutrient gaps. The final set of six CFR would ensure dietary adequacy for five of twelve nutrients at a minimal cost of 271 kyats/d (based on the exchange rate of 900 kyats/USD at the time of data collection: 3rd quarter of 2012), but inadequacies remained for niacin, folate, thiamin, Fe, Zn, Ca and vitamin B6. TIP showed that mothers believed liver and vegetables would cause worms and diarrhoea, but these beliefs could be overcome to successfully promote liver consumption. Therefore, an acceptable set of CFR were developed to improve the dietary practices of 12-23-month-old Myanmar children using locally available foods. Alternative interventions such as fortification, however, are still needed to ensure dietary adequacy of all nutrients.

  17. Thermal degradation of groundnut oil during continuous and intermittent frying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit K; Babylatha, R; Pavithra, A S; Khatoon, Sakina

    2013-12-01

    The quality of refined groundnut oil, as affected by frying Poori, was assessed with respect to two types of frying operations viz., continuous frying and intermittent frying. Continuous frying was carried out consistently for 8 h, whereas intermittent frying was performed for 2 h everyday for 4 days for a total of 8 frying hours. The purpose of the study was to compare the level of deterioration that occurred during the two operations. Among the parameters studied, peroxide value (11.3 ± 0.26 meqO2/kg), anisidine value (172.4 ± 2.71), diene value (1.57 ± 0.095), oxidized fatty acid (2.6 ± 0.17%) and viscosity (103.8 ± 2.5 mPa s(-1)), were found to be higher after 8 h due to intermittent frying. The corresponding values 4.9 ± 0.15, 133.3 ± 0.49, 0.811 ± 0.04, 0.38 ± 0.023 and 81.8 ± 2.02 were observed in continuous frying. Parameters such as iodine value, unsaturated fatty acids, saponification value and smoke point decreased significantly (P frying. Results showed that intermittent frying caused more quality degradation to GNO than continuous frying.

  18. Promising mutant varieties of groundnut evolved through gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, P.K.; Rahman, H.

    1980-01-01

    The Chotanagpur plateau region of Bihar is the main potential area for groundnut cultivation in the State. Var. AK 12-24 - an early, bunch type - has been the predominant variety under cultivation. Because of special nature of soil and rainfall pattern of this area, it is desirable to evolve a variety with early to mid-early maturity and bunch habit, but with improved yield potential over the ruling var. AK 12-24. Two bold podded mutants BP 1 and BP 2 were obtained throuo.h gamma irradiation of var 41-C which is a late maturing variety (135-140 days), spreading in habit and with medium kernel and pod size, whereas the mutant varieties have early (110-115 days for BP 1) to mid-early (115-120 days for BP 2) maturity, bunch habit and bold kernel and pods (HKW 55-60 gm for BP 1 and 60-66 gms for BP 2). Both have 20-25% higher yield potential over AK 12-24. The results of 3 years' yield evaluation trials at Kanke and one year minikit trials at different locations in Bihar show that BP 1 and BP 2 have significantly outyielded the check AK 12-24 and were at par with each other. Both varieties -because of their bold seededness - come under HPS type and have good export market. These varieties have now been released by the Rajendra Agricultural University as Sonya Bold 1 and Sonya Bold 2 for cultivation in Bihar. (author)

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  20. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  1. Nutritive Evaluation of the Bambara Groundnut Ci12 Landrace [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)] Produced in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N’Dri Yao, Denis; Kouassi, Kouakou Nestor; Erba, Daniela; Scazzina, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional evaluation of the Bambara groundnut Ci12 landrace (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds produced in Côte d’Ivoire shows a 19% content of protein, containing all the essential amino acids with tryptophan as the limiting amino acid, a total dietary fiber level of 10%, with a low soluble fraction content, and a fat content of 1.4%, with a high proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61%) of which 36% were n-6 fatty acids. This legume contains phosphorus, as the major mineral, followed by magnesium and calcium, and trace elements (iron, copper and zinc). It is characterized by the same amount of α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity as common legumes. The high concentration of essential amino acids, n-6 fatty acids and minerals, mainly Fe, in the Ci12 landrace of Bambara groundnut indicates that this local legume has the potentiality to improve the nutritional status in Côte d’Ivoire and it could be regarded as a nutrient dense food. PMID:26370971

  2. Nutritive Evaluation of the Bambara Groundnut Ci12 Landrace [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)] Produced in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Denis N'Dri; Kouassi, Kouakou Nestor; Erba, Daniela; Scazzina, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina

    2015-09-07

    The nutritional evaluation of the Bambara groundnut Ci12 landrace (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds produced in Côte d'Ivoire shows a 19% content of protein, containing all the essential amino acids with tryptophan as the limiting amino acid, a total dietary fiber level of 10%, with a low soluble fraction content, and a fat content of 1.4%, with a high proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61%) of which 36% were n-6 fatty acids. This legume contains phosphorus, as the major mineral, followed by magnesium and calcium, and trace elements (iron, copper and zinc). It is characterized by the same amount of α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity as common legumes. The high concentration of essential amino acids, n-6 fatty acids and minerals, mainly Fe, in the Ci12 landrace of Bambara groundnut indicates that this local legume has the potentiality to improve the nutritional status in Côte d'Ivoire and it could be regarded as a nutrient dense food.

  3. Nutritive Evaluation of the Bambara Groundnut Ci12 Landrace [Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. (Fabaceae] Produced in Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis N'Dri Yao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional evaluation of the Bambara groundnut Ci12 landrace (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. seeds produced in Côte d’Ivoire shows a 19% content of protein, containing all the essential amino acids with tryptophan as the limiting amino acid, a total dietary fiber level of 10%, with a low soluble fraction content, and a fat content of 1.4%, with a high proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61% of which 36% were n-6 fatty acids. This legume contains phosphorus, as the major mineral, followed by magnesium and calcium, and trace elements (iron, copper and zinc. It is characterized by the same amount of α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity as common legumes. The high concentration of essential amino acids, n-6 fatty acids and minerals, mainly Fe, in the Ci12 landrace of Bambara groundnut indicates that this local legume has the potentiality to improve the nutritional status in Côte d’Ivoire and it could be regarded as a nutrient dense food.

  4. The use of linear programming to determine whether a formulated complementary food product can ensure adequate nutrients for 6- to 11-month-old Cambodian infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Jutta Kloppenborg Heick; Bunthang, Touch; Chamnan, Chhoun

    2014-01-01

    A new software tool, Optifood, developed by the WHO and based on linear programming (LP) analysis, has been developed to formulate food-based recommendations.......A new software tool, Optifood, developed by the WHO and based on linear programming (LP) analysis, has been developed to formulate food-based recommendations....

  5. Factors and Caregiver’s Behavior Affecting Inadequate Complementary Food of Infants Aged 6-12 Months in Naresuan University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitima Ngoenmak, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Food plays an important role in infant nutrition. Hence, the various factors and behavior that affect the right choice of nutrition for infants aged 6-12 months by caregivers need to be investigated. The objectives were to study the associated factors and caregiver’s behavior affecting inadequate feeding of food to infants aged 6-12 months. Methods: This present work was a cross-sectional study in which 54 caregivers for infants were included. In this study, a survey was performed by using questionnaires for collecting data. The data were analyzed statistically in terms of percentage and mean and by using Chi-Square test (Fisher’s Exact Test and z-test. Results: It was found that most of the infants (79.6 % had normal weight. The age at the start of proper feeding was 5 months and 27 days old. The education level, age, occupation, and income of the caregivers were factors affecting the food choices for the infants at p< 0.05. Inappropriate feeding practices were as follows: feeding pre- masticated foods, liquid food feeding, drinking sweetened juice and soft drinks, eating sweets, and adding salt, sugar, monosodium glutamate and fish sauce to the infants’ food. The caregivers chose food by judging for age and FDA logo on product labels. Advertising did not affect their decision to purchase food. Moreover, occupation, education, and income of the caregivers were not associated with purchasing the right food for the baby. Conclusion: Occupation, income, age, and education level of the infant caregivers were associated with the food selection. The inappropriate feeding behaviors were still persisting.

  6. Metabolism of labelled ziram in groundnut plants and its microbiological degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghu, K.; Kumarasamy, R.; Rao, S.R.; Murthy, N.B.K.; Sane, P.V.

    1976-01-01

    Groundnut plants were sprayed with [ 35 S]-ziram when 62 days old. The unchanged fungicide and derivatives were recovered, identified and assayed. A bacterial species capable of metabolizing the fungicide residue was isolated. At the time of harvest (124 days) of the seed pods more of the radioactive tracer was found in the shell than in the seed. (author)

  7. Timing of mounding for bambara groundnut affects crop development and yield in a rainfed tropical environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouedrago, Mahama; M'bi, Bertin Zagre; Liu, Fulai

    2013-01-01

    -ecological zone of Burkina Faso were conducted. Yield data confirm the findings from a drier part of Burkina Faso; i.e., mounding of bambara groundnut should not be carried out around the time of flowering. In a semi-arid area, such as Sudan–Sahel agro-ecological zone and with germplasm maturing within 90 days...

  8. 23 Effects of Groundnut Husk Ash-blended Cement on Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    areas or site for usage (Neville, 2000). Since. OPC is typically the most expensive constituent of concrete, the replacement of proportion of it with Groundnut Husk Ash. (GHA) may improve concrete affordability particularly for low-cost housing in developing countries like Nigeria. The use of GHA may contribute not only to the.

  9. Effects of Intra-Row Spacing on Herbage Yields of Two Groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SH

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, LAUTECH, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, 2013. Effects of Intra-Row Spacing on Herbage Yields of Two. Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Varieties in Sokoto,. Semi-Arid Zone, Nigeria. M.B. Sokoto, I. Bello and E. A. Osemuahu. Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  10. aqueous plant extracts for control of groundnut leaf spot in burkina

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2017-08-08

    Aug 8, 2017 ... Treatments with aqueous extracts of L. multiflora and Z. mucronata recorded the best disease control. The disease scores of these ... has confirmed that plants tested significantly control leaf spot diseases of groundnut. Key Words: Arachis ..... Integrated pests and disease management. Eds. Mukerji Rajeev ...

  11. Farmers’ contributions to the conservation of tree diversity in the Groundnut Basin, Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambou, Antoine; Sambou, Bienvenu; Ræbild, Anders

    2017-01-01

    the diversity and structure of the tree vegetation across landscape classes. Inventories were carried out in three villages in the Groundnut Basin in Senegal, assessing tree diversity, density and crown cover. Tree diversity as assessed by species accumulation curves was high in forests, but cultivated...

  12. an investigation into the use of groundnut shell as fine aggregate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Department of Civil Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. Emails: abhsada@abu.edu.ng; bydamartey@abu.edu.ng ; csamaila.bako@yahoo.com. Abstract. The suitability of groundnut shell as a constituent material in concrete was investigated by re- placing proportions by volume of fine ...

  13. Genetic diversity in bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) landraces revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massawe, F J; Dickinson, M; Roberts, J A; Azam-Ali, S N

    2002-12-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc), an African indigenous legume, is popular in most parts of Africa. The present study was undertaken to establish genetic relationships among 16 cultivated bambara groundnut landraces using fluorescence-based amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Seven selective primer combinations generated 504 amplification products, ranging from 50 to 400 bp. Several landrace-specific products were identified that could be effectively used to produce landrace-specific markers for identification purposes. On average, each primer combination generated 72 amplified products that were detectable by an ABI Prism 310 DNA sequencer. The polymorphisms obtained ranged from 68.0 to 98.0%, with an average of 84.0%. The primer pairs M-ACA + P-GCC and M-ACA + P-GGA produced more polymorphic fragments than any other primer pairs and were better at differentiating landraces. The dendrogram generated by the UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging) grouped 16 landraces into 3 clusters, mainly according to their place of collection or geographic origin. DipC1995 and Malawi5 were the most genetically related landraces. AFLP analysis provided sufficient polymorphism to determine the amount of genetic diversity and to establish genetic relationships in bambara groundnut landraces. The results will help in the formulation of marker-assisted breeding in bambara groundnut.

  14. Aqueous plant extracts for control of groundnut leaf spot in Burkina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... native plants species of Burkina (Lippia multiflora Moldenke, Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam, Ziziphus mucronata Willd. and Securidaca longepedonculata L) against these diseases, on a susceptible groundnut variety (TS32-1) in the field during the cropping seasons of 2010 to 2012, in Gampela district in Burkina Faso.

  15. Efficacy of Olive oil, Groundnut oil, Soybean oil and Palm kernel oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the potentials of four different vegetable oils (olive oil, groundnut oil, soybean oil and palm kernel oil) for the protection of stored cowpea against Callosobruchus maculatus. Ife-brown seeds (a susceptible variety) used for the experiment were subjected to the different ...

  16. Comparative study on chemical compositions and properties of protein isolates from mung bean, black bean and bambara groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudre, Tanaji G; Benjakul, Soottawat; Kishimura, Hideki

    2013-08-15

    Different legume seeds may have different protein compositions and properties, thereby affecting applications in food systems. This study aimed to extract and characterize protein isolates from legumes grown in Thailand, including mung bean (MBPI), black bean (BBPI) and bambara groundnut (BGPI). All protein isolates had a protein content in the range of 85.2-88.2%. The highest trypsin inhibitory activity was found in BGPI. All protein isolates exhibited satisfactory balanced amino acids with respect to the FAO/WHO pattern. MBPI and BBPI had three predominant proteins with a molecular weight (MW) range of 42-54 kDa, whereas BGPI had two dominant proteins with MW of 52 and 62 kDa. Based on differential scanning calorimetric analysis, MBPI and BGPI had two endothermic peaks, whereas three peaks were found for BBPI. All protein isolates exhibited similar FTIR spectra, indicating similarity in functional group and structure. All protein isolates showed a minimum protein solubility at around pH 4-5. All protein isolates were important sources of proteins with high lysine content. Isolates from different legumes showed slight differences in physiochemical and thermal properties. Those isolates can be used as proteinaceous ingredients in a variety of food products such as salad dressing, meat products and desserts. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Evaluating the bio-energy potential of groundnut shell and sugarcane bagasse waste composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde Ajani Oyelaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An assessment has been carried out on bio-coal briquettes from coal with sugarcane bagasse and coal with groundnut shell. Proximate analyses and elemental compositions of the coal and biomasses were determined. Different samples of briquettes were produced by blending varying composition of the coal with the biomasses in the ratio of 100:0; 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60 and 0: 100, using calcium carbonate as a desulfurizing agent and cassava starch as a binder. A manual hydraulically operated briquetting machine was used with the pressure kept at 5MPa. The results of the properties evaluated shows that biomass increases the burning efficiency of briquettes with increase in the biomass material, increasing combustion rate, faster ignition, producing lesser ash and fewer pollutants. Results obtained shows that the calorific value of briquettes produced from coal-groundnut shells and coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 16.94 - 20.81 and 17.31 – 21.03 MJ/kg respectively. The ignition time ranges from 6.9 – 12.5 minutes for coal-groundnut shells briquettes while that of coal-sugarcane bagasse ranges from 6.5 – 11.1 minutes. The bio-coal blends with sugarcane bagasse were better than that of groundnut shells. However, both sugarcane bagasse and groundnut shells produce bio-coal briquettes that are very efficient, providing sufficient heat as at the time necessary, generating less smoke and gases (e.g sulphur that are harmful to environment, and generating less ash, as these have adverse effect during cooking.

  18. Breeding for high N2 fixation in groundnut and soybean in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Xuan Hong

    1998-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Mer.) are grown mainly on two types of soil in Viet Nam: coastal-sandy and upland-degraded soils. These soils are deficient in N, and considering that fertilizer N is not only costly to farmers but also a threat to the environment, it is important to maximize productivity by exploiting the ability of these legumes to fix N 2 symbiotically in their root nodules. We initiated programmes of breeding and selection to combine high N 2 fixation and high grain-yielding capacity. In the spring of 1992, breeding lines of groundnut and soybean were tested under greenhouse conditions for varietal differences in the capacity to fix N 2 using the acetylene reduction assay and the 15 N-dilution technique, with upland rice as reference plants. Varietal differences were found in nitrogenase activity, and percent N derived from fixation (%Ndfa) ranged from 11 to 63% for groundnut and from 9 to 79% for soybean. Field experiments in the autumn-winter season of 1992 again revealed significant varietal differences; %Ndfa ranged from 36 to 56% for groundnut and from 28 to 58% for soybean. Gamma-irradiated seeds of soybean were propagated in bulk from M 1 to M 4 . Five high-yielding mutant lines of both species were selected from the M 5 populations, and N 2 fixation was estimated using the 15 N-dilution technique. The average values for %Ndfa of the mutants were 55 and 57%, significant improvements over the parent-cultivar values of 25 and 29% for soybean and groundnut, respectively

  19. Growth and complementary feeding in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, C K

    2012-10-01

    To describe growth patterns of young children in Latin America and the Caribbean, the types of nationally representative data available on complementary feeding practices and complementary feeding practices. Data on growth, timing of introduction of liquids and foods, and complementary feeding practices were abstracted from nationally representative surveys. The high prevalence of stunting relative to the low prevalence of underweight is striking, with the "average" child in the region, with the exception of the Haitian child, short and chubby. The focus of the demographic and health surveys continues to be on undernutrition with only one question, intake of sugary foods, related foods that may have consequences for adult health. The United States has more comprehensive information; Mexico has information on beverage consumption and Brazil on soft drink and biscuit or snack consumption. In 14 of 19 countries, fewer than half of infants are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of life, indicating an early introduction of liquids and complementary foods. Among the 5 countries with data on the intake of sugary foods, intake in the previous 24 h among children 6-23 months of age ranged from 14% to 79%. The absence of data to characterize complementary feeding diets as they relate to risk of overweight and chronic diseases in the Region of the Americas calls attention to the need to improve data collection frameworks and methods to address this important gap in knowledge. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Complementary feeding and obesity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Veit; Theurich, Melissa

    2014-05-01

    This article will summarize recent progress in research in the area of complementary feeding as it relates to childhood obesity. Newly emerged findings demonstrate how research on contributing factors has shifted. Examining nutrient and caloric intakes alone has failed to answer the critical question, 'Why are some children obese, whereas others are not?' Recent research explores parental attitudes, beliefs and parental feeding styles as contributing factors. Studies examining the impact of specific macronutrients on obesity risk may have partially uncovered a link between consistently high protein intakes during infancy and an elevated obesity risk, at least until the second year of life. However, this relationship was not evident in all studies evaluated in a systematic review this year. Childhood obesity is not linked to any specific types of foods or food groups during the complementary feeding period. Adherence to dietary guidelines is associated with increased lean body mass, but not BMI or fat mass. Complementary feeding practices, socioeconomic and other family dynamics at least partially explain obesity risk. As young infants are dependent on adults for nourishment, parental attitudes and beliefs about infant nutrition and actual feeding practices directly influence infant nutritional status. Early nutrition interventions to prevent obesity should take nutrition belief systems, parental feeding styles, socioeconomic and educational status, among other characteristics into consideration.

  1. EFFECT OF DIETARY RAW CHICKPEA (Cicer arietinum L.) SEEDS REPLACEMENT GROUNDNUT MEAL, SESAME MEAL ON BROILER PERFORMANCE AND BLOOD CONSTITUENTS

    OpenAIRE

    T.A. Algam; Kh.A. Abdel Atti; B.M. Dousa; S.M. Elawad; B.A. Atta Elmanan

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of chickpea seeds on performance and blood constituents of broilers. One hundred and twenty eight unsexed one day old (Ross) broiler chicks were randomly assigned to four approximately isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets labeled as follows: Diet (F0) containing 0% chickpea (control diet), diet (F1) 10% chickpea substitute same levels of sesame meal and groundnuts meal, diet (F2) 10% chickpea substitute from groundnuts meal only and diet (F3) ...

  2. Influence of planting densities on the performance of intercropped bambara groundnut with cowpea in Makurdi, Benue state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Alhassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was undertaken during the rainy seasons (August – December of 2010 and 2011 at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi in Benue State, located in the Southern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria. The objective was to investigate the suitability of some landraces of bambara groundnut for intercropping at varying planting densities with cowpea. The experiment was a 2 x 3 x 3 split-split plot set out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Intercropping decreased canopy width, number of pods per plant and grain yields of bambara groundnut component. Number of pods plant-1 and grain yields of bambara groundnuts increased with increased planting density. Landrace x planting density interaction effects was significant signifying that landraces have to be selected for specific densities. The landraces of bambara groundnuts used for this study are better suited for planting at high densities (>100,000 plants ha-1. Sole cowpea proved superior to intercropped cowpea with bambara groundnut in dry grain yield, total plant biomass and harvest index. Productivity indices indicated that bambara groundnut/ cowpea intercropping was productive, but cowpea was the dominant component of this intercropping system.

  3. Dietary Protein Intake in Young Children in Selected Low-Income Countries Is Generally Adequate in Relation to Estimated Requirements for Healthy Children, Except When Complementary Food Intake Is Low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Joanne E; Brown, Kenneth H

    2017-05-01

    Background: Previous research indicates that young children in low-income countries (LICs) generally consume greater amounts of protein than published estimates of protein requirements, but this research did not account for protein quality based on the mix of amino acids and the digestibility of ingested protein. Objective: Our objective was to estimate the prevalence of inadequate protein and amino acid intake by young children in LICs, accounting for protein quality. Methods: Seven data sets with information on dietary intake for children (6-35 mo of age) from 6 LICs (Peru, Guatemala, Ecuador, Bangladesh, Uganda, and Zambia) were reanalyzed to estimate protein and amino acid intake and assess adequacy. The protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score of each child's diet was calculated and multiplied by the original (crude) protein intake to obtain an estimate of available protein intake. Distributions of usual intake were obtained to estimate the prevalence of inadequate protein and amino acid intake for each cohort according to Estimated Average Requirements. Results: The prevalence of inadequate protein intake was highest in breastfeeding children aged 6-8 mo: 24% of Bangladeshi and 16% of Peruvian children. With the exception of Bangladesh, the prevalence of inadequate available protein intake decreased by age 9-12 mo and was very low in all sites (0-2%) after 12 mo of age. Inadequate protein intake in children <12 mo of age was due primarily to low energy intake from complementary foods, not inadequate protein density. Conclusions: Overall, most children consumed protein amounts greater than requirements, except for the younger breastfeeding children, who were consuming low amounts of complementary foods. These findings reinforce previous evidence that dietary protein is not generally limiting for children in LICs compared with estimated requirements for healthy children, even after accounting for protein quality. However, unmeasured effects of infection

  4. Statistical optimization of bambara groundnut protein isolate-alginate matrix systems on survival of encapsulated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyanat Kaewiad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation may protect viable probiotic cells. This study aims at the evaluation of a bambara groundnut protein isolate (BGPI-alginate matrix designed for encapsulating a probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The response surface methodology was employed to gain the optimal concentrations of BGPI and alginate on encapsulation efficiency and survival of encapsulated cells. The capsules were prepared at the optimal combination by the traditional extrusion method composed of 8.66% w/v BGPI and 1.85% w/v alginate. The encapsulation efficiency was 97.24%, whereas the survival rates in an acidic condition and after the freeze-drying process were 95.56% and 95.20%, respectively—higher than those using either BGPI or alginate as the encapsulating agent individually. The designed capsules increased the probiotic L. rhamnosus GG survival relative to free cells in a simulated gastric fluid by 5.00 log cfu/ml after 3 h and in a simulated intestinal fluid by 8.06 log cfu/ml after 4 h. The shelf-life studies of the capsules over 6 months at 4 °C and 30 °C indicated that the remaining number of viable cells in a BGPI-alginate capsule was significantly higher than that of free cells in both temperatures. It was demonstrated that the BGPI-alginate capsule could be utilized as a new probiotic carrier for enhanced gastrointestinal transit and storage applied in food and/or pharmaceutical products.

  5. Use of microsatellite markers for the assessment of bambara groundnut breeding system and varietal purity before genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai Kuan; Muchugi, Alice; Muthemba, Samuel; Kariba, Robert; Mavenkeni, Busiso Olga; Hendre, Prasad; Song, Bo; Van Deynze, Allen; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Maximizing the research output from a limited investment is often the major challenge for minor and underutilized crops. However, such crops may be tolerant to biotic and abiotic stresses and are adapted to local, marginal, and low-input environments. Their development through breeding will provide an important resource for future agricultural system resilience and diversification in the context of changing climates and the need to achieve food security. The African Orphan Crops Consortium recognizes the values of genomic resources in facilitating the improvement of such crops. Prior to beginning genome sequencing there is a need for an assessment of line varietal purity and to estimate any residual heterozygosity. Here we present an example from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilized drought tolerant African legume. Two released varieties from Zimbabwe, identified as potential genotypes for whole genome sequencing (WGS), were genotyped with 20 species-specific SSR markers. The results indicate that the cultivars are actually a mix of related inbred genotypes, and the analysis allowed a strategy of single plant selection to be used to generate non-heterogeneous DNA for WGS. The markers also confirmed very low levels of heterozygosity within individual plants. The application of a pre-screen using co-dominant microsatellite markers is expected to substantially improve the genome assembly, compared to a cultivar bulking approach that could have been adopted.

  6. [Complementary medicine in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Moshe; Gamus, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been an increase in the use and popularity of complementary medicine in Israel. Currently, there are over 100 complementary medicine clinics in the public health sector supported by the four health funds and most hospitals in Israel. The number of visits to those clinics reaches close to 3 million visits annually. This reflects an extensive system of care that Israelis utilize in addition to the conventional heaLthcare system. However, the communication between the two systems is still Limited and the education of complementary medicine providers is not regulated by the Ministry of Health. Concurrently, there are a growing number of physicians who expand the knowledge on these therapies and actually integrate them in patients' care. This issue describes experiences and knowledge related to the integration of complementary medicine in the Israeli healthcare system and provides additional research data in support of further integration of complementary medicine within conventional healthcare.

  7. Effect of bambara groundnut flour (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) supplementation on chemical, physical, nutritional and sensory evaluation of wheat bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdualrahman, Mohammed A Y; Ali, Ali O; Elkhalifa, Elamin A; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim E

    2012-09-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterrenea (L) Verdc) is a major source of vegetable protein in sub-Saharan Africa. And the aim of this study was to enhance the nutritional value of wheat bread through the addition of bambara groundnut flour to wheat four. For this, bambara groundnut seeds were soaked in tap water, manually decorticated, sun dried and milled into fine flour. Proximate analysis of flours of de-hulled bambara groundnut and wheat were conducted. Flour of de-hulled bambara groundnut was used for bread supplementation in ratios of 5, 10 and 15%. Rheological properties of the control flour and wheat flour supplemented with 10% of de-hulled bambara groundnut flour were conducted. The total area and dough development time increased. However, water absorption, stability and extensibility respectively decreased, from 71.3; 8.5; 190 in the control flour to 71.0; 5.5; 180 in the 10% supplemented flour. The increases in the resistance to extension and proportional number from 260 to 280 and 1.37 to 1.56, respectively resulted in stiff dough. The most important effect of wheat bread supplementation was the improvement of protein quantity from 13.74 +/- 0.02% for the control bread to 15.49 +/- 0.02, 17.00 +/- 0.05 and 18.98 +/- 0.02% for the 5, 10 and 15% blending ratios, respectively. The in-vitro protein digestibility progressively increased from 84.33 +/- 0.03 in the control bread to 85.42 +/- 0.04, 86.57 +/- 0.04 and 87.64 +/- 0.03 in breads containing 5, 10 and 15% bambara groundnut flour. The sensory attributes of different types of bread showed that, a significant difference was observed in texture, colour and overall acceptability. However, the panelists gave higher score for 10% de-hulled bambara groundnut flour bread than bread made from other blends. The loaf weights, loaf volume and specific volume increased. However, while the loaf weight increased with addition of 15% de-hulled bambara groundnut flour, both of loaf volume and specific volume decreased

  8. Potential negative consequences of geoengineering on crop production: A study of Indian groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiyi; Dobbie, Steven; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Feng, Kuishuang; Challinor, Andrew J; Chen, Bing; Gao, Yao; Lee, Lindsay; Yin, Yan; Sun, Laixiang; Watson, James; Koehler, Ann-Kristin; Fan, Tingting; Ghosh, Sat

    2016-11-28

    Geoengineering has been proposed to stabilize global temperature, but its impacts on crop production and stability are not fully understood. A few case studies suggest that certain crops are likely to benefit from solar dimming geoengineering, yet we show that geoengineering is projected to have detrimental effects for groundnut. Using an ensemble of crop-climate model simulations, we illustrate that groundnut yields in India undergo a statistically significant decrease of up to 20% as a result of solar dimming geoengineering relative to RCP4.5. It is somewhat reassuring, however, to find that after a sustained period of 50 years of geoengineering crop yields return to the nongeoengineered values within a few years once the intervention is ceased.

  9. Genetic diversity in Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L.) germplasm revealed by RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadou, H I; Bebeli, P J; Kaltsikes, P J

    2001-12-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess genetic diversity in Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L.) germplasm using 25 African accessions from the collection in the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria. Fifty random decamer primers were screened to assess their ability to detect polymorphism in bambara; 17 of them were selected for this study. Considerable genetic diversity was found among the V. subterranea accessions studied. The relationships among the 25 accessions were studied by cluster analysis. The dendrograms showed two main groups of accessions mainly along the lines of their geographic origin. It is concluded that RAPD can be used for germplasm classification in bambara groundnut and hence for improving this crop.

  10. Some chemical and physical properties of bambara groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea Thouars) seed and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, N J; Hung, Y C

    1996-11-01

    Some chemical and physical properties of bambara groundnut seed were determined. The proximate composition of the bambara groundnut seed was found to be 9.7% moisture, 16.6% protein, 5.9% fat, 2.9% ash, 4.9% crude fibre and 64.9% carbohydrate. Maximum water absorption was attained after soaking for 11, 9, 6, and 4 h at 25, 40, 50, and 60 degrees C, respectively. Maximum dehulling efficiency was attained when the seeds absorbed 54.7% water and drying for 9 h at 60 degrees C. Study of the microstructure of the raw flour and seed showed that they contained differently shaped and sized starch granules and protein materials within the cell wall in the cotyledon. Milling disorganised the arrangement of these components in the cotyledons. In the steamed moin-moin ('okpa'), all components in the seed had lost their identity and integrity.

  11. Effects of substituting groundnut cake with ammoniated full-fat neem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of substituting groundnut cake with ammoniated full-fat neem kernel meal on haematobiochemical components of broilers. ... Red Blood Cell (RBC) counts in Ti (3.86 x 106 mm3) and 14 (3.49 x 106 mm3) were significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of ^ (3.07 x 106 mm3), but RBC value for T4 did not differ significantly ...

  12. The effect of microwave roasting on the antioxidant properties of the Bangladeshi groundnut cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abbas; Islam, Anowarul; Pal, Tarun K

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut seeds are an important source of bioactive phenolic compounds with noteworthy antioxidant capacity, which may be enhanced by the microwave roasting process. The aim of this work is   to study the changes in antioxidant activity in groundnut seeds during microwave roasting, as a function of roasting time and extract concentration, in order to maximise the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of roasted seeds. The study was conducted to evaluate total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and antioxidative activity of methanolic (GME), ethanolic (GEE), and chloroform (GCE) extracts and methanolic extract of oil (GMO) from groundnut seeds exposed to microwaves. The antioxidant activity was investigated using several assays, namely phosphomolybdenum assay, DPPH radical scavenging activity, H2O2 scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and reducing power. The microwave roasting process significantly increased the TPC, whilst the TFC decreased with roasting time. Antioxidant activity increased with increased roasting time and extract concentration in all extracts. Antioxidant activity increased significantly at lower concentrations; however, the rate of increment decreased gradually as the concentration of the solvent extract increased. Thus, among all the extracts, methanol extracts at all roasting times and extract concentrations appeared to display the highest effectiveness. The various scavenging activities of the samples are ranked in the following order: GME > GEE > GCE > GMO, in both raw and roasted samples. Both roasting time and extract concentration were found to be critical factors in determining the overall quality of the product. This investigation is important to determine optimum roasting conditions, in order to maximise the anti-oxidative health benefits of the Bangladeshi groundnut cultivar.

  13. Evaluation of chickpea and groundnut for N2 fixation and yield in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattar, M.A.; Podder, A.K.; Das, M.L.; Shaikh, M.A.Q.; Danso, S.K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Field experiments on chickpea and groundnut were variously carried out at four locations in Bangladesh. Generally consistent trends were obtained in terms of positive effects of inoculation with rhizobia, and genotypic diversity for components of N 2 fixation and yield. Inoculation of groundnut increased average nodule number by 77% at Rajshahi, 99% at Mymensingh and 148% at Jamalput. The increases in nodule dry weight, plant dry weight, pod and stover yields due to inoculation ranged from 93 to 146%, 55 to 77%, 43 to 50% and 29 to 80%, respectively. At all three locations, significant differences were found amongst the genotypes for nodulation, dry matter production and yield. Mutant genotype 62-30 was superior for most components, and statistically better than the present variety Dacca-1 for all characteristics investigated. Inoculant application to chickpea resulted in at least a doubling of nodule number at Ishurdi and Mymensingh; on average, there was a three-fold increase in nodule mass as a result of inoculation. Seed-yield increases due to inoculation ranged from 24 to 50%. Inoculated cv. G-97 recorded a seed yield of about 1.5 t/ha at Ishurdi, 47% higher than that produced by Nabin, a variety widely cultivated in Bangladesh. Total-N yield and the amount of N fixed by G-97 with inoculant were also higher than for Hyprosola, which is known for high yield and protein content. In a screening trial at Mymensingh the commercial chickpea Nabin and Hyprosola were consistently inferior to advanced lines produced by mutation breeding. Of 12 mutant groundnut genotypes tested, D1-15KR/62-30 maintained superiority for almost all components. Most of the mutants performed better than the commercial variety Dacca-1. The data show the potential for increasing chickpea and groundnut yields in Bangladesh by improving N 2 fixation via selection of superior genotype in conjunction with compatible rhizobia

  14. Aflatoxin contamination in food commodities in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Monika; Harris, Julie; Afreen, Sadia; Deak, Eszter; Gade, Lalitha; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Park, Benjamin; Chiller, Tom; Luby, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    During September 2009, we performed a rapid cross-sectional study to investigate the extent of aflatoxin contamination among common Bangladeshi foods. We collected eight common human food commodities (rice, lentils, wheat flour, dates, betelnut, red chili powder, ginger and groundnuts) and poultry feed samples from two large markets in each of three cities in Bangladesh. We quantified aflatoxin levels from pooled subsamples using fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography. Aflatoxin levels were highest in dates and groundnuts (maximum 623 and 423 ng/g), respectively. Samples of betelnut (mean 30.6 ng/g), lentils (mean 21.2 ng/g) and red chili powder (>20 ng/g) also had elevated levels. The mean aflatoxin level among poultry feed samples was 73.0 ng/g. Aflatoxin levels were above the US maximum regulatory levels of 20 ng/g in five of eight commonly ingested human food commodities tested.

  15. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  16. Management of Stem-rot of Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. Cultivar in Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khirood DOLEY

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted at University of Pune for biocontrol of soil-borne plant pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii by incorporating arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and conventional system of cultivation with different spacing pattern (15 and 30 cm in field. Both mycorrhizal inoculation and 30 cm spacing pattern significantly increased growth and yield as compared to control or 15 cm spacing pattern. The pathogenic mycorrhizal groundnut plants in 30 as well as 15 cm spacing pattern showed better growth in terms of plant height, leaf and pod number, fresh and dry weight of whole groundnut plant in comparison to non-mycorrhizal pathogenic ones and the plant growth was better in 30 spacing than 15 cm. The colonization by AM fungi in both spacing pattern was higher in absence of pathogen S. rolfsii. However, pathogen’s presence decreased the mycorrhizal colonization considerably in 30 and 15 cm. The disease severity and incidence were recorded to be lowered when inoculated with mycorrhiza in pathogenic groundnut plants as compared to non-mycorrhizal pathogenic ones in both spacing pattern and incidence and severity was significantly lower in 30 cm as compared to 15 cm. Therefore, it was observed from our results that for management of soil-borne pathogens inoculation of AM fungi and spacing patterns are necessary.

  17. Acceptability of Iron- and Zinc-Biofortified Pearl Millet (ICTP-8203)-Based Complementary Foods among Children in an Urban Slum of Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Samantha Lee; Venkatramanan, Sudha; Udipi, Shobha A; Finkelstein, Julia Leigh; Ghugre, Padmini; Haas, Jere Douglas; Thakker, Varsha; Thorat, Aparna; Salvi, Ashwini; Kurpad, Anura V; Mehta, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Biofortification, a method for increasing micronutrient content of staple crops, is a promising strategy for combating major global health problems, such as iron and zinc deficiency. We examined the acceptability of recipes prepared using iron- and zinc-biofortified pearl millet (FeZnPM) (~80 ppm Fe, ~34 ppm Zn, varietal ICTP-8203), compared to conventional pearl millet (CPM) (~20 ppm Fe, ~19 ppm Zn) in preparation for an efficacy trial. Our objective was to examine the acceptability of FeZnPM compared to CPM among young children and mothers living in the urban slums of Mumbai. Standardized traditional feeding program recipes ( n  = 18) were prepared with either FeZnPM or CPM flour. The weight (g) of each food product was measured before and after consumption by children ( n  = 125) and the average grams consumed over a 3-day period were recorded. Mothers ( n  = 60) rated recipes using a 9-point hedonic scale. Mean intakes and hedonic scores of each food product were compared using t -tests across the two types of pearl millet. There were no statistically significant differences in consumption by children (FeZnPM: 25.27 ± 13.0 g; CPM: 21.72 ± 6.90 g) across the food products ( P  = 0.28). Overall mean hedonic scores for all recipes were between 7 to 9 points. CPM products were rated higher overall (8.22 ± 0.28) compared to FeZnPM products (7.95 ± 0.35) ( P  = 0.01). FeZnPM and CPM were similarly consumed and had high hedonic scores, demonstrating high acceptability in this population. These results support using these varieties of pearl millet in a proposed trial [http://Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02233764; Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI), reference number REF/2014/10/007731, CTRI number CTRI/2015/11/006376] testing the efficacy of FeZnPM for improving iron status and growth.

  18. Aspergillus section Flavi community structure in Zambia influences aflatoxin contamination of maize and groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachapulula, Paul W; Akello, Juliet; Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Cotty, Peter J

    2017-11-16

    Aflatoxins are cancer-causing, immuno-suppressive mycotoxins that frequently contaminate important staples in Zambia including maize and groundnut. Several species within Aspergillus section Flavi have been implicated as causal agents of aflatoxin contamination in Africa. However, Aspergillus populations associated with aflatoxin contamination in Zambia have not been adequately detailed. Most of Zambia's arable land is non-cultivated and Aspergillus communities in crops may originate in non-cultivated soil. However, relationships between Aspergillus populations on crops and those resident in non-cultivated soils have not been explored. Because characterization of similar fungal populations outside of Zambia have resulted in strategies to prevent aflatoxins, the current study sought to improve understanding of fungal communities in cultivated and non-cultivated soils and in crops. Crops (n=412) and soils from cultivated (n=160) and non-cultivated land (n=60) were assayed for Aspergillus section Flavi from 2012 to 2016. The L-strain morphotype of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus were dominant on maize and groundnut (60% and 42% of Aspergillus section Flavi, respectively). Incidences of A. flavus L-morphotype were negatively correlated with aflatoxin in groundnut (log y=2.4990935-0.09966x, R 2 =0.79, P=0.001) but not in maize. Incidences of A. parasiticus partially explained groundnut aflatoxin concentrations in all agroecologies and maize aflatoxin in agroecology III (log y=0.1956034+0.510379x, R 2 =0.57, Paflatoxin contamination in Zambia. Communities in both non-cultivated and cultivated soils were dominated by A. parasiticus (69% and 58%, respectively). Aspergillus parasiticus from cultivated and non-cultivated land produced statistically similar concentrations of aflatoxins. Aflatoxin-producers causing contamination of crops in Zambia may be native and, originate from non-cultivated areas, and not be introduced with non-native crops such as maize and

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... regulating CAM use in Nigeria. Keywords: Cancer patients, complementary and alternative medicine, correlates, .... products, such as herbs and food; manipulative therapies, such as chiropractic and massage; and ..... immunity and hence a better quality of life and treatment outcome.[7] These findings are ...

  20. Evaluation of food additives as alternative or complementary chemicals to conventional fungicides for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palou, Lluis; Smilanick, Joseph L; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate potential alternatives to conventional fungicides to control decay, more than 20 food additives and generally regarded as safe compounds were tested at three concentrations in in vivo primary screenings with several cultivars of California peaches, nectarines, and plums that had been artificially inoculated with seven major postharvest pathogens: Monilinia fructicola, Botrytis cinerea, Geotrichum candidum, Alternaria alternata, Penicillium expansum, Mucor piriformis, and Rhizopus stolonifer. Overall, the best compounds were 200 mM potassium sorbate (PS), 200 mM sodium benzoate (SB), 200 mM sodium sorbate, 100 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 400 mM sodium carbonate, and 250 mM potassium carbonate. Sodium and ammonium molybdates, acid lactic, and hydrogen peroxide were somewhat effective but were phytotoxic to fruit skin tissues. However, the best compounds lacked effectiveness and persistence when tested against brown rot in small-scale trials of 60-s dips in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures; PS and SB reduced brown rot incidence by less than 40%. Rinsing treated fruit with tap water reduced the efficacy of the compounds by up to 30%. In contrast, heating the solutions to 55 or 60 degrees C significantly increased treatment efficacy. Brown rot incidence and severity were reduced by 35 and 25%, respectively, on PS-treated peaches after 7 days of incubation at 20 degrees C. However, treatment efficacy was not superior to that with water alone at these temperatures. In semicommercial trials, mixtures of fludioxonil with PS, SB, or 2-deoxy-D-glucose applied as fruit coatings on a packing line were not synergistic in their effect on brown rot, gray mold, and sour rot.

  1. Exploiting Genomic Resources for Efficient Conservation and Use of Chickpea, Groundnut, and Pigeonpea Collections for Crop Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Laxmipathi Gowda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Both chickpea ( L. and pigeonpea [ (L. Millsp.] are important dietary source of protein while groundnut ( L. is one of the major oil crops. Globally, approximately 1.1 million grain legume accessions are conserved in genebanks, of which the ICRISAT genebank holds 49,485 accessions of cultivated species and wild relatives of chickpea, pigeonpea, and groundnut from 133 countries. These genetic resources are reservoirs of many useful genes for present and future crop improvement programs. Representative subsets in the form of core and mini core collections have been used to identify trait-specific genetically diverse germplasm for use in breeding and genomic studies in these crops. Chickpea, groundnut, and pigeonpea have moved from “orphan” to “genomic resources rich crops.” The chickpea and pigeonpea genomes have been decoded, and the sequences of groundnut genome will soon be available. With the availability of these genomic resources, the germplasm curators, breeders, and molecular biologists will have abundant opportunities to enhance the efficiency of genebank operations, mine allelic variations in germplasm collection, identify genetically diverse germplasm with beneficial traits, broaden the cultigen’s genepool, and accelerate the cultivar development to address new challenges to production, particularly with respect to climate change and variability. Marker-assisted breeding approaches have already been initiated for some traits in chickpea and groundnut, which should lead to enhanced efficiency and efficacy of crop improvement. Resistance to some pests and diseases has been successfully transferred from wild relatives to cultivated species.

  2. Complementary feeding: a commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostoni, Carlo; Decsi, Tamas; Fewtrell, Mary; Goulet, Olivier; Kolacek, Sanja; Koletzko, Berthold; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer; Moreno, Luis; Puntis, John; Rigo, Jacques; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Turck, Dominique; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    This position paper on complementary feeding summarizes evidence for health effects of complementary foods. It focuses on healthy infants in Europe. After reviewing current knowledge and practices, we have formulated these conclusions: Exclusive or full breast-feeding for about 6 months is a

  3. Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and nutritional status of 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine breastfeeding, complementary feeding and nutritional status of 6 - 12-month-old rural infants. Study design. A cross-sectional survey was done. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices were determined by questionnaire; an unquantified food frequency questionnaire was used to ...

  4. Effects of bradyrhiziobium and vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) inoculation on symbiotic properties, yield and seed quality of groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamedzein, Ekhlas Mohamedzein M.

    1996-11-01

    A local and introduced Bradyrhizobium strains and a locally-isolated VAM fungi were used to study their effects on groundnut in clay (Shambat) and sandy (El-Rwakeeb) soil in a pot experiment. A field experiment was carried out at El-Rwakeeb to study the effect of urea, superphosphate and chicken manure on inoculated or uninoculated groundnut. Inoculation significantly increased number of nodules, dry weight of shoot, root and nodules, plant N and P content, number and dry weight of pods, yield and seed composition and quality in both pot and field experiments. Introduced strain (TAL 1000) was more effective than locally- isolated strain (ENRRI 16). All fertilizers added to inoculated or uninoculated groundnut significantly increased all measured parameters. Chiken manure reflected good results than rea and superphosphate, which showed comparable results. All treatents significantly improved the seed composition especially protein and oil content. (Author)

  5. Influence of temperature on the fermentation of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) to produce a dawadawa-type product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, E N; Barimalaa, I S; Omosigho, J

    1999-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) was fermented to produce a dawadawa-type product using a starter culture of Bacillus licheniformis isolated from naturally fermenting bambara groundnut beans. Fermentation was carried out at 30 and 37 degrees C for four days and at 45 degrees C for two days. The pH of the substrate decreased after 24 hours and then rose at 30 and 37 degrees C but remained constant at 45 degrees C after the initial drop. Total titratable acidity of the fermenting beans mimicked the pH values. Proximate analyses for moisture, protein and fat of the cotyledons showed an increase in all three constituent at each of the three fermentation temperatures. At the end of fermentation, total available carbohydrate was 55%, 59% and 62% of the original value at 30, 37 and 45 degrees C, respectively. Fermentation of bambara groundnut at 45 degrees C for two days is recommended as the ideal fermentation temperature and time.

  6. Complementary feeding: A critical window of opportunity from six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The typical maize-based feeding pattern is low in food sourced from animals, vegetables and fruit and omega-3 fatty acids. Efforts by ... These could include nutrition education to improve caregiver practices, the use of high-quality, locally available foods, the use of enriched complementary foods, and exceptional support of ...

  7. Growth performance and hematology of Djallonké rams fed haulms of four varieties of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Ansah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess the chemical composition of the haulms of 4 dual-purpose groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. varieties and their effects on the growth and hematology of Djallonké rams. The groundnut varieties were ICGV 97049 (Obolo, ICGX SM 87057 (Yenyawoso, RMP 12 (Azivivi and Manipinta. Rams (live weight 15.0 ± 3.0 kg were randomly assigned to 4 sole groundnut haulm meal (GHM treatments, with 4 rams each in an individual pen per treatment (total n = 16 rams. Samples of the groundnut haulms were milled and analyzed for crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF. The CP concentration was higher (P  0.05 when the Djallonké rams were fed the haulms. However, significant differences were observed in final live weight and average daily live weight gain. Rams fed the Yenyawoso variety had higher (P < 0.05 final live weight and average daily live weight gain compared with those fed Obolo and Azivivi varieties. Consumption of any of the 4 varieties of groundnut haulms by Djallonké rams did not have any harmful effect on their red and white blood cell numbers and hemoglobin concentration. The study revealed that the different varieties of groundnut haulms differ in nutrient composition and also affect the growth performance of the rams. The Yenyawoso variety may be used as a sole diet for fattening Djallonké rams.

  8. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Suresh Bonthala

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01 under the sub-optimal (23°C and very sub-optimal (18°C temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties.

  9. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthala, Venkata Suresh; Mayes, Katie; Moreton, Joanna; Blythe, Martin; Wright, Victoria; May, Sean Tobias; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean; Twycross, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip) coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01) under the sub-optimal (23°C) and very sub-optimal (18°C) temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes) that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties.

  10. Complementary curves of descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.; Lipscombe, Trevor C.

    2013-01-01

    The shapes of two wires in a vertical plane with the same starting and ending points are described as complementary curves of descent if beads frictionlessly slide down both of them in the same time, starting from rest. Every analytic curve has a unique complement, except for a cycloid (solution of the brachistochrone problem), which is self complementary. A striking example is a straight wire whose complement is a lemniscate of Bernoulli. Alternatively, the wires can be tracks down which round objects undergo a rolling race. The level of presentation is appropriate for an intermediate undergraduate course in classical mechanics.

  11. Response of Groundnut (�JL-24� Cultivar to Mycorrhiza Inoculation and Phosphorous Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khirood DOLEY

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted on peanut Arachis hypogaea L. during 2007 growing season to determine their growth characteristics due to mycorrhizal inoculation and two different levels of soluble phosphorous application. Due to inoculation by AM fungi the growth parameters such as leaf number, shoot length, root length, fresh weight, dry weight, pod number and nodule number were significantly increased but two different level of phosphate also showed growth. However, growth parameters showed variable results when two different level of phosphate was applied along with AM fungi. Without phosphorous the mycorrhizal groundnut showed significant growth but when first low level of phosphorous was applied it showed more significant growth, however most significant result was observed with second high level of phosphorous application to the groundnut plant. Total chlorophyll content and acid and alkaline phosphatase activity was also significantly higher but most significant were observed when first level of phosphorous was applied followed by second level of phosphorous. The percent root colonization by mycorrhizal fungus Glomus fasciculatum was higher due to application of phosphorous but mycorrhizal dependency went on decreasing due to increase in the level of phosphorous. The different level of phosphorous had significant effect on growth and physiological parameters of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Arachis plants after 30, 60 and 90 days of growth period. However, the obtained results proved the improvement in plant growth with application of phosphorous. Thus, for increase in production of groundnut in the state of Maharashtra seems to be feasible option for increasing the overall production and yield.

  12. Performance Evaluation of the Effect of waste paper on Groundnut Shell Briquette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunde A Oyelaran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current energy shortage and environmental issues resulting from the use of fossil fuels have lead to exploitation of renewable energy resources that includes municipal waste and agricultural residues. These residues are available, indigenous and are environmental friendly but some can not be used directly in combustion process due high moisture content and low volumetric energy unless by briquetting. The study was undertaken to assess the combustion characteristic of binderless briquettes produced from waste paper and groundnut shell. Combustion characteristics investigated were ignition time, burning time, calorific values, burning rate, specific fuel consumption, fuel efficiency and water boiling time. The calorific values of the briquettes ranged from 19.51 - 19.92 MJ/kg, while the thermal efficiency ranges between 13.75 – 21.64%, other results shows that the average burning rate between 0.511 and 1.133 kg/hr and the specific fuel consumption ranges between 0.087 and 0.131 J/g. The recorded boiling time values were between 17.5 and 30.0 minutes for cold start and 15.0 and 20.0 minutes for hot start. The results shows that waste paper and groundnut shell up to 25% in composition composite briquettes were found to have good combustion characteristics which qualify them as alternative to firewood for domestic and industrial energy. However, production of briquettes from waste paper and groundnut shell at mixing ratio of 85:15 was found to comparatively better from all experiment conducted.

  13. RESISTANCE OF SOME GROUNDNUT CULTIVARS TO SOYBEAN POD BORER, ETIELLA ZINCKENELLA TREIT. (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwinardi Apriyanto, Edi Gunawan, dan Tri Sunardi .

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of some groundnut cultivars to soybean pod borer, Etiella zinckenella Treit. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae.  Five groundnut cultivars: Badak, Panther, Sima, Gajah, and Simpai, were grown in field in June-August, 2006 to determine their resistance/susceptibility to Etiella zinckenella Treit.  Two local cultivars (big and small seeds were included as comparison (controls. All cultivars were grown in experimental plots arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCBD, replicated three times. The incidence of soybean pod borer and damaged pods were observed at 9, 11, 13 weeks after sowing (WAS at 10 sample plants taken randomly from each plot. All cultivars were harvested at 13 WAS. Number of damaged pods was counted and percentages per plant were calculated. Larvae observed inside pod or in the soil were counted and collected. The seed yield per plant and weight of 100 seeds from 100 sample plants taken randomly at harvest were weighted to nearest gram at 10% water content. Pod toughness (hardness was measured with penetrometer. Resistance level of each cultivar was determined based on cultivar’s means and overall mean and standard deviation of the percentages of damaged pods. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA and means were separated with DMRT. The result revealed that mean percentages of damaged pod differed significantly between cultivars. Seed yield of cultivar Panther, Sima and Badak were significantly higher than those of the other two and local cultivars. Cultivar Panther was categorized as resistant, cultivar Sima and Badak as moderately resistant, while the others as susceptible. The relative resistance of groundnut cultivar seems, at least in part, to correlate with the structural hardness of pod.

  14. Plant growth analysis used as secondary traits in selection for high yield on groundnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manshuri, A.G.; Nugrahaeni

    1996-01-01

    Groundnut growth and yield can be expressed as the product to solar radiation interception (Qi), conversion efficiency of radiation to total dry matter (Ek) and partitioning efficiency to economic yield (Ep) or harvest index. Groundnut genotypes differ in characters related to Qi, Ek and Ep, and the characters have the possibility to be used as secondary traits in selection for high yield. Extinction coefficient (k) and leaf area index (LAI) are the influential factors in increasing Qi. Variability in leaf size lead to the description of the existence of variability in k value within the genotypes under study. LAI three is the level necessary to attain 90 percent total radiation absorption in groundnut. An increased of LAI exceeding four would be inefficient for increasing the fraction of radiation absorption. Convertion efficiency of radiation to total dry matter (Ek) related to the rate of plant photosynthesis and respiration, inspite of the need study the field, however, the study was still limited. Harvest index can be used as a secondary trait to identify high yield genotypes. There was a positive correlation between pod yield and harvest index. An increased of harvest index by 1 percent caused an increased of dry pod as high as 0.365 g/plant. ICG 1697, ICGV 86844 and ICGV 87161 gave yield more than 3.5 t/ha, and their total dry matter (TDM) were 49.2, 52.5 and 40.7 g/plant, whereas their harvest indexes (HI) were 0.47, 0.46 and 0.55, respectively. Theoretically, improvement of the groundnut pod yield can be attained by using variety which has TDM 52.5 g/plant and HI 0.55. Using HI as secondary selection criteria, five genotypes were selected, i.e., G/C/LM-88-B-25 (HI 0.59), local Irian and local Lombok (HI 0.57), ICGV 87161 and LM/ICGV 87165-B-2-1 (HI 0.55). Two genotypes were selected for their high TDM, namely ICGV 86844 and LM/ICGV 87165-88-B-82 [in

  15. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  16. Complementary Coffee Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  17. INFLUENCE OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS ON THE GROWTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'INFLUENCE DES ALIMENTS COMPLÉMENTAIRES SUR LES INDICATEURS DE LA CROISSANCE DES ENFANTS A GABANE, BOTSWANA Résumé Cette étude a été effectuée dans le but de caractériser la relation entre les aliments complémentaires et la croissance des enfants âgés de trois à 36 mois à Gabane au ...

  18. Optimisation and Evaluation of the Effect of Bambara Groundnut Addition on the Nutritional Quality and Functional Properties of Amaranth Grain-Based Composite Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awolu Olugbenga Olufemi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional quality and functional properties of composite flour consisting amaranth grain, bambara groundnut, carrot and rice bran flours were evaluated. The dependent variables were optimized using optimal mixture model of response surface methodology. Amaranth grain flour (70 – 80.75%, bambara groundnut flour (15-25%, carrot flour (2-5% and rice bran (2-10% were the independent variables. From the results, very high protein content (about 40% was obtained when the bambara content inclusion was 25%. Bambara groundnut flour inclusion up to 15% also resulted in high protein contents (≤ 37%. Supplementation of the composite flour with high carrot flour content (up to 10% also enhanced the protein content when the bambara groundnut content was low. High carrot flour inclusion had the highest positive effect on the crude fibre content (3.7-3.9% followed by rice bran and bambara groundnut flours in that order. Bambara groundnut had highest positive effect on the ash content; followed by carrot and rice flours. While amaranth grain, carrot and rice bran significantly (p≤0.05 affect the proximate and functional compositions, bambara groundnut had the highest and best effect on the proximate, functional, mineral properties as well as the amino acid profile of the composite flour.

  19. Climate smart crops for food and nutritional security for semi-arid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate smart crops for food and nutritional security for semi-arid zones of Zimbabwe. ... smallholder farmers increase diversity of crops that can be grown in changed climates. Trials were conducted to test a basket of ... nut (Vigna subterranea), groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan. A second ...

  20. Business opportunities and food safety of the Myanmar edible oil sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, J.H.M.; Biersteker, J.; Hagedoorn, L.F.; Louisse, J.

    2014-01-01

    This report analyses the business opportunities of the oilseed and edible oil sector in Myanmar as well as the food safety control system. Myanmar is a significant producer of oilseed specialities. It is world’s largest producer of sesame seeds, ranks on the sixth position for groundnut production

  1. Genetic analysis of some agronomic traits in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Alam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 10×10 half diallel experiment was conducted on groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. to ascertain the gene action and genetic parameters of ten traits including 50% flowering, no. of pods per plant, plant height, harvest index, pod index, 100 pod weight, 100 kernel weight, pod size, diseases infection and yield per plot. The experiments were carried out in the Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU, Mymensingh during the cropping season of 2010-2011. The estimates of gene effects indicated that significance of both additive and non-additive variance for pod size, 100 pod weight and diseases infection among the traits and presence of over dominance satisfying assumptions of diallel except dormancy. However, both the additive and non-additive gene affects together importance to control of most quantitative traits in the groundnut. The average degree of dominance (H1/D 1/2 (H1 = dominance variance, D = additive variance was higher than one, indicating over dominance for all the traits. The narrow-sense heritability was high for 50% flowering (38%, harvest index (35%, pod size (52%, 100 pod weight (35% and yield per plot (41% indicating that great genetic gain could be achieved for them.

  2. Effect of heating on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of microwave roasted groundnut seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Ali, M; Anowarul Islam, M; Othman, Noor Hidayu; Noor, Ahmadilfitri Md

    2017-12-01

    The oxidative stability and fatty acid composition of groundnut seed oil (GSO) exposed to microwaves were evaluated during heating at 170 °C. During heating, the oxidative indices such as free fatty acid, peroxide value, p -anisidine value, TOTOX, thiobarbituric acid value, specific extinctions, and color value were increased. The increments were found to be higher in unroasted seed oils compared to roasted ones indicating lower release of lipid oxidation products in roasted GSO. After 9 h heating, the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased to 89.53% and that of saturated fatty acid (SFA) increased to 117.46% in unroasted sample. The relative content of PUFA decreased to 92.05% and that of SFA increased to 105.76% in 7.5 min roasted sample after 9 h of heating. However, the roasting process slowed down the oxidative deterioration of PUFA. With increased heating times, an appreciable loss was more apparent in the triacylglycerol species OLL and OOL in unroasted samples compared to roasted ones. In FTIR, the peak intensities in unroasted samples were markedly changed in comparison with roasted samples during heating. The roasting of groundnut seed prior to the oil extraction reduced the oxidative degradation of oil samples; thereby increasing heat stability.

  3. Genetic diversity of the Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) as assessed by SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somta, P; Chankaew, S; Rungnoi, O; Srinives, P

    2011-11-01

    Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an important African legume crop. In this study, a collection consisting of 240 accessions was analyzed using 22 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 166 alleles were detected, with a mean of 7.59 alleles per locus. Allelic and gene diversities were higher in the west African and Cameroon/Nigeria regions with 6.68 and 6.18 alleles per locus, and 0.601 and 0.571, respectively. The genetic distance showed high similarity between west African and Cameroon/Nigeria accessions. Principal coordinate analyses and neighbor-joining analysis consistently revealed that the majority of west African accessions were grouped with Cameroon/Nigeria accessions, but they were differentiated from east African, central African, and southeast Asian accessions. Population structure analysis showed that two subpopulations existed, and most of the east African accessions were restricted to one subpopulation with some Cameroon/Nigeria accessions, whereas most of the west African accessions were associated with most of the Cameroon/Nigeria accessions in the other subpopulation. Comparison with SSR analysis of other Vigna cultigens, i.e., cultivated azuki bean ( Vigna angularis ) and mungbean ( Vigna radiata ), reveals that the mean gene diversity of Bambara groundnut was lower than azuki bean but higher than mungbean.

  4. Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Charles

    2012-11-21

    There is one commodity the world over that unites mankind-food. In 2011 the United Nations claimed that the world's population had reached the seven billion mark, a number which is set to increase dramatically in the decades to come. Food security, supply and sustainability are of paramount concern to the future economic and social progress of humanity. It is the responsibility of the food industry, together with food scientists and technologists, to shoulder the burden of ensuring an adequate supply of nutritious, safe and sensorially acceptable foods for a range of demanding consumers. In responding to this challenge, we need to understand the link between agriculture, engineering, food processing, molecular biosciences, human nutrition, commercialisation and innovation. Access to information concerning the composition and quality of foods has never been so easy for consumers and technologists alike. A plethora of research publications are made available each month to scientists and associated interested parties. The outcomes of these research manuscripts are often distilled and disseminated into messages available to everyone through bulletin boards, forums and the popular press. Newspapers and new agencies constantly report on the latest pharma-medical finding, or news regarding food safety and security concerns. We live in an age where information is so readily available to everyone that the task of finding credible and reputable data can be difficult at times. Providing sound evidenced based research is where a peer-reviewed journal can provide clarity. [...].

  5. Application of response surface methodology for studying the product characteristics of extruded rice-cowpea-groundnut blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Emmanuel Kwasi; Sefa-Dedeh, Samuel; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther; Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene

    2004-08-01

    Response surface methodology (with central composite rotatable design for k=3) was used to investigate the product properties of extruded rice-cowpea-groundnut blends in a single screw extruder. The combined effect of cowpea (0-20%), groundnut (0-10%), and feed moisture (14-48%) levels were used for formulation of the products. The product moisture, expansion ratio, bulk density and total colour change were studied using standard analytical methods. Well-expanded rice-legume blend extrudates of less bulk density and lower moisture content were produced at low feed moisture. Increasing legume addition affected the various shades of colour in the product. Models developed for the indices gave R(2) values ranging from 52.8% (for the b-value) to 86.5% (for bulk density). The models developed suggested that the optimal process variables for the production of a puffed snack with an enhanced nutrition and spongy structure from a rice-cowpea-groundnut blend are low feed moisture of 14-20% and maximum additions of 20% cowpea and 10% groundnut. A lack-of-fit test showed no significance, indicating that the models adequately fitted the data.

  6. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hui Chai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs were generated at the (unmasked probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  7. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-22

    Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  8. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section A Note on Complementary Medicines Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) currently being used by millions of Americans. ...

  9. Nutrient content and acceptability of soybean based complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary foods of good nutritive value can be locally made by using available food ingredients that complement each other in such a way that they meet the nutritional requirement of children. For banana consuming communities, increased consumption of soybean could improve the nutritional status of their children.

  10. Evaluation of yield and N2 fixation of mutant lines of groundnut in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli, I.; Harun, A.R.; Rahman, K.A.; Shamsuddin, S.; Rahim, K.A.; Danso, S.K.A.

    1998-01-01

    The 15 N-dilution technique was used to evaluate N 2 fixation in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in three field trials of cultivars Matjan and V-13 (parents), their selected mutant lines, and a other local and foreign genotypes. Matjan mutant MJ/40/42 consistently produced the highest pod yields, at above 4 t ha -1 , 14-22% higher yields than the parent. In contrast, none of the V-13 mutants had consistently better yields than the parent. The mutant lines did not show consistent agronomic performance from year to year. Total dry matter yield did not correlate with pod yield, and pod yield did not correlate with amount of N fixed

  11. Detection of Urocanase in The Blood of Chickens Chronically Poisoned with Toxic Groundnut Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonow, N.

    1965-01-01

    Chickens were fed for up to six weeks a ration containing 30 per cent of toxic groundnut meal and their controls were fed balanced commercial ration for comparable periods. Urocanase activity was determined in the blood and livers of principal and control birds killed after two, four or six weeks on these diets. Urocanase activity was detected in the blood sera of 3 out of the 9 intoxicated birds examined as early as two weeks after the initiation of the feeding trial. By the sixth week, the incidence of urocanase in the serum increased to 5 of 8 intoxicated birds. Liver urocanase concentration was uniform throughout the duration of the experiment when measured in units per gram of hepatic tissue. However, when its activity was expressed on the basis of units per total liver weight, its total activity increased toward the end of the experiment. PMID:14281076

  12. An experimental study of the combustion characteristics of groundnut shell and waste paper admixture briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Oyelaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to assess the heat released of briquettes produced from waste paper and groundnut shell admixture in five mixing ratios (90:10; 80:20; 70:30; 60:40; and 50:50. The briquettes were prepared on an existing motorized briquetting machine. The suitability of briquetted fuel as domestic fuel was studied in terms of flame propagation, afterglow, calorific value, and utilized heat, after sun drying the prepared briquettes for nineteen (19 days. The results of propagation rate and afterglow obtained for all the six compositions are satisfactory they range between 0.13 to 0.14 and 365 to 380 respectively. These energy values obtained for the whole samples are sufficient enough to produce heat required for household cooking and small scale industrial cottage applications. Finally it was observed that composition variation affects the properties of the briquettes.

  13. STUDY ON THE PERFORMANCE OF GROUNDNUT (ARACHIS HYPOGEA L. GENOTYPES FOR SEED YIELD AND QUALITY TRAITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya R. KOKKIRIPATI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was carried out at Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences (SHIATS, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh during kharif 2014. The experimental material consisted of 11 Groundnut genotypes along with one check (IND-156. The genotypes were sown at Field Experimentation Centre in three replications adopting randomized block design to evaluate seed yield and quality traits. Analysis of variance revealed that the presence of considerable variation among the genotypes for all the characters studied. On the basis of mean performance, genotype ICG 14127 revealed better performance in primary branches/ plant, pods per plant, pod yield/plant, seed yield/plant and ICG 14482 showed better performance in kernel yield q/ha, oil content, oil yield while ICG 188 showed higher protein content.

  14. Production and organoleptic assessment of akara from bambara groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea (L.) Thouars).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobo, A P

    1999-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (BGN) seeds were pretreated by soaking, dry-milling or autoclaving and used to produce pastes which were then used to prepare akara. Proximate analysis and organoleptic tests were conducted. Method of pretreatment affected the proximate composition of the akara. The moisture, protein and fiber contents of akara prepared from BGN seeds, which were cracked and soaked or autoclaved, were significantly (p< or =0.05) different than those from soaked whole grains and flour. The cooked batch weights of the akara ranged from 258-272 g, akara from soaked whole and autoclaved seeds having the lowest and highest values, respectively. Akara from autoclaved BGN seeds was more highly preferred by panelists compared to akara from other pretreatments. Except for appearance and color, no significant differences were found between BGN akara and the cowpea akara used as reference. Heat treatment of BGN seeds prior to dehulling appeared to influence the level of acceptability of the akara.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers and their application for diversity assessment in cultivated groundnut (Arachis hypogaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouch Jonathan H

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is the fourth most important oilseed crop in the world, grown mainly in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate climates. Due to its origin through a single and recent polyploidization event, followed by successive selection during breeding efforts, cultivated groundnut has a limited genetic background. In such species, microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are very informative and useful for breeding applications. The low level of polymorphism in cultivated germplasm, however, warrants a need of larger number of polymorphic microsatellite markers for cultivated groundnut. Results A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from the genotype TMV2. Sequencing of 720 putative SSR-positive clones from a total of 3,072 provided 490 SSRs. 71.2% of these SSRs were perfect type, 13.1% were imperfect and 15.7% were compound. Among these SSRs, the GT/CA repeat motifs were the most common (37.6% followed by GA/CT repeat motifs (25.9%. The primer pairs could be designed for a total of 170 SSRs and were optimized initially on two genotypes. 104 (61.2% primer pairs yielded scorable amplicon and 46 (44.2% primers showed polymorphism among 32 cultivated groundnut genotypes. The polymorphic SSR markers detected 2 to 5 alleles with an average of 2.44 per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC value for these markers varied from 0.12 to 0.75 with an average of 0.46. Based on 112 alleles obtained by 46 markers, a phenogram was constructed to understand the relationships among the 32 genotypes. Majority of the genotypes representing subspecies hypogaea were grouped together in one cluster, while the genotypes belonging to subspecies fastigiata were grouped mainly under two clusters. Conclusion Newly developed set of 104 markers extends the repertoire of SSR markers for cultivated groundnut. These markers showed a good level of PIC value in cultivated germplasm

  16. Quality evaluation of beef patties formulated with bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean L.) seed flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakali, J S; Irtwange, S V; Mzer, M T

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated composite beef-bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean L.) seed flour patties to determine the effect of bambara groundnut flour (BGF) inclusion on the quality and acceptability of the products. The effect of different levels of BGF (0%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5%) on the proximate composition and pH indicate that BGF had no significant (p0.05) effect on moisture, protein and carbohydrate of raw patties except ash and pH whereas there was significant (p0.05) effect on all the parameters for the cooked patties. BGF significantly (p0.05) reduced the shrinkage of the cooked patties from 9.13% to 6.76%, while percentage cooking yield, moisture retention, and fat retention increased significantly (p0.05) with increasing BGF levels from 79.1% to 87.2%, 67.51% to 78.05% and 73.51% to 88.34%, respectively. The use of BGF significantly (p0.05) increased the pH of cooked patties from 6.16 to 6.23. Beef patties extended with BGF up to 5% addition exhibited good quality attributes most acceptable to the consumers. The pH of the 0% BGF-beef patties decreased significantly during storage, up to day 14, and increased thereafter. However, the pH of the patties with BGF consistently decreased significantly up to day 21. The TBA values of both (0% and 5% BGF-beef patties) increased significantly (p0.05) from 0.054 to 0.25 and from 0.05 to 0.24mg malonaldehyde/kg, respectively. All sensory attributes decreased significantly (p0.05) as storage time progressed. The physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of the patties were found to be acceptable after 21days refrigerated storage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant regeneration via direct shoot organogenesis from cotyledon explants of Bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koné, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea [L.] Verdc. is mainly grown for human consumption. However, several factors limit a wider adoption of the crop including the presence of antinutritional factors in the seeds that lower product quality and protein availability but also the plant susceptibility to pests and diseases. Tissue culture techniques are very scanty in Bambara groundnut and should be developed before carrying out genetic transformation for the crop improvement. Therefore, here, an efficient system for in vitro shoot induction from cotyledons derived from mature seeds has been established. Different types and concentrations of plant growth regulators were used to induce buds in embryo-free cotyledon explants. Cotyledons were cut transversally or longitudinally into three segments: proximal, middle and distal part. The influence of explant orientation on the medium, the type of segment and landrace has then been studied. Benzylaminopurine (3 mg·l-1 alone or combined with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.05 mg·l-1 induced multiple shoot formations. The organogenic potential was restricted to the proximal segment of cotyledons. Frequency of bud induction (30% and average number of buds per explant (12 were higher when the adaxial side of the proximal segment was in contact with the medium. Shoot regeneration from cotyledon explants of ten Bambara landraces revealed that the response is genotype-dependent with varieties Ci6, Ci2, Ci4 and Ci15 exhibiting 20 to 30% shoot regeneration and six to ten buds per explant. Regenerated shoot buds excised from explants were elongated and rooted on MS basal medium devoid of plant growth regulators. All rooted plantlets survived to the transfer on a sand soil mixture, and morphologically normal plants were hardened and transferred to greenhouse for further growth to maturity and seed set.

  18. A Coordinated Research Project on the Implementation of Nuclear Techniques to Improve Food Traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Russell; Cannavan, Andrew; Zandric, Zora; Maestroni, Britt; Abrahim, Aiman

    2013-04-01

    Traceability systems play a key role in assuring a safe and reliable food supply. Analytical techniques harnessing the spatial patterns in distribution of stable isotope and trace element ratios can be used for the determination of the provenance of food. Such techniques offer the potential to enhance global trade by providing an independent means of verifying "paper" traceability systems and can also help to prove authenticity, to combat fraudulent practices, and to control adulteration, which are important issues for economic, religious or cultural reasons. To address some of the challenges that developing countries face in attempting to implement effective food traceability systems, the IAEA, through its Joint FAO/IAEA Division on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, has initiated a 5-year coordinated research project involving institutes in 15 developing and developed countries (Austria, Botswana, Chile, China, France, India, Lebanon, Morocco, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Thailand, Uganda, UK, USA). The objective is to help in member state laboratories to establish robust analytical techniques and databases, validated to international standards, to determine the provenance of food. Nuclear techniques such as stable isotope and multi-element analysis, along with complementary methods, will be applied for the verification of food traceability systems and claims related to food origin, production, and authenticity. This integrated and multidisciplinary approach to strengthening capacity in food traceability will contribute to the effective implementation of holistic systems for food safety and control. The project focuses mainly on the development of techniques to confirm product authenticity, with several research partners also considering food safety issues. Research topics encompass determination of the geographical origin of a variety of commodities, including seed oils, rice, wine, olive oil, wheat, orange juice, fish, groundnuts, tea, pork, honey and

  19. Quantifying N2-fixed by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as compared to some summer legumes using ''1''5N methodology with different reference crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adlan, M. A. M.; Mukhtar, N. O.

    2004-01-01

    Using the ''1''5N methodology, one of the cultivar of groundnut repeated once (as groundnut 1 and 2) and one cultivar of each of the summer legumes guar, pigeon pea and mungbean were studied (a) to determine the amounts of nitrogen fixed by these legumes using different reference crops and (b) to compare N-fixation by groundnut to that of the above mentioned summer legumes. The reference crops used were, sorghum, soybean and a non-nodulating groundnut isoline. Each of the studied legumes and reference crops was grown at the Gezira Research Station Farm, in a microplot of 2.4 m''2 situated at one side of a main-plot of 24 m''2. The N 2 fixing legumes guar, mung bean, and pigeon pea and sorghum were given 20 kg N/ha as urea at 5.0% ''1''5N atom excess, and the reference crops of soybean and non -nodulating groundnut were given 100 kg N/ha at 1.0% ''1''5N atom excess. ''1''4N/''1''5N ratios were determined in plants sampled from the microplots. The results showed that pigeon pea and guar could compete well with groundnut as N 2 -fixers. Levels of fixation (%Ndfa) were 79% (108 kg N/ha), 77% (138 kg N/ha) and 80% (70 kg N/ha) of the total crop's N need for guar, groundnut and pigeon pea, respectively. Mungbean fixed about 12% (6 kg N/ha) of its N need. The variation in the amounts of N 2 fixed in kg/ha is dependent on the total plant N yield of each legume which was 160-180, 139, 87 and 68 for groundnut, guar, pigeon pea and mug bean, respectively. The non-nodulating groundnut was a superior reference crop over sorghum and soybean. Thus, the studied reference crops can be listed in a descending order of excellence as follows: non-nodulating groundnut, sorghum, soybean.(Author)

  20. Effects of malting on the milling performance and acceptability of bambara groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea Thouars) seeds and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvere, P O; Uwaegbute, A C; Adedeji, E M

    1999-01-01

    Germinated bambara groundnut was dried by three methods--oven-drying at 50 degrees C, in a solar drier at 38-42 degrees C, and sun drying at 28 +/- 2 degrees C. The samples were milled into flour, and made into 'okpa', a steamed gel. Flour yield increased only in oven-dried malts. The quality of the 'okpa' based on appearance and taste decreased with malting time; solar drying resulted in the poorest product because of its dark color.

  1. Growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhala, A; Rathod, P H; Patel, K C; Van Damme, P

    2005-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) productivity in India is low, because of many problems beset in its cultivation. One of the serious problems are weeds. Groundnut yield losses due to weeds have been estimated as high as 24 to 70 percent. This has created a scope for using herbicides in groundnut crop. A field investigation was carried out during kharif (rainy) season of 2001-2002 on a sandy loam soil at College Agronomy Farm, B.A. College of Agriculture, Gujarat Agricultural University, Anand, India to study the effect of weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation on growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Ten weed control treatments, comprising four treatments of sole application of fluchloralin, pendimethalin, butachlor and metolachlor, respectively each applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1); four treatments comprising of an application of the same herbicides at the same levels coupled with one hand weeding at 30 DAS; one weed-free treatment (hand weedings at 15, 30, 45 DAS); and one unweeded control. All 10 treatmets were combined with and without Rhizobium inoculation (i.e. a total of 20 treatment combinations) under a factorial randomized complete block design (FRBD) with four replications. Minimum weed dry matter accumulation (70 kg/ha) with higher weed control efficiency (90.70%) was recorded under an integrated method i.e. pendimethalin at 1.0 kg ha(-1) + hand weeding at 30 DAS, which also resulted in maximum pod yield (1773.50 kg ha(-1)). This treatment was comparable to fluchloralin applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) combined with hand- weeding at 30 DAS. Weedy conditions in the unweeded control treatment reduced pod yield by 29.90-35.95% as compared to integrated method. Significantly higher pod yield was obtained with Rhizobium inoculation than the mean value of all treatments without inoculation. For most agronomical parameters examined, Rhizobium inoculation and weed control treatments were independent in their effect.

  2. Uncommon occurrence ratios of aflatoxin B1, B 2, G 1, and G 2 in maize and groundnuts from Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matumba, Limbikani; Sulyok, Michael; Njoroge, Samuel M C; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Van Poucke, Christof; De Saeger, Sarah; Krska, Rudolf

    2015-02-01

    We report an unusual aflatoxin profile in maize and groundnuts from Malawi, with aflatoxin G1 found routinely at equal or even higher levels than aflatoxin B1. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ratio in a contaminated sample is generally greater than 50% of total aflatoxin (sum of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2). In Malawi, the aflatoxin occurrence ratios were determined by examining LC-MS/MS and HPLC fluorescence detection (FLD) data of 156 naturally contaminated raw maize and 80 groundnut samples collected in 2011 and 2012. Results showed that natural aflatoxin occurrence ratio differed. In 47% of the samples, the concentration of AFG1 was higher than that of AFB1. The mean concentration percentages of AFB1/AFB2/AFG1/AFG2 in reference to total aflatoxins were found to be 47:5:43:5%, respectively. The AFG1 and AFB1 50/50 trend was observed in maize and groundnuts and was consistent for samples collected in both years. If the AFB1 measurement was used to check compliance of total aflatoxin regulatory limit set at 10, 20, 100, and 200 μg/kg with an assumption that AFB1≥50% of the total aflatoxin content, 8, 13, 24, and 26% false negative rates would have occurred respectively. It is therefore important for legislation to consider total aflatoxins rather than AFB1 alone.

  3. Growth analysis and yield of two varieties of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by different weed control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayinka, Bolaji U; Etejere, Emmanuel O

    Field trials were carried out to evaluate the effects of seven weed management strategies on the growth and yield of two groundnut varieties (Samnut 10 and MK 373) for two successive seasons (2010-2011). The experimental layout was a split plot complete randomized block design with three replications. The two groundnut varieties showed identical pattern of results for leaf area index, dry matter accumulation, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and crop growth rate as well as yield. All the weed control treatments significantly enhanced the growth and yield compared with the weedy check. The weed free check had the highest growth but the highest yield was recorded from rice straw mulch at 0.1 m depth + one hand weeding at 6 weeks after sowing (WAS) due to increase in number of matured pods per plant, seed weight per plant and 100-seed weight. The results showed that rice straw mulch at 0.1 m depth + one hand weeding at 6 WAS was better agronomical practice for enhancing growth and yield of groundnut. This enhancement could be as a result of its positive influence on physiological parameters such as leaf area index, dry matter accumulation, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and crop growth rate. Its use is also ecofriendly as it limits the need for synthetic herbicide.

  4. Intraspecific and interspecific competition in Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Callosobruchus subinnotatus (Pic) on stored bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lale, N E.S.; Vidal, S

    2001-10-01

    Intraspecific competition was studied in Callosobruchus maculatus and Callosobruchus subinnotatus. Interspecific competition between the two bruchids was also studied to determine which of these species is likely to cause more damage to stored bambara groundnuts, Vigna subterranea in cases of joint infestation. Results showed that increasing the adult density up to 8 females per 10g of bambara groundnut seeds did not significantly reduce the mean number of eggs laid per female, the number of eggs developing to the adult stage, or the weight of emerged adults of either species. The developmental period of the two species was also not significantly affected. The adult emergence curve of C. maculatus was similar to that of C. subinnotatus and was of the scramble type. C. maculatus performed better than C. subinnotatus in interspecific competition and it achieved this through a higher egg-laying ability and a higher rate of progeny production coupled with a shorter life-cycle. The implications of these findings with respect to damage and possible loss of stored bambara groundnut are discussed.

  5. Complementary alternative medicine and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werneke, Ursula; McCready, V.Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Complementary alternative medicines (CAMs), including food supplements, are taken widely by patients, especially those with cancer. Others take CAMs hoping to improve fitness or prevent disease. Physicians (and patients) may not be aware of the potential side-effects and interactions of CAMs with conventional treatment. Likewise, their known physiological effects could interfere with radiopharmaceutical kinetics, producing abnormal treatment responses and diagnostic results. Nuclear medicine physicians are encouraged to question patients on their intake of CAMs when taking their history prior to radionuclide therapy or diagnosis. The potential effect of CAMs should be considered when unexpected therapeutic or diagnostic results are found. (orig.)

  6. Traditional foods vs. manufactured baby foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Elaine L; Darmon, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The provision of nutrient-dense complementary foods is essential to ensure an infant's nutrient requirements are met. Yet often, relative to recommendations, traditional complementary foods have low levels of nutrients, suggesting a role, for fortified manufactured baby foods, in ensuring dietary adequacy. In this review, the potential benefits and safety of using fortified manufactured baby foods versus traditional foods alone are evaluated based on evidence from food composition data, diet modeling and intervention studies. Results from the food composition data and diet modeling suggest that ensuring a nutritionally adequate complementary feeding diet based on traditional foods alone is difficult. Conversely, except for biochemical iron status, intervention trials do not show consistent benefits, for growth or biochemical zinc or riboflavin status, with the use of fortified manufactured baby foods versus traditional foods alone. The safety of manufactured baby foods will depend on food preparation practices and the presence of effective governmental regulatory infrastructures. Hence, in environments where fortified manufactured baby foods are expensive, unavailable or where there is an absence of effective governmental regulatory infrastructures, the use of traditional foods is advised. Conversely, where affordable manufactured baby foods are available, marketed safely and fortified appropriately, their use is likely to result in improved nutrient intakes and infant biochemical iron status. In all environments, the promotion of breastfeeding, active feeding and high levels of hygiene is essential to ensure optimal nutritional status.

  7. The initiation of complementary feeding among Qom indigenous people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Sofia Irene; Valeggia, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    As of six months of life, breastfeeding no longer covers an infant's energy or micronutrient needs, so appropriate complementary feeding should be provided. The objective of this study was to assess the time and adequacy for introducing complementary feeding in a Qom/Toba population and analyze the sociocultural concepts of families regarding complementary feeding. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by participant observation and semistructured surveys administered to mothers of 0-2 year old infants. Qom breastfeed their infants long term and on demand. Most infants have an adequate nutritional status and start complementary feeding at around 6 months old as per the local health center and international standards. However, mostly due to socioeconomic factors, foods chosen to complement breastfeeding have a relatively scarce nutritional value.

  8. Effect of Soaking and Boiling on Anti-nutritional Factors, Oligosaccharide Contents and Protein Digestibility of Newly Developed Bambara Groundnut Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaposi Adeleke

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Newly developed Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. seeds (Accessions No: TVSU 5 – Bambara Groundnut White (BGW and TVSU 146 – Bambara Groundnut Brown (BGB were collected from International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA, Nigeria, planted and harvested. The effects of processing methods (soaking and boiling on anti-nutritional factors and oligosaccharides content and protein digestibility of BGW and BGB compared with Bambara groundnut commercial (BGC seeds were investigated. Soaking and boiling significantly reduced the anti-nutritional factors of the samples and the effect increased as processing time was elongated. Sample BGC had lower anti-nutritional factors than BGW and BGB after soaking for 48 h. Tannin contents of the samples were reduced drastically by 99 % throughout the soaking periods. Greatest loss in raffinose level was observed in BGB (59% and BGW (50% after boiling for 60 min compared with BGC (43%. The loss in stachyose content of the samples varies with processing and BGC (59% had greatest loss after boiling for 60 min while soaking for 48 h reduced that of BGB and BGW by 57 and 35%, respectively. Boiling for 60 min increased the in vitro protein digestibility of BGB (89.34 % compared with BGW (87.48% and BGC (82.89%. Overall, the results demonstrated that soaking and boiling of newly developed Bambara groundnut seeds could improve the nutritive quality of the seeds.

  9. Replacing groundnut cake with gluten meals of rice and maize in diets for growing Sahiwal cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Tariq A; Thakur, S S; Mahesh, M S; Yogi, R K

    2017-10-01

    This experiment investigated the effect of isonitrogenous replacement of groundnut cake (GNC) by rice gluten meal (RGM) and maize gluten meal (MGM) at 75% level on nutrient intake, apparent digestibility, growth performance and related blood constituents in growing Sahiwal cattle. Eighteen Sahiwal calves were divided into three groups, based on average body weight (87.24 kg) and age (6 to 12 mo), and treatments were assigned to the different groups randomly. The first group (GP-I) was kept as control and received GNC-based concentrate mixture. In second (GP-II) and third (GP-III) groups, 750 g/kg nitrogen (N) of GNC was substituted by RGM and MGM respectively, with similar forage:concentrate ratio (56:44). The 90 days of experimental feeding revealed that intake of dry matter, crude protein and digestibility coefficients for all nutrients did not differ among groups. Furthermore, although N balance was greater (p≤0.05) for GP-III than GP-I and GP-II, average daily gain was similar between GP-I and GP-II but greater (p≤0.05) for GP-III. In addition, feed efficiency and related haematological variables did not differ due to treatments. Nutritional worth of GNC and RGM was highly comparable in terms of intake, digestibility and growth in growing calves. However, MGM was found to be more efficacious in improving growth rate than RGM at 75% replacement level of GNC protein.

  10. Compatibility of Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas fluorescens in growth promotion of groundnut ( Arachis hypogea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDHARE A. PRASAD

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We attempted to study the compatibility among plant beneficial bacteria in the culture level by growing them near in the nutrient agar plates. Among all the bacteria tested, Rhizobium was found to inhibit the growth of other bacteria. From the compatible group of PGPR, we have selected one biofertilizer (Azospirillum brasilense strain TNAU and one biocontrol agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PF1 for further studies in the pot culture. We have also developed a bioformulation which is talc powder based, for individual bacteria and mixed culture. This formulation was used as seed treatment, soil application, seedling root dip and foliar spray in groundnut crop in vitro germination conditions. A. brasilense was found to enhance the tap root growth and P. fluorescens, the lateral root growth. The other growth parameters like shoot growth, number of leaves were enhanced by the combination of both of the bacteria than their individual formulations. Among the method of application tested in our study, soil application was found to be the best in yielding better results of plant growth promotion.

  11. Compatibility of Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas fluorescens in growth promotion of groundnut ( Arachis hypogea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Andhare A; Babu, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    We attempted to study the compatibility among plant beneficial bacteria in the culture level by growing them near in the nutrient agar plates. Among all the bacteria tested, Rhizobium was found to inhibit the growth of other bacteria. From the compatible group of PGPR, we have selected one biofertilizer (Azospirillum brasilense strain TNAU) and one biocontrol agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PF1) for further studies in the pot culture. We have also developed a bioformulation which is talc powder based, for individual bacteria and mixed culture. This formulation was used as seed treatment, soil application, seedling root dip and foliar spray in groundnut crop in vitro germination conditions. A. brasilense was found to enhance the tap root growth and P. fluorescens, the lateral root growth. The other growth parameters like shoot growth, number of leaves were enhanced by the combination of both of the bacteria than their individual formulations. Among the method of application tested in our study, soil application was found to be the best in yielding better results of plant growth promotion.

  12. Replacing groundnut cake with gluten meals of rice and maize in diets for growing Sahiwal cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A. Malik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This experiment investigated the effect of isonitrogenous replacement of groundnut cake (GNC by rice gluten meal (RGM and maize gluten meal (MGM at 75% level on nutrient intake, apparent digestibility, growth performance and related blood constituents in growing Sahiwal cattle. Methods Eighteen Sahiwal calves were divided into three groups, based on average body weight (87.24 kg and age (6 to 12 mo, and treatments were assigned to the different groups randomly. The first group (GP-I was kept as control and received GNC-based concentrate mixture. In second (GP-II and third (GP-III groups, 750 g/kg nitrogen (N of GNC was substituted by RGM and MGM respectively, with similar forage:concentrate ratio (56:44. Results The 90 days of experimental feeding revealed that intake of dry matter, crude protein and digestibility coefficients for all nutrients did not differ among groups. Furthermore, although N balance was greater (p≤0.05 for GP-III than GP-I and GP-II, average daily gain was similar between GP-I and GP-II but greater (p≤0.05 for GP-III. In addition, feed efficiency and related haematological variables did not differ due to treatments. Conclusion Nutritional worth of GNC and RGM was highly comparable in terms of intake, digestibility and growth in growing calves. However, MGM was found to be more efficacious in improving growth rate than RGM at 75% replacement level of GNC protein.

  13. Emerging issues in complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Kim F.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence; Bégin, France

    2017-01-01

    addressed these issues. There are several emerging research areas that are likely to provide a better understanding of how complementary feeding influences growth, development, and health. These include the effect of the young child's diet on body composition, gastrointestinal microbiota, and environmental......The complementary feeding period (6-24 months) is a window of opportunity for preventing stunting, wasting, overweight, and obesity and for improving long-term development and health. Because WHO published its guiding principles for complementary feeding in 2003, new knowledge and evidence have...... been generated in the area of child feeding. The aim of this paper is to highlight some of the emerging issues in complementary feeding and potential implications on the guidelines revision. Evidence on the effect of the quality and quantity of protein and fat intake on child growth during...

  14. Headaches and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confusion . Headache. 2011;51(9):1419–1425. Verhagen AP, Damen L, Berger MY, et al. Behavioral treatments ... health: patterns of use in the United States . Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2009;15(9): ...

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is any medical and ... are based on scientific evidence from research studies. Complementary medicine refers to treatments that are used with standard ...

  16. Complementary Feeding Pattern in a Population of Pre-school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: It has been postulated that offering bland diets to infants could habituate to food refusal during early childhood. To investigate the complementary feeding pattern in Nigerian preschool children and a possible association with their current feeding habits, a cross-sectional study of two hundred (200) children was ...

  17. Assessment of the Essential and Toxic Elements in Complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the commonly used complementary foods (Unga wa Lishe) for children 0-5 years in Tanzania were analyze for essential and toxic elements in order to assess their nutritional levels. 60 samples were purchased from shops in Dar es Salaam, Moshi and Arusha regions and analyzed using Energy Dispersive ...

  18. Poor complementary feeding practices among young children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deficiencies, and common childhood illnesses such as diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections.3,4. Insufficient quantities and inadequate quality of complementary foods, poor child-feeding practices and high rates of infections have a detrimental impact on health and growth during the first two years of life.5 Children, ...

  19. Efficacy of Carbofuran in Controlling Root-Knot Nematode (Meloidogyne javanica Whitehead, 1949 on Cultivars of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. in Yola, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Jada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterrenea L. Verdc. is an important crop produced in Adamawa State of Nigeria. However, the production of the crop is seriously threatened by root-knot nematodes (RKNs; Meloidogyne spp.. Since cultural methods have not been very effective in controlling RKN, carbofuran was evaluated to determine its efficacy in controlling M. javanica in Yola during 2002 and 2003. Three bambara groundnut cultivars (Kwachanjiwa, Kwaheuma, and Kwatolotolo were evaluated using three application timings (at planting, 3 and 6 weeks after planting, and none. Results indicated that applying carbofuran at planting provided the greatest reduction in M. javanica population levels, which lead to increased yields in bambara groundnuts compared to the other two application timings. Furthermore, both Kwachanjiwa and Kwatolotolo provided similar high yields compared to Kwaheuma, which was most likely related to the M. javanica tolerance in these cultivars.

  20. A Novel WRKY Transcription Factor, MuWRKY3 (Macrotyloma uniflorum Lam. Verdc. Enhances Drought Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnool Kiranmai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress has adverse effects on growth, water relations, photosynthesis and yield of groundnut. WRKY transcription factors (TFs are the plant-specific TFs which regulate several down-stream stress-responsive genes and play an essential role in plant biotic and abiotic stress responses. We found that WRKY3 gene is highly up-regulated under drought stress conditions and therefore isolated a new WRKY3TF gene from a drought-adapted horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum Lam. Verdc.. Conserved domain studies revealed that protein encoded by this gene contains highly conserved regions of two WRKY domains and two C2H2 zinc-finger motifs. The fusion protein localization studies of transient MuWRKY3-YFP revealed its nuclear localization. Overexpression of MuWRKY3 TF gene in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. showed increased tolerance to drought stress compared to wild-type (WT plants. MuWRKY3 groundnut transgenics displayed lesser and delayed wilting symptoms than WT plants after 10-days of drought stress imposition. The transgenic groundnut plants expressing MuWRKY3 showed less accumulation of malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and superoxide anion (O2∙-, accompanied by more free proline, total soluble sugar content, and activities of antioxidant enzymes than WT plants under drought stress. Moreover, a series of stress-related LEA, HSP, MIPS, APX, SOD, and CAT genes found up-regulated in the transgenic groundnut plants. The study demonstrates that nuclear-localized MuWRKY3 TF regulates the expression of stress-responsive genes and the activity of ROS scavenging enzymes which results in improved drought tolerance in groundnut. We conclude that MuWRKY3 may serve as a new putative candidate gene for the improvement of stress resistance in plants.

  1. Introdução de alimentos complementares nos primeiros dois anos de vida de crianças de escolas particulares no município de São Paulo Introduction of complementary foods in the first two years of life of children attending private schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Gabriela N Simon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a idade de introdução de alimentos complementares nos primeiros dois anos de vida e sua relação com variáveis demográficas e socioeconômicas de crianças matriculadas em pré-escolas particulares do município de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com informações demográficas e socioeconômicas de 566 crianças, sendo verificada a idade em meses de introdução dos alimentos complementares. Foi considerada como variável dependente a idade em meses da introdução dos alimentos complementares e, como variáveis independentes ou explanatórias, a idade e escolaridade maternas, a condição de trabalho materno e a renda familiar. Para análise da relação entre as variáveis, utilizou-se a técnica de regressão múltipla de Cox. RESULTADOS: 50% das crianças eram do sexo masculino e 61% maiores de 4 anos. A maior proporção das mães tinha nível superior de escolaridade e trabalhava fora. A renda familiar mostrou uma população de alto nível socioeconômico. A água e/ou chá, frutas e leite não-materno foram introduzidos antes do sexto mês de vida. A variável 'idade da mãe' mostrou associação com introdução de três grupos de alimentos: cereais, carne e guloseimas. CONCLUSÃO: Alimentos complementares foram introduzidos precocemente nessa população de nível socioeconômico elevado e a única variável que se associou à introdução desses alimentos foi a idade materna.OBJECTIVE: To verify the age of complementary food introduction in the first two years of life and its relation to demographic, social, and economic status of preschool children of private schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey with demographic, social and economic status information. The studied population included 566 children. The age in months of complementary foods introduction was verified. The dependent variable was the age in months of complementary foods introduction. Independent or

  2. Integrating genetic maps in bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.] and their syntenic relationships among closely related legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai Kuan; Chai, Hui Hui; Kendabie, Presidor; Ahmad, Nariman Salih; Jani, Jaeyres; Massawe, Festo; Kilian, Andrzej; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-20

    Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc.] is an indigenous legume crop grown mainly in subsistence and small-scale agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa for its nutritious seeds and its tolerance to drought and poor soils. Given that the lack of ex ante sequence is often a bottleneck in marker-assisted crop breeding for minor and underutilised crops, we demonstrate the use of limited genetic information and resources developed within species, but linked to the well characterised common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genome sequence and the partially annotated closely related species; adzuki bean (Vigna angularis) and mung bean (Vigna radiata). From these comparisons we identify conserved synteny blocks corresponding to the Linkage Groups (LGs) in bambara groundnut genetic maps and evaluate the potential to identify genes in conserved syntenic locations in a sequenced genome that underlie a QTL position in the underutilised crop genome. Two individual intraspecific linkage maps consisting of DArTseq markers were constructed in two bambara groundnut (2n = 2x = 22) segregating populations: 1) The genetic map of Population IA was derived from F 2 lines (n = 263; IITA686 x Ankpa4) and covered 1,395.2 cM across 11 linkage groups; 2) The genetic map of Population TD was derived from F 3 lines (n = 71; Tiga Nicuru x DipC) and covered 1,376.7 cM across 11 linkage groups. A total of 96 DArTseq markers from an initial pool of 142 pre-selected common markers were used. These were not only polymorphic in both populations but also each marker could be located using the unique sequence tag (at selected stringency) onto the common bean, adzuki bean and mung bean genomes, thus allowing the sequenced genomes to be used as an initial 'pseudo' physical map for bambara groundnut. A good correspondence was observed at the macro synteny level, particularly to the common bean genome. A test using the QTL location of an agronomic trait in one of the bambara groundnut maps

  3. Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov., isolated from groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) nodules grown in rainfed Pothwar, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Rabia; Zhang, Yu Jing; Ali, Safdar; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Amara, Ummay; Chen, Wen Xin; Hayat, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-negative, white, non-motile, rod shaped bacterial strain BN-19(T) was isolated from a root nodule of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain BN-19(T) formed a subclade in the genus Rhizobium together with Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176(T), Rhizobium huautlense SO2(T) and Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T) with sequence similarities of 97.5, 97.3, 97.2 and 97.1 % respectively. Sequence analysis of housekeeping genes atpD, glnII and recA (with sequence similarities of ≤92 %) confirmed the unique position of BN-19(T) in the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness between the strain BN-19(T) and R. alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), R. vignae CCBAU 05176(T), R. huautlense SO2(T) and R. tarimense PL-41(T) were 20.6, 22.5, 15.9 and 20.5 % respectively, further confirming that BN-19(T) represents a novel species in the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G + C content was 60.1 mol%. The dominant fatty acids of strain BN-19(T) were C19:0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 2 (C14:0 3OH and/or C16:1 iso I) and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c). Some phenotypic features also differentiate the strain BN-19(T) from the related species. On the basis of these results, strain BN-19(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BN-19(T) (=LMG 27895(T) = CCBAU 101086(T)).

  4. Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of groundnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Chimwamurombe, Percy; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Seven strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To corroborate their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences with Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T being the most closely related type strain in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium daqingense CCBAU 15774T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, most closely related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T. The species status was validated by results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with nifH of ‘Bradyrhizobium arachidis’ CCBAU 051107 that also nodulates peanuts. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 58 2-1T induced effective nodules on V. subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and A. hypogaea, and some strains on Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov. is proposed, with 58 2-1T [ = DSM 100298T = LMG 28792T = NTCCM0016T (Windhoek)] as the type strain. The DNA G+C content of strain 58 2-1T was 64.7 mol% (T m).

  5. Evaluation of food additives as alternative or complementary chemicals to conventional fungicides for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among more than twenty food additives and GRAS (generally regarded as safe) compounds that were tested at three concentrations in in vivo primary screenings with several cultivars of California peaches, nectarines, and plums that had been artificially inoculated with seven major postharvest pathogen...

  6. Fostering triacylglycerol accumulation in novel oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus psychrotolerans IITRFD utilizing groundnut shell for improved biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, Farha; Pruthi, Vikas; Negi, Yuvraj S

    2017-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to examine the potential of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation by novel oleaginous yeast isolate Cryptococcus psychrotolerans IITRFD on utilizing groundnut shell acid hydrolysate (GSH) as cost-effective medium. The maximum biomass productivity and lipid productivity of 0.095±0.008g/L/h and 0.044±0.005g/L/h, respectively with lipid content 46% was recorded on GSH. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profile obtained by GC-MS analysis revealed oleic acid (37.8%), palmitic (29.4%) and linoleic (32.8%) as major fatty acids representing balance between oxidative stability (OS) and cold flow filter properties (CFFP) for improved biodiesel quality. The biodiesel property calculated were correlated well with the fuel standards limits of ASTM D6751, EN 14214 and IS 15607. The present findings raise the possibility of using agricultural waste groundnut shell as a substrate for production of biodiesel by novel oleaginous yeast isolate C. psychrotolerans IITRFD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. FEEDING OF FERRETS WITH THE RAW MEAT AND LIVER OF CHICKENS CHRONICALLY POISONED WITH TOXIC GROUNDNUT MEAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLATONOW, N; BEAUREGARD, M

    1965-03-01

    Chickens were fed a ration containing 30 per cent of toxic groundnut meal for up to six weeks. The concentration of aflatoxin (toxic metabolites of Aspergillus flavus) in the above ration was 3.06 p.p.m. At the end of 2nd, 4th or 6th week the birds were killed. The meat was removed from the bones and put through a meat grinder. The livers of three groups were pooled together. Three control groups of birds kept on commercial pellets were treated similarly. Female ferrets, two years of age, were used in the present study. They were divided into four groups. The first three groups were given for one month meat from chickens fed the toxic ration for 2, 4, and 6 weeks, respectively. Each of these three groups contained one control ferret that was fed with the meat of chickens fed a commercial ration for a similar period of time. One half of the 4th group was fed pooled liver from intoxicated birds and one half was fed liver from control birds. No significant changes in the ferret tissues were observed as a consequence of feeding them with the meat or liver from the chickens chronically poisoned with toxic groundnut meal.

  8. Agromorphological and Phenological Variabilities of 10 Bambara Groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. (Fabaceae] Landraces Cultivated in Ivory Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touré, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the agro-morphological and phenological characteristics of ten Bambara groundnut landraces that originated in the Ivory Coast. The study was conducted on an experimental plot at the University of Abobo-Adjame. The trial was set up according to a randomized complete block design with five replications. Twenty variables were used to identify the landraces. Landraces Ci1, Ci3, Ci10 and Ci12 exhibited high emergence percentages, early maturity within 90 DAS (days after sowing and low vegetative/floral development. A high seed yield (388 to 495 kg/ha was also obtained from these landraces. In contrast, a low seedling emergence rate, high vegetative development and yield (80 kg/ha could be observed with landrace Ci9. This landrace reached maturity within 180 DAS. Landraces Ci2, Ci4, Ci5, and Ci8, on the other hand, reached maturity between 120-150 DAS. The principal component analysis conducted on the data obtained showed that the landraces with a high seed yield were early in terms of flowering and maturity, but presented low vegetative development, with limited foliage, secondary roots, leaf area and biomass. The physiological and agronomical traits presented by landraces that originated in the Ivory Coast could be exploited in Bambara groundnut varietal improvement programmes.

  9. Constitutive traits and selective indices of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc) landraces for drought tolerance under Botswana conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, S. K.; Tabona, T. T.

    Constitutive traits of 12 landraces of Bamabra groundnut ( Vigna subterranea (L) Verdc) were studied during the 1999/2000 and 2000/2001 at the Botswana College of Agriculture, for traits which relate to the crop’s adaptation to drought. The objective was to estimate the degree of phenotypic and genotypic variation of traits whose selection would lead to earliness in maturity and drought tolerance through drought escape. The landraces showed significant diversity. Low environmental variability was recorded for days to maturity, root:shoot ratio, canopy spread, number of seeds per pod, 100-seed weight and shelling percentage. Genotypic correlation coefficients and path coefficient of number of pods per plant and seed size on yield were significantly high. The results of this experiment indicate that, canopy spread, root:shoot ratio, 100-seed weight and number of seeds per pod are among parameters that could be used for indirect selection for drought tolerance in Bambara groundnut in Botswana and other areas where drought is a common occurrence.

  10. Physico-chemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics of plain yoghurt from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and soybeans (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade, Kolawole O; Ogundele, Opeolu M; Ogunshe, Adenike O; Fayemi, Olanrewaju E; Ocloo, Fidelis C K

    2015-09-01

    Physico-chemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics of plain yoghurt from bambara groundnut and soybean milks were studied. Milks were prepared from bambara and soybean and then fermented using Lactobacillus delbruieckii subspp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarus subspp. thermophilus to produce yoghurt. The yoghurts were stored at 7 °C and 27 °C for 9 days and their quality monitored. Results showed that pH of soy and bambara yoghurts decreased during the storage period for both storage temperatures. This decrease in pH was accompanied by simultaneous increase in titratable acidity. Total solids and apparent viscosities of soy and bambara yoghurts increased at 7 °C, but decreased at 27 °C during storage period. Bambara yoghurt received higher sensory acceptability than soy yoghurt. Predominant microorganisms in the stored yoghurts were lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The LAB count in the yoghurts stored at 7 °C decreased but increased at 27 °C during the storage period. Similar trends were followed by total aerobic bacteria, yeast and moulds counts. Pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Coliform and E. coli were absent in all the yogurt samples. Yoghurts of acceptable quality and safety were produced from bambara groundnut and soybeans.

  11. Effect of Trichoderma harzianum biomass and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain NC 92 to control leaf blight disease of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea caused by Rhizoctonia solani in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana Kanjanamaneesathian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Four hundred and sixty two strains of Trichoderma spp. were isolated from 23 soil samples in which groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. and bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. had been planted in Songkhla, Phattalung, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Narathiwat and Yala provinces. These fungi were tested against Rhizoctonia solani, a causal agent of leaf blight of bambara groundnut, using dual culture technique on PDA medium. Among 462 isolates tested, 226 isolates had an ability to overgrow R. solani completely. Further testing found 13 isolates having the ability to parasitize mycelia of R. solani. Among these isolates, ThB-1-54 produced a cellulolytic enzyme on congo-red agar. This isolate was later identified as T. harzianum Rifai. In the field test, applying biomass of the isolate ThB-1-54 cultured on ground mesocarp fiber of oil palm, the combination of the isolate ThB-1-54 on ground mesocarp fiber of oil palm and Bradyrhizobium sp. (strain NC 92, or fungicide (iprodione had no effect on disease severity, yield, or the amount of total nitrogen content in stems or seeds of bambara groundnut plant.

  12. DROUGHT TOLERANCE OF LOCAL ROTE AND CHECK VARIETIES OF GROUNDNUT (Arachis hypogaea L. UNDER DRY SEASON IN TWO LOCATIONS IN EAST NUSA TENGGARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosep S. Mau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut is the most important pulse crop in East Nusa Tenggara (ENT; however, the crop yield in ENT is low due to erratic climatic condition, drought stress, and low yielding ability of most cultivated genotypes. Local Rote is a well-known local groundnut variety in ENT, which is a potential superior variety and parental source due its large seed size and high yielding ability. Information on its resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses is important for its future development. Five groundnut genotypes, Local Rote and check varieties were elucidated to identify drought resistant genotypes. The study was carried out in a split-plot design with three replicates in two locations during dry season 2013. Two irrigation regimes (optimum and stress conditions were assigned as main plot and 5 groundnut geno-types as sub-plot. Research results revealed significant effect of irrigation by genotype interaction on observed yield and yield compo-nent characters in both locations. Seed yields of most tested genotypes were below their yield potential. Local Rote yielded best over two locations (1.26 t.ha-1 seed yield. Yields of check varieties were below 1.0 t.ha-1. Local Rote was considered tolerant to drought based on STI, GMP, SSI and YL selection indices.

  13. Effect of a short and severe intermittent drought on transpiration, seed yield components, and harvest index in four landraces of bambara groundnut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren Thorndal; Ntundu, W.H.; Ouédraogo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Drought is a major constraint to crop production worldwide and landraces are one of the important genetic resources to crop improvement in the dry areas. The objective of this study was to investigate transpiration and yield responses of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) landraces e...

  14. Industrial Evolution Through Complementary Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses the dynamics through which product markets become derailed from early product life cycle (PLC)-tracks and engaged in complementary convergence with other product markets or industries. We compare and contrast the theories that can explain, respectively, the PLC...

  15. Complementary Colours for a Physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing…

  16. Altered complementary feeding strategies of the consumers Hydrobia ulvae and Idotea emarginata via passive selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, N.; Malzahn, A. M.; Grey, J.; Hillebrand, H.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to identify differences in selectivity, foraging behaviour and complementary feeding of two benthic consumers (the isopod Idotea emarginata and the snail Hydrobia ulvae) using traditional cell counting as an indicator for algal biomass reduction and stable isotope labelling to detect differences in assimilation and digestion. We hypothesized that even when active feeding preferences of food components are not apparent, passive selectivity via mechanisms such as food assimilation and digestion can be of relevance. Algal biomass was reduced to a similar degree by the grazers independently from grazer and prey combinations without any indication for an active choice of food components. However, the isotope labelling approach indicated that passive selectivity can alter complementary feeding strategies, as we detected shifts in feeding preferences in relation to food quantity and competition. Thus, stable isotope labelling of food components opens up new perspectives in community ecology, allowing assessment of such complex mechanisms as passive selectivity, complementary feeding and competition.

  17. Complementary therapies and traditional Judaism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, F

    1999-03-01

    In Jewish tradition, physicians are obligated to heal the sick and patients are obligated to seek healing from physicians. Judaism also sanctions certain complementary therapies such as prayers, faith healing, and amulets, when used as supplements to traditional medical therapy. Confidence in the healing powers of God through prayer and contrition is encouraged, provided that the patient uses prayer alongside traditional scientific medicine, not as a substitute for it.

  18. Performance Of Groundnut Arachis Hypogaea L. Varieties As Influenced By Weed Control Treatments In Kano State Of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Garko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out during 2012 rainy season at the Research Farm of Bayero University Kano 110 58 N 80 26E and 475m above sea level and National Horticultural Research Institute Bagauda sub-station Bebeji local Government area of Kano State 110 33N 80 23E and 481m above sea level to find out the performance of varieties and weed control treatments on growth and development of groundnut Arachis hypogaea L.. The experiment consisted of two groundnut varieties SAMNUT-22 and SAMNUT-23 and 12 weed control treatments Metolachlor at 2 levels of 1.0 and 2.0kg a.i. ha Fluazifop-p butyl at 2 levels of 1.0 and 1.5 kg a.i. ha at pre or post-emergence or combined with hoe weeding at 15 days after sowing or supplementary hoe weeding at 30 days after sowing while weed free check at 15 and 30 days after sowing and weedy check were included as control. The treatments were laid out using split plot design with variety assigned to the main and weed control to the sub plot. The result showed that SAMNUT-22 out yielded SAMNUT-23 and exhibited superior growth and yield components such as stand count canopy height number of branches leaf area index plant dry weight. The application of Metolaclor at 1.0 kg a.i. ha followed by Fluazifop-p butyl at 1.0 kg a.i. ha as well as Metolaclor at 1.0 or 2.0 kg a.i. ha followed by supplementary hoe weeding produced significantly higher number of pods per plant and pod yield per hactare. Leaf area index and number of pod per plant were significantly and positively correlated with pod weight. Thus SAMNUT-22 can be recommended for the two study areas. Similarly application of Metolaclor at 1.0 kg a.i. ha followed by Fluazifop-p butyl at 1.0 kg a.i. ha and Metolaclor at 1.0 or 2.0 kg a.i. ha followed by supplementary hoe weeding could be recommended for weed control in groundnut in the study area.

  19. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Advanced Search. Journal Home > African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines: Advanced Search. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C Research. Information. Outreach. The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) was established in October 1998 to coordinate ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the arena of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). More about us. CAM at the NCI ...

  1. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  2. Economic Evaluation of Cookie made from blend of Brewers′ Spent Grain (BSG, Groundnut cake and Sorghum Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawoye Babatunde

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bakery and pastry products such as cookies are usually produced from wheat flour and as such contribute to high foreign exchange for tropical countries where such cereal is not cultivated. In view of this, we evaluated the engineering economics for the utilization of dried brewers′ spent grain, groundnut cake and sorghum flour in the industrial production of cookies. The production was based on the assumption that the cash flow was uniform over the plant life (i.e. 10 years with no salvage value. The equipment required for the production process was identified and estimates obtained from equipment manufactures. The production of the cookies was based on constant mass flow rate of 90 packets/min. The effects of uncertainties on cookie production were evaluated by varying the operation days (330, 300 and 250 days and also by varying the price of some key variables required for the production processes. The results indicate that the capital cost (fixed and working capital and the annual production cost (APC were US$1.39×106 and US$10.08×106/year, respectively. The after tax annual revenue was US$1.63×106/yr. The return on investment (ROI, single payback period (SPBP, discounted payback period, gross margin and internal rate of return (IRR of the plant were 63%, 1.58 years, 2.08 years, 23% and 77.52%, respectively. The result also showed that the production plant is feasible and could be operated for 330, 300 and 250 days. The difference between operation times lies in the profitability, which decreases as the number of days reduces. Based on the result of this analysis, brewers’ spent grain, groundnut cake, and sorghum flour can be utilized in industrial production of cookies with guaranteed profitability.

  3. African origin of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc) in Ghanaian and South African soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puozaa, Doris K; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids secreted by legumes play a major role as signal molecules for attracting compatible rhizobia. The aim of this study was to assess and understand the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) landraces of different seedcoat colours using restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Seedcoat pigmentation of landraces had effect on the diversity of microsymbionts of Bambara groundnut. Even when planted together in one hole, nodulating bradyrhizobia clustered differently. For example, 16S rDNA-RFLP typing of rhizobial samples TUTVSBLM.I, TUTVSCRM.I and TUTVSRDM.I originating respectively from Black, Cream and Red landraces that were co-planted in the same hole at Manga in the Sudano-sahelian savanna, as well as TUTVSCRK.I and TUTVSRDK.I respectively from Cream and Red landraces co-planted at Kpalisogu in the Guinea savanna, revealed different 16S rDNA- RFLP types. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA, glnII, recA and atpD sequences showed that Vigna subterranea was nodulated specifically by a diverse group of Bradyrhizobium species (e.g. Bradyrhizobium vignae, and a novel group of Bradyrhizobium spp.) in soils from Ghana and South Africa. The recA gene phylogeny showed incongruency with the other housekeeping genes, indicating the possibility of lateral gene transfer and/or recombination events. The grouping of isolates according to symbiotic gene (nifH and nodD) phylogenies revealed inter- and intra-specific symbiotic plasmid transfer and different evolutionary history. The results also showed that a cropping history and physico-chemical environment of soils increased bradyrhizobial diversity in Ghana and South Africa.

  4. African origin of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc in Ghanaian and South African soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris K Puozaa

    Full Text Available Flavonoids secreted by legumes play a major role as signal molecules for attracting compatible rhizobia. The aim of this study was to assess and understand the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc. landraces of different seedcoat colours using restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Seedcoat pigmentation of landraces had effect on the diversity of microsymbionts of Bambara groundnut. Even when planted together in one hole, nodulating bradyrhizobia clustered differently. For example, 16S rDNA-RFLP typing of rhizobial samples TUTVSBLM.I, TUTVSCRM.I and TUTVSRDM.I originating respectively from Black, Cream and Red landraces that were co-planted in the same hole at Manga in the Sudano-sahelian savanna, as well as TUTVSCRK.I and TUTVSRDK.I respectively from Cream and Red landraces co-planted at Kpalisogu in the Guinea savanna, revealed different 16S rDNA- RFLP types. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA, glnII, recA and atpD sequences showed that Vigna subterranea was nodulated specifically by a diverse group of Bradyrhizobium species (e.g. Bradyrhizobium vignae, and a novel group of Bradyrhizobium spp. in soils from Ghana and South Africa. The recA gene phylogeny showed incongruency with the other housekeeping genes, indicating the possibility of lateral gene transfer and/or recombination events. The grouping of isolates according to symbiotic gene (nifH and nodD phylogenies revealed inter- and intra-specific symbiotic plasmid transfer and different evolutionary history. The results also showed that a cropping history and physico-chemical environment of soils increased bradyrhizobial diversity in Ghana and South Africa.

  5. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding in relation to body mass index and overweight at ages 7 and 11 y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Ängquist, Lars; Baker, Jennifer Lyn

    2018-01-01

    Background: Infant feeding may play an important role in the development of childhood overweight and obesity. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine whether duration of breastfeeding (BF), timing of introduction of complementary food, and protein intake at age 18 mo are associated...... associations with overweight. Results: Duration of BF was not associated with childhood BMIz at ages 7 and 11 y. Earlier introduction of complementary food (... of overweight in childhood. However, the effect sizes were small. Early introduction of complementary food may be associated with child BMIz and child overweight. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03334760....

  6. Dietary Patterns during Complementary Feeding and Later Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Pauline M

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for healthy infant feeding provide advice on breastfeeding and complementary feeding. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) derived dietary patterns in comparison to infant feeding guidelines and by using principal components analysis (PCA). The ALSPAC cohort was recruited during pregnancy. Parent-completed questionnaires assessed diet at age 6 and 15 months. Children were weighed and measured at 7 years of age and IQ was assessed at 8 years. A complementary feeding utility index was calculated in relation to 14 feeding recommendations. High scores on the index were due to longer breastfeeding, and feeding more fruit and vegetables and less ready-prepared baby foods. The index scores were positively related to IQ and 'healthy' dietary patterns in childhood. In infancy four dietary patterns were derived from PCA at each age. Three occurred at both ages: 'HM traditional' (home-made meat, vegetables and desserts), 'discretionary' (processed adult foods) and 'RM baby foods' (commercial ready-made baby foods). A 'breastfeeding' pattern was derived at 6 months, with fruit and vegetables included. At 15 months, a 'HM contemporary' pattern included cheese, fish, nuts, legumes, fruit and vegetables. The 'discretionary' and 'RM baby foods' patterns at both ages were negatively associated, while the 'breastfeeding' and 'HM contemporary' patterns were positively associated with IQ. These results suggest that infant diet influences cognitive development in children and may set a trend for later eating patterns. © 2016 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  8. Complementary colours for a physicist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, Vitomir; Cepic, Mojca

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple experiment which enables splitting incident light into two different modes, each having a colour exactly complementary to the other. A brief historical development of colour theories and differences in a physicist's point of view with respect to an artist's one is discussed. An experimental system for producing colours and their physically exact complements using cellophane is presented. The origin of the colours lies in the transmission of polarized light through the birefringent cellophane, and therefore the optics of birefringent materials is briefly presented. A set-up which will be described in the following can be used in a laboratory experiment at an undergraduate level

  9. Representações sociais de mães sobre a introdução de alimentos complementares para lactentes Representaciones sociales de madres sobre la introducción de alimentos complementares para lactantes Social representations of mothers on the introduction of complementary foods for infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine Maria Salve

    2009-02-01

    , observando el comportamiento del niño y buscando en su ambiente y en su visión de mundo para decidir sobre la alimentación de hijo.OBJECTIVES: To know mother's representations about introduction of complementary foods and to identify the elements that form their process of choice. METHODS: We chose qualitative research, analyzing data from 17 interviews of women, according the theory of Social Representation and Model "Risks and Benefits". The methodological strategy was the Subjective Speech Collective. RESULTS: Three themes emerged. "Living the Weaning Period", "Taking Positions in front Child's Food Choices" and "Making the Food Choices Properly". They talking about the experiences during the weaning period, the standards of choice and the representations of mothers about introduction of complementary foods. CONCLUSION: Based in their representations and experiences, mothers judge, interpret and construct indicators from observation of child behaviors and search, in their environment and in theirs point of view, the elements to take a decision about their child food.

  10. Complementary feeding patterns in Europe with a special focus on Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroli, M; Mele, R M; Tomaselli, M A; Cammisa, M; Longo, F; Attolini, E

    2012-10-01

    Early nutrition is considered to be crucial for development of persistent obesity in later life. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of complementary feeding patterns across European countries. Most European infants introduce solid foods earlier than 6 completed months of age as recommended by WHO. The commonest risk factors for early introduction of solid foods have been shown to be smoking mothers of young age, low SES and no breastfeeding. The foods most frequently introduced as first solids are fruit and cereals followed by other foods that vary depending on the country of residence and the infants' type of feeding. Insufficient updated information has been made available in Europe in terms of infants' nutrient intake during complementary feeding, as well as on the potential acute metabolic effects of complementary feeding. Websites, e-forums and blogs on complementary feeding are widely spread in the web. The recipes and daily menus published in food industry websites are often nutritionally incorrect. Baby led-weaning (BLW) is based on the principle that babies, upon being started on complementary foods, should be allowed to eat whatever food they want (regular family foods included) in its normal shape. No nutrient intake and metabolic data are nevertheless available about BLW. The current scenario in terms of our understanding of complementary feeding in Europe opens several new research avenues. Not using and not improving our current knowledge of nutrition to improve children's health represents an infringement of children's rights. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  13. Iron Fortified Complementary Foods Containing a Mixture of Sodium Iron EDTA with Either Ferrous Fumarate or Ferric Pyrophosphate Reduce Iron Deficiency Anemia in 12- to 36-Month-Old Children in a Malaria Endemic Setting: A Secondary Analysis of a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinz, Dominik; Wegmüller, Rita; Ouattara, Mamadou; Diakité, Victorine G; Aaron, Grant J; Hofer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Michael B; Adiossan, Lukas G; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Hurrell, Richard F

    2017-07-14

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The efficacy of iron fortification against IDA is uncertain in malaria-endemic settings. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a complementary food (CF) fortified with sodium iron EDTA (NaFeEDTA) plus either ferrous fumarate (FeFum) or ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) to combat IDA in preschool-age children in a highly malaria endemic region. This is a secondary analysis of a nine-month cluster-randomized controlled trial conducted in south-central Côte d'Ivoire. 378 children aged 12-36 months were randomly assigned to no food intervention ( n = 125; control group), CF fortified with 2 mg NaFeEDTA plus 3.8 mg FeFum for six days/week ( n = 126; FeFum group), and CF fortified with 2 mg NaFeEDTA and 3.8 mg FePP for six days/week ( n = 127; FePP group). The outcome measures were hemoglobin (Hb), plasma ferritin (PF), iron deficiency (PF anemia (Hb iron deficiency with or without anemia ( p = 0.068). IDA prevalence sharply decreased in the FeFum (32.8% to 1.2%, p anemia. These data indicate that, despite the high endemicity of malaria and elevated inflammation biomarkers (C-reactive protein or α-1-acid-glycoprotein), IDA was markedly reduced by provision of iron fortified CF to preschool-age children for 9 months, with no significant differences between a combination of NaFeEDTA with FeFum or NaFeEDTA with FePP. However, there was no overall effect on anemia, suggesting most of the anemia in this setting is not due to ID. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01634945).

  14. Response surface methodology for studying the effect of processing conditions on some nutritional and textural properties of bambara groundnuts (Voandzei subterranea) during canning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene; Budu, Agnes Simpson; Merson, Alan Bullock

    2007-06-01

    The response surface methodology and central composite rotatable design for K=3 was used to study the combined effect of blanching, soaking and sodium hexametaphosphate salt concentration on moisture, ash, leached solids, phytates, tannins and hardness of bambara groundnut during canning. Regression models were developed to predict the effects of the processing parameters on the studied indices. Significant interactions were observed between all the factors with high regression coefficients (64.4-82.6%). Blanching and soaking of the seeds prior to canning led to increases in moisture content and leached solids, while significant decreases were observed for phytates, tannins and hardness of the canned bambara groundnuts. Increasing the concentration of sodium salt added during soaking caused significant (Pgroundnuts.

  15. [Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and risk of childhood obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Jurado, Luis; Jiménez Báez, María Valeria; Olivares Juárez, Sibli; de la Cruz Olvera, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pattern of breastfeeding and weaning as a risk of obesity in pre-school children from a Primary Care Unit. Cross-sectional analytical study LOCATION: Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico). Children from 2-4 years of age from a Primary Care Unit. Duration of total and exclusive breastfeeding, age and food utilized for complementary feeding reported by the mother or career of the child and nutritional status assessment evaluated by body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95 percentile. Determination of prevalence ratio (PR), odds ratio (OR), chi squared (x2), and binary logistic regression. The study included 116 children (55.2% girls) with a mean age of 3.2 years, with obesity present in 62.1%, Exclusive breastfeeding in 72.4% with mean duration of 2.3 months, and age at introducing solids foods was 5.0 months. There was a difference for breastfeeding and complementary feeding by gender sex (P<.05). A PR=3.9 (95% CI: 1.49-6.34) was calculated for exclusive breastfeeding and risk of obesity. The model showed no association between these variables and obesity in children CONCLUSIONS: Exclusive breastfeeding of less than three months is associated with almost 4 more times in obese children. There was a difference in age of complementary feeding, duration of breastfeeding, and formula milk consumption time for obese and non-obese children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors Associated with the Early Introduction of Complementary Feeding in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyadh A. Alzaheb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mothers’ instigation of complementary feeding before their infant reaches 6 months old risks shortening their breastfeeding duration, and high morbidity and mortality for their child. Complementary feeding practices require further investigation in Saudi Arabia. The present study aims to evaluate complementary feeding practices, and to establish which factors are associated with the early introduction of complementary feeding in the Saudi Arabian context. Cross-sectional research was conducted with 632 mothers of infants aged between 4 and 24 months attending five primary health care centers (PHCCs between July and December 2015 in Saudi Arabia. Data on participants’ socio-demographic characteristics and complementary feeding practices were collected via structured questionnaires. A regression analysis identified the factors associated with the early introduction of solid foods, defined as before 17 weeks. 62.5% of the study’s infants received solid foods before reaching 17 weeks old. The maternal factors at higher risk of early introduction of solids were: younger age; Saudi nationality; shorter education; employment within 6 months post-birth; caesareans; not breastfeeding fully for six weeks post-birth, and living in low-income households. Complementary feeding prior to 6 months postpartum was common in Saudi Arabia. Public health interventions are needed to reduce early complementary feeding, focusing on mothers at highest risk of giving solids too early.

  17. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  18. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  19. Complementary, alternative, integrative, or unconventional medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, R T; Castro, C M; Seiden, M V; Chabner, B A; Lynch, T J

    2001-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center. The Schwartz Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and sustenance to the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. Interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has grown exponentially in the past decade, fueled by Internet marketing, dissatisfaction with mainstream medicine, and a desire for patients to be actively involved in their health care. There is a large discordance between physician estimates and reported prevalence of CAM use. Many patients do not disclose their practices mainly because they believe CAM falls outside the rubric of conventional medicine or because physicians do not ask. Concern about drug interactions and adverse effects are compounded by a lack of Food and Drug Administration regulation. Physicians need to be informed about CAM and be attuned to the psychosocial needs of patients.

  20. Contextualising complementary feeding in a broader framework for stunting prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Christine P; Iannotti, Lora; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2013-01-01

    ; society and culture; agriculture and food systems; and water, sanitation and environment. We argue that these community and societal conditions underlie infant and young child feeding practices, which are a central pillar to healthy growth and development, and can serve to either impede or enable progress......An estimated 165 million children are stunted due to the combined effects of poor nutrition, repeated infection and inadequate psychosocial stimulation. The complementary feeding period, generally corresponding to age 6-24 months, represents an important period of sensitivity to stunting...... the role of complementary feeding within the layers of contextual and causal factors that lead to stunted growth and development and the resulting short- and long-term consequences. Contextual factors are organized into the following groups: political economy; health and health care systems; education...

  1. Complementary medicine in chronic pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Charles A

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses several issues related to therapies that are considered "complementary" or "alternative" to conventional medicine. A definition of "complementary and alternative medicine" (CAM) is considered in the context of the evolving health care field of complementary medicine. A rationale for pain physicians and clinicians to understand these treatments of chronic pain is presented. The challenges of an evidence-based approach to incorporating CAM therapies are explored. Finally, a brief survey of the evidence that supports several widely available and commonly used complementary therapies for chronic pain is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Very low dose gamma irradiation stimulates gaseous exchange and carboxylation efficiency, but inhibits vascular sap flow in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Sumedha; Singh, Bhupinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Singhal, R K; Venu Babu, P

    2014-02-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of low dose gamma radiation on germination, plant growth, nitrogen and carbon fixation and carbon flow and release characteristics of groundnut. Dry seeds of groundnut variety Trombay groundnut 37A (TG 37A), a radio mutant type developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India, were subjected to the pre-sowing treatment of gamma radiation within low to high dose physiological range, i.e., 0.0, 0.0082, 0.0164. 0.0328, 0.0656, 0.1312, 5, 25, 100, 500 Gray (Gy) from a cobalt source ((60)Co). Observations were recorded for the radiation effect on percentage germination, vigour, gas exchange attributes such as photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, chlorophyll content, root exudation in terms of (14)C release, vascular sap flow rate and activities of rate defining carbon and nitrogen assimilating enzymes such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) and nitrate reductase (NR). Seed germination was increased by 10-25% at the lower doses up to 5 Gy while the improvement in plant vigour in the same dose range was much higher (22-84%) than the unirradiated control. For radiation exposure above 5 Gy, a dose-dependent decline in germination and plant vigour was measured. No significant effect was observed on the photosynthesis at radiation exposure below 5 Gy but above 5 Gy dose there was a decline in the photosynthetic rate. Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, however, were only inhibited at a high dose of 500 Gy. Leaf rubisco activity and NR activities remained unaffected at all the investigated doses of gamma irradiation. Mean root exudation and sap flow rate of the irradiated plants, irrespective of the dose, was reduced over the unirradiated control more so in a dose-dependent manner. Results indicated that a very low dose of gamma radiation, in centigray to gray range, did not pose any threat and in fact stimulated metabolic functions in such a way to aid

  3. Yield, quality and nodulation studies of Kersting's groundnut (Macrotyloma geocarpum, (Harms) Merachal and Baudet) in the Coastal Savannah Agro-ecological zone of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adazebra, G. A.

    2013-07-01

    Two investigations were carried out in the field and laboratory to assess variation in yield and nodulation potential as well as differences in the types of Rhizobia nodulating some local accessions of Kersting's groundnut (Macrotyloma geocarpum Harms) Marechal and Baudet in the Coastal Savannah Agro-Ecological Zone of Ghana. The aim was to obtain information relevant to important yield and nodulation attributes of Kersting's groundnut under prevailing agro-ecological conditions and thereby determine the suitability or otherwise of growing the crop in the Coastal Savannah Agro-Ecological Zone. Ten local accessions of Kersting's groundnuts were obtained from the University for Development Studies (UDS) Nyankpala, Tamale in the Northern Region of Ghana and were evaluated under field conditions at Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) research farms in the Greater Accra Region. Significant variations were found in most of quantitative characters that were measured for all the ten accessions. Yield studies conducted identified the Kersting's groundnut accession T8 to be the highest in both shoot dry matter production and grain yield per plot with values of 35.09 t ha -1 and 0.84 t ha -1 respectively. Nodulation studies also identified accessions T5 and T3 to be the best in %N content of roots and shoots with values of 1.43% and 3.05% respectively. The nitrogen yield was however, highest in Kersting's groundnut accession T7 for both roots and shoots with values of 12.29 kg ha -1 and 1,178 kg ha -1 respectively. Again, accession T7 was superior in the total plant nitrogen yield with a value of 1190 kg ha -1 . Correlation analysis revealed perfect association (r =1.0) between grain yield and dry seed and a nearly perfect association (r=0.99) between total plant nitrogen yield and nitrogen yield of shoots. Harvest index was highly positively correlated (r=0.72) with dry pod yield. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis was conducted for nine (9

  4. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  5. Ecuador's Healthy Food Campaign: An Effectiveness Assessment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Initiatives include improving processed food labelling, and promoting fresh foods and traditional Andean diets. Building on a food movement This project will build on Ecuador's grassroots food movement known as Colectivo Nacional Agroecologico. It offers an alternative, complementary, and organized approach focused ...

  6. Nutrient density in complementary feeding of infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, N W; Vossenaar, M

    2013-05-01

    The paradigm of the first 1000 days of life, the period from conception to the second birthday, has been advanced as a critical window of opportunity to save a life and a child's future. Infancy and toddler life, through the first 24 months after birth, is a unique period during which human milk is recommended as either the exclusive source of nutrition (6 months) or a variable component thereof. After the maternal delivery of milk is accounted for, the remainder of the energy and nutrients needs come from complementary foods. There is an intrinsic gap left by the maternal milk supply in volume and micronutrient content in relation to expanding infant and toddler needs. The nutrient density approach provides us with a mathematical framework to manage the closing of the nutrient gap. The intrinsic nutrient content of the unprocessed foods appropriate for young children is limited. The most problematic nutrients are calcium, iron and zinc. Some manner to enhance the nutrient density of the complementary foods is an incontestable necessity. The nutrient density consideration, which identifies for us the nature of the problem, offers a tool for the titrating of the fortification to an adequate--but safe--addition.

  7. Nutritional and functional properties of a complementary food based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Considering amaranth grain product fed to infant three times a day, at a reconstitution of 15% product, the levels of magnesium, manganese and tocopherols were far above the recommended intakes, while protein, phosphorous, iron, zinc, riboflavin and niacin were above the average requirements. Therefore, reconstituting ...

  8. Nutrient composition of commonly used complementary foods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... fore the age of 5 years than a baby born in the develop- ed, industrialized countries (UNICEF, 2001). ... In the ab- sence of the biological mother, the person considered to be the child's caretaker (Father, Aunt, ..... are the highest of the lifespan and the rapidly growing weaning infant has no iron stores and ...

  9. Nutritional and functional properties of a complementary food based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty of Agriculture

    2012-04-02

    Apr 2, 2012 ... The effect of processing on the functional and nutritional properties of amaranth grain was analyzed. Two blends were prepared from raw and processed amaranth grains. Standard procedures of Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) were used to determine the proximate chemical composition ...

  10. Formulation of complementary food using amaranth, chickpea and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    containing water at 32oC for 72 hours resulted in the lowest phytate levels. In sensory testing, all of the formulated porridges with different proportions of amaranth flour were acceptable to mothers and their children, although the red color was ...

  11. Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 ...

  12. Microstructure, mechanical and fracture properties of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide dispersion strengthened aluminium matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide was investigated. GSA and silicon carbide with different mix ratios (10:0, 7.5:2.5, 5.0:5.0, 2.5:7.5 and 0:10 constituted 6 and 10 wt.% of the reinforcing phase, while the matrix material was Al–Mg–Si alloy. The hybrid composites were produced via a two-step stir casting technique. Microstructural examination, hardness, tensile and fracture toughness testing were carried out to appraise the mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that with increasing GSA in the reinforcing phase, the hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and specific strength of the composites decreased slightly for both 6 and 10 wt.% reinforced Al–Mg–Si based composites owing to the amount of the oxides of Al, Si, Ca, K2 and Mg present in the composition of GSA. However, the percentage elongation improved marginally and was generally invariant to increasing GSA content while the fracture toughness increased with increasing GSA content. GSA offered a favourable influence on the mechanical properties of Al–Mg–Si hybrid composites comparable to that of rice husk ash and bamboo leaf ash.

  13. Effect of annealing and heat moisture conditioning on the physicochemical characteristics of bambarra groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea) starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebowale, K.O.; Lawal, O.S.

    2002-05-01

    Isolated starch of bambarra groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea) was subjected to hydrothermal modifications through annealing and heat moisture conditioning. Both annealing and heat moisture conditioning reduced the swelling power and solubility of the starch. Water binding capacity reduced after annealing, heat moisture conditioning at 18% moisture level (HMB 18 ) and heat moisture conditioning at 21% moisture level (HMB 21 ). Both heat moisture conditioning at 24% moisture level (HMB 24 ) and heat moisture conditioning at 27% moisture level (HMB 27 ) increased the water binding capacity. Hydrothermal modifications reduced the oil absorption capacity of the raw starch. Annealing and heat moisture conditioning reduced the peak viscosity, (Pv) viscosity at 95 deg C (Hv) and viscosity at 95 deg. C after 30 minutes holding (Hv 30 ). However, viscosity increased on cooling down to 50 deg. C after annealing. Annealing and heat moisture treatments as revealed by scanning electron micrograph and light micrograph did not alter the shape and size of the raw starch. The results indicate a rearrangement within the starch granule following hydrothermal treatments. (author)

  14. Effect of annealing and heat moisture conditioning on the physicochemical characteristics of Bambarra groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea) starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebowale, K O; Lawal, O S

    2002-10-01

    Isolated starch of Bambarra groundnut (Voandzeia subterranean) was subjected to hydrothermal modifications through annealing and heat moisture conditioning. Both annealing and heat moisture conditioning reduced the swelling power and solubility of the starch. Water binding capacity reduced after annealing heat moisture conditioning at 18% moisture level (HMB18) and heat moisture conditioning at 21% moisture level (HMB21). Both heat moisture conditioning at 24% moisture level (HMB24) and heat moisture conditioning at 27% moisture level (HMB27) increased the water binding capacity. Hydrothermal modifications reduced the oil absorption capacity of the raw starch. Annealing and heat moisture conditioning reduced the peak viscosity (Pv), viscosity at 95 degrees C (Hv) and viscosity at 95 degrees C after 30 min holding (Hv30). However, viscosity increased on cooling down to 50 degrees C after annealing. Annealing and heat moisture treatments as revealed by scanning electron micrograph and light micrograph did not alter the shape and size of the raw starch. The results indicate a rearrangement within the starch granule following hydrothermal treatments.

  15. Multilocation trial of potential selected mutant lines of groundnut (arachis hypogaea) at 3 location in Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Harun; Rusli Ibrahim; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Shuhaimi Shamsuddin

    2002-01-01

    Two fixed mutant lines of groundnut derived from cultivar Matjan were selected for their yield potential at M 1 0 generation. Multilocation trial of these mutants (MJ40/42 and MJ20/165-5) was carried out to evaluate genotype stability at different climate and soil types in Peninsular Malaysia. The mutant lines were planted and compared with their parent (Matjan) and control variety (MKT1). The identified locations were in Taiping (Perak), Machang (Kelantan), and Air Hitam (Johor). The soils at the locations were of the Serdang, Bungor and Rengam series, respectively. The trial was carried out simultaneously in the same year at each location. Mutant MJ20/165-5 showed stable performance at all location compared to other genotypes tested. Its yield was higher than the parent in Kelantan and Johor trial and showed similar performance in Perak. This mutant also showed better yield performance than the control varieties in the Kelantan trial. Meanwhile, mutant line MJ40/42 gave better yield in Kelantan and Johor but did not perform well in Perak as compared to its parent and control varieties. (Author)

  16. Hard-to-cook phenomenon in bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubaiwa, Juliet; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Chidewe, Cathrine; Linnemann, Anita R.

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous legume crops are pivotal in providing proteins and food security to sub-Saharan African rural communities, but most of these crops are underutilized because of the so-called hard-to-cook (HTC) phenomenon in combination with inadequate processing techniques. This review studies the case

  17. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  18. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  19. KIT RELIABILITY FOR CONTROLLING THE QUALITY OF OILS IN FOOD FRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Oloni Kotchoni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Benin, West Africa, frying is one of the major ways of cooking. However, the chemical composition of the oil used in the food frying process contains unsaturated fatty acids and other by-products that compromise the oil quality making it toxic and often carcinogenic. The aim of this study was to check the reliability of kits in controlling three frying yams oil quality. The food frying was performed using oil in a discontinuous heating period of 15 min followed by three hours of cooling period for two experimental days. The temperature, and the oil chemical samplings were assessed with the kit every thirty minutes. In addition, selected oil chemical characteristics were determined to quantitatively and qualitatively appreciate the chemical modifications during the fast food versus the rapid food processing methods. Our findings indicate that water and volatile chemical compounds vary significantly for the first day of analysis from 0.18% to 1.6% for groundnut oil; from 0.14% to 1.4% for palm oil and from 0.17% to 1.6% for cotton oils. We detected a decrease of iodine index to 25%; 35.31% and 27.78% for groundnut, palm and cotton oils respectively. However, the peroxide index increases to 55.33%; 61.90% and 57.78% for groundnut, palm and cotton oils respectively. The increases of acid and saponification indices were also observed. Under conjugated effect of water temperature contained in the yam and air contact, the chemical characteristics of oil vary with the frying time. Our results reveal concordance consistent data with both the rapid methods and laboratory data set analysis.

  20. Comparativo entre o Regulamento Técnico Brasileiro de Boas Práticas para Serviços de Alimentação e as legislações complementares da Região Sul | Comparison between the Brazilian Technical Regulation on Good Practices for Food Services and complementary laws in the Southern Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia de Freitas Saccol

    2015-11-01

    food handlers. Another similar regulation was the Ordinance design, which used a structured checklist and compliance percentage. In contrast, Santa Catarina State’s resolution, despite its checklist design, presents fewer similarities. The Health Surveillance Agency of the state of Paraná had no complementary laws, published a specific Technical Note for street food.

  1. Effects of raw and heat-treated bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) on the performance and body composition of growing broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fru Nji, F; Niess, E; Pfeffer, E

    2003-12-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterannea)--a leguminous root nut, which grows in the tropics and subtropics--was used in an experiment to test its effect on the performance of growing broiler chicks. Performance was measured by monitoring growth, measuring nutrients and energy balances and also by determining nutrient accretion. Twelve-day old broiler chicks, kept in individual metabolic cages, were used in an experiment in which birds were equally allotted (n = 10) into a control (fed high performance diet made up principally of wheat and soybean meal) and 6 test groups fed diets containing 19, 76 and 95% raw or autoclaved bambara groundnuts. All diets were similar in energy, nitrogen and total lipid contents. Diets were also balanced for amino acids, vitamins and minerals in accordance to the specific requirements of the birds. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Growth performance was monitored over 15 days. Nutrient and energy balances were measured by use of TiO2 as marker. The comparative slaughter technique was implored for the determination of energy and nutrient accretion. The results showed that the level of raw or autoclaved bambara had no significant influence on feed intake. Increasing the bambara level in the diets caused a general linear drop in the performance of the broilers. However, with up to 95% bambara in the diet, the general performance was still above 75% compared to the control. Increasing levels of bambara groundnut caused a decrease in the metabolizability of energy and efficiency of utilisation of ME for BWG. The animals retained more water with increasing levels of raw bambara in the diets while autoclaving increased their DM content to levels comparable to the control. The protein composition of gain was comparable at all levels of inclusion. In general autoclaving improved the performance of bambara.

  2. Antioxidant activities of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) protein hydrolysates and their membrane ultrafiltration fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arise, Abimbola K; Alashi, Adeola M; Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D; Ijabadeniyi, Oluwatosin A; Aluko, Rotimi E; Amonsou, Eric O

    2016-05-18

    In this study, the bambara protein isolate (BPI) was digested with three proteases (alcalase, trypsin and pepsin), to produce bambara protein hydrolysates (BPHs). These hydrolysates were passed through ultrafiltration membranes to obtain peptide fractions of different sizes (3 kDa. This is in agreement with the result obtained for the ferric reducing power, metal chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities where higher molecular weight peptides exhibited better activity (p alcalase and trypsin hydrolysates (82%). These findings show the potential use of BPHs and their peptide fraction as antioxidants in reducing food spoilage or management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders.

  3. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP-cDNA) analysis of differential gene expression from the xerophyte Ammopiptanthus mongolicus in response to cold, drought and cold together with drought.

  4. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Sleep Disorders: In Depth Share: On This Page What’s ... know about the usefulness of complementary approaches for sleep disorders? Relaxation techniques can be helpful for insomnia. ...

  5. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Chronic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation, an ancient disease, is prevalent, and costly in the general population. Complementary and alternative therapies are frequently used for constipation. This review introduces various methods of complementary and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and herbal medicine. Efficacy, safety, influence factors, sham control design, and mechanisms of these therapies are discussed and evaluated. Acupuncture or electroacupuncture was found to be most commonly used for constipation among these complementary and alternative therapies, followed by herbal medicine. Although only a small number of clinical studies are flawless, our review of the literature seems to suggest that acupuncture or electroacupuncture and herbal medicine are effective in treating constipation, whereas findings on massage and moxibustion are inconclusive. More well-designed clinical trials are needed to improve and prove the efficacy of the complementary and alternative therapies for constipation; mechanistic studies that would lead to wide spread use and improvement of the methods are also discussed in this review.

  6. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Careers at LLS Language English Spanish Canadian English French Canadian I am a Patient looking for Disease/ ... like to know more about complementary clinical trials, speak with your doctor or contact one of The ...

  7. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These observations could be explained by some qualitative and /or quantitative differences observed between the constituents of the two essential oils studied. Keywords: Cymbopogon nardus, Essential oil, Chemistry, Analgesic, Comparison, Benin, Congo. African Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Vol.

  8. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicines (AJTCAM) provides rapid publication of papers on ethnomedicines and veterinary ethnomedicines. The Journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence.

  9. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  10. Child factors associated with complementary feeding practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immunisation and deworming consultations is likely to encourage beneficial complementary feeding practices in Uganda. Keywords: child age, complementary feeding, deworming, immunisation, Uganda Demographic and Health Survey. Introduction. Complementary feeding is essential if children are to grow and develop ...

  11. Introduction to complementary, alternative, and traditional therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramlich, Debra

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary, alternative, and traditional therapies is increasing in the United States, and patients and their families are bringing these practices into the acute care setting. Acute and critical care nurses are in a unique and trusted position to advocate for their patients and to promote safe incorporation of complementary, alternative, and traditional therapies into the plan of care. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Complementary computer generated holography for aesthetic watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Christophe; Lemonnier, Olivier; Laulagnet, Fabien; Fargeix, Alain; Tissot, Florent; Armand, Marie Françoise

    2012-02-27

    We present herein an original solution for the watermarking of holograms in binary graphic arts without unaesthetic diffractive effect. It is based on the Babinet principle of complementary diffractive structures adapted to Lohmann-type computer generated holograms. We introduce the concept and demonstrate its interest for anti-counterfeiting applications with the decoding of a hidden data matrix. A process of thermal lithography is used for the manufacturing of binary graphic arts containing complementary computer generated holograms.

  13. Complementary symbiont contributions to plant decomposition in a fungus-farming termite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulsen, Michael; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai; Chen, Zhensheng; Xu, Luohao; Otani, Saria; Nygaard, Sanne; Nobre, Tania; Klaubauf, S.; Schindler, Philipp M; Hauser, Frank; Pan, Hailin; Yang, Zhikai; Sonnenberg, Anton S M; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Zhang, Yong; Wingfield, Michael J; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; de Vries, Ronald P; Korb, Judith; Aanen, Duur K; Wang, Jun; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Zhang, Guojie; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Termites normally rely on gut symbionts to decompose organic matter but the Macrotermitinae domesticated Termitomyces fungi to produce their own food. This transition was accompanied by a shift in the composition of the gut microbiota, but the complementary roles of these bacteria in the symbiosis

  14. Complementary symbiont contributions to plant decomposition in a fungus-farming termite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas-Poulsen, Michael; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai

    2014-01-01

    Termites normally rely on gut symbionts to decompose organic matter but the Macrotermitinae domesticated Termitomyces fungi to produce their own food. This transition was accompanied by a shift in the composition of the gut microbiota, but the complementary roles of these bacteria in the symbiosi...

  15. Early Taste Experiences and Later Food Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cosmi, Valentina; Scaglioni, Silvia; Agostoni, Carlo

    2017-02-04

    Nutrition in early life is increasingly considered to be an important factor influencing later health. Food preferences are formed in infancy, are tracked into childhood and beyond, and complementary feeding practices are crucial to prevent obesity later in life. Through a literature search strategy, we have investigated the role of breastfeeding, of complementary feeding, and the parental and sociocultural factors which contribute to set food preferences early in life. Children are predisposed to prefer high-energy, -sugar, and -salt foods, and in pre-school age to reject new foods (food neophobia). While genetically determined individual differences exist, repeated offering of foods can modify innate preferences. Starting in the prenatal period, a varied exposure through amniotic fluid and repeated experiences with novel flavors during breastfeeding and complementary feeding increase children's willingness to try new foods within a positive social environment.

  16. Early Taste Experiences and Later Food Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina De Cosmi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nutrition in early life is increasingly considered to be an important factor influencing later health. Food preferences are formed in infancy, are tracked into childhood and beyond, and complementary feeding practices are crucial to prevent obesity later in life. Methods. Through a literature search strategy, we have investigated the role of breastfeeding, of complementary feeding, and the parental and sociocultural factors which contribute to set food preferences early in life. Results. Children are predisposed to prefer high-energy, -sugar, and -salt foods, and in pre-school age to reject new foods (food neophobia. While genetically determined individual differences exist, repeated offering of foods can modify innate preferences. Conclusions. Starting in the prenatal period, a varied exposure through amniotic fluid and repeated experiences with novel flavors during breastfeeding and complementary feeding increase children’s willingness to try new foods within a positive social environment.

  17. BIOLOGICAL YIELD AND PROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF BAMBARA GROUNDNUT (VIGNA SUBTERRANEA (L VERDC. AS INFLUENCED BY SOWING DEPTHS AND SOIL TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji Umar OLAYINKA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Seeding at the appropriate depth and planting under suitable soil types are important factors for improvement of crop performance. In light of this, potted experiment was carried out at the University of Ilorin Botanical Garden to examine the effects of different sowing depths and soil types on the growth, yield and seed quality of bambara groundnut. The experimental layout followed completely randomized design with four replications. The treatment consisted of 0, 1, 2, 4 6 and 8 cm sowing depths and three different soil types (sand, loam and clay. Sowing at a depth of 1 cm produced the highest seedling emergence, tallest plant height, highest number of leaves, highest leaf area, highest yield components in terms of number of pods per plants, pod weight and seed weight per plant. The deepest sowing depth (8 cm, produced the lowest values of all the aforementioned parameters. Growth attributes were found to be highest in sandy soil compared to loamy and clayey soils. However, yield components were higher in loamy soil than other soil types. Sowing depths of 4-8 cm and clayey soil increased the percentage ash, fibre and carbohydrate contents of the seeds when compared to other sowing depths and soil types respectively. Therefore, for improved seedling emergence and biological yield, sowing depth of 1 cm under suitable soil types such as sandy and loamy soils could be considered appropriate for the cultivation of this crop. Fluctuation exists in all the proximate composition. However, sowing depth of 4-8 cm and clayey soil had a remarkable influence on some of the proximate compositions.

  18. The turnover of 14C labelled groundnut straw, soil organic matter dynamics, and CO2 evolution in an Alfisol and a Vertisol of semi-arid tropical India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, S.

    1993-01-01

    During all seasons and experiments in a prevailing warm climate in the Indian semi-arid tropics, the turnover of uniformly 14 C tagged groundnut straw was faster in the shallow, sandy Alfisol than in the deep clayey, smectitic Vertisol. In both soils, the initial 14 C losses were highest in the first weeks when straw was incorporated in the rainy season. After 2.5 years, the residual 14 C accounted for 14% in the Alfisol and for 26% in the Vertisol. The straw burial in the hot dry season resulted in considerable losses in desiccated soils what agreed to studies under controlled environmental conditions. Following frequent dry/wet cycles in the field, further drastic decline of straw-derived 14 C was observed. Also, 14 C losses were more pronounced in the drier postrainy season than in the rainy seasons underlining the effective adaptation of soil microbes to moisture conditions far below field capacity. Labelled groundnut roots decomposed much slower than aboveground biomass during half a year in the rainy season. In all field experiments, shading favored larger turnover of 14 C. That was attributed to prolonged soil moisture under shade where the positive effects of higher temperature on more rapid litter decay in the open were offset. Recordings of CO 2 during 2 years showed no impacts of living roots on retardation of 14 CO 2 -C fluxes if compared to release rates from fallow/bare treatments. (orig./EF)

  19. EVALUATION OF Cassia sieberiana (DC AND Vernonia amygdalina (Del. AGAINST Callosobruchus maculatus (F. INFESTING STORED BAMBARA GROUNDNUT Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Gana Kabir

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal activity of Cassia sieberiana (DC and Vernonia amygdalina (Del. aqueous extract against Callosobruchus maculatus (F. in treated bambara groundnut was evaluated under laboratory conditions (25 – 29°C and 56 – 70% r.h.. Seeds were treated separately at four concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8 ml/100g of seeds of both plants aqueous extracts. Pirimiphos methyl applied at 8 mg a.i./kg was included as positive control. Data collected were adult mortality, number of adult progeny  (F1 and F2, percentage seed damage, percentage weight loss and germination capacity. Results showed that increasing concentration of both plant extracts and period of exposure to treated seeds significantly (P<0.05 increased adult mortality levels from 16.9±2.9 to 100%. Furthermore, both plant extracts applied at 8 ml/100 g of seeds were comparable to pirimiphos-methyl after 96 h of exposure. The plant extracts significantly (P<0.05 reduced number of adult progeny, percentage seed damage and percentage weight loss, which all progressively declined with increasing concentration from 2 to 8 ml. Both plant aqueous extracts had no effect on germination capacity of treated seeds. For all the parameters measured, the plant extracts tested showed significantly higher biological activity in treated seeds compared to the untreated control. The present results suggest that these plant aqueous extracts have the potential to control C. maculatus populations in stored bambara groundnut.

  20. Efficient in vitro direct shoot organogenesis and regeneration of fertile plants from embryo explants of Bambara groundnut ( Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, B; Assoumou, Y; Sangwan, R S

    2003-08-01

    An efficient protocol has been developed for direct shoot organogenesis from embryo axes derived from mature seeds of two different landraces of Bambara groundnut. Multiple shoots were initiated on several media containing different concentrations and combinations of benzylaminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ). Efficient regeneration occurred when the embryo axes were first plated for 6 days on a medium containing high concentrations of BAP (1 mg/l) and alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, 1 mg/l) and then cut transversely and transferred onto a medium containing 1.5 mg/l BAP. Shoot regeneration frequency was 100% and from five to eight shoots per explant were obtained. The importance of using embryo explants and cytokinins in the culture media, with respect to controlling the development of a highly organogenic system, was demonstrated. Histological studies revealed that proliferating buds originated directly from the superficial layers of the explants without an intermediate callus phase. The regenerated shoots were rooted on a medium containing 1 mg/l NAA and then transferred to the greenhouse. Flow cytometric analyses and chloroplast counts of guard cells suggested that the regenerants were diploid. All were morphologically normal and fertile. The short duration, high efficiency and low frequency of somaclonal variation of this system make it well suited for wider biotechnological applications of Bambara groundnut-a neglected and under-utilized crop.

  1. Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Bambara Groundnut Starch Films Modified with Stearic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyinka, Samson A; Singh, Suren; Amonsou, Eric O

    2017-01-01

    The physicochemical and mechanical properties of biofilm prepared from bambara starch modified with varying concentrations of stearic acid (0%, 2.5%, 3.5%, 5%, 7%, and 10%) were studied. By scanning electron microscopy, bambara starch films modified with stearic acid (≥3.5%) showed a progressively rough surface compared to those with 2.5% stearic acid and the control. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra revealed a peak shift of approximately 31 cm -1 , suggesting the promotion of hydrogen bond formation between hydroxyl groups of starch and stearic acid. The addition of 2.5% stearic acid to bambara starch film reduced water vapor permeability by approximately 17%. Bambara starch films modified with higher concentration of stearic acid were more opaque and showed significantly high melting temperatures. However, mechanical properties of starch films were generally negatively affected by stearic acid. Bambara starch film may be modified with 2.5% stearic acid for improved water vapor permeability and thermal stability with minimal effect on tensile strength. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  3. Proposal of indicators to evaluate complementary feeding based on World Health Organization indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldan, Paula Chuproski; Venancio, Sonia Isoyama; Saldiva, Silvia Regina Dias Medici; de Mello, Débora Falleiros

    2016-09-01

    This study compares complementary feeding World Health Organization (WHO) indicators with those built in accordance with Brazilian recommendations (Ten Steps to Healthy Feeding). A cross-sectional study was carried out during the National Immunization Campaign against Poliomyelitis in Guarapuava-Paraná, Brazil, in 2012. Feeding data from 1,355 children aged 6-23 months were obtained through the 24 h diet recall. Based on five indicators, the proportion of adequacy was evaluated: introduction of solid, semi-solid, or soft foods; minimum dietary diversity; meal frequency; acceptable diet; and consumption of iron-rich foods. Complementary feeding showed adequacy higher than 85% in most WHO indicators, while review by the Ten Steps assessment method showed a less favorable circumstance and a high intake of unhealthy foods. WHO indicators may not reflect the complementary feeding conditions of children in countries with low malnutrition rates and an increased prevalence of overweight/obesity. The use of indicators according to the Ten Steps can be useful to identify problems and redirect actions aimed at promoting complementary feeding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Complementary Feeding Strategies to Facilitate Acceptance of Fruits and Vegetables: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Nicklaus

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Complementary feeding (CF, which should begin after exclusive breastfeeding for six months, according to the World Health Organization (WHO, or after four months and before six months according to the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN, is a period when the infant implicitly learns what, when, how, and how much to eat. At the onset of CF, the brain and the gut are still developing and maturing, and food experiences contribute to shaping brain connections involved in food hedonics and in the control of food intake. These learning processes are likely to have a long-term impact. Children’s consumption of fruit and vegetables (FV is below recommendations in many countries. Thus, it is crucial to establish preferences for FV early, when infants are learning to eat. The development of food preferences mainly starts when infants discover their first solid foods. This narrative review summarizes the factors that influence FV acceptance at the start of the CF period: previous milk feeding experience; timing of onset of CF; repeated exposures to the food; variety of foods offered as of the start of the CF period; quality and sensory properties of the complementary foods; quality of the meal time context; and parental responsive feeding.

  5. Complementary Feeding Strategies to Facilitate Acceptance of Fruits and Vegetables: A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklaus, Sophie

    2016-11-19

    Complementary feeding (CF), which should begin after exclusive breastfeeding for six months, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), or after four months and before six months according to the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN), is a period when the infant implicitly learns what, when, how, and how much to eat. At the onset of CF, the brain and the gut are still developing and maturing, and food experiences contribute to shaping brain connections involved in food hedonics and in the control of food intake. These learning processes are likely to have a long-term impact. Children's consumption of fruit and vegetables (FV) is below recommendations in many countries. Thus, it is crucial to establish preferences for FV early, when infants are learning to eat. The development of food preferences mainly starts when infants discover their first solid foods. This narrative review summarizes the factors that influence FV acceptance at the start of the CF period: previous milk feeding experience; timing of onset of CF; repeated exposures to the food; variety of foods offered as of the start of the CF period; quality and sensory properties of the complementary foods; quality of the meal time context; and parental responsive feeding.

  6. Complementary Feeding Practices of Mothers and Their Perceived Impacts on Young Children: Findings from KEEA District of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egyir, Bridget K; Ramsay, Samantha A; Bilderback, Barry; Safaii, SeAnne

    2016-09-01

    Objective Appropriate and timely complementary feeding practices are fundamental to a child's growth, health, and development during the first 2 years of life. This study aimed to understand (1) Ghanaian mother's complementary feeding practices, and (2) their perceived and observed impacts of complementary feeding on their children. Methods Ghanaian mothers with children 4-24 months of age were recruited from four communities in the Komenda Edina Eguafo Abrem district in the Central Region of Ghana (n = 99). A qualitative methodological approach with focus group interview discussions was used. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, and were audio recorded and transcribed. The audio transcriptions were coded and analyzed into pertinent themes, meta-themes, and theoretical concepts. Results Over 80 % (85) of mothers reported poor knowledge about the effects of complementary feeding on their children and 45 % (45) of the children were undernourished, indicating inappropriate complementary feeding practices. Some mothers held misconceptions about the effect of food on children's health. Four overarching themes were identified: (1) mothers' background knowledge about food, child health and growth outcomes, (2) mothers' motivation in feeding their children, (3) barriers to feeding, (4) foods mothers offered their children. Conclusion for Practice Nutrition education on complementary feeding is needed for Ghanaian mothers. Health facilities and community outreach programs could be a venue to provide education to mothers regarding infant and young child feeding practices in Ghana.

  7. Behavioral Change Strategies for Improving Complementary Feeding and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osendarp, Saskia J M; Roche, Marion L

    2016-01-01

    Improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices, including breastfeeding and complementary feeding, has been identified as one of the most effective interventions to improve child survival, stunting and wasting. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that effective promotion of breastfeeding and complementary feeding, with or without food provision, has the potential to improve IYCF practices and child nutrition. However, in many countries, breastfeeding practices and complementary feeding practices are still far from optimal. The lack of implementation of available, effective, affordable interventions in scale-up programs is in part attributed to a lack of innovative, creative and effective behavioral change strategies that enable and encourage caregivers. Successful behavioral change strategies should be based on a rigorous situational analysis and formative research, and the findings and insights of formative research should be used to further design interventions that address the identified barriers and enablers, to select delivery channels, and to formulate appropriate and effective messages. In addition, successful behavioral change interventions should a priori define and investigate the program impact pathway to target behavioral change and should assess intermediary behavioral changes and indicators to learn why the expected outcome was achieved or not achieved by testing the program theory. The design of behavioral change communication must be flexible and responsive to shifts in societies and contexts. Performance of adequate IYCF also requires investments to generate community demand through social mobilization, relevant media and existing support systems. Applying these principles has been shown to be effective in improving IYCF practices in Vietnam, Bangladesh and Ethiopia and is recommended to be adopted by other programs and countries in order to accelerate progress in improving child nutrition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to identify ways by which the theorizing of supply chain management (SCM) takes place, with particular attention to complementary theories. SCM suffers as well as benefits from a “conceptual slack”. Design/methodology/approach – The nature of SCM is discussed...... complementary theories to advancing understanding of SCM can benefit from the five building blocks of theorizing SCM proposed in the paper. Practical implications – Theoretical principles in SCM are not only used to describe practical problems but also to “produce the world”; supply chains can be seen...

  9. Utilization of Arachis hypogea (Groundnut and Lablab purpureus (lablab Forage Meal Fed Sole or Mixed by Growing Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Iyeghe-Erakpotobor, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-six crossbred growing rabbits were used to evaluate performance of rabbits on sole and mixed forage meals in a 3 x 2 factorial experiment consisting three treatments made of Arachis hypogea (groundnut, GFM, Lablab purpureus (lablab, LFM forage meals and 50:50 mixture of both forage meals (GLFM, and two sex groups (males and females in a completely randomized design. Both forages were harvested, chopped and milled before inclusion at 50% rate into the concentrate diet to make complete diets and offered at 125 g/rabbit/day in earthen feeders in the morning at 08.00 hr. Results obtained indicated that forage type did not affect final weight of rabbits. Feed intake and weight gain respectively were similar for GFM (75.26 ± 4.18, 6.02 ± 1.18 g/day, LFM (78.91 ± 3.50, 7.86 ± 0.99 g/day and GLFM (74.35 ± 3.54, 7.53 ± 1.00 g/day. Feed cost and feed cost/kg gain were also similar for all the forage types. Male and female rabbits had similar final weight, feed intake, weight gain, feed cost and feed cost/kg gain. While weight gain was higher on GFM (7.95 ± 1.29 g/day and LFM (7.37 ± 1.39 g/day than GLFM (5.25 ± 1.29 g/day for male rabbits, for female rabbits, weight gain was similar on GLFM (9.81 ± 1.53 g/day and LFM (8.33 ± 1.39 g/day and lower on GFM (4.09 ± 1.97 g/day. Saving/kg gain for male rabbits fed GFM and LFM was $ 0.64-0.81 than GLFM while it was $ 0.91-1.35 for female rabbits fed LFM and GLFM than GFM.

  10. Parent-led or baby-led? Associations between complementary feeding practices and health-related behaviours in a survey of New Zealand families

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Sonya L; Taylor, Rachael W; Heath, Anne-Louise M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine feeding practices and selected health-related behaviours in New Zealand families following a ?baby-led? or more traditional ?parent-led? method for introducing complementary foods. Design, setting and participants 199 mothers completed an online survey about introducing complementary foods to their infant. Participants were classified into one of four groups: ?adherent baby-led weaning (BLW)?, the infant mostly or entirely fed themselves at 6?7?months; ?self-identified ...

  11. Complementary Feeding, Micronutrients and Developmental Outcomes of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Jacqueline F

    2017-01-01

    The period of complementary feeding (6-24 months of age) can be a challenging and vulnerable time for infant nutrition due to disproportionately high requirements for metabolic processes, rapid developmental processes, and limited gastric capacity. This is a period of crucial brain development where high caloric intake is necessary to allow synaptogenesis (creation of channels between neurons for communication), and maintenance of established synapses, myelination (laying the myelin sheath around neuronal axons) and everyday psychological functioning. Key nutrients needed for infant brain development include iron (required for oxygen provision to metabolize energy), fatty acids (for cellular membranes and myelin) and protein (for structural support, such as in myelin). Deficiencies in key nutrients during the complementary feeding period have been consistently linked to child development outcomes. Observational studies have consistently demonstrated links between nutrient deficiencies and impairments in intellectual abilities, work capacity, behavioral functioning and even delayed mental and motor development. Yet results from a number of interventions using food, individual nutrients or multiple micronutrients with child development assessments are mixed, possibly partly due to differences in interventions (nutrients and timing), populations, baseline nutrient status, sample sizes, attrition and method of assessment. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Comparison of the complementary feeding practices between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to compare the complementary feeding practices between mothers with twins and mothers with singletons. Methods: mother-infant pairs (50 mother-twin pairs and 50 mother-singleton pairs) with children aged 6 to 23 months were recruited from two public health clinics and communities in Tema ...

  13. Black Hole Complementary Principle and Noncommutative Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Ren

    2006-01-01

    In the spirit of black hole complementary principle, we have found the noncommutative membrane of Scharzchild black holes. In this paper we extend our results to Kerr black hole and see the same story. Also we make a conjecture that spacetimes are noncommutative on the stretched membrane of the more general Kerr-Newman black hole.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  15. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  16. Complementary medicines: When regulation results in revolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The regulatory practices include all the steps from the development and manufacture of the active ingredients until the medicines reach the consumer. The Medicines Control Council (MCC) is mandated to regulate medicines in South Africa. Complementary medicines were previously perceived to be unregulated, although ...

  17. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survey of dental students' attitude regarding oriental medicine/complementary and alternative medicine: comparison between two Japanese dental schools · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Atsushi Kameyama, Kazuo Toda, 287-295.

  18. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differences in attitudes towards/beliefs on complementary and alternative medicine witnessed between physiotherapists, nurses/paramedics and physicians · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. D Živčić, A Racz, D Naletilić, 57-65.

  19. Mental disorders frequency alternative and complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT) are chronic disorders with which mental disorders may coexist and for which patients may resort to alternative medicine use. Alternative and complementary medicine is a treatment option that patients tend to use. This study is to determine the prevalence of mental ...

  20. (COPD) on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine usage in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients living in the eastern part of Turkey. In this study a descriptive design was used. The study was conducted with 216 patients who were present at the clinic.

  1. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 6 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Errata | Adewunmi | African Journal of Traditional, Complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 6 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rate of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients is on the increase worldwide. This is due to the innate urge among humans to try new and alternative ways of medicine, especially where conventional medicine failed to provide satisfactory solution such as in sickle cell ...

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine use among diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among patients with chronic diseases in developing countries. The rising use of CAM in the management of diabetes is an emerging public health concern given the potential adverse effects, drug interactions and benefits associated with its use.

  5. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4S (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthelminthic efficacy of aqueous extract of Acanthus montanus leaf against strongylid nematodes of small ruminants · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ... Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at Zhejiang University Teaching Hospital, Zhuji Hospital, China · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ...

  7. Determining Complementary Properties with Quantum Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Saaltink, R. Y.; Giner, L.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    In a classical world, simultaneous measurements of complementary properties (e.g., position and momentum) give a system's state. In quantum mechanics, measurement-induced disturbance is largest for complementary properties and, hence, limits the precision with which such properties can be determined simultaneously. It is tempting to try to sidestep this disturbance by copying the system and measuring each complementary property on a separate copy. However, perfect copying is physically impossible in quantum mechanics. Here, we investigate using the closest quantum analog to this copying strategy, optimal cloning. The coherent portion of the generated clones' state corresponds to "twins" of the input system. Like perfect copies, both twins faithfully reproduce the properties of the input system. Unlike perfect copies, the twins are entangled. As such, a measurement on both twins is equivalent to a simultaneous measurement on the input system. For complementary observables, this joint measurement gives the system's state, just as in the classical case. We demonstrate this experimentally using polarized single photons.

  8. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technology was used to analyze ... that 9 of the studied expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are related to protein modification, 12 ESTs are involved in the .... primers were used during the first strand synthesis of our cDNA synthesis ...

  9. Optimizing Usability Studies by Complementary Evaluation Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmettow, Martin; Bach, Cedric; Scapin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines combinations of complementary evaluation methods as a strategy for efficient usability problem discovery. A data set from an earlier study is re-analyzed, involving three evaluation methods applied to two virtual environment applications. Results of a mixed-effects logistic

  10. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    Borrowing from complementary theories has become an important part of theorizing SCM. We build upon principal-agent theory (PAT), transaction cost analysis (TCA), network theory (NT), and resource-based view (RBV) to provide insights on how to structure a supply chain and manage it. Through...

  11. Hypertension management: Perspectives of complementary and al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information available on the various forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) used in the management of hypertension is inadequate and conflicting. The primary objective of this study was to assess the use of CAM in the management of hypertension by CAM practition-ers. A qualitative study utilizing ...

  12. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Brondino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM represents a popular therapeutic option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data regarding the efficacy of CAM in ASD. The aim of the present systematic review is to investigate trials of CAM in ASD. Material and Methods. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Agricola, and Food Science Source. Results. Our literature search identified 2687 clinical publications. After the title/abstract screening, 139 publications were obtained for detailed evaluation. After detailed evaluation 67 studies were included, from hand search of references we retrieved 13 additional studies for a total of 80. Conclusion. There is no conclusive evidence supporting the efficacy of CAM therapies in ASD. Promising results are reported for music therapy, sensory integration therapy, acupuncture, and massage.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine - representations in popular magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Alexandra; Phillips, Christine

    2010-09-01

    More than half the patients who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Australia do not discuss it with their doctors. Many consumers use popular media, especially women's magazines, to learn about CAM. To explore representations of CAM in popular Australian women's magazines. Content analysis of three Australian magazines: Australian Women's Weekly, Dolly and New Idea published from January to June 2008. Of 220 references to CAM (4-17 references per issue), most were to biologically based practices, particularly 'functional foods', which enhance health. Most representations of CAM were positive (81.3% positive, 16.4% neutral, 2.3% negative). Explanations of modes of action of CAM tended to be biological but relatively superficial. Australian magazines cast CAM as safe therapy which enhances patient engagement in healthcare, and works in ways analogous to orthodox medical treatments. General practitioners can use discussions with their patients about CAM to encourage health promoting practices.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Natascia; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Rocchetti, Matteo; Provenzani, Umberto; Barale, Francesco; Politi, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a popular therapeutic option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data regarding the efficacy of CAM in ASD. The aim of the present systematic review is to investigate trials of CAM in ASD. Material and Methods. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Agricola, and Food Science Source. Results. Our literature search identified 2687 clinical publications. After the title/abstract screening, 139 publications were obtained for detailed evaluation. After detailed evaluation 67 studies were included, from hand search of references we retrieved 13 additional studies for a total of 80. Conclusion. There is no conclusive evidence supporting the efficacy of CAM therapies in ASD. Promising results are reported for music therapy, sensory integration therapy, acupuncture, and massage.

  15. Fatores associados à interrupção precoce do aleitamento materno exclusivo e à introdução tardia da alimentação complementar no centro-oeste brasileiro Risk factors for early interruption of exclusive breastfeeding and late introduction of complementary foods among infants in midwestern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela S. Brunken

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores associados à interrupção precoce (antes dos 4 meses do aleitamento materno exclusivo e à introdução tardia (após os 8 meses de alimentos complementares. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se estudo transversal, por meio de inquérito, no primeiro dia da Campanha Nacional de Vacinação de 2004 em Cuiabá (MT. A amostra consistiu de 921 crianças menores de 1 ano, cujos acompanhantes foram entrevistados utilizando questionário semi-estruturado. Aplicou-se técnica de probitos para avaliação da oferta de líquidos e sólidos, e análise de regressão logística para análise de fatores associados à introdução precoce de líquidos ou introdução tardia de sólidos. RESULTADOS: Observou-se elevado consumo de água e chás, seguido pelo de leite de vaca, nos menores de 120 dias. A chance de estar ofertando líquido no momento do inquérito foi maior para as crianças que receberam tais alimentos no dia da alta da maternidade. A partir dos 8 meses, aproximadamente 60% das crianças estavam recebendo sopa ou comida da família. CONCLUSÕES: A oferta de líquidos no primeiro dia em casa mostrou-se um bom preditor desse hábito nos primeiros 4 meses, reforçando a necessidade de ações no acompanhamento pré-natal e na maternidade sobre os malefícios dessa prática. Após os 8 meses, no entanto, há que se reforçar a importância da participação da criança na comida da família, especialmente para as mães adultas, com menos do que o 3º grau de escolaridade e primíparas.OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with early interruption (before 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding and late introduction (after 8 months of complementary foods. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, based on a survey conducted on the first day of the National Vaccination Campaign in 2004, in Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. The sample comprised 921 children less than 1 year old, and the adult accompanying each child was interviewed and a semi

  16. Efeitos de reguladores vegetais no desenvolvimento e na produtividade do amendoinzeiro (Arachis hypogaea L. Effects of growth regulators on groundnut development (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.C. Castro

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de determinar a ação de substâncias de crescimento no desenvolvimento e produtividade do amendoinzeiro, sob condições de casa de vegetação. Plantas de Arachis hypogaea cv. Tatu-53, providas de 4 folhas definitivas, foram pulverizadas com chlormequat 2000 ppm, daminozide 4000 ppm, ácido giberélico 100 ppm, ácido indolilacético 100 ppm, além do controle. Foram determinados: altura das plantas, número de hastes, número de entrenós, comprimento do segundo e quarto entrenós, e o número de folhas. Também foram verificados os números de flores, de frutos e de sementes; peso dos frutos, das sementes, da matéria seca da parte aérea e da matéria seca das raízes do amendoinzeiro. Os resultados obtidos revelaram que daminozide 4000 ppm reduziu a altura, o número de entrenós na haste principal e o comprimento do quarto entrenó. Este produto também aumentou o número de folhas, atrasou a florescência, aumentou o número de flores e tendeu a aumentar o peso seco da parte aérea do amendoinzeiro. Pulverização com chlormequat 2000 ppm e ácido indolilacético 100 ppm, diminuiu a altura da planta e o comprimento do quarto entrenó da haste principal do amendoinzeiro.This research deals with the effects of plant growth regulators on groundnut growth (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Tatu-53. Plants of groundnut with four leaves grown in pots under greenhouse conditions, were sprayed with chlormequat 2000 ppm, daminozide 4000 ppm, gibberellic acid 100 ppm, indolylacetic acid 100 ppm, mid check treatment. Daminozide 4000 ppm reduced plant height, internode number and the length of the fourth internode. Daminozide increased the number of leaves, retarded flowering, increased the number of flowers and presented a tendency to increase the dry weight of stems. Chlormequat 2000 ppm and indolylacetic acid 100 ppm reduced plant height and the lenght of the fourth internode of the groundnut plant stem.

  17. DNA based methods used for characterization and detection of food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of food borne pathogen is of outmost importance in the food industries and related agencies. For the last few decades conventional methods were used to detect food borne pathogens based on phenotypic characters. At the advent of complementary base pairing and amplification of DNA, the diagnosis of food ...

  18. Maternal knowledge about complementary feeding in Latin america: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fidel Sierra Zúñiga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition has been the cause of 60% of the 10.9 million of deaths annually among children under five in the world. More than two thirds of those deaths are related to inappropriate feeding practices. Complementary feeding of children begins at 6 months with the introduction of any food other than breast milk or its substitutes. The inadequate start, inappropriate practices and insufficient knowledge about it, bring important consequences on the health of children and future adults. Objective: To review the degree of maternal knowledge about AC, in Latin America 2001 -2016. Methodology: This was a narrative review. Original, available in full version, studies evaluating maternal knowledge about complementary feeding in Latin America were included. The reports were evaluated means the STROBE tool (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. Results: There were 13 studies on practices and knowledge in complementary feeding: Mexico (one study, Peru (11 studies and Ecuador (one study. In Colombia, there were six studies on practices and one about breastfeeding knowledge. Conclusion: In Latin America, the most studies show an intermediate level of knowledge about complementary feeding. In Colombia, is difficult to establish a degree of knowledge of complementary feeding current due to the lack of studies.

  19. High prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with genetically proven mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franik, Sebastian; Huidekoper, Hidde H; Visser, Gepke; de Vries, Maaike; de Boer, Lonneke; Hermans-Peters, Marion; Rodenburg, Richard; Verhaak, Chris; Vlieger, Arine M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Janssen, Mirian C H; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2015-05-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases, clinical management of these conditions remains largely supportive, and no effective treatment is available. We therefore assumed that the burden of disease combined with the lack of adequate treatment leaves open a big market for complementary and alternative medicine use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in children and adults with genetically proven mitochondrial disease. The reported use was surprisingly high, with 88% of children and 91% of adults having used some kind of complementary and alternative medicine in the last 2 years. Also, the mean cost of these treatments was impressive, being 489/year for children and 359/year for adult patients. Over-the-counter remedies (e.g., food supplements, homeopathy) and self-help techniques (e.g., Reiki, yoga) were the most frequently used complementary and alternative therapies in our cohort: 54% of children and 60% of adults reported the various complementary and alternative medicine therapies to be effective. Given the fact that currently no effective treatment exists, further research toward the different therapies is needed, as our study clearly demonstrates that such therapies are highly sought after by affected patients.

  20. Learning from nature: binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this Review, nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs), consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials. Once the distance between the two nanoscopic components is comparable to the characteristic length of some physical interactions, the cooperation between these complementary building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with novel and superior properties. The first implementation of the BCCNMs is the design of bio-inspired smart materials with superwettability and their reversible switching between different wetting states in response to various kinds of external stimuli. Coincidentally, recent studies on other types of functional nanomaterials contribute more examples to support the idea of BCCNMs, which suggests a potential yet comprehensive range of future applications in both materials science and engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Complementary and Integrative Medicine for Neurologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Baute, Vanessa; Wahbeh, Helané

    2017-09-01

    Although many neurologic conditions are common, cures are rare and conventional treatments are often limited. Many patients, therefore, turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of selected, evidence-based CAM therapies for the prevention and treatment of migraine, carpal tunnel syndrome, and dementia are presented. Evidence is growing many of modalities, including nutrition, exercise, mind-body medicine, supplements, and acupuncture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ZEROES OF GENERALIZED FRESNEL COMPLEMENTARY INTEGRAL FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lobo Segura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical upper and lower bounds are established for zeroes of a parametric family of functions which are defined by integrals of the same type as the Fresnel complementary integral. Asymptotic properties for these bounds are obtained as well as monotony properties of the localization intervals. Given the value of the parameter an analytical-numerical procedure is deduced to enclose all zeros of a given function with an a priori error.

  3. Complementary and Integrative Health Practices for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, Judy

    2017-12-01

    The current article reviews selected complementary health approaches for the treatment of depressive symptoms. Complementary and integrative health (CIH) focuses on the whole person with the goal of optimal health-body, mind, and spirit. Patient use of integrative health practices and products is increasing; therefore, providers must understand these practices and products and be able to recommend or advise for or against their use based on research and guidelines. Difficulty with the current limitations of research on CIH practices is discussed, as these studies often may not have the same rigor or scientific weight as conventional treatment research. Although some individuals may use certain treatment options alone, such as massage therapy, meditation, and supplements to diet, the article discusses ways to combine CIH with allopathic care. Nurse practitioners should be open to considering complementary practices for health care and knowledgeable to guide patients in making safe health decisions. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(12), 22-33.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Food hygienics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Yeong Gyun; Lee, Gwang Bae; Lee, Han Gi; Kim, Se Yeol

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with food hygienics with eighteen chapters, which mention introduction on purpose of food hygienics, administration of food hygienics, food and microscopic organism, sanitary zoology, food poisoning, food poisoning by poisonous substance, chronic poisoning by microscopic organism, food and epidemic control , control of parasitic disease, milk hygiene meat hygiene, an egg and seafood hygiene, food deterioration and preservation, food additives, food container and field hygiene, food facilities hygiene, food hygiene and environmental pollution and food sanitation inspection.

  5. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Integrative Health NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science ... 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, Info for Patients: Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches Mind and Body ...

  6. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... V W X Y Z The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States Share: On This Page ... Prevention) released new findings on Americans' use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The findings are from the 2007 National ...

  7. Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Home > Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Small Text Medium Text Large Text Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine YESTERDAY The concept that the mind is important ...

  8. Safe Use of Complementary Health Products and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newsletter with evidence-based information on complementary and integrative practices and a health condition All News & Events About ... Safety Information Message From the Director: Complementary and Integrative Health Practices in the Real World (08/05/14) In ...

  9. Nitrogen fixation by groundnut and velvet bean and residual benefit to a subsequent maize crop Fixação de nitrogênio por amendoim e mucuna e benefício residual para uma cultura de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambate Okito

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical fertilisers are rarely avaiable to poor farmers, for whom the nitrogen (N is often the most limiting element for cereal grain production. The objective of this study was to quantify the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea and velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens crops using the 15N natural abundance (delta15N technique and to determine their residual effect and that of a natural fallow, on growth and N accumulation by two rustic maize varieties. The contribution of BNF calculated from delta15N data was 40.9, 59.6 and 30.9 kg ha-1, for groundnut, velvet bean and the natural fallow, respectively. The only legume grain harvested was from the groundnut, which yielded approximately 1.000 kg ha-1. The subsequent maize varieties ("Sol de Manhã" and "Caiana Sobralha" yielded between 1.958 and 2.971 kg ha-1, and were higher after velvet bean for both maize varieties and "Sol da Manhã" groundnut, followed by "Caiana" after groundnut and, finally, the natural fallow. For a small-holder producer the most attractive system is the groundnut followed by maize, as, in this treatment, both groundnut and maize grain harvest are possible. However, a simple N balance calculation indicated that the groundnut-maize sequence would, in the long term, deplete soil N reserves, while the velvet bean-maize sequence would lead to a build up of soil nitrogen.Fertilizantes químicos raramente estão disponíveis aos agricultores com poucos recursos econômicos, e assim o N é, freqüentemente, um elemento mais limitante para a produção de grãos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar a contribuição da fixação biológica de nitrogênio (FBN às culturas de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea e mucuna (Mucuna pruriens, por meio da técnica de abundância natural de 15N e determinar o efeito residual das leguminosas e do pousio sobre o crescimento e acumulação de N em duas variedades de milho. A contribuição da FBN calculada a

  10. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Inappropriate complementary feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months is major cause of under nutrition. There is scarce information on the relationship between complementary feeding practices and nutritional status. This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary ...

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Expanding Horizons of Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is this year celebrating 10 years of ... Photo: NCCAM This year, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) celebrates its 10th anniversary. We explore complementary ...

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nzeagwu, OC. Vol 26, No 1 (2008) - Articles Nutrient Composition, Functional and Organoleptic Properties of Complementary Foods Formulated From Sorghum, Groundnut and Crayfish Abstract · Vol 27, No 2 (2009) - Articles Nutrient composition, physical and sensory properties of fruit juices produced from velvet tamarind ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 210 ... SN Suleiman. Vol 25 (2013), Mineral Retention Values for Blends of Cereal Based Complementary Food in Rats, Abstract PDF ... Vol 23 (2011), Physiochemical Properties and Antinutrient Content of Fermented Popcorn and Groundnut Composite Flours Using Pure Strains, Abstract PDF. AO Ojokoh.

  14. Designing appropriate complementary feeding recommendations: tools for programmatic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelmans, Bernadette; Ferguson, Elaine; Lutter, Chessa K; Singh, Neha; Pachón, Helena; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Woldt, Monica; Mangasaryan, Nuné; Cheung, Edith; Mir, Roger; Pareja, Rossina; Briend, André

    2013-09-01

    Suboptimal complementary feeding practices contribute to a rapid increase in the prevalence of stunting in young children from age 6 months. The design of effective programmes to improve infant and young child feeding requires a sound understanding of the local situation and a systematic process for prioritizing interventions, integrating them into existing delivery platforms and monitoring their implementation and impact. The identification of adequate food-based feeding recommendations that respect locally available foods and address gaps in nutrient availability is particularly challenging. We describe two tools that are now available to strengthen infant and young child-feeding programming at national and subnational levels. ProPAN is a set of research tools that guide users through a step-by-step process for identifying problems related to young child nutrition; defining the context in which these problems occur; formulating, testing, and selecting behaviour-change recommendations and nutritional recipes; developing the interventions to promote them; and designing a monitoring and evaluation system to measure progress towards intervention goals. Optifood is a computer-based platform based on linear programming analysis to develop nutrient-adequate feeding recommendations at lowest cost, based on locally available foods with the addition of fortified products or supplements when needed, or best recommendations when the latter are not available. The tools complement each other and a case study from Peru illustrates how they have been used. The readiness of both instruments will enable partners to invest in capacity development for their use in countries and strengthen programmes to address infant and young child feeding and prevent malnutrition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Complementary and alternative interventions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohee; Bielory, Leonard

    2010-08-01

    The burden of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), is significant and far-reaching. In addition to cost of care and therapies, it affects the quality of life for those affected as well as their caretakers. Complementary and alternative therapies are commonly used because of concerns about potential adverse effects of conventional therapies and frustration with the lack of response to prescribed medications, be it due to the severity of the AD or the lack of appropriate regular use. Despite the promising results reported with various herbal medicines and biologic products, the clinical efficacy of such alternative therapies remains to be determined. Physicians need to be educated about alternative therapies and discuss benefits and potential adverse effects or limitations with patients. A systematic approach and awareness of reputable and easily accessible resources are helpful in dealing with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM interventions is common among individuals with AD. Epidemiologic data have been a motivating drive for better elucidation of the efficacy of CAM interventions for allergic disease. Herbal medicines and biologics for AD treatment and, more recently, prevention comprise a major area of clinical investigation. Potential mechanisms of therapeutic effect elucidated by animal models and human clinical studies implicate modulation of TH2-type allergic inflammation and induction of immune tolerance. Population-based research regarding the use of CAM for allergic diseases underscores the increasing challenge for care providers with respect to identifying CAM use and ensuring safe use of allopathic and complementary medicines in disease management. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Sophia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine is not uncommonly encountered in our patients. This manuscript reviewed the latest evidence on other modalities in treating rheumatic diseases. Treatments that are found to be helpful for rheumatoid arthritis include herbs, fish oil, and acupuncture. Fish oil, vitamin D, N-acetylcysteine, and cognitive behavior treatments are helpful for systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydrotherapy and massage are potentially beneficial for fibromyalgia patients. Diet supplement is not found to be beneficial for osteoarthritis. CAM modalities will need further studies.

  18. Food claims and nutrition facts of commercial infant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yu-Chin; Chang, Jung-Su; Chen, Yi Chun

    2018-01-01

    Composition claim, nutrition claim and health claim are often found on the commercial complementary food packaging. The introduction of complementary foods (CFs) to infants is a turning point in the development of their eating behavior, and their commercial use for Taiwanese infants is growing. In Taiwan, lots of the advertisements for CFs employed health or nutrition claims to promote the products, but the actual nutritional content of these CFs is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the food claims of commercial complementary food products with their actual nutrition facts. A sample of 363 commercial CFs was collected from websites, local supermarkets, and other food stores, and their nutrition-related claims were classified into composition, nutrition, and health categories. Although the World Health Organization recommends that infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months, 48.2% of the commercial CFs were targeted at infants younger than 6 months. Therefore, marketing regulations should be implemented to curb early weaning as a result of products targeted at infants younger than 6 months. More than 50% of Taiwanese commercial CFs have high sugar content and more than 20% were high in sodium. Products with health claims, such as "provides good nutrition to children" or "improves appetite," have higher sodium or sugar content than do those without such claims. Moreover, products with calcium or iron content claims did not contain more calcium or iron than products without such claims. Additionally, a significantly greater proportion of the products with "no added sugar" claims were classified as having high sugar content as compared to those without such claims. Parents cannot choose the healthiest food products for their children by simply focusing on food claims. Government should regulate the labeling of nutrition facts and food claims for foods targeted at infants younger than 12 months.

  19. Compressed sensing MRI exploiting complementary dual decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2014-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) MRI exploits the sparsity of an image in a transform domain to reconstruct the image from incoherently under-sampled k-space data. However, it has been shown that CS suffers particularly from loss of low-contrast image features with increasing reduction factors. To retain image details in such degraded experimental conditions, in this work we introduce a novel CS reconstruction method exploiting feature-based complementary dual decomposition with joint estimation of local scale mixture (LSM) model and images. Images are decomposed into dual block sparse components: total variation for piecewise smooth parts and wavelets for residuals. The LSM model parameters of residuals in the wavelet domain are estimated and then employed as a regional constraint in spatially adaptive reconstruction of high frequency subbands to restore image details missing in piecewise smooth parts. Alternating minimization of the dual image components subject to data consistency is performed to extract image details from residuals and add them back to their complementary counterparts while the LSM model parameters and images are jointly estimated in a sequential fashion. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method in preserving low-contrast image features even at high reduction factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, Claudia; Agostinetto, Elisa; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    The role of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatments in oncology has always been heavily debated. It is estimated that about half of cancer patients experience at least one form of CAM through their life and because of the growing spread of these on the internet, the proportion is destined to grow. There is no clear distinction between alternative and complementary treatment due to the possibility to use the same remedy both alongside and instead of traditional therapies. The use of CAM may expose the patients to a wide spectrum of risks that may range from under treatment due to the delay in using official medicine treatment, to toxicities derived both as a direct consequence of the alternative molecule or because of drug interaction with conventional treatments. Because of the uncertainty regarding the risk-benefit ratio and the fact that the patients often do not declare their use if no specifically requested, this topic is relevant for physicians. Aim of this review is to cover the preeminent CAM, their supposed benefits, toxicities and interactions with conventional therapeutic agents.