WorldWideScience

Sample records for grounded empirically tested

  1. Empirical Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    This document includes the empirical specification on the IEA task of evaluation building energy simulation computer programs for the Double Skin Facades (DSF) constructions. There are two approaches involved into this procedure, one is the comparative approach and another is the empirical one. I....... In the comparative approach the outcomes of different software tools are compared, while in the empirical approach the modelling results are compared with the results of experimental test cases....

  2. Empirically Testing Thematic Analysis (ETTA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkier Gildberg, Frederik; Bradley, Stephen; Tingleff, Ellen Boldrup

    2015-01-01

    Text analysis is not a question of a right or wrong way to go about it, but a question of different traditions. These tend to not only give answers to how to conduct an analysis, but also to provide the answer as to why it is conducted in the way that it is. The problem however may be that the link...... between tradition and tool is unclear. The main objective of this article is therefore to present Empirical Testing Thematic Analysis, a step by step approach to thematic text analysis; discussing strengths and weaknesses, so that others might assess its potential as an approach that they might utilize....../develop for themselves. The advantage of utilizing the presented analytic approach is argued to be the integral empirical testing, which should assure systematic development, interpretation and analysis of the source textual material....

  3. Final Empirical Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    This document includes the empirical specification on the IEA task of evaluation building energy simulation computer programs for the Double Skin Facades (DSF) constructions. There are two approaches involved into this procedure, one is the comparative approach and another is the empirical one....

  4. An Empirically Grounded Model of the Adoption of Intellectual Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    1992-01-01

    Data on adoption of 43 user-developed computing applications in 3 large corporations were analyzed to develop an empirically grounded model of the adoption process for intellectual technologies. A five-stage model consisting of Resource Acquisition, Application Development, Adoption/Renewal, Routinization/Enhancement, and External Adoption was…

  5. Hybrid-Empirical Ground Motion Estimations for Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsereteli Nino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground motion prediction equations are essential for several purposes ranging from seismic design and analysis to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. In seismically active regions without sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models, hybrid models become vital. Georgia does not have sufficiently strong ground motion data to build empirical models. In this study, we have applied the host-to-target method in two regions in Georgia with different source mechanisms. According to the tectonic regime of the target areas, two different regions are chosen as host regions. One of them is in Turkey with the dominant strike-slip source mechanism, while the other is in Iran with the prevalence of reverse-mechanism events. We performed stochastic finite-fault simulations in both host and target areas and employed the hybrid-empirical method as introduced in Campbell (2003. An initial set of hybrid empirical ground motion estimates is obtained for PGA and SA at selected periods for Georgia.

  6. Grounding Concepts An Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, C S

    2008-01-01

    Grounding Concepts tackles the issue of arithmetical knowledge, developing a new position which respects three intuitions which have appeared impossible to satisfy simultaneously: a priorism, mind-independence realism, and empiricism.Drawing on a wide range of philosophical influences, but avoiding unnecessary technicality, a view is developed whereby arithmetic can be known through the examination of empirically grounded concepts. These are concepts which, owing to their relationship to sensory input, are non-accidentally accurate representations of the mind-independent world. Examination of

  7. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Andy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nelson, Austin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chebahtah, Justin [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Wang, Trudie [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); McCarty, Michael [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  8. 49 CFR 234.249 - Ground tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ground tests. 234.249 Section 234.249 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION..., Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.249 Ground tests. A test for grounds on each energy...

  9. 49 CFR 236.107 - Ground tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ground tests. 236.107 Section 236.107...: All Systems Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.107 Ground tests. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a test for grounds on each energy bus furnishing power to circuits,...

  10. 2011 Ground Testing Highlights Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.; Buchholz, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Two tests supporting development of the launch abort system for the Orion MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle were run in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnel last year. The first test used a fully metric model to examine the stability and controllability of the Launch Abort Vehicle during potential abort scenarios for Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2.5. The aerodynamic effects of the Abort Motor and Attitude Control Motor plumes were simulated using high-pressure air flowing through independent paths. The aerodynamic effects of the proximity to the launch vehicle during the early moments of an abort were simulated with a remotely actuated Service Module that allowed the position relative to the Crew Module to be varied appropriately. The second test simulated the acoustic environment around the Launch Abort Vehicle caused by the plumes from the 400,000-pound thrust, solid-fueled Abort Motor. To obtain the proper acoustic characteristics of the hot rocket plumes for the flight vehicle, heated Helium was used. A custom Helium supply system was developed for the test consisting of 2 jumbo high-pressure Helium trailers, a twelve-tube accumulator, and a 13MW gas-fired heater borrowed from the Propulsion Simulation Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test provided fluctuating surface pressure measurements at over 200 points on the vehicle surface that have now been used to define the ground-testing requirements for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle.

  11. Science of empirical design in mining ground control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Many problems in rock engineering are limited by our imperfect knowledge of the material properties and failure mechanics of rock masses. Mining problems are somewhat unique, however, in that plenty of real world experience is generally available and can be turned into valuable experimental data. Every pillar that is developed, or stope that is mined, represents a full-scale test of a rock mechanics design. By harvesting these data, and then using the appropriate statistical techniques to interpret them, mining engineers have developed powerful design techniques that are widely used around the world. Successful empirical methods are readily accepted because they are simple, transparent, practical, and firmly tethered to reality. The author has been intimately associated with empirical design for his entire career, but his previous publications have described the application of individual techniques to specific problems. The focus of this paper is the process used to develop a successful empirical method. A six-stage process is described:identification of the problem, and of the end users of the final product;devel-opment of a conceptual rock mechanics model, and identification of the key parameters in that model;identification of measures for each of the key parameters, and the development of new measures (such as rating scales) where necessary;data sources and data collection;statistical analysis;and packaging of the final product. Each of these stages has its own potential rewards and pitfalls, which will be illustrated by incidents from the author’s own experience. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide a new and deeper appreciation for empirical techniques, as well as some guidelines and opportunities for future developers.

  12. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  13. An empirically grounded framework to guide blogging for digital scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailey Minocha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This research project investigated how openness and sharing of knowledge are manifested through scholarly blogging. We aimed to identify the academics’ and researchers’ motivations for starting a blog; the contribution of blogging to their personal and professional development; and any challenges. Twenty-six participants were recruited. A pre-interview questionnaire was first emailed to the participants to collect background information. An initial unstructured interview was conducted by email, followed by a synchronous semi-structured interview. Textual and visual extracts of blog content were also collected. The datasets were analysed using different techniques. The findings revealed varied reasons for blogging. Some academics/researchers began a blog for its accessibility to self and others. Blogging aided the academics’ and researchers’ personal and professional development in several ways. Bloggers can quickly reach a wider audience compared to other forms of academic publishing. Among the challenges, there were concerns over validity of online content. Based on previous scholarship models and on our findings, we have derived an empirically grounded framework of blog use in academia and research. The framework describes how characteristics of digital scholarship such as openness and sharing are manifested through blogging. The framework can be used to guide academics and researchers who are interested in taking up blogging as a scholarly practice.

  14. An Empirical Study of Atmospheric Correction Procedures for Regional Infrasound Amplitudes with Ground Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    This study focusses on improving methods of accounting for atmospheric effects on infrasound amplitudes observed on arrays at regional distances in the southwestern United States. Recordings at ranges of 150 to nearly 300 km from a repeating ground truth source of small HE explosions are used. The explosions range in actual weight from approximately 2000-4000 lbs. and are detonated year-round which provides signals for a wide range of atmospheric conditions. Three methods of correcting the observed amplitudes for atmospheric effects are investigated with the data set. The first corrects amplitudes for upper stratospheric wind as developed by Mutschlecner and Whitaker (1999) and uses the average wind speed between 45-55 km altitudes in the direction of propagation to derive an empirical correction formula. This approach was developed using large chemical and nuclear explosions and is tested with the smaller explosions for which shorter wavelengths cause the energy to be scattered by the smaller scale structure of the atmosphere. The second approach isa semi-empirical method using ray tracing to determine wind speed at ray turning heights where the wind estimates replace the wind values in the existing formula. Finally, parabolic equation (PE) modeling is used to predict the amplitudes at the arrays at 1 Hz. The PE amplitudes are compared to the observed amplitudes with a narrow band filter centered at 1 Hz. An analysis is performed of the conditions under which the empirical and semi-empirical methods fail and full wave methods must be used.

  15. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China's autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approach, the test content is designed to be stage by stage, moving from simplicity to complexity and from individual modules to the entire vehicle. The hierarchical test environment is established according to the levels of test content. The test method based on multilevel platforms and sensors is put forward to ensure the accuracy of test results. A fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method combined with analytic hierarchy process (AHP is used for the comprehensive evaluation which can quantitatively evaluate the individual module and the overall technical performance of autonomous ground vehicles. The proposed test and evaluation system has been successfully applied to real autonomous ground vehicle competitions.

  16. Near fault broadband ground motion simulation with empirical Green's functions: the Upper Rhine Graben case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, Sergio; Hok, Sébastian; Causse, Mathieu; Festa, Gaetano; Lancieri, Maria

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental stage in seismic hazard assessment is the prediction of realistic ground motion for potential future earthquakes. To do so, one of the steps is to make an estimation of the expected ground motion level and this is commonly done by the use of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Nevertheless GMPEs do not represent the whole variety of source processes and this can lead to incorrect estimates for some specific case studies, such as in the near-fault range because of the lack of records of large earthquakes at short distances. In such cases, ground motion simulations can be a valid tool to complement prediction equations for scenario studies, provided that both source and propagation are accurately described and uncertainties properly addressed. Such simulations, usually referred to as "blind", require the generation of a population of ground motion records that represent the natural variability of the source process for the target earthquake scenario. In this study we performed simulations using the empirical Green's function technique, which consists in using records of small earthquakes as the medium transfer function provided the availability of small earthquakes located close to the target fault and recorded at the target site. The main advantage of this technique is that it does not require a detailed knowledge of the propagation medium, which is not always possible, but requires availability of high quality records of small earthquakes in the target area. We couple this empirical approach with a k-2 kinematic source model, which naturally let us to introduce high frequency in the source description. Here we present an application of our technique to the Upper Rhine Graben. This is an active seismic region with a moderate rate of seismicity and for which it is interesting to provide ground motion estimation in the vicinity of the faults to be compared with estimations traditionally provided by GMPEs in a seismic hazard evaluation study. We

  17. Regionally Adaptable Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) from Empirical Models of Fourier and Duration of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter; Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The current practice of deriving empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) involves using ground motions recorded at multiple sites. However, in applications like site-specific (e.g., critical facility) hazard ground motions obtained from the GMPEs are need to be adjusted/corrected to a particular site/site-condition under investigation. This study presents a complete framework for developing a response spectral GMPE, within which the issue of adjustment of ground motions is addressed in a manner consistent with the linear system framework. The present approach is a two-step process in which the first step consists of deriving two separate empirical models, one for Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) and the other for a random vibration theory (RVT) optimized duration (Drvto) of ground motion. In the second step the two models are combined within the RVT framework to obtain full response spectral amplitudes. Additionally, the framework also involves a stochastic model based extrapolation of individual Fourier spectra to extend the useable frequency limit of the empirically derived FAS model. The stochastic model parameters were determined by inverting the Fourier spectral data using an approach similar to the one as described in Edwards and Faeh (2013). Comparison of median predicted response spectra from present approach with those from other regional GMPEs indicates that the present approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  18. Advanced Testing Method for Ground Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Clemenzi, Rick [Geothermal Design Center Inc.; Liu, Su [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2017-04-01

    A new method is developed that can quickly and more accurately determine the effective ground thermal conductivity (GTC) based on thermal response test (TRT) results. Ground thermal conductivity is an important parameter for sizing ground heat exchangers (GHEXs) used by geothermal heat pump systems. The conventional GTC test method usually requires a TRT for 48 hours with a very stable electric power supply throughout the entire test. In contrast, the new method reduces the required test time by 40%–60% or more, and it can determine GTC even with an unstable or intermittent power supply. Consequently, it can significantly reduce the cost of GTC testing and increase its use, which will enable optimal design of geothermal heat pump systems. Further, this new method provides more information about the thermal properties of the GHEX and the ground than previous techniques. It can verify the installation quality of GHEXs and has the potential, if developed, to characterize the heterogeneous thermal properties of the ground formation surrounding the GHEXs.

  19. The Factor Content of Bilateral Trade: An Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Krishna, Pravin

    2004-01-01

    The factor proportions model of international trade is one of the most influential theories in international economics. Its central standing in this field has appropriately prompted, particularly recently, intense empirical scrutiny. A substantial and growing body of empirical work has tested the predictions of the theory on the net factor content…

  20. Stewardship and risk: An empirically grounded theory of organic fish farming in Scotland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Georgakopoulos; P. Ciancanelli; A. Coulson; P.E. Kaldis

    2008-01-01

    It has long been assumed ownership gives farmers incentives to act as stewards of the land. On this basis, quasi-property rights are granted to fish farmers to encourage them to manage risks to the aquatic environment. This paper offers an empirically grounded theorisation of fish farmers’ perspecti

  1. Coping with the Stigma of Mental Illness: Empirically-Grounded Hypotheses from Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Amy; Har, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    This research demonstrates how affect control theory and its computer program, "Interact", can be used to develop empirically-grounded hypotheses regarding the connection between cultural labels and behaviors. Our demonstration focuses on propositions in the modified labeling theory of mental illness. According to the MLT, negative societal…

  2. Coping with the Stigma of Mental Illness: Empirically-Grounded Hypotheses from Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Amy; Har, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    This research demonstrates how affect control theory and its computer program, "Interact", can be used to develop empirically-grounded hypotheses regarding the connection between cultural labels and behaviors. Our demonstration focuses on propositions in the modified labeling theory of mental illness. According to the MLT, negative societal…

  3. Ground test for vibration control demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C.; Prodigue, J.; Broux, G.; Cantinaud, O.; Poussot-Vassal, C.

    2016-09-01

    In the objective of maximizing comfort in Falcon jets, Dassault Aviation is developing an innovative vibration control technology. Vibrations of the structure are measured at several locations and sent to a dedicated high performance vibration control computer. Control laws are implemented in this computer to analyse the vibrations in real time, and then elaborate orders sent to the existing control surfaces to counteract vibrations. After detailing the technology principles, this paper focuses on the vibration control ground demonstration that was performed by Dassault Aviation in May 2015 on Falcon 7X business jet. The goal of this test was to attenuate vibrations resulting from fixed forced excitation delivered by shakers. The ground test demonstrated the capability to implement an efficient closed-loop vibration control with a significant vibration level reduction and validated the vibration control law design methodology. This successful ground test was a prerequisite before the flight test demonstration that is now being prepared. This study has been partly supported by the JTI CleanSky SFWA-ITD.

  4. Empirical Evaluation of Directional-Dependence Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Testing of directional dependence is a method to infer causal direction that recently has attracted some attention. Previous examples by e.g. von Eye and DeShon (2012a) and extensive simulation studies by Pornprasertmanit and Little (2012) have demonstrated that under specific assumptions, directional-dependence tests can recover the true causal…

  5. Empirical Measurement of the Software Testing and Reliability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Feng-zhong; Xu Ren-zuo

    2004-01-01

    The meanings of parameters of software reliability models are investigated in terms of the process of the software testing and in terms of other measurements of software. Based on the investigation, the empirical estimation of the parameters is addressed. On one hand, these empirical estimates are also measurements of the software, which can be used to control and to optimize the process of the software development. On the other hand, by treating these empirical estimates as Bayes priors, software reliability models are extended such that the engineers' experience can be integrated into and hence to improve the models.

  6. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  7. Solar wind driven empirical forecast models of the time derivative of the ground magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintoft Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical models are developed to provide 10–30-min forecasts of the magnitude of the time derivative of local horizontal ground geomagnetic field (|dBh/dt| over Europe. The models are driven by ACE solar wind data. A major part of the work has been devoted to the search and selection of datasets to support the model development. To simplify the problem, but at the same time capture sudden changes, 30-min maximum values of |dBh/dt| are forecast with a cadence of 1 min. Models are tested both with and without the use of ACE SWEPAM plasma data. It is shown that the models generally capture sudden increases in |dBh/dt| that are associated with sudden impulses (SI. The SI is the dominant disturbance source for geomagnetic latitudes below 50° N and with minor contribution from substorms. However, at occasions, large disturbances can be seen associated with geomagnetic pulsations. For higher latitudes longer lasting disturbances, associated with substorms, are generally also captured. It is also shown that the models using only solar wind magnetic field as input perform in most cases equally well as models with plasma data. The models have been verified using different approaches including the extremal dependence index which is suitable for rare events.

  8. The discovered preference hypothesis - an empirical test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Using stated preference methods for valuation of non-market goods is known to be vulnerable to a range of biases. Some authors claim that these so-called anomalies in effect render the methods useless for the purpose. However, the Discovered Preference Hypothesis, as put forth by Plott [31], offers...... an nterpretation and explanation of biases which entails that the stated preference methods need not to be completely written off. In this paper we conduct a test for the validity and relevance of the DPH interpretation of biases. In a choice experiment concerning preferences for protection of Danish nature areas...... from new motorway development, we find that respondent preferences are susceptible to starting point bias. In particular, our results show that the bias is gender-specific as only female respondents are significantly biased. Importantly, we find that the impact of the starting point bias decays...

  9. The discovered preference hypothesis - an empirical test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    an nterpretation and explanation of biases which entails that the stated preference methods need not to be completely written off. In this paper we conduct a test for the validity and relevance of the DPH interpretation of biases. In a choice experiment concerning preferences for protection of Danish nature areas...... from new motorway development, we find that respondent preferences are susceptible to starting point bias. In particular, our results show that the bias is gender-specific as only female respondents are significantly biased. Importantly, we find that the impact of the starting point bias decays......Using stated preference methods for valuation of non-market goods is known to be vulnerable to a range of biases. Some authors claim that these so-called anomalies in effect render the methods useless for the purpose. However, the Discovered Preference Hypothesis, as put forth by Plott [31], offers...

  10. Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Models of Innovation Diffusion: A Critical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Innovation diffusion has been studied extensively in a variety of disciplines, including sociology, economics, marketing, ecology, and computer science. Traditional literature on innovation diffusion has been dominated by models of aggregate behavior and trends. However, the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm is gaining popularity as it captures agent heterogeneity and enables fine-grained modeling of interactions mediated by social and geographic networks. While most ABM work on innovation diffusion is theoretical, empirically grounded models are increasingly important, particularly in guiding policy decisions. We present a critical review of empirically grounded agent-based models of innovation diffusion, developing a categorization of this research based on types of agent models as well as applications. By connecting the modeling methodologies in the fields of information and innovation diffusion, we suggest that the maximum likelihood estimation framework widely used in the former is a promising paradigm...

  11. Empirical testing of criteria for dissociative schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferrière-Simard, Marie-Christine; Lecomte, Tania; Ahoundova, Lola

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the validity of dissociative schizophrenia diagnostic criteria. In the first phase, 50 participants with a psychotic disorder were administered the Dissociative Experiences Scale and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire to identify those with dissociative characteristics. In the second phase, we selected those who had a score of 15 or above on the Dissociative Experiences Scale. Fifteen of these participants were evaluated thoroughly with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II, and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders to determine whether they met the criteria for dissociative schizophrenia and to generate a clinical description. Our results indicated that 24% of the individuals we tested met these criteria. We propose making mandatory 1 of the 3 dissociative symptoms of the criteria to eliminate people with only nonspecific symptoms (e.g., extensive comorbidity). According to this modified criterion, 14% of our sample would receive a diagnosis of dissociative schizophrenia. However, a more comprehensive look at the clinical picture begs the question of whether dissociative schizophrenia is truly present in every person meeting the criteria. We discuss the relevance of creating a new schizophrenia subtype and offer recommendations for clinicians.

  12. Empirical initialization of the trait estimator in adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Wim J.

    1999-01-01

    A procedure for empirical initialization of the trait. estimator in adaptive testing is proposed that is based on the statistical relation between and background variables known prior to test administration. The relation is modeled using a two-parameter version of a logistic item response theory m

  13. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Ground Test History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold P.

    2014-01-01

    -ups in May-June 1966 with 30.75 minutes accumulative operating time at or above 1GW. The NRX-A6 was tested in December 1969 and ran for 62 minutes at 1100 MW. Each engine had post-test examination and found various structure anomalies which were identified for correction and the fuel element corrosion rate was reduced. The Phoebus series of research reactors began testing at test cell C, in June 1965 with Phoebus 1A. Phoebus 1A operated for 10.5 minutes at 1100 MW before unexpected loss of propellant and leading to an engine breakdown. Phoebus 1B ran for 30 minutes in February of 1967. Phoebus 2A was the highest steady state reactor built at 5GW. Phoebus 2A ran for 12 minutes at 4100 MW demonstrating sufficient power is available. The Peewee test bed reactor was tested November- December 1968 in test cell C for 40 minutes at 500MW with overall performance close to pre-run predictions. The XE' engine was the only engine tested with close to a flight configuration and fired downward into a diffuser at the Engine Test Stand (ETS) in 1969. The XE' was 1100 MW and had 28 start-ups. The nuclear furnace NF-1 was operated at 44 MW with multiple test runs at 90 minutes in the summer of 1972. The NF-1 was the last NTP reactor tested. The Rover/NERVA program was cancelled in 1973. However, before cancellation, a lot of other engineering work was conducted by Aerojet on a 75, 000 lbf prototype flight engine and by Los Alamos on a 16,000 lbf "Small Engine" nuclear rocket design. The ground test history of NTP at the NRDS also offers many lessons learned on how best to setup, operate, emergency shutdown, and post-test examine NTP engines. The reactor and engine maintenance and disassembly facilities were used for assembly and inspection of radioactive engines after testing. Most reactor/ engines were run at test cell A or test cell C with open air exhaust. The Rover/NERVA program became aware of a new environmental regulation that would restrict the amount of radioactive particulates

  14. "Emergence" vs. "Forcing" of Empirical Data? A Crucial Problem of "Grounded Theory" Reconsidered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Kelle

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960s Barney GLASER and Anselm STRAUSS, developers of the methodology of "Grounded Theory" have made several attempts to explicate, clarify and reconceptualise some of the basic tenets of their methodological approach. Diverging concepts and understandings of Grounded Theory have arisen from these attempts which have led to a split between its founders. Much of the explication and reworking of Grounded Theory surrounds the relation between data and theory and the role of previous theoretical assumptions. The book which initially established the popularity of GLASER's and STRAUSS' methodological ideas, "The Discovery of Grounded Theory", contains two conflicting understandings of the relation between data and theory—the concept of "emergence" on the one hand and the concept of "theoretical sensitivity" on the other hand. Much of the later developments of Grounded Theory can be seen as attempts to reconcile these prima facie diverging concepts. Thereby GLASER recommends to draw on a variety of "coding families" while STRAUSS proposes the use of a general theory of action to build an axis for an emerging theory. This paper first summarises the most important developments within "Grounded Theory" concerning the understanding of the relation between empirical data and theoretical statements. Thereby special emphasis will be laid on differences between GLASER's and STRAUSS' concepts and on GLASER's current critique that the concepts of "coding paradigm" and "axial coding" described by STRAUSS and Juliet CORBIN lead to the "forcing" of data. It will be argued that GLASER's critique points out some existing weaknesses of STRAUSS' concepts but vastly exaggerates the risks of the STRAUSSian approach. A main argument of this paper is that basic problems of empirically grounded theory construction can be treated much more effectively if one draws on certain results of contemporary philosophical and epistemological discussions and on widely

  15. Learning-Testing Process in Classroom: An Empirical Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Rodolphe

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical micro-simulation model of the teaching and the testing process in the classroom (Programs and sample data are available--the actual names of pupils have been hidden). It is a non-econometric micro-simulation model describing informational behaviors of the pupils, based on the observation of the pupils'…

  16. The empirical foundations of psychoanalytic approaches to psychological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L S

    1990-01-01

    The view that psychoanalytic approaches to psychological testing lack empirical foundations is disputed by systematically examining the ways in which psychoanalytic theory expands the sources of data available to the psychological tester at each step in the assessment process. The contention is made that it is unscientific to restrict the concept of what constitutes scientific rigor to formal experimentation with statistical analysis.

  17. Empirical testing of forecast update procedure forseasonal products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chee Yew; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    of a toy supply chain. The theoretical simulation involves historical weekly consumer demand data for 122 toy products. The empirical test is then carried out in real-time with 291 toy products. The results show that the proposed forecast updating procedure: 1) reduced forecast errors of the annual...

  18. Design of primary ground support during roadway development using empirical databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ry Stone⇑

    2016-01-01

    There have been many design practices utilised within the coal mining industry to arrive at the minimum densities of primary ground support required during roadway development. This paper demonstrates the practical use of empirical databases, and focuses on the main drivers for ground support as demonstrated in conceptual models. Golder Associates’ empirical databases used for ground support include a primary roof support database and a primary rib support database. Both are based on successful ground support designs installed in mines in Australia, the US, the UK, South Africa, New Zealand, and Europe. The term‘successful”refers to those designs that were used on a repeated basis for the purpose of roadway devel-opment. The primary roof support database indicates that the major factors influencing successful roof support designs are roof competency, expressed as the coal mine roof rating (CMRR), and in situ stress. In regard to the primary rib support database, it is evident from the current database that the primary factors affecting the capacity of rib support required for a successful design are roadway height and depth of cover. These databases have been used to help determine the minimum primary ground support designs required at many mine sites in Australasia, Europe, and the US. This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of these databases at two selected mines in Australia and the US. In order to improve the primary rib support database, this paper will also propose a new rib deformation rating based on the addition of site specific coal strength data for the Australian mines. The proposed rat-ing attempts to capture the main variables that define the behaviour of a buckling column.

  19. Strong Ground Motion Evaluation for an Active Fault System by the Empirical Green Function Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, In Kil; Choun, Young Sun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Shiba, Yoshiaki; Ohtori, Yasuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    In an area with a high seismic activity, a design earthquake ground motion is generally determined empirically by investigating the historical records concerning damaging events. But it is difficult in Korea to obtain such seismic records that reflect the local characteristics because of the low seismic activity. A geological survey on the active faults near the sites of nuclear power plants has been carried out recently, and the segmentation, slip rate and the latest activity of the fault system are partly revealed. It will be significant for the advanced seismic design of nuclear facilities to utilize the information derived from these geological investigations and evaluate the strong ground motions. In this study, the empirical Green's function method (EFGM) was used to simulate strong ground motions from an active fault system in Korea. The source models are assumed by using the information obtained from the geological survey and the trench investigation on the fault system. Finally, the applicability of this approach to Korea was estimated.

  20. Empirical models for the prediction of ground motion duration for intraplate earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Neaz Sheikh, M.; Bajaj, Ketan; Mariya Dayana, P. J.; Madhura, H.; Reddy, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    Many empirical relationships for the earthquake ground motion duration were developed for interplate region, whereas only a very limited number of empirical relationships exist for intraplate region. Also, the existing relationships were developed based mostly on the scaled recorded interplate earthquakes to represent intraplate earthquakes. To the author's knowledge, none of the existing relationships for the intraplate regions were developed using only the data from intraplate regions. Therefore, an attempt is made in this study to develop empirical predictive relationships of earthquake ground motion duration (i.e., significant and bracketed) with earthquake magnitude, hypocentral distance, and site conditions (i.e., rock and soil sites) using the data compiled from intraplate regions of Canada, Australia, Peninsular India, and the central and southern parts of the USA. The compiled earthquake ground motion data consists of 600 records with moment magnitudes ranging from 3.0 to 6.5 and hypocentral distances ranging from 4 to 1000 km. The non-linear mixed-effect (NLMEs) and logistic regression techniques (to account for zero duration) were used to fit predictive models to the duration data. The bracketed duration was found to be decreased with an increase in the hypocentral distance and increased with an increase in the magnitude of the earthquake. The significant duration was found to be increased with the increase in the magnitude and hypocentral distance of the earthquake. Both significant and bracketed durations were predicted higher in rock sites than in soil sites. The predictive relationships developed herein are compared with the existing relationships for interplate and intraplate regions. The developed relationship for bracketed duration predicts lower durations for rock and soil sites. However, the developed relationship for a significant duration predicts lower durations up to a certain distance and thereafter predicts higher durations compared to the

  1. Empirical models for the prediction of ground motion duration for intraplate earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Neaz Sheikh, M.; Bajaj, Ketan; Mariya Dayana, P. J.; Madhura, H.; Reddy, G. R.

    2017-07-01

    Many empirical relationships for the earthquake ground motion duration were developed for interplate region, whereas only a very limited number of empirical relationships exist for intraplate region. Also, the existing relationships were developed based mostly on the scaled recorded interplate earthquakes to represent intraplate earthquakes. To the author's knowledge, none of the existing relationships for the intraplate regions were developed using only the data from intraplate regions. Therefore, an attempt is made in this study to develop empirical predictive relationships of earthquake ground motion duration (i.e., significant and bracketed) with earthquake magnitude, hypocentral distance, and site conditions (i.e., rock and soil sites) using the data compiled from intraplate regions of Canada, Australia, Peninsular India, and the central and southern parts of the USA. The compiled earthquake ground motion data consists of 600 records with moment magnitudes ranging from 3.0 to 6.5 and hypocentral distances ranging from 4 to 1000 km. The non-linear mixed-effect (NLMEs) and logistic regression techniques (to account for zero duration) were used to fit predictive models to the duration data. The bracketed duration was found to be decreased with an increase in the hypocentral distance and increased with an increase in the magnitude of the earthquake. The significant duration was found to be increased with the increase in the magnitude and hypocentral distance of the earthquake. Both significant and bracketed durations were predicted higher in rock sites than in soil sites. The predictive relationships developed herein are compared with the existing relationships for interplate and intraplate regions. The developed relationship for bracketed duration predicts lower durations for rock and soil sites. However, the developed relationship for a significant duration predicts lower durations up to a certain distance and thereafter predicts higher durations compared to the

  2. Context, Experience, Expectation, and Action—Towards an Empirically Grounded, General Model for Analyzing Biographical Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig Reiter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a general, empirically grounded model for analyzing biographical uncertainty. The model is based on findings from a qualitative-explorative study of transforming meanings of unemployment among young people in post-Soviet Lithuania. In a first step, the particular features of the uncertainty puzzle in post-communist youth transitions are briefly discussed. A historical event like the collapse of state socialism in Europe, similar to the recent financial and economic crisis, is a generator of uncertainty par excellence: it undermines the foundations of societies and the taken-for-grantedness of related expectations. Against this background, the case of a young woman and how she responds to the novel threat of unemployment in the transition to the world of work is introduced. Her uncertainty management in the specific time perspective of certainty production is then conceptually rephrased by distinguishing three types or levels of biographical uncertainty: knowledge, outcome, and recognition uncertainty. Biographical uncertainty, it is argued, is empirically observable through the analysis of acting and projecting at the biographical level. The final part synthesizes the empirical findings and the conceptual discussion into a stratification model of biographical uncertainty as a general tool for the biographical analysis of uncertainty phenomena. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100120

  3. The efficient market hypothesis: problems with interpretations of empirical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Alajbeg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite many “refutations” in empirical tests, the efficient market hypothesis (EMH remains the central concept of financial economics. The EMH’s resistance to the results of empirical testing emerges from the fact that the EMH is not a falsifiable theory. Its axiomatic definition shows how asset prices would behave under assumed conditions. Testing for this price behavior does not make much sense as the conditions in the financial markets are much more complex than the simplified conditions of perfect competition, zero transaction costs and free information used in the formulation of the EMH. Some recent developments within the tradition of the adaptive market hypothesis are promising regarding development of a falsifiable theory of price formation in financial markets, but are far from giving assurance that we are approaching a new formulation. The most that can be done in the meantime is to be very cautious while interpreting the empirical evidence that is presented as “testing” the EMH.

  4. Empirical likelihood ratio tests for multivariate regression models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jianhong; ZHU Lixing

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes some diagnostic tools for checking the adequacy of multivariate regression models including classical regression and time series autoregression. In statistical inference, the empirical likelihood ratio method has been well known to be a powerful tool for constructing test and confidence region. For model checking, however, the naive empirical likelihood (EL) based tests are not of Wilks' phenomenon. Hence, we make use of bias correction to construct the EL-based score tests and derive a nonparametric version of Wilks' theorem. Moreover, by the advantages of both the EL and score test method, the EL-based score tests share many desirable features as follows: They are self-scale invariant and can detect the alternatives that converge to the null at rate n-1/2, the possibly fastest rate for lack-of-fit testing; they involve weight functions, which provides us with the flexibility to choose scores for improving power performance, especially under directional alternatives. Furthermore, when the alternatives are not directional, we construct asymptotically distribution-free maximin tests for a large class of possible alternatives. A simulation study is carried out and an application for a real dataset is analyzed.

  5. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  6. Testing the gravity p-median model empirically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Carling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the location of a facility, the presumption in the widely used p-median model is that the customer opts for the shortest route to the nearest facility. However, this assumption is problematic on free markets since the customer is presumed to gravitate to a facility by the distance to and the attractiveness of it. The recently introduced gravity p-median model offers an extension to the p-median model that account for this. The model is therefore potentially interesting, although it has not yet been implemented and tested empirically. In this paper, we have implemented the model in an empirical problem of locating vehicle inspections, locksmiths, and retail stores of vehicle spare-parts for the purpose of investigating its superiority to the p-median model. We found, however, the gravity p-median model to be of limited use for the problem of locating facilities as it either gives solutions similar to the p-median model, or it gives unstable solutions due to a non-concave objective function.

  7. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-08-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal-offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal-offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted.

  8. An empirical method of RH correction for satellite estimation of ground-level PM concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifeng; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Liu, Yang; Hu, Xuefei; Tao, Minghui

    2014-10-01

    A hygroscopic growth model suitable for local aerosol characteristics and their temporal variations is necessary for accurate satellite retrieval of ground-level particulate matters (PM). This study develops an empirical method to correct the relative humidity (RH) impact on aerosol extinction coefficient and to further derive PM concentrations from satellite observations. Not relying on detailed information of aerosol chemical and microphysical properties, this method simply uses the in-situ observations of visibility (VIS), RH and PM concentrations to characterize aerosol hygroscopicity, and thus makes the RH correction capable of supporting the satellite PM estimations with large spatial and temporal coverage. In this method, the aerosol average mass extinction efficiency (αext) is used to describe the general hygroscopic growth behaviors of the total aerosol populations. The association between αext and RH is obtained through empirical model fitting, and is then applied to carry out RH correction. Nearly one year of in-situ measurements of VIS, RH and PM10 in Beijing urban area are collected for this study and RH correction is made for each of the months with sufficient data samples. The correlations between aerosol extinction coefficients and PM10 concentrations are significantly improved, with the monthly correlation R2 increasing from 0.26-0.63 to 0.49-0.82, as well as the whole dataset's R2 increasing from 0.36 to 0.68. PM10 concentrations are retrieved through RH correction and validated for each season individually. Good agreements between the retrieved and observed PM10 concentrations are found in all seasons, with R2 ranging from 0.54 in spring to 0.73 in fall, and the mean relative errors ranging from -2.5% in winter to -10.8% in spring. Based on the satellite AOD and the model simulated aerosol profiles, surface PM10 over Beijing area is retrieved through the RH correction. The satellite retrieved PM10 and those observed at ground sites agree well

  9. Empirical testing of earthquake recurrence models at source and site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarello, D.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2012-04-01

    Several probabilistic procedures are presently available for seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), based on time-dependent or time-independent models. The result is a number of different outcomes (hazard maps), and to take into account the inherent uncertainty (epistemic), the outcomes of alternative procedures are combined in the frame of logic-tree approaches by scoring each procedure as a function of the respective reliability. This is deduced by evaluating ex-ante (by expert judgements) each element concurring in the relevant PSH computational procedure. This approach appears unsatisfactory also because the value of each procedure depends both on the reliability of each concurring element and on that of their combination: thus, checking the correctness of single elements does not allow evaluating the correctness of the procedure as a whole. Alternative approaches should be based 1) on the ex-post empirical testing of the considered PSH computational models and 2) on the validation of the assumptions underlying concurrent models. The first goal can be achieved comparing the probabilistic forecasts provided by each model with empirical evidence relative to seismic occurrences (e.g., strong-motion data or macroseismic intensity evaluations) during some selected control periods of dimension comparable with the relevant exposure time. About assumptions validation, critical issues are the dimension of the minimum data set necessary to distinguish processes with or without memory, the reliability of mixed data on seismic sources (i.e. historical and palaeoseismological), the completeness of fault catalogues. Some results obtained by the application of these testing procedures in Italy will be shortly outlined.

  10. GVT-Based Ground Flutter Test without Wind Tunnel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc (ZONA) and Arizona State University (ASU) propose a R&D effort to develop a ground flutter testing system without wind tunnel, called the...

  11. GVT-Based Ground Flutter Test without Wind Tunnel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc (ZONA) and Arizona State University (ASU) propose a R&D effort to further develop the ground flutter testing system in place of a wind...

  12. Ground vibration test and flutter analysis of air sampling probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center conducted a ground vibration test and a flutter analysis of an air sampling probe that was to be mounted on a Convair 990 airplane. The probe was a steel, wing-shaped structure used to gather atmospheric data. The ground vibration test was conducted to update the finite-element model used in the flutter analysis. The analysis predicted flutter speeds well outside the operating flight envelope of the Convair 990 airplane.

  13. Empirical retrocausality: Testing physics hypotheses with parapsychological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobyns, York

    2017-05-01

    In 2011, Daryl Bem published a report of nine parapsychological experiments showing evidence of retrocausal information transfer. Earlier in 2016, the team of Bem, Tressoldi, Rabeyron, and Duggan published the results of a meta-analysis containing 81 independent replications of the original Bem experiments (total of 90 with the originals).[1] This much larger database continues to show positive results of generally comparable effect size, thus demonstrating that the effects claimed by Bem can be replicated by independent researchers and greatly strengthening the case for empirically observed retrocausation. Earlier (2011) work by this author showed how a modification of one of Bem's original experiments could be used to test the mechanism implicitly proposed by Echeverria, Klinkhammer, and Thorne to explain how retrocausal phenomena can exist without any risk of self-contradictory event sequences (time paradoxes). In light of the new publication and new evidence, the current work generalizes the previous analysis which was restricted to only one of Bem's experimental genres (precognitive approach and avoidance). The current analysis shows how minor modifications can be made in Bem's other experimental genres of retroactive priming, retroactive habituation, and retroactive facilitation of recall to test the EKT anti-paradox mechanism. If the EKT hypothesis is correct, the modified experiments, while continuing to show replicable retrocausal phenomena, will also show a characteristic pattern of distortion in the statistics of the random selections used to drive the experiments.

  14. An empirical test of schema mode conceptualizations in personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; Van Vreeswijk, Michiel F; Arntz, Arnoud

    2008-07-01

    Although the use of schema modes in schema-focused therapy (SFT) has been very popular since its introduction, Young's schema mode concept remained largely empirically untested. In order to provide insight into the mode conceptualization of personality disorders (PDs), the current study assessed the relationships between 14 schema modes and all PDs. Relationships between dimensional PD scores and self-reported mode scores were tested in a mixed study group of 489 participants, consisting of axis I and axis II patients, and non-patients. Psychopathology was assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I and axis II disorders (SCID I and SCID II) or the Structural Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SIDP-IV), and modes were assessed by the Schema Mode Inventory. Kendall's partial tau coefficients, controlling each PD-mode correlation for all other PD scores, indicated unique mode profiles for all PDs and corroborated most of the hypothesized PD-mode correlations, supporting the construct validity of the mode model. Nevertheless, the high number of correlations found for some PDs raises concerns about the specificity of the mode model. Implications for both research and therapy are discussed.

  15. Empirical evidence of Rayleigh waves in Norcia (central Italy) and their quantitative contribution to ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Cattaneo, Marco; Bordoni, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Spectral ratio techniques, such as the Horizontal-to-Vertical (HV) and Standard (SSR) may exhibit different trends in specific frequency bands when conducted in alluvial basins. A possible explanation of this discrepancy can be provided by the presence of Rayleigh oscillations, that are considered responsible of an amplification of the vertical component with respect to the horizontal. We propose a new methodology for the identification of Rayleigh waves arrivals, to test on small-size basins. With this procedure, candidate Rayleigh waves are localized in time-frequency domain on an instantaneous polarization plane which is constructed by defining the instantaneous maximum vertical and horizontal spectral amplitudes. Validation of the candidate Rayleigh arrivals is performed by evaluating the instantaneous ellipticity. This step yields to a quantitative measure of the polarization, providing an indicator of the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion. We tested this methodology in the Norcia basin (central Italy) using a 18 selected earthquakes (2.0 L'Aquila sequence (2009). We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology by localizing evidences of Rayleigh wave arrivals immediately from (1 s) up to 30 s after the first S-wave group, even for low-magnitude events (Ml < 3.0). The generation of the detected Rayleigh waves analyzed in time-frequency range, appears to be magnitude-dependent and in function of the location in the basin. Our quantitative estimate of the Rayleigh polarization resulted to be comparable to the HV response value in specific frequency bands, for example in deamplification, demonstrating a plausible connection with Rayleigh oscillations. The authors encourage the usage or implementation of similar procedures conducted in basin studies, in order to determine quantitatively the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion, for a better characterization of the local seismic response.

  16. Empirical tests of performance of some M - estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaś, Marek; Ligas, Marcin

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents an empirical comparison of performance of three well known M - estimators (i.e. Huber, Tukey and Hampel's M - estimators) and also some new ones. The new M - estimators were motivated by weighting functions applied in orthogonal polynomials theory, kernel density estimation as well as one derived from Wigner semicircle probability distribution. M - estimators were used to detect outlying observations in contaminated datasets. Calculations were performed using iteratively reweighted least-squares (IRLS). Since the residual variance (used in covariance matrices construction) is not a robust measure of scale the tests employed also robust measures i.e. interquartile range and normalized median absolute deviation. The methods were tested on a simple leveling network in a large number of variants showing bad and good sides of M - estimation. The new M - estimators have been equipped with theoretical tuning constants to obtain 95% efficiency with respect to the standard normal distribution. The need for data - dependent tuning constants rather than those established theoretically is also pointed out. W artykule przedstawiono empiryczne porównanie trzech dobrze znanych M - estymatorów (Huber'a, Tukey'a oraz Hampel'a) jak również kilku nowych. Nowe estymatory motywowane były funkcjami wagowymi wykorzystywanymi w teorii wielomianów ortogonalnych, estymacji jądrowej oraz jeden motywowany przez funkcję gęstości "półokręgu" Wigner'a. Każdy z estymatorów został użyty do wykrywania obserwacji odstających w skażonych zbiorach danych. Obliczenia wykonano za pomocą "reważonej" metody najmniejszych kwadratów. Ze względu na fakt, iż wariancja resztowa (używana w konstrukcji macierzy kowariancyjnych) nie jest odpornym estymatorem skali, w testach wykorzystano również odporne miary takie jak: rozstęp ćwiartkowy oraz znormalizowane odchylenie medianowe. Testy wykonano na prostej sieci niwelacyjnej w dużej ilości wariantów ukazuj

  17. An Assessment of Testing Requirement Impacts on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Ground Test Facility Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipers, Larry R.; Ottinger, Cathy A.; Sanchez, Lawrence C.

    1994-07-01

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  18. An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

    1993-10-25

    Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

  19. Enhancing Reflection Skills through Learning Portfolios: An Empirical Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Susanne G.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an empirical study of the effectiveness of portfolios as learning tools in a sample of MBAs. The results showed that portfolio use was positively related to reflection, defined here as the conscious awareness and questioning of personal experience, a search for alternative explanations and interpretations, and…

  20. Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test - Ground and Flight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenbergy, Davis L.; Hicks, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and flight operations aspects to the Pad Abort 1 launch. The paper details the processes used to plan all operations. The paper then discussions the difficulties of integration and testing, while detailing some of the lessons learned throughout the entire launch campaign. Flight operational aspects of the launc are covered in order to provide the listener with the full suite of operational issues encountered in preparation for the first flight test of the Orion Launch Abort System.

  1. Empirical Testing of an Algorithm for Defining Somatization in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, Howard D.; Fogel, Joshua; Lazarovich, Regina; Pustilnik, Inna

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A previous article proposed an algorithm for defining somatization in children by classifying them into three categories: well, medically ill, and somatizer; the authors suggested further empirical validation of the algorithm (Postilnik et al., 2006). We use the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to provide this empirical validation. Method Parents of children seen in pediatric clinics completed the CBCL (n=126). The physicians of these children completed specially-designed questionnaires. The sample comprised of 62 boys and 64 girls (age range 2 to 15 years). Classification categories included: well (n=53), medically ill (n=55), and somatizer (n=18). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical comparisons. Discriminant function analysis was conducted with the CBCL subscales. Results There were significant differences between the classification categories for the somatic complaints (p=algorithm proposed by Postilnik et al. (2006) shows promise for classification of children and adolescents with somatic symptoms. PMID:18421368

  2. The provincial administration of the Ottoman Empire in the XVI century on the ground of the kanunname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Kovalchuk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The title of the article is ‘The provincial administration of the Ottoman empire in the XVI century on the ground of the kanunname’. The purpose of the article is to characterize the structure of the provincial administration of the Ottoman Empire in the XVI century on the ground of the sultans’ kanunname. The administrative divisions of the Ottoman Empire has been studied in the article: the largest ottoman provinces - eyalets were divided into two types: timarli, in which the system of sanjaks, ottoman law, timar system were established; and salyaneli, where timar system was absent, all taxes were gathered and distributed to local needs; the second administrative-military territorial units were sanjaks, the subdivisions of sanjak were kazas and kadiluks, then – nahiyes. Moreover, outside this system there were various types of vassal and tributary states. The governance of such large territory, control over the execution of orders, establishment of relations between different groups of multi-ethnic population of the empire, which lived mostly not in the metropolitan area, but in the provinces, needed the constant functioning of local authorities. The main task of the provincial administration was to organize and to strengthen the communications between the province and the center. Special attention has been given to the description of the place and role, rights and duties of beylerbey, sanjakbey, qadi (judge, defterdar and other local managers at the system of the Ottoman provincial administration. In conclusion it is necessary to point out that the system of local authorities was formed by representatives of the military-administrative (sipahi-timarli, sanjakbey, beylerbey, the Grand Vizier, judicial (qadis (judges, kazaskers, sheikh-ul-Islam and financial (defterdars branches of the Ottoman government. Legal prohibitions and mutual cooperation supported sustainable balance between these executive power branches.

  3. Searching for a Common Ground--A Literature Review of Empirical Research on Scientific Inquiry Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnebeck, Silke; Bernholt, Sascha; Ropohl, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of scientific inquiry in science education, researchers and educators disagree considerably regarding what features define this instructional approach. While a large body of literature addresses theoretical considerations, numerous empirical studies investigate scientific inquiry on quite different levels of detail and also…

  4. Cryogenic actuator testing for the SAFARI ground calibration setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, C.; Eggens, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, A. C. T.; Detrain, A.; Smit, H.; Dieleman, P.

    2012-09-01

    For the on-ground calibration setup of the SAFARI instrument cryogenic mechanisms are being developed at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, including a filter wheel, XYZ-scanner and a flipmirror mechanism. Due to the extremely low background radiation requirement of the SAFARI instrument, all of these mechanisms will have to perform their work at 4.5 Kelvin and low-dissipative cryogenic actuators are required to drive these mechanisms. In this paper, the performance of stepper motors, piezoelectric actuators and brushless DC-motors as cryogenic actuators are compared. We tested stepper motor mechanical performance and electrical dissipation at 4K. The actuator requirements, test setup and test results are presented. Furthermore, design considerations and early performance tests of the flipmirror mechanism are discussed. This flipmirror features a 102 x 72 mm aluminum mirror that can be rotated 45°. A Phytron stepper motor with reduction gearbox has been chosen to drive the flipmirror. Testing showed that this motor has a dissipation of 49mW at 4K with a torque of 60Nmm at 100rpm. Thermal modeling of the flipmirror mechanism predicts that with proper thermal strapping the peak temperature of the flipmirror after a single action will be within the background level requirements of the SAFARI instrument. Early tests confirm this result. For low-duty cycle operations commercial stepper motors appear suitable as actuators for test equipment in the SAFARI on ground calibration setup.

  5. Modeling earthquake ground motion with an earthquake simulation program (EMPSYN) that utilizes empirical Green's functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report outlines a method of using empirical Green's functions in an earthquake simulation program EMPSYN that provides realistic seismograms from potential earthquakes. The theory for using empirical Green's functions is developed, implementation of the theory in EMPSYN is outlined, and an example is presented where EMPSYN is used to synthesize observed records from the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. To provide useful synthetic ground motion data from potential earthquakes, synthetic seismograms should model frequencies from 0.5 to 15.0 Hz, the full wave-train energy distribution, and absolute amplitudes. However, high-frequency arrivals are stochastically dependent upon the inhomogeneous geologic structure and irregular fault rupture. The fault rupture can be modeled, but the stochastic nature of faulting is largely an unknown factor in the earthquake process. The effect of inhomogeneous geology can readily be incorporated into synthetic seismograms by using small earthquakes to obtain empirical Green's functions. Small earthquakes with source corner frequencies higher than the site recording limit f{sub max}, or much higher than the frequency of interest, effectively have impulsive point-fault dislocation sources, and their recordings are used as empirical Green's functions. Since empirical Green's functions are actual recordings at a site, they include the effects on seismic waves from all geologic inhomogeneities and include all recordable frequencies, absolute amplitudes, and all phases. They scale only in amplitude with differences in seismic moment. They can provide nearly the exact integrand to the representation relation. Furthermore, since their source events have spatial extent, they can be summed to simulate fault rupture without loss of information, thereby potentially computing the exact representation relation for an extended source earthquake.

  6. Review of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Ground Test Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coote, David J.; Power, Kevin P.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen

    2015-01-01

    High efficiency rocket propulsion systems are essential for humanity to venture beyond the moon. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is a promising alternative to conventional chemical rockets with relatively high thrust and twice the efficiency of highest performing chemical propellant engines. NTP utilizes the coolant of a nuclear reactor to produce propulsive thrust. An NTP engine produces thrust by flowing hydrogen through a nuclear reactor to cool the reactor, heating the hydrogen and expelling it through a rocket nozzle. The hot gaseous hydrogen is nominally expected to be free of radioactive byproducts from the nuclear reactor; however, it has the potential to be contaminated due to off-nominal engine reactor performance. NTP ground testing is more difficult than chemical engine testing since current environmental regulations do not allow/permit open air testing of NTP as was done in the 1960's and 1970's for the Rover/NERVA program. A new and innovative approach to rocket engine ground test is required to mitigate the unique health and safety risks associated with the potential entrainment of radioactive waste from the NTP engine reactor core into the engine exhaust. Several studies have been conducted since the ROVER/NERVA program in the 1970's investigating NTP engine ground test options to understand the technical feasibility, identify technical challenges and associated risks and provide rough order of magnitude cost estimates for facility development and test operations. The options can be divided into two distinct schemes; (1) real-time filtering of the engine exhaust and its release to the environment or (2) capture and storage of engine exhaust for subsequent processing.

  7. Foundations of Quantum Gravity : The Role of Principles Grounded in Empirical Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, M

    2013-01-01

    When attempting to assess the strengths and weaknesses of various principles in their potential role of guiding the formulation of a theory of quantum gravity, it is crucial to distinguish between principles which are strongly supported by empirical data - either directly or indirectly - and principles which instead (merely) rely heavily on theoretical arguments for their justification. These remarks are illustrated in terms of the current standard models of cosmology and particle physics, as well as their respective underlying theories, viz. general relativity and quantum (field) theory. It is argued that if history is to be of any guidance, the best chance to obtain the key structural features of a putative quantum gravity theory is by deducing them, in some form, from the appropriate empirical principles (analogous to the manner in which, say, the idea that gravitation is a curved spacetime phenomenon is arguably implied by the equivalence principle). It is subsequently argued that the appropriate empirica...

  8. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  9. Considerations for fault current testing of optical ground wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madge, R.C.; Barrett, J.S.; Maruice, C.G. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada). Research Div.)

    1992-10-01

    Optical Ground Wires (OPGW) are being used more frequently by utilities. However, fault current testing of OPGW has not been fully examined. In this paper, peak component temperatures are measured for both 10 m and 60 m spans. The cable temperature decay time is measured, and is compared against a numerical model of convection and conduction losses. A numerical model is developed to predict the peak cable tension following a hit. This model can be used to establish appropriate initial cable tensions to simulate full-span faults. The issue of dynamic stresses in the form of cable whipping is reviewed. Lastly, various cable termination procedures are tested.

  10. CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed Ground Test Article Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to CRYOTE ground test data. The CRYOTE ground test artide was jointly developed by Innovative Engineering Solutions, United Launch Alliance and NASA KSC. The test article was constructed out of a titanium alloy tank, Sapphire 77 composite skin (similar to G10), an external secondary payload adapter ring, thermal vent system, multi layer insulation and various data acquisition instrumentation. In efforts to understand heat loads throughout this system, the GTA (filled with liquid nitrogen for safety purposes) was subjected to a series of tests in a vacuum chamber at Marshall Space Flight Center. By anchoring analytical models against test data, higher fidelity thermal environment predictions can be made for future flight articles which would eventually demonstrate critical cryogenic fluid management technologies such as system chilldown, transfer, pressure control and long term storage. Significant factors that influenced heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation performance, tank fill levels and pressures and even contact conductance coefficients. This report demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established and includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses.

  11. Testing a new Free Core Nutation empirical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Santiago; Ferrándiz, José M.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a free mode of the Earth's rotation caused by the different material characteristics of the Earth's core and mantle. This causes the rotational axes of those layers to slightly diverge from each other, resulting in a wobble of the Earth's rotation axis comparable to nutations. In this paper we focus on estimating empirical FCN models using the observed nutations derived from the VLBI sessions between 1993 and 2013. Assuming a fixed value for the oscillation period, the time-variable amplitudes and phases are estimated by means of multiple sliding window analyses. The effects of using different a priori Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) in the derivation of models are also addressed. The optimal choice of the fundamental parameters of the model, namely the window width and step-size of its shift, is searched by performing a thorough experimental analysis using real data. The former analyses lead to the derivation of a model with a temporal resolution higher than the one used in the models currently available, with a sliding window reduced to 400 days and a day-by-day shift. It is shown that this new model increases the accuracy of the modeling of the observed Earth's rotation. Besides, empirical models determined from USNO Finals as a priori ERP present a slightly lower Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) of residuals than IERS 08 C04 along the whole period of VLBI observations, according to our computations. The model is also validated through comparisons with other recognized models. The level of agreement among them is satisfactory. Let us remark that our estimates give rise to the lowest residuals and seem to reproduce the FCN signal in more detail.

  12. ISTAR: Project Status and Ground Test Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jason Eugene

    2003-01-01

    Review of the current technical and programmatic status of the Integrated System Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) project. November 2002 completed Phase 1 of this project: which worked the conceptual design of the X-43B demonstrator vehicle and Flight Test Engine (FTE) order to develop realistic requirements for the Ground Test Engine (GTE). The latest conceptual FTE and X-43B configuration is briefly reviewed. The project plan is to reduce risk to the GTE and FTE concepts through several tests: thruster, fuel endothermic characterization, engine structure/heat exchanger, injection characterization rig, and full scale direct connect combustion rig. Each of these will be discussed along with the project schedule. This discussion is limited due to ITAR restrictions on open literature papers.

  13. Deep in Data. Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J. [J.Neymark and Associates, Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes progress toward developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite using home energy consumption and building description data. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This could allow for modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data.

  14. Testing the Empirical Shock Arrival Model using Quadrature Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, N; Xie, H; Yashiro, S

    2013-01-01

    The empirical shock arrival (ESA) model was developed based on quadrature data from Helios (in-situ) and P-78 (remote-sensing) to predict the Sun-Earth travel time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) [Gopalswamy et al. 2005a]. The ESA model requires earthward CME speed as input, which is not directly measurable from coronagraphs along the Sun-Earth line. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) were in quadrature during 2010 - 2012, so the speeds of Earth-directed CMEs were observed with minimal projection effects. We identified a set of 20 full halo CMEs in the field of view of SOHO that were also observed in quadrature by STEREO. We used the earthward speed from STEREO measurements as input to the ESA model and compared the resulting travel times with the observed ones from L1 monitors. We find that the model predicts the CME travel time within about 7.3 hours, which is similar to the predictions by the ENLIL model. We also find that CME-CME and CME...

  15. Statistical Measures of Integrity in Online Testing: Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielicki, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on longitudinal study regarding integrity of testing in an online format as used by e-learning platforms. Specifically, this study explains whether online testing, which implies an open book format is compromising integrity of assessment by encouraging cheating among students. Statistical experiment designed for this study…

  16. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2006-01-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the ris...... to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging....

  17. Empirical Assessment of Nonlinear Seismic Demand of Mainshock-Aftershock Ground Motion Sequences for Japanese Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuichiro eGoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of earthquake types, magnitudes, and hysteretic behavior on the peak and residual ductility demands of inelastic single-degree-of-freedom systems and evaluates the effects of major aftershocks on the nonlinear structural responses. An extensive dataset of real mainshock-aftershock sequences for Japanese earthquakes is developed. The constructed dataset is large, compared with previous datasets of similar kinds, and includes numerous sequences from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, facilitating an investigation of spatial aspects of the aftershock effects. The empirical assessment of peak and residual ductility demands of numerous inelastic systems having different vibration periods, yield strengths, and hysteretic characteristics indicates that the increase in seismic demand measures due to aftershocks occurs rarely but can be significant. For a large mega-thrust subduction earthquake, a critical factor for major aftershock damage is the spatial occurrence process of aftershocks.

  18. Prediction of mandibular rotation: an empirical test of clinician performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; West, E E

    1984-11-01

    An experiment was conducted in an attempt to determine empirically how effective a number of expert clinicians were at differentiating "backward rotators" from "forward rotators" on the basis of head-film information which might reasonably have been available to them prior to instituting treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusion. As a result of a previously reported ongoing study, pre- and posttreatment head films were available for 188 patients treated in the mixed dentition for the correction of Class II malocclusion and for 50 untreated Class II subjects. These subjects were divided into 14 groups (average size of group, 17; range, 6 to 23) solely on the basis of type of treatment and the clinician from whose clinic the records had originated. From within each group, we selected the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme backward rotation and the two or three subjects who had exhibited the most extreme forward rotation of the mandible during the interval between films. The sole criterion for classification was magnitude of change in the mandibular plane angle of Downs between the pre- and posttreatment films of each patient. The resulting sample contained 32 backward-rotator subjects and 32 forward-rotator subjects. Five expert judges (mean clinical experience, 28 years) were asked to identify the backward-rotator subjects by examination of the pretreatment films. The findings may be summarized as follows: (1) No judge performed significantly better than chance. (2) There was strong evidence that the judges used a shared, though relatively ineffective, set of rules in making their discriminations between forward and backward rotators. (3) Statistical analysis of the predictive power of a set of standard cephalometric measurements which had previously been made for this set of subjects indicated that the numerical data also failed to identify potential backward rotators at a rate significantly better than chance. We infer from these

  19. A grand canonical genetic algorithm for the prediction of multi-component phase diagrams and testing of empirical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, William W; Hennig, Richard G

    2013-12-11

    We present an evolutionary algorithm which predicts stable atomic structures and phase diagrams by searching the energy landscape of empirical and ab initio Hamiltonians. Composition and geometrical degrees of freedom may be varied simultaneously. We show that this method utilizes information from favorable local structure at one composition to predict that at others, achieving far greater efficiency of phase diagram prediction than a method which relies on sampling compositions individually. We detail this and a number of other efficiency-improving techniques implemented in the genetic algorithm for structure prediction code that is now publicly available. We test the efficiency of the software by searching the ternary Zr-Cu-Al system using an empirical embedded-atom model potential. In addition to testing the algorithm, we also evaluate the accuracy of the potential itself. We find that the potential stabilizes several correct ternary phases, while a few of the predicted ground states are unphysical. Our results suggest that genetic algorithm searches can be used to improve the methodology of empirical potential design.

  20. Short-Form Philadelphia Naming Test: Rationale and Empirical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Grant M.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To create two matched short forms of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996) that yield similar results to the PNT for measuring anomia. Method: In Study 1, archived naming data from 94 individuals with aphasia were used to identify which PNT items should be included in the short forms. The 2…

  1. [Mes differ by positioning: empirical testing of decentralized dynamics of the self].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Shinichi

    2013-10-01

    The present study empirically tested the conceptualization of the decentralized dynamics of the self proposed by Hermans & Kempen (1993), which they developed theoretically and from clinical cases, not from large samples of empirical data. They posited that worldviews and images of the self could vary by positioning even in the same individual, and denied that the ego was an omniscient entity that knew and controlled all aspects of the self (centralized ego). Study 1 tested their conceptualization empirically with 47 university students in an experimental group and 17 as a control group. The results showed that the scores on the Rosenberg's self-esteem scale and images of the Mes in the experimental group significantly varied by positioning, but those in the control group did not. Similar results were found in Study 2 with a sample of 120 university students. These results empirically supported the conceptualization of the decentralized dynamics of the self.

  2. Business Enterprise Value in Shopping Malls: An Empirical Test

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Jeffrey D.; George H. Lentz

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the economic basis for the existence of business enterprise value in a shopping mall. The existence of business enterprise value in a mall is then tested by examining the rent paid by existing tenants on a lease renewal vs. that paid by new tenants for otherwise identical space. The hypothesis that there is no difference in rents between renewals and new tenants can be rejected. This suggests that with each lease renewal there is a marginal increase in business enterprise...

  3. Quiet Spike Build-Up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center uses a modified F-15B (836) aircraft as a testbed for a variety of flight research:experiments mounted underneath the aircraft fuselage. The F-15B was selected to fly Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation's (GAC)QuietSpike(TM)(QS) project; however, this experiment is very unique and unlike any of the previous testbed experiments flown on the F-15B. It involves the addition of a relatively long quiet spike boom attached to the radar bulkhead of the aircraft. This QS experiment is a stepping stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate sonic born strength of business jets over land. The QS boom is a concept in Which an aircraft's front-end would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing would effectively lengthen the aircraft, reducing peak sonic boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, non-coalescing shocklets. Prior to flying the Quietspike(TM) experiment on the F-15B aircraft several ground vibration tests (GVT) were required in order to understand the QS modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B. However, due to the project's late hardware delivery of the QS and the intense schedule, a "traditional" GVT of the mated F-1513 Quietspike(tm) ready-for-flight configuration would not have left sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. The objective of the QuietSpike (TM) build-up ground testing approach was to ultimately obtain confidence in the F-15B Quietspike(TM) finite element model (FEM) to be used for the flutter analysis. In order to obtain the F15B QS FEM with reliable foundation stiffness between the QS and the F-15B radar bulkhead as well as QS modal characteristics, several different GVT configurations were performed. EAch of the four GVT's performed had a

  4. Orbit-to-ground Wireless Power Transfer test mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsrud, C.; Noghanian, S.; Straub, J.; Whalen, D.; Fevig, R.

    Since the 1970s the concept of transferring power from orbit for use on Earth has had a great deal of consideration for future energy and environmental sustainability here on Earth. The cost, size and complexity of a production-grade system are extremely large, and have many environmental considerations. There has never been a publicly disclosed orbit-to-ground power transfer test mission. A proposed project provides an opportunity to test the conceptual operation of such a system, albeit at a much lower power level than the `grand' or `real scale' system. During this test, a small Solar Powered (SP) 6-U CubSat will be deployed into Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) (225 or 325 km) to collect and store 1 KW of power from solar energy as the satellite is orbiting. The goal is to transmit 1 KW of wireless power at a microwave frequency of 5.8 or 10 GHz to a ground antenna array system. This paper presents the architecture for the proposed mission and discusses the regulatory, legal, and environmental issues that such a mission poses. Furthermore, the gain of the transmitter is analyzed at 20 and 30 dB as well as the gain of the receiver is analyzed at 30, 40, and 50 dB. A SP 6-U CubeSat will have a Lithium Ion (LIon) battery capable of storing enough energy for 83.33 Whr charge to run the satellites controls, and 1 KW necessary for a 5-minute demonstration and test (in addition to power required for its own operational requirements). Once charged, the satellite will use highly accurate position and attitude knowledge provided by an onboard star-tracker, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and inertial measurement unit to determine the proper orientation for the power transfer test. The onboard Attitude Determination and Control (ADCS) will be utilized to achieve and maintain this orientation during the test period. A cold-gas propulsion system will be available to de-spin the reaction wheels to ensure that sufficient ADCS capabilities exist for attitude-stabilization use during

  5. Empirical grounding of the nature of scientific inquiry: A study of developing researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Amy Preece

    This work uses grounded theory methodology for developing theory about the nature of authentic scientific inquiry that occurs on a day-to-day basis in an academic research laboratory. Symbolic interaction and situated learning provide a theoretical framework. Data were collected from field notes, over 100 hours of videotape of researchers working in a chemical research laboratory, and interviews with participants. The phenomena of a research laboratory suggest that authentic daily work stretches scientists in three learning modalities: cognitive, affective and motivational beliefs and goals, which influence action to promote learning. A laboratory's line of research is divided into individual, thematic projects. Researchers are enabled in a specialized laboratory environment with sets of unique artifacts, substances, people and theoretical concepts to facilitate production of significant research goals. The work itself consists of chemical and mechanical processes facilitated by human actions, appropriate mental states, and theoretical explanations. The cognitive, affective (emotional), and conative (motivational) stretching then leads to explicit learning as well as implicit learning in the gain of experience and tacit knowledge. Implications of these findings about the nature of authentic scientific research on a day-to-day basis are applied to inquiry in science education in undergraduate and graduate education.

  6. Portuguese validation of the Internet Addiction Test: An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Halley M; Patrão, Ivone M; Griffiths, Mark D

    2014-06-01

    Research into Internet addiction (IA) has increased greatly over the last decade. Despite its various definitions and general lack of consensus regarding its conceptualisation amongst researchers, instruments for measuring this phenomenon have proliferated in a number of countries. There has been little research on IA in Portugal and this may be partly due to the absence of standardised measurement tools for assessing IA. This study attempted to address this issue by adapting a Portuguese version of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) via a translation-back translation process and Confirmatory Factor Analysis in a sample of 593 Portuguese students that completed a Portuguese version of the IAT along with questions related to socio-demographic variables. The findings suggested that the IAT appears to be a valid and reliable instrument for measuring IA among Portuguese young adults as demonstrated by its satisfactory psychometric properties. However, the present findings also suggest the need to reword and update some of the IAT's items. Prevalence of IA found in the sample was 1.2% and is discussed alongside findings relating to socio-demographic correlates. Limitations and implications of the present study are also discussed. The present study calls for a reflection of the IAT while also contributing to a better understanding of the basic aspects of IA in the Portuguese community since many health practitioners are starting to realise that Internet use may pose a risk for some individuals.

  7. New empirical tests of the multifractal Omori law for Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Sornette, Didier

    2011-01-01

    We report new tests on the Taiwan earthquake catalog of the prediction by the Multifractal Stress Activation (MSA) model that the p-value of the Omori law for the rate of aftershocks following a mainshock is an increasing function of its magnitude Mm. This effort is motivated by the quest to validate this crucial prediction of the MSA model and to investigate its possible dependence on local tectonic conditions. With careful attention to the long-term as well as short-term time-dependent magnitude completeness of the Taiwan catalog, and with the use of three different declustering techniques, we confirm the universality of the prediction p(Mm) = (0.09 \\pm 0.03) \\times Mm + (0.47 \\pm 0.10), valid for the SCEC Southern California catalog, the Harvard-CMT worldwide catalog, the JMA Japan catalog and the Taiwan catalog. The observed deviations of the two coefficients of the p(Mm) linear dependence on Mm from catalog to catalog are not significant enough to correlate meaningfully with any tectonic features.

  8. NASA Boeing 757 HIRF test series low power on-the-ground tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggio, A.J.; Pennock, S.T.; Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Carney, H.L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley AFB, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1996-08-01

    The data acquisition phase of a program intended to provide data for the validation of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transports; for the checkout of instrumentation for following test programs; and for the support of protection engineering of airborne systems has been completed. Funded by the NASA Fly-By-Light/ Power-By-Wire Program, the initial phase involved on-the-ground electromagnetic measurements using the NASA Boeing 757 and was executed in the LESLI Facility at the USAF Phillips Laboratory. The major participants in this project were LLNL, NASA Langley Research Center, Phillips Laboratory, and UIE, Inc. The tests were performed over a five week period during September through November, 1994. Measurements were made of the fields coupled into the aircraft interior and signals induced in select structures and equipment under controlled illumination by RF fields. A characterization of the ground was also performed to permit ground effects to be included in forthcoming validation exercises. This report and the associated test plan that is included as an appendix represent a definition of the overall on-the-ground test program. They include descriptions of the test rationale, test layout, and samples of the data. In this report, a detailed description of each executed test is provided, as is the data identification (data id) relating the specific test with its relevant data files. Samples of some inferences from the data that will be useful in protection engineering and EM effects mitigation are also presented. The test plan which guided the execution of the tests, a test report by UIE Inc., and the report describing the concrete pad characterization are included as appendices.

  9. Empirical Bayes Test for the Parameter of Rayleigh Distribution with Error of Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JUAN

    2011-01-01

    For the data with error of measurement in historical samples,the empirical Bayes test rule for the parameter of Rayleigh distribution is constructed,and the asymptotically optimal property is obtained.It is shown that the convergence rate of the proposed EB test rule can be arbitrarily close to O(n-1/2) under suitable conditions.

  10. An empirical RBF model of the magnetosphere parameterized by interplanetary and ground-based drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Andreeva, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    In our recent paper (Andreeva and Tsyganenko, 2016), a novel method was proposed to model the magnetosphere directly from spacecraft data, with no a priori knowledge nor ad hoc assumptions about the geometry of the magnetic field sources. The idea was to split the field into the toroidal and poloidal parts and then expand each part into a weighted sum of radial basis functions (RBF). In the present work we take the next step forward by having developed a full-fledged model of the near magnetosphere, based on a multiyear set of space magnetometer data (1995-2015) and driven by ground-based and interplanetary input parameters. The model consolidates the largest ever amount of data and has been found to provide the best ever merit parameters, in terms of both the overall RMS residual field and record-high correlation coefficients between the observed and model field components. By experimenting with different combinations of input parameters and their time-averaging intervals, we found the best so far results to be given by the ram pressure Pd, SYM-H, and N-index by Newell et al. (2007). In addition, the IMF By has also been included as a model driver, with a goal to more accurately represent the IMF penetration effects. The model faithfully reproduces both externally and internally induced variations in the global distribution of the geomagnetic field and electric currents. Stronger solar wind driving results in a deepening of the equatorial field depression and a dramatic increase of its dawn-dusk asymmetry. The Earth's dipole tilt causes a consistent deformation of the magnetotail current sheet and a significant north-south asymmetry of the polar cusp depressions on the dayside. Next steps to further develop the new approach are also discussed.

  11. Encouraging Sustainable Transport Choices in American Households: Results from an Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Natalini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The transport sector needs to go through an extended process of decarbonisation to counter the threat of climate change. Unfortunately, the International Energy Agency forecasts an enormous growth in the number of cars and greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Two issues can thus be identified: (1 the need for a new methodology that could evaluate the policy performances ex-ante and (2 the need for more effective policies. To help address these issues, we developed an Agent-Based Model called Mobility USA aimed at: (1 testing whether this could be an effective approach in analysing ex-ante policy implementation in the transport sector; and (2 evaluating the effects of alternative policy scenarios on commuting behaviours in the USA. Particularly, we tested the effects of two sets of policies, namely market-based and preference-change ones. The model results suggest that this type of agent-based approach will provide a useful tool for testing policy interventions and their effectiveness.

  12. Solar Array at Very High Temperatures: Ground Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Solar array design for any spacecraft is determined by the orbit parameters. For example, operational voltage for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is limited by significant differential charging due to interactions with low temperature plasma. In order to avoid arcing in LEO, solar array is designed to generate electrical power at comparatively low voltages (below 100 volts) or to operate at higher voltages with encapsulation of all suspected discharge locations. In Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) differential charging is caused by energetic electrons that produce differential potential between the coverglass and the conductive spacecraft body in a kilovolt range. In such a case, the weakly conductive layer over coverglass, indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the possible measures to eliminate dangerous discharges on array surface. Temperature variations for solar arrays in both orbits are measured and documented within the range of minus150 degrees Centigrade to plus 1100 degrees Centigrade. This wide interval of operational temperatures is regularly reproduced in ground tests with radiative heating and cooling inside a shroud with flowing liquid nitrogen. The requirements to solar array design and tests turn out to be more complicated when planned trajectory crosses these two orbits and goes closer to the Sun. The conductive layer over coverglass causes a sharp increase in parasitic current collected from LEO plasma, high temperature may cause cracks in encapsulating (Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) material; radiative heating of a coupon in vacuum chamber becomes practically impossible above 1500 degrees Centigrade; conductivities of glass and adhesive go up with temperature that decrease array efficiency; and mechanical stresses grow up to critical magnitudes. A few test arrangements and respective results are presented in current paper. Coupons were tested against arcing in simulated LEO and GEO environments under elevated temperatures up to 2000 degrees

  13. Motor sport in France: testing-ground for the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofaigh, Eamon O

    2011-01-01

    The birth of the automobile in the late nineteenth century was greeted with a mixture of awe, scepticism and sometimes even disdain from sections of the European public. In this article, the steps taken in France to pioneer and promote this new invention are examined. Unreliable and noisy, the early automobile owes a debt of gratitude to the French aristocracy who organised and codified motor racing in an effort to test these new inventions while at the same time introduce them to a wider public. City-to-city races demonstrated the potential of the automobile before the initiative of Gordon Bennett proved to be the catalyst for the birth of international motor sport as we recognise it today. Finally this article looks at the special connection between Le Mans and the automobile. Le Mans has, through its 24-hour race, maintained a strong link with the development of everyday automobile tourism and offers the enthusiast an alternative to the machines that reach incredible speeds on modern-day closed circuits. This article examines how French roads were veritable testing grounds for the earliest cars and how the public roads of Le Mans maintain the tradition to this day.

  14. Static tests of excess ground attenuation at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, L. C.; Brown, R.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive experimental measurement program which evaluated the attenuation of sound for close to horizontal propagation over the ground was designed to replicate, under static conditions, results of the flight measurements carried out earlier by NASA at the same site (Wallops Flight Center). The program consisted of a total of 41 measurement runs of attenuation, in excess of spreading and air absorption losses, for one third octave bands over a frequency range of 50 to 4000 Hz. Each run consisted of measurements at 10 locations up to 675 m, from a source located at nominal elevations of 2.5, or 10 m over either a grassy surface or an adjacent asphalt concrete runway surface. The tests provided a total of over 8100 measurements of attenuation under conditions of low wind speed averaging about 1 m/s and, for most of the tests, a slightly positive temperature gradient, averaging about 0.3 C/m from 1.2 to 7 m. The results of the measurements are expected to provide useful experimental background for the further development of prediction models of near grazing incidence sound propagation losses.

  15. Ground vibration tests of a helicopter structure using OMA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, N.; Grappasonni, C.; Coppotelli, G.; Ewins, D. J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper is focused on an assessment of the state-of-the-art of operational modal analysis (OMA) methodologies in estimating modal parameters from output responses on helicopter structures. For this purpose, a ground vibration test was performed on a real helicopter airframe. In the following stages, several OMA techniques were applied to the measured data and compared with the results from typical input-output approach. The results presented are part of a more general research activity carried out in the Group of Aeronautical Research and Technology in Europe (GARTEUR) Action Group 19, helicopter technical activity, whose overall objective is the improvement of the structural dynamic finite element models using in-flight test data. The structure considered is a medium-size helicopter, a time-expired Lynx Mk7 (XZ649) airframe. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, the behaviour of both frequency- and time-domain-based OMA techniques are considered for the modal parameter estimates. An accuracy index and the reliability of the OMA methods with respect to the standard EMA procedures, together with the evaluation of the influence of the experimental setup on the estimate of the modal parameters, will be presented in the paper.

  16. Static tests of excess ground attenuation at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, L. C.; Brown, R.

    1981-06-01

    An extensive experimental measurement program which evaluated the attenuation of sound for close to horizontal propagation over the ground was designed to replicate, under static conditions, results of the flight measurements carried out earlier by NASA at the same site (Wallops Flight Center). The program consisted of a total of 41 measurement runs of attenuation, in excess of spreading and air absorption losses, for one third octave bands over a frequency range of 50 to 4000 Hz. Each run consisted of measurements at 10 locations up to 675 m, from a source located at nominal elevations of 2.5, or 10 m over either a grassy surface or an adjacent asphalt concrete runway surface. The tests provided a total of over 8100 measurements of attenuation under conditions of low wind speed averaging about 1 m/s and, for most of the tests, a slightly positive temperature gradient, averaging about 0.3 C/m from 1.2 to 7 m. The results of the measurements are expected to provide useful experimental background for the further development of prediction models of near grazing incidence sound propagation losses.

  17. An Empirically grounded Agent Based simulator for the Air Traffic Management in the SESAR scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Gurtner, Gérald; Ducci, Marco; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulator allowing to perform policy experiments relative to the air traffic management. Different SESAR solutions can be implemented in the model to see the reaction of the different stakeholders as well as other relevant metrics (delays, safety, etc). The model describes both the strategic phase associated to the planning of the flight trajectories and the tactical modifications occurring in the en-route phase. An implementation of the model is available as open-source and freely accessible by any user. More specifically, different procedures related to business trajectories and free-routing are tested and we illustrate the capabilities of the model on airspace implementing these concepts. After performing numerical simulations with the model, we show that in a free-routing scenario the controllers perform less operations although they are dispersed over a larger portion of the airspace. This can potentially increase the complexity of conflict detection and resolution for controll...

  18. The empirical likelihood goodness-of-fit test for regression model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xing ZHU; Yong-song QIN; Wang-li XU

    2007-01-01

    Goodness-of-fit test for regression modes has received much attention in literature. In this paper, empirical likelihood (EL) goodness-of-fit tests for regression models including classical parametric and autoregressive (AR) time series models are proposed. Unlike the existing locally smoothing and globally smoothing methodologies, the new method has the advantage that the tests are self-scale invariant and that the asymptotic null distribution is chi-squared. Simulations are carried out to illustrate the methodology.

  19. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  20. An Empirical Investigation of Methods for Assessing Item Fit for Mixed Format Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kyong Hee; Lee, Won-Chan; Ansley, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical information regarding performance of model-fit procedures has been a persistent need in measurement practice. Statistical procedures for evaluating item fit were applied to real test examples that consist of both dichotomously and polytomously scored items. The item fit statistics used in this study included the PARSCALE's G[squared],…

  1. Mechanistic-empirical subgrade design model based on heavy vehicle simulator test results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theyse, HL

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available -empirical design models. This paper presents a study on subgrade permanent deformation based on the data generated from a series of Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) tests done at the Richmond Field Station in California. The total subgrade deflection was found to be a...

  2. An empirical test of reference price theories using a semiparametric approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boztug, Yasemin; Hildebrandt, Lutz

      In this paper we estimate and empirically test different behavioral theories of consumer reference price formation. Two major theories are proposed to model the reference price reaction: assimilation contrast theory and prospect theory. We assume that different consumer segments will use...

  3. A Hydrogen Containment Process For Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. The hydrogen exhaust from the engine is contained in two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. The burner burns off the majority of the hydrogen, and the remaining hydrogen is removed in the tubular heat exchanger through the species recombination mechanism. A multi-dimensional, pressure-based multiphase computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to conceptually sizing the oxygen-rich burner, while a one-dimensional thermal analysis methodology was used to conceptually sizing the heat exchanger. Subsequently, a steady-state operation of the entire hydrogen containment process, from pressure vessel, through nozzle, diffuser, burner and heat exchanger, was simulated numerically, with the afore-mentioned computational fluid dynamics methodology. The computational results show that 99% of hydrogen reduction is achieved at the end of the burner, and the rest of the hydrogen is removed to a trivial level in the heat exchanger. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger is less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  4. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  5. Bayesian and Empirical Bayes Approaches to Setting Passing Scores on Mastery Tests. Publication Series in Mastery Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Huynh; Saunders, Joseph C., III

    The Bayesian approach to setting passing scores, as proposed by Swaminathan, Hambleton, and Algina, is compared with the empirical Bayes approach to the same problem that is derived from Huynh's decision-theoretic framework. Comparisons are based on simulated data which follow an approximate beta-binomial distribution and on real test results from…

  6. Ground Testing A 20-Meter Inflation Deployed Solar Sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Troy; Behun, Vaughn; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Sleight, David

    2006-01-01

    Solar sails have been proposed for a variety of future space exploration missions and provide a cost effective source of propellantless propulsion. Solar sails span very large areas to capture and reflect photons from the Sun and are propelled through space by the transfer of momentum from the photons to the solar sail. The thrust of a solar sail, though small, is continuous and acts for the life of the mission without the need for propellant. Recent advances in materials and ultra-low mass gossamer structures have enabled a host of useful space exploration missions utilizing solar sail propulsion. The team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center, under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office (ISP), has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. The 100-m baseline solar sail concept was optimized around the one astronomical unit (AU) Geostorm mission, and features a Mylar sail membrane with a striped-net sail suspension architecture with inflation-deployed sail support beams consisting of inflatable sub-Tg (glass transition temperature) rigidizable semi-monocoque booms and a spreader system. The solar sail has vanes integrated onto the tips of the support beams to provide full 3-axis control of the solar sail. This same structural concept can be scaled to meet the requirements of a number of other NASA missions. Static and dynamic testing of a 20m scaled version of this solar sail concept have been completed in the Space Power Facility (SPF) at the NASA Glenn Plum Brook facility under vacuum and thermal conditions simulating the operation of a solar sail in space. This paper details the lessons learned from these and other similar ground based tests of gossamer structures during the three year solar sail project.

  7. Hunter standoff killer team (HSKT) ground and flight test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Balinda; Ennis, Mark; Yeates, Robert; Condon, Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Warfighter's Associate (WA) which was integrated onto the Apache Longbow, and the Mobile Commanders Associate (MCA) which was integrated onto the Army Airborne Command and Control System (A2C2S) UH-60 Blackhawk. In this paper we will discuss what WA and MCA provided to the warfighter, and the results of the HSKT ground and flight testing.

  8. An empirical test of Maslow's theory of need hierarchy using hologeistic comparison by statistical sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Sharts, J

    1986-10-01

    Maslow's hierarchy of basic human needs provides a major theoretical framework in nursing science. The purpose of this study was to empirically test Maslow's need theory, specifically at the levels of physiological and security needs, using a hologeistic comparative method. Thirty cultures taken from the 60 cultural units in the Health Relations Area Files (HRAF) Probability Sample were found to have data available for examining hypotheses about thermoregulatory (physiological) and protective (security) behaviors practiced prior to sleep onset. The findings demonstrate there is initial worldwide empirical evidence to support Maslow's need hierarchy.

  9. Statistical Issues for Uncontrolled Reentry Hazards - Empirical Tests of the Predicted Footprint for Uncontrolled Satellite Reentry Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, M.

    2012-01-01

    A number of statistical tools have been developed over the years for assessing the risk of reentering objects to human populations. These tools make use of the characteristics (e.g., mass, material, shape, size) of debris that are predicted by aerothermal models to survive reentry. The statistical tools use this information to compute the probability that one or more of the surviving debris might hit a person on the ground and cause one or more casualties. The statistical portion of the analysis relies on a number of assumptions about how the debris footprint and the human population are distributed in latitude and longitude, and how to use that information to arrive at realistic risk numbers. Because this information is used in making policy and engineering decisions, it is important that these assumptions be tested using empirical data. This study uses the latest database of known uncontrolled reentry locations measured by the United States Department of Defense. The predicted ground footprint distributions of these objects are based on the theory that their orbits behave basically like simple Kepler orbits. However, there are a number of factors in the final stages of reentry - including the effects of gravitational harmonics, the effects of the Earth's equatorial bulge on the atmosphere, and the rotation of the Earth and atmosphere - that could cause them to diverge from simple Kepler orbit behavior and possibly change the probability of reentering over a given location. In this paper, the measured latitude and longitude distributions of these objects are directly compared with the predicted distributions, providing a fundamental empirical test of the model assumptions.

  10. Nuclear Geoplosics Sourcebook. Volume IV. Part I. Empirical Analysis of Ground Motion from Above and Underground Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    November 10, 1975. IV-1.8 Feynman , R. P., R. B. Leighton, and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. II, Chapter 39, Addison Wesley, Massachusetts...Event, POR 6400, Sandia Laboratories, March 1971. IV-2.18 Preston, R. G., and V. E. Wheeler , Response of the Line-of-Sight Pipe to Ground Shock in the...Hupmobile Nuclear Effects Test, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (Unpublished). IV-2.19 Randolph, P. L., R. G. Preston, and V. E. Wheeler , Preliminary

  11. Empirical Statistical Power for Testing Multilocus Genotypic Effects under Unbalanced Designs Using a Gibbs Sampler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyoung Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Epistasis that may explain a large portion of the phenotypic variation for complex economic traits of animals has been ignored in many genetic association studies. A Baysian method was introduced to draw inferences about multilocus genotypic effects based on their marginal posterior distributions by a Gibbs sampler. A simulation study was conducted to provide statistical powers under various unbalanced designs by using this method. Data were simulated by combined designs of number of loci, within genotype variance, and sample size in unbalanced designs with or without null combined genotype cells. Mean empirical statistical power was estimated for testing posterior mean estimate of combined genotype effect. A practical example for obtaining empirical statistical power estimates with a given sample size was provided under unbalanced designs. The empirical statistical powers would be useful for determining an optimal design when interactive associations of multiple loci with complex phenotypes were examined.

  12. Computer Model of the Empirical Knowledge of Physics Formation: Coordination with Testing Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert V. Mayer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of method of imitational modeling to study forming the empirical knowledge in pupil’s consciousness is discussed. The offered model is based on division of the physical facts into three categories: 1 the facts established in everyday life; 2 the facts, which the pupil can experimentally establish at a physics lesson; 3 the facts which are studied only on the theoretical level (speculative or ideally. The determination of the forgetting coefficients of the facts of the first, second and third categories and coordination of imitating model with distribution of empirical information in the school physics course and testing results is carried out. The graphs of dependence of empirical knowledge for various physics sections and facts categories on time are given.

  13. Some Preliminary Notes on an Empirical Test of Freud’s Theory on Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias eDesmet

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature indicates that empirical researchers have difficulty translating Freud’s theory on depression into appropriate research questions and hypotheses. In their attempt to do so, the level of complexity in Freud’s work is often lost. As a result, what is empirically tested is no more than a caricature of the original theory. To help researchers avoid such problems, this study presents a conceptual analysis of Freud’s theory of depression as it is presented in Mourning and Melancholia (Freud, 1917. In analyzing Freud’s theory on the etiology of depression, it is essential to differentiate between (1 an identification with the satisfying and frustrating aspects of the love object, (2 the inter- and an intrapersonal loss of the love object, and (3 conscious and unconscious dynamics. A schematic representation of the mechanism of depression is put forward and a research design by which this schema can be empirically investigated is outlined.

  14. Investigation of an empirical probability measure based test for multivariate normality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, J.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Beckman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Foutz (1980) derived a goodness of fit test for a hypothesis specifying a continuous, p-variate distribution. The test statistic is both distribution-free and independent of p. In adapting the Foutz test for multivariate normality, we consider using chi/sup 2/ and rescaled beta variates in constructing statistically equivalent blocks. The Foutz test is compared to other multivariate normality tests developed by Hawkins (1981) and Malkovich and Afifi (1973). The set of alternative distributions tested include Pearson type II and type VII, Johnson translations, Plackett, and distributions arising from Khintchine's theorem. Univariate alternatives from the general class developed by Johnson et al. (1980) were also used. An empirical study confirms the independence of the test statistic on p even when parameters are estimated. In general, the Foutz test is less conservative under the null hypothesis but has poorer power under most alternatives than the other tests.

  15. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. C.; Beck, D. F.; Harmon, C. D.; Shipers, L. R.

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program.

  16. AMS Ground Truth Measurements: Calibration and Test Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasiolek, P. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Airborne gamma spectrometry is one of the primary techniques used to define the extent of ground contamination after a radiological incident. Its usefulness was demonstrated extensively during the response to the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in March-May 2011. To map ground contamination a set of scintillation detectors is mounted on an airborne platform (airplane or helicopter) and flown over contaminated areas. The acquisition system collects spectral information together with the aircraft position and altitude every second. To provide useful information to decision makers, the count rate data expressed in counts per second (cps) needs to be converted to the terrestrial component of the exposure rate 1 m above ground, or surface activity of isotopes of concern. This is done using conversion coefficients derived from calibration flights. During a large scale radiological event, multiple flights may be necessary and may require use of assets from different agencies. However, as the production of a single, consistent map product depicting the ground contamination is the primary goal, it is critical to establish very early into the event a common calibration line. Such a line should be flown periodically in order to normalize data collected from different aerial acquisition systems and potentially flown at different flight altitudes and speeds. In order to verify and validate individual aerial systems, the calibration line needs to be characterized in terms of ground truth measurements. This is especially important if the contamination is due to short-lived radionuclides. The process of establishing such a line, as well as necessary ground truth measurements, is described in this document.

  17. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  18. The development and testing of pulsed detonation engine ground demonstrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Philip Koshy

    2008-10-01

    The successful implementation of a PDE running on fuel and air mixtures will require fast-acting fuel-air injection and mixing techniques, detonation initiation techniques such as DDT enhancing devices or a pre-detonator, an effective ignition system that can sustain repeated firing at high rates and a fast and capable, closed-loop control system. The control system requires high-speed transducers for real-time monitoring of the PDE and the detection of the detonation wave speed. It is widely accepted that the detonation properties predicted by C-J detonation relations are fairly accurate in comparison to experimental values. The post-detonation flow properties can also be expressed as a function of wave speed or Mach number. Therefore, the PDE control system can use C-J relations to predict the post-detonation flow properties based on measured initial conditions and compare the values with those obtained from using the wave speed. The controller can then vary the initial conditions within the combustor for the subsequent cycle, by modulating the frequency and duty cycle of the valves, to obtain optimum air and fuel flow rates, as well as modulate the energy and timing of the ignition to achieve the required detonation properties. Five different PDE ground demonstrators were designed, built and tested to study a number of the required sub-systems. This work presents a review of all the systems that were tested, along with suggestions for their improvement. The PDE setups, ranged from a compact PDE with a 19 mm (3/4 in.) i.d., to two 25 mm (1 in.) i.d. setups, to a 101 mm (4 in.) i.d. dual-stage PDE setup with a pre-detonator. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in the smaller PDEs. In the dual-stage PDE, propane-oxygen was used in the pre-detonator, while propane-air mixtures were used in the main combustor. Both rotary valves and solenoid valve injectors were studied. The rotary valves setups were tested at 10 Hz, while the solenoid valves were tested at up to 30 Hz

  19. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  20. Eurobot Ground Prototype Control System Overview & Tests Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Andrea; Martelli, Andrea; Pensavalle, Emanuele; Ferraris, Simona; Didot, Frederic

    2010-08-01

    In the planned missions on Moon and Mars, robotics can play a key role, as robots can both assist astronauts and, above all, relieve them of dangerous or too difficult tasks. To this aim, both cooperative capabilities and a great level of autonomy are needed: the robotic crew assistant must be able to work on its own, without supervision by humans, and to help astronauts to accomplish tasks otherwise unfeasible for them. Within this context, a project named Eurobot Ground Prototype, conducted in conjunction with ESA and Thales Alenia Space, is presented. EGP is a dual-arm mobile manipulator and exploits both stereo cameras and force/torque sensors in order to rely on visual and force feedback. This paper provides an overview of the performed and on going activities within the Eurobot Ground Prototype project.

  1. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn

    2006-01-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks...... and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles' heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant....... Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-advanced stellar compass (mu ASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method...

  2. Tacit knowledge: A refinement and empirical test of the Academic Tacit Knowledge Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insch, Gary S; McIntyre, Nancy; Dawley, David

    2008-11-01

    Researchers have linked tacit knowledge to improved organizational performance, but research on how to measure tacit knowledge is scarce. In the present study, the authors proposed and empirically tested a model of tacit knowledge and an accompanying measurement scale of academic tacit knowledge. They present 6 hypotheses that support the proposed tacit knowledge model regarding the role of cognitive (self-motivation, self-organization); technical (individual task, institutional task); and social (task-related, general) skills. The authors tested these hypotheses with 542 responses to the Academic Tacit Knowledge Scale, which included the respondents' grade point average-the performance variable. All 6 hypotheses were supported.

  3. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  4. A Test of a Strong Ground Motion Prediction Methodology for the 7 September 1999, Mw=6.0 Athens Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L; Ioannidou, E; Voulgaris, N; Kalogeras, I; Savy, J; Foxall, W; Stavrakakis, G

    2004-08-06

    We test a methodology to predict the range of ground-motion hazard for a fixed magnitude earthquake along a specific fault or within a specific source volume, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this into probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA). We modeled ground motion with empirical Green's functions. We tested our methodology with the 7 September 1999, Mw=6.0 Athens earthquake, we: (1) developed constraints on rupture parameters based on prior knowledge of earthquake rupture processes and sources in the region; (2) generated impulsive point shear source empirical Green's functions by deconvolving out the source contribution of M < 4.0 aftershocks; (3) used aftershocks that occurred throughout the area and not necessarily along the fault to be modeled; (4) ran a sufficient number of scenario earthquakes to span the full variability of ground motion possible; (5) found that our distribution of synthesized ground motions span what actually occurred and their distribution is realistically narrow; (6) determined that one of our source models generates records that match observed time histories well; (7) found that certain combinations of rupture parameters produced ''extreme'' ground motions at some stations; (8) identified that the ''best fitting'' rupture models occurred in the vicinity of 38.05{sup o} N 23.60{sup o} W with center of rupture near 12 km, and near unilateral rupture towards the areas of high damage, and this is consistent with independent investigations; and (9) synthesized strong motion records in high damage areas for which records from the earthquake were not recorded. We then developed a demonstration PSHA for a source region near Athens utilizing synthesized ground motion rather that traditional attenuation. We synthesized 500 earthquakes distributed throughout the source zone likely to have Mw=6.0 earthquakes near Athens. We assumed an average return period of 1000 years for this

  5. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. Development and testing of the empirical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeshoff, Kennert; Lanaro, Flavio [Berg Bygg Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lanru Jing [Royal Inst. of Techn., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Engineering Geology

    2002-05-01

    This report presents the results of one part of a wide project for the determination of a methodology for the determination of the rock mechanics properties of the rock mass for the so-called Aespoe Test Case. The Project consists of three major parts: the empirical part dealing with the characterisation of the rock mass by applying empirical methods, a part determining the rock mechanics properties of the rock mass through numerical modelling, and a third part carrying out numerical modelling for the determination of the stress state at Aespoe. All Project's parts were performed based on a limited amount of data about the geology and mechanical tests on samples selected from the Aespoe Database. This Report only considers the empirical approach. The purpose of the project is the development of a descriptive rock mechanics model for SKBs rock mass investigations for a final repository site. The empirical characterisation of the rock mass provides correlations with some of the rock mechanics properties of the rock mass such as the deformation modulus, the friction angle and cohesion for a certain stress interval and the uniaxial compressive strength. For the characterisation of the rock mass, several empirical methods were analysed and reviewed. Among those methods, some were chosen because robust, applicable and widespread in modern rock mechanics. Major weight was given to the well-known Tunnel Quality Index (Q) and Rock Mass Rating (RMR) but also the Rock Mass Index (RMi), the Geological Strength Index (GSI) and Ramamurthy's Criterion were applied for comparison with the two classical methods. The process of: i) sorting the geometrical/geological/rock mechanics data, ii) identifying homogeneous rock volumes, iii) determining the input parameters for the empirical ratings for rock mass characterisation; iv) evaluating the mechanical properties by using empirical relations with the rock mass ratings; was considered. By comparing the methodologies involved

  6. MEASUREMENT OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A HANG-GLIDER-WING BY GROUND RUN TESTS USING A TEST VEHICLE

    OpenAIRE

    Hozumi, Koki; KOMODA, Masaki; Ono, Takatsugu; TSUKANO, Yukichi; 穂積, 弘毅; 古茂田, 真幸; 小野, 孝次; 塚野, 雄吉

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate longitudinal force and moment characteristics of a hang-glider-wing, ground run tests were conducted using a test vehicle. A hang-glider-wing was installed on a test vehicle using a six-components-balance for wind tunnel use. Aerodynamic force and moment were measrued during the vehicle run at various constant speeds. Geometrical twist distribution along the wing span was recorded as well. Measured force and moment data were corrected for possible ground effect and upw...

  7. Strategies for Ground Based Testing of Manned Lunar Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Jeff; Peacock, Mike; Gill, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Integrated testing (such as Multi-Element Integrated Test (MEIT)) is critical to reducing risks and minimizing problems encountered during assembly, activation, and on-orbit operation of large, complex manned spacecraft. Provides the best implementation of "Test Like You Fly:. Planning for integrated testing needs to begin at the earliest stages of Program definition. Program leadership needs to fully understand and buy in to what integrated testing is and why it needs to be performed. As Program evolves and design and schedules mature, continually look for suitable opportunities to perform testing where enough components are together in one place at one time. The benefits to be gained are well worth the costs.

  8. Space Shuttle Damper System for Ground Wind Load Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G. D.; Holt, J. R.; Chang, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    An active damper system which was originally developed for a 5.5% Saturn IB/Skylab Ground Winds Model was modified and used for similar purposes in a Space Shuttle model. A second damper system which was originally used in a 3% Saturn V/Dry Workshop model was also modified and made compatible with the Space Shuttle model to serve as a back-up system. Included in this final report are descriptions of the modified damper systems and the associated control and instrumentation.

  9. Software Development and Test Methodology for a Distributed Ground System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, George; Guillebeau, Pat; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Center (POC) ground system has evolved over a period of about 10 years. During this time the software processes have migrated from more traditional to more contemporary development processes in an effort to minimize unnecessary overhead while maximizing process benefits. The Software processes that have evolved still emphasize requirements capture, software configuration management, design documenting, and making sure the products that have been developed are accountable to initial requirements. This paper will give an overview of how the Software Processes have evolved, highlighting the positives as well as the negatives. In addition, we will mention the COTS tools that have been integrated into the processes and how the COTS have provided value to the project.

  10. Testing of the Ricardian Equivalence proposition: An Empirical Examination for Malaysia (1962-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismadi Ismail

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of debts and budgetary deficit on real variables using structural Vector Error Correction Model (VECM method with long-run restrictions. We compare our estimates of the impulse responses with those based on levels Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR with standard recursive order restrictions. The test is conducted on the Malaysian data covering the period of 1962-2006. The empirical results do not support the existence of “Ricardian Equivalence” hypothesis. The effects of budgetary deficit and government spending have a significant influence on private consumption and private investment.

  11. Strategic regulatory entry deterrence: an empirical test in the ophthalmic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas-Wilson, D

    1989-12-01

    This paper provides an empirical test of the theory of strategic regulatory entry deterrence--the theory that subgroups of firms within an industry will use the regulatory process to increase rivals' costs and thereby deter rivals' entry. The results suggest that the commercial practice restrictions present in the ophthalmic industry deterred chain optical firms' entry into the market. This result in combination with earlier findings that the restrictions increase optometrists' prices suggests that cost-raising strategies can be used to disadvantage rivals or drive them out of the market without the need to lower price.

  12. Models of expected returns on the brazilian market: Empirical tests using predictive methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Mussa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Predictive methodologies for test of the expected returns models are largely diffused on the international academic environment. However, these methods have not been used in Brazil in a systematic way. Generally, empirical studies proceeded with Brazilian stock market data are concentrated only in the first step of these methodologies. The purpose of this article was test and compare the models CAPM, 3-factors and 4-factors using a predictive methodology, considering two steps – temporal and cross-section regressions – with standard errors obtained by the techniques of Fama and Macbeth (1973. The results indicated the superiority of the 4-fators model as compared to the 3-fators model, and the superiority of the 3- factors model as compared to the CAPM, but no one of the tested models were enough on the explanation of the Brazilian stock returns. Contrary to some empirical evidences, that do not use predictive methodology, the size and momentum effect seem do not exist on the Brazilian capital markets, but there are evidences of the value effect and the relevance of the market for explanation of expected returns. These finds rise some questions, mainly caused by the originality of the methodology on the local market and by the fact that this subject is still incipient and polemic on the Brazilian academic environment.

  13. Strong ground motion synthesis for a M=7.2 earthquake in the Gulf of Corinth, Greece using Empirical Green`s functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.; Stavrakakis, G.N.; Ioannidou, E.; Wu, F.T.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.

    1998-01-01

    We synthesize strong ground motion at three sites from a M=7.2 earthquake along the MW-trending Gulf of Cornith seismic zone. We model rupture along an 80 segment of the zone. The entire length of the fault, if activated at one time, can lead to an event comparable to that of the 1995 Kobe earthquake. With the improved digital data now routinely available, it becomes possible to use recordings of small earthquakes as empirical Green`s functions to synthesize potential ground motion for future large earthquakes. We developed a suite of 100 rupture scenarios for the earthquake and computed the commensurate strong ground motion time histories. We synthesized strong ground motion with physics-based solutions of earthquake rupture and applied physical bounds on rupture parameters. The synthesized ground motions obtained are source and site specific. By having a suite of rupture scenarios of hazardous earthquakes for a fixed magnitude and identifying the hazard to a site from the statistical distribution of engineering parameters, we have introduced a probabilistic component to the deterministic hazard calculation. The time histories suggested for engineering design are the ones that most closely match either the average or one standard deviation absolute accelerations response values.

  14. Theories of coalition formation: An empirical test using data from Danish local government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjæveland, Asbjørn; Serritzlew, Søren; Blom-Hansen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    problem present in many coalition studies - namely that the theories are tested on data of national government coalitions in postwar Europe: the very data that gave rise to the theories in the first place. Instead, the authors focus on government coalitions at the municipal level. They base their analysis......Theories of coalition formation represent a diverse set of arguments about why some government coalitions form while others do not. In this article, the authors present a systematic empirical test of the relative importance of the various arguments. The test is designed to avoid a circularity...... on an expert survey of almost 3,000 local councillors from all municipalities in Denmark. They use conditional logit analysis to model government formation as a discrete choice between all potential governments. The analysis confirms some, but far from all, traditional explanations such as those based...

  15. A Model of Managerial Effectiveness in Information Security: From Grounded Theory to Empirical Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-13

    timed increments with forced gaps of at least three days each phase that actually averaged over four days each ( Conger , Kanungo , & Menon, 2000...2004, from http://www.cert.org/stats/cert_stats.html#incidents Conger , J., A., Kanungo , R. N., & Menon, S. T. (2000). Charismatic Leadership and

  16. SMART empirical approaches for predicting field performance of PV modules from results of reliability tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardikar, Kedar Y.; Liu, Bill J. J.; Bheemreddy, Venkata

    2016-09-01

    Gaining an understanding of degradation mechanisms and their characterization are critical in developing relevant accelerated tests to ensure PV module performance warranty over a typical lifetime of 25 years. As newer technologies are adapted for PV, including new PV cell technologies, new packaging materials, and newer product designs, the availability of field data over extended periods of time for product performance assessment cannot be expected within the typical timeframe for business decisions. In this work, to enable product design decisions and product performance assessment for PV modules utilizing newer technologies, Simulation and Mechanism based Accelerated Reliability Testing (SMART) methodology and empirical approaches to predict field performance from accelerated test results are presented. The method is demonstrated for field life assessment of flexible PV modules based on degradation mechanisms observed in two accelerated tests, namely, Damp Heat and Thermal Cycling. The method is based on design of accelerated testing scheme with the intent to develop relevant acceleration factor models. The acceleration factor model is validated by extensive reliability testing under different conditions going beyond the established certification standards. Once the acceleration factor model is validated for the test matrix a modeling scheme is developed to predict field performance from results of accelerated testing for particular failure modes of interest. Further refinement of the model can continue as more field data becomes available. While the demonstration of the method in this work is for thin film flexible PV modules, the framework and methodology can be adapted to other PV products.

  17. Single-shell tank riser resistance to ground test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiewert, L.R.

    1996-03-11

    This Test Procedure provides the general directions for conducting Single-Shell Tank Riser to Earth Measurements which will be used by engineering as a step towards providing closure for the Lightning Hazard Issue.

  18. Enhanced ground-based vibration testing for aerodynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daborn, P. M.; Ind, P. R.; Ewins, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Typical methods of replicating aerodynamic environments in the laboratory are generally poor. A structure which flies "freely" in its normal operating environment, excited over its entire external surface by aerodynamic forces and in all directions simultaneously, is then subjected to a vibration test in the laboratory whilst rigidly attached to a high impedance shaker and excited by forces applied through a few attachment points and in one direction only. The two environments could hardly be more different. The majority of vibration testing is carried out at commercial establishments and it is understandable that little has been published which demonstrates the limitations with the status quo. The primary objective of this research is to do just that with a view to identifying significant improvements in vibration testing in light of modern technology. In this paper, case studies are presented which highlight some of the limitations with typical vibration tests showing that they can lead to significant overtests, sometimes by many orders of magnitude, with the level of overtest varying considerably across a wide range of frequencies. This research shows that substantial benefits can be gained by "freely" suspending the structure in the laboratory and exciting it with a relatively small number of electrodynamic shakers using Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) control technology. The shaker configuration can be designed to excite the modes within the bandwidth utilising the inherent amplification of the resonances to achieve the desired response levels. This free-free MIMO vibration test approach is shown to result in substantial benefits that include extremely good replication of the aerodynamic environment and significant savings in time as all axes are excited simultaneously instead of the sequential X, Y and Z testing required with traditional vibration tests. In addition, substantial cost savings can be achieved by replacing some expensive large shaker systems

  19. Guidelines of the Design of Electropyrotechnic Firing Circuit for Unmanned Flight and Ground Test Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Lucy, Melvin H.; Massie, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center, Engineering Directorate, Electronic System Branch, is responsible for providing pyrotechnic support capabilities to Langley Research Center unmanned flight and ground test projects. These capabilities include device selection, procurement, testing, problem solving, firing system design, fabrication and testing; ground support equipment design, fabrication and testing; checkout procedures and procedure?s training to pyro technicians. This technical memorandum will serve as a guideline for the design, fabrication and testing of electropyrotechnic firing systems. The guidelines will discuss the entire process beginning with requirements definition and ending with development and execution.

  20. Joint ACE ground penetrating radar antenna test facility at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter; Sarri, A.;

    2005-01-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility, established within the ACE network at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), is described. Examples of results from the facility obtained from measurements of eight different GPR antennas are presented.......A ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility, established within the ACE network at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), is described. Examples of results from the facility obtained from measurements of eight different GPR antennas are presented....

  1. Guidance on the Stand Down, Mothball, and Reactivation of Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Gregrey T.; Dunn, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of aerospace and aeronautics products typically requires three distinct types of testing resources across research, development, test, and evaluation: experimental ground testing, computational "testing" and development, and flight testing. Over the last twenty plus years, computational methods have replaced some physical experiments and this trend is continuing. The result is decreased utilization of ground test capabilities and, along with market forces, industry consolidation, and other factors, has resulted in the stand down and oftentimes closure of many ground test facilities. Ground test capabilities are (and very likely will continue to be for many years) required to verify computational results and to provide information for regimes where computational methods remain immature. Ground test capabilities are very costly to build and to maintain, so once constructed and operational it may be desirable to retain access to those capabilities even if not currently needed. One means of doing this while reducing ongoing sustainment costs is to stand down the facility into a "mothball" status - keeping it alive to bring it back when needed. Both NASA and the US Department of Defense have policies to accomplish the mothball of a facility, but with little detail. This paper offers a generic process to follow that can be tailored based on the needs of the owner and the applicable facility.

  2. Criterion for traffic phases in single vehicle data and empirical test of a microscopic three-phase traffic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, B S; Hiller, A; Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hiller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    A microscopic criterion for distinguishing synchronized flow and wide moving jam phases in single vehicle data measured at a single freeway location is presented. Empirical local congested traffic states in single vehicle data measured on different days are classified into synchronized flow states and states consisting of synchronized flow and wide moving jam(s). Then empirical microscopic characteristics for these different local congested traffic states are studied. Using these characteristics and empirical spatiotemporal macroscopic traffic phenomena, an empirical test of a microscopic three-phase traffic flow theory is performed. Simulations show that the microscopic criterion and macroscopic spatiotemporal objective criteria lead to the same identification of the synchronized flow and wide moving jam phases in congested traffic. It is found that microscopic three-phase traffic models can explain both microscopic and macroscopic empirical congested pattern features. It is obtained that microscopic distrib...

  3. Current Ground Test Options for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    About 20 different NTP engines/ reactors were tested from 1959 to 1972 as part of the Rover and Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program. Most were tested in open air at test cell A or test cell C, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Even after serious engine breakdowns of the reactor (e.g., Phoebus 1A), the test cells were cleaned up for other engine tests. The engine test stand (ETS) was made for high altitude (approximately 1 psia) testing of an NTP engine with a flight configuration, but still had the exhaust released to open air. The Rover/NERVA program became aware of new environmental regulations which would prohibit the release of any significant quantity of radioactive particulates and noble gases into the open air. The nuclear furnace (NF-1) was the last reactor tested before the program was cancelled in 1973, but successfully demonstrated a scrubber concept on how to filter the NTP exhaust. The NF-1 was demonstrated in the summer of 1972. The NF-1 used a 44MW reactor and operated each run for approximately 90 minutes. The system cooled the hot hydrogen exhaust from the engine with a water spray before entering a particle filter. The exhaust then passed through a series of heat exchangers and water separators to help remove water from the exhaust and further reduce the exhaust temperatures. The exhaust was next prepared for the charcoal trap by passing through a dryer and effluent cooler to bring exhaust temperatures close to liquid nitrogen. At those low temperatures, most of the noble gases (e.g., Xe and Kr made from fission products) get captured in the charcoal trap. The filtered hydrogen is finally passed through a flare stack and released to the air. The concept was overall successful but did show a La plating on some surfaces and had multiple recommendations for improvement. The most recent detailed study on the NTP scrubber concept was performed by the ARES Corporation in 2006. The concept is based on a 50,000 lbf thrust engine

  4. Partial Nucleate Pool Boiling at Low Heat Flux: Preliminary Ground Test for SOBER-SJ10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke; Li, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Hui-Xiong; Li, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Focusing on partial nucleate pool boiling at low heat flux, SOBER-SJ10, one of 27 experiments of the program SJ-10, has been proposed to study local convection and heat transfer around an isolated growing vapor bubble during nucleate pool boiling on a well characterized flat surface in microgravity. An integrated micro heater has been developed. By using a local pulse overheating method in the experimental mode of single bubble boiling, a bubble nucleus can be excited with accurate spatial and temporal positioning on the top-side of a quartz glass substrate with a thickness of 2 mm and an effective heating area of 4.5 mm in diameter, and then grows under an approximate constant heat input provided by the main heater on the back-side of the substrate. Ten thin film micro-RTDs are used for local temperature measurements on the heating surface underneath the growing bubble. Normal pool boiling experiments can also be carried out with step-by-step increase of heating voltage. A series of ground test of the flight module of SOBER-SJ10 have been conducted. Good agreement of the measured data of single phase natural convection with the common-used empirical correlation warrants reasonable confidence in the data. It is found that the values of the incipience superheat of pool boiling at different subcooling are consistent with each others, verifying that the influence of subcooling on boiling incipience can be neglected. Pool boiling curves are also obtained, which shows great influence of subcooling on heat transfer of partial nucleate pool boiling, particularly in lower heat flux.

  5. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  6. Artificial intelligence techniques for ground test monitoring of rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Moonis; Gupta, U. K.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed which can detect anomalies in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data significantly earlier than the redline algorithm currently in use. The training of such an expert system focuses on two approaches which are based on low frequency and high frequency analyses of sensor data. Both approaches are being tested on data from SSME tests and their results compared with the findings of NASA and Rocketdyne experts. Prototype implementations have detected the presence of anomalies earlier than the redline algorithms that are in use currently. It therefore appears that these approaches have the potential of detecting anomalies early eneough to shut down the engine or take other corrective action before severe damage to the engine occurs.

  7. Erroneous HIV test isn't grounds for recovering damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-21

    The Florida Supreme Court ruled that a Florida man cannot recover damages for the mental anguish he suffered for nineteen months after being misdiagnosed as HIV-positive. The court refused to drop the state's impact rule, which limits awards for mental anguish in negligence lawsuits to cases with underlying physical injuries or willful misconduct. The plaintiff, known as [name removed], filed suit against Humana Hospital-Lucerne in [name removed], where he received the test; [name removed] Clinical Laboratories, which performed the test and analysis; and the doctor, [name removed]. Although the court rejected [name removed]'s arguments, they gave him leave to file an amended complaint if he could demonstrate that the medical treatment he underwent as a result of his HIV diagnosis caused him physical injury.

  8. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  9. Development of Items for a Pedagogical Content Knowledge Test Based on Empirical Analysis of Pupils' Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttner, Melanie; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2012-05-01

    In view of the lack of instruments for measuring biology teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), this article reports on a study about the development of PCK items for measuring teachers' knowledge of pupils' errors and ways for dealing with them. This study investigated 9th and 10th grade German pupils' (n = 461) drawings in an achievement test about the knee-jerk in biology, which were analysed by using the inductive qualitative analysis of their content. The empirical data were used for the development of the items in the PCK test. The validation of the items was determined with think-aloud interviews of German secondary school teachers (n = 5). If the item was determined, the reliability was tested by the results of German secondary school biology teachers (n = 65) who took the PCK test. The results indicated that these items are satisfactorily reliable (Cronbach's alpha values ranged from 0.60 to 0.65). We suggest a larger sample size and American biology teachers be used in our further studies. The findings of this study about teachers' professional knowledge from the PCK test could provide new information about the influence of teachers' knowledge on their pupils' understanding of biology and their possible errors in learning biology.

  10. EMPIRICAL WEIGHTED MODELLING ON INTER-COUNTY INEQUALITIES EVOLUTION AND TO TEST ECONOMICAL CONVERGENCE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia\tMOROIANU‐DUMITRESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, the regional convergence process in Europe has attracted a considerable interest as a highly significant issue, especially after EU enlargement with the New Member States from Central and Eastern Europe. The most usual empirical approaches are using the β- and σ-convergence, originally developed by a series of neo-classical models. Up-to-date, the EU integration process was proven to be accompanied by an increase of the regional inequalities. In order to determine the existence of a similar increase of the inequalities between the administrative counties (NUTS3 included in the NUTS2 and NUTS1 regions of Romania, this paper provides an empirical modelling of economic convergence allowing to evaluate the level and evolution of the inter-regional inequalities over more than a decade period lasting from 1995 up to 2011. The paper presents the results of a large cross-sectional study of σ-convergence and weighted coefficient of variation, using GDP and population data obtained from the National Institute of Statistics of Romania. Both graphical representation including non-linear regression and the associated tables summarizing numerical values of the main statistical tests are demonstrating the impact of pre- accession policy on the economic development of all Romanian NUTS types. The clearly emphasised convergence in the middle time subinterval can be correlated with the pre-accession drastic changes on economic, political and social level, and with the opening of the Schengen borders for Romanian labor force in 2002.

  11. Ground Handling of Batteries at Test and Launch-site Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Hohl, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Ground handling of flight as well as engineering batteries at test facilities and launch-site facilities is a safety critical process. Test equipment interfacing with the batteries should have the required controls to prevent a hazardous failure of the batteries. Test equipment failures should not induce catastrophic failures on the batteries. Transportation requirements for batteries should also be taken into consideration for safe transportation. This viewgraph presentation includes information on the safe handling of batteries for ground processing at test facilities as well as launch-site facilities.

  12. Developing Uncertainty Models for Robust Flutter Analysis Using Ground Vibration Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Starr; Lind, Rick; Kehoe, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground vibration test can be used to obtain information about structural dynamics that is important for flutter analysis. Traditionally, this information#such as natural frequencies of modes#is used to update analytical models used to predict flutter speeds. The ground vibration test can also be used to obtain uncertainty models, such as natural frequencies and their associated variations, that can update analytical models for the purpose of predicting robust flutter speeds. Analyzing test data using the -norm, rather than the traditional 2-norm, is shown to lead to a minimum-size uncertainty description and, consequently, a least-conservative robust flutter speed. This approach is demonstrated using ground vibration test data for the Aerostructures Test Wing. Different norms are used to formulate uncertainty models and their associated robust flutter speeds to evaluate which norm is least conservative.

  13. The Utopianisation of Critique: The Tension between Education Conceived as a Utopian Concept and as One Grounded in Empirical Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Critique is a concept that is constantly used as an instrument for agreement or disagreement, for reflection and discussion. There is a difference, however, between critique as a historically grounded phenomenon and critique as a utopian conception not situated in any particular socio-historical context. Educational theory resists reduction to…

  14. Empirical model for mean temperature for Indian zone and estimation of precipitable water vapor from ground based GPS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Suresh Raju

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of precipitable water (PW in the atmosphere from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS essentially involves modeling the zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD in terms of surface Pressure (Ps and subtracting it from the corresponding values of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD to estimate the zenith wet (non-hydrostatic delay (ZWD. This further involves establishing an appropriate model connecting PW and ZWD, which in its simplest case assumed to be similar to that of ZHD. But when the temperature variations are large, for the accurate estimate of PW the variation of the proportionality constant connecting PW and ZWD is to be accounted. For this a water vapor weighted mean temperature (Tm has been defined by many investigations, which has to be modeled on a regional basis. For estimating PW over the Indian region from GPS data, a region specific model for Tm in terms of surface temperature (Ts is developed using the radiosonde measurements from eight India Meteorological Department (IMD stations spread over the sub-continent within a latitude range of 8.5°–32.6° N. Following a similar procedure Tm-based models are also evolved for each of these stations and the features of these site-specific models are compared with those of the region-specific model. Applicability of the region-specific and site-specific Tm-based models in retrieving PW from GPS data recorded at the IGS sites Bangalore and Hyderabad, is tested by comparing the retrieved values of PW with those estimated from the altitude profile of water vapor measured using radiosonde. The values of ZWD estimated at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC are used to test the validity of the models by estimating the PW using the models and comparing it with those obtained from radiosonde data. The region specific Tm-based model is found to be in par with if not better than a

  15. Empirical tests of natural selection-based evolutionary accounts of ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thagaard, Marthe S; Faraone, Stephen V; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J;

    2016-01-01

    -based evolutionary accounts for ADHD in adherence with the PRISMA guideline. The PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO databases were screened for relevant publications, by combining search terms covering evolution/selection with search terms covering ADHD. RESULTS: The search identified 790 records. Of these, 15 full......-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and three were included in the review. Two of these reported on the evolution of the seven-repeat allele of the ADHD-associated dopamine receptor D4 gene, and one reported on the results of a simulation study of the effect of suggested ADHD-traits on group survival...... validity for the disorder. CONCLUSIONS: This review indicates that the natural selection-based accounts of ADHD have not been subjected to empirical test and therefore remain hypothetical....

  16. A Meta-Analysis of Empirically Tested School-Based Dating Violence Prevention Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Edwards

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Teen dating violence prevention programs implemented in schools and empirically tested were subjected to meta-analysis. Eight studies met criteria for inclusion, consisting of both within and between designs. Overall, the weighted mean effect size (ES across studies was significant, ESr = .11; 95% confidence interval (CI = [.08, .15], p < .0001, showing an overall positive effect of the studied prevention programs. However, 25% of the studies showed an effect in the negative direction, meaning students appeared to be more supportive of dating violence after participating in a dating violence prevention program. This heightens the need for thorough program evaluation as well as the need for decision makers to have access to data about the effectiveness of programs they are considering implementing. Further implications of the results and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  17. Empirical testing of Kotler's high-performance factors to increase sales growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Dayan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and/or objectives: The primary objective of this study is to empirically test Kotler's (2003 high-performance model which ensures an increase in sales growth. More specifically, the study explores the influence of process variables (as measured by marketing strategies, resources management (as measured by the management of labour, materials, machines, information technology and energy and organisational variables (as measured by TQM and organisational culture on sales growth in the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Problem investigated Various research studies suggest that the managers of firms are continuously challenged in their attempts to increase their sales (Morre, 2007; Pauwels, Silva Risso, Srinivasan & Hanssens, 2004: 142-143; Gray & Hayes, 2007: 1. Kotler (2003 suggests a model that leads to a high performing business. The question is posed as to whether this model can be used to increase sales growth in all businesses. This study seeks to develop a generic model to increase sales growth across industries by using an adapted version of Kotler's (2003 high-performance model. The study investigates the application of this adapted model on the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Design and/or methodology and/or approach: An empirical causal research design that includes 770 marketing and product development practitioners from multinational food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing firms, was used in this study. A response rate of 76.1% was achieved as only 571 useable questionnaires were returned. The internal reliability and discriminant validity of the measuring instrument were assessed by the calculation of Cronbach alpha coefficients and the conducting an exploratory factor analysis respectively. Structural Equation Modelling SEM was used to statistically test the relationships between the independent variables (marketing strategies, resource management, TQM and

  18. Hardware and software for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batischev, A. G., E-mail: Alexey-Batischev@mail.ru; Galper, A. M. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Grishin, S. A. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics, National (Belarus); Naumov, P. Yu. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Niadvetski, N. S. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics, National (Belarus)

    2015-12-15

    The article presents a hardware and software complex for ground tests of onboard charged particle spectrometers that are designed at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI for monitoring of nuclear-physical factors of space weather and can be installed in a wide class of satellites. The structural scheme and operating principles of component parts are discussed. The main algorithm and software features are presented. The technique of ground spectrometer tests and calibrations in various measurement modes at atmospheric cosmic particle flows, both in autonomous laboratories and in interface tests as part of a satellite, is also described.

  19. An empirical look at the Defense Mechanism Test (DMT): reliability and construct validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekehammar, Bo; Zuber, Irena; Konstenius, Marja-Liisa

    2005-07-01

    Although the Defense Mechanism Test (DMT) has been in use for almost half a century, there are still quite contradictory views about whether it is a reliable instrument, and if so, what it really measures. Thus, based on data from 39 female students, we first examined DMT inter-coder reliability by analyzing the agreement among trained judges in their coding of the same DMT protocols. Second, we constructed a "parallel" photographic picture that retained all structural characteristic of the original and analyzed DMT parallel-test reliability. Third, we examined the construct validity of the DMT by (a) employing three self-report defense-mechanism inventories and analyzing the intercorrelations between DMT defense scores and corresponding defenses in these instruments, (b) studying the relationships between DMT responses and scores on trait and state anxiety, and (c) relating DMT-defense scores to measures of self-esteem. The main results showed that the DMT can be coded with high reliability by trained coders, that the parallel-test reliability is unsatisfactory compared to traditional psychometric standards, that there is a certain generalizability in the number of perceptual distortions that people display from one picture to another, and that the construct validation provided meager empirical evidence for the conclusion that the DMT measures what it purports to measure, that is, psychological defense mechanisms.

  20. Development of empirical correlation of peak friction angle with surface roughness of discontinuities using tilt test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serasa, Ailie Sofyiana; Lai, Goh Thian; Rafek, Abdul Ghani; Simon, Norbert; Hussein, Azimah; Ern, Lee Khai; Surip, Noraini; Mohamed, Tuan Rusli

    2016-11-01

    The significant influence of surface roughness of discontinuity surfaces is a quantity that is fundamental to the understanding of shear strength of geological discontinuities. This is due to reason that the shear strength of geological discontinuities greatly influenced the mechanical behavior of a rock mass especially in stability evaluation of tunnel, foundation, and natural slopes. In evaluating the stability of these structures, the study of peak friction angle (Φpeak) of rough discontinuity surfaces has become more prominent seeing that the shear strength is a pivotal factor causing failures. The measurement of peak friction angle however, requires an extensive series of laboratory tests which are both time and cost demanding. With that in mind, this publication presents an approach in the form of an experimentally determined polynomial equation to estimate peak friction angle of limestone discontinuity surfaces by measuring the Joint Roughness Coefficient (JRC) values from tilt tests, and applying the fore mentioned empirical correlation. A total of 1967 tilt tests and JRC measurements were conducted in the laboratory to determine the peak friction angles of rough limestone discontinuity surfaces. A polynomial equation of ɸpeak = -0.0635JRC2 + 3.95JRC + 25.2 that exhibited 0.99 coefficient of determination (R2) were obtained from the correlation of JRC and peak friction angles. The proposed correlation offers a practical method for estimation of peak friction angles of rough discontinuity surfaces of limestone from measurement of JRC in the field.

  1. An Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel DIF Analysis for Computer-Adaptive Tests. LSAC Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    This study investigated the applicability to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis that involves an empirical Bayes (EB) enhancement of the popular Mantel Haenszel (MH) DIF analysis method. The computerized Law School Admission Test (LSAT) assumed for this study was similar to that currently…

  2. Thermal and Fluid Modeling of the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) Ground Test Article (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to data acquired from a ground test article (GTA) for the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed - CRYOTE. To accomplish this analysis, it was broken into four primary tasks. These included model development, pre-test predictions, testing support at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC} and post-test correlations. Information from MSFC facilitated the task of refining and correlating the initial models. The primary goal of the modeling/testing/correlating efforts was to characterize heat loads throughout the ground test article. Significant factors impacting the heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation (MLI) performance, tank fill levels, tank pressures, and even contact conductance coefficients. This paper demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established, and it includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses seen during testing.

  3. Objectives and Progress on Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing for the Ares Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Asloms. Brice R.

    2009-01-01

    As NASA begins design and development of the Ares launch vehicles to replace the Space Shuttle and explore beyond low Earth orbit, Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component of ensuring that those vehicles can perform the missions assigned to them. A ground vibration test (GVT) is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. This data is then used to calibrate loads and control systems analysis models for verifying analyses of the launch vehicle. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be conducting IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2011 to 2012 using the venerable Test Stand (TS) 4550, which supported similar tests for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicle stacks.

  4. Testing the role of meander cutoff in promoting gene flow across a riverine barrier in ground skinks (Scincella lateralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Jackson

    Full Text Available Despite considerable attention, the long-term impact of rivers on species diversification remains uncertain. Meander loop cutoff (MLC is one river phenomenon that may compromise a river's diversifying effects by passively transferring organisms from one side of the river to the other. However, the ability of MLC to promote gene flow across rivers has not been demonstrated empirically. Here, we test several predictions of MLC-mediated gene flow in populations of North American ground skinks (Scincella lateralis separated by a well-established riverine barrier, the Mississippi River: 1 individuals collected from within meander cutoffs should be more closely related to individuals across the river than on the same side, 2 individuals within meander cutoffs should contain more immigrants than individuals away from meander cutoffs, 3 immigration rates estimated across the river should be highest in the direction of the cutoff event, and 4 the distribution of alleles native to one side of the river should be better predicted by the historical rather than current path of the river. To test these predictions we sampled 13 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA from ground skinks collected near three ancient meander loops. These predictions were generally supported by genetic data, although support was stronger for mtDNA than for microsatellite data. Partial support for genetic divergence of samples within ancient meander loops also provides evidence for the MLC hypothesis. Although a role for MLC-mediated gene flow was supported here for ground skinks, the transient nature of river channels and morphologies may limit the long-term importance of MLC in stemming population divergence across major rivers.

  5. Aerothermal Ground Testing of Flexible Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Walter E., III; Mesick, Nathaniel J.; Ferlemann, Paul G.; Siemers, Paul M., III; DelCorso, Joseph A.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Tobin, Steven A.; Kardell, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Flexible TPS development involves ground testing and analysis necessary to characterize performance of the FTPS candidates prior to flight testing. This paper provides an overview of the analysis and ground testing efforts performed over the last year at the NASA Langley Research Center and in the Boeing Large-Core Arc Tunnel (LCAT). In the LCAT test series, material layups were subjected to aerothermal loads commensurate with peak re-entry conditions enveloping a range of HIAD mission trajectories. The FTPS layups were tested over a heat flux range from 20 to 50 W/cm with associated surface pressures of 3 to 8 kPa. To support the testing effort a significant redesign of the existing shear (wedge) model holder from previous testing efforts was undertaken to develop a new test technique for supporting and evaluating the FTPS in the high-temperature, arc jet flow. Since the FTPS test samples typically experience a geometry change during testing, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models of the arc jet flow field and test model were developed to support the testing effort. The CFD results were used to help determine the test conditions experienced by the test samples as the surface geometry changes. This paper includes an overview of the Boeing LCAT facility, the general approach for testing FTPS, CFD analysis methodology and results, model holder design and test methodology, and selected thermal results of several FTPS layups.

  6. Critical analysis of the empirical tests of local hidden-variable theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Emilio

    1992-10-01

    A local hidden-variable model is exhibited for the experiments by Aspect, Grangier, and Roger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 47, 460 (1981); 49, 91 (1982)] and Aspect, Dalibard, and Roger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1804 (1982)] measuring polarization correlation of optical-photon pairs. The model agrees with quantum-mechanical predictions for all measurable quantities even with ideal polarizers and detectors, and emphasizes the need of a high degree of directional correlation, besides the correlation of spin (or polarization or other quantities), in any test of locality. It is proved that homogeneous inequalities, involving only coincidence detection rates, cannot discriminate between quantum mechanics and local theories, which invalidates all previously used empirical tests. The role of supplementary assumptions, like the so-called no enhancement, for the derivation of Bell's inequalities is discussed. Finally it is conjectured that quantum mechanics might be compatible with local realism, if we assume that not all self-adjoint operators represent observables and not all density operators represent states.

  7. Testing the robustness of the anthropogenic climate change detection statements using different empirical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbers, J.; Lopez, A.; Huntingford, C.; Allen, M. R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims to test the robustness of the detection and attribution of anthropogenic climate change using four different empirical models that were previously developed to explain the observed global mean temperature changes over the last few decades. These studies postulated that the main drivers of these changes included not only the usual natural forcings, such as solar and volcanic, and anthropogenic forcings, such as greenhouse gases and sulfates, but also other known Earth system oscillations such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). In this paper, we consider these signals, or forced responses, and test whether or not the anthropogenic signal can be robustly detected under different assumptions for the internal variability of the climate system. We assume that the internal variability of the global mean surface temperature can be described by simple stochastic models that explore a wide range of plausible temporal autocorrelations, ranging from short memory processes exemplified by an AR(1) model to long memory processes, represented by a fractional differenced model. In all instances, we conclude that human-induced changes to atmospheric gas composition is affecting global mean surface temperature changes.

  8. Testing the robustness of the anthropogenic climate change detection statements using different empirical models

    KAUST Repository

    Imbers, J.

    2013-04-27

    This paper aims to test the robustness of the detection and attribution of anthropogenic climate change using four different empirical models that were previously developed to explain the observed global mean temperature changes over the last few decades. These studies postulated that the main drivers of these changes included not only the usual natural forcings, such as solar and volcanic, and anthropogenic forcings, such as greenhouse gases and sulfates, but also other known Earth system oscillations such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). In this paper, we consider these signals, or forced responses, and test whether or not the anthropogenic signal can be robustly detected under different assumptions for the internal variability of the climate system. We assume that the internal variability of the global mean surface temperature can be described by simple stochastic models that explore a wide range of plausible temporal autocorrelations, ranging from short memory processes exemplified by an AR(1) model to long memory processes, represented by a fractional differenced model. In all instances, we conclude that human-induced changes to atmospheric gas composition is affecting global mean surface temperature changes. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  9. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihang Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter—SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  10. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-09-16

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter-SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  11. Quiet Spike(TradeMark) Build-up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Flight tests of the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation s Quiet Spike(TradeMark) hardware were recently completed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B airplane. NASA Dryden uses a modified F-15B (836) airplane as a testbed aircraft to cost-effectively fly flight research experiments that are typically mounted underneath the airplane, along the fuselage centerline. For the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment, instead of a centerline mounting, a forward-pointing boom was attached to the radar bulkhead of the airplane. The Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment is a stepping-stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate the sonic-boom strength of business jets flying over land. Prior to flying the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment on the F-15B airplane several ground vibration tests were required to understand the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B airplane. Because of flight hardware availability and compressed schedule requirements, a "traditional" ground vibration test of the mated F-15B Quiet Spike(TradeMark) ready-for-flight configuration did not leave sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight-testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. This report provides an overview of each phase of the "nontraditional" ground vibration testing completed for the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) project.

  12. X-51A Scramjet Demonstrator Program: Waverider Ground and Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    USAF) WaveRider program. The overall test objective of the X-51A program was to demonstrate a scramjet engine using endothermic hydrocarbon fuel...Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) scramjet engine , integrated into the vehicle, used endothermic hydrocarbon fuel (JP-7). The X-51A was designed to be...unlimited, 412TW-PA-13417 X-51A SCRAMJET DEMONSTRATOR PROGRAM: WAVERIDER GROUND AND FLIGHT TEST Maj Christopher M. Rondeau Chief Flight Test Engineer

  13. Rupture process of the main shock of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake with special reference to damaging ground motions: waveform inversion with empirical Green's functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Atsushi; Nagasaka, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rupture process of the main shock of the Kumamoto earthquake, particularly the generation of strong ground motions in the frequency range relevant to structural damage, was investigated based on the inversion of strong ground motions. Strong-motion records in the near-source region were mainly utilized because the authors were interested in the generation mechanism of damaging ground motions in the near-source region. Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) were applied to avoid uncertainty in the subsurface structure model. Four cases of inversions with different combinations of small events were used to investigate the dependence of the inversion results on the selection of the small events. It was found that the dependence of the final slip distribution and peak slip velocity distribution on the selection of the EGF events is small. The results clearly indicate that a region of significantly large slip and slip velocity existed approximately 15 km northeast of the hypocenter. However, no "asperity" was observed between the hypocenter and Mashiki. Thus, it is not appropriate to conclude that the large-amplitude pulse-like ground motion in Mashiki was generated by the forward-directivity effect associated with the rupture of an asperity. As far as the source effect is concerned, the ground motion in Mashiki cannot be interpreted as the worst case scenario. On the other hand, the rupture of the "asperity" 15 km northeast of the hypocenter should have caused significantly large ground motions in regions close to the asperity. The significant damage of highway bridges in the region can potentially be attributed to the rupture of the asperity. The result of this study was compared with an inversion result obtained from numerical Green's functions for a layered half-space. The two results share the main features in spite of the difference of the Green's functions and stations used. Therefore, it can be concluded that these two source models capture the

  14. Technology benefits and ground test facilities for high-speed civil transport development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Matthew M.; Shields, Elwood M.; Morris, Shelby J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The advanced technology base necessary for successful twenty-first century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft will require extensive ground testing in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and other disciplines. This paper analyzes the benefits of advanced technology application to HSCT concepts, addresses the adequacy of existing groundbased test facilities, and explores the need for new facilities required to support HSCT development. A substantial amount of HSCT-related ground testing can be accomplished in existing facilities. The HSCT development effort could also benefit significantly from some new facilities initially conceived for testing in other aeronautical research areas. A new structures testing facility is identified as critically needed to insure timely technology maturation.

  15. Including values in evidence-based policy making for breast screening: An empirically grounded tool to assist expert decision makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa

    2017-07-01

    Values are an important part of evidence-based decision making for health policy: they guide the type of evidence that is collected, how it is interpreted, and how important the conclusions are considered to be. Experts in breast screening (including clinicians, researchers, consumer advocates and senior administrators) hold differing values in relation to what is important in breast screening policy and practice, and committees may find it difficult to incorporate the complexity and variety of values into policy decisions. The decision making tool provided here is intended to assist with this process. The tool is modified from more general frameworks that are intended to assist with ethical decision making in public health, and informed by data drawn from previous empirical studies on values amongst Australian breast screening experts. It provides a structured format for breast screening committees to consider and discuss the values of themselves and others, suggests relevant topics for further inquiry and highlights areas of need for future research into the values of the public. It enables committees to publicly explain and justify their decisions with reference to values, improving transparency and accountability. It is intended to act alongside practices that seek to accommodate the values of individual women in the informed decision making process for personal decision making about participation in breast screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A study on the nondestructive test optimum design for a ground tracked combat vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Byeong Ho; Seo, Jae Hyun; Gil, Hyeon Jun [Defence Agency for Technology and Quality, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hyeong [Hanwha Techwin Co.,Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Sang Chul [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a nondestructive test (NDT) is performed to inspect the optimal design of a ground tracked combat vehicle for self-propelled artillery, tank, and armored vehicles. The minimum qualification required for personnel performing the NDT of a ground tracked combat vehicle was initially established in US military standards, and then applied to the Korean defense specifications to develop a ground tracked combat vehicle. However, the qualification standards of an NDT inspector have been integrated into NAS410 through the military and commercial specifications unification project that were applied in the existing aerospace/defense industry public standard. The design method for this study was verified by applying the optimal design to the liquid penetrant testing Al forging used in self-propelled artillery. This confirmed the reliability and soundness of the product.

  17. Selfish mothers? An empirical test of parent-offspring conflict over extended parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Manabi; Sen Majumder, Sreejani; Bhadra, Anindita

    2014-03-01

    Parent-offspring conflict (POC) theory is an interesting conceptual framework for understanding the dynamics of parental care. However, this theory is not easy to test empirically, as exact measures of parental investment in an experimental set-up are difficult to obtain. We have used free-ranging dogs Canis familiaris in India, to study POC in the context of extended parental care. We observed females and their pups in their natural habitat for the mother's tendency to share food given by humans with her pups in the weaning and post-weaning stages. Since these dogs are scavengers, and depend largely on human provided food for their sustenance, voluntary sharing of food by the mother with her pups is a good surrogate for extended parental care. Our behavioural observations convincingly demonstrate an increase of conflict and decrease of cooperation by the mother with her offspring over given food within a span of 4-6 weeks. We also demonstrate that the competition among the pups in a litter scales with litter size, an indicator of sib-sib competition.

  18. Ground vibration test results for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST)/Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1R) aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, T. H.; Gilyard, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) project was designed to control flutter actively at high subsonic speeds. Accurate knowledge of the structural model was critical for the successful design of the control system. A ground vibration test was conducted on the DAST vehicle to determine the structural model characteristics. This report presents and discusses the vibration and test equipment, the test setup and procedures, and the antisymmetric and symmetric mode shape results. The modal characteristics were subsequently used to update the structural model employed in the control law design process.

  19. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  20. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Winkler, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hancock, E. [Mountain Energy Partnership, Longmont, CO (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  1. The ACE-DTU Planar Near-Field Ground Penetrating Radar Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The ACE-DTU planar near-field ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility is used to measure the plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a GPR loop antenna close to the air-soil interface by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented using knowledge about the complex...

  2. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification program. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A proposal for the demonstration, development and production of the Isotope Brayton Flight System for space vehicles is presented with details on the technical requirements for designing and testing a ground demonstration system and on the program organization and personnel. (LCL)

  3. The ACE-DTU Planar Near-Field Ground Penetrating Radar Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The ACE-DTU planar near-field ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility is used to measure the plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a GPR loop antenna close to the air-soil interface by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented using knowledge about the complex...

  4. Empirical Testing of a Conceptual Model and Measurement Instrument for the Assessment of Trustworthiness of Project Team Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Van Bruggen, Jan; Valcke, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Rusman, E., Van Bruggen, J., & Valcke, M. (2009). Empirical Testing of a Conceptual Model and Measurement Instrument for the Assessment of Trustworthiness of Project Team Members. Paper presented at the Trust Workshop at the Eighth International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems

  5. Empirical Testing of a Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: An Exploratory Study of Educational Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    This study extended the technology acceptance model and empirically tested the new model with wikis, a new type of educational technology. Based on social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, three new variables, wiki self-efficacy, online posting anxiety, and perceived behavioral control, were added to the original technology…

  6. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Characterization of Vacuum Facility Background Gas Through Simulation and Considerations for Electric Propulsion Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, John T.; Burt, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The background gas in a vacuum facility for electric propulsion ground testing is examined in detail through a series of cold flow simulations using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. The focus here is on the background gas itself, its structure and characteristics, rather than assessing its interaction and impact on thruster operation. The background gas, which is often incorrectly characterized as uniform, is found to have a notable velocity within a test facility. The gas velocity has an impact on the proper measurement of pressure and the calculation of ingestion flux to a thruster. There are also considerations for best practices for tests that involve the introduction of supplemental gas flows to artificially increase the background pressure. All of these effects need to be accounted for to properly characterize the operation of electric propulsion thrusters across different ground test vacuum facilities.

  8. Empirical Bayes Estimates of Domain Scores under Binomial and Hypergeometric Distributions for Test Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miao-Hsiang; Hsiung, Chao A.

    1994-01-01

    Two simple empirical approximate Bayes estimators are introduced for estimating domain scores under binomial and hypergeometric distributions respectively. Criteria are established regarding use of these functions over maximum likelihood estimation counterparts. (SLD)

  9. Empirical tests of Zipf's law mechanism in open source Linux distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillart, T; Sornette, D; Spaeth, S; von Krogh, G

    2008-11-21

    Zipf's power law is a ubiquitous empirical regularity found in many systems, thought to result from proportional growth. Here, we establish empirically the usually assumed ingredients of stochastic growth models that have been previously conjectured to be at the origin of Zipf's law. We use exceptionally detailed data on the evolution of open source software projects in Linux distributions, which offer a remarkable example of a growing complex self-organizing adaptive system, exhibiting Zipf's law over four full decades.

  10. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, William [Brooks Engineering, Vacaville, CA (United States); Basso, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Coddington, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  11. Ground Test of the Urine Processing Assembly for Accelerations and Transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice; Almond, Deborah F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the ground test of the urine processing assembly for accelerations and transfer functions. Details are given on the test setup, test data, data analysis, analytical results, and microgravity assessment. The conclusions of the tests include the following: (1) the single input/multiple output method is useful if the data is acquired by tri-axial accelerometers and inputs can be considered uncorrelated; (2) tying coherence with the matrix yields higher confidence in results; (3) the WRS#2 rack ORUs need to be isolated; (4) and future work includes a plan for characterizing performance of isolation materials.

  12. Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01

    An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

  13. On the Testing of Ground--Motion Prediction Equations against Small--Magnitude Data

    CERN Document Server

    Beauval, Céline; Laurendeau, Aurore; Delavaud, Elise; Cotton, Fabrice; Guéguen, Philippe; Kuehn, Nicolas; 10.1785/0120110271

    2012-01-01

    Ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) are essential in probabilistic seismic hazard studies for estimating the ground motions generated by the seismic sources. In low seismicity regions, only weak motions are available in the lifetime of accelerometric networks, and the equations selected for the probabilistic studies are usually models established from foreign data. Although most ground-motion prediction equations have been developed for magnitudes 5 and above, the minimum magnitude often used in probabilistic studies in low seismicity regions is smaller. Desaggregations have shown that, at return periods of engineering interest, magnitudes lower than 5 can be contributing to the hazard. This paper presents the testing of several GMPEs selected in current international and national probabilistic projects against weak motions recorded in France (191 recordings with source-site distances up to 300km, 3.8\\leqMw\\leq4.5). The method is based on the loglikelihood value proposed by Scherbaum et al. (2009). The ...

  14. Effluent Containment System for space thermal nuclear propulsion ground test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the research and development study work performed for the Space Reactor Power System Division of the U.S. Department of Energy on an innovative effluent containment system (ECS) that would be used during ground testing of a space nuclear thermal rocket engine. A significant portion of the ground test facilities for a space nuclear thermal propulsion engine are the effluent treatment and containment systems. The proposed ECS configuration developed recycles all engine coolant media and does not impact the environment by venting radioactive material. All coolant media, hydrogen and water, are collected, treated for removal of radioactive particulates, and recycled for use in subsequent tests until the end of the facility life. Radioactive materials removed by the treatment systems are recovered, stored for decay of short-lived isotopes, or packaged for disposal as waste. At the end of the useful life, the facility will be decontaminated and dismantled for disposal.

  15. Ground test results and analysis advancements for the AFRL airborne CO2 DIAL system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.

    1999-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS systems, after the incorporation of modifications and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests. Following the presentation of the direct detection results, a summary of current work on a heterodyne DIAL system is given.

  16. Performance characterization and ground testing of an airborne CO2 differential absorption lidar system (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Daniel C.; Fox, Marsha J.; Hamilton, Carla M.; Richter, Dale A.; Higdon, N. S.; Kelly, Brian T.

    1999-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Active Remote Sensing Branch has developed the Laser Airborne Remote Sensing (LARS) system for chemical detection using the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. The system is based on a high-power CO2 laser which can use either the standard 12C16O2 or the 13C16O2 carbon dioxide isotopes as the lasing medium, and has output energies of up to 5 J on the stronger laser transitions. The lidar system is mounted on a flight-qualified optical breadboard designed for installation into the AFRL Argus C- 135E optical testbed aircraft. The Phase I ground tests were conducted at Kirtland AFB in 1997, prior to the LARS flight tests performed in September 1997 at Kirtland AFB and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Phase II ground tests were conducted in 1998 to determine the optimum performance of the LARS system, after the incorporation of modification and improvements suggested by the flight test results. This paper will present some of the chemical detection and radiometric results obtained during the Phase II ground tests.

  17. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xianwen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  18. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Xianwen; Wang Yuying; Zhang Jiaxun; Liu Dongxiao

    2015-01-01

    Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal con-trol system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the nor-mal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC) array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indi-cate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection per-formance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 ?C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large space-craft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  19. An empirical likelihood ratio test robust to individual heterogeneity for differential expression analysis of RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maoqi; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-21

    The individual sample heterogeneity is one of the biggest obstacles in biomarker identification for complex diseases such as cancers. Current statistical models to identify differentially expressed genes between disease and control groups often overlook the substantial human sample heterogeneity. Meanwhile, traditional nonparametric tests lose detailed data information and sacrifice the analysis power, although they are distribution free and robust to heterogeneity. Here, we propose an empirical likelihood ratio test with a mean-variance relationship constraint (ELTSeq) for the differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). As a distribution-free nonparametric model, ELTSeq handles individual heterogeneity by estimating an empirical probability for each observation without making any assumption about read-count distribution. It also incorporates a constraint for the read-count overdispersion, which is widely observed in RNA-seq data. ELTSeq demonstrates a significant improvement over existing methods such as edgeR, DESeq, t-tests, Wilcoxon tests and the classic empirical likelihood-ratio test when handling heterogeneous groups. It will significantly advance the transcriptomics studies of cancers and other complex disease.

  20. Ground test program for a full-size solar dynamic heat receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, L. M.; Kaufmann, K. J.; McLallin, K. L.; Kerslake, T. W.

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures were developed to conduct ground testing of a full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver in a partially simulated, low earth orbit environment. The heat receiver was designed to supply 102 kW of thermal energy to a helium and xenon gas mixture continuously over a 94 minute orbit, including up to 36 minutes of eclipse. The purpose of the test program was to quantify the receiver thermodynamic performance, its operating temperatures, and thermal response to changes in environmental and power module interface boundary conditions. The heat receiver was tested in a vacuum chamber using liquid nitrogen cold shrouds and an aperture cold plate. Special test equipment was designed to provide the required ranges in interface boundary conditions that typify those expected or required for operation as part of the solar dynamic power module on the Space Station Freedom. The support hardware includes an infrared quartz lamp heater with 30 independently controllable zones and a closed-Brayton cycle engine simulator to circulate and condition the helium-xenon gas mixture. The test article, test support hardware, facilities, and instrumentation developed to conduct the ground test program are all described.

  1. Evaluation of Nevada Test Site Ground Motion and Rock Property Data to Bound Ground Motions at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L H; Foxall, W; Rambo, J; Wagoner, J L

    2005-03-09

    Yucca Mountain licensing will require estimation of ground motions from probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) with annual probabilities of exceedance on the order of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} per year or smaller, which correspond to much longer earthquake return periods than most previous PSHA studies. These long return periods for the Yucca Mountain PSHA result in estimates of ground motion that are extremely high ({approx} 10 g) and that are believed to be physically unrealizable. However, there is at present no generally accepted method to bound ground motions either by showing that the physical properties of materials cannot maintain such extreme motions, or the energy release by the source for such large motions is physically impossible. The purpose of this feasibility study is to examine recorded ground motion and rock property data from nuclear explosions to determine its usefulness for studying the ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The premise is that nuclear explosions are an extreme energy density source, and that the recorded ground motion will provide useful information about the limits of ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The data were categorized by the source and rock properties, and evaluated as to what extent non-linearity in the material has affected the recordings. They also compiled existing results of non-linear dynamic modeling of the explosions carried out by LLNL and other institutions. They conducted an extensive literature review to outline current understanding of extreme ground motion. They also analyzed the data in terms of estimating maximum ground motions at Yucca Mountain.

  2. Evaluation of Nevada Test Site Ground Motion and Rock Property Data to Bound Ground Motions at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L J; Foxall, W; Rambo, J; Wagoner, J L

    2005-02-14

    Yucca Mountain licensing will require estimation of ground motions from probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) with annual probabilities of exceedance on the order of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} per year or smaller, which correspond to much longer earthquake return periods than most previous PSHA studies. These long return periods for the Yucca Mountain PSHA result in estimates of ground motion that are extremely high ({approx} 10 g) and that are believed to be physically unrealizable. However, there is at present no generally accepted method to bound ground motions either by showing that the physical properties of materials cannot maintain such extreme motions, or the energy release by the source for such large motions is physically impossible. The purpose of this feasibility study is to examine recorded ground motion and rock property data from nuclear explosions to determine its usefulness for studying the ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The premise is that nuclear explosions are an extreme energy density source, and that the recorded ground motion will provide useful information about the limits of ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The data were categorized by the source and rock properties, and evaluated as to what extent non-linearity in the material has affected the recordings. They also compiled existing results of non-linear dynamic modeling of the explosions carried out by LLNL and other institutions. They conducted an extensive literature review to outline current understanding of extreme ground motion. They also analyzed the data in terms of estimating maximum ground motions at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Initial results from the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project at NASA Lewis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built, and tested a 2 kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum, and solar flux as encountered in low earth orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station Alpha.

  4. Interior noise control ground test studies for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Cannon, Mark R.; Burge, Paul L.; Boyd, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement and analysis procedures are documented, and the results of interior noise control ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are summarized. The objectives of these tests were to study the fuselage response characteristics of treated and untreated aircraft with aft-mount advanced turboprop engines and to analyze the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise on these aircraft. The results of fuselage structural mode surveys, cabin cavity surveys and sound intensity surveys are presented. The performance of various structural and cabin sidewall treatments is assessed, based on measurements of the resulting interior noise levels under simulated advanced turboprop excitation.

  5. Ground tests with active neutron instrumentation for the planetary science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvak, M.L., E-mail: litvak@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, I.G.; Sanin, A.B. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kozyrev, A.S. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Krylov, A.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Timoshenko, G.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Starr, R. [Catholic University of America, Washington DC (United States); Zontikov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-11

    We present results of experimental work performed with a spare flight model of the DAN/MSL instrument in a newly built ground test facility at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. This instrument was selected for the tests as a flight prototype of an active neutron spectrometer applicable for future landed missions to various solid solar system bodies. In our experiment we have fabricated simplified samples of planetary material and tested the capability of neutron activation methods to detect thin layers of water/water ice lying on top of planetary dry regolith or buried within a dry regolith at different depths.

  6. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the proposed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance. The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  7. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhengtao; Yu Gang; Li Shaoxia; He Xiuli; Chen Ru; Zheng Caiyun; Ning Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID) type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO) algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the pro-posed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance). The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID) controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID) controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  8. Tests of the Empirical Classification of Horizontal and Vertical Intra-industry Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Teit; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller

    2002-01-01

    intra-industry trade mentioned in the empirical literature probably covers up many products shifting between e.g. vertical and horizontal intra-industry trade. The paper therefore questions the work of the last decade in the measurement of intra-industry trade. JEL no. F14.......Using longitudinal data this paper shows the separation of international trade in (a) inter-industry trade, (b) horizontal intra-industry trade, and (c) vertical intra-industry trade used in the empirical trade literature to be non-stable at the individual product level. The high level of vertical...

  9. Tests of the Empirical Classification of Horizontal and Vertical Intra-Industry Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller

    2002-01-01

    intra-industry trade mentioned in the empirical literature probably covers up many products shifting between e.g. vertical and horizontal intra-industry trade. The paper therefore questions the work of the last decade in the measurement of intra-industry trade. JEL no. F14......Using longitudinal data this paper shows the separation of international trade in (a) inter-industry trade, (b) horizontal intra-industry trade, and (c) vertical intra-industry trade used in the empirical trade literature to be non-stable at the individual product level. The high level of vertical...

  10. A statistical test of the stability assumption inherent in empirical estimates of economic depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, K A

    1986-01-01

    Realistic estimates of economic depreciation are required for analyses of tax policy, economic growth and production, and national income and wealth. THe purpose of this paper is to examine the stability assumption underlying the econometric derivation of empirical estimates of economic depreciation for industrial machinery and and equipment. The results suggest that a reasonable stability of economic depreciation rates of decline may exist over time. Thus, the assumption of a constant rate of economic depreciation may be a reasonable approximation for further empirical economic analyses.

  11. Direction and Integration of Experimental Ground Test Capabilities and Computational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper groups and summarizes the salient points and findings from two AIAA conference panels targeted at defining the direction, with associated key issues and recommendations, for the integration of experimental ground testing and computational methods. Each panel session utilized rapporteurs to capture comments from both the panel members and the audience. Additionally, a virtual panel of several experts were consulted between the two sessions and their comments were also captured. The information is organized into three time-based groupings, as well as by subject area. These panel sessions were designed to provide guidance to both researchers/developers and experimental/computational service providers in defining the future of ground testing, which will be inextricably integrated with the advancement of computational tools.

  12. High-stability temperature control for ST-7/LISA Pathfinder gravitational reference sensor ground verification testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, S.; Allen, G.; Bencze, W.; Byer, R.; Dang, A.; DeBra, D. B.; Lauben, D.; Dorlybounxou, S.; Hanson, J.; Ho, L.; Huffman, G.; Sabur, F.; Sun, K.; Tavernetti, R.; Rolih, L.; Van Patten, R.; Wallace, J.; Williams, S.

    2006-03-01

    This article demonstrates experimental results of a thermal control system developed for ST-7 gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability δT control of the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiate 1/f fluctuations. Although for ground testing these specifications can be met fairly readily with sufficient insulation and thermal mass, in contrast, for spacecraft the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can simultaneously meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements in the presence of long time delay; a considerable design challenge. Simple control laws presently provide ~ 1mK/surdHz for >24 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feedforward control algorithm will extend performance to <1 mK/surdHz at f < 0.01 mHz and possibly lower, extending LISA coverage of super massive black hole mergers.

  13. Gender Roles, Gender (In)equality and Fertility : An Empirical Test of Five Gender Equity Indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, M.

    2010-01-01

    The division of gender roles in the household and societal level gender (in)equality have been situated as one of the most powerful factors underlying fertility behaviour. Despite continued theoretical attention to this issue by demographers, empirical research integrating gender roles and equity in

  14. Computer Model of the Empirical Knowledge of Physics Formation: Coordination with Testing Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Robert V.

    2016-01-01

    The use of method of imitational modeling to study forming the empirical knowledge in pupil's consciousness is discussed. The offered model is based on division of the physical facts into three categories: 1) the facts established in everyday life; 2) the facts, which the pupil can experimentally establish at a physics lesson; 3) the facts which…

  15. What determines crime rates? An empirical test of integrated economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Peter Jan; Lander, Michel W.; van Essen, Marc

    Research on crime has by no means reached a definitive conclusion on which factors are related to crime rates. We contribute to the crime literature by providing an integrated empirical model of economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior and by using a very comprehensive set of

  16. Gender Roles, Gender (In)equality and Fertility : An Empirical Test of Five Gender Equity Indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, M.

    2010-01-01

    The division of gender roles in the household and societal level gender (in)equality have been situated as one of the most powerful factors underlying fertility behaviour. Despite continued theoretical attention to this issue by demographers, empirical research integrating gender roles and equity in

  17. What determines crime rates? An empirical test of integrated economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Peter Jan; Lander, Michel W.; van Essen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Research on crime has by no means reached a definitive conclusion on which factors are related to crime rates. We contribute to the crime literature by providing an integrated empirical model of economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior and by using a very comprehensive set of economic

  18. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    GSA's Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies.

  19. Contrast validation test for retrieval method of high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hailong; GUO Peifang; HAN Shuzong; XIE Qiang; ZHOU Liangming

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the working principles of high frequency ground wave radar for retrieval of ocean wave and sea wind elements were used to systematically study the data obtained from contrast validation test in Zhoushan sea area of Zhejiang Province on Oct. 2000, to validate the accuracy of OSMAR2000for wave and wind parameters, and to analyze the possible error caused when using OSMAR2000 to retrieve ocean parameters.

  20. Prototype of space-borne LTT module and its ground tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop the technique of Laser Time Transfer(LTT) ,Shanghai Astronomical Observatory has built a prototype of space-borne LTT module. The performance of the LTT module and the results of ground tests are discussed in the paper. The average precision of time difference between two rubidium clocks measured by laser pulses is 196 ps,and the uncertainty of measurement for the relative frequency differences is 1.2×10-13/2800 s.

  1. Tests of Parameters Instability: Theoretical Study and Empirical Applications on Two Types of Models (ARMA Model and Market Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahbi FARHANI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers tests of parameters instability and structural change with known, unknown or multiple breakpoints. The results apply to a wide class of parametric models that are suitable for estimation by strong rules for detecting the number of breaks in a time series. For that, we use Chow, CUSUM, CUSUM of squares, Wald, likelihood ratio and Lagrange multiplier tests. Each test implicitly uses an estimate of a change point. We conclude with an empirical analysis on two different models (ARMA model and simple linear regression model.

  2. Testing empirical relationships between global sea-level and global temperature in long climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Storch, H.; Zorita, E.; Gonzalez-Rouco, F.

    2009-04-01

    Estimations of future global sea-level rise brought about by increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases of anthropogenic origin are based on simulations with coarse-resolution global climate models, which imposes some limitations on the skill of future projections because some of the processes that modulate the heat and fresh water flux into may not be adequately represented. To fill this gap, and until more complex climate models are available, some ad-hoc methods have been proposed that link the rise in global average temperature with the global mean sea-level rise. The statistical methods can be calibrated with observations and applied to the future global temperature rise simulated by climate models. This methods can be tested in the virtual reality simulated by global atmosphere.ocean models. Thereby, deficiencies can be identified and improvement suggested. The output of 1000-year long climate model simulation with the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHO-G over the past millennium has been used to determine the skill of different predictors to describe the variations of the rate of sea-level change in the simulation. These predictor variables comprise the global mean near-surface temperature, its rate of change with time and the heat-flux into the ocean. It is found that, in the framework of this climate simulation, global mean temperature is not a good predictor for the rate-of-change of sea-level. The correlation between both variables is not stable along the simulations and even its sign changes. A better predictor is the rate-of-change of temperature. Its correlation with the rate-of-change of sea-level is much more stable, it is always positive along the simulation, and there exists a lead-lag relationship between both that can be understood in simple physical terms. The best predictor among those tested is the heat-flux into the ocean. Its correlation is higher and there exists no time lag to the rate-of-change of sea-level, as expected

  3. Ground-Water Temperature Data, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Clark, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada, 2000-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Reiner

    2007-08-07

    Ground-water temperature data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in wells at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site during the years 2000–2006. Periodic ground-water temperatures were collected in 166 wells. In general, periodic ground-water temperatures were measured annually in each well at 5 and 55 feet below the water surface. Ground-water temperature profiles were collected in 73 wells. Temperatures were measured at multiple depths below the water surface to produce these profiles. Databases were constructed to present the ground-water temperature data.

  4. Ground-Water Temperature Data, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Clark, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada, 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water temperature data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in wells at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site during the years 2000-2006. Periodic ground-water temperatures were collected in 166 wells. In general, periodic ground-water temperatures were measured annually in each well at 5 and 55 feet below the water surface. Ground-water temperature profiles were collected in 73 wells. Temperatures were measured at multiple depths below the water surface to produce these profiles. Databases were constructed to present the ground-water temperature data.

  5. Extreme Ground-Motion Rockfall Deposits on the Nevada Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, J. W.; Buckingham, S. E.; Magner, J. E.; Finkel, R. C.; Brune, J. N.; von Seggern, D.; Honke, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    In order to detect the evidence of extreme ground motion in the past, we have begun to catalog geomorphic characteristics that distinguish slope deposits strongly influenced by extreme ground motion from deposits primarily influenced by climate processes. Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) of yields between 200 kilotons and 1.3 megatons were conducted under Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test site from 1962 to 1992. The primary surface effects from these tests were surface cracks, triggered earthquakes, offsets on pre-existing faults, and changes in land surface topography. Rockfall and rock spall were observed along cliffs after a few nuclear tests; however, few observations of accumulations of shattered rock were documented. A large volume of rockfall located along a 1.5-km¬-long cliff of welded ash-flow tuff resulted from extreme ground motions from two nearby UNEs. In 1968 UNE Rickey released maximum ground motions of 500 cm/s peak ground velocity (PGV) at the closest cliff face and PGV decreased to about 300 cm/s at the north end of the cliff. Large boulders with 1-3-m average diameters were shaken loose from fracture planes and cooling joints to form a stack of jumbled boulders at the base of the cliff. Very few large boulders rolled to the base of the hillslope. Subsequently, in 1976, UNE Pool induced 300-350 cm/s PGV along the same cliff. A significant volume of rock, also released along fractures and joints, was added to the coarse boulder colluvium shaken loose in 1968. Ground motion from Pool also rearranged the hillslope boulders from UNE Rickey, but did not cause many boulders to roll downslope. Extreme ground motions from these two UNEs resulted in 1.5-3.0 m of physical erosion to the cliff face. Rockfall from less welded ash-flow tuff units situated above and below the cliff produced significantly less boulder colluvium. Our observations indicate that boulder size and rockfall volume from a cliff or ridge crest due to extreme ground motion are

  6. Department of Health application for approval of construction SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The following Application For Approval of Construction is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site, which will provide a new source of radioactive emissions to the atmosphere. The US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Defense have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. It is proposed that the SP-100 test reactor be tested in the existing decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment building (309 Building). The reactor will be operated for at least three months and up to 2 yr. Following the test, the 309 Building will be decontaminated for potential use in other programs. It is projected this new source of emissions will contribute approximately 0.05 mrem/yr dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual. This application is being submitted in response to those projected emissions that would provide the described offsite dose. 28 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Is Asian American Parenting Controlling and Harsh? Empirical Testing of Relationships between Korean American and Western Parenting Measures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Asian American parenting is often portrayed as highly controlling and even harsh. This study empirically tested the associations between a set of recently developed Korean ga-jung-kyo-yuk measures and several commonly used Western parenting measures to accurately describe Asian American family processes, specifically those of Korean Americans. The results show a much nuanced and detailed picture of Korean American parenting as a blend of Western authoritative and authoritarian styles with pos...

  8. Ground-based testing of the dynamics of flexible space structures using band mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. F.; Chew, Meng-Sang

    1991-01-01

    A suspension system based on a band mechanism is studied to provide the free-free conditions for ground based validation testing of flexible space structures. The band mechanism consists of a noncircular disk with a convex profile, preloaded by torsional springs at its center of rotation so that static equilibrium of the test structure is maintained at any vertical location; the gravitational force will be directly counteracted during dynamic testing of the space structure. This noncircular disk within the suspension system can be configured to remain unchanged for test articles with the different weights as long as the torsional spring is replaced to maintain the originally designed frequency ratio of W/k sub s. Simulations of test articles which are modeled as lumped parameter as well as continuous parameter systems, are also presented.

  9. Do Pre-Entry Tests Predict Competencies Required to Excel Academically in Law School?: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective students of law are required to demonstrate competence in certain disciplines to attain admission to law school. The grounding in the disciplines is expected to demonstrate competencies required to excel academically in law school. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevance of the law school admission test to…

  10. Update of the 2 Kw Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the operation of a complete 2 kW, SD system in a simulated space environment at a NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) thermal-vacuum facility. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A brief description of the SD system identifying key design features of the system, subsystems, and components is included. An aerospace industry/government team is working together to design, fabricate, assemble, and test a complete SD system.

  11. Development of a sine-dwell ground vibration test (GVT) system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, Lourens H

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available stream_source_info VanZyl_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9765 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name VanZyl_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Development of a Sine-Dwell Ground... vibration testing? • Basics of sine-dwell testing Getting the structure to vibrate in phase, and what then? • Excitation hardware Exciters are similar to speakers • Measurement system Force and response as complex numbers • Excitation control...

  12. Development of Methods to Predict the Effects of Test Media in Ground-Based Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Parker, Peter A.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Chelliah, Harsha K.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Bivolaru, Daniel; Givi, Peyman; Hassan, Hassan A.

    2009-01-01

    This report discusses work that began in mid-2004 sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Test & Evaluation/Science & Technology (T&E/S&T) Program. The work was undertaken to improve the state of the art of CFD capabilities for predicting the effects of the test media on the flameholding characteristics in scramjet engines. The program had several components including the development of advanced algorithms and models for simulating engine flowpaths as well as a fundamental experimental and diagnostic development effort to support the formulation and validation of the mathematical models. This report provides details of the completed work, involving the development of phenomenological models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes codes, large-eddy simulation techniques and reduced-kinetics models. Experiments that provided data for the modeling efforts are also described, along with with the associated nonintrusive diagnostics used to collect the data.

  13. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  14. Prevention of significant deterioration application for approval to construct SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The following application is being submitted by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352, pursuant to WAC 173-403-080, and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing a Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for a new source of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The new source, the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Test Site, will be located in the 309 Building of the 300 Area. The US Department of Energy (DOE), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Defense (DOD) have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. The DOE has primary responsibility for developing and ground testing the nuclear subsystem. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. The SP-100 GES Test Site will provide a location for the operation and testing of a prototype space-based, liquid metal-cooled, fast flux nuclear reactor in an environment closely simulating the vacuum and temperature conditions of space operations. The purpose of the GES is to develop safe, compact, light-weight and durable space reactor power system technology. This technology will be used to provide electric power, in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts, for a variety of potential future civilian and military space missions requiring long-term, high-power level sources of energy. 20 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Centrifuge model test on earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAMOTO; Yasuhiro; HOTTA; Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic centrifuge model test was conducted to study the earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground, and the influence of asymmetry of building was investigated. During the experiment, the overconsolidated kaolin clay ground with a three-dimensional asymmetrical structure model was shaken by a basically balanced input motion, and bender elements were used to measure shear wave velocities of model ground to reveal the soil fabric evolution during and after shaking. The test results show that, the total seismic settlement of foundation is composed of instantaneous and long-term post-earthquake settlements, and most of the differential settlement occurs immediately after the earthquake while the post-earthquake settlement is relatively uniform despite its large amplitude. The asymmetry of building affects the settlement behavior considerably. Compared with 1-or 2-dimensional structures, more evident differential settlement occurs under threedimensional asymmetrical building during shaking, which accounts for one-half of the total seismic settlements and results in complex spatial tilting effects of foundation.

  16. Centrifuge model test on earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YanGuo; CHEN YunMin; SHAMOTO Yasuhiro; HOTTA Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic centrifuge model test was conducted to study the earthquake-induced differential settlement of foundation on cohesive ground, and the influence of asymmetry of building was investigated. During the experiment, the overconsolidated kaolin clay ground with a three-dimensional asymmetrical structure model was shaken by a basically balanced input motion, and bender elements were used to measure shear wave velocities of model ground to reveal the soil fabric evolution during and after shaking. The test results show that, the total seismic settlement of foundation is composed of instantaneous and long-term post-earthquake settlements, and most of the differential settlement occurs immediately after the earthquake while the post-earthquake settlement is relatively uniform despite its large amplitude. The asymmetry of building affects the settlement behavior considerably. Compared with 1- or 2-dimensional structures, more evident differential settlement occurs under three-dimensional asymmetrical building during shaking, which accounts for one-half of the total seismic settlements and results in complex spatial tilting effects of foundation.

  17. Analysis of test results of a ground demonstration of a Pluto/Express power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournier, J.-M.; El-Genk, M.S. [University of New Mexico, Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Results of recent tests of a Pluto/Express electric power generator ground demonstration were analysed. The performance parameters of each of the eight ground demonstrations vapour anode, multitube alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (AMTEC) cells, designated PX-3G, were analysed and compared. The ground demonstration cells produced a total peak electric power of 27 W{sub e} at a load voltage of 16 V when tested at hot and cold side temperatures of 1123 K and 553 K, respectively. The electric power output and terminal voltage of the individual cells, however, differed by as much as 25%, from 2.94 to 3.76 W{sub e}, and from 1.73 to 2.21 V, respectively. These variations were attributed to differences among the cells in the values of: (a) the contact resistance of the BASE/electrode and of the electrode/current collector; (b) the leakage current between the anode and cathode electrodes through the metal-ceramic braze joint between the BASE tubes and the metal support plate; and (c) the charge-exchange polarisation losses. Analysis of results suggested the existence of large electrical leakage currents in some of the PX-3G cells. The performance of the PX-3G cells was below that needed for meeting the Pluto/Express mission's electric power requirement. (Author)

  18. Calibration and Recovery of Nuclear Test Seismic Ground-Motion Data from the Leo Brady Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B.; Abbott, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    In 1960, Sandia National Laboratories established a small seismic network with stations in Nevada, Utah, and California with the mission to monitor underground nuclear tests (UGTs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). Over time, this seismic network came to be known as the Leo Brady Seismic Network (LBSN). The LBSN recorded approximately 800 UGTs at the NNSS from its inception through the end of testing in 1992. These irreplaceable data, mostly archived on analog, frequency-modulated magnetic tapes and stored in vaults, are now being digitized. This necessitated a calibration method to take the data from analog FM to digital counts to ground-motion units. Complicating the issue, the seismic system setup, telemetering, instrumentation, and calibration methods changed several times over the course of the LBSN's service life, and much of the documentation and knowledge of the system has been lost to time. The information necessary to understand, interpret, and ultimately calibrate these data was therefore collected from many disparate sources, each of which contains bits and pieces of relevant information. Contradictory information was often the rule rather than the exception. Where necessary (due to a lack of direct information) we made educated guesses as to the exact system, setup, and methodologies used. Ultimately, we documented the evolution and configuration of the seismic network, and determined both empirical and analytical approaches to calibrating these data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office has been sponsoring 2 separate, independent system design and development hardware demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L'Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter ground demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators. Descriptions of the system designs for both the ATK and L'Garde systems will be presented. Changes, additions and evolution of the system designs will be highlighted. A description of the modeling and analyses activities performed by both teams, as well as testing conducted to raise the TRL of solar sail technology will be presented. A summary of the results of model correlation activities will be presented. Finally, technology gaps identified during the assessment and gap closure plans will be presented, along with "lessons learned", subsequent planning activities and validation flight opportunities for solar sail propulsion technology.

  20. Updating the Finite Element Model of the Aerostructures Test Wing using Ground Vibration Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shun-fat; Pak, Chan-gi

    2009-01-01

    Improved and/or accelerated decision making is a crucial step during flutter certification processes. Unfortunately, most finite element structural dynamics models have uncertainties associated with model validity. Tuning the finite element model using measured data to minimize the model uncertainties is a challenging task in the area of structural dynamics. The model tuning process requires not only satisfactory correlations between analytical and experimental results, but also the retention of the mass and stiffness properties of the structures. Minimizing the difference between analytical and experimental results is a type of optimization problem. By utilizing the multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization (MDAO) tool in order to optimize the objective function and constraints; the mass properties, the natural frequencies, and the mode shapes can be matched to the target data to retain the mass matrix orthogonality. This approach has been applied to minimize the model uncertainties for the structural dynamics model of the Aerostructures Test Wing (ATW), which was designed and tested at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) (Edwards, California). This study has shown that natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes from the updated finite element model have excellent agreement with corresponding measured data.

  1. Project size and common pool size: An empirical test using Danish municipal mergers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Welling

    The paper examines the proposition that project size tends to increase with common pool size from the law of 1 over n (Weingast et al, 1981). This remains under-investigated and a recent study conducted by Primo & Snyder (2008) argues, and empirically substantiates, a reverse law of 1 over n....... In this paper, the proposition is examined using recent municipal mergers in Denmark as a crucial case under less favorable conditions. The paper finds positive, statistically and economically significant effects of common pool size in the ultimate year of the treatment period. These results are consistent...

  2. An empirical test of competing theories of hazard-related trust: the case of GM food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, Nick

    2007-08-01

    Few scholars doubt the importance of trust in explaining variation in public perception of technological risk. Relatively little, however, is known about the particular types of judgments that people use in granting or withholding trust. This article presents findings from an empirical study that explores several dimensions of trust relevant for citizens' judgments of scientists involved in the development of GM food. The relationship between particular dimensions of trust and perceptions of GM food risk is also explored, using structural equation modeling. Results suggest that trust judgments based on the perception of shared values are most important in relation to GM food risk, but that judgments about scientists' technical competence are also important.

  3. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  4. HEAVY METALS IN THE ECOSYSTEM COMPONENTS AT "DEGELEN" TESTING GROUND OF THE FORMER SEMIPALATINSK TEST SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Yankauskas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ecological situation in the former Semipalatinsk test site is characterized by a combination of both radiative and "nonradiative" factors. There were investigated near-portal areas of the tunnels with water seepage at "Degelen" site. All the tunnel waters are characterized by higher concentrations of uranium, beryllium, and molybdenum. The watercourse of the tunnel # 504 is unique for its elemental composition, in particular, the content of rare earth elements, whose concentration in the water is in the range n*10-5 – n*10-7 %. Of all the rare earth elements in the samples were found 13, the concentrations of aluminum, manganese, zinc are comparable to the concentrations of macro-components. Concentration of 238U in the studied waters lie in the range of n*10-4 – n*10-6 %, which suggests the influence of uranium, not only as a toxic element, but its significance as the radiation factor.

  5. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  6. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  7. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  8. Torsion pendulum facility for ground testing of gravitational sensors for LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Hüller, M; Dolesi, R; Vitale, S; Weber, W J

    2002-01-01

    We report here on a torsion pendulum facility for ground-based testing of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational sensors. We aim to measure weak forces exerted by a capacitive position sensor on a lightweight version of the LISA test mass, suspended from a thin torsion fibre. This facility will permit measurement of the residual, springlike coupling between the test mass and the sensor and characterization of other stray forces relevant to LISA drag-free control. The expected force sensitivity of the proposed torsion pendulum is limited by the intrinsic thermal noise at approx 3x10 sup - sup 1 sup 3 N Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 at 1 mHz. We briefly describe the design and implementation of the apparatus, its expected performance and preliminary experimental data.

  9. SSE software test management STM capability: Using STM in the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    This report is one of a series discussing configuration management (CM) topics for Space Station ground systems software development. It provides a description of the Software Support Environment (SSE)-developed Software Test Management (STM) capability, and discusses the possible use of this capability for management of developed software during testing performed on target platforms. This is intended to supplement the formal documentation of STM provided by the SEE Project. How STM can be used to integrate contractor CM and formal CM for software before delivery to operations is described. STM provides a level of control that is flexible enough to support integration and debugging, but sufficiently rigorous to insure the integrity of the testing process.

  10. Self contamination effects in the TAUVEX UV Telescope: Ground testing and computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Y.; Noter, Y.; Grossman, E.; Genkin, L.; Murat, M.; Saar, N.; Blasberger, A.

    1994-01-01

    The contamination effects due to outgassing from construction materials of the TAUVEX (Tel Aviv University UV Telescope) were evaluated using a combination of ground testing and computer simulations. Tests were performed from the material level of the system level including: (1) High sensitivity CVCM(10(exp -3 percent) measurements of critical materials. (2) Optical degradation measurements of samples specially contaminated by outgassing products at different contamination levels. (3) FTIR studies of chemical composition of outgassed products on above samples. (4) High resolution AFM studies of surface morphology of contaminated surfaces. The expected degradation of TAUVEX performance in mission was evaluated applying a computer simulation code using input parameters determined experimentally in the above tests. The results have served as guidelines for the proper selection of materials, cleanliness requirements, determination of the thermal conditions of the system and bakeout processes.

  11. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  12. Objectives and Progress on Ground Vibration Testing for the Ares Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vehicle ground vibration testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component for ensuring the safety of NASA s next generation of exploration vehicles to send human beings to the Moon and beyond. A ground vibration test (GVT) measures the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be conducting the IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2012 to 2014 using Test Stand (TS) 4550. MSFC conducted similar GVT for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicles. FITO will perform the IVGVT on the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will lift the Orion crew exploration vehicle to low Earth orbit, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which can launch the lunar lander into orbit and send the combined Orion/lander vehicles toward the Moon. Ares V consists of a six-engine core stage with two solid rocket boosters and an Earth departure stage (EDS). The same engine will power the EDS and the Ares I second stage. The current plan is to test six configurations in three unique test positions inside TS 4550. Four Ares I second stage test configurations will be tested in Position 3, consisting of the Upper Stage and Orion crew module in four nominal conditions: J-2X engine ignition, post Launch Abort System (LAS) jettison, critical slosh mass, and J-2X burn-out. Position 2 consists of the entire launch stack at first stage burn-out (using empty first stage segments). Position 1 represents the entire launch stack at lift-off (using inert first stage segments). Because of long disuse, TS 4550 is being repaired and modified for reactivation to conduct the Ares I IVGVT. The Shuttle-era platforms have been removed and are being replaced with mast climbers that provide ready access to the test articles and can be moved easily to support different positions within the test stand. Two new cranes will help move test articles at the test stand and at the

  13. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office sponsored two separate, independent solar sail system design and development demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L' Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators.

  14. Concept study of a hydrogen containment process during nuclear thermal engine ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric T.; Canabal, Francisco

    A new hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. It utilizes two thermophysical steps to contain the hydrogen exhaust. First, the decomposition of hydrogen through oxygen-rich combustion at higher temperature; second, the recombination of remaining hydrogen with radicals at low temperature. This is achieved with two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. A computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to analyze the entire process on a three-dimensional domain. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger was less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process.

  15. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: ground verification test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongya; Peng, Wenxi; Cui, XingZhu; Wang, Huanyu

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang’E-3 rover Yutu, with which the major elemental composition of lunar soils and rocks can be measured on site. In order to assess the instrument performance and the accuracy of determination, ground verification test was carried out with two blind samples(basaltic rock, powder). Details of the experiments and data analysis method are discussed. The results show that the accuracy of quantitative analysis for major elements(Mg,Al,Si,K,Ca,Ti,Fe) is better than 15%.

  16. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Associates, Yuma Proving Ground Office Sergio Obregon David Mcintyre BiuceGoff Yuma Proving Ground Aviation and Airdrop Systems Rick Douglas Bert Evans...on relatively narrow gullies, relative to the wide, braded channels of the wash test area. The Glass (2000) study area was dominated by pavement

  17. Airborne and Ground-Based Optical Characterization of Legacy Underground Nuclear Test Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, S.; Craven, J.; Anderson, D.; Dzur, R.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Sussman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Detecting, locating, and characterizing suspected underground nuclear test sites is a U.S. security priority. Currently, global underground nuclear explosion monitoring relies on seismic and infrasound sensor networks to provide rapid initial detection of potential underground nuclear tests. While seismic and infrasound might be able to generally locate potential underground nuclear tests, additional sensing methods might be required to further pinpoint test site locations. Optical remote sensing is a robust approach for site location and characterization due to the ability it provides to search large areas relatively quickly, resolve surface features in fine detail, and perform these tasks non-intrusively. Optical remote sensing provides both cultural and surface geological information about a site, for example, operational infrastructure, surface fractures. Surface geological information, when combined with known or estimated subsurface geologic information, could provide clues concerning test parameters. We have characterized two legacy nuclear test sites on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), U20ak and U20az using helicopter-, ground- and unmanned aerial system-based RGB imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) systems. The multi-faceted information garnered from these different sensing modalities has allowed us to build a knowledge base of how a nuclear test site might look when sensed remotely, and the standoff distances required to resolve important site characteristics.

  18. Empirical likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Art B

    2001-01-01

    Empirical likelihood provides inferences whose validity does not depend on specifying a parametric model for the data. Because it uses a likelihood, the method has certain inherent advantages over resampling methods: it uses the data to determine the shape of the confidence regions, and it makes it easy to combined data from multiple sources. It also facilitates incorporating side information, and it simplifies accounting for censored, truncated, or biased sampling.One of the first books published on the subject, Empirical Likelihood offers an in-depth treatment of this method for constructing confidence regions and testing hypotheses. The author applies empirical likelihood to a range of problems, from those as simple as setting a confidence region for a univariate mean under IID sampling, to problems defined through smooth functions of means, regression models, generalized linear models, estimating equations, or kernel smooths, and to sampling with non-identically distributed data. Abundant figures offer vi...

  19. Test anxiety and the validity of cognitive tests: A confirmatory factor analysis perspective and some empirical findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Zand Scholten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of cognitive ability tests is often interpreted solely as a function of the cognitive abilities that these tests are supposed to measure, but other factors may be at play. The effects of test anxiety on the criterion related validity (CRV) of tests was the topic of a recent study by Ree

  20. Test Anxiety and the Validity of Cognitive Tests: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Perspective and Some Empirical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Scholten, Annemarie Zand

    2010-01-01

    The validity of cognitive ability tests is often interpreted solely as a function of the cognitive abilities that these tests are supposed to measure, but other factors may be at play. The effects of test anxiety on the criterion related validity (CRV) of tests was the topic of a recent study by Reeve, Heggestad, and Lievens (2009) (Reeve, C. L.,…

  1. Testing alternative ground water models using cross-validation and other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Perona, P.; Burlando, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many methods can be used to test alternative ground water models. Of concern in this work are methods able to (1) rank alternative models (also called model discrimination) and (2) identify observations important to parameter estimates and predictions (equivalent to the purpose served by some types of sensitivity analysis). Some of the measures investigated are computationally efficient; others are computationally demanding. The latter are generally needed to account for model nonlinearity. The efficient model discrimination methods investigated include the information criteria: the corrected Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and generalized cross-validation. The efficient sensitivity analysis measures used are dimensionless scaled sensitivity (DSS), composite scaled sensitivity, and parameter correlation coefficient (PCC); the other statistics are DFBETAS, Cook's D, and observation-prediction statistic. Acronyms are explained in the introduction. Cross-validation (CV) is a computationally intensive nonlinear method that is used for both model discrimination and sensitivity analysis. The methods are tested using up to five alternative parsimoniously constructed models of the ground water system of the Maggia Valley in southern Switzerland. The alternative models differ in their representation of hydraulic conductivity. A new method for graphically representing CV and sensitivity analysis results for complex models is presented and used to evaluate the utility of the efficient statistics. The results indicate that for model selection, the information criteria produce similar results at much smaller computational cost than CV. For identifying important observations, the only obviously inferior linear measure is DSS; the poor performance was expected because DSS does not include the effects of parameter correlation and PCC reveals large parameter correlations. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  2. Inter-temporal CAPM: an empirical test with Brazilian market data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Portolano Machado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the empirical validity of the Inter-temporal Capital Asset Pricing Model (ICAPM with Brazilian market data. The Bali and Engle (2010 methodology is used with the estimation of conditional covariances between stock portfolio returns and pricing factors. The covariances are then used as explanatory variables in the pricing equation. The results validate the model for the 1988 to 2012 period. The estimated risk aversion coefficient is positive and significant, and the relevant pricing factors are interest rates, inflation and gold prices; the reverse is true in the case of the exchange rate. Breaking up the sample period into sub-periods indicates that major events (changes in economic regimes and the 2008 crisis are capable of modifying the associations observed and reducing the model’s validity.

  3. Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Tests in the Field of Sexual Abuse Against Minors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORIN M. RĂDULESCU

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the main theoretical and practical contributions in the field of sexual abuse against children. To this end, the article examines the following key issues in this area of research: the main obstacles faced by empirical research in this field, the risk factors which reinforce the perpetration of acts of sexual abuse, the incidence of sexual abuse in the contemporary world, the explanatory models of this phenomenon (biological, psychological, psychiatric, psycho-social, sociological, the specific theories and research with respect to the main characteristics of sexualaggressors. In this context, the article verifies the validity of the theoretical model of the "four factors" (emotional congruence, sexual arousal, blockage and disinhibition proposed by David Finkelhor. The author of the present article opts, instead, for a multiple-factor explanation of the subject in question.

  4. An empirical test of a self-care model of women's responses to battering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J C; Weber, N

    2000-01-01

    A model of women's responses to battering was constructed based on Orem's theory of self-care deficit and on empirical and clinical observations. The model proposed that the age, educational level, and cultural influences as basic conditioning factors would all be directly related to relational conflict, which would be negatively related to self-care agency (as a mediator) and indirectly related to both outcomes of health and well-being. Using simultaneous structural equation modeling with specification searching, a modified model was derived that eliminated the mediation path but supported direct effects of both abuse and self-care agency on health. The derived model was found to be only a borderline fit with the data, probably due to measurement problems, lack of inclusion of important variables, and small sample size (N = 117). However, there was support for several of the relationships deduced from and/or congruent with Orem's theory.

  5. Empirical validation of the thermal model of a passive solar cell test

    CERN Document Server

    Mara, T A; Boyer, H; Mamode, M

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with an empirical validation of a building thermal model. We put the emphasis on sensitivity analysis and on research of inputs/residual correlation to improve our model. In this article, we apply a sensitivity analysis technique in the frequency domain to point out the more important parameters of the model. Then, we compare measured and predicted data of indoor dry-air temperature. When the model is not accurate enough, recourse to time-frequency analysis is of great help to identify the inputs responsible for the major part of error. In our approach, two samples of experimental data are required. The first one is used to calibrate our model the second one to really validate the optimized model

  6. An empirical test of helium diffusion in apatite: borehole data from the Otway basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Martha A.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Kohn, Barry P.

    1999-07-01

    We have analyzed helium ages of apatites from several boreholes in the Otway basin, Australia, to evaluate whether laboratory helium diffusivity can be accurately extrapolated to conditions relevant in nature. Downhole apatite helium ages define a broad swath of values from 78-71 Ma at the surface (15°C) to nearly zero at depths corresponding to ambient temperatures of ˜80°C. The width of the swath results from uncertainties in corrected borehole temperatures, differences in the thermal history experienced by the various boreholes, and possibly from slightly different helium diffusivities among the detrital apatite grains studied. In the eastern Otway basin, the shape and position of the helium age profile is in good agreement with predictions based on the extrapolation of laboratory diffusivity data for Durango apatite coupled with published thermal histories for this part of the basin. In contrast, helium ages are much younger than predicted in the western Otway basin. Based on measured ages from Otway sediments, which have been essentially isothermal over the last few million years, an empirical diffusivity ( D/ a2) of 2×10 -15 s -1 can be assigned to apatites residing at downhole temperatures of 67-97°C. This empirical diffusivity is consistent with laboratory diffusion measurements, demonstrating that such measurements are reasonably accurate and can be applied with confidence to natural geologic settings. Given this confirmation of the laboratory diffusivity data, the discrepancy between the observed and modeled helium age profiles in the western Otway basin suggests that these sediments recently experienced higher temperatures than presently supposed.

  7. Ground Tests of Einstein's Equivalence Principle: From Lab-based to 10-m Atomic Fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Schlippert, D; Richardson, L L; Nath, D; Heine, H; Meiners, C; Wodey, É; Billon, A; Hartwig, J; Schubert, C; Gaaloul, N; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E M

    2015-01-01

    To date, no framework combining quantum field theory and general relativity and hence unifying all four fundamental interactions, exists. Violations of the Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP), being the foundation of general relativity, may hold the key to a theory of quantum gravity. The universality of free fall (UFF), which is one of the three pillars of the EEP, has been extensively tested with classical bodies. Quantum tests of the UFF, e.g. by exploiting matter wave interferometry, allow for complementary sets of test masses, orders of magnitude larger test mass coherence lengths and investigation of spin-gravity coupling. We review our recent work towards highly sensitive matter wave tests of the UFF on ground. In this scope, the first quantum test of the UFF utilizing two different chemical elements, Rb-87 and K-39, yielding an E\\"otv\\"os ratio $\\eta_{\\,\\text{Rb,K}}=(0.3\\pm 5.4)\\times 10^{-7}$ has been performed. We assess systematic effects currently limiting the measurement at a level of parts in...

  8. Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During re-entry, spacecrafts are subjected to extreme thermal loads. On mars, they may go through dust storms. These external heat loads are leading the design of re-entry vehicles or are affecting it for spacecraft facing solid propellant jet stream. Sizing the Thermal Protection System require a good knowledge of such solicitations and means to model and reproduce them on earth. Through its work on European projects, ASTRIUM has developed the full range of competences to deal with such issues. For instance, we have designed and tested the heat-shield of the Huygens probe which landed on Titan. In particular, our plasma generators aim to reproduce a wide variety of re-entry conditions. Heat loads are generated by the huge speed of the probes. Such conditions cannot be fully reproduced. Ground tests focus on reproducing local aerothermal loads by using slower but hotter flows. Our inductive plasma torch enables to test little samples at low TRL. Amongst the arc-jets, one was design to test architecture design of ISS crew return system and others fit more severe re-entry such as sample returns or Venus re-entry. The last developments aimed in testing samples in seeded flows. First step was to design and test the seeding device. Special diagnostics characterizing the resulting flow enabled us to fit it to the requirements.

  9. Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

  10. Ground test challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle orbiter auxiliary power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, N. H.; Lance, R. J.; Weary, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    A conventional aircraft hydraulic system design approach was selected to provide fluid power for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Developing the power unit, known as the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), to drive the hydraulic pumps presented a major technological challenge. A small, high speed turbine drive unit powered by catalytically decomposed hydrazine and operating in the pulse mode was selected to meet the requirement. Because of limitations of vendor test facilities, significant portions of the development, flight qualification, and postflight anomaly testing of the Orbiter APU were accomplished at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) test facilities. This paper discusses the unique requirements of attitude, gravity forces, pressure profiles, and thermal environments which had to be satisfied by the APU, and presents the unique test facility and simulation techniques employed to meet the ground test requirements. In particular, the development of the zero-g lubrication system, the development of necessary APU thermal control techniques, the accomplishment of integrated systems tests, and the postflight investigation of the APU lube oil cooler behavior are discussed.

  11. Testing of Balassa-Samuelson model functionality: Empirical research in case of Serbia and European Monetary Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Predrag

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of empirical testing of Balassa-Samuelson model functionality in case of Serbia and European Monetary Union. The research for Serbia pertains to the period between 2004 and 2010, while in the case of EMU, due to unavailability of data about employment per sector, the period is somewhat shorter, covering 2005 to 2010. Applying both methods of cointegration analysis (Johansen and Engle-Granger's one, we have reached the results which show that internal transmission mechanism does not function in Serbia.

  12. DISCLOSURE POLICY AND PRICE VOLATILITY: A THEORETICAL DESCRIPTION AND EMPIRICAL TESTS OF THE 'FILTER EFFECT'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiangminChen; JianghuiLin

    2004-01-01

    In the context of a push towards full disclosure by the regulatory authorities of securities markets, we evaluate the effectiveness of corporate disclosure policy by examining the 'filter effect'. Controlling for firm size and earnings changes, we conduct an empirical test of various disclosure options. Our results shows that the recent increase in disclosure frequency in mainland China's securities markets has not yet achieved its anticipated objective. Disclosure quality remains low and small firms often manipulate their stock prices through selective release of information.

  13. A study of ground-structure interaction in dynamic plate load testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzina, Bojan B.; Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2002-10-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented for the forced vertical vibration of a padded annular footing on a layered viscoelastic half-space. On assuming a depth-independent stress distribution for the interfacial buffer, the set of triple integral equations stemming from the problem is reduced to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. The solution method, which is tailored to capture the stress concentrations beneath footing edges, is highlighted. To cater to small-scale geophysical applications, the model is used to investigate the near-field effects of ground-loading system interaction in dynamic geotechnical and pavement testing. Numerical results indicate that the uniform-pressure assumption for the contact load between the composite disc and the ground which is customary in dynamic plate load testing may lead to significant errors in the diagnosis of subsurface soil and pavement conditions. Beyond its direct application to non-intrusive site characterization, the proposed solution can be used in the seismic analysis of a variety of structures involving annular foundation geometries.

  14. Testing sea-level markers observed in ground-penetrating radar data from Feddet, south-eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Nielsen, Lars; Clemmensen, Lars B;

    2012-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data have been collected across the modern part (test identification of sea-level markers in GPR data from microtidal depositional environments. Nielsen and Clemmensen (2009) showed...

  15. Development of Neural Network Model for Predicting Peak Ground Acceleration Based on Microtremor Measurement and Soil Boring Test Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerh, T; Lin, J. S; Gunaratnam, D

    2012-01-01

    .... This paper is therefore aimed at developing a neural network model, based on available microtremor measurement and on-site soil boring test data, for predicting peak ground acceleration at a site...

  16. Gravity-Off-loading System for Large-Displacement Ground Testing of Spacecraft Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Olyvia; Kienholz, David; Janzen, Paul; Kidney, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gravity-off-loading of deployable spacecraft mechanisms during ground testing is a long-standing problem. Deployable structures which are usually too weak to support their own weight under gravity require a means of gravity-off-loading as they unfurl. Conventional solutions to this problem have been helium-filled balloons or mechanical pulley/counterweight systems. These approaches, however, suffer from the deleterious effects of added inertia or friction forces. The changing form factor of the deployable structure itself and the need to track the trajectory of the center of gravity also pose a challenge to these conventional technologies. This paper presents a novel testing apparatus for high-fidelity zero-gravity simulation for special application to deployable space structures such as solar arrays, magnetometer booms, and robotic arms in class 100,000 clean room environments

  17. NASA solar dynamic ground test demonstration (GTD) program and its application to space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, William B.; Shaltens, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems are readily adaptable to any heat source contemplated for space application. The inert gas working fluid can be used directly in gas-cooled reactors and coupled to a variety of heat sources (reactor, isotope or solar) by a heat exchanger. This point is demonstrated by the incorporation in the NASA 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Space Power Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) Program of the turboalternator-compressor and recuperator from the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) program. This paper will review the goals and status of the SD GTD Program, initiated in April 1992. The performance of the BIPS isotope-heated system will be compared to the solar-heated GTD system incorporating the BIPS components and the applicability of the GTD test bed to dynamics space nuclear power R&D will be discussed.

  18. An Empirical Test of Roskam's Conjecture about the Interpretation of an ICC Parameter in Personality Inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbo, Bruno D.; Pope, Gregory A.; Watson, Jackie E.; Hubley, Anita M.

    1997-01-01

    E. Roskam's (1985) conjecture that steeper item characteristic curve (ICC) "a" parameters (slopes) (and higher item total correlations in classical test theory) would be found with more concretely worded test items was tested with results from 925 young adults on the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (H. Eysenck and S. Eysenck, 1975).…

  19. Test holes drilled in support of ground-water investigations, Project Gnome, Eddy County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J.B.

    1962-01-01

    Project Gnome is a proposed underground nuclear shot to be detonated within a massive salt bed in Eddy County, N. Mex. Potable and neat potable ground water is present in rocks above the salt and is being studied in relation to this nuclear event. This report presents details of two test holes which were drilled to determine ground-water conditions in the near vicinity of the shot point. A well-defined aquifer is present at the site of USGS test hole 1, about 1,000 feet south of the access shaft to the underground shot point. Water with 75 feet of artesian pressure head is contained in the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler formation. The dolomite aquifer is 32 feet thick and its top lies at a depth of 517 feet below land surface. The aquifer yielded 100 gpm (gallons per minute) with a drawdown of 40 feet during a pumping period of 24 hours. Water was not found in rocks above or below the Culebra dolomite. At the site of USGS test hole 2, about 2 miles southwest of the access shaft no distinctive aquifer exists. About one-half gpm was yielded to the well from the rocks between the Culebra dolomite and the top of the salt. Water could not be detected in the Culebra dolomite or overlying rocks. The report contains drawdown and recovery curves of yield tests, drilling-time charts, and electric logs. The data are given in tables; they include summaries of hole construction, sample description logs, water measurements, drilling-time logs, and water analyses.

  20. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  1. The evolution of intra-organizational trust networks - The case of a German paper factory : An empirical test of six trust mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bunt, GG; Wittek, RPM; de Klepper, MC; Wittik, R.P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the distinction between expressive and instrumental motives, six theoretical mechanisms for the formation of trust relationships are elaborated and empirically tested. When expressive motives drive tie formation, individuals primarily attach emotional value to social relationships. Three me

  2. The evolution of intra-organizational trust networks : The case of a German paper factory: An empirical test of six trust mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, Gerhard G. van der; Wittek, Rafael P. M.; Klepper, Maurits C. de

    2005-01-01

    Based on the distinction between expressive and instrumental motives, six theoretical mechanisms for the formation of trust relationships are elaborated and empirically tested. When expressive motives drive tie formation, individuals primarily attach emotional value to social relationships. Three me

  3. Ground testing and flight demonstration of charge management of insulated test masses using UV-LED electron photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Buchman, Sasha; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; Suwaidan, Badr Al; AlRashed, Abdullah; Al-Nassban, Badr; Alaqeel, Faisal; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin; Qasim, Bandar Bin; Alfauwaz, Abdulrahman; Al-Majed, Mohammed; DeBra, Daniel; Byer, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The UV-LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses. Test mass charge control is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag-free sensors which are at the core of geodesy, aeronomy and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational wave experiments and observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on Gravity Probe B and is presently part of the LISA Pathfinder technology demonstration. The UV-LED mission and prior ground testing demonstrates that AlGaN UVLEDs operating at 255 nm are superior to Hg lamps because of their smaller size, lower power draw, higher dynamic range, and higher control authority. We show laboratory data demonstrating the effectiveness and survivability of the UV-LED devices and performance of the charge management system. We also show flight data from a small satellite experiment that was one of the payloads on KACST’s SaudiSat-4 mission that demonstrates ‘AC charge control’ (UV-LEDs and bias are AC modulated with adjustable relative phase) between a spherical test mass and its housing. The result of the mission brings the UV-LED device Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to TRL-9 and the charge management system to TRL-7. We demonstrate the ability to control the test mass potential on an 89 mm diameter spherical test mass over a 20 mm gap in a drag-free system configuration, with potential measured using an ultra-high impedance contact probe. Finally, the key electrical and optical characteristics of the UV-LEDs showed less than 7.5% change in performance after 12 months in orbit.

  4. Ensuring Safe Exploration: Ares Launch Vehicle Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, M. L.; Chenevert, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vehicle ground vibration testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component for ensuring the safety of NASA's next generation of exploration vehicles to send human beings to the Moon and beyond. A ground vibration test (GVT) measures the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be leading the IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2012 to 2014 using Test Stand (TS) 4550. MSFC conducted similar GVT for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicles. FITO is responsible for performing the IVGVT on the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will lift the Orion crew exploration vehicle to low Earth orbit, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which can launch the lunar lander into orbit and send the combined Orionilander vehicles toward the Moon. Ares V consists of a six-engine core stage with two solid rocket boosters and an Earth departure stage (EDS). The same engine will power the EDS and the Ares I second stage. For the Ares IVGVT, the current plan is to test six configurations in three unique test positions inside TS 4550. Position 1 represents the entire launch stack at liftoff (using inert first stage segments). Position 2 consists of the entire launch stack at first stage burn-out (using empty first stage segments). Four Ares I second stage test configurations will be tested in Position 3, consisting of the Upper Stage and Orion crew module in four nominal conditions: J-2X engine ignition, post Launch Abort System (LAS) jettison, critical slosh mass, and J-2X burn-out. Because of long disuse, TS 4550 is being repaired and reactivated to conduct the Ares I IVGVT. The Shuttle-era platforms have been removed and are being replaced with mast climbers that provide ready access to the test articles and can be moved easily to support different positions within the test stand. The electrical power distribution system for TS 4550 was

  5. The Social Consequences of Poverty: An Empirical Test on Longitudinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mood, Carina; Jonsson, Jan O

    Poverty is commonly defined as a lack of economic resources that has negative social consequences, but surprisingly little is known about the importance of economic hardship for social outcomes. This article offers an empirical investigation into this issue. We apply panel data methods on longitudinal data from the Swedish Level-of-Living Survey 2000 and 2010 (n = 3089) to study whether poverty affects four social outcomes-close social relations (social support), other social relations (friends and relatives), political participation, and activity in organizations. We also compare these effects across five different poverty indicators. Our main conclusion is that poverty in general has negative effects on social life. It has more harmful effects for relations with friends and relatives than for social support; and more for political participation than organizational activity. The poverty indicator that shows the greatest impact is material deprivation (lack of cash margin), while the most prevalent poverty indicators-absolute income poverty, and especially relative income poverty-appear to have the least effect on social outcomes.

  6. The effects of traited and situational impression management on a personality test: an empirical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAEL S. HENRY

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies examining impression management (IM in self-report measures typically assume that impression management is either a 1 trait or 2 situational variable, which has led to often conflicting results (Stark, Chernyshenko, Chan, Lee and Drasgow. 2001. This study examined the item-level and scale-level responses on six empirically-derived facets of conscientiousness from the California Psychological Inventory (CPI between high and low IM groups. Subjects (N = 6,220 were participants in a management assessment conducted by an external consulting firm. Subjects participated in the assessment as part of either 1 a selection or promotional process, or 2 a feedback and development process, and two specific occupational groups (sales/marketing and accounting/finance were examined. Using the IRT-based DFIT framework (Raju, Van der Linden & Fleer, 1995, the item-level and scale-level differences were examined for the situational IM and traited IM approaches. The results indicated that relatively little DIF/DTF was present and that the differences between the two approaches to examining IM may not be as great as previously suggested.

  7. An Empirical Investigation of Thurstone and IRT Methods of Scaling Achievement Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Douglas F.; Forsyth, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement scales developed using Thurstone and item-response theory (IRT) methods of scaling achievement tests for the same single-level data were compared for approximately 4,000 high school students taking the Iowa Tests of Educational Development in 1975. Results of both approaches indicate that variability increases as grade level increases.…

  8. Empirical Profiles of Academic Oral English Proficiency from an International Teaching Assistant Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikkyu

    2017-01-01

    Language proficiency constitutes a crucial barrier for prospective international teaching assistants (ITAs). Many US universities administer screening tests to ensure that ITAs possess the required academic oral English proficiency for their TA duties. Such ITA screening tests often elicit a sample of spoken English, which is evaluated in terms of…

  9. Empirical Profiles of Academic Oral English Proficiency from an International Teaching Assistant Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikkyu

    2017-01-01

    Language proficiency constitutes a crucial barrier for prospective international teaching assistants (ITAs). Many US universities administer screening tests to ensure that ITAs possess the required academic oral English proficiency for their TA duties. Such ITA screening tests often elicit a sample of spoken English, which is evaluated in terms of…

  10. Ground Testing and Flight Demonstration of Charge Management of Insulated Test Masses Using UV LED Electron Photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; AlRashed, Abdullah; Nassban, Badr Al; Suwaidan, Badr Al; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin; Qasim, Bandar Bin; DeBra, Daniel; Byer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The UV LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses that is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag free sensors. Accelerometers and drag free sensors were and remain at the core of geodesy, aeronomy, and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational science experiments and gravitational wave observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on Gravity Probe B and is presently part of the LISA Pathfinder technology demonstration. The UV LED mission and prior ground testing demonstrates that AlGaN UV LEDs operating at 255 nm are superior to Mercury vapor lamps because of their smaller size, lower draw, higher dynamic range, and higher control authority. We show flight data from a small satellite mission on a Saudi Satellite that demonstrates AC charge control (UV LEDs and bias are AC modulated with adjustable relative phase) between a spherical test mass and its h...

  11. Small UAV Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System Design Considerations and Flight Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokowski, Paul; Skoog, Mark; Burrows, Scott; Thomas, SaraKatie

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (SUAV) Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) project demonstrated several important collision avoidance technologies. First, the SUAV Auto GCAS design included capabilities to take advantage of terrain avoidance maneuvers flying turns to either side as well as straight over terrain. Second, the design also included innovative digital elevation model (DEM) scanning methods. The combination of multi-trajectory options and new scanning methods demonstrated the ability to reduce the nuisance potential of the SUAV while maintaining robust terrain avoidance. Third, the Auto GCAS algorithms were hosted on the processor inside a smartphone, providing a lightweight hardware configuration for use in either the ground control station or on board the test aircraft. Finally, compression of DEM data for the entire Earth and successful hosting of that data on the smartphone was demonstrated. The SUAV Auto GCAS project demonstrated that together these methods and technologies have the potential to dramatically reduce the number of controlled flight into terrain mishaps across a wide range of aviation platforms with similar capabilities including UAVs, general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and model aircraft.

  12. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  13. Prescribed differences in exercise intensity based on the TCAR test over sandy ground and grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fernandes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of training might be influenced by exercise mode and type of terrain. Thus, the objective of this study was a to compare the physiological indices determined in the TCAR test carried out on natural grass (NG and sandy ground (SG, and b to analyze heart rate (HR and blood lactate responses during constant exercise on SG and NG. Ten soccer players (15.11 ± 1.1 years, 168 ± 4.0 cm, 60 ± 4.0 kg were submitted to the TCAR test to determine peak velocity (PV and the intensity corresponding to 80.4% PV (V80.4 on NG and SG. The second evaluation consisted of two constant load tests (CLT (80.4% PV on NG and SG with a duration of 27 min. The paired Student t-test was used to compare the tests carried out on NG and SG. ANOVA (two-way, complemented by the Tukey test, was used to compare lactate concentrations [La] at 9, 18 and 27 min between the two types of terrain. A p value <0.05 was adopted. PV and V80.4 (15.3±1.0 and 12.3±0.6 km/h were significantly higher on grass than on sand (14.3±1.0 and 11.5±0.4 km/h. Lactate concentration during the CLT [LaV80.4] was significantly higher on sand (4.1±0.9 mmol/L than on grass (2.8±0.7 mmol/L. In the CLT, no significant difference in mean HR was observed between the two terrains, whereas there was a difference in [La]. In conclusion, the type of terrain interferes with indicators associated with aerobic power and capacity obtained by the TCAR test.

  14. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feretti, Donatella; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gustavino, Bianca; Zerbini, Llaria; Zani, Claudia; Monarca, Silvano; Rizzoni, Marco

    2012-02-17

    Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L) and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L). These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia). No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  15. Radiological safety studies on ground disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. Environmental simulation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadachi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Takebe, Shinichi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Washio, Masakazu (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki. Tokai Research Establishment)

    1982-03-01

    As the method of disposing low level radioactive wastes on land, the underground disposal method disposing the wastes in the structures constructed underground near the ground surface has been investigated as a feasible method. In order to contribute to the environmental safety assessment for this underground disposal method, environmental simulation test is planned at present, in which earth is sampled in the undisturbed state, and the behavior of radioactive nuclides is examined. The testing facilities are to be constructed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute from fiscal 1981. First, the research made so far concerning the movement of radioactive nuclides in airing layer and aquifer which compose natural barrier is outlined. As for the environmental simulation test, the necessity and method of the test, earth sampling, the underground simulation facility and the contribution to environmental safety assessment are explained. By examining the movement of radioactive nuclides through natural barrier and making the effective mddel for the underground movement of radioactive nuclides, the environmental safety assessment for the disposal can be performed to obtain the national consensus.

  16. Possibilities of ground penetrating radar usage within acceptance tests of rigid pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryk, Josef; Matula, Radek; Pospisil, Karel

    2013-10-01

    Within the road pavement acceptance tests, destructive as well as non-destructive tests of individual road layers are performed to verify the standard requirements. The article describes a method for providing quick, effective and sufficiently accurate measurements of both dowel and tie bar positions in concrete pavements, using a two-channel ground penetrating radar (GPR). Measurements were carried out in laboratory and in-situ conditions. A special hand cart for field measurements, set for the testing requirements, was designed. It was verified that following the correct measuring and assessment method, it is possible to reach accuracy of determining the in-built rebar up to 1 cm in vertical direction and up to 1.5 cm per 11.5 m of measured length in horizontal direction. In the in-situ tests, GPR identification of possible anomalies due to the phase of concrete pavement laying was presented. In the conclusion, a measurement report is mentioned. The standard requirements for the position of dowels and tie bars cover maximum possible deviation of the rebar position from the project documentation in vertical and horizontal direction, maximum deflection of rebar ends to each other, and maximum translation of rebar in the direction of its longitudinal axis.

  17. Exploring the plexus of context and consequences : An empirical test of a theory of disaster vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, Michel; Frerks, Georg; Birkmann, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    What determines the disaster vulnerability of countries? In this study a theoretical model was tested, linking disaster vulnerability to physical hazards and cultural and historical factors. Associations between the World Vulnerability Index and Hofstede's cultural dimensions scores were explored us

  18. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the third volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of appendices C through U of the report

  19. On-ground tests of LISA PathFinder thermal diagnostics system

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conditions in the LTP, the LISA Technology Package, are required to be very stable, and in such environment precision temperature measurements are also required for various diagnostics objectives. A sensitive temperature gauging system for the LTP is being developed at IEEC, which includes a set of thermistors and associated electronics. In this paper we discuss the derived requirements applying to the temperature sensing system, and address the problem of how to create in the laboratory a thermally quiet environment, suitable to perform meaningful on-ground tests of the system. The concept is a two layer spherical body, with a central aluminium core for sensor implantation surrounded by a layer of polyurethane. We construct the insulator transfer function, which relates the temperature at the core with the laboratory ambient temperature, and evaluate the losses caused by heat leakage through connecting wires. The results of the analysis indicate that, in spite of the very demanding stability conditio...

  20. Radiative Heating in MSL Entry: Comparison of Flight Heating Discrepancy to Ground Test and Predictive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; White, Todd R.; Mahzari, Milad; Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    During the recent entry of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the heat shield was equipped with thermocouple stacks to measure in-depth heating of the thermal protection system (TPS). When only convective heating was considered, the derived heat flux from gauges in the stagnation region was found to be underpredicted by as much as 17 W/sq cm, which is significant compared to the peak heating of 32 W/sq cm. In order to quantify the contribution of radiative heating phenomena to the discrepancy, ground tests and predictive simulations that replicated the MSL entry trajectory were performed. An analysis is carried through to assess the quality of the radiation model and the impact to stagnation line heating. The impact is shown to be significant, but does not fully explain the heating discrepancy.

  1. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  2. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the third volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of appendices C through U of the report

  3. Does restructuring hospitals result in greater efficiency?--An empirical test using diachronic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Mary T; Hindle, Donald; Iedema, Rick A; Black, Deborah A

    2006-02-01

    Hospitals are being restructured more frequently. Increased cost efficiency is the usual justification given for such changes. All 20 major teaching hospitals in Australia's two most populous states were investigated by classifying each over a 5-6 year period in terms of their cost efficiency (average cost per case weighted by Australian diagnosis-related group [AN-DRG] data and adjusted for inflation) and structure, categorized as traditional-professional (TP), clinical-divisional (CD), or clinical-institute (CI). In all, 12 hospitals changed structure during the study period. There was slight evidence that CD structures were more efficient than TP structures but this was not supported by other evidence. There were no significant differences in efficiency in the first or second years following changes from either TP to CD or TP to CI structures. All four hospitals changing from CD to CI structure became significantly less efficient. This may be due to frequency rather than type of change as they were the only hospitals that implemented two structural changes. Hospitals that changed or did not change structure were similar in efficiency at the beginning and at the end of the study period, in overall efficiency during the period, and in trends toward efficiency over time. The findings challenge those who advocate restructuring hospitals on the grounds of improving cost efficiency.

  4. Analysis of the Effects of Vitiates on Surface Heat Flux in Ground Tests of Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent; Gaffney, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the high enthalpy conditions associated with hypersonic flight, many ground test facilities burn fuel in the air upstream of the test chamber. Unfortunately, the products of combustion contaminate the test gas and alter gas properties and the heat fluxes associated with aerodynamic heating. The difference in the heating rates between clean air and a vitiated test medium needs to be understood so that the thermal management system for hypersonic vehicles can be properly designed. This is particularly important for advanced hypersonic vehicle concepts powered by air-breathing propulsion systems that couple cooling requirements, fuel flow rates, and combustor performance by flowing fuel through sub-surface cooling passages to cool engine components and preheat the fuel prior to combustion. An analytical investigation was performed comparing clean air to a gas vitiated with methane/oxygen combustion products to determine if variations in gas properties contributed to changes in predicted heat flux. This investigation started with simple relationships, evolved into writing an engineering-level code, and ended with running a series of CFD cases. It was noted that it is not possible to simultaneously match all of the gas properties between clean and vitiated test gases. A study was then conducted selecting various combinations of freestream properties for a vitiated test gas that matched clean air values to determine which combination of parameters affected the computed heat transfer the least. The best combination of properties to match was the free-stream total sensible enthalpy, dynamic pressure, and either the velocity or Mach number. This combination yielded only a 2% difference in heating. Other combinations showed departures of up to 10% in the heat flux estimate.

  5. Plans of a test bed for ionospheric modelling based on Fennoscandian ground-based instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Aikio, Anita; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku; Turunen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Virtanen, Ilkka; Norberg, Johannes; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Kallio, Esa; Kestilä, Antti; Partamies, Noora; Syrjäsuo, Mikko

    2016-07-01

    One of the recommendations for teaming among research groups in the COSPAR/ILWS roadmap is about building test beds in which coordinated observing supports model development. In the presentation we will describe a test bed initiative supporting research on ionosphere-thermosphere-magnetosphere interactions. The EISCAT incoherent scatter radars with their future extension, EISCAT3D, form the backbone of the proposed system. The EISCAT radars are surrounded by versatile and dense arrays of ground-based instrumentation: magnetometers and auroral cameras (the MIRACLE and IMAGE networks), ionospheric tomography receivers (the TomoScand network) and other novel technology for upper atmospheric probing with radio waves (e.g. the KAIRA facility, riometers and the ionosonde maintained by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory). As a new opening, close coordination with the Finnish national cubesat program is planned. We will investigate opportunities to establish a cost efficient nanosatellite program which would support the ground-based observations in a systematic and persistent manner. First experiences will be gathered with the Aalto-1 and Aalto-2 satellites, latter of which will be the Finnish contribution to the international QB50 mission. We envisage close collaboration also in the development of data analysis tools with the goal to integrate routines and models from different research groups to one system, where the different elements support each other. In the longer run we are aiming for a modelling framework with observational guidance which gives a holistic description on ionosphere-thermosphere processes and this way enables reliable forecasts on upper atmospheric space weather activity.

  6. Edge effects and geometric constraints: a landscape-level empirical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Suzy E; Prevedello, Jayme A; Delciellos, Ana Cláudia; Vieira, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    Edge effects are pervasive in landscapes yet their causal mechanisms are still poorly understood. Traditionally, edge effects have been attributed to differences in habitat quality along the edge-interior gradient of habitat patches, under the assumption that no edge effects would occur if habitat quality was uniform. This assumption was questioned recently after the recognition that geometric constraints tend to reduce population abundances near the edges of habitat patches, the so-called geometric edge effect (GEE). Here, we present the first empirical, landscape-level evaluation of the importance of the GEE in shaping abundance patterns in fragmented landscapes. Using a data set on the distribution of small mammals across 18 forest fragments, we assessed whether the incorporation of the GEE into the analysis changes the interpretation of edge effects and the degree to which predictions based on the GEE match observed responses. Quantitative predictions were generated for each fragment using simulations that took into account home range, density and matrix use for each species. The incorporation of the GEE into the analysis changed substantially the interpretation of overall observed edge responses at the landscape scale. Observed abundances alone would lead to the conclusion that the small mammals as a group have no consistent preference for forest edges or interiors and that the black-eared opossum Didelphis aurita (a numerically dominant species in the community) has on average a preference for forest interiors. In contrast, incorporation of the GEE suggested that the small mammal community as a whole has a preference for forest edges, whereas D. aurita has no preference for forest edges or interiors. Unexplained variance in edge responses was reduced by the incorporation of GEE, but remained large, varying greatly on a fragment-by-fragment basis. This study demonstrates how to model and incorporate the GEE in analyses of edge effects and that this

  7. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  8. The optical performance of the PILOT instrument from ground end-to-end tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, R.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Longval, Y.; Ristorcelli, I.; Ade, P.; Alina, D.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousqet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Chaigneau, M.; Charra, M.; Crane, B.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J. P.; Engel, C.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Pajot, F.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tauber, J.; Tucker, C.

    2017-06-01

    The Polarized Instrument for Long-wavelength Observation of the Tenuous interstellar medium ( PILOT) is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the linear polarization of thermal dust emission in two photometric bands centred at wavelengths 240 μm (1.2 THz) and 550 μm (545 GHz), with an angular resolution of a few arcminutes. Several end-to-end tests of the instrument were performed on the ground between 2012 and 2014, in order to prepare for the first scientific flight of the experiment that took place in September 2015 from Timmins, Ontario, Canada. This paper presents the results of those tests, focussing on an evaluation of the instrument's optical performance. We quantify image quality across the extent of the focal plane, and describe the tests that we conducted to determine the focal plane geometry, the optimal focus position, and sources of internal straylight. We present estimates of the detector response, obtained using an internal calibration source, and estimates of the background intensity and background polarization.

  9. Theoretical foundations for on-ground tests of LISA PathFinder thermal diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, A; Ramos-Castro, J; Sanjuan, J; Lobo, Alberto; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the methods and results of a theoretical analysis to design an insulator which must provide a thermally quiet environment to test on ground delicate temperature sensors and associated electronics. These will fly on board ESA's LISA PathFinder (LPF) mission as part of the thermal diagnostics subsystem of the LISA Test-flight Package (LTP). We evaluate the heat transfer function (in frequency domain) of a central body of good thermal conductivity surrounded by a layer of a very poorly conducting substrate. This is applied to assess the materials and dimensions necessary to meet temperature stability requirements in the metal core, where sensors will be implanted for test. The analysis is extended to evaluate the losses caused by heat leakage through connecting wires, linking the sensors with the electronics in a box outside the insulator. The results indicate that, in spite of the very demanding stability conditions, a sphere of outer diameter of the order one metre is sufficient.

  10. Criminal law and HIV testing: empirical analysis of how at-risk individuals respond to the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Goo

    2014-01-01

    This Note assesses the effect of laws that specifically criminalize behaviors that expose others to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This Note examines the relationship between HIV testing decisions by high-risk individuals and the existence of these HIV-specific statutes, as well as the amount of media coverage related to them. One of the main reasons public health experts criticize criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior is that it may discourage at-risk individuals from undergoing HIV testing. This argument, however, remains empirically untested to date. This study quantitatively examines whether at-risk individuals living in jurisdictions with HIV-specific statutes are less likely to report having been tested for HIV in the past year compared to those living in jurisdictions without HIV-specific statutes. Regression analysis is conducted using data collected in the United States over a seven-year span. The results show that at-risk individuals residing in states with HIV-specific statutes are no less likely to report having been tested for HIV than those who live in other states. However, the number of people who reported that they had been tested for HIV is inversely correlated with the frequency of newspaper coverage of criminalization of HIV-exposing behavior. These findings imply that at-risk individuals' HIV testing is associated with media coverage of criminalizing HIV-exposing behavior. The negative impact that criminal law has on HIV testing rates could be a serious public health threat. Testing is often the initial step in public health interventions that most effectively modify the risky behavior of HIV-positive individuals. The adverse consequence of criminalization should weigh heavily in the design and application of criminal sanctions for HIV-exposing behavior. In addition, future research should further explore the relationships between criminalization, media coverage of criminalization, and HIV testing decisions for a more nuanced

  11. Tests of Selection in Pooled Case-Control Data: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin eUdpa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available For smaller organisms with faster breeding cycles, artificial selection can be used to create sub-populations with different phenotypic traits. Genetic tests can be employed to identify the causal markers for the phenotypes, as a precursor to engineering strains with a combination of traits. Traditional approaches involve analyzing crosses of inbred strains to test for co-segregation with genetic markers. Here we take advantage of cheaper next generation sequencing techniques to identifygenetic signatures of adaptation to the selection constraints. Obtaining individual sequencing data is often unrealistic due to cost and sample issues, so we focus on pooled genomic data.In this paper, we explore a series of statistical tests for selection using pooled case (under selection and control populations. Extensive simulations are used to show that these approaches work well for a wide range of population divergence times and strong selective pressures. We show that pooling does not have a significant impact on statistical power. The tests are also robust to reasonable variations in several different parameters, including window size, base-calling error rate, and sequencing coverage. We then demonstrate the viability (and the challenges of one of these methods in two independent Drosophila populations (Drosophila melanogaster bred under selectionfor hypoxia and accelerated development, respectively. Testing for extreme hypoxia tolerance showed clear signals of selection, pointing to loci that are important for hypoxia adaptation.Overall, we outline a strategy for finding regions under selection using pooled sequences, then devise optimal tests for that strategy. The approaches show promise for detecting selection, even several generations after fixation of the beneficial allele has occurred.

  12. Two-sample density-based empirical likelihood tests for incomplete data in application to a pneumonia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexler, Albert; Yu, Jihnhee

    2011-07-01

    In clinical trials examining the incidence of pneumonia it is a common practice to measure infection via both invasive and non-invasive procedures. In the context of a recently completed randomized trial comparing two treatments the invasive procedure was only utilized in certain scenarios due to the added risk involved, and given that the level of the non-invasive procedure surpassed a given threshold. Hence, what was observed was bivariate data with a pattern of missingness in the invasive variable dependent upon the value of the observed non-invasive observation within a given pair. In order to compare two treatments with bivariate observed data exhibiting this pattern of missingness we developed a semi-parametric methodology utilizing the density-based empirical likelihood approach in order to provide a non-parametric approximation to Neyman-Pearson-type test statistics. This novel empirical likelihood approach has both a parametric and non-parametric components. The non-parametric component utilizes the observations for the non-missing cases, while the parametric component is utilized to tackle the case where observations are missing with respect to the invasive variable. The method is illustrated through its application to the actual data obtained in the pneumonia study and is shown to be an efficient and practical method. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Brand Value: Empirical Test of the Importance of Dimensions of Brand Value Forming Perspective on Consumer in Brazilian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Sergio Costa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the importance of formative dimensions of consumer-based brand equity in the Brazilian context through the empirical testing of the model proposed by Yoo and Donthu (2001. Other authors have validated the multidimensionality of the concept of consumer-based brand equity (Myers, 2003; Villarejo-Ramos and Sánchez-Franco, 2005; Vargas and Luce, 2006. However, these studies differed as to the number of dimensions and the respective importance thereof, which is evidence of a gap in the literature. To answer the questions posed by this study, a survey of 636 consumers was conducted. The data collected were subjected to the statistical technique of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and structural equation modeling (SEM. The results of the study suggest a partial validity of the model of Yoo and Donthu (2001. The importance of the dimensions loyalty and perceived quality in the formation of consumer-based brand equity were empirically supported. However, the absence of a significant relationship between awareness/associations and overall brand equity suggests the need for further studies, whether to validate this relationship, whether to propose new scales to measure the construct of brand awareness/associations.

  14. Dynamic Time Warping Distance Method for Similarity Test of Multipoint Ground Motion Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmin Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reasonability of artificial multi-point ground motions and the identification of abnormal records in seismic array observations, are two important issues in application and analysis of multi-point ground motion fields. Based on the dynamic time warping (DTW distance method, this paper discusses the application of similarity measurement in the similarity analysis of simulated multi-point ground motions and the actual seismic array records. Analysis results show that the DTW distance method not only can quantitatively reflect the similarity of simulated ground motion field, but also offers advantages in clustering analysis and singularity recognition of actual multi-point ground motion field.

  15. Inequality of Higher Education in China: An Empirical Test Based on the Perspective of Relative Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to examine what makes Chinese college students dissatisfied with entrance opportunities for higher education. Based on the author's survey data, we test two parameters which could be a potential cause of this dissatisfaction: 1) distributive inequality, which emphasizes the individual's dissatisfaction caused by…

  16. Detection of aberrant item score patterns in computerized adaptive testing : An empirical example using the CUSUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Iris J. L.; Meijer, Rob R.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Schakel, Lolle; Smid, Nico G.

    2010-01-01

    The scalability of individual trait scores on a computerized adaptive test (CAT) was assessed through investigating the consistency of individual item score patterns. A sample of N = 428 persons completed a personality CAT as part of a career development procedure. To detect inconsistent item score

  17. What Drives Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction? An Empirical Test using Structural Equation Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patient satisfaction determinants in emergency departments (EDs) have for decades been heavily investigated. Despite great focus, a lack of consensus about which parameters are deemed most important remains. This study proposes an integrated framework for ED patient satisfaction, testing four key...

  18. The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulac, Anthony; Giles, Howard; Bradac, James J.; Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The gender-linked language effect (GLLE) is a phenomenon in which transcripts of female communicators are rated higher on Socio-Intellectual Status and Aesthetic Quality and male communicators are rated higher on Dynamism. This study proposed and tested a new general process model explanation for the GLLE, a central mediating element of which…

  19. Empirical Test of the Know, See, Plan, Do Model for Curriculum Design in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth Ann; Allen, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    This research assesses the Know, See, Plan, portions of the Know, See, Plan, Do (KSPD) model for curriculum design in leadership education. There were 3 graduate student groups, each taught using 1 of 3 different curriculum designs (KSPD and 2 control groups). Based on a pretest, post-test design, students' performance was measured to assess their…

  20. Labour turnover and its effects on performance : an empirical test using firm data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glebbeek, A.C.; Bax, E.H.

    2002-01-01

    In this article we test the hypothesis that the relationship between labour turnover and the economic performance of the firm is bell-shaped: a turnover level too low has a negative effect and likewise does a level too high. Our analysis is based on economic performance data of 110 offices of a temp

  1. Through rose-coloured glasses : An empirical test of narcissistic overestimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbestael, Jill; de Bruin, Anique; Kok, Ellen; Voncken, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grandiosity is designated as a hallmark trait of narcissism. The current study tested whether narcissistic traits are related to overestimation of a range of agentic performances. METHOD: Eighty-five non-patients executed six objective tasks to assess their level of (emotional) intellige

  2. An Empirical Test of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Contraceptive Use in Rural Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kiene, Susan M.; Hopwood, Sarah; Lule, Haruna; Rhoda K Wanyenze

    2013-01-01

    There is a high unmet need for contraceptives in developing countries such as Uganda, with high population growth, where efforts are needed to promote family planning and contraceptive use. Despite this high need, little research has investigated applications of health behaviour change theories to contraceptive use amongst this population. The present study tested the Theory of Planned Behaviour’s ability to predict contraceptive use-related behaviours among postpartum women in rural Uganda. ...

  3. Comparisons of SHM Sensor Models with Empirical Test Data for Sandwich Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    propagation in a honeycomb sandwich panel was done by Metis Design Inc. in collaboration with ARC NASA . The sandwich panel fabricated for this test...structures. Sandwich type composites are being studied for use in NASAs new heavy lift launch vehicle and flaw detection is crucial for safety and for...and at the Marshall Space Flight Center to examine acoustic wave propagating and the ability to detect intrinsic faults in sandwich type composite

  4. Empirical Formula for the Relationship between Compressive Strength and Test Temperature of Carbon/Polyimide Composites

    OpenAIRE

    濱口, 泰正; Hamaguchi, Yasumasa

    2002-01-01

    T800H/PMR-15 carbon/polyimide composite possesses good specific strength and specific rigidity in the high-temperature region around 300C. This material is an advanced structural composite for use in elevons and other secondary structures of the unmanned space reentry vehicle HOPE-X. The author carried out basic strength evaluation tests on this material. Compressive strength data is especially important for structural design using composite materials. Compressive strength data was therefore ...

  5. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  6. A Large-Scale Empirical Evaluation of Cross-Validation and External Test Set Validation in (Q)SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, Martin; Helma, Christoph; Karwath, Andreas; Kramer, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    (Q)SAR model validation is essential to ensure the quality of inferred models and to indicate future model predictivity on unseen compounds. Proper validation is also one of the requirements of regulatory authorities in order to accept the (Q)SAR model, and to approve its use in real world scenarios as alternative testing method. However, at the same time, the question of how to validate a (Q)SAR model, in particular whether to employ variants of cross-validation or external test set validation, is still under discussion. In this paper, we empirically compare a k-fold cross-validation with external test set validation. To this end we introduce a workflow allowing to realistically simulate the common problem setting of building predictive models for relatively small datasets. The workflow allows to apply the built and validated models on large amounts of unseen data, and to compare the performance of the different validation approaches. The experimental results indicate that cross-validation produces higher performant (Q)SAR models than external test set validation, reduces the variance of the results, while at the same time underestimates the performance on unseen compounds. The experimental results reported in this paper suggest that, contrary to current conception in the community, cross-validation may play a significant role in evaluating the predictivity of (Q)SAR models.

  7. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. The federal government's General Services Administration's (GSA) Public Buildings Service (PBS) acquires space on behalf of the federal government through new construction and leasing, and acts as a caretaker for federal properties across the country. PBS owns or leases 9,624 assets and maintains an inventory of more than 370.2 million square feet of workspace, and as such has enormous potential for implementing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies to reduce energy and water use and associated emissions. The Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies. In 2011, the GPG program selected 16 technologies or practices for rigorous testing and evaluation. Evaluations are currently being performed in collaboration with the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, and a steady stream of results will be forthcoming throughout 2012. This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. Lastly, it provides a general overview of the 2012 program.

  8. Development and Testing of Techniques for In-Ground Stabilization, Size Reduction and Safe Removal of Radioactive Wastes Stored in Large Containments in Burial Grounds - 13591

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc, 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from laboratories have been stored below ground in large containments at a number of sites in the US DOE Complex, and at nuclear sites in Europe. These containments are generally referred to as caissons or shafts. The containments are in a range of sizes and depths below grade. The caissons at the DOE's Hanford site are cylindrical, of the order of 2,500 mm in diameter, 3,050 mm in height and are buried about 6,000 mm below grade. One type of caisson is made out of corrugated pipe, whereas others are made of concrete with standard re-bar. However, the larger shafts in the UK are of the order of 4,600 mm in diameter, 53,500 mm deep, and 12,000 below grade. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities performed to date to evaluate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of the contents of large containments similar to those at Hanford. In practice, the height of the Test Facility provided for a test cell that was approximately 22' deep. That prevented a 'full scale mockup' test in the sense that the Hanford Caisson configuration would be an identical replication. Therefore, the project was conducted in two phases. The first phase tested a simulated Caisson with surrogate contents, and part of a Chute section, and the second phase tested a full chute section. These tests were performed at VJ Technologies Test Facility located in East Haven, CT, as part of the Proof of Design Concept program for studying the feasibility of an in-situ grout/grind/mix/stabilize technology for the remediation of four caissons at the 618-11 Burial Ground at US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The test site was constructed such that multiple testing areas were provided for the evaluation of various tools, equipment and procedures under conditions that simulated the Hanford site, with representative soils and layout dimensions. (authors)

  9. Is Asian American Parenting Controlling and Harsh? Empirical Testing of Relationships between Korean American and Western Parenting Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonsun; Kim, You Seung; Kim, Su Yeong; Park, Irene Kim

    2013-01-01

    Asian American parenting is often portrayed as highly controlling and even harsh. This study empirically tested the associations between a set of recently developed Korean ga-jung-kyo-yuk measures and several commonly used Western parenting measures to accurately describe Asian American family processes, specifically those of Korean Americans. The results show a much nuanced and detailed picture of Korean American parenting as a blend of Western authoritative and authoritarian styles with positive and—although very limited—negative parenting. Certain aspects of ga-jung-kyo-yuk are positively associated with authoritative style or authoritarian style, or even with both of them simultaneously. They were positively associated with positive parenting (warmth, acceptance, and communication) but not with harsh parenting (rejection and negative discipline). Exceptions to this general pattern were Korean traditional disciplinary practices and the later age of separate sleeping of children. The study discusses implications of these findings and provides suggestions for future research. PMID:23977415

  10. Is Asian American Parenting Controlling and Harsh? Empirical Testing of Relationships between Korean American and Western Parenting Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonsun; Kim, You Seung; Kim, Su Yeong; Park, Irene Kim

    2013-03-01

    Asian American parenting is often portrayed as highly controlling and even harsh. This study empirically tested the associations between a set of recently developed Korean ga-jung-kyo-yuk measures and several commonly used Western parenting measures to accurately describe Asian American family processes, specifically those of Korean Americans. The results show a much nuanced and detailed picture of Korean American parenting as a blend of Western authoritative and authoritarian styles with positive and-although very limited-negative parenting. Certain aspects of ga-jung-kyo-yuk are positively associated with authoritative style or authoritarian style, or even with both of them simultaneously. They were positively associated with positive parenting (warmth, acceptance, and communication) but not with harsh parenting (rejection and negative discipline). Exceptions to this general pattern were Korean traditional disciplinary practices and the later age of separate sleeping of children. The study discusses implications of these findings and provides suggestions for future research.

  11. Trust Testing in Care Pathways for Neurodevelopmental Disorders: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Waxegard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building care pathways for the expansive, heterogeneous, and complex field of neurodevelopmental disorders (ND is challenging. This classic grounded theory study conceptualizes problems encountered and resolved by professionals in the unpacking—diagnosis and work up—of ND. A care pathway for ND in children and adolescents was observed for six years. Data include interviews, documentation of a dialogue-conference devoted to the ND care pathway, 100+ hours of participant observations, and coding of stakeholder actions. Trust testing explores whether professional unpacking collaboration can occur without being “stuck with the buck” and if other professionals can be approached to solve own unpacking priorities. ND complexity, scarce resources, and diverging stakeholder interests undermine the ability to make selfless collaborative professional choices in the care pathway. ND professionals and managers should pay as much attention to trust issues as they do to structures and patient flows. The trust testing theory may improve the understanding of ND care pathways further as a modified social dilemma framework.

  12. A detailed numerical simulation of a liquid-propellant rocket engine ground test experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, D. W.; Simmons, M. A.; Heikkinen, B. D.

    1992-07-01

    A computational simulation of a Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) ground test experiment was performed using two modeling approaches. The results of the models were compared with selected data to assess the validity of state-of-the-art computational tools for predicting the flowfield and radiative transfer in complex flow environments. The data used for comparison consisted of in-band station radiation measurements obtained in the near-field portion of the plume exhaust. The test article was a subscale LRE with an afterbody, resulting in a large base region. The flight conditions were such that afterburning regions were observed in the plume flowfield. A conventional standard modeling approach underpredicted the extent of afterburning and the associated radiation levels. These results were attributed to the absence of the base flow region which is not accounted for in this model. To assess the effects of the base region a Navier-Stokes model was applied. The results of this calculation indicate that the base recirculation effects are dominant features in the immediate expansion region and resulted in a much improved comparison. However, the downstream in-band station radiation data remained underpredicted by this model.

  13. Operational Phase Life Cycle Assessment of Select NASA Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George H.; Marshall, Timothy J.; McGinnis, Sean

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) is responsible for many large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. In order to accomplish these national objectives, significant energy and resources are consumed. A select group of facilities was analyzed using life-cycle assessment (LCA) to determine carbon footprint and environmental impacts. Most of these impacts stem from electricity and natural gas consumption, used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. Other activities were analyzed but determined to be smaller in scale and frequency with relatively negligible environmental impacts. More specialized facilities use R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, and these unique inputs can have a considerable effect on a facility s overall environmental impact. The results of this LCA will be useful to ATP and NASA as the nation looks to identify its top energy consumers and NASA looks to maximize research output and minimize environmental impact. Keywords: NASA, Aeronautics, Wind tunnel, Keyword 4, Keyword 5

  14. Testing the performance of empirical remote sensing algorithms in the Baltic Sea waters with modelled and in situ reflectance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ligi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing studies published up to now show that the performance of empirical (band-ratio type algorithms in different parts of the Baltic Sea is highly variable. Best performing algorithms are different in the different regions of the Baltic Sea. Moreover, there is indication that the algorithms have to be seasonal as the optical properties of phytoplankton assemblages dominating in spring and summer are different. We modelled 15,600 reflectance spectra using HydroLight radiative transfer model to test 58 previously published empirical algorithms. 7200 of the spectra were modelled using specific inherent optical properties (SIOPs of the open parts of the Baltic Sea in summer and 8400 with SIOPs of spring season. Concentration range of chlorophyll-a, coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM and suspended matter used in the model simulations were based on the actually measured values available in literature. For each optically active constituent we added one concentration below actually measured minimum and one concentration above the actually measured maximum value in order to test the performance of the algorithms in wider range. 77 in situ reflectance spectra from rocky (Sweden and sandy (Estonia, Latvia coastal areas were used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms also in coastal waters. Seasonal differences in the algorithm performance were confirmed but we found also algorithms that can be used in both spring and summer conditions. The algorithms that use bands available on OLCI, launched in February 2016, are highlighted as this sensor will be available for Baltic Sea monitoring for coming decades.

  15. An empirical test of the Theory of Planned Behaviour applied to contraceptive use in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Susan M; Hopwood, Sarah; Lule, Haruna; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2014-12-01

    There is a high unmet need for contraceptives in developing countries such as Uganda, with high population growth, where efforts are needed to promote family planning and contraceptive use. Despite this high need, little research has investigated applications of health-behaviour-change theories to contraceptive use among this population. This study tested the Theory of Planned Behaviour's ability to predict contraceptive-use-related behaviours among post-partum women in rural Uganda. Results gave modest support to the theory's application and suggest an urgent need for improved theory-based interventions to promote contraceptive use in the populations of developing countries. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Market structure and the role of consumer information in the physician services industry: an empirical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H S

    1996-04-01

    This paper applies Panzar and Rosse's (1987) econometric test of market structure to examine two long-debated issues: What is the market structure for physician services? Do more physicians in a market area raise the search cost of obtaining consumer information and increase prices (Satterthwaite, 1979, 1985)? For primary care and general and family practice physicians, the monopolistically competitive model prevailed over the competing hypotheses--monopoly, perfect competition, and monopolistic competition characterized by consumer informational confusion. Although less conclisive, there is some evidence to support the monopolistically competitive model for surgeons and the consumer informational confusion model for internal medicine physicians.

  17. Reproductive isolation, reproductive mode, and sexual selection: empirical tests of the viviparity-driven conflict hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Seth W; Harlin-Cognato, April; Jones, Adam G

    2009-03-01

    A central goal in evolutionary biology is to elucidate general mechanisms and patterns of species divergence. The viviparity-driven conflict (VDC) hypothesis posits that intense mother-embryo conflict associated with viviparity drives rapid reproductive isolation among viviparous species, is intensified by multiple paternity, and reduces female reliance on precopulatory cues in mate choice. We tested these predictions using comparisons of oviparous and viviparous fishes. Consistent with the VDC hypothesis, we found that, relative to oviparous species, only closely related viviparous fishes are known to hybridize. Also in support of the VDC hypothesis, we found that (1) elaborate male sexual ornamentation may be more common in viviparous species with relatively low levels of maternal provisioning of embryos compared with those with high levels of provisioning and (2) the degree of multiple paternity is higher in viviparous species than in oviparous species. In contrast to a prediction of the VDC hypothesis, we found no relationship between the degree of multiple paternity and elaborate male sexual ornamentation, although statistical power was quite low for this test. Whereas overall our results strongly support the central tenet of the VDC hypothesis-that reproductive mode affects rates of evolution of reproductive isolation and the strength of sexual selection-they cannot rule out two alternative models we propose that may also explain the observed patterns.

  18. Online social networks for crowdsourced multimedia-involved behavioral testing: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho eChoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk, which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  19. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  20. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  1. IEEE 802.11p Empirical Performance Model from Evaluations on Test Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Demmel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available IEEE 802.11p is the new standard for intervehicular communications (IVC using the 5.9 GHz frequency band; it is planned to be widely deployed to enable cooperative systems. 802.11p uses and performance have been studied theoretically and in simulations over the past years. Unfortunately, many of these results have not been confirmed by on-tracks experimentation. In this paper, we describe field trials of 802.11p technology with our test vehicles; metrics such as maximum range, latency and frame loss are examined. Then, we propose a detailed modelisation of 802.11p that can be used to accurately simulate its performance within Cooperative Systems (CS applications.

  2. What Drives International Competitiveness? An Empirical Test in Emerging Indonesian Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetyo Heru Aries

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to identify factors which drive international sustainable competitive advantage using Indonesian listed-multinational companies. The study began with identifying the terminology for emerging market using a single index model. We then deployed the three measurements for competitive advantage which are return on sales, return on asset and return on equity. Our results showed that all three measurements have the power to explain each competitive factor for Indonesian multinational firm, but statistically, ROA showed as the best proxies. Moreover, eight out of ten hypotheses tested were strongly supported by the data. The study strongly emphasized the importance of knowledge management, local leadership and a factor of location as vital drivers for global competitive advantage. Lastly, the study also stressed the importance of globalizing subsidiaries in order to gain sustainable competitive advantage for the host country.

  3. Protestant Clergy and the Culture Wats: An Empirical Test of Hunter’s Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E.; Lucke, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    This study instead focuses on culture wars among religious elites—clergy—and tests three aspects of the culture wars thesis: (1) whether cultural wars exist at all among religious elites, (2) whether clergy attitudes are polarized on these issues, and (3) whether religious authority or religious affiliation is more salient in creating culture wars cleavages. Using data from a large random sample of Protestant clergy, we find a substantial amount of engagement in culture wars by all types of Protestant clergy. The amount of polarization is more attributable to views of religious authority (i.e., biblical inerrancy) than to religious tradition. Moreover, polarization among clergy is somewhat more evident on culture wars issues than on other social and political issues. These findings are generally supportive of the culture wars thesis and should help return examinations of culture wars back to where they were originally theorized to be waged: among elites. PMID:24072933

  4. Protestant Clergy and the Culture Wats: An Empirical Test of Hunter's Thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E; Lucke, Glenn

    2011-12-01

    This study instead focuses on culture wars among religious elites-clergy-and tests three aspects of the culture wars thesis: (1) whether cultural wars exist at all among religious elites, (2) whether clergy attitudes are polarized on these issues, and (3) whether religious authority or religious affiliation is more salient in creating culture wars cleavages. Using data from a large random sample of Protestant clergy, we find a substantial amount of engagement in culture wars by all types of Protestant clergy. The amount of polarization is more attributable to views of religious authority (i.e., biblical inerrancy) than to religious tradition. Moreover, polarization among clergy is somewhat more evident on culture wars issues than on other social and political issues. These findings are generally supportive of the culture wars thesis and should help return examinations of culture wars back to where they were originally theorized to be waged: among elites.

  5. Endogenous Versus Exogenous Shocks in Complex Networks: An Empirical Test Using Book Sale Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Deschâtres, F.; Gilbert, T.; Ageon, Y.

    2004-11-01

    We study the precursory and recovery signatures accompanying shocks in complex networks, that we test on a unique database of the Amazon.com ranking of book sales. We find clear distinguishing signatures classifying two types of sales peaks. Exogenous peaks occur abruptly and are followed by a power law relaxation, while endogenous peaks occur after a progressively accelerating power law growth followed by an approximately symmetrical power law relaxation which is slower than for exogenous peaks. These results are rationalized quantitatively by a simple model of epidemic propagation of interactions with long memory within a network of acquaintances. The observed relaxation of sales implies that the sales dynamics is dominated by cascades rather than by the direct effects of news or advertisements, indicating that the social network is close to critical.

  6. An Empirical Test of Rejection- and Anger-Related Interpretation Bias in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; McNally, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    The authors tested whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpretation bias for disambiguating stimuli in favor of threatening interpretations, especially concerning abuse, abandonment, rejection, and anger-core emotional triggers for BPD patients. A mixed sample of 106 patients with marked BPD traits and nonpatients were assessed with SCID I and II and were presented with vignettes depicting ambiguous social interactions. Interpretations of these vignettes were assessed both in a closed and an open answer format. Results showed that BPD traits were related to a rejection- (closed and open answer formats) and an anger-related interpretation bias (closed answer option only). Cluster C traits were associated with self-blame interpretations. Aside from further validating the cognitive model of BPD, these findings denote interpretation bias as a key feature in patients with BPD that might contribute to their emotional hyperreactivity and interpersonal problems. These findings also highlight the importance of therapeutically normalizing interpretative bias in BPD and cluster C patients.

  7. Neighborhood social capital and adult health: an empirical test of a Bourdieu-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpiano, Richard M

    2007-09-01

    Drawing upon Bourdieu's [1986. The forms of capital. In: Richardson, J.G. (Ed.), Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education. Greenwood, New York, pp. 241-258.] social capital theory, I test a conceptual model of neighborhood conditions and social capital - considering relationships between neighborhood social capital forms (social support, social leverage, informal social control, and neighborhood organization participation) and adult health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking) and perceived health, as well as interactions between neighborhood social capital and individuals' access to that social capital. Analyzing Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey data linked with tract level census data, results suggest that specific social capital forms were directly associated with both positive and negative health outcomes. Additionally, residents' neighborhood attachment moderated relationships between various social capital forms and health. Future studies should consider social capital resources and the role of differential access to such resources for promoting or compromising health.

  8. An empirical test of Woody and Bowers's dissociated-control theory of hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Graham A; Sheehan, Peter W

    2004-07-01

    Woody and Bowers's dissociated-control theory predicts impaired performance on tasks indexing frontally mediated supervisory attentional functions during hypnosis, especially for high susceptibles. This prediction is tested using Stroop task behavioral performance to measure aspects of anterior-mediated supervisory attentional function. All measures of anterior-mediated attentional functions significantly declined during hypnosis. Interactions be-tween susceptibility and hypnosis condition showed specific changes among hypnotized high susceptibles. Total Stroop errors (failures of attentional suppression) were significantly higher in hypnosis for high, but not low, susceptibles. Tellegen's experiential mental set was highest for hypnotized highs. Use of rehearsal strategy (instrumental set) decreased significantly in hypnosis but more so for highs than lows. Results suggest that "absorption" in hypnosis may be a consequence of dissociated anterior attentional control. It is proposed that dissociated control emerges from the functional disconnection of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex.

  9. Empirical Tests of a Brain-Based Model of Executive Function Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, Sammy; Plebanek, Daniel J; Lorenz, Megan G; Spencer, John P; Samuelson, Larissa K

    2017-06-19

    Executive function (EF) plays a foundational role in development. A brain-based model of EF development is probed for the experiences that strengthen EF in the dimensional change card sort task in which children sort cards by one rule and then are asked to switch to another. Three-year-olds perseverate on the first rule, failing the task, whereas 4-year-olds pass. Three predictions of the model are tested to help 3-year-olds (N = 54) pass. Experiment 1 shows that experience with shapes and the label "shape" helps children. Experiment 2 shows that experience with colors-without a label-helps children. Experiment 3 shows that experience with colors induces dimensional attention. The implications of this work for early intervention are discussed. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  10. An Empirical Study on Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Traci L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Prowant, Matthew S.; Mathews, Royce

    2012-09-01

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for inspecting nuclear power plant (NPP) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate UT techniques to assess their ability to detect, locate, size, and characterize fabrication flaws in typical NPP weldments. This particular study focused on the evaluation of four carbon steel pipe-to-pipe welds on specimens that ranged in thicknesses from 19.05 mm (0.75 in.) to 27.8 mm (1.094 in.) and were 355.6 mm (14.0 in.) or 406.4 mm (16.0 in.) in diameter. The pipe welds contained both implanted (intentional) fabrication flaws as well as bonus (unintentional) flaws throughout the entire thickness of the weld and the adjacent base material. The fabrication flaws were a combination of planar and volumetric flaw types, including incomplete fusion, incomplete penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array UT (PA UT) techniques applied primarily for detection and length sizing of the flaws. Radiographic examinations were also conducted on the specimens with RT detection and length sizing results being used to establish true state. This paper will discuss the comparison of UT and RT (true state) detection results conducted to date along with a discussion on the technical gaps that need to be addressed before these methods can be used interchangeably for repair and replacement activities for NPP components.

  11. Further Evaluation of Covariate Analysis using Empirical Bayes Estimates in Population Pharmacokinetics: the Perception of Shrinkage and Likelihood Ratio Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu Steven; Yuan, Min; Yang, Haitao; Feng, Yan; Xu, Jinfeng; Pinheiro, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Covariate analysis based on population pharmacokinetics (PPK) is used to identify clinically relevant factors. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) based on nonlinear mixed effect model fits is currently recommended for covariate identification, whereas individual empirical Bayesian estimates (EBEs) are considered unreliable due to the presence of shrinkage. The objectives of this research were to investigate the type I error for LRT and EBE approaches, to confirm the similarity of power between the LRT and EBE approaches from a previous report and to explore the influence of shrinkage on LRT and EBE inferences. Using an oral one-compartment PK model with a single covariate impacting on clearance, we conducted a wide range of simulations according to a two-way factorial design. The results revealed that the EBE-based regression not only provided almost identical power for detecting a covariate effect, but also controlled the false positive rate better than the LRT approach. Shrinkage of EBEs is likely not the root cause for decrease in power or inflated false positive rate although the size of the covariate effect tends to be underestimated at high shrinkage. In summary, contrary to the current recommendations, EBEs may be a better choice for statistical tests in PPK covariate analysis compared to LRT. We proposed a three-step covariate modeling approach for population PK analysis to utilize the advantages of EBEs while overcoming their shortcomings, which allows not only markedly reducing the run time for population PK analysis, but also providing more accurate covariate tests.

  12. Private Capital and Investment Climate for Economic Growth: Empirical Lessons based on ARDL bound test technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Tchouassi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using time series, autoregressive distributed lags (ARDL-bound test approach and error-correction model (ECM, this paper aims to analyze how private capital and investment climate contribute to economic growth in African countries: Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Tunisia, South Africa and Zambia. We find that in short-run there is a significant relationship between private capital, economic freedom and economic growth in Cameroon, in Côte d’Ivoire, in South Africa and in Zambia. In long run, we establish that a long term relationship exists between the variables. This implies that there is a long run cointegration relationship among the variables in some equations in Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, South Africa and Zambia. Employing the appropriate order of the ARDL specification and multidimensional economic freedom proxies to examine this linkage, the results obtained are not all significant.  JEL Classifications: C13, C22, E22, F43, O11, O47 Key-Words: Private capital, Investment climate, Economic freedom, Economic growth, Time series, ARDL bound test approach, Error-Correction Model. Normal 0 14 false false false IT X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  13. Accurate relative location estimates for the North Korean nuclear tests using empirical slowness corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna, T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2017-01-01

    Declared North Korean nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013 and 2016 were observed seismically at regional and teleseismic distances. Waveform similarity allows the events to be located relatively with far greater accuracy than the absolute locations can be determined from seismic data alone. There is now significant redundancy in the data given the large number of regional and teleseismic stations that have recorded multiple events, and relative location estimates can be confirmed independently by performing calculations on many mutually exclusive sets of measurements. Using a 1-D global velocity model, the distances between the events estimated using teleseismic P phases are found to be approximately 25 per cent shorter than the distances between events estimated using regional Pn phases. The 2009, 2013 and 2016 events all take place within 1 km of each other and the discrepancy between the regional and teleseismic relative location estimates is no more than about 150 m. The discrepancy is much more significant when estimating the location of the more distant 2006 event relative to the later explosions with regional and teleseismic estimates varying by many hundreds of metres. The relative location of the 2006 event is challenging given the smaller number of observing stations, the lower signal-to-noise ratio and significant waveform dissimilarity at some regional stations. The 2006 event is however highly significant in constraining the absolute locations in the terrain at the Punggye-ri test-site in relation to observed surface infrastructure. For each seismic arrival used to estimate the relative locations, we define a slowness scaling factor which multiplies the gradient of seismic traveltime versus distance, evaluated at the source, relative to the applied 1-D velocity model. A procedure for estimating correction terms which reduce the double-difference time residual vector norms is presented together with a discussion of the associated uncertainty. The modified

  14. Testing the hydrodynamics and stability of ammonoids: empirical and simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas; Astrop, Timothy; Ren, Qilong; Angioni, Stefano; Carley, Michael; Wills, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The coiled shells of ammonoids have classically been modelled in theoretical morphospaces with just a few variables. As dynamic accretionary structures, their shells preserve developmental trajectory as well as adult morphology. In traversing mass extinction events, the morphospace occupation of ammonoids was repeatedly reduced, but the clade often recolonized much of this morphospace in the wake of each mass extinction. The gross morphology of ammonoid shells was therefore subject to high levels of homoplasy and convergence. However, it is unclear what precise functions the ammonoid shells may have been optimized for, neither is it known what determined the bounds of their morphospace given that not all geometrically possible forms were realized. We demonstrate that the actualized occupation of Raupian morphospace can be predicted from numerical modelling, given the dual requirements for stability and manoeuvrability, both while stationary within the water column and while swimming. We test these theoretical predictions in two ways: firstly using 3D printed models in waterflow tank experiments, and secondly using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) approaches. All concur that ammonoids were not especially efficient or impressive swimmers. Spherocone forms maximized stability at the expense of manoeuvrability, while platycone and oxycone morphologies were better adapted for more rapid directional change rather than stability. We speculate that the former were optimized for stability within the water column, while the latter were adapted for moving dynamically around obstructions close to the bottom or for predation-avoidance manoeuvres.

  15. An empirical test of the independence between declarative and procedural working memory in Oberauer's (2009) theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Corbin, Lucie; Dagry, Isabelle; Camos, Valérie

    2015-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that working memory could be conceived as two symmetrical subsystems with analogous structure and processing principles: a declarative working memory storing objects of thought available for cognitive operations, and a procedural working memory holding representations of what to do with these objects (Oberauer, Psychology of learning and motivation 51: 45-100, 2009). Within this theoretical framework, the two subsystems are thought to be independent and fueled by their own capacity. The present study tested this hypothesis through two experiments using a complex span task in which participants were asked to maintain consonants for further recall while performing response selection tasks. In line with Oberauer's conception, the load of the procedural working memory was varied by manipulating the number of stimulus-response mappings of the response selection task. Increasing the number of these mappings had a strong detrimental effect on recall performance. Besides contradicting Oberauer's proposal, this finding supports models that assume a resource-sharing between processing and storage in working memory.

  16. Gender, general theory of crime and computer crime: an empirical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byongook; McCluskey, John D; McCluskey, Cynthia P; Lee, Sangwon

    2013-04-01

    Regarding the gender gap in computer crime, studies consistently indicate that boys are more likely than girls to engage in various types of computer crime; however, few studies have examined the extent to which traditional criminology theories account for gender differences in computer crime and the applicability of these theories in explaining computer crime across gender. Using a panel of 2,751 Korean youths, the current study tests the applicability of the general theory of crime in explaining the gender gap in computer crime and assesses the theory's utility in explaining computer crime across gender. Analyses show that self-control theory performs well in predicting illegal use of others' resident registration number (RRN) online for both boys and girls, as predicted by the theory. However, low self-control, a dominant criminogenic factor in the theory, fails to mediate the relationship between gender and computer crime and is inadequate in explaining illegal downloading of software in both boy and girl models. Theoretical implication of the findings and the directions for future research are discussed.

  17. Testing Capital Asset Pricing Model: Empirical Evidences from Indian Equity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil CHOUDHARY

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM for the Indian stock market using monthly stock returns from 278 companies of BSE 500 Index listed on the Bombay stock exchange for the period of January 1996 to December 2009. The findings of this study are not substantiating the theory’s basic result that higher risk (beta is associated with higher levels of return. The model does explain, however, excess returns and thus lends support to the linear structure of the CAPM equation. The theory’s prediction for the intercept is that it should equal zero and the slope should equal the excess returns on the market portfolio. The results of the study lead to negate the above hypotheses and offer evidence against the CAPM. The tests conducted to examine the nonlinearity of the relationship between return and betas bolster the hypothesis that the expected return-beta relationship is linear. Additionally, this study investigates whether the CAPM adequately captures all-important determinants of returns including the residual variance of stocks. The results exhibit that residual risk has no effect on the expected returns of portfolios.

  18. Segregation analysis of cryptogenic epilepsy and an empirical test of the validity of the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottman, R.; Hauser, W.A.; Barker-Cummings, C.; Lee, J.H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    We used POINTER to perform segregation analysis of crytogenic epilepsy in 1,557 three-generation families (probands and their parents, siblings, and offspring) ascertained from voluntary organizations. Analysis of the full data set indicated that the data were most consistent with an autosomal dominant (AD) model with 61% penetrance of the susceptibility gene. However, subsequent analyses revealed that the patterns of familial aggregation differed markedly between siblings and offspring of the probands. Risks in siblings were consistent with an autosomal recessive (AR) model and inconsistent with an AD model, whereas risks in offspring were inconsistent with an AR model and more consistent with an AD model. As a further test of the validity of the AD model, we used sequential ascertainment to extend the family history information in the subset of families judged likely to carry the putative susceptibility gene because they contained at least three affected individuals. Prevalence of idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy was only 3.7% in newly identified relatives expected to have a 50% probability of carrying the susceptibility gene under an AD model. Approximately 30% (i.e., 50% X 61%) were expected to be affected under the AD model resulting from the segregation analysis. These results suggest that the familial distribution of cryptogenic epilepsy is inconsistent with any conventional genetic model. The differences between siblings and offspring in the patterns of familial risk are intriguing and should be investigated further. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. Do confessions taint perceptions of handwriting evidence? An empirical test of the forensic confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukucka, Jeff; Kassin, Saul M

    2014-06-01

    Citing classic psychological research and a smattering of recent studies, Kassin, Dror, and Kukucka (2013) proposed the operation of a forensic confirmation bias, whereby preexisting expectations guide the evaluation of forensic evidence in a self-verifying manner. In a series of studies, we tested the hypothesis that knowing that a defendant had confessed would taint people's evaluations of handwriting evidence relative to those not so informed. In Study 1, participants who read a case summary in which the defendant had previously confessed were more likely to erroneously conclude that handwriting samples from the defendant and perpetrator were authored by the same person, and were more likely to judge the defendant guilty, compared with those in a no-confession control group. Study 2 replicated and extended these findings using a within-subjects design in which participants rated the same samples both before and after reading a case summary. These findings underscore recent critiques of the forensic sciences as subject to bias, and suggest the value of insulating forensic examiners from contextual information.

  20. Empirically testing vaterite structural models using neutron diffraction and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Pracheil, Brenda M.; Koenigs, Ryan P.; Bruch, Ronald M.; Feygenson, Mikhail

    2016-11-01

    Otoliths, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) ear bones, are among the most commonly used age and growth structures of fishes. Most fish otoliths are comprised of the most dense CaCO3 polymorph, aragonite. Sturgeon otoliths, in contrast, have been characterized as the rare and structurally enigmatic polymorph, vaterite—a metastable polymorph of CaCO3. Vaterite is an important material ranging from biomedical to personal care applications although its crystal structure is highly debated. We characterized the structure of Lake Sturgeon otoliths using thermal analysis and neutron powder diffraction, which is used non-destructively. We confirmed that while Lake Sturgeon otoliths are primarily composed of vaterite, they also contain the denser CaCO3 polymorph, calcite. For the vaterite fraction, neutron diffraction data provide enhanced discrimination of the carbonate group compared to x-ray diffraction data, owing to the different relative neutron scattering lengths, and thus offer the opportunity to uniquely test the more than one dozen crystal structural models that have been proposed for vaterite. Of those, space group P6522 model, a = 7.1443(4)Å, c = 25.350(4)Å, V = 1121.5(2)Å3 provides the best fit to the neutron powder diffraction data, and allows for a structure refinement using rigid carbonate groups.

  1. "The liability of newness" revisited: Theoretical restatement and empirical testing in emergent organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiantian; Aldrich, Howard E

    2017-03-01

    The mismatch between Stinchcombe's original propositions regarding "the liability of newness" and subsequent attempts to test those propositions suggests to us that the form and causes of the liability remain open to further investigation. Taking organizational emergence as a process comprising entrepreneurs engaging in actions that produce outcomes, we propose hypotheses about the social mechanisms of organizational construction involved in investing resources, developing routines, and maintaining boundaries. Distinguishing between initial founding conditions versus subsequent activities, our results not only confirm the liability of newness hypothesis, but also reveal a much higher risk of failure in organizations' early lifetime than rates found in previous research. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of entrepreneurs' continuing effort after their initial organizing attempts. Whereas only a few initial founding conditions lower the risk of failure, subsequent entrepreneurial activities play a major role in keeping the venture alive. Entrepreneurs contribute to whether a venture survives through raising more resources, enacting routines, and gaining increased public recognition of organizational boundaries. After controlling for financial performance, our results still hold. Based on our analysis, we offer suggestions for theory and research on organizations and entrepreneurship.

  2. Linking predator risk and uncertainty to adaptive forgetting: a theoretical framework and empirical test using tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Maud C O; Brown, Grant E; Bortolotti, Gary R; Chivers, Douglas P

    2010-07-22

    Hundreds of studies have examined how prey animals assess their risk of predation. These studies work from the basic tennet that prey need to continually balance the conflicting demands of predator avoidance with activities such as foraging and reproduction. The information that animals gain regarding local predation risk is most often learned. Yet, the concept of 'memory' in the context of predation remains virtually unexplored. Here, our goal was (i) to determine if the memory window associated with predator recognition is fixed or flexible and, if it is flexible, (ii) to identify which factors affect the length of this window and in which ways. We performed an experiment on larval wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, to test whether the risk posed by, and the uncertainty associated with, the predator would affect the length of the tadpoles' memory window. We found that as the risk associated with the predator increases, tadpoles retained predator-related information for longer. Moreover, if the uncertainty about predator-related information increases, then prey use this information for a shorter period. We also present a theoretical framework aiming at highlighting both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that could affect the memory window of information use by prey individuals.

  3. Empirically testing vaterite structural models using neutron diffraction and thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Pracheil, Brenda M; Koenigs, Ryan P; Bruch, Ronald M; Feygenson, Mikhail

    2016-11-18

    Otoliths, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) ear bones, are among the most commonly used age and growth structures of fishes. Most fish otoliths are comprised of the most dense CaCO3 polymorph, aragonite. Sturgeon otoliths, in contrast, have been characterized as the rare and structurally enigmatic polymorph, vaterite-a metastable polymorph of CaCO3. Vaterite is an important material ranging from biomedical to personal care applications although its crystal structure is highly debated. We characterized the structure of Lake Sturgeon otoliths using thermal analysis and neutron powder diffraction, which is used non-destructively. We confirmed that while Lake Sturgeon otoliths are primarily composed of vaterite, they also contain the denser CaCO3 polymorph, calcite. For the vaterite fraction, neutron diffraction data provide enhanced discrimination of the carbonate group compared to x-ray diffraction data, owing to the different relative neutron scattering lengths, and thus offer the opportunity to uniquely test the more than one dozen crystal structural models that have been proposed for vaterite. Of those, space group P6522 model, a = 7.1443(4)Å, c = 25.350(4)Å, V = 1121.5(2)Å(3) provides the best fit to the neutron powder diffraction data, and allows for a structure refinement using rigid carbonate groups.

  4. Ground Tests and In-Orbit Performance of Variable Emittance Device Based on Manganese Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Sumitaka; Ohnishi, Akira; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Akira

    A new thermal control material named the Smart Radiation Device (SRD) has shown improvement in development. The SRD can be used as a variable emittance radiator that controls the heat radiated into deep space without assistances of any electrical instruments or mechanical parts. Its total hemispherical emittance changes from low to high as the temperature increases. This new device reduces the energy consumption of the on-board heater, and decreases the weight and the cost of the thermal control system (TCS). Space environmental simulation tests on the ground were performed, and the first generation of the SRD has been demonstrating success on the MUSES-C ‘HAYABUSA’ spacecraft that was launched in May 2003. During its cruise on the orbit, the distance from the spacecraft to the sun varied from 0.86AU to 1.70AU. As the spacecraft experienced solar intensity variation by a factor 4, it was effective to use the variable emittance radiator for decreasing the heater power. In-orbit temperature indicated that the SRD had successfully minimized component temperature variation and saved heater power, as expected. With the opportunity to validate the SRD in space, this lightweight and low cost thermal control device offers a possibility for flexible thermal control on future spacecrafts.

  5. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  6. HV Test of the CTS Edgeless Silicon Detector in Vacuum and Close to a Grounded Plate

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, Vladimir; Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    The TOTEM Roman Pot Silicon sensors will be operated in vacuum to minimise the mechanical stress of the thin metal window which separates the detector package from the ultra high vacuum of the beam. To approach the beam axis as close as possible the detectors will be mounted with their edge at a distance of the order 100 - 200 um from the thin metal window. As the detectors will be run in overdepletion mode to allow the full charge collection within the shaping time of the readout electronics, there will be a potential drop of more than 100 V across their edge. Moreover this potential drop might need to be further increased with the accumulated radiation dose. The main goals of the tests described in this note are: - Characterisation of the voltage-current characteristics when the detector edge is in the direct vicinity of a grounded metal plate which simulates the above mentioned vacuum window; - Demonstration of the detector operation in vacuum at different pressures.

  7. Life-Cycle Assessments of Selected NASA Ground-Based Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George Honeycutt

    2012-01-01

    In the past two years, two separate facility-specific life cycle assessments (LCAs) have been performed as summer student projects. The first project focused on 13 facilities managed by NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP), an organization responsible for large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. A facility inventory was created for each facility, and the operational-phase carbon footprint and environmental impact were calculated. The largest impacts stemmed from electricity and natural gas used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. However, in specialized facilities that use unique inputs like R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, these sometimes had a considerable effect on the facility s overall environmental impact. The second LCA project was conducted on the NASA Ames Arc Jet Complex and also involved creating a facility inventory and calculating the carbon footprint and environmental impact. In addition, operational alternatives were analyzed for their effectiveness at reducing impact. Overall, the Arc Jet Complex impact is dominated by the natural-gas fired boiler producing steam on-site, but alternatives were provided that could reduce the impact of the boiler operation, some of which are already being implemented. The data and results provided by these LCA projects are beneficial to both the individual facilities and NASA as a whole; the results have already been used in a proposal to reduce carbon footprint at Ames Research Center. To help future life cycle projects, several lessons learned have been recommended as simple and effective infrastructure improvements to NASA, including better utility metering and data recording and standardization of modeling choices and methods. These studies also increased sensitivity to and appreciation for quantifying the impact of NASA s activities.

  8. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Bert

    2006-02-01

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g., chiral models, factorizing models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work, I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff( S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL (2, Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular "Euclideanization" is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J.A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" contribution hep-th/0502125.

  9. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [FU Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2005-04-15

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factoring models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular 'Euclideanization' is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J. A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an 'Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics' contribution hep-th/0502125. (author)

  10. A Rigorous Test of the Fit of the Circumplex Model to Big Five Personality Data: Theoretical and Methodological Issues and Two Large Sample Empirical Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGeest, David Scott; Schmidt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to apply the rigorous test developed by Browne (1992) to determine whether the circumplex model fits Big Five personality data. This test has yet to be applied to personality data. Another objective was to determine whether blended items explained correlations among the Big Five traits. We used two working adult samples, the Eugene-Springfield Community Sample and the Professional Worker Career Experience Survey. Fit to the circumplex was tested via Browne's (1992) procedure. Circumplexes were graphed to identify items with loadings on multiple traits (blended items), and to determine whether removing these items changed five-factor model (FFM) trait intercorrelations. In both samples, the circumplex structure fit the FFM traits well. Each sample had items with dual-factor loadings (8 items in the first sample, 21 in the second). Removing blended items had little effect on construct-level intercorrelations among FFM traits. We conclude that rigorous tests show that the fit of personality data to the circumplex model is good. This finding means the circumplex model is competitive with the factor model in understanding the organization of personality traits. The circumplex structure also provides a theoretically and empirically sound rationale for evaluating intercorrelations among FFM traits. Even after eliminating blended items, FFM personality traits remained correlated.

  11. Ground penetrating radar for determining volumetric soil water content ; results of comparative measurements at two test sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmeeren, R.A. van; Sariowan, S.V.; Gehrels, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) can provide information on the soil water content of the unsaturated zone in sandy deposits via measurements from the surface, and so avoids drilling. Proof of this was found from measurements of radar wave velocities carried out ten times over 13 months at two test si

  12. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary Alan; DeSimone, Julia Carol; Freeman, John L.; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. We performed ground testing to determine whether ARC EMCS seed cassettes could be adapted for use with tardigrades for future spaceflight experiments. Tardigrades (water bears) are small invertebrates that enter the tun state in response to desiccation or other environmental stresses. Tardigrade tuns have suspended metabolism and have been shown to be survive exposure to space vacuum, high pressure, temperature and other stresses. For spaceflight experiments using the EMCS, the organisms ideally must be able to survive desiccation and storage in the cassette at ambient temperature for several weeks prior to the initiation of the experiment by the infusion of water to the cassette during spaceflight. The ability of tardigrades to survive extremes by entering the tun state make them ideal candidates for growth experiments in the EMCS cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membrane contains dried growth medium. The goals of our study were to (1) determine whether tardigrades survive and reproduce on PES membranes, (2) develop a consistent method for dehydration of the tardigrades with high recovery rates upon rehydration, (3) to determine an appropriate food source for the tardigrades that can also be dehydrated/rehydrated and (4) successful mock rehydration experiment in cassettes with appropriate food source. We present results that show successful multigenerational growth of tardigrades on PES membranes with a variety of wet food sources. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration with tardigrades and at least one candidate food, protonema of the moss Polytrichum, that supports multigenerational growth and whose spores germinate quickly enough to match tardigrade feeding patterns post rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini

  13. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, W.

    2015-02-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  14. Testing sea-level markers observed in ground-penetrating radar data from Feddet, south-eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Nielsen, Lars; Clemmensen, Lars B

    2012-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data have been collected across the modern part (test identification of sea-level markers in GPR data from microtidal depositional environments. Nielsen and Clemmensen (2009) showed that iden......Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data have been collected across the modern part (... that identified downlap points in GPR data from Anholt (an island in the Kattegat Sea, Denmark) can be interpreted to mark sea level at the time of deposition. The data presented here support this hypothesis. The GPR reflection data have been acquired with shielded 250 MHz Sensors & Software antennae along...

  15. Sensitivity is not an intrinsic property of a diagnostic test: empirical evidence from histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrilho Carla

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to provide empirical evidence of how spectrum effects can affect the sensitivity of histological assessment of Helicobacter pylori infection, which may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across populations with expectedly similar prevalence. Methods Cross-sectional evaluation of dyspeptic subjects undergoing upper digestive endoscopy, including collection of biopsy specimens from the greater curvature of the antrum for assessment of H. pylori infection by histopathological study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR, from Portugal (n = 106 and Mozambique (n = 102 following the same standardized protocol. Results In the Portuguese sample the prevalence of infection was 95.3% by histological assessment and 98.1% by PCR. In the Mozambican sample the prevalence was 63.7% and 93.1%, respectively. Among those classified as infected by PCR, the sensitivity of histological assessment was 96.2% among the Portuguese and 66.3% among the Mozambican. Among those testing positive by both methods, 5.0% of the Portuguese and 20.6% of the Mozambican had mild density of colonization. Conclusions This study shows a lower sensitivity of histological assessment of H. pylori infection in Mozambican dyspeptic patients compared to the Portuguese, which may be explained by differences in the density of colonization, and may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across African settings.

  16. Aquifer tests and simulation of ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks near Colmar, Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.; Bird, Philip H.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks near Colmar, in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pa. The study was conducted to help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluate remediation alternatives at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, where ground water has been contaminated by volatile organic solvents (primarily trichloroethene). The investigation focused on determining the (1) drawdown caused by separately pumping North PennWater Authority wells NP?21 and NP?87, (2) probable paths of groundwater movement under present-day (2000) conditions (with NP?21 discontinued), and (3) areas contributing recharge to wells if pumping from wells NP-21 or NP?87 were restarted and new recovery wells were installed. Drawdown was calculated from water levels measured in observation wells during aquifer tests of NP?21 and NP?87. The direction of ground-water flow was estimated by use of a three-dimensional ground-water-flow model. Aquifer tests were conducted by pumping NP?21 for about 7 days at 257 gallons per minute in June 2000 and NP?87 for 3 days at 402 gallons per minute in May 2002. Drawdown was measured in 45 observation wells during the NP?21 test and 35 observation wells during the NP?87 test. Drawdown in observation wells ranged from 0 to 6.8 feet at the end of the NP?21 test and 0.5 to 12 feet at the end of the NP?87 test. The aquifer tests showed that ground-water levels declined mostly in observation wells that were completed in the geologic units penetrated by the pumped wells. Because the geologic units dip about 27 degrees to the northwest, shallow wells up dip to the southeast of the pumped well showed a good hydraulic connection to the geologic units stressed by pumping. Most observation wells down dip from the pumping well penetrated units higher in the stratigraphic section that were not well

  17. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  18. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  19. Vessel grounding in entrance channels: case studies and physical model tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tulsi, K

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical model studies were conducted of a 250K DWT fully laden iron ore vessel grounding on the side slopes of the outbound channel at a major Australian port. A key deliverable of the study was to estimate the tug force required to pull the vessel...

  20. How Much Can the Total Aleatory Variability of Empirical Ground Motion Prediction Equations Be Reduced Using Physics-Based Earthquake Simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T. H.; Wang, F.; Graves, R. W.; Callaghan, S.; Olsen, K. B.; Cui, Y.; Milner, K. R.; Juve, G.; Vahi, K.; Yu, J.; Deelman, E.; Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) in common use predict the logarithmic intensity of ground shaking, lnY, as a deterministic value, lnYpred(x), conditioned on a set of explanatory variables x plus a normally distributed random variable with a standard deviation σT. The latter accounts for the unexplained variability in the ground motion data used to calibrate the GMPE and is typically 0.5-0.7 in natural log units. Reducing this residual or "aleatory" variability is a high priority for seismic hazard analysis, because the probabilities of exceedance at high Y values go up rapidly with σT. adding costs to the seismic design of critical facilities to account for the prediction uncertainty. However, attempts to decrease σT by incorporating more explanatory variables to the GMPEs have been largely unsuccessful (e.g., Strasser et al., SRL, 2009). An alternative is to employ physics-based earthquake simulations that properly account for source directivity, basin effects, directivity-basin coupling, and other 3D complexities. We have explored the theoretical limits of this approach through an analysis of large (> 108) ensembles of 3D synthetic seismograms generated for the Los Angeles region by SCEC's CyberShake project using the new tool of averaging-based factorization (ABF, Wang & Jordan, BSSA, 2014). The residual variance obtained by applying GMPEs to the CyberShake dataset matches the frequency-dependence of σT obtained for the GMPE calibration dataset. The ABF analysis allows us to partition this variance into uncorrelated components representing source, path, and site effects. We show that simulations can potentially reduce σT by about one-third, which could lower the exceedance probabilities for high hazard levels at fixed x by orders of magnitude. Realizing this gain in forecasting probability would have a broad impact on risk-reduction strategies, especially for critical facilities such as large dams, nuclear power plants, and energy transportation

  1. Ground tests with prototype of CeBr3 active gamma ray spectrometer proposed for future venus surface missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Golovin, D. V.; Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The results of a series of ground tests with a prototype of an active gamma-ray spectrometer based on a new generation of scintillation crystal (CeBr3) are presented together with a consideration to its applicability to future Venus landing missions. We evaluated the instrument's capability to distinguish the subsurface elemental composition of primary rock forming elements such as O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K and Fe. Our study uses heritage from previous ground and field tests and applies to the analysis of gamma lines from activation reaction products generated by a pulsed neutron generator. We have estimated that the expected accuracies achieved in this approach could be as high as 1-10% for the particular chemical element being studied.

  2. Development of a Ground Test and Analysis Protocol to Support NASA's NextSTEP Phase 2 Habitation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Kara H.; Chappell, Steven P.; Bekdash, Omar S.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP) program is a public-private partnership model that seeks commercial development of deep space exploration capabilities to support extensive human spaceflight missions around and beyond cislunar space. NASA first issued the Phase 1 NextSTEP Broad Agency Announcement to U.S. industries in 2014, which called for innovative cislunar habitation concepts that leveraged commercialization plans for low Earth orbit. These habitats will be part of the Deep Space Gateway (DSG), the cislunar space station planned by NASA for construction in the 2020s. In 2016, Phase 2 of the NextSTEP program selected five commercial partners to develop ground prototypes. A team of NASA research engineers and subject matter experts have been tasked with developing the ground test protocol that will serve as the primary means by which these Phase 2 prototype habitats will be evaluated. Since 2008, this core test team has successfully conducted multiple spaceflight analog mission evaluations utilizing a consistent set of operational products, tools, methods, and metrics to enable the iterative development, testing, analysis, and validation of evolving exploration architectures, operations concepts, and vehicle designs. The purpose of implementing a similar evaluation process for the NextSTEP Phase 2 Habitation Concepts is to consistently evaluate the different commercial partner ground prototypes to provide data-driven, actionable recommendations for Phase 3.

  3. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Tracked Vehicle Movement across Desert Pavement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the tracked vehicle movement component of the testing program. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased infiltration and/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. The simulated exposure of wash vegetation to water loss was quantified using estimates of exposed land area from a digital ortho quarter quad aerial photo and field observations, a 30 30 m digital elevation model, the flow accumulation feature of ESRI ArcInfo, and a two-step process in which runoff was estimated from direct precipitation to a land area and from water that flowed from upgradient to a land area. In all simulated scenarios, absolute water loss decreased with distance from the disturbance, downgradient in the washes; however, percentage water loss was greatest in land areas immediately downgradient of a disturbance. Potential effects on growth and survival of wash trees were quantified by using an empirical relationship derived from a local unpublished study of water infiltration rates. The risk characterization concluded that neither risk to wash vegetation growth or survival nor risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction was expected. The risk characterization was negative for both the incremental risk of the test program and the combination of the test and pretest disturbances.

  4. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-546 Teleoperated Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) Latency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), AD No.: 14. ABSTRACT...discrete system components or measurements of latency in autonomous systems. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Basic Video Latency, End -to... End System Latency, Command-to-Action Latency 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 23 19a

  5. Construction and Testing of Broadband High Impedance Ground Planes (HIGPS) for Surface Mount Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    mushrooms (with side lengths of 7.6mm). Larger mushrooms (with side lengths of 16mm) were located to the edges of the substrate . The resulting...thickness and substrate permittivity are two of the main design parameters. But these parameters have production constraints, since they are ordered off...plane designs as a meta- substrate for a broadband bow-tie antenna were presented. Consequently, the high impedance ground plane provided a suitable

  6. Efficiency test of modeled empirical equations in predicting soil loss from ephemeral gully erosion around Mubi, Northeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijasini John Tekwa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A field study was carried out to assess soil loss from ephemeral gully (EG erosion at 6 different locations (Digil, Vimtim, Muvur, Gella, Lamorde and Madanya around the Mubi area between April, 2008 and October, 2009. Each location consisted of 3 watershed sites from where data was collected. EG shape, land use, and conservation practices were noted, while EG length, width, and depth were measured. Physico-chemical properties of the soils were studied in the field and laboratory. Soil loss was both measured and predicted using modeled empirical equations. Results showed that the soils are heterogeneous and lying on flat to hilly topographies with few grasses, shrubs and tree vegetations. The soils comprised of sand fractions that predominated the texture, with considerable silt and clay contents. The empirical soil loss was generally related with the measured soil loss and the predictions were widely reliable at all sites, regardless of season. The measured and empirical aggregate soil loss were more related in terms of volume of soil loss (VSL (r2=0.93 and mass of soil loss (MSL (r2=0.92, than area of soil loss (ASL (r2=0.27. The empirical estimates of VSL and MSL were consistently higher at Muvur (less vegetation and lower at Madanya and Gella (denser vegetations in both years. The maximum efficiency (Mse of the empirical equation in predicting ASL was between 1.41 (Digil and 89.07 (Lamorde, while the Mse was higher at Madanya (2.56 and lowest at Vimtim (15.66 in terms of VSL prediction efficiencies. The Mse also ranged from 1.84 (Madanya to 15.74 (Vimtim in respect of MSL predictions. These results led to the recommendation that soil conservationists, farmers, private and/or government agencies should implement the empirical model in erosion studies around Mubi area.

  7. A portable Ka-band front-end test package for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluation. Part 1: Design and ground tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Stewart, S. R.; Franco, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    A unique experimental method was used to test the beam waveguide (BWG) antenna at Deep Space Station (DDS) 13 in the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex near Barstow, California. The methodology involved the use of portable test packages to make measurements of operating noise temperatures and antenna efficiencies (as functions of antenna pointing angles) at the Cassegrain focal point and the final focal point located in a subterranean pedestal room. Degradations caused by the BWG mirror systems were determined by making comparisons of the measured parameters at the two focal points of the antenna. Previous articles were concerned with the design, performance characteristics, and test results obtained with an X-band test package operating at 32 GHz. Noise temperature measurement results are presented for the Ka-band test package in an on-the-ground test configuration.

  8. Grounding the Innovation of Future Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Oulasvirta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile and ubiquitous technologies can potentially change the role of information and communication technology in human lives. Empirical, human-centered approaches are emerging as an alternative to technology-driven approaches in the innovation of these technologies. Three necessary empirical stages, intertwined with analytical ones and with each informing and grounding the succeeding stages, are analyzed. First, needfinding is utilized to discover societal and individual demands for technology. Second, observational and experimental studies examine the social and cognitive preconditions for interaction. From these two steps, a hypothesis is formulated regarding how technology will change existing practices. Finally, this hypothesis, embodied in the design of a prototype, is tested in a field trial. Four design cases illustrate the value of empirical grounding.

  9. Ground-based tests of JEM-EUSO components at the Telescope Array site, "EUSO-TA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting tests of optical and electronics components of JEMEUSO at the Telescope Array site in Utah with a ground-based "EUSO-TA" detector. The tests will include an engineering validation of the detector, cross-calibration of EUSO-TA with the TA fluorescence detector and observations of air shower events. Also, the proximity of the TA's Electron Light Source will allow for convenient use of this calibration device. In this paper, we report initial results obtained with the EUSO-TA telescope.

  10. Implementing ground surface deformation tools to characterize field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer during a short hydraulic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, fluid flow is governed by the structural and hydromechanical properties of fracture networks or conductive fault zones. In order to ensure a sustained exploitation of resources or to assess the safety of underground storage, it is necessary to evaluate these properties. As they generally form highly heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs, fractured media may be well characterized by means of several complementary experimental methods or sounding techniques. In this framework, the observation of ground deformation has been proved useful to gain insight of a fractured reservoir's geometry and hydraulic properties. Commonly, large conductive structures like faults can be studied from surface deformation from satellite methods at monthly time scales, whereas meter scale fractures have to be examined under short-term in situ experiments using high accuracy intruments like tiltmeters or extensometers installed in boreholes or at the ground's surface. To the best of our knowledge, the feasability of a field scale (~ 100 m) characterization of a fractured reservoir with geodetic tools in a short term experiment has not yet been addressed. In the present study, we implement two complementary ground surface geodetic tools, namely tiltmetry and optical leveling, to monitor the deformation induced by a hydraulic recovery test at the Ploemeur hydrological observatory (France). Employing a simple purely elastic modeling approach, we show that the joint use of time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement) makes it possible to evaluate the geometry (dip, root depth and lateral extent) and the storativity of a hydraulically active fault zone, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence we demonstrate that the adequate use of two complementary ground surface deformation methods offer a rich insight of large conductive structure's properties using a single short term hydraulic load. Ground surface

  11. Adoption of a service innovation in the business market : An empirical test of supply-side variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, RT; Nooteboom, B; Wedel, M; Barkema, H.W.

    The objective of this article is to assess the influence of variables over which suppliers have control (supply-side variables) on the adoption gf innovations in addition to adopter-side variables. The empirical study focused on the adoption of electronic banking in the Dutch business market. A

  12. Adoption of a service innovation in the business market : An empirical test of supply-side variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, RT; Nooteboom, B; Wedel, M; Barkema, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this article is to assess the influence of variables over which suppliers have control (supply-side variables) on the adoption gf innovations in addition to adopter-side variables. The empirical study focused on the adoption of electronic banking in the Dutch business market. A quan

  13. Development of Neural Network Model for Predicting Peak Ground Acceleration Based on Microtremor Measurement and Soil Boring Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kerh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It may not be possible to collect adequate records of strong ground motions in a short period of time; hence microtremor survey is frequently conducted to reveal the stratum structure and earthquake characteristics at a specified construction site. This paper is therefore aimed at developing a neural network model, based on available microtremor measurement and on-site soil boring test data, for predicting peak ground acceleration at a site, in a science park of Taiwan. The four key parameters used as inputs for the model are soil values of the standard penetration test, the medium grain size, the safety factor against liquefaction, and the distance between soil depth and measuring station. The results show that a neural network model with four neurons in the hidden layer can achieve better performance than other models presently available. Also, a weight-based neural network model is developed to provide reliable prediction of peak ground acceleration at an unmeasured site based on data at three nearby measuring stations. The method employed in this paper provides a new way to treat this type of seismic-related problem, and it may be applicable to other areas of interest around the world.

  14. Impact of seasonal forecast use on agricultural income in a system with varying crop costs and returns: an empirically-grounded simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, T.; Bazuin, J. T.; Nay, J.; Yeung, K. L.

    2017-03-01

    Access to seasonal climate forecasts can benefit farmers by allowing them to make more informed decisions about their farming practices. However, it is unclear whether farmers realize these benefits when crop choices available to farmers have different and variable costs and returns; multiple countries have programs that incentivize production of certain crops while other crops are subject to market fluctuations. We hypothesize that the benefits of forecasts on farmer livelihoods will be moderated by the combined impact of differing crop economics and changing climate. Drawing upon methods and insights from both physical and social sciences, we develop a model of farmer decision-making to evaluate this hypothesis. The model dynamics are explored using empirical data from Sri Lanka; primary sources include survey and interview information as well as game-based experiments conducted with farmers in the field. Our simulations show that a farmer using seasonal forecasts has more diversified crop selections, which drive increases in average agricultural income. Increases in income are particularly notable under a drier climate scenario, when a farmer using seasonal forecasts is more likely to plant onions, a crop with higher possible returns. Our results indicate that, when water resources are scarce (i.e. drier climate scenario), farmer incomes could become stratified, potentially compounding existing disparities in farmers’ financial and technical abilities to use forecasts to inform their crop selections. This analysis highlights that while programs that promote production of certain crops may ensure food security in the short-term, the long-term implications of these dynamics need careful evaluation.

  15. Ground tests of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutron instrument operation in the passive mode with a Martian soil model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, V. N.; Dubasov, P. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Zontikov, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument ground tests in the passive mode of operation are presented in comparison with the numerical calculations. These test series were conducted to support the current surface measurements of DAN onboard the MSL Curiosity rover. The instrument sensitivity to detect thin subsurface layers of water ice buried at different depths in the analog of Martian soil has been evaluated during these tests. The experiments have been done with a radioisotope Pu-Be neutron source (analog of the MMRTG neutron source onboard the Curiosity rover) and the Martian soil model assembled from silicon-rich window glass pane. Water ice layers were simulated with polyethylene sheets. All experiments have been performed at the test facility built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia).

  16. Test of ground-based lidar instrument WLS7-159

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn

    This report presents the result of the test performed for the given Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. The test aims at establishing a relation between the reference wind measurements and corresponding lidar wind indications, and evaluating a set of quality...

  17. Test of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS200S-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the test performed for the given Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. The test aims at establishing a relation between the reference wind measurements and corresponding lidar wind indications, and evaluating a set of quality...

  18. Stochastic Modeling of Structural Uncertainty/Variability from Ground Vibration Modal Test Data (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    inclusion of a nonlinear bend–twist couple without permanent deformation of the test article. For modal testing, a Polytec PSV-400-3D scanning laser...scanned using the Polytec PSV-400-3D scanning LDV. The joined-wing test article was excited with an autoping hammer with a force sensor mounted to the

  19. F-4 Beryllium Rudders; A Precis of the Design, Fabrication, Ground and Flight Test Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    Stress concentration factor KIPS (1000 pounds) per square inch Applied moment (usually a Ending moment) Cycles to failure in fatigue; number...Beryllium rudder assembly. A- TEST 2- RUDDER ULTIMATE STATIC TEST WITH MAXIMUM AIRLOAD AT W„ THORn The objective of this test was to demonstrate

  20. Test of ground-based Lidar instrument WLS200S-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the test performed for the given Windcube at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Høvsøre, Denmark. The test aims at establishing a relation between the reference wind measurements and corresponding lidar wind indications, and evaluating a set of quality...

  1. Status of the Correlation Process of the V-HAB Simulation with Ground Tests and ISS Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetner, Peter; Anderson, Molly S.; Czupalla, Markus; Ewert, Micahel K.; Roth, Christof Martin; Zhulov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The Virtual Habitat (V-HAB) is a dynamic Life Support System (LSS) simulation, created to investigate future human spaceflight missions. V-HAB provides the capability to optimize LSS during early design phases. Furthermore, it allows simulation of worst case scenarios which cannot be tested in reality. In a nutshell, the tool allows the testing of LSS robustness by means of computer simulations. V-HAB is a modular simulation consisting of a: 1. Closed Environment Module 2. Crew Module 3. Biological Module 4. Physio-Chemical Module The focus of the paper will be the correlation and validation of V-HAB against ground test and flight data. The ECLSS technologies (CDRA, CCAA, OGA, etc.) are correlated one by one against available ground test data, which is briefly described in this paper. The technology models in V-HAB are merged to simulate the ISS ECLSS. This simulation is correlated against telemetry data from the ISS, including the water recovery system and the air revitalization system. Finally, an analysis of the results is included in this paper.

  2. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Brief History of NTP: Project Rover Began in 1950s by Los Alamos Scientific Labs (now Los Alamos National Labs) and ran until 1970s Tested a series of nuclear reactor engines of varying size at Nevada Test Site (now Nevada National Security Site) Ranged in scale from 111 kN (25 klbf) to 1.1 MN (250 klbf) Included Nuclear Furnace-1 tests Demonstrated the viability and capability of a nuclear rocket engine test program One of Kennedys 4 goals during famous moon speech to Congress Nuclear Engines for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) Atomic Energy Commission and NASA joint venture started in 1964 Parallel effort to Project Rover was focused on technology demonstration Tested XE engine, a 245-kN (55-klbf) engine to demonstrate startup shutdown sequencing. Hot-hydrogen stream is passed directly through fuel elements potential for radioactive material to be eroded into gaseous fuel flow as identified in previous programs NERVA and Project Rover (1950s-70s) were able to test in open atmosphere similar to conventional rocket engine test stands today Nuclear Furance-1 tests employed a full scrubber system Increased government and environmental regulations prohibit the modern testing in open atmosphere. Since the 1960s, there has been an increasing cessation on open air testing of nuclear material Political and national security concerns further compound the regulatory environment

  3. Burst and inter-burst duration statistics as empirical test of long-range memory in the financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontis, V.; Kononovicius, A.

    2017-10-01

    We address the problem of long-range memory in the financial markets. There are two conceptually different ways to reproduce power-law decay of auto-correlation function: using fractional Brownian motion as well as non-linear stochastic differential equations. In this contribution we address this problem by analyzing empirical return and trading activity time series from the Forex. From the empirical time series we obtain probability density functions of burst and inter-burst duration. Our analysis reveals that the power-law exponents of the obtained probability density functions are close to 3 / 2, which is a characteristic feature of the one-dimensional stochastic processes. This is in a good agreement with earlier proposed model of absolute return based on the non-linear stochastic differential equations derived from the agent-based herding model.

  4. Bubble motion in a rotating liquid body. [ground based tests for space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, P.; Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of a single gas bubble inside a rotating liquid-filled sphere has been investigated analytically and experimentally as part of ground-based investigations aimed at aiding in the design and interpretation of Shuttle experiments. In the analysis, a quasi-static description of the motion of a bubble was developed in the limit of small values of the Taylor number. A series of rotation experiments using air bubbles and silicone oils were designed to match the conditions specified in the analysis, i.e., the bubble size, sphere rotation rate, and liquid kinematic viscosity were chosen such that the Taylor number was much less than unity. The analytical description predicts the bubble velocity and its asymptotic location. It is shown that the asymptotic position is removed from the axis of rotation.

  5. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  6. Testing the growth rate hypothesis in vascular plants with above- and below-ground biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiang; Wu, Honghui; He, Nianpeng; Lü, Xiaotao; Wang, Zhiping; Elser, James J; Wu, Jianguo; Han, Xingguo

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ) is associated with higher P concentration and lower C:P and N:P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N:C under N limitation and positively correlated with P:C under P limitation. However, the N:P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C:N:P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C:N:P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations.

  7. Testing the growth rate hypothesis in vascular plants with above- and below-ground biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yu

    Full Text Available The growth rate hypothesis (GRH proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ is associated with higher P concentration and lower C:P and N:P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N:C under N limitation and positively correlated with P:C under P limitation. However, the N:P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C:N:P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C:N:P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations.

  8. Aerodynamic Drag Analysis of 3-DOF Flex-Gimbal GyroWheel System in the Sense of Ground Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Huo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available GyroWheel is an innovative device that combines the actuating capabilities of a control moment gyro with the rate sensing capabilities of a tuned rotor gyro by using a spinning flex-gimbal system. However, in the process of the ground test, the existence of aerodynamic disturbance is inevitable, which hinders the improvement of the specification performance and control accuracy. A vacuum tank test is a possible candidate but is sometimes unrealistic due to the substantial increase in costs and complexity involved. In this paper, the aerodynamic drag problem with respect to the 3-DOF flex-gimbal GyroWheel system is investigated by simulation analysis and experimental verification. Concretely, the angular momentum envelope property of the spinning rotor system is studied and its integral dynamical model is deduced based on the physical configuration of the GyroWheel system with an appropriately defined coordinate system. In the sequel, the fluid numerical model is established and the model geometries are checked with FLUENT software. According to the diversity and time-varying properties of the rotor motions in three-dimensions, the airflow field around the GyroWheel rotor is analyzed by simulation with respect to its varying angular velocity and tilt angle. The IPC-based experimental platform is introduced, and the properties of aerodynamic drag in the ground test condition are obtained through comparing the simulation with experimental results.

  9. Hypersonic ground test capabilities for T and E testing above mach 8 ''a case where S and T meets T and E''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantino, M; Miles, R; Brown, G; Laster, M; Nelson, G

    1999-10-05

    Simulation of hypersonic flight in ground test and evaluation (T and E) facilities is a challenging and formidable task, especially to fully duplicate the flight environment above approximately Mach 8 for most all hypersonic flight systems that have been developed, conceived, or envisioned. Basically, and for many years, the enabling technology to build such a ground test wind tunnel facility has been severely limited in the area of high-temperature, high-strength materials and thermal protection approaches. To circumvent the problems, various approaches have been used, including partial simulation and use of similarity laws and reduced test time. These approaches often are not satisfactory, i.e. operability and durability testing for air-breathing propulsion development and thermal protection development of many flight systems. Thus, there is a strong need for science and technology (S and T) community involvement in technology development to address these problems. This paper discusses a specific case where this need exists and where significant S and T involvement has made and continues to make significant contributions. The case discussed will be an Air Force research program currently underway to develop enabling technologies for a Mach 8-15 hypersonic true temperature wind tunnel with relatively long run time. The research is based on a concept proposed by princeton University using radiant or beamed energy into the supersonic nozzle flow.

  10. A rotating differential accelerometer for testing the equivalence principle in space: results from laboratory tests of a ground prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.

    2003-07-01

    We have proposed to test the equivalence principle (EP) in low Earth orbit with a rapidly rotating differential accelerometer (made of weakly coupled concentric test cylinders) whose rotation provides high frequency signal modulation and avoids severe limitations otherwise due to operation at room temperature [PhRvD 63 (2001) 101101]. Although the accelerometer has been conceived for best performance in absence of weight, we have designed, built and tested a variant of it at 1-g. Here we report the results of measurements performed so far. Losses measured with the full system in operation yield a quality factor only four times smaller than the value required for the proposed high accuracy EP test in space. Unstable whirl motions, which are known to arise in the system and might be a matter of concern, are found to grow as slowly as predicted and can be stabilized. The capacitance differential read-out (the mechanical parts, electronics and software for data analysis) is in all similar to what is needed in the space experiment. In the instrument described here the coupling of the test masses is 24 000 times stiffer than in the one proposed for flight, which makes it 24 000 times less sensitive to differential displacements. With this stiffness it should detect test masses separations of 1.5·10 -2 μm, while so far we have achieved only 1.5 μm, because of large perturbations—due to the motor, the ball bearings, the non-perfect verticality of the system—all of which, however, are absent in space. The effects of these perturbations should be reduced by 100 times in order to perform a better demonstration. Further instrument improvements are underway to fill this gap and also to reduce its stiffness, thus increasing its significance as a prototype of the space experiment.

  11. Space-based LH 2 propellant storage system: subscale ground testing results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggett, M. W.

    An orbital cryogenic liquid storage facility will be one of the essential elements of the US Space Program to realize the benefits of space-based cryogenic propulsion vehicles such as NASA's space transfer vehicle (STV) for transporting personnel and scientific packages from a space station in low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the moon and beyond. Long-term thermal control of LH 2 and LO 2 storage cryotanks is a key technical objective for many NASA and SDI programmes. Improved retention using refrigeration, boil-off vapour-cooled shields (VCSs), multilayer superinsulation (MLI) and para-ortho (P-O) hydrogen conversion are the required state-of-the-art techniques. The cryotank system level development testing (CSLDT) programme has supported the development of these technologies. Under the programme, trade studies and analyses were followed by the design and construction of a subscale LH 2 storage facility test article for steady-state and transient thermal tests. A two-stage gaseous helium (GHe) refrigerator was integrated with the test article and used to reduce boil-off and/or decrease the time required between passive test configuration steady-state conditions. The LH 2 tank, mounted in a vacuum chamber, was thermally shielded from the chamber wall by MLI blankets and two VCSs. The VCSs were cooled with either LH 2 boil-off gas (through an optional P-O converter) or refrigerated GHe. The CSLDT test article design, assembly and results from 400 hours of thermal tests are presented along with important conclusions. A comparison of predicted and measured steady-state boil-off rates is provided for 10 test configurations, and the system time constant is addressed. Also presented are some of the unique issues and challenges encountered during these tests that are related to instrumentation and control.

  12. Modelling ground rupture due to groundwater withdrawal: applications to test cases in China and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, A.; Teatini, P.; Janna, C.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Ye, S.; Carreón-Freyre, D.

    2015-11-01

    The stress variation induced by aquifer overdraft in sedimentary basins with shallow bedrock may cause rupture in the form of pre-existing fault activation or earth fissure generation. The process is causing major detrimental effects on a many areas in China and Mexico. Ruptures yield discontinuity in both displacement and stress field that classic continuous finite element (FE) models cannot address. Interface finite elements (IE), typically used in contact mechanics, may be of great help and are implemented herein to simulate the fault geomechanical behaviour. Two main approaches, i.e. Penalty and Lagrangian, are developed to enforce the contact condition on the element interface. The incorporation of IE incorporation into a three-dimensional (3-D) FE geomechanical simulator shows that the Lagrangian approach is numerically more robust and stable than the Penalty, thus providing more reliable solutions. Furthermore, the use of a Newton-Raphson scheme to deal with the non-linear elasto-plastic fault behaviour allows for quadratic convergence. The FE - IE model is applied to investigate the likely ground rupture in realistic 3-D geologic settings. The case studies are representative of the City of Wuxi in the Jiangsu Province (China), and of the City of Queretaro, Mexico, where significant land subsidence has been accompanied by the generation of several earth fissures jeopardizing the stability and integrity of the overland structures and infrastructure.

  13. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Massey, T. N.; Siem, S.

    2013-11-01

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys.0008-420410.1139/p65-139 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.

  14. Ground Testing and Flight Demonstration of Charge Management of Insulated Test Masses Using UV LED Electron Photoemission

    OpenAIRE

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Buchman, Sasha; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Lui, Chin Yang; Soulage, Michael; Faied, Dohy; Hanson, John; Ling, Kuok; Jaroux, Belgacem; AlRashed, Abdullah; Nassban, Badr Al; Suwaidan, Badr Al; Harbi, Mohammed Al; Salamah, Badr Bin; Othman, Mohammed Bin

    2016-01-01

    The UV LED mission demonstrates the precise control of the potential of electrically isolated test masses that is essential for the operation of space accelerometers and drag free sensors. Accelerometers and drag free sensors were and remain at the core of geodesy, aeronomy, and precision navigation missions as well as gravitational science experiments and gravitational wave observatories. Charge management using photoelectrons generated by the 254 nm UV line of Hg was first demonstrated on G...

  15. Ground Testing of the EMCS Seed Cassette for Biocompatibility with the Cellular Slime Mold, Dictyostelium Discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanely, Julia C.; Reinsch, Sigrid; Myers, Zachary A.; Freeman, John; Steele, Marianne K.; Sun, Gwo-Shing; Heathcote, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System, EMCS, was developed by ESA for plant experiments. To expand the use of flight verified hardware for various model organisms, we performed ground experiments to determine whether ARC EMCS Seed Cassettes could be adapted for use with cellular slime mold for future space flight experiments. Dictyostelium is a cellular slime mold that can exist both as a single-celled independent organism and as a part of a multicellular colony which functions as a unit (pseudoplasmodium). Under certain stress conditions, individual amoebae will aggregate to form multicellular structures. Developmental pathways are very similar to those found in Eukaryotic organisms, making this a uniquely interesting organism for use in genetic studies. Dictyostelium has been used as a genetic model organism for prior space flight experiments. Due to the formation of spores that are resistant to unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, Dictyostelium is also a good candidate for use in the EMCS Seed Cassettes. The growth substratum in the cassettes is a gridded polyether sulfone (PES) membrane. A blotter beneath the PES membranes contains dried growth medium. The goals of this study were to (1) verify that Dictyostelium are capable of normal growth and development on PES membranes, (2) develop a method for dehydration of Dictyostelium spores with successful recovery and development after rehydration, and (3) successful mock rehydration experiments in cassettes. Our results show normal developmental progression in two strains of Dictyostelium discoideum on PES membranes with a bacterial food source. We have successfully performed a mock rehydration of spores with developmental progression from aggregation to slug formation, and production of morphologically normal spores within 9 days of rehydration. Our results indicate that experiments on the ISS using the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum could potentially be performed in the flight verified hardware of

  16. Lewis icing research tunnel test of the aerodynamic effects of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of the effect of aircraft ground deicing/anti-icing fluids on the aerodynamic characteristics of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane was conducted. The test was carried out in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Fluids tested include a Newtonian deicing fluid, three non-Newtonian anti-icing fluids commercially available during or before 1988, and eight new experimental non-Newtonian fluids developed by four fluid manufacturers. The results show that fluids remain on the wind after liftoff and cause a measurable lift loss and drag increase. These effects are dependent on the high-lift configuration and on the temperature. For a configuration with a high-lift leading-edge device, the fluid effect is largest at the maximum lift condition. The fluid aerodynamic effects are related to the magnitude of the fluid surface roughness, particularly in the first 30 percent chord. The experimental fluids show a significant reduction in aerodynamic effects.

  17. Design and Test Results of AMIGO: A Novel Remote Ground Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    situe entre 150 m et 1,2 km, selon l’emplacement du capteur , la portée optique et la disposition du terrain. Par ailleurs, on a testé AMIGO sur le...l’emplacement du capteur , la portée optique et la disposition du terrain Par ailleurs, on a testé AMIGO sur le terrain à RDDC Valcartier selon divers...variant entre 20 et 333 heures. Équipé de capteurs IR passifs et acoustiques, AMIGO peut détecter une cible en mouvement de dimension humaine à une

  18. A test of the empirical network surrounding affective instability and the degree to which it is independent from neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Jessica; Miller, Joshua D; Hoffman, Brian J; Johnson, Sheri L

    2014-07-01

    Affective instability (AI) is as a central component of a number of psychiatric disorders, but it has received relatively little empirical attention as an individual construct. The goal of the current study was to study AI in the context of a broad empirical network of relevant constructs and compare its pattern of relations with those generated by trait neuroticism, both of which were assessed using both self- and informant reports. In a sample of 343 college students, the present study examined the correlations generated by an AI factor (derived from a factor analysis of relevant scales) in comparison to neuroticism in relation to personality and etiological and outcome variables. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a one-factor structure of AI related to the experience of intense and changeable negative affect and subsequent physical and behavioral consequences. The correlations generated by self- and informant reports of AI with these external criteria were almost perfectly correlated with the correlations demonstrated by self- and informant reports of neuroticism. Self- and informant reports of AI generated a pattern of results consistent with its role in a number of psychological disorders that are associated with substantial impairment. The current data suggest that AI might be best conceived of as largely overlapping with neuroticism rather than as a distinct construct.

  19. Measuring structure deformations of a composite glider by optical means with on-ground and in-flight testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakunowicz, Jerzy; Święch, Łukasz; Meyer, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    In aeronautical research experimental data sets of high quality are essential to verify and improve simulation algorithms. For this reason the experimental techniques need to be constantly refined. The shape, movement or deformation of structural aircraft elements can be measured implicitly in multiple ways; however, only optical, correlation-based techniques are able to deliver direct high-order and spatial results. In this paper two different optical metrologies are used for on-ground preparation and the actual execution of in-flight wing deformation measurements on a PW-6U glider. Firstly, the commercial PONTOS system is used for static tests on the ground and for wind tunnel investigations to successfully certify an experimental sensor pod mounted on top of the test bed fuselage. Secondly, a modification of the glider is necessary to implement the optical method named image pattern correlation technique (IPCT), which has been developed by the German Aerospace Center DLR. This scientific technology uses a stereoscopic camera set-up placed inside the experimental pod and a stochastic dot matrix applied to the area of interest on the glider wing to measure the deformation of the upper wing surface in-flight. The flight test installation, including the preparation, is described and results are presented briefly. Focussing on the compensation for typical error sources, the paper concludes with a recommended procedure to enhance the data processing for better results. Within the presented project IPCT has been developed and optimized for a new type of test bed. Adapted to the special requirements of the glider, the IPCT measurements were able to deliver a valuable wing deformation data base which now can be used to improve corresponding numerical models and simulations.

  20. Experimental Results of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Cells in a Low Density LEO Plasma Environment: Ground Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma ground testing results, conducted at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) National Plasma Interaction (N-PI) Facility, are presented for a number of thin-film photovoltaic cells. The cells represent a mix of promising new technologies identified by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under the CYGNUS Space Science Technology Experiment (SSTE-4) Program. The current ground tests are aimed at characterizing the performance and survivability of thin film technologies in the harsh low earth orbital space environment where they will be flown. Measurements of parasitic current loss, charging/dielectric breakdown of cover-slide coatings and arcing threshold tests are performed for each individual cell. These measurements are followed by a series of experiments designed to test for catastrophic arc failure mechanisms. A special type of power supply, called a solar array simulator (SAS) with adjustable voltage and current limits on the supply s output, is employed to bias two adjacent cells at a predetermined voltage and current. The bias voltage is incrementally ramped up until a sustained arc results. Sustained arcs are precursors to catastrophic arc failure where the arc current rises to a maximum value for long timescales often ranging between 30 to 100 sec times. Normal arcs by comparison, are short lived events with a timescale between 10 to 30 sec. Sustained arcs lead to pyrolization with extreme cell damage and have been shown to cause the loss of entire array strings in solar arrays. The collected data will be used to evaluate the suitability of thin-film photovoltaic technologies for future space operations.

  1. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  2. Interim-Night Integrated Goggle Head Tracking System (I-Nights). Volume 1. Ground Test Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Albery, J. Whitestone, The Standard Automated Mass Properties Testing Procedure, 1988, AAMRL-TR-88-XX (unpublished). 2. A. Lephart, C. Albery, A. Obert ...Systematic Variation of Headgear Weights and Centre -of- Gravity", Aviation. Sgace. and Environmental Medicine, pp 901- 905, October 1983. 13. Privitzer, E

  3. Ground tests of 120 kW(heat) biomass fired gasifier diesel installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyssin, L.V.; Maronet, I.J.; Morshin, V.N. [Energotechnology Ltd., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    For the 1 MW and less power range diesel gasifier power plants could be considered as one of the main energy sources. The brief information about works carried out in Russia according to this direction is presented. Data of preliminary tests for gas diesel installations are presented. (orig.)

  4. Standard practice for guided wave testing of above ground steel pipework using piezoelectric effect transduction

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a procedure for the use of guided wave testing (GWT), also previously known as long range ultrasonic testing (LRUT) or guided wave ultrasonic testing (GWUT). 1.2 GWT utilizes ultrasonic guided waves, sent in the axial direction of the pipe, to non-destructively test pipes for defects or other features by detecting changes in the cross-section and/or stiffness of the pipe. 1.3 GWT is a screening tool. The method does not provide a direct measurement of wall thickness or the exact dimensions of defects/defected area; an estimate of the defect severity however can be provided. 1.4 This practice is intended for use with tubular carbon steel or low-alloy steel products having Nominal Pipe size (NPS) 2 to 48 corresponding to 60.3 to 1219.2 mm (2.375 to 48 in.) outer diameter, and wall thickness between 3.81 and 25.4 mm (0.15 and 1 in.). 1.5 This practice covers GWT using piezoelectric transduction technology. 1.6 This practice only applies to GWT of basic pipe configuration. This inc...

  5. Instrumentation for Ground-Based Testing in Simulated Space and Planetary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Horodetsky, Sergey; Issoupov, Vitali

    This paper is an overview of instrumentation developed and created by ITL Inc. for simulated testing and performance evaluation of spacecraft materials, structures, mechanisms, assemblies and components in different space and planetary environments. The LEO Space Environment Simulator allows simulation of the synergistic effect of ultra-high vacuum conditions, 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams, Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) radiation, and temperature conditions. The simulated space environmental conditions can be controlled in-situ using a quadruple mass-spectrometer, Time-of-Flight technique, as well as Quartz Crystal Microbalance sensors. The new NUV System is capable of delivering an NUV power intensity of up to 10 Equivalent Suns. The design of the system uses horizontal orientation of the 5 kW Mercury lamp, focusing of NUV radiation is achieved due to a parabolic reflector. To address the Lunar/Martian surface environments, the Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility has been developed and built to allow for physical evaluation of the effects of the Lunar/Martian dust environments in conjunction with other factors (ultra-high vacuum or planetary atmospheric conditions, VUV/NUV radiation, thermal cycling, and darkness). The ASTM E 595/ASTM E 1559 Outgassing Test Facility provides the means for the outgassing test of materials with the objective to select materials with low outgassing properties for spacecraft use and allows to determine the following outgassing parameters: Total Mass Loss, Collected Volatile Condensable Materials, and Water Vapor Regained.

  6. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  7. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  8. On-ground testing of the role of adhesion in the LISA-Pathfinder test mass injection phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Zanoni, C.; Conklin, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Many space missions share the need to fly a free-falling body inside the spacecraft, as a reference for navigation and/or as a probe for the local gravitational field. When a mechanism is required to cage such an object during the launch phase, the need arises to release it to free-fall once the operational phase must be initiated in orbit. The criticality of this phase increases when the mechanical interfaces between the body and the mechanism are affected by adhesion and the actuation authority of the control system on the free-falling body is limited. Both conditions are realized in the LISA Pathfinder mission, which aims at injecting a gold-coated 2 kg cubic test mass into a nearly perfect geodesic trajectory to demonstrate the readiness of the developed technology for in-space gravity wave detection. The criticality of adhesion is widely recognized in space technology, because it can affect and jeopardize the functionality of mechanisms, when arising between moving parts. In the LISA Pathfinder case, metallic adhesion potentially plays a relevant role, mainly for two reasons. First, thanks to its properties (ductility, high surface energy) the gold coating on the proof mass easily produces cold weldings, especially in vacuum conditions. Second, the detachment of the proof mass from the releasing device occurs abruptly and a relevant influence of the separation velocity is expected on the strength of the welding. This can produce an excessive velocity of the proof mass at the retraction of the releasing device for the following capture and centring phase on behalf of the control system. A testing activity is performed to characterize the dynamic behaviour of the adhesive bonds between the proof mass and the releasing device, which can be used to predict their contribution on the residual velocity of the proof mass after in-flight release. The study of such a dynamic phenomenon sets some challenging requirements on the measurement technique, both on the

  9. Marine and Lacustrine Turbidite Records: Testing Linkages and Estimating Ground Motions, Central Cascadia Margin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, R. B.; Goldfinger, C.; Black, B.; Collins, T.; Romsos, C. G.; Medeiros, L.; Mutschler, M.; Galer, S.; Raymond, R.; Morey, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    measurements. Initial slope stability models suggest that slopes less than ~ 25 degrees are statically stable. We are investigating the levels of ground motion required to destabilize surface sediments around the lake, and radiocarbon dating the disturbance events for comparison to other paleoseismic records, including new offshore cores at a similar latitude.

  10. Electrophoresis tests on STS-3 and ground control experiments - A basis for future biological sample selections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Static zone electrophoresis is an electrokinetic method of separating macromolecules and small particles. However, its application for the isolation of biological cells and concentrated protein solutions is limited by sedimentation and convection. Microgravity eliminates or reduces sedimentation, floatation, and density-driven convection arising from either Joule heating or concentration differences. The advantages of such an environment were first demonstrated in space during the Apollo 14 and 16 missions. In 1975 the Electrophoresis Technology Experiment (MA-011) was conducted during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project flight. In 1979 a project was initiated to repeat the separations of human kidney cells. One of the major objectives of the Electrophoresis Equipment Verification Tests (EEVT) on STS-3 was to repeat and thereby validate the first successful electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells. Attention is given to the EEVT apparatus, the preflight electrophoresis, and inflight operational results.

  11. A torsion pendulum ground test of the LISA Pathfinder Free-fall mode

    CERN Document Server

    Russano, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is the technological demonstrator space mission for the future gravitational waves observatory in space eLISA, with the aim of measure the differential acceleration between free-falling test masses orbiting in the same apparatus at a level of 30 fm/s-2Hz-1/2 at 1 mHz. Because the satellite can't follow the two masses at the same time, the second mass must be forced to follow either the other one or the spacecraft. The actuation force applied to compensate this effect introduces a dominant source of force noise in the mission noise budget at frequency near and below the mHz. The free-fall mode actuation control scheme has been designed to suppress this noise source and avoid actuation instabilities: actuation is limited to brief periodic impulses, with test masses in free fall in between two kicks. This actuation-free motion is then analyzed for the remaining sources of acceleration ultra noise. A free-fall mode parallel testing has been successfully implemented on torsion pendulum facility at ...

  12. Airborne Gravity Data Denoising Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition: A Case Study for SGA-WZ Greenland Test Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Lei; Wu, Meiping; Forsberg, René

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the Earth's gravity field refers to an important domain of Geodesy, involving deep connections with Earth Sciences and Geo-information. Airborne gravimetry is an effective tool for collecting gravity data with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. The main obstacle...... of airborne gravimetry is extracting gravity disturbance from the extremely low signal to noise ratio measuring data. In general, the power of noise concentrates on the higher frequency of measuring data, and a low pass filter can be used to eliminate it. However, the noise could distribute in a broad range...... of frequency while low pass filter cannot deal with it in pass band of the low pass filter. In order to improve the accuracy of the airborne gravimetry, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) is employed to denoise the measuring data of two primary repeated flights of the strapdown airborne gravimetry system SGA...

  13. Multi-offset ground-penetrating radar imaging of a lab-scale infiltration test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Mangel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A lab scale infiltration experiment was conducted in a sand tank to evaluate the use of time-lapse multi-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR data for monitoring dynamic hydrologic events in the vadose zone. Sets of 21 GPR traces at offsets between 0.44–0.9 m were recorded every 30 s during a 3 h infiltration experiment to produce a data cube that can be viewed as multi-offset gathers at unique times or common offset images, tracking changes in arrivals through time. Specifically, we investigated whether this data can be used to estimate changes in average soil water content during wetting and drying and to track the migration of the wetting front during an infiltration event. For the first problem we found that normal-moveout (NMO analysis of the GPR reflection from the bottom of the sand layer provided water content estimates ranging between 0.10–0.30 volumetric water content, which underestimated the value determined by depth averaging a vertical array of six moisture probes by 0.03–0.05 volumetric water content. Relative errors in the estimated depth to the bottom of the 0.6 m thick sand layer were typically on the order of 2%, though increased as high as 25% as the wetting front approached the bottom of the tank. NMO analysis of the wetting front reflection during the infiltration event generally underestimated the depth of the front with discrepancies between GPR and moisture probe estimates approaching 0.15 m. The analysis also resulted in underestimates of water content in the wetted zone on the order of 0.06 volumetric water content and a wetting front velocity equal to about half the rate inferred from the probe measurements. In a parallel modeling effort we found that HYDRUS-1D also underestimates the observed average tank water content determined from the probes by approximately 0.01–0.03 volumetric water content, despite the fact that the model was calibrated to the probe data. This error suggests that the assumed conceptual

  14. 命题质量影响因素的实证研究%An Empirical Study of Factors Affecting Test Development Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵美珍; 张林英; 张晓涛; 欧瑜

    2013-01-01

    本研究采用实证方法研究命题质量影响因素。命题质量主要取决于教师素质、教学行为、命题行为、命题环境、命题态度等影响因素的协同作用;命题行为受教学行为的直接影响较大;命题环境支持对教师的命题态度和考试结果有很大影响。研究结论为提高命题管理水平提供了实证参考。%An empirical research method is used to find the factors affecting test development quality. Test development quality depends on several synergistic effects’factors such as the quality of the teachers, teaching behavior, test development behavior, test development environment, and test development attitudes. Test development behavior is directly influenced by teaching behavior. Test development environment greatly affects test development attitudes as well as exam results. The conclusion of this study can provide a solid theoretical basis for quality control of test development and improve the management level.

  15. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  16. Experimental study of a low-thrust measurement system for thruster ground tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jingsong; Hou, Lingyun; Zhao, Wenhua

    2014-03-01

    The development of thrusters used for the control of position and orbit of micro-satellites requires thrust stands that can measure low thrust. A new method to measure low thrust is presented, and the measuring device is described. The test results show that the thrust range is up to 1000 mN, the measurement error of the device is lower than ±1% of full scale, and the drift of the zero offset is less than ±1% of full scale. Its response rise time is less than 15 ms. It is employed to measure the working process of a model chemical thruster with repeatability.

  17. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  18. Microtensile bond strength test and failure analysis to assess bonding characteristics of different adhesion approaches to ground versus unground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira; Anauate Netto, Camillo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Goes, Mario Fernando de

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the bonding characteristics to ground and unground enamel obtained with different strategies. For this purpose, 24 sound third-molars were bisected mesiodistally to obtain tooth halves. A flat enamel area was delimited in the tooth sections, which were randomly distributed into 8 groups (n=6), according to the enamel condition (ground and unground) and adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2 - SB2; Adper Prompt L-Pop - PLP; Adper Prompt - AD; Clearfil SE Bond - SE). Each system was applied according manufacturers' instructions and a 6-mm-high resin composite "crown" was incrementally built up on bonded surfaces. Hourglass-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm(2) cross-section were produced. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was recorded and the failure patterns were classified. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences among the μTBS values of SB2, PLP and AD (p>0.05). SE values were significantly lower (p0.05). There was prevalence of cohesive failure within enamel, adhesive system and resin composite for SB2. The self-etch systems produced higher incidence of cohesive failures in the adhesive system. Enamel condition did not determine significant differences on bonding characteristics for the same bonding system. In conclusion, the bonding systems evaluated in this study resulted in specific μTBS and failure patterns due to the particular interaction with enamel.

  19. Microbiological Testing Results of Boneless and Ground Beef Purchased for the National School Lunch Program, 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerscher, Darin R; Lutz, Terry L; Whisenant, Stephen J; Smith, Kerry R; Morris, Craig A; Schroeder, Carl M

    2015-09-01

    The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) purchases boneless and ground beef for distribution to recipients through federal nutrition assistance programs, including the National School Lunch Program, which represents 93% of the overall volume. Approximately every 2,000 lb (ca. 907 kg) of boneless beef and 10,000 lb (ca. 4,535 kg) of ground beef are designated a "lot" and tested for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, standard plate count organisms (SPCs), E. coli, and coliforms. Any lot of beef positive for E. coli O157:H7 or for Salmonella, or any beef with concentrations of organisms exceeding critical limits for SPCs (100,000 CFU g(-1)), E. coli (500 CFU g(-1)), or coliforms (1,000 CFU g(-1)) is rejected for purchase by AMS and must be diverted from federal nutrition assistance programs. From July 2011 through June 2014, 537,478,212 lb (ca. 243,795,996 kg) of boneless beef and 428,130,984 lb (ca. 194,196,932 kg) of ground beef were produced for federal nutrition assistance programs. Of the 230,359 boneless beef samples collected over this period, 82 (0.04%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 924 (0.40%) were positive for Salmonella, 222 (0.10%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 69 (0.03%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 123 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Of the 46,527 ground beef samples collected over this period, 30 (0.06%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 360 (0.77%) were positive for Salmonella, 20 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 22 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 17 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Cumulatively, these data suggest beef produced for the AMS National School Lunch Program is done so under an adequate food safety system, as indicated by the low percentage of lots that were pathogen positive or exceeded critical limits for indicator organisms.

  20. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, Luca; Fernandez, Jose; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Rivalta, Eleonora; Camacho, Antonio; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  1. Ground Truth and Application for the Anisotropic Receiver Functions Technique - Test site KTB: the installation campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Irene; Anselmi, Mario; Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Qorbani, Ehsan; Gribovszki, Katalin; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    The project at hand is a field test around the KTB (Kontinentale Tiefbohrung) site in the Oberpfalz, Southeastern Germany, at the northwestern edge of the Bohemian Massif. The region has been extensively studied through the analysis of several seismic reflection lines deployed around the drilling site. The deep borehole had been placed into gneiss rocks of the Zone Erbendorf-Vohenstrauss. Drilling activity lasted since 1987 to 1994, and it descends down to a depth of 9101 meters. In our experiment, we aim to recover structural information as well as anisotropy of the upper crust using the receiver function technique. This retrieved information will form the base for a comparison between the resulting anisotropy amount and orientation with information of rock samples from up to 9 km depth, and with earlier high-frequency seismic experiments around the drill site. For that purpose, we installed 9 seismic stations, and recorded seismicity continuously for two years.

  2. A high flux pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen. [for spacecraft materials ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1986-01-01

    The design and demonstration of a pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen are reported. In the present test setup, molecular oxygen under several atmospheres of pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A 10J CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10 to the 9th W/sq cm in the nozzle throat, generating a laser-induced breakdown with a resulting 20,000-K plasma. Plasma expansion is confined by the nozzle geometry to promote rapid electron-ion recombination. Average O-atom beam velocities from 5-13 km/s at fluxes up to 10 to the 18th atoms/pulse are measured, and a similar surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples to that obtained on the STS-8 mission is found.

  3. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Schrör, B

    2005-01-01

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factorizing models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) and a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime. As a special case of the thermal duality, the SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is thus a consequence of the principles of thermal QFT togeth...

  4. From Ground Truth to Space: Surface, Subsurface and Remote Observations Associated with Nuclear Test Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Burt, C.; Craven, J.; Kimblin, C.; McKenna, I.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Miller, E.; Yocky, D. A.; Haas, D.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) result in numerous signatures that manifest on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Currently, prompt signals, such as the detection of seismic waves provide only generalized locations and the timing and amplitude of non-prompt signals are difficult to predict. As such, research into improving the detection, location, and identification of suspect events has been conducted, resulting in advancement of nuclear test detection science. In this presentation, we demonstrate the scalar variably of surface and subsurface observables, briefly discuss current capabilities to locate, detect and characterize potential nuclear explosion locations, and explain how emergent technologies and amalgamation of disparate data sets will facilitate improved monitoring and verification. At the smaller scales, material and fracture characterization efforts on rock collected from legacy UNE sites and from underground experiments using chemical explosions can be incorporated into predictive modeling efforts. Spatial analyses of digital elevation models and orthoimagery of both modern conventional and legacy nuclear sites show subtle surface topographic changes and damage at nearby outcrops. Additionally, at sites where such technology cannot penetrate vegetative cover, it is possible to use the vegetation itself as both a companion signature reflecting geologic conditions and showing subsurface impacts to water, nutrients, and chemicals. Aerial systems based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging can allow for combined remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks. Finally, more remote systems such as satellite based synthetic aperture radar and satellite imagery are other techniques in development for UNE site detection, location and characterization.

  5. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  6. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  7. Testing an astronomically-based decadal-scale empirical harmonic climate model versus the IPCC (2007) general circulation climate models

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    We compare the performance of a recently proposed empirical climate model based on astronomical harmonics against all available general circulation climate models (GCM) used by the IPCC (2007) to interpret the 20th century global surface temperature. The proposed model assumes that the climate is resonating with, or synchronized to a set of natural harmonics that have been associated to the solar system planetary motion, mostly determined by Jupiter and Saturn. We show that the GCMs fail to reproduce the major decadal and multidecadal oscillations found in the global surface temperature record from 1850 to 2011. On the contrary, the proposed harmonic model is found to well reconstruct the observed climate oscillations from 1850 to 2011, and it is able to forecast the climate oscillations from 1950 to 2011 using the data covering the period 1850-1950, and vice versa. The 9.1-year cycle is shown to be likely related to a decadal Soli/Lunar tidal oscillation, while the 10-10.5, 20-21 and 60-62 year cycles are sy...

  8. Airborne Gravity Data Denoising Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition: A Case Study for SGA-WZ Greenland Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surveying the Earth’s gravity field refers to an important domain of Geodesy, involving deep connections with Earth Sciences and Geo-information. Airborne gravimetry is an effective tool for collecting gravity data with mGal accuracy and a spatial resolution of several kilometers. The main obstacle of airborne gravimetry is extracting gravity disturbance from the extremely low signal to noise ratio measuring data. In general, the power of noise concentrates on the higher frequency of measuring data, and a low pass filter can be used to eliminate it. However, the noise could distribute in a broad range of frequency while low pass filter cannot deal with it in pass band of the low pass filter. In order to improve the accuracy of the airborne gravimetry, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD is employed to denoise the measuring data of two primary repeated flights of the strapdown airborne gravimetry system SGA-WZ carried out in Greenland. Comparing to the solutions of using finite impulse response filter (FIR, the new results are improved by 40% and 10% of root mean square (RMS of internal consistency and external accuracy, respectively.

  9. Gay identity, interpersonal violence, and HIV risk behaviors: an empirical test of theoretical relationships among a probability-based sample of urban men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relf, Michael V; Huang, Bu; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Catania, Joe

    2004-01-01

    The highest absolute number of new HIV infections and AIDS cases still occur among men who have sex with men (MSM). Numerous theoretical approaches have been used to understand HIV risk behaviors among MSM; however, no theoretical model examines sexual risk behaviors in the context of gay identity and interpersonal violence. Using a model testing predictive correlational design, the theoretical relationships between childhood sexual abuse, adverse early life experiences, gay identity, substance use, battering, aversive emotions, HIV alienation, cue-to-action triggers, and HIV risk behaviors were empirically tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The relationships between these constructs are complex, yet childhood sexual abuse and gay identity were found to be theoretically associated with HIV risk behaviors. Also of importance, battering victimization was identified as a key mediating variable between childhood sexual abuse, gay identity, and adverse early life experiences and HIV risk behaviors among urban MSM.

  10. Study of the Pierre Auger Observatory ground detectors: tests, simulation and calibration; Etude des detecteurs de surface de l'observatoire Pierre Auger: tests, simulation et etalonnage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creusot, A

    2004-10-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is intended to the ultra high energy cosmic rays study. This study is realized through the particles showers coming from the interaction between the cosmic rays and the atmosphere. The ground detection of these showers requires a comprehensive understanding of the detectors. Several test tanks have been elaborated for this purpose, especially the Orsay one. The first chapter is dedicated to the presentation of the cosmic rays and of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The second one describes the detectors used for the Observatory surface array. The Orsay test tank is then presented and detailed. We study the results we have got with the Orsay test tank in the fourth chapter and compare these results with those of the Observatory detectors in the fifth chapter. The sixth chapter is dedicated to the validation of the results set through the simulation (GEANT4 software). Finally, the first detected particles showers are presented in the seventh chapter. The data acquisition has begun this year. The construction will be finished by end of 2005. From this moment, The Pierre Auger Observatory will allow us to contribute to solving the cosmic rays puzzle. (author)

  11. Automatic apparatus and data transmission for field response tests of the ground; Automatisation et teletransmission des donnees pour les tests de reponse du terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloui, L.; Steinmann, G.

    2004-07-01

    This is the report on the third part of a development started 1998 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. Energy piles are becoming increasingly used as a heat exchanger and heat storage device, as are geothermal probes. Their design and sizing is subject to some uncertainty due to the fact that the planner has to estimate the thermal and mechanical properties of the ground surrounding the piles or probes. The aim of the project was to develop an apparatus for field measurements of thermal and mechanical properties of an energy pile or a geothermal probe (thermal response tests). In the reported third phase of the project the portable apparatus was equipped with a data transmission device using the Internet. Real-time data acquisition and supervision is now implemented and data processing has been improved. Another goal of the project was to obtain the official accreditation of such response tests according to the European standard EN 45,000. First operation experience from a test in Lyon, France is reported.

  12. Testing the generality of above-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types at the continent scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Keryn I; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Chave, Jerome; England, Jacqueline R; Zerihun, Ayalsew; Specht, Alison; Lewis, Tom; Bennett, Lauren T; Baker, Thomas G; Adams, Mark A; Huxtable, Dan; Montagu, Kelvin D; Falster, Daniel S; Feller, Mike; Sochacki, Stan; Ritson, Peter; Bastin, Gary; Bartle, John; Wildy, Dan; Hobbs, Trevor; Larmour, John; Waterworth, Rob; Stewart, Hugh T L; Jonson, Justin; Forrester, David I; Applegate, Grahame; Mendham, Daniel; Bradford, Matt; O'Grady, Anthony; Green, Daryl; Sudmeyer, Rob; Rance, Stan J; Turner, John; Barton, Craig; Wenk, Elizabeth H; Grove, Tim; Attiwill, Peter M; Pinkard, Elizabeth; Butler, Don; Brooksbank, Kim; Spencer, Beren; Snowdon, Peter; O'Brien, Nick; Battaglia, Michael; Cameron, David M; Hamilton, Steve; McAuthur, Geoff; Sinclair, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground-based estimation of the carbon stored in terrestrial ecosystems is critical to quantifying the global carbon budget. Allometric models provide cost-effective methods for biomass prediction. But do such models vary with ecoregion or plant functional type? We compiled 15 054 measurements of individual tree or shrub biomass from across Australia to examine the generality of allometric models for above-ground biomass prediction. This provided a robust case study because Australia includes ecoregions ranging from arid shrublands to tropical rainforests, and has a rich history of biomass research, particularly in planted forests. Regardless of ecoregion, for five broad categories of plant functional type (shrubs; multistemmed trees; trees of the genus Eucalyptus and closely related genera; other trees of high wood density; and other trees of low wood density), relationships between biomass and stem diameter were generic. Simple power-law models explained 84-95% of the variation in biomass, with little improvement in model performance when other plant variables (height, bole wood density), or site characteristics (climate, age, management) were included. Predictions of stand-based biomass from allometric models of varying levels of generalization (species-specific, plant functional type) were validated using whole-plot harvest data from 17 contrasting stands (range: 9-356 Mg ha(-1) ). Losses in efficiency of prediction were biomass prediction in 92% of the 53 species tested. Further, overall efficiency of stand-level biomass prediction was 99%, with a mean absolute prediction error of only 13%. Hence, for cost-effective prediction of biomass across a wide range of stands, we recommend use of generic allometric models based on plant functional types. Development of new species-specific models is only warranted when gains in accuracy of stand-based predictions are relatively high (e.g. high-value monocultures).

  13. Integration of ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic tests and infrared thermography for the analysis of a precious medieval rose window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, L.; Calia, A.; Liberatore, D.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2010-04-01

    The integration of high-resolution, non-invasive geophysical techniques (such as ground-penetrating radar or GPR) with emerging sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) can complement limited destructive tests to provide a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the state of preservation, material and construction components of monuments. This paper presents the results of the application of GPR, infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonic tests to the 13th century rose window of Troia Cathedral (Apulia, Italy), affected by widespread decay and instability problems caused by the 1731 earthquake and reactivated by recent seismic activity. This integrated approach provided a wide amount of complementary information at different scales, ranging from the sub-centimetre size of the metallic joints between the various architectural elements, narrow fractures and thin mortar fillings, up to the sub-metre scale of the internal masonry structure of the circular ashlar curb linking the rose window to the façade, which was essential to understand the original building technique and to design an effective restoration strategy.

  14. Flight Test Result for the Ground-Based Radio Navigation System Sensor with an Unmanned Air Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaegyu; Ahn, Woo-Guen; Seo, Seungwoo; Lee, Jang Yong; Park, Jun-Pyo

    2015-11-11

    The Ground-based Radio Navigation System (GRNS) is an alternative/backup navigation system based on time synchronized pseudolites. It has been studied for some years due to the potential vulnerability issue of satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS or Galileo). In the framework of our study, a periodic pulsed sequence was used instead of the randomized pulse sequence recommended as the RTCM (radio technical commission for maritime services) SC (special committee)-104 pseudolite signal, as a randomized pulse sequence with a long dwell time is not suitable for applications requiring high dynamics. This paper introduces a mathematical model of the post-correlation output in a navigation sensor, showing that the aliasing caused by the additional frequency term of a periodic pulsed signal leads to a false lock (i.e., Doppler frequency bias) during the signal acquisition process or in the carrier tracking loop of the navigation sensor. We suggest algorithms to resolve the frequency false lock issue in this paper, relying on the use of a multi-correlator. A flight test with an unmanned helicopter was conducted to verify the implemented navigation sensor. The results of this analysis show that there were no false locks during the flight test and that outliers stem from bad dilution of precision (DOP) or fluctuations in the received signal quality.

  15. Flight Test Result for the Ground-Based Radio Navigation System Sensor with an Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegyu Jang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ground-based Radio Navigation System (GRNS is an alternative/backup navigation system based on time synchronized pseudolites. It has been studied for some years due to the potential vulnerability issue of satellite navigation systems (e.g., GPS or Galileo. In the framework of our study, a periodic pulsed sequence was used instead of the randomized pulse sequence recommended as the RTCM (radio technical commission for maritime services SC (special committee-104 pseudolite signal, as a randomized pulse sequence with a long dwell time is not suitable for applications requiring high dynamics. This paper introduces a mathematical model of the post-correlation output in a navigation sensor, showing that the aliasing caused by the additional frequency term of a periodic pulsed signal leads to a false lock (i.e., Doppler frequency bias during the signal acquisition process or in the carrier tracking loop of the navigation sensor. We suggest algorithms to resolve the frequency false lock issue in this paper, relying on the use of a multi-correlator. A flight test with an unmanned helicopter was conducted to verify the implemented navigation sensor. The results of this analysis show that there were no false locks during the flight test and that outliers stem from bad dilution of precision (DOP or fluctuations in the received signal quality.

  16. How do 'Public' Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men's Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rod; Small, Will; Shoveller, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Philosophical arguments stemming from the public health ethics arena suggest that public health interventions ought to be subject to normative inquiry that considers relational values, including concepts such as solidarity, reciprocity and health equity. As yet, however, the extent to which 'public' values influence the 'autonomous' decisions of the public remains largely unexplored. Drawing on interviews with 50 men in Vancouver, Canada, this study employs a critical discourse analysis to examine participants' decisions and motivations to voluntarily access HIV testing and/or to accept a routine HIV test offer. Within a sub-set of interviews, a transactional discourse emerged in which the decision to test features an arrangement of 'giving and receiving'. Discourses related to notions of solidarity emphasize considerations of justice and positions testing as a 'public' act. Lastly, 'individualistic' discourses focused on individual-level considerations, with less concern for the broader public 'good'. These findings underscore how normative dimensions pertaining to men's decisions to test are dialectically interrelated with the broader social and structural influences on individual and collective health-related behaviour, thereby suggesting a need to advance an explicit empirical-normative research agenda related to population and public health intervention research.

  17. Does corporate social responsibility put reputation at risk by inviting activist targeting? An empirical test among European SMEs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is believed to improve a company’s reputation. However,CSR may also put reputation at risk by making the company a more attractive target for activists’campaigns. We test this effect on a sample of 1355 European small and medium-sized enterprises(SMEs). We find

  18. Cost Analysis for Aircraft System Test and Evaluation: Empirical Survey Data Structuring and Parametric Modeling. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    the B-52 prototypes flight test and mockup hours. Other KC-135 data include other block 1 data, i.e., maintenance trainers, support equipment, static...DE w. \\,i 177 Frequency Hi stogramn r 2 4 ~ ... . . .. . e n 0*i / 0 20 40 60 80 100 wep DIVIDE wavi 178 Frequencw Histogram 6 Isvo I. I I S J J a I I

  19. Do imaging studies performed in physician offices increase downstream utilization? An empiric analysis of cardiac stress testing with imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jersey; Fazel, Reza; Ross, Joseph S.; McNamara, Robert L.; Einstein, Andrew J.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare patterns of downstream testing and procedures after stress testing with imaging performed at physician offices versus at hospital-outpatient facilities. Background Stress testing with imaging has grown dramatically in recent years, but whether the location of where the test is performed correlates with different patterns for subsequent cardiac testing and procedures is unknown. Methods We identified 82,178 adults with private health insurance from 2005–2007 who underwent ambulatory myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) or stress echocardiography (SE). Subsequent MPI, SE, cardiac catheterization or revascularization within 6 months were compared between physician office and hospital-outpatient settings. Results Overall, 84.5% of MPI and 84.9% of SE were performed in physician offices. The proportion of patients who underwent subsequent MPI, SE or cardiac catheterization was not statistically different between physician office and hospital-outpatient settings for MPI (14.2% v 14.1%, p=0.80) or SE (7.9% v 8.6%, p=0.21). However, patients with physician-office imaging had slightly higher rates of repeat MPI within 6 months compared with hospital-outpatient imaging for both index MPI (3.5% v 2.0%, p<0.001) and SE (3.4% v 2.1%, p<0.001), and slightly lower rates of cardiac catheterization after index MPI (11.5% v 12.3, p=0.01) and SE (4.5% v 7.0%, p<0.001). Differences in 6-month utilization were observed across the 5 healthcare markets after index MPI but not after index SE. Conclusions Physician office imaging is associated with slightly higher repeat MPI and fewer cardiac catheterizations than hospital outpatient imaging, but no overall difference in the proportion of patients undergoing additional further testing or procedures. While regional variation exists, especially for MPI, the relationship between physician-office location of stress testing with imaging and greater downstream resource utilization appears modest. PMID:21679898

  20. The Design of Ground Test Equipment on Special Computer%某计算机地面检测设备的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田琨

    2001-01-01

    机载电子设备的研制和开发,需要功能完备的地面检测设备。本文简要介绍了某计算机基于微程序的地面检测设备的软硬件设计及其实施途径。%The research of equipment on airplane need ground test equipment which have maturity functions. This paper introduces design of hardware, software of the ground test equipment of the some airplane computer based micro-program, and the method how to carry into execution.

  1. Empirical Test of “Barometer Function” of China's Stock Market——With Discussion of Lasting Price Falling in the Stock Market since 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙开连; 王凯涛; 从臻

    2002-01-01

    Through the empirical test of the economic and stock market price index from 1994-2001.6, this article finds that the price tendency of the stock market in China could reflect the economic status and the future trend, thus has the function of barometer, additionally through the normal analysis of the continuing falling of the stock price since July 2001, so,the paper comes to the conclusion that the falling price is the reflection of the weak macro economy and the accelerating recession of the industries, and therefore is a warning of the possible worsened economic tendency. Suggestions are to adjust the macro fiscal and financial policy to prevent the economy from recessing. By the way the article conducts some of the primary analyses of punishments against market defiance and reducing state owned shares, thus to clarify some of the unclear concepts and prevent the misleading of economic adjustment.

  2. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Helicopter Overflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Suter, Glenn [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus of the assessment was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper focuses on the wildlife risk assessment for the helicopter overflight. The primary stressors were sound and the view of the aircraft. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using Air Force sound contour programs NOISEMAP and MR_NMAP, which gave very different results. Slant distance from helicopters to deer was also used as a measure of exposure that integrated risk from sound and view of the aircraft. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of behavioral thresholds in sound exposure level or maximum sound level units or slant distance. Available sound thresholds were limited for desert mule deer, but a distribution of slant-distance thresholds was available for ungulates. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the Apache overflight is uncertain, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  3. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Missile Firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Daniel Steven [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Suter, Glenn [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Pater, Larry [ERDC-CERL

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60- A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the missile launch and detonation. The primary stressor associated with this activity was sound. Other minor stressors included the detonation impact, shrapnel, and fire. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using the Army sound contour program BNOISE2, as well as distances from the explosion to deer. Few effects data were available from related studies. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of human "disturbance" and hearing damage thresholds in units of C-weighted decibels (sound exposure level) and a distance-based No Observed Adverse Effects Level for moose and cannonfire. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the missile firing was likely for a negligible number of deer, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  4. MEG-SIM: a web portal for testing MEG analysis methods using realistic simulated and empirical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aine, C J; Sanfratello, L; Ranken, D; Best, E; MacArthur, J A; Wallace, T; Gilliam, K; Donahue, C H; Montaño, R; Bryant, J E; Scott, A; Stephen, J M

    2012-04-01

    MEG and EEG measure electrophysiological activity in the brain with exquisite temporal resolution. Because of this unique strength relative to noninvasive hemodynamic-based measures (fMRI, PET), the complementary nature of hemodynamic and electrophysiological techniques is becoming more widely recognized (e.g., Human Connectome Project). However, the available analysis methods for solving the inverse problem for MEG and EEG have not been compared and standardized to the extent that they have for fMRI/PET. A number of factors, including the non-uniqueness of the solution to the inverse problem for MEG/EEG, have led to multiple analysis techniques which have not been tested on consistent datasets, making direct comparisons of techniques challenging (or impossible). Since each of the methods is known to have their own set of strengths and weaknesses, it would be beneficial to quantify them. Toward this end, we are announcing the establishment of a website containing an extensive series of realistic simulated data for testing purposes ( http://cobre.mrn.org/megsim/ ). Here, we present: 1) a brief overview of the basic types of inverse procedures; 2) the rationale and description of the testbed created; and 3) cases emphasizing functional connectivity (e.g., oscillatory activity) suitable for a wide assortment of analyses including independent component analysis (ICA), Granger Causality/Directed transfer function, and single-trial analysis.

  5. MEG-SIM: A Web Portal for Testing MEG Analysis Methods using Realistic Simulated and Empirical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aine, C. J.; Sanfratello, L.; Ranken, D.; Best, E.; MacArthur, J. A.; Wallace, T.; Gilliam, K.; Donahue, C. H.; Montaño, R.; Bryant, J. E.; Scott, A.; Stephen, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    MEG and EEG measure electrophysiological activity in the brain with exquisite temporal resolution. Because of this unique strength relative to noninvasive hemodynamic-based measures (fMRI, PET), the complementary nature of hemodynamic and electrophysiological techniques is becoming more widely recognized (e.g., Human Connectome Project). However, the available analysis methods for solving the inverse problem for MEG and EEG have not been compared and standardized to the extent that they have for fMRI/PET. A number of factors, including the non-uniqueness of the solution to the inverse problem for MEG/EEG, have led to multiple analysis techniques which have not been tested on consistent datasets, making direct comparisons of techniques challenging (or impossible). Since each of the methods is known to have their own set of strengths and weaknesses, it would be beneficial to quantify them. Toward this end, we are announcing the establishment of a website containing an extensive series of realistic simulated data for testing purposes (http://cobre.mrn.org/megsim/). Here, we present: 1) a brief overview of the basic types of inverse procedures; 2) the rationale and description of the testbed created; and 3) cases emphasizing functional connectivity (e.g., oscillatory activity) suitable for a wide assortment of analyses including independent component analysis (ICA), Granger Causality/Directed transfer function, and single-trial analysis. PMID:22068921

  6. Space-Borne and Ground-Based InSAR Data Integration: The Åknes Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Bardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns a proposal of the integration of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data acquired by ground-based (GB and satellite platforms. The selected test site is the Åknes rockslide, which affects the western Norwegian coast. The availability of GB-InSAR and satellite InSAR data and the accessibility of a wide literature make the landslide suitable for testing the proposed procedure. The first step consists of the organization of a geodatabase, performed in the GIS environment, containing all of the available data. The second step concerns the analysis of satellite and GB-InSAR data, separately. Two datasets, acquired by RADARSAT-2 (related to a period between October 2008 and August 2013 and by a combination of TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X (acquired between July 2010 and October 2012, both of them in ascending orbit, processed applying SBAS (Small BAseline Subset method, are available. GB-InSAR data related to five different campaigns of measurements, referred to the summer seasons of 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012, are available, as well. The third step relies on data integration, performed firstly from a qualitative point of view and later from a semi-quantitative point of view. The results of the proposed procedure have been validated by comparing them to GPS (Global Positioning System data. The proposed procedure allowed us to better define landslide sectors in terms of different ranges of displacements. From a qualitative point of view, stable and unstable areas have been distinguished. In the sector concerning movement, two different sectors have been defined thanks to the results of the semi-quantitative integration step: the first sector, concerning displacement values higher than 10 mm, and the 2nd sector, where the displacements did not exceed a 10-mm value of displacement in the analyzed period.

  7. The effect of vegetation type and fire on permafrost thaw: An empirical test of a process based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Aaron; Estop-Aragones, Cristian; Fisher, James; Hartley, Iain; Murton, Julian; Phoenix, Gareth; Street, Lorna; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    As conditions become more favourable for plant growth in the high latitudes, most models predict that these areas will take up more carbon during the 21st century. However, vast stores of carbon are frozen in boreal and arctic permafrost, and warming may result in some of this carbon being released to the atmosphere. The recent inclusion of permafrost thaw in large-scale model simulations has suggested that the permafrost feedback could potentially substantially reduce the predicted global net uptake of carbon by terrestrial ecosystems, with major implications for the rate of climate change. However, large uncertainties remain in predicting rates of permafrost thaw and in determining the impacts of thaw in contrasting ecosystems, with many of the key processes missing from carbon-climate models. The role that different plant communities play in insulating soils and protecting permafrost is poorly quantified, with key groups such as mosses absent in many models. But it is thought that they may play a key role in determining permafrost resilience. In order to test the importance of these ecological processes we use a new specially acquired dataset from sites in the Canadian arctic to develop, parameterise and evaluate a detailed process-based model of vegetation-soil-permafrost interactions which includes an insulating moss understory. We tested the sensitivity of modelled active layer depth to a series of factors linked to fire disturbance, which is common in boreal permafrost areas. We show how simulations of active layer depth (ALD) respond to removals of (i) vascular vegetation, (ii) moss cover, and (iii) organic soil layers. We compare model responses to observed patterns from Canada. We also describe the sensitivity of our modelled ALD to changes in temperature and precipitation. We found that four parameters controlled most of the sensitivity in the modelled ALD, linked to conductivity of organic soils and mosses.

  8. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test for non-identically distributed random variables: with application to empirical Bayes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, W.J. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Cox, D.D. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Martz, H.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    When using parametric empirical Bayes estimation methods for estimating the binomial or Poisson parameter, the validity of the assumed beta or gamma conjugate prior distribution is an important diagnostic consideration. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests of the beta or gamma prior hypothesis are developed for use when the binomial sample sizes or Poisson exposure times vary. Nine examples illustrate the application of the methods, using real data from such diverse applications as the loss of feedwater flow rates in nuclear power plants, the probability of failure to run on demand and the failure rates of the high pressure coolant injection systems at US commercial boiling water reactors, the probability of failure to run on demand of emergency diesel generators in US commercial nuclear power plants, the rate of failure of aircraft air conditioners, baseball batting averages, the probability of testing positive for toxoplasmosis, and the probability of tumors in rats. The tests are easily applied in practice by means of corresponding Mathematica{reg_sign} computer programs which are provided.

  9. Does morality have a biological basis? An empirical test of the factors governing moral sentiments relating to incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra; Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2003-04-22

    Kin-recognition systems have been hypothesized to exist in humans, and adaptively to regulate altruism and incest avoidance among close genetic kin. This latter function allows the architecture of the kin recognition system to be mapped by quantitatively matching individual variation in opposition to incest to individual variation in developmental parameters, such as family structure and co-residence patterns. Methodological difficulties that appear when subjects are asked to disclose incestuous inclinations can be circumvented by measuring their opposition to incest in third parties, i.e. morality. This method allows a direct test of Westermarck's original hypothesis that childhood co-residence with an opposite-sex individual predicts the strength of moral sentiments regarding third-party sibling incest. Results support Westermarck's hypothesis and the model of kin recognition that it implies. Co-residence duration objectively predicts genetic relatedness, making it a reliable cue to kinship. Co-residence duration predicts the strength of opposition to incest, even after controlling for relatedness and even when co-residing individuals are genetically unrelated. This undercuts kin-recognition models requiring matching to self (through, for example, major histocompatibility complex or phenotypic markers). Subjects' beliefs about relatedness had no effect after controlling for co-residence, indicating that systems regulating kin-relevant behaviours are non-conscious, and calibrated by co-residence, not belief.

  10. An empirical test of the aggregation model of coexistence and consequences for competing container-dwelling mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Joseph E; Juliano, Steven A

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the aggregation model of coexistence as a potential mechanism explaining patterns of coexistence between container mosquitoes Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti in southern Florida, USA. Aedes aegypti coexists with the invasive A. albopictus in many locations despite being an inferior resource competitor under most conditions. In agreement with aggregation theory we observed significant intraspecific aggregation of A. albopictus in all six field sites sampled in southern Florida in 2009. Quantitative results suggest that larval distributions of A. albopictus across containers are sufficiently aggregated to permit persistence of the inferior competitor A. aegypti. We tested whether observed levels of A. albopictus aggregation would significantly improve A. aegypti population performance in a controlled laboratory competition experiment manipulating A. albopictus aggregation while holding mean densities constant. We quantified A. aegypti's estimated rate of population change for replicate, multi-container cohorts in response to increasing A. albopictus aggregation across the cohorts. Aedes albopictus aggregation treatments produced J statistics for aggregation that spanned the range observed in the field study. We demonstrate a positive linear relationship between intraspecific aggregation of the superior competitor A. albopictus and estimated rate of population change for cohorts of the inferior A. aegypti. Thus, aggregation of A. albopictus at levels comparable to those observed in nature appears to be sufficient to reduce significantly the competitive impact of A. albopictus on multi-container cohorts of A. aegypti, and may therefore contribute to local coexistence of these competitors.

  11. South African physicians’ acceptance of e-prescribing technology: an empirical test of a modified UTAUT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Cohen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available E-prescribing systems hold promise for improving the quality and efficiency of the scripting process. Yet, the use of the technology has been associated with a number of challenges. The diffusion of e-prescribing into physician practices and the consequent realisation of its potential benefits will depend on whether physicians are willing to accept and engage with the technology. This study draws on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and recent literature on user trust in technology to develop and test a model of the factors influencing South African physicians’ acceptance of e-prescribing. Data was collected from a sample of 72 physicians. Results indicate a general acceptance of e-prescribing amongst physicians who on average reported strong intentions to use e-prescribing technologies if given the opportunity. PLS analysis revealed that physicians’ performance expectancies and perceptions of facilitating conditions had significant direct effects on acceptance whilst trust and effort expectancy had important indirect effects. Social influence and price value perceptions did not add additional explanatory power. The model explained 63% of the variation in physician acceptance.

  12. Developing and testing a comprehensive tool to assess family meetings: Empirical distinctions between high- and low-quality meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Courtenay R; Newell, Alana D; Brewer, Jonathan H; Timme, Divina O; Cherry, Evan; Moore, Justine; Carrettin, Jennifer; Landeck, Emily; Axline, Rebecca; Millette, Allison; Taylor, Ruth; Downey, Andrea; Uddin, Faisal; Gotur, Deepa; Masud, Faisal; Zhukovsky, Donna S

    2017-07-28

    The heterogeneity with regard to findings on family meetings (or conferences) suggests a need to better understand factors that influence family meetings. While earlier studies have explored frequency or timing of family meetings, little is known about how factors (such as what is said during meetings, how it is said, and by whom) influence family meeting quality. (1) To develop an evaluation tool to assess family meetings (Phase 1); (2) to identify factors that influence meeting quality by evaluating 34 family meetings (Phase 2). For Phase 1, methods included developing a framework, cognitive testing, and finalizing the evaluation tool. The tool consisted of Facilitator Characteristics (i.e., gender, experience, and specialty of the person leading the meeting), and 22 items across 6 Meeting Elements (i.e., Introductions, Information Exchanges, Decisions, Closings, Communication Styles, and Emotional Support) and sub-elements. For Phase 2, methods included training evaluators, assessing family meetings, and analyzing data. We used Spearman's rank-order correlations to calculate meeting quality. Qualitative techniques were used to analyze free-text. No Facilitator Characteristic had a significant correlation with meeting quality. Sub-elements related to communication style and emotional support most strongly correlated with high-quality family meetings, as well as whether "next steps" were outlined (89.66%) and whether "family understanding" was elicited (86.21%). We also found a significant and strong positive association between overall proportion scores and evaluators' ratings (rs=0.731, p<0.001). We filled a gap by developing an evaluation tool to assess family meetings, and we identified how what is said during meetings impacts quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Do respiratory limitations affect metabolism of insect larvae before moulting? An empirical test at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Sami M; Lehmann, Philipp; Gotthard, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Recent data suggest that oxygen limitation may induce moulting in larval insects. This oxygen-dependent induction of moulting (ODIM) hypothesis stems from the fact that the tracheal respiratory system of insects grows primarily at moults, whereas tissue mass increases massively between moults. This may result in a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand at the end of each larval instar because oxygen demand of growing tissues exceeds the relatively fixed supply capacity of the respiratory system. The ODIM hypothesis predicts that, within larval instars, respiration and metabolic rates of an individual larva first increase with increasing body mass but eventually level off once the supply capacity of the tracheal system starts to constrain metabolism. Here, we provide the first individual-level test of this key prediction of the ODIM hypothesis. We use a novel methodology where we repeatedly measure respiration and metabolic rates throughout the penultimate- and final-instar larvae in the butterfly Pieris napi In the penultimate instar, respiration and metabolic rates gradually decelerated along with growth, supporting the ODIM hypothesis. However, respiration and metabolic rates increased linearly during growth in the final instar, contradicting the prediction. Moreover, our data suggest considerable variation among individuals in the association between respiration rate and mass in the final instar. Overall, the results provide partial support for the ODIM hypothesis and suggest that oxygen limitation may emerge gradually within a larval instar. The results also suggest that there may be different moult induction mechanisms in larva-to-larva moults compared with the final metamorphic moult. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. An empirical test of the decision to lie component of the Activation-Decision-Construction-Action Theory (ADCAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masip, Jaume; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; de la Riva, Clara; Herrero, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Meta-analyses reveal that behavioral differences between liars and truth tellers are small. To facilitate lie detection, researchers are currently developing interviewing approaches to increase these differences. Some of these approaches assume that lying is cognitively more difficult than truth telling; however, they are not based on specific cognitive theories of lie production, which are rare. Here we examined one existing theory, Walczyk et al.'s (2014) Activation-Decision-Construction-Action Theory (ADCAT). We tested the Decision component. According to ADCAT, people decide whether to lie or tell the truth as if they were using a specific mathematical formula to calculate the motivation to lie from (a) the probability of a number of outcomes derived from lying vs. telling the truth, and (b) the costs/benefits associated with each outcome. In this study, participants read several hypothetical scenarios and indicated whether they would lie or tell the truth in each scenario (Questionnaire 1). Next, they answered several questions about the consequences of lying vs. telling the truth in each scenario, and rated the probability and valence of each consequence (Questionnaire 2). Significant associations were found between the participants' dichotomous decision to lie/tell the truth in Questionnaire 1 and their motivation to lie scores calculated from the Questionnaire 2 data. However, interestingly, whereas the expected consequences of truth telling were associated with the decision to lie vs. tell the truth, the expected consequences of lying were not. Suggestions are made to refine ADCAT, which can be a useful theoretical framework to guide deception research.

  15. Dependence of radiation belt simulations to assumed radial diffusion rates tested for two empirical models of radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Shprits, Yuri; Aseev, Nikita; Kellerman, Adam; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2017-04-01

    Radial diffusion is one of the dominant physical mechanisms that drives acceleration and loss of the radiation belt electrons, which makes it very important for nowcasting and forecasting space weather models. We investigate the sensitivity of the two parameterizations of the radial diffusion of Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] on long-term radiation belt modeling using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB). Following Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014], we first perform 1-D radial diffusion simulations. Comparison of the simulation results with observations shows that the difference between simulations with either radial diffusion parameterization is small. To take into account effects of local acceleration and loss, we perform 3-D simulations, including pitch-angle, energy and mixed diffusion. We found that the results of 3-D simulations are even less sensitive to the choice of parameterization of radial diffusion rates than the results of 1-D simulations at various energies (from 0.59 to 1.80 MeV). This result demonstrates that the inclusion of local acceleration and pitch-angle diffusion can provide a negative feedback effect, such that the result is largely indistinguishable simulations conducted with different radial diffusion parameterizations. We also perform a number of sensitivity tests by multiplying radial diffusion rates by constant factors and show that such an approach leads to unrealistic predictions of radiation belt dynamics. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999ja900344. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. Jonathan Rae, and D. K. Milling (2014), Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res. [Space Phys.], 119(3), 1587-1605, doi:10.1002/2013JA019204.

  16. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants.

  17. Choosing the correct empirical antibiotic for urinary tract infection in pediatric: Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Escherichia coli by E-Test method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Sedighi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs are of the most common bacterial diseases worldwide. We investigate the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of Escherichia coli (E. coli strains isolated from pediatric patients with community acquired urinary tract infection (UTI to find a clinical guidance for choosing a right empirical antibiotic in these patients.In this cross sectional study, 100 urine specimens which were positive for E. coli had been investigated for antibiotics susceptibility pattern. The susceptibility to Co-trimoxazol (25μg, Amikacin (30μg, Ceftriaxone (30μg, Nalidixic Acid (30μg, Cefixime (5μg, and Nitrofurantoin (300μg tested with Disk diffusion agar and MIC determined with the E-test.Mean age of patients was 38 Months. Girls had greater proportion than boys (74 versus 26%. In Disk diffusion method, 26% of the isolates were susceptible to cotrimoxazole. Susceptibility to amikacin, ceftriaxone, nitrofurantoin, nalidixic acid and cefixime was 94%, 66%, 97%, 62% and 52%, respectively. By E-Test method and according to CLSI criteria susceptibility for co-trimoxazol, amikacin, ceftriaxone and nalidixic acid was 37%, 97%, 67% and 50%, respectively. The highest percentage of agreement between Disk diffusion and E-Test method was found for amikacin (96% and the lowest percentage for co-trimoxazole (89%.Treatment failure, prolonged or repeated hospitalization, increased costs of care, and increased mortality are some consequence of bacterial resistance in UTIs. Misuse of antibiotics in each geographic location directly affects antibiotic resistance pattern. In the treatment of UTI, proper selection of antimicrobial agents should be relevant to the bacterial susceptibility testing surveillance. According to our results, amikacin as an injectable drug and nitrofurantoin as an oral agent could be used as a drug of choice in our region for children with UTIs.

  18. Empire Redux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercau, Ezequiel

    The Falklands War was shrouded in symbolism and permeated with imperial rhetoric, imagery and memories, bringing to the fore divergent conceptions of Britishness, kinship and belonging. The current dispute, moreover, is frequently framed in terms of national identity, and accusations of imperialism...... and neo-colonialism persist. Thus in dealing with the conflict, historians and commentators alike have often made references to imperial legacies, yet this has rarely been afforded much careful analysis. Views on this matter continue to be entrenched, either presenting the war as a throwback to nineteenth...... from the legacies of empire. Taking decolonization as a starting point, this thesis demonstrates how the idea of a ‘British world’ gained a new lease of life vis-à-vis the Falklands, as the Islanders adopted the rhetorical mantle of ‘abandoned Britons’. Yet this new momentum was partial and fractured...

  19. Empire Redux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercau, Ezequiel

    from the legacies of empire. Taking decolonization as a starting point, this thesis demonstrates how the idea of a ‘British world’ gained a new lease of life vis-à-vis the Falklands, as the Islanders adopted the rhetorical mantle of ‘abandoned Britons’. Yet this new momentum was partial and fractured......The Falklands War was shrouded in symbolism and permeated with imperial rhetoric, imagery and memories, bringing to the fore divergent conceptions of Britishness, kinship and belonging. The current dispute, moreover, is frequently framed in terms of national identity, and accusations of imperialism......, as evinced by the developments triggered by the Argentine invasion in 1982. Despite the apparent firmness of the British government’s commitment to the Islands, cracks and fissures over the meaning of Britishness were simultaneously magnified. The perceived temporal dislocation of defending loyal Britons...

  20. Strength and durability tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing under the influence of operational loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surikov Vitaliy Ivanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with integrated research works and tests of pipeline supports for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” which is laid in the eternally frozen grounds. In order to ensure the above-ground routing method for the oil pipeline “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe” and in view of the lack of construction experience in case of above-ground routing of oil pipelines, the leading research institute of JSC “Transneft” - LLC “NII TNN” over the period of August, 2011 - September, 2012 performed a research and development work on the subject “Development and production of pipeline supports and pile foundation test specimens for the areas of above-ground routing of the pipeline system “Zapolyarye - Pur-pe”. In the course of the works, the test specimens of fixed support, linear-sliding and free-sliding pipeline supports DN1000 and DN800 were produced and examined. For ensuring the stable structural reliability of the supports constructions and operational integrity of the pipelines the complex research works and tests were performed: 1. Cyclic tests of structural elements of the fixed support on the test bed of JSC “Diascan” by means of internal pressure and bending moment with the application of specially prepared equipment for defining the pipeline supports strength and durability. 2. Tests of the fixed support under the influence of limit operating loads and by means of internal pressure for confirming the support’s integrity. On the test bed there were simulated all the maximum loads on the support (vertical, longitudinal, side loadings, bending moment including subsidence of the neighboring sliding support and, simultaneously, internal pressure of the carried medium. 3. Cyclic tests of endurance and stability of the displacements of sliding supports under the influence of limit operating loads for confirming their operation capacity. Relocation of the pipeline on the sliding

  1. The effect of long term exposition at 540 °C on the empirical correlations for determination of mechanical properties of low alloy CrMoV steel from the results of Small Punch tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Dorazil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the effect of long term exposure at 540 °C on the empirical correlations for determination of yield strength, tensile strength and FATT of 14MoV6-3 low alloy steel. Empirical correlations obtained for the pipe in as received state were compared with the results of standardized tensile, impact and Small Punch tests carried out on the testing materials cut of the three pipes of significantly different metallurgical quality and time of exposure at 540 °C.

  2. The Las Vegas Valley Seismic Response Project: Ground Motions in Las Vegas Valley from Nuclear Explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; McCallen, D

    2005-03-18

    Between 2001-2004 the Las Vegas Seismic Response Project has sought to understand the response of Las Vegas Valley (LVV) to seismic excitation. In this study, the author report the findings of this project with an emphasis on ground motions in LVV from nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These ground motions are used to understand building structural response and damage as well as human perception. Historical nuclear explosion observations are augmented with earthquake recordings from a temporary deployment of seismometers to improve spatial coverage of LVV. The nuclear explosions were conducted between 1968 and 1989 and were recorded at various sites within Las Vegas. The data from past nuclear tests were used to constrain ground motions in LVV and to gain a predictive capability of ground motions for possible future nuclear tests at NTS. Analysis of ground motion data includes peak ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and amplification of basin sites relative to hard rock sites (site response). Site response was measured with the Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) technique relative to hard rock reference sites on the periphery of LVV. The site response curves indicate a strong basin amplification of up to a factor of ten at frequencies between 0.5-2 Hz. Amplifications are strongest in the central and northern portions of LVV, where the basin is deeper than 1 km based on the reported basin depths of Langenheim et al (2001a). They found a strong correlation between amplification and basin depth and shallow shear wave velocities. Amplification below 1 Hz is strongly controlled by slowness-averaged shear velocities to depths of 30 and 100 meters. Depth averaged shear velocities to 10 meters has modest control of amplifications between 1-3 Hz. Modeling reveals that low velocity material in the shallow layers (< 200 m) effectively controls amplification. They developed a method to scale nuclear explosion ground motion time series to sites around LVV

  3. Evaluation of geologic structure guiding ground water flow south and west of Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, E.H.

    1998-02-01

    Ground water flow through the region south and west of Frenchman Flat, in the Ash Meadows subbasin of the Death Valley ground water flow system, is controlled mostly by the distribution of permeable and impermeable rocks. Geologic structures such as faults are instrumental in arranging the distribution of the aquifer and aquitard rock units. Most permeability is in fractures caused by faulting in carbonate rocks. Large faults are more likely to reach the potentiometric surface about 325 meters below the ground surface and are more likely to effect the flow path than small faults. Thus field work concentrated on identifying large faults, especially where they cut carbonate rocks. Small faults, however, may develop as much permeability as large faults. Faults that are penetrative and are part of an anastomosing fault zone are particularly important. The overall pattern of faults and joints at the ground surface in the Spotted and Specter Ranges is an indication of the fracture system at the depth of the water table. Most of the faults in these ranges are west-southwest-striking, high-angle faults, 100 to 3500 meters long, with 10 to 300 /meters of displacement. Many of them, such as those in the Spotted Range and Rock Valley are left-lateral strike-slip faults that are conjugate to the NW-striking right-lateral faults of the Las Vegas Valley shear zone. These faults control the ground water flow path, which runs west-southwest beneath the Spotted Range, Mercury Valley and the Specter Range. The Specter Range thrust is a significant geologic structure with respect to ground water flow. This regional thrust fault emplaces siliceous clastic strata into the north central and western parts of the Specter Range.

  4. SIR-C/X-SAR data calibration and ground truth campaign over the NASA-CB1 test-site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notarnicola, C.; Posa, F.; Refice, A.; Sergi, R.; Smacchia, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Bari (Italy); Casarano, D. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy); De Carolis, G.; Mattia, F. [Istituto di Tecnologia Informatica Spaziale-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Centro di Geodesia Spaziale G. Colombo, Terlecchia, MT (Italy); Schena, V.D. [Alenia Spazio, Rome (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    During the Space Shuttle Endeavour mission in October 1994, a remote-sensing campaign was carried out with the objectives of both radiometric and polarimetric calibration and ground truth data acquisition of bare soils. This paper presents the results obtained in the experiment. Polarimetric cross-talk and channel imbalance values, as well as radiometric calibration parameters, have been found to be within the science requirements for SAR images. Regarding ground truth measurements, a wide spread in the height rms values and correlation lengths has been observed, which was motivated a critical revisiting of surface parameters descriptors.

  5. Lightning current test of power ground wires with optical fibres (OPGW); Blitzstromfestigkeitspruefung von Erdseilen mit integrierten Lichtwellenleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehme, M. [VEW EuroTest GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Moeller, K. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik und Hochspannungstechnik; Nolden, W. [Felten und Guilleaume Energietechnik AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-09-21

    The area-wide application of ground wires with integrated optical fibers establishes a basis to use the existing overhead lines in addition to power supply also as communication networks. Taking in account the particular lightning stroke endangering of overhead lines a basic study of the thermal stress and damage progression of this ground wire type during a lightning stroke is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Einsatz von Erdseilen mit integrierten Lichtwellenleitern schafft die Voraussetzung, bestehende Freileitungstrassen nicht nur zur Energieversorgung zu nutzen, sondern auch als Kommunikationsnetze zu betreiben. Unter Beruecksichtigung der besonderen Blitzeinschlagsgefaehrdung von Freileitungstrassen ist eine grundlegende Untersuchung der thermischen Beanspruchung und der Schadensentwicklung dieses Erdseiltyps waehrend eines Blitzeinschlags notwendig. (orig.)

  6. Willingness-to-pay for water quality improvements in Chinese rivers: an empirical test on the ordering effects of multiple-bounded discrete choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; He, Jie; Kim, Yoonhee; Kamata, Takuya

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a study of the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for surface water quality improvement in China. In the Huaping County of Yunnan Province, we found that people are willing to pay 74 Yuan (or US$12.33 in 2012 prices) per household per month (or 5% of household income) continuously for five years to achieve an improvement of water quality in the two major local rivers from the current Grade IV to Grade III, which denotes a level suitable for swimming and fishing and matches the water quality level from 10 years ago. This WTP study is based on an actual investment project that was under serious consideration by the government and is based on the multiple-bounded discrete choice (MBDC) approach, which explicitly recognizes the potential uncertainties involved in the study. The potential ordering effects associated with the MBDC approach are empirically tested, and the results indicate that although the presentation order of the polychotomous likelihood choices may not have a significant impact on the WTP estimation, the presentation order of bid levels may have a significant impact.

  7. Missile Defense: DOD’s Report Provides Limited Insight on Testing Options for the Ground-based Midcourse Defense System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Cochran Ranking Member Subcommittee on Defense Committee on Appropriations United States Senate The Honorable Howard P. " Buck " McKeon Chairman The...System Component Mission Location Ground Based Interceptor (GBI) The interceptor consists of a silo-based, three-stage booster stack and a “hit-to

  8. 我国资本市场效率的再检验%A Empirical Test on Capital Market Efficiency of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐潮进

    2012-01-01

    In the context of equity separation reform, this paper empirically tested the efficiency of China capital market by observing the correlation between the choice of depreciation policy and earning reaction coefficient (ERC). Empirical results are as follows: there is no significant correlation between the depreciation policy and ERC in the sample before the equity separation reform, suggesting that there existed functional fixation in the capital market; there is significant positive correlation between the depreciation policy and ERC in the sample after the equity separation reform, suggesting that the capital market can price earning based on the adjustment of depreciation policy.%在股权分置改革的背景下,通过检验上市公司折旧政策选择与盈余反应系数之间的相关关系,从而对我国资本市场的效率做出实证检验。研究结果显示,盈余反应系数和折旧费率之间在股权分置改革之前的样本中并不存在显著的相关关系,表明资本市场存在着功能锁定现象,而在股权分置改革之后的样本中则存在着显著的正相关关系,表明资本市场能够在调整上市公司折旧政策横截面差异的基础上对其会计盈余做出定价。因此,我国的股权分置改革促进了资本市场的完善,从而有助于我们了解我国资本市场的效率变迁。

  9. Terrain Considerations and Data Base Development for the Design and Testing of Devices to Detect Intruder-Induced Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    ground transmission lines 16N. Brush and grasslands 17. Transmission towers ( microwave ) 18. Pipelines 19. Lock or dam 20. Cpnpsite (recreation) 21. Wells...in the fte.Id from the magnetic tape recorder. Portions of the previously described equipment were housed in two racks, shock -mounted in fiberglass...in which the mass of the matt is transferred from one support (a foot1, hand, or elbow ) to another at a rate descriptive of the particular travel mode

  10. An empirical test of pseudo random number generators by means of an exponential decaying process; Una prueba empirica de generadores de numeros pseudoaleatorios mediante un proceso de decaimiento exponencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coronel B, H.F.; Hernandez M, A.R.; Jimenez M, M.A. [Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, A.P. 475, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Mora F, L.E. [CIMAT, A.P. 402, 36000 Guanajuato (Mexico)]. e-mail: hcoronel@uv.mx

    2007-07-01

    Empirical tests for pseudo random number generators based on the use of processes or physical models have been successfully used and are considered as complementary to theoretical tests of randomness. In this work a statistical methodology for evaluating the quality of pseudo random number generators is presented. The method is illustrated in the context of the so-called exponential decay process, using some pseudo random number generators commonly used in physics. (Author)

  11. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net --- result of a ground inflation test of a 2,000 cubic-meter balloon ---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Nakashino, Kyoichi; Akita, Daisuke; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Shimadu, Shigeyuki; Goto, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Takuma

    2016-07-01

    A light super-pressure balloon has been developed using a method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net of high-tensile fibers. The goal is to fly a payload of 900 kg to the altitude of 37 km with a 300,000 m^{3} balloon. Beginning from a demonstration test of the net-balloon with a 10 m^{3} balloon in 2010, we have been polished the net-balloon through ground inflation tests and flight tests, including a flight test of a 3,000 m ^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 15,000 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon in 2012, and a flight test of a 10 m^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 2 kg rubber balloon in 2013, as reported in the last COSPAR. In 2014, we developed a 5,000 m^{3} balloon and performed a ground inflation test to find that the balloon burst from a lip panel for termination with a differential pressure of 425 Pa. It was due to a stress concentration at the edge of a thick tape attached along the termination mechanism. In 2015, we modified the balloon by adding tapes on the lip panel to avoid the stress concentration, and also shorten the net length to leave some margin of the film and performed a ground inflation test again to find the balloon showed asymmetrical deployment and burst from the edge of the net with a differential pressure of 348 Pa. We consider it is due to the margin of the film along the circumferential direction, and proposed a gore shape which circumference length is kept as determined by the pumpkin shape of the balloon but setting meridian length longer than that. We developed a 10 m^{3} balloon with the gore design to find that the balloon deployed symmetrically and showed the burst pressure of 10,000 Pa. In 2016, we are going to develop a 2,000 m^{3} balloon with the gore design and perform its ground inflation test. In this paper, we are going to report its result with the sequence of the development.

  12. In-Situ Load System for Calibrating and Validating Aerodynamic Properties of Scaled Aircraft in Ground-Based Aerospace Testing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commo, Sean A. (Inventor); Lynn, Keith C. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor); Acheson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An In-Situ Load System for calibrating and validating aerodynamic properties of scaled aircraft in ground-based aerospace testing applications includes an assembly having upper and lower components that are pivotably interconnected. A test weight can be connected to the lower component to apply a known force to a force balance. The orientation of the force balance can be varied, and the measured forces from the force balance can be compared to applied loads at various orientations to thereby develop calibration factors.

  13. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. II. The rejection of common mode forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandi, G. L.; Toncelli, R.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Bramanti, D.; Nobili, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) is a fast rotating differential accelerometer designed to test the equivalence principle (EP). Its sensitivity to differential effects, such as the effect of an EP violation, depends crucially on the capability of the accelerometer to reject all effects acting in common mode. By applying the theoretical and simulation methods reported in Part I of this work, and tested therein against experimental data, we predict the occurrence of an enhanced common mode rejection of the GGG accelerometer. We demonstrate that the best rejection of common mode disturbances can be tuned in a controlled way by varying the spin frequency of the GGG rotor.

  14. An empirical model of net photosynthesis for the desert plant Hammada scoparia (Pomel) Iljin : I. Description and test of the model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E -D; Lange, O L; Evenari, M; Kappen, L; Buschbom, U

    1976-12-01

    An empirical model for describing daily courses of net photosynthesis in Hammada scoparia is being developed. The model is based on the functional relationships, by which various environmental factors affect the photosynthetic activity and which can be measured by experiment in the field. In a sequence of steady-states daily courses of net photosynthesis are predicted during a growing season considering the variability of the physiological states and the capacity for regulative adaptations. The rate of net photosynthesis at a certain date is calculated from the maximal rate of CO2 uptake being expected at that season and from the effects of light, temperature, and air humidity which are scaled from 0 to 1. All factors are connected multiplicatively. The light function accounts for the seasonal changes in the light curve, the temperature function is based on the seasonal shift of the temperature optimum, and the humidity function considers the increasing sensitivity of the stomatal humidity response at increasing water stress. The model is built to be a submodel of a general ecosystem model, where various other submodels (i.e. water stress model, phenology model) are supplied. The present model is tested by predicting daily courses at extreme climatic conditions during the year and by comparing the predicted values of gas exchange with values being measured in an independent experimental procedure. The result shows that the model is able to simulate the natural behaviour of Hammada scoparia during the growing and dry season of a desert habitat. The problems of incorporating the influence of water stress, the interaction of the various factors, and the phenological aspect of the photosynthetic activity is being discussed.

  15. Endogenous Research and Empirical Test on China's Money Supply%我国货币供给的内生性研究与实证检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵光磊

    2015-01-01

    Under the condition of open,through the data from 1990 to 2013,the empirical test shows that China's currency are strongly endogenous.Reflect for the money multiplier is not stable,and have a big volatility;The monetary base does not have a long -term stable relationship with money supply,and they have a opposite trend between each other.It means that the central bank can not inde-pendently decide money supply as supported by exogenous theorists,which indicates the central bank could control the money supply to actively adjust macro economy.The central bank's monetary policy should change ideas,speed up financial reform,and take the initia-tive to meet the needs of market need monetary management.%在开放条件下,我国的货币供给反映出基础货币和货币乘数的内生性。通过1990年至2013年数据的实证检验,货币供给表现为货币乘数不稳定,波动大;基础货币与货币供应量之间没有长期稳定的关系,并且二者之间变化趋势相反。这就意味着中央银行不能自主地决定货币供给量,不能像外生论者所支持的可以通过控制货币的供应量主动的调整宏观经济。中央银行应转变思路,加快金融改革,主动适应市场需要的进行货币需求管理的改革。

  16. Kilowatt Isotope Power System: component test report for the ground demonstration system jet condenser orifice performance. 77-KIPS-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, E.L.

    1977-11-08

    The purpose of these tests was to determine which orifice elements achieved satisfactory hydraulic and thermal performance prior to their incorporation into the Jet Condenser Assembly. Requirements were as set forth within the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) Component Test Procedure number 414 for the Jet Condenser Orifice Performance testing. The results of the performance testing conducted on the Jet Condenser Orifices are presented. Part Number 720841 Jet Condenser Orifice Nozzle successfully completed the orifice screening tests.

  17. Ground test equipment for neutral atom imaging system-high%中性原子成像仪地检电子系统的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    明晨曦; 余庆龙; 梁金宝; 张焕新; 荆涛

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the structure and working principle of the Neutral Atom Imaging System-High (NAIS-H) which is in the MIT project. Based on the testing needs of the instrument, we have designed ground test equipment, including the circuit system and the host computer system. In this paper, we show the structure and working principle of the ground test for NAIS-H, and tell structure and java programming of the sub modules of the host computer system in detail, such as API communicating system, data analyzing system and data saving system. At last, we test the equipment, and the result shows the ground test system has good performance and achieves the design requirement.%本文介绍了MIT卫星计划中性原子成像仪(NAIS-H)的基本结构以及工作原理,通过分析MIT卫星NAIS-H的工作原理及测试需求,设计并实现了基于该成像仪的地面检测,包括硬件电路系统及上位机软件系统.本文分别从通讯、数据处理等方面,描述了地检系统的主要结构设计以及工作流程,并详述了上位机系统中串口通讯、数据解包、图像处理等各软件模块设计以及java代码编写.最后,对地检系统进行测试,得到的结果显示该系统具有良好的性能,达到了设计要求.

  18. Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, R.

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

  19. Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, R.

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

  20. Testing of ground fault relay response during the energisation of megawatt range electric boilers in thermal power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth; Davidsen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    , during the energisation of a boiler. A special case for concern was the presence of an electric arc between the electrodes of the boiler and the water in the boiler during approximately 2s at the energisation, which can in theory be seen as a ground fault by the relay. The voltage and current transient......Large controllable loads may support power systems with an increased penetration of fluctuating renewable energy, by providing a rapid response to a change in the power production. Megawatt range electric boilers are an example of such controllable loads, capable of change rapidly...