WorldWideScience

Sample records for groundbased detection strategies

  1. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  2. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  3. Ground-based detection of G star superflares with NGTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, James A. G.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pugh, Chloe E.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Gillen, Edward; Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Armstrong, David J.; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Chaushev, Alexander; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Goad, Michael R.; Grange, Andrew; Günther, Maximilian N.; Jenkins, James S.; McCormac, James; Raynard, Liam; Thompson, Andrew P. G.; Udry, Stéphane; Walker, Simon; Watson, Christopher A.; West, Richard G.

    2018-04-01

    We present high cadence detections of two superflares from a bright G8 star (V = 11.56) with the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS). We improve upon previous superflare detections by resolving the flare rise and peak, allowing us to fit a solar flare inspired model without the need for arbitrary break points between rise and decay. Our data also enables us to identify substructure in the flares. From changing starspot modulation in the NGTS data we detect a stellar rotation period of 59 hours, along with evidence for differential rotation. We combine this rotation period with the observed ROSAT X-ray flux to determine that the star's X-ray activity is saturated. We calculate the flare bolometric energies as 5.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}× 10^{34}and 2.6^{+0.4}_{-0.3}× 10^{34}erg and compare our detections with G star superflares detected in the Kepler survey. We find our main flare to be one of the largest amplitude superflares detected from a bright G star. With energies more than 100 times greater than the Carrington event, our flare detections demonstrate the role that ground-based instruments such as NGTS can have in assessing the habitability of Earth-like exoplanets, particularly in the era of PLATO.

  4. Strong Sporadic E Occurrence Detected by Ground-Based GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Ning, Baiqi; Yue, Xinan; Li, Guozhu; Hu, Lianhuan; Chang, Shoumin; Lan, Jiaping; Zhu, Zhengping; Zhao, Biqiang; Lin, Jian

    2018-04-01

    The ionospheric sporadic E (Es) layer has significant impact on radio wave propagation. The traditional techniques employed for Es layer observation, for example, ionosondes, are not dense enough to resolve the morphology and dynamics of Es layer in spatial distribution. The ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technique is expected to shed light on the understanding of regional strong Es occurrence, owing to the facts that the critical frequency (foEs) of strong Es structure is usually high enough to cause pulse-like disturbances in GNSS total electron content (TEC), and a large number of GNSS receivers have been deployed all over the world. Based on the Chinese ground-based GNSS networks, including the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China and the Beidou Ionospheric Observation Network, a large-scale strong Es event was observed in the middle latitude of China. The strong Es shown as a band-like structure in the southwest-northeast direction extended more than 1,000 km. By making a comparative analysis of Es occurrences identified from the simultaneous observations by ionosondes and GNSS TEC receivers over China middle latitude statistically, we found that GNSS TEC can be well employed to observe strong Es occurrence with a threshold value of foEs, 14 MHz.

  5. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, K L; Akutsu, T; Dwyer, S; Puppo, P

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years’ worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO 600 and KAGRA. (paper)

  6. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, K. L.; Akutsu, T.; Dwyer, S.; Puppo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years’ worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO 600 and KAGRA.

  7. Prospects for Ground-Based Detection and Follow-up of TESS-Discovered Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varakian, Matthew; Deming, Drake

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will monitor over 200,000 main sequence dwarf stars for exoplanetary transits, with the goal of discovering small planets orbiting stars that are bright enough for follow-up observations. We here evaluate the prospects for ground-based transit detection and follow-up of the TESS-discovered planets. We focus particularly on the TESS planets that only transit once during each 27.4 day TESS observing window per region, and we calculate to what extent ground-based recovery of additional transits will be possible. Using simulated exoplanet systems from Sullivan et al. and assuming the use of a 60-cm telescope at a high quality observing site, we project the S/N ratios for transits of such planets. We use Phoenix stellar models for stars with surface temperatures from 2500K to 12000K, and we account for limb darkening, red atmospheric noise, and missed transits due to the day-night cycle and poor weather.

  8. Lightning discrimination by a ground-based nuclear burst detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornbrough, A.D.

    1978-04-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing for the U.S. Army a Ground-Based Nuclear Burst Detection System to provide pertinent information for its field commanders and higher authorities. The equipment must operate in all kinds of weather and produce very low false alarms under all types of conditions. With these requirements, a study of the effects during thunderstorms, which includes thousands of lightning flashes, was conducted. The results of these studies were that, with suitable discrimination, the system had no false alarms during a period of high thunderstorm activity in the Albuquerque area for the time from September 13 to October 3, 1977. Data and plots are included of those false alarms that were recorded before the final discriminants were implemented to provide an inventory of waveshapes for additional analysis

  9. Lightning discrimination by a ground-based nuclear burst detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornbrough, A.D.

    1978-04-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing for the U.S. Army a Ground-Based Nuclear Burst Detection System to provide pertinent information for its field commanders and higher authorities. The equipment must operate in all kinds of weather and produce very low false alarms under all types of conditions. With these requirements, a study of the effects during thunderstorms, which includes thousands of lightning flashes, was conducted. The results of these studies were that, with suitable discrimination, the system had no false alarms during a period of high thunderstorm activity in the Albuquerque area for the time from September 13 to October 3, 1977. Data and plots are included of those false alarms that were recorded before the final discriminants were implemented to provide an inventory of waveshapes for additional analysis.

  10. z'-BAND GROUND-BASED DETECTION OF THE SECONDARY ECLIPSE OF WASP-19b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Pollacco, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Littlefair, S. P.; Dhillon, V. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Gibson, N. P. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Marsh, T. R., E-mail: jburton04@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    We present the ground-based detection of the secondary eclipse of the transiting exoplanet WASP-19b. The observations were made in the Sloan z' band using the ULTRACAM triple-beam CCD camera mounted on the New Technology Telescope. The measurement shows a 0.088% {+-} 0.019% eclipse depth, matching previous predictions based on H- and K-band measurements. We discuss in detail our approach to the removal of errors arising due to systematics in the data set, in addition to fitting a model transit to our data. This fit returns an eclipse center, T{sub 0}, of 2455578.7676 HJD, consistent with a circular orbit. Our measurement of the secondary eclipse depth is also compared to model atmospheres of WASP-19b and is found to be consistent with previous measurements at longer wavelengths for the model atmospheres we investigated.

  11. Weak-lensing detection of intracluster filaments with ground-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturi, Matteo; Merten, Julian

    2013-11-01

    According to the current standard model of cosmology, matter in the Universe arranges itself along a network of filamentary structure. These filaments connect the main nodes of this so-called "cosmic web", which are clusters of galaxies. Although its large-scale distribution is clearly characterized by numerical simulations, constraining the dark-matter content of the cosmic web in reality turns out to be difficult. The natural method of choice is gravitational lensing. However, the direct detection and mapping of the elusive filament signal is challenging and in this work we present two methods that are specifically tailored to achieve this task. A linear matched filter aims at detecting the smooth mass-component of filaments and is optimized to perform a shear decomposition that follows the anisotropic component of the lensing signal. Filaments clearly inherit this property due to their morphology. At the same time, the contamination arising from the central massive cluster is controlled in a natural way. The filament 1σ detection is of about κ ~ 0.01 - 0.005 according to the filter's template width and length, enabling the detection of structures beyond reach with other approaches. The second, complementary method seeks to detect the clumpy component of filaments. The detection is determined by the number density of subclump identifications in an area enclosing the potential filament, as was found within the observed field with the filter approach. We tested both methods against mocked observations based on realistic N-body simulations of filamentary structure and proved the feasibility of detecting filaments with ground-based data.

  12. Tentative detection of clear-air turbulence using a ground-based Rayleigh lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauchecorne, Alain; Cot, Charles; Dalaudier, Francis; Porteneuve, Jacques; Gaudo, Thierry; Wilson, Richard; Cénac, Claire; Laqui, Christian; Keckhut, Philippe; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Dolfi, Agnès; Cézard, Nicolas; Lombard, Laurent; Besson, Claudine

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves and turbulence generate small-scale fluctuations of wind, pressure, density, and temperature in the atmosphere. These fluctuations represent a real hazard for commercial aircraft and are known by the generic name of clear-air turbulence (CAT). Numerical weather prediction models do not resolve CAT and therefore provide only a probability of occurrence. A ground-based Rayleigh lidar was designed and implemented to remotely detect and characterize the atmospheric variability induced by turbulence in vertical scales between 40 m and a few hundred meters. Field measurements were performed at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, France) on 8 December 2008 and 23 June 2009. The estimate of the mean squared amplitude of bidimensional fluctuations of lidar signal showed excess compared to the estimated contribution of the instrumental noise. This excess can be attributed to atmospheric turbulence with a 95% confidence level. During the first night, data from collocated stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar were available. Altitudes of the turbulent layers detected by the lidar were roughly consistent with those of layers with enhanced radar echo. The derived values of turbulence parameters Cn2 or CT2 were in the range of those published in the literature using ST radar data. However, the detection was at the limit of the instrumental noise and additional measurement campaigns are highly desirable to confirm these initial results. This is to our knowledge the first successful attempt to detect CAT in the free troposphere using an incoherent Rayleigh lidar system. The built lidar device may serve as a test bed for the definition of embarked CAT detection lidar systems aboard airliners.

  13. Detection Techniques of Microsecond Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Ground-based Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krennrich, F.; Le Bohec, S.; Weekes, T. C.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray observations above 200 MeV are conventionally made by satellite-based detectors. The EGRET detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has provided good sensitivity for the detection of bursts lasting for more than 200 ms. Theoretical predictions of high-energy gamma-ray bursts produced by quantum mechanical decay of primordial black holes (Hawking) suggest the emission of bursts on shorter timescales. The final stage of a primordial black hole results in a burst of gamma rays, peaking around 250 MeV and lasting for 1/10 of a microsecond or longer depending on particle physics. In this work we show that there is an observational window using ground-based imaging Cerenkov detectors to measure gamma-ray burst emission at energies E>200 MeV. This technique, with a sensitivity for bursts lasting nanoseconds to several microseconds, is based on the detection of multiphoton-initiated air showers. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society

  14. On advanced estimation techniques for exoplanet detection and characterization using ground-based coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  15. Blowing snow detection in Antarctica, from space borne and ground-based remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossart, A.; Souverijns, N.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J.; Gorodetskaya, I.; Schween, J. H.; Van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) strongly controls spatial and temporal variations in the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) mass balance and its contribution to sea level rise. Currently, the scarcity of observational data and the challenges of climate modelling over the ice sheet limit our understanding of the processes controlling AIS SMB. Particularly, the impact of blowing snow on local SMB is not yet constrained and is subject to large uncertainties. To assess the impact of blowing snow on local SMB, we investigate the attenuated backscatter profiles from ceilometers at two East Antarctic locations in Dronning Maud Land. Ceilometers are robust ground-based remote sensing instruments that yield information on cloud base height and vertical structure, but also provide information on the particles present in the boundary layer. We developed a new algorithm to detect blowing snow (snow particles lifted by the wind from the surface to substantial height) from the ceilometer attenuated backscatter. The algorithm successfully allows to detect strong blowing snow signal from layers thicker than 15 m at the Princess Elisabeth (PE, (72°S, 23°E)) and Neumayer (70°S, 8° W) stations. Applying the algorithm to PE, we retrieve the frequency and annual cycle of blowing snow as well as discriminate between clear sky and overcast conditions during blowing snow. We further apply the blowing snow algorithm at PE to evaluate the blowing snow events detection by satellite imagery (Palm et al., 2011): the near-surface blowing snow layers are apparent in lidar backscatter profiles and enable snowdrift events detection (spatial and temporal frequency, height and optical depth). These data are processed from CALIPSO, at a high resolution (1x1 km digital elevation model). However, the remote sensing detection of blowing snow events by satellite is limited to layers of a minimal thickness of 20-30 m. In addition, thick clouds, mostly occurring during winter storms, can impede drifting snow

  16. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. The SPQR experiment: detecting damage to orbiting spacecraft with ground-based telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, Antonio; Porfilio, Manfredi; Currie, Douglas G.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the Specular Point-like Quick Reference (SPQR) experiment was to evaluate the possibility of improving the resolution of ground-based telescopic imaging of manned spacecraft in orbit. The concept was to reduce image distortions due to atmospheric turbulence by evaluating the Point Spread Function (PSF) of a point-like light reference and processing the spacecraft image accordingly. The target spacecraft was the International Space Station (ISS) and the point-like reference was provided by a laser beam emitted by the ground station and reflected back to the telescope by a Cube Corner Reflector (CCR) mounted on an ISS window. The ultimate objective of the experiment was to demonstrate that it is possible to image spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) with a resolution of 20 cm, which would have probably been sufficient to detect the damage which caused the Columbia disaster. The experiment was successfully performed from March to May 2005. The paper provides an overview of the SPQR experiment.

  18. Techniques For Near-Earth Interplanetary Matter Detection And Characterisation From Optical Ground-Based Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    PhD Thesis defended the 5th June 2017. Universidad Complutense de Madrid.This dissertation undertakes the research of the interplanetary matter near the Earth using two different observational approaches.The first one is based on the detection of the sunlight reflected by the bodies. The detection and characterisation of these nearby population require networks of medium-sized telescopes to survey and track them. We design a robotic system (the TBT telescopes) for the European Space Agency as a prototype for a future network. The first unit is already installed in Spain and we present the results of the commissioning. Additionally we evaluate the expected performance of such an instrument using a simulation with a synthetic population. We consider that the system designed is a powerful instrument for nearby asteroid discovery and tracking. It is based on commercial components, and therefore ready for a scalable implementation in a global network.Meanwhile the bodies smaller than asteroids are observed using the atmosphere as a detector. When these particles collide with the atmospheric molecules they are heated, ablated, sublimated, and finally light is emitted by these hot vapours, what we call meteors. We conduct the investigation of these meteors to study the meteoroids. In particular we address two different topics: On one hand we explore the size/mass frequency distribution of meteoroids using flux determination when the collide into the atmosphere. We develop a method to determine this flux using video observations of meteors and analyse the properties of meteors as an optical proxy to meteoroids in order to maximise the detection. It yields three ground-based observational solutions that we transform into instrumental designs. First we design and develop a meteor all-sky detection station for Observatorio UCM and use the Draconids 2011 campaign as a showcase for the flux determination, with successful results. Then we investigate the observation of meteors

  19. Detection of greenbug infestation on wheat using ground-based radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiming

    Scope of methods of study. The purpose of this greenhouse study was to characterize stress in wheat caused by greenbugs using ground-based radiometry. Experiments were conducted to (a) identify spectral bands and vegetation indices sensitive to greenbug infestation; (b) differentiate stress caused due to greenbugs from water stress; (c) examine the impacts of plant growth stage on detection of greenbug infestation; and (d) compare infestations due to greenbug and Russian wheat aphid. Wheat (variety-TAM 107) was planted (seed spacing 1 in. x 3 in.) in plastic flats with dimension 24 in. x 16 in. x 8.75 in. Fifteen days after sowing, wheat seedlings were infested with greenbugs (biotype-E). Nadir measurement of canopy reflectance started the day after infestation and lasted until most infested plants were dead. Using a 16-band Cropscan radiometer, spectral reflectance data were collected daily (between 13:00--14:00 hours) and 128 vegetation indices were derived in addition to greenbug counts per tiller. Using SAS PROC MIXED, sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was identified based on Threshold Day. Subsequent to Threshold Day there was a consistent significant spectral difference between control and infested plants. Sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was further examined using correlation and relative sensitivity analyses. Findings and conclusions. Results show that it is possible to detect greenbug-induced stress on wheat using hand-held radiometers, such as Cropscan. Band 694 nm and the ratio-based vegetation index (RVI) derived from the band 694 nm and 800 nm were identified as most sensitive to greenbug infestation. Landsat TM bands and their derived vegetation indices also show potential for detecting wheat stress caused by greenbug infestation. Also, RVIs particularly derived using spectral band 694 nm and 800 nm were found useful in differentiating greenbug infestation from water stress. Furthermore, vegetation indices such as Normalized total

  20. Monitoring Strategies of Earth Dams by Ground-Based Radar Interferometry: How to Extract Useful Information for Seismic Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Andrea; Nico, Giovanni; Pitullo, Alfredo; Prezioso, Giuseppina

    2018-01-16

    The aim of this paper is to describe how ground-based radar interferometry can provide displacement measurements of earth dam surfaces and of vibration frequencies of its main concrete infrastructures. In many cases, dams were built many decades ago and, at that time, were not equipped with in situ sensors embedded in the structure when they were built. Earth dams have scattering properties similar to landslides for which the Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (GBSAR) technique has been so far extensively applied to study ground displacements. In this work, SAR and Real Aperture Radar (RAR) configurations are used for the measurement of earth dam surface displacements and vibration frequencies of concrete structures, respectively. A methodology for the acquisition of SAR data and the rendering of results is described. The geometrical correction factor, needed to transform the Line-of-Sight (LoS) displacement measurements of GBSAR into an estimate of the horizontal displacement vector of the dam surface, is derived. Furthermore, a methodology for the acquisition of RAR data and the representation of displacement temporal profiles and vibration frequency spectra of dam concrete structures is presented. For this study a Ku-band ground-based radar, equipped with horn antennas having different radiation patterns, has been used. Four case studies, using different radar acquisition strategies specifically developed for the monitoring of earth dams, are examined. The results of this work show the information that a Ku-band ground-based radar can provide to structural engineers for a non-destructive seismic assessment of earth dams.

  1. Preliminary Assessment of Detection Efficiency for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper Using Intercomparisons with Ground-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Monte; Mach, Douglas; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William

    2018-01-01

    As part of the calibration/validation (cal/val) effort for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on GOES-16, we need to assess instrument performance (detection efficiency and accuracy). One major effort is to calculate the detection efficiency of GLM by comparing to multiple ground-based systems. These comparisons will be done pair-wise between GLM and each other source. A complication in this process is that the ground-based systems sense different properties of the lightning signal than does GLM (e.g., RF vs. optical). Also, each system has a different time and space resolution and accuracy. Preliminary results indicate that GLM is performing at or above its specification.

  2. Strategies of Life Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Botta, Oliver; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Javaux, Emmanuelle; Selsis, Franck; Summons, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The search for life outside the Earth has been one of mankind's most challenging quests. We have reached a level of technology that allows for initial steps toward thorough scientific investigation. The aim of this workshop was to take an interdisciplinary look at the signatures that would be indicative of past or present life on another planet and compare them to biosignatures on Earth. The purpose of the workshop was also to discuss state-of-the-art in-situ instruments that are envisioned to search for these signatures in the exploration of the solar system, as well as the discussion of concepts descriptive of the search for habitable planets around other stars. This book is intended to provide a reference to scientists and instrument developers working in the field of in-situ and remote life detection. It can also be used as an interdisciplinary introduction for students and post-doctoral researchers entering this new and exciting field.

  3. Strategies for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of alternative forms of dark matter, both baryonic and nonbaryonic, is reviewed. Alternative arguments are presented for the predominance of either cold dark matter (CDM) or of baryonic dark matter (BDM). Strategies are described for dark matter detection, both for dark matter that consists of weakly interacting relic particles and for dark matter that consists of dark stellar remnants

  4. The thermal signature of Aso Volcano during unrest episodes detected from space and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigolini, Corrado; Coppola, Diego; Yokoo, Akihiko; Laiolo, Marco

    2018-04-01

    phreatic-phreatomagmatic and the eruptive cycle was completed. During this period, the MIROVA system detected very few thermal alerts and the ground-based measurements were fluctuating around 1 MW. The most violent explosion occurred on October 8, 2016, and within the following weeks measured VRP were moderately above 2 MW. This is coeval with a thermal increase at the fumarole field of the South Area, with temperatures well above 300 °C. Thermal monitoring at Aso Volcano is an additional tool in volcano surveillance that may contribute to near-real-time hazard assessment.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2014-01-01

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M E planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M E planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  6. GNSS as a sea ice sensor - detecting coastal freeze states with ground-based GNSS-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    Based on the idea of using freely available signals for remote sensing, ground-based GNSS-reflectometry (GNSS-R) has found more and more applications in hydrology, oceanography, agriculture and other Earth sciences. GNSS-R is based on analysing the elevation dependent SNR patterns of GNSS signals, and traditionally only the oscillation frequency and phase have been studied to retrieve parameters from the reflecting surfaces. However, recently Strandberg et al. (2016) developed an inversion algorithm that has changed the paradigms of ground-based GNSS-R as it enables direct access to the radiometric properties of the reflector. Using the signal envelope and the rate at which the magnitude of the SNR oscillations are damped w.r.t. satellite elevation, the algorithm retrieves the roughness of the reflector surface amongst other parameters. Based on this idea, we demonstrate for the first time that a GNSS installation situated close to the coastline can detect the presence of sea-ice unambiguously. Using data from the GTGU antenna at the Onsala Space Observatory, Sweden, the time series of the derived damping parameter clearly matches the occurrence of ice in the bay where the antenna is situated. Our results were validated against visual inspection logs as well as with the help of ice charts from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Our method is even sensitive to partial and intermediate ice formation stages, with clear difference in response between frazil ice and both open and solidly frozen water surfaces. As the GTGU installation is entirely built with standard geodetic equipment, the method can be applied directly to any coastal GNSS site, allowing analysis of both new and historical data. One can use the method as an automatic way of retrieving independent ground truth data for ice extent measurements for use in hydrology, cryosphere studies, and even societal interest fields such as sea transportation. Finally, the new method opens up for

  7. Prospects for Detecting Gravitational Waves at 5 Hz with Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Martynov, Denis; Vitale, Salvatore; Evans, Matthew; Shoemaker, David; Barr, Bryan; Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Hough, James; Huttner, Sabina; Rowan, Sheila; Sorazu, Borja; Carbone, Ludovico; Freise, Andreas; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Dooley, Katherine L.; Fulda, Paul; Grote, Hartmut; Sigg, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    We propose an upgrade to Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), named LIGO-LF, that focuses on improving the sensitivity in the 5-30 Hz low-frequency band, and we explore the upgrade's astrophysical applications. We present a comprehensive study of the detector's technical noises and show that with technologies currently under development, such as interferometrically sensed seismometers and balanced-homodyne readout, LIGO-LF can reach the fundamental limits set by quantum and thermal noises down to 5 Hz. These technologies are also directly applicable to the future generation of detectors. We go on to consider this upgrade's implications for the astrophysical output of an aLIGO-like detector. A single LIGO-LF can detect mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) out to a redshift of z ≃6 and would be sensitive to intermediate-mass black holes up to 2000 M⊙. The detection rate of merging BHs will increase by a factor of 18 compared to aLIGO. Additionally, for a given source the chirp mass and total mass can be constrained 2 times better than aLIGO and the effective spin 3-5 times better than aLIGO. Furthermore, LIGO-LF enables the localization of coalescing binary neutron stars with an uncertainty solid angle 10 times smaller than that of aLIGO at 30 Hz and 4 times smaller when the entire signal is used. LIGO-LF also significantly enhances the probability of detecting other astrophysical phenomena including the tidal excitation of neutron star r modes and the gravitational memory effects.

  8. Prospects for Detecting Gravitational Waves at 5 Hz with Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Martynov, Denis; Vitale, Salvatore; Evans, Matthew; Shoemaker, David; Barr, Bryan; Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Hough, James; Huttner, Sabina; Rowan, Sheila; Sorazu, Borja; Carbone, Ludovico; Freise, Andreas; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Dooley, Katherine L; Fulda, Paul; Grote, Hartmut; Sigg, Daniel

    2018-04-06

    We propose an upgrade to Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), named LIGO-LF, that focuses on improving the sensitivity in the 5-30 Hz low-frequency band, and we explore the upgrade's astrophysical applications. We present a comprehensive study of the detector's technical noises and show that with technologies currently under development, such as interferometrically sensed seismometers and balanced-homodyne readout, LIGO-LF can reach the fundamental limits set by quantum and thermal noises down to 5 Hz. These technologies are also directly applicable to the future generation of detectors. We go on to consider this upgrade's implications for the astrophysical output of an aLIGO-like detector. A single LIGO-LF can detect mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) out to a redshift of z≃6 and would be sensitive to intermediate-mass black holes up to 2000  M_{⊙}. The detection rate of merging BHs will increase by a factor of 18 compared to aLIGO. Additionally, for a given source the chirp mass and total mass can be constrained 2 times better than aLIGO and the effective spin 3-5 times better than aLIGO. Furthermore, LIGO-LF enables the localization of coalescing binary neutron stars with an uncertainty solid angle 10 times smaller than that of aLIGO at 30 Hz and 4 times smaller when the entire signal is used. LIGO-LF also significantly enhances the probability of detecting other astrophysical phenomena including the tidal excitation of neutron star r modes and the gravitational memory effects.

  9. Analysis of a dryline-like feature in northern Germany detected by ground-based microwave profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaenkuch, Dietrich [Leibniz-Soziaetet der Wissenschaften zu Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gueldner, Juergen [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatorium; Bender, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (DE). Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Steinhagen, Hans

    2011-08-15

    Two dryline-like humidity drops without considerable temperature change were detected by the ground-based microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) at the Richard-Assmann-Observatory Lindenberg (52.21 N, 14.12 E) on April 28, 2007. The detailed analysis of these two events includes cloud radar and radar wind profiler measurements at the site as well as data from the surface synoptic network and from integrated water vapour (IWV) maps derived from GPS. The first more pronounced humidity drop is part of a roughly 200 km long line that meets the criterion of a classical dryline or dewpoint front, namely of a moisture gradient larger 3.5 g m{sup -3} per 100 km. This dewpoint front is ahead of an approaching cold front and is caused by strong downdraft induced by low tropospheric wind shear due to weakening of a midtropospheric high over Germany. It consisted in particular in two kernels of variable size depending on their stage. The fate of the kernels - migration, speed, unification and divorce - is described in detail. Their lifetime was a bit more than 9 hours. The second humidity drop at the site was observed after the passage of the cold front and was caused by dry advection behind the front. Both events are predicted by the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service to some extent.

  10. THE IMPACT OF THE IONOSPHERE ON GROUND-BASED DETECTION OF THE GLOBAL EPOCH OF REIONIZATION SIGNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Marcin; Wayth, Randall B.; Tremblay, Steven E.; Tingay, Steven J.; Waterson, Mark; Tickner, Jonathan; Emrich, David; Schlagenhaufer, Franz; Kenney, David; Padhi, Shantanu, E-mail: marcin.sokolowski@curtin.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, G.P.O Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    The redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen (H i), potentially observable at low radio frequencies (∼50–200 MHz), is a promising probe of the physical conditions of the intergalactic medium during Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The sky-averaged H i signal is expected to be extremely weak (∼100 mK) in comparison to the Galactic foreground emission (∼10{sup 4} K). Moreover, the sky-averaged spectra measured by ground-based instruments are affected by chromatic propagation effects (∼tens of kelvin) originating in the ionosphere. We analyze data collected with the upgraded Broadband Instrument for Global Hydrogen Reionization Signal system deployed at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory to assess the significance of ionospheric effects on the detection of the global EoR signal. The ionospheric effects identified in these data are, particularly during nighttime, dominated by absorption and emission. We measure some properties of the ionosphere, such as the electron temperature (T{sub e} ≈ 470 K at nighttime), magnitude, and variability of optical depth (τ{sub 100} {sub MHz} ≈ 0.01 and δτ ≈ 0.005 at nighttime). According to the results of a statistical test applied on a large data sample, very long integrations (∼100 hr collected over approximately 2 months) lead to increased signal-to-noise ratio even in the presence of ionospheric variability. This is further supported by the structure of the power spectrum of the sky temperature fluctuations, which has flicker noise characteristics at frequencies ≳10{sup −5} Hz, but becomes flat below ≈10{sup −5} Hz. Hence, we conclude that the stochastic error introduced by the chromatic ionospheric effects tends to zero in an average. Therefore, the ionospheric effects and fluctuations are not fundamental impediments preventing ground-based instruments from integrating down to the precision required by global EoR experiments, provided that the ionospheric contribution is

  11. [Advances and strategies in gene doping detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangang; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jing; Dou, Peng; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2008-07-01

    This review surveys the recent status of gene doping detection and the strategies for anti-gene doping. The main gene doping candidates for athletes are summarized, and the advances in the detection of the proteins expressed by these genes such as erythropoietin (EPO) and human growth hormone (hGH) are reviewed. The potential detection strategies for further gene doping analysis are also discussed.

  12. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  13. Application of a pilot control strategy identification technique to a joint FAA/NASA ground-based simulation of head-up displays for CTOL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a pilot's control strategy was developed, evaluated, and applied to a joint FAA-NASA ground-based simulation of two competing concepts of head-up displays for use in conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. The technique, called the Non-Intrusive Pilot Identification Program (NIPIP), estimates the pilot's input-output describing function and combined pilot-vehicle performance parameters such as crossover frequency and phase margin by using a time domain model of the pilot and a least-squares identification algorithm. NIPIP functions in realtime and uses a sliding time window to maintain freshness in the data; thus time-varying characteristics in the pilot's control strategy can be measured.

  14. Near-infrared Thermal Emission Detections of a Number of Hot Jupiters and the Systematics of Ground-based Near-infrared Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Bryce; Albert, Loic; Jayawardhana, Ray; Cushing, Michael; Moutou, Claire; Lafreniere, David; Johnson, John Asher; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Deleuil, Magali; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, K CONT-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK bands), for faint and bright stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the CFHT, which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  15. Optimized Strategies for Detecting Extrasolar Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Gregg

    2018-06-01

    Fully understanding the implications of space weather for the young solar system, as well as the wider population of planet-hosting stars, requires remote sensing of space weather in other stellar systems. Solar coronal mass ejections can be accompanied by bright radio bursts at low frequencies (typically measurement of the magnetic field strength of the planet, informing on whether the atmosphere of the planet can survive the intense magnetic activity of its host star. However, both stellar and planetary radio emission are highly variable and optimal strategies for detection of these emissions requires the capability to monitor 1000s of nearby stellar/planetary systems simultaneously. I will discuss optimized strategies for both ground and space-based experiments to take advantage of the highly variable nature of the radio emissions powered by extrasolar space weather to enable detection of stellar CMEs and planetary magnetospheres.

  16. Developing strategies for detection of gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoutina, Anna; Alexander, Ian E; Rasko, John E J; Emslie, Kerry R

    2008-01-01

    It is feared that the use of gene transfer technology to enhance athletic performance, the practice that has received the term 'gene doping', may soon become a real threat to the world of sport. As recognised by the anti-doping community, gene doping, like doping in any form, undermines principles of fair play in sport and most importantly, involves major health risks to athletes who partake in gene doping. One attraction of gene doping for such athletes and their entourage lies in the apparent difficulty of detecting its use. Since the realisation of the threat of gene doping to sport in 2001, the anti-doping community and scientists from different disciplines concerned with potential misuse of gene therapy technologies for performance enhancement have focused extensive efforts on developing robust methods for gene doping detection which could be used by the World Anti-Doping Agency to monitor athletes and would meet the requirements of a legally defensible test. Here we review the approaches and technologies which are being evaluated for the detection of gene doping, as well as for monitoring the efficacy of legitimate gene therapy, in relation to the detection target, the type of sample required for analysis and detection methods. We examine the accumulated knowledge on responses of the body, at both cellular and systemic levels, to gene transfer and evaluate strategies for gene doping detection based on current knowledge of gene technology, immunology, transcriptomics, proteomics, biochemistry and physiology. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  18. Protein lipoxidation: Detection strategies and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Aldini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid metabolism can give rise to reactive species that may covalently modify cellular or plasma proteins through a process known as lipoxidation. Under basal conditions, protein lipoxidation can contribute to normal cell homeostasis and participate in signaling or adaptive mechanisms, as exemplified by lipoxidation of Ras proteins or of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, both of which behave as sensors of electrophilic species. Nevertheless, increased lipoxidation under pathological conditions may lead to deleterious effects on protein structure or aggregation. This can result in impaired degradation and accumulation of abnormally folded proteins contributing to pathophysiology, as may occur in neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of the protein targets of lipoxidation and its functional consequences under pathophysiological situations can unveil the modification patterns associated with the various outcomes, as well as preventive strategies or potential therapeutic targets. Given the wide structural variability of lipid moieties involved in lipoxidation, highly sensitive and specific methods for its detection are required. Derivatization of reactive carbonyl species is instrumental in the detection of adducts retaining carbonyl groups. In addition, use of tagged derivatives of electrophilic lipids enables enrichment of lipoxidized proteins or peptides. Ultimate confirmation of lipoxidation requires high resolution mass spectrometry approaches to unequivocally identify the adduct and the targeted residue. Moreover, rigorous validation of the targets identified and assessment of the functional consequences of these modifications are essential. Here we present an update on methods to approach the complex field of lipoxidation along with validation strategies and functional assays illustrated with well-studied lipoxidation targets.

  19. Retrievals of ethane from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations with updated line parameters: determination of the optimum strategy for the Jungfraujoch station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, W.; Perrin, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Sudo, K.; Yashiro, H.; Gauss, M.; Demoulin, P.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2012-04-01

    of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) in the 3.4 μm region (Bray et al., 2011) will be quantified. The ethane a priori volume mixing ratio (VMR) profile and associated covariance are based on synthetic data from the chemical transport model (CTM) of the University of Oslo. In this contribution, we will present updated ethane total and tropospheric column retrievals, using the SFIT-2 algorithm (v3.91) and high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar absorption observations recorded with a Bruker 120HR instrument, at the high altitude research station of the Jungfraujoch (46.5° N, 8° E, 3580 m asl), within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, visit http://www.ndacc.org). We will characterize three microwindows encompassing the strongest ethane features after careful selection of a priori VMR profiles, spectroscopic parameters, accounting at best for all interfering species. We will then present the retrieval strategy representative of the best combination of those three characterized micro-windows in order to minimize the fitting residuals while maximizing the information content, the precision and the reliability of the retrieved product. The long-term C2H6 column time series will be produced using the Jungfraujoch observational database. Comparisons with synthetic data produced by two chemical transport model (CHASER and the one of the University of Oslo) will also be presented and analyzed, aiming at the determination and interpretation of long-term trends and interannual variations of ethane at Northern mid-latitudes. Acknowledgments The University of Liège involvement has primarily been supported by the PRODEX program funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office, Brussels and by the Swiss GAW-CH program. E. Mahieu is Research Associate with the F.R.S. - FNRS. The FRS-FNRS and the Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles are further acknowledged for observational activities support. We thank the International

  20. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurlow, M. E., E-mail: thurlow@huarp.harvard.edu; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Co, D. T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States); O' Brien, A. S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hanisco, T. F. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 614, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10{sup 12}. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ′} = 2) ← X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ″} = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  1. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10 12 . The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A 2 Π 3/2 (v ′ = 2) ← X 2 Π 3/2 (v ″ = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America

  2. The Development and Deployment of a Ground-Based, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for the In Situ Detection of Iodine Monoxide Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Co, D. T.; O'Brien, A. S.; Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 1012. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A23/2 (v = 2) ? X23/2 (v = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  3. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Gibb, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H{sub 2}O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H{sub 2}O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10{sup 29} and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10{sup 26} molecules s{sup −1}, respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10{sup −4}, i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H{sub 2}O.

  4. Ground-based Detection of Deuterated Water in Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) at IR Wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Gibb, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a deep search for deuterated water (HDO) in the Oort Cloud comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), through infrared (IR) spectroscopy with NIRSPEC at the Keck Observatory. In this Letter, we present our detections of HDO and water (H 2 O) in comet Lovejoy on 2015 February 4 (post-perihelion) after 1 hr integration on source. The IR observations allowed simultaneous detection of H 2 O and HDO, yielding production rates of 5.9 ± 0.13 × 10 29 and 3.6 ± 1.0 × 10 26 molecules s −1 , respectively. The simultaneous detection permitted accurate determination of the isotopic ratio (D/H) in water of 3.02 ± 0.87 × 10 −4 , i.e., larger than the value for water in terrestrial oceans (or Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water, VSMOW) by a factor of 1.94 ± 0.56. This D/H ratio in water exceeds the value obtained independently at millimeter wavelengths (0.89 ± 0.25 VSMOW; pre-perihelion). We discuss these parameters in the context of origins and emphasize the need for contemporaneous measurements of HDO and H 2 O.

  5. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Zerrouki, Nabil; Sun, Ying; Houacine, Amrane

    2017-01-01

    the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart

  6. Detection strategies for extreme mass ratio inspirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Neil J

    2011-01-01

    The capture of compact stellar remnants by galactic black holes provides a unique laboratory for exploring the near-horizon geometry of the Kerr spacetime, or possible departures from general relativity if the central cores prove not to be black holes. The gravitational radiation produced by these extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) encodes a detailed map of the black hole geometry, and the detection and characterization of these signals is a major scientific goal for the LISA mission. The waveforms produced are very complex, and the signals need to be coherently tracked for tens of thousands of cycles to produce a detection, making EMRI signals one of the most challenging data analysis problems in all of gravitational wave astronomy. Estimates for the number of templates required to perform an exhaustive grid-based matched-filter search for these signals are astronomically large, and far out of reach of current computational resources. Here I describe an alternative approach that employs a hybrid between genetic algorithms and Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, along with several time-saving techniques for computing the likelihood function. This approach has proven effective at the blind extraction of relatively weak EMRI signals from simulated LISA data sets.

  7. Worlds Beyond: A Strategy for the Detection and Characterization of Exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunine, J; Fischer, D; Hammel, H; Hillenbrand, L; Kasting, J; Laughlin, G; Macintosh, B; Marley, M; Melnick, G; Monet, D; Noecker, C; Peale, S; Quirrenbach, A; Seager, S; Winn, J

    2008-06-02

    This report is a comprehensive study of the search for and study of planets around other stars (exoplanets). The young but maturing field of exoplanets is perhaps one of the most compelling fields of study in science today--both because of the discoveries made to date on giant planets around other stars, and because the detection of planets just like our Earth ('Earth analogs') is at last within reach technologically. In the Report we outline the need for a vigorous research program in exoplanets to understand our place in the cosmos: whether planets like our home Earth are a common or rare outcome of cosmic evolution. The strategy we developed is intended to address the following fundamental questions, in priority order, within three distinct 5-yr long phases, over a 15 year period: (1) What are the physical characteristics of planets in the habitable zones around bright, nearby stars? (2) What is the architecture of planetary systems? (3) When, how and in what environments are planets formed? The Report recommends a two-pronged strategy for the detection and characterization of planets the size of the Earth. For stars much less massive and cooler than our Sun (M-dwarfs), existing ground-based techniques including radial velocity and transit searches, and space-based facilities both existing and under development such as Spitzer and JWST, are adequate for finding and studying planets close to the mass and size of the Earth. Conducted in parallel with the M-dwarf strategy is one for the more challenging observations of the hotter and brighter F, G, and K stars, some of which are very close in properties to our Sun, in which the frequency of Earth-sized planets is assessed with Corot and Kepler, but new space missions are required for detection and study of specific Earth-mass and Earth-sized objects. Our Task Force concludes that the development of a space-based astrometric mission, narrowly-focused to identify specific nearby stars with Earth

  8. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of 'game-changer' advances in science and technology.

  9. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  10. TAWS: TABLE ASSISTED WALK STRATEGY IN CLONE ATTACK DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sybi Cynthia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs deployed in the destructive atmosphere are susceptible to clone attacks. Clone attack in wireless sensor network is a complicated problem because it deployed in hostile environments, and also the nodes could be physically compromised by an adversary. For valuable clone attack detection, the selection criteria play an important role in the proposed work. In this paper, it has been classified the existing detection schemes regarding device type, detection methodologies, deployment strategies and detection ranges and far explore various proposals in deployment based selection criteria category. And also this paper provides a review of detection methodology based on various clone attack detection techniques. It is also widely agreed that clones should be detected quickly as possible with the best optional. Our work is exploratory in that the proposed algorithm concern with table assisted random walk with horizontal and vertical line, frequent level key change and revokes the duplicate node. Our simulation results show that it is more efficient than the detection criteria in terms of security feature, and in detection rate with high resiliency. Specifically, it concentrates on deployment strategy which includes grid based deployment technique. These all come under the selection criteria for better security performance. Our protocol analytically provides effective and clone attack detection capability of robustness.

  11. Mars Sample Return - Launch and Detection Strategies for Orbital Rendezvous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Mattingly, Richard L.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sets forth conceptual mission design strategies for the ascent and rendezvous phase of the proposed NASA/ESA joint Mars Sample Return Campaign. The current notional mission architecture calls for the launch of an acquisition/cache rover in 2018, an orbiter with an Earth return vehicle in 2022, and a fetch rover and ascent vehicle in 2024. Strategies are presented to launch the sample into a coplanar orbit with the Orbiter which facilitate robust optical detection, orbit determination, and rendezvous. Repeating ground track orbits exist at 457 and 572 km which provide multiple launch opportunities with similar geometries for detection and rendezvous.

  12. Mars Sample Return: Launch and Detection Strategies for Orbital Rendezvous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Mattingly, Richard L.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sets forth conceptual mission design strategies for the ascent and rendezvous phase of the proposed NASA/ESA joint Mars Sample Return Campaign. The current notional mission architecture calls for the launch of an acquisition/ caching rover in 2018, an Earth return orbiter in 2022, and a fetch rover with ascent vehicle in 2024. Strategies are presented to launch the sample into a nearly coplanar orbit with the Orbiter which would facilitate robust optical detection, orbit determination, and rendezvous. Repeating ground track orbits existat 457 and 572 km which would provide multiple launch opportunities with similar geometries for detection and rendezvous.

  13. [Clinical impact of social marketing strategy on breast cancer detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Vidaurri, Adriana Guadalupe; Santana-Chávez, Luis Alejandro; González-Villalobos, Cynthia Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    to prove the impact of social marketing strategies in breast cancer detection, taking as a parameter the number of mammographies performed. quasi-experimental research, before and after. Sixty-nine physicians in charge of medical consultation and fourteen nurses were studied for a period of seven months, applying social marketing strategies. The total of mammographies were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank-sum test (p marketing proved to be an adequate strategy, which has an impact on the clinical practice of both physicians and nurses.

  14. 1999 Leak Detection, Monitoring, and Mitigation Strategy Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented

  15. Defeating crypsis: detection and learning of camouflage strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolyon Troscianko

    Full Text Available Camouflage is perhaps the most widespread defence against predators in nature and an active area of interdisciplinary research. Recent work has aimed to understand what camouflage types exist (e.g. background matching, disruptive, and distractive patterns and their effectiveness. However, work has almost exclusively focused on the efficacy of these strategies in preventing initial detection, despite the fact that predators often encounter the same prey phenotype repeatedly, affording them opportunities to learn to find those prey more effectively. The overall value of a camouflage strategy may, therefore, reflect both its ability to prevent detection by predators and resist predator learning. We conducted four experiments with humans searching for hidden targets of different camouflage types (disruptive, distractive, and background matching of various contrast levels over a series of touch screen trials. As with previous work, disruptive coloration was the most successful method of concealment overall, especially with relatively high contrast patterns, whereas potentially distractive markings were either neutral or costly. However, high contrast patterns incurred faster decreases in detection times over trials compared to other stimuli. In addition, potentially distractive markings were sometimes learnt more slowly than background matching markings, despite being found more readily overall. Finally, learning effects were highly dependent upon the experimental paradigm, including the number of prey types seen and whether subjects encountered targets simultaneously or sequentially. Our results show that the survival advantage of camouflage strategies reflects both their ability to avoid initial detection (sensory mechanisms and predator learning (perceptual mechanisms.

  16. Defeating crypsis: detection and learning of camouflage strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troscianko, Jolyon; Lown, Alice E; Hughes, Anna E; Stevens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Camouflage is perhaps the most widespread defence against predators in nature and an active area of interdisciplinary research. Recent work has aimed to understand what camouflage types exist (e.g. background matching, disruptive, and distractive patterns) and their effectiveness. However, work has almost exclusively focused on the efficacy of these strategies in preventing initial detection, despite the fact that predators often encounter the same prey phenotype repeatedly, affording them opportunities to learn to find those prey more effectively. The overall value of a camouflage strategy may, therefore, reflect both its ability to prevent detection by predators and resist predator learning. We conducted four experiments with humans searching for hidden targets of different camouflage types (disruptive, distractive, and background matching of various contrast levels) over a series of touch screen trials. As with previous work, disruptive coloration was the most successful method of concealment overall, especially with relatively high contrast patterns, whereas potentially distractive markings were either neutral or costly. However, high contrast patterns incurred faster decreases in detection times over trials compared to other stimuli. In addition, potentially distractive markings were sometimes learnt more slowly than background matching markings, despite being found more readily overall. Finally, learning effects were highly dependent upon the experimental paradigm, including the number of prey types seen and whether subjects encountered targets simultaneously or sequentially. Our results show that the survival advantage of camouflage strategies reflects both their ability to avoid initial detection (sensory mechanisms) and predator learning (perceptual mechanisms).

  17. Blood doping: risks to athletes' health and strategies for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carolina Dizioli Rodrigues de; Bairros, André Valle de; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Blood doping has been defined as the misuse of substances or certain techniques to optimize oxygen delivery to muscles with the aim to increase performance in sports activities. It includes blood transfusion, administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents or blood substitutes, and gene manipulations. The main reasons for the widespread use of blood doping include: its availability for athletes (erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and blood transfusions), its efficiency in improving performance, and its difficult detection. This article reviews and discusses the blood doping substances and methods used for in sports, the adverse effects related to this practice, and current strategies for its detection.

  18. Ground-based photo monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick C. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based photo monitoring is repeat photography using ground-based cameras to document change in vegetation or soil. Assume those installing the photo location will not be the ones re-photographing it. This requires a protocol that includes: (1) a map to locate the monitoring area, (2) another map diagramming the photographic layout, (3) type and make of film such...

  19. Optimal sampling strategies for detecting zoonotic disease epidemics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake M Ferguson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The early detection of disease epidemics reduces the chance of successful introductions into new locales, minimizes the number of infections, and reduces the financial impact. We develop a framework to determine the optimal sampling strategy for disease detection in zoonotic host-vector epidemiological systems when a disease goes from below detectable levels to an epidemic. We find that if the time of disease introduction is known then the optimal sampling strategy can switch abruptly between sampling only from the vector population to sampling only from the host population. We also construct time-independent optimal sampling strategies when conducting periodic sampling that can involve sampling both the host and the vector populations simultaneously. Both time-dependent and -independent solutions can be useful for sampling design, depending on whether the time of introduction of the disease is known or not. We illustrate the approach with West Nile virus, a globally-spreading zoonotic arbovirus. Though our analytical results are based on a linearization of the dynamical systems, the sampling rules appear robust over a wide range of parameter space when compared to nonlinear simulation models. Our results suggest some simple rules that can be used by practitioners when developing surveillance programs. These rules require knowledge of transition rates between epidemiological compartments, which population was initially infected, and of the cost per sample for serological tests.

  20. Optimal sampling strategies for detecting zoonotic disease epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jake M; Langebrake, Jessica B; Cannataro, Vincent L; Garcia, Andres J; Hamman, Elizabeth A; Martcheva, Maia; Osenberg, Craig W

    2014-06-01

    The early detection of disease epidemics reduces the chance of successful introductions into new locales, minimizes the number of infections, and reduces the financial impact. We develop a framework to determine the optimal sampling strategy for disease detection in zoonotic host-vector epidemiological systems when a disease goes from below detectable levels to an epidemic. We find that if the time of disease introduction is known then the optimal sampling strategy can switch abruptly between sampling only from the vector population to sampling only from the host population. We also construct time-independent optimal sampling strategies when conducting periodic sampling that can involve sampling both the host and the vector populations simultaneously. Both time-dependent and -independent solutions can be useful for sampling design, depending on whether the time of introduction of the disease is known or not. We illustrate the approach with West Nile virus, a globally-spreading zoonotic arbovirus. Though our analytical results are based on a linearization of the dynamical systems, the sampling rules appear robust over a wide range of parameter space when compared to nonlinear simulation models. Our results suggest some simple rules that can be used by practitioners when developing surveillance programs. These rules require knowledge of transition rates between epidemiological compartments, which population was initially infected, and of the cost per sample for serological tests.

  1. New Trends in Food Allergens Detection: Toward Biosensing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rita C; Barroso, M Fátima; González-García, María Begoña; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-10-25

    Food allergens are a real threat to sensitized individuals. Although food labeling is crucial to provide information to consumers with food allergies, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins may result from undeclared allergenic substances by means of food adulteration, fraud or uncontrolled cross-contamination. Allergens detection in foodstuffs can be a very hard task, due to their presence usually in trace amounts, together with the natural interference of the matrix. Methods for allergens analysis can be mainly divided in two large groups: the immunological assays and the DNA-based ones. Mass spectrometry has also been used as a confirmatory tool. Recently, biosensors appeared as innovative, sensitive, selective, environmentally friendly, cheaper and fast techniques (especially when automated and/or miniaturized), able to effectively replace the classical methodologies. In this review, we present the advances in the field of food allergens detection toward the biosensing strategies and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of this technology.

  2. Ground-Based Radar Detection of the Inner Boundary of the Ion Plasma Sheet and its Response to the Changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayachandran, P. T; MacDougall, J. W; Moorcroft, D. R; Donovan, E. F

    2006-01-01

    ...-I). Wide area coverage made it possible to detect some of the proxies for the magnetospheric land marks and boundaries on a global scale and shed some light on the on the some of the fundamental problems...

  3. Osteoarthritis: detection, pathophysiology, and current/future treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovani, Sujata; Grogan, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joint, and age is the major risk factor for its development. Clinical manifestation of OA includes joint pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available to treat this specific joint disease; only symptom-modifying drugs are available. Improvement in imaging technology, identification of biomarkers, and increased understanding of the molecular basis of OA will aid in detecting the early stages of disease. Yet the development of interventional strategies remains elusive and will be critical for effective prevention of OA-associated joint destruction. The potential of cell-based therapies may be applicable in improving joint function in mild to more advanced cases of OA. Ongoing studies to understand the basis of this disease will eventually lead to prevention and treatment strategies and will also be a key in reducing the social and economic burden of this disease. Nurses are advised to provide an integrative approach of disease assessment and management in OA patients' care with a focus on education and implementation. Knowledge and understanding of OA and how this affects the individual patient form the basis for such an integrative approach to all-round patient care and disease management.

  4. Section on prospects for dark matter detection of the white paper on the status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrum, K.; Horan, D.; Tait, T.; Wanger, R.; Zaharijas, G.; Buckley , J.; Baltz, E. A.; Bertone, G.; Dingus, B.; Fegan, S.; Ferrer, F.; Gondolo, P.; Hall, J.; Hooper, D.; Horan, D.; Koushiappas, S.; Krawczynksi, H.; LeBohec, S.; Pohl, M.; Profumo, S.; Silk , J; Vassilev, V.; Wood , M.; Wakely, S.; High Energy Physics; FNAL; Univ. of St. Louis; Stanford Univ.; Insti. d' Astrophysique; LANL; Univ. of California; Washington Univ.; Univ. of Utah; Brown Univ.; Oxford Univ.; Iowa State Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-05-13

    This is a report on the findings of the dark matter science working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper was commissioned by the American Physical Society, and the full white paper can be found on astro-ph (arXiv:0810.0444). This detailed section discusses the prospects for dark matter detection with future gamma-ray experiments, and the complementarity of gamma-ray measurements with other indirect, direct or accelerator-based searches. We conclude that any comprehensive search for dark matter should include gamma-ray observations, both to identify the dark matter particle (through the characteristics of the gamma-ray spectrum) and to measure the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos.

  5. Genetically modified crops: detection strategies and biosafety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamle, Suchitra; Ali, Sher

    2013-06-15

    Genetically modified (GM) crops are increasingly gaining acceptance but concurrently consumers' concerns are also increasing. The introduction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes into the plants has raised issues related to its risk assessment and biosafety. The International Regulations and the Codex guidelines regulate the biosafety requirements of the GM crops. In addition, these bodies synergize and harmonize the ethical issues related to the release and use of GM products. The labeling of GM crops and their products are mandatory if the genetically modified organism (GMO) content exceeds the levels of a recommended threshold. The new and upcoming GM crops carrying multiple stacked traits likely to be commercialized soon warrant sensitive detection methods both at the DNA and protein levels. Therefore, traceability of the transgene and its protein expression in GM crops is an important issue that needs to be addressed on a priority basis. The advancement in the area of molecular biology has made available several bioanalytical options for the detection of GM crops based on DNA and protein markers. Since the insertion of a gene into the host genome may even cause copy number variation, this may be uncovered using real time PCR. Besides, assessing the exact number of mRNA transcripts of a gene, correlation between the template activity and expressed protein may be established. Here, we present an overview on the production of GM crops, their acceptabilities, detection strategies, biosafety issues and potential impact on society. Further, overall future prospects are also highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a spatial analysis method using ground-based repeat photography to detect changes in the alpine treeline ecotone, Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, W.; Munroe, Jeffrey S.; Fagre, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    Repeat photography is a powerful tool for detection of landscape change over decadal timescales. Here a novel method is presented that applies spatial analysis software to digital photo-pairs, allowing vegetation change to be categorized and quantified. This method is applied to 12 sites within the alpine treeline ecotone of Glacier National Park, Montana, and is used to examine vegetation changes over timescales ranging from 71 to 93 years. Tree cover at the treeline ecotone increased in 10 out of the 12 photo-pairs (mean increase of 60%). Establishment occurred at all sites, infilling occurred at 11 sites. To demonstrate the utility of this method, patterns of tree establishment at treeline are described and the possible causes of changes within the treeline ecotone are discussed. Local factors undoubtedly affect the magnitude and type of the observed changes, however the ubiquity of the increase in tree cover implies a common forcing mechanism. Mean minimum summer temperatures have increased by 1.5??C over the past century and, coupled with variations in the amount of early spring snow water equivalent, likely account for much of the increase in tree cover at the treeline ecotone. Lastly, shortcomings of this method are presented along with possible solutions and areas for future research. ?? 2007 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  7. Towards Improved Airborne Fire Detection Systems Using Beetle Inspired Infrared Detection and Fire Searching Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Bousack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Every year forest fires cause severe financial losses in many countries of the world. Additionally, lives of humans as well as of countless animals are often lost. Due to global warming, the problem of wildfires is getting out of control; hence, the burning of thousands of hectares is obviously increasing. Most important, therefore, is the early detection of an emerging fire before its intensity becomes too high. More than ever, a need for early warning systems capable of detecting small fires from distances as large as possible exists. A look to nature shows that pyrophilous “fire beetles” of the genus Melanophila can be regarded as natural airborne fire detection systems because their larvae can only develop in the wood of fire-killed trees. There is evidence that Melanophila beetles can detect large fires from distances of more than 100 km by visual and infrared cues. In a biomimetic approach, a concept has been developed to use the surveying strategy of the “fire beetles” for the reliable detection of a smoke plume of a fire from large distances by means of a basal infrared emission zone. Future infrared sensors necessary for this ability are also inspired by the natural infrared receptors of Melanophila beetles.

  8. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorius Hans-Rolf

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering. Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS and the "high forest system" (HFS, can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Results Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1 Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2 The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed

  9. HABITABLE PLANETS ECLIPSING BROWN DWARFS: STRATEGIES FOR DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belu, Adrian R.; Selsis, Franck; Raymond, Sean N.; Bolmont, Emeline; Pallé, Enric; Street, Rachel; Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Figueira, Pedro; Ribas, Ignasi

    2013-01-01

    Given the very close proximity of their habitable zones, brown dwarfs (BDs) represent high-value targets in the search for nearby transiting habitable planets that may be suitable for follow-up occultation spectroscopy. In this paper, we develop search strategies to find habitable planets transiting BDs depending on their maximum habitable orbital period (P HZ o ut ). Habitable planets with P HZ o ut shorter than the useful duration of a night (e.g., 8-10 hr) can be screened with 100% completeness from a single location and in a single night (near-IR). More luminous BDs require continuous monitoring for longer duration, e.g., from space or from a longitude-distributed network (one test scheduling achieved three telescopes, 13.5 contiguous hours). Using a simulated survey of the 21 closest known BDs (within 7 pc) we find that the probability of detecting at least one transiting habitable planet is between 4.5 +5.6 -1.4 % and 56 +31 -13 %, depending on our assumptions. We calculate that BDs within 5-10 pc are characterizable for potential biosignatures with a 6.5 m space telescope using ∼1% of a five-year mission's lifetime spread over a contiguous segment only one-fifth to one-tenth of this duration.

  10. Task demands determine comparison strategy in whole probe change detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udale, Rob; Farrell, Simon; Kent, Chris

    2018-05-01

    Detecting a change in our visual world requires a process that compares the external environment (test display) with the contents of memory (study display). We addressed the question of whether people strategically adapt the comparison process in response to different decision loads. Study displays of 3 colored items were presented, followed by 'whole-display' probes containing 3 colored shapes. Participants were asked to decide whether any probed items contained a new feature. In Experiments 1-4, irrelevant changes to the probed item's locations or feature bindings influenced memory performance, suggesting that participants employed a comparison process that relied on spatial locations. This finding occurred irrespective of whether participants were asked to decide about the whole display, or only a single cued item within the display. In Experiment 5, when the base-rate of changes in the nonprobed items increased (increasing the incentive to use the cue effectively), participants were not influenced by irrelevant changes in location or feature bindings. In addition, we observed individual differences in the use of spatial cues. These results suggest that participants can flexibly switch between spatial and nonspatial comparison strategies, depending on interactions between individual differences and task demand factors. These findings have implications for models of visual working memory that assume that the comparison between study and test obligatorily relies on accessing visual features via their binding to location. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. HABITABLE PLANETS ECLIPSING BROWN DWARFS: STRATEGIES FOR DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belu, Adrian R.; Selsis, Franck; Raymond, Sean N.; Bolmont, Emeline [Universite de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France); Palle, Enric [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna (Spain); Street, Rachel [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Von Braun, Kaspar [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Figueira, Pedro [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ribas, Ignasi, E-mail: belu@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5, parell, 2a pl., E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2013-05-10

    Given the very close proximity of their habitable zones, brown dwarfs (BDs) represent high-value targets in the search for nearby transiting habitable planets that may be suitable for follow-up occultation spectroscopy. In this paper, we develop search strategies to find habitable planets transiting BDs depending on their maximum habitable orbital period (P{sub HZ{sub out}}). Habitable planets with P{sub HZ{sub out}} shorter than the useful duration of a night (e.g., 8-10 hr) can be screened with 100% completeness from a single location and in a single night (near-IR). More luminous BDs require continuous monitoring for longer duration, e.g., from space or from a longitude-distributed network (one test scheduling achieved three telescopes, 13.5 contiguous hours). Using a simulated survey of the 21 closest known BDs (within 7 pc) we find that the probability of detecting at least one transiting habitable planet is between 4.5{sup +5.6}{sub -1.4}% and 56{sup +31}{sub -13}%, depending on our assumptions. We calculate that BDs within 5-10 pc are characterizable for potential biosignatures with a 6.5 m space telescope using {approx}1% of a five-year mission's lifetime spread over a contiguous segment only one-fifth to one-tenth of this duration.

  12. Chemometric Strategies for Peak Detection and Profiling from Multidimensional Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Reig, Meritxell; Bedia, Carmen; Tauler, Romà; Jaumot, Joaquim

    2018-04-03

    The increasing complexity of omics research has encouraged the development of new instrumental technologies able to deal with these challenging samples. In this way, the rise of multidimensional separations should be highlighted due to the massive amounts of information that provide with an enhanced analyte determination. Both proteomics and metabolomics benefit from this higher separation capacity achieved when different chromatographic dimensions are combined, either in LC or GC. However, this vast quantity of experimental information requires the application of chemometric data analysis strategies to retrieve this hidden knowledge, especially in the case of nontargeted studies. In this work, the most common chemometric tools and approaches for the analysis of this multidimensional chromatographic data are reviewed. First, different options for data preprocessing and enhancement of the instrumental signal are introduced. Next, the most used chemometric methods for the detection of chromatographic peaks and the resolution of chromatographic and spectral contributions (profiling) are presented. The description of these data analysis approaches is complemented with enlightening examples from omics fields that demonstrate the exceptional potential of the combination of multidimensional separation techniques and chemometric tools of data analysis. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Simulating the Performance of Ground-Based Optical Asteroid Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric J.; Shelly, Frank C.; Gibbs, Alex R.; Grauer, Albert D.; Hill, Richard E.; Johnson, Jess A.; Kowalski, Richard A.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a set of asteroid survey simulation tools in order to estimate the capability of existing and planned ground-based optical surveys, and to test a variety of possible survey cadences and strategies. The survey simulator is composed of several layers, including a model population of solar system objects and an orbital integrator, a site-specific atmospheric model (including inputs for seeing, haze and seasonal cloud cover), a model telescope (with a complete optical path to estimate throughput), a model camera (including FOV, pixel scale, and focal plane fill factor) and model source extraction and moving object detection layers with tunable detection requirements. We have also developed a flexible survey cadence planning tool to automatically generate nightly survey plans. Inputs to the cadence planner include camera properties (FOV, readout time), telescope limits (horizon, declination, hour angle, lunar and zenithal avoidance), preferred and restricted survey regions in RA/Dec, ecliptic, and Galactic coordinate systems, and recent coverage by other asteroid surveys. Simulated surveys are created for a subset of current and previous NEO surveys (LINEAR, Pan-STARRS and the three Catalina Sky Survey telescopes), and compared against the actual performance of these surveys in order to validate the model’s performance. The simulator tracks objects within the FOV of any pointing that were not discovered (e.g. too few observations, too trailed, focal plane array gaps, too fast or slow), thus dividing the population into “discoverable” and “discovered” subsets, to inform possible survey design changes. Ongoing and future work includes generating a realistic “known” subset of the model NEO population, running multiple independent simulated surveys in coordinated and uncoordinated modes, and testing various cadences to find optimal strategies for detecting NEO sub-populations. These tools can also assist in quantifying the efficiency of novel

  14. Optimal detection and control strategies for invasive species management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefali V. Mehta; Robert G. Haight; Frances R. Homans; Stephen Polasky; Robert C. Venette

    2007-01-01

    The increasing economic and environmental losses caused by non-native invasive species amplify the value of identifying and implementing optimal management options to prevent, detect, and control invasive species. Previous literature has focused largely on preventing introductions of invasive species and post-detection control activities; few have addressed the role of...

  15. Denaturation strategies for detection of double stranded PCR products on GMR magnetic biosensor array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Guldberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    Microarrays and other surface-based nucleic acid detection schemes rely on the hybridization of the target to surface-bound detection probes. We present the first comparison of two strategies to detect DNA using a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor platform starting from an initially double...

  16. Effective sampling strategy to detect food and feed contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouzembrak, Yamine; Fels, van der Ine

    2018-01-01

    Sampling plans for food safety hazards are aimed to be used to determine whether a lot of food is contaminated (with microbiological or chemical hazards) or not. One of the components of sampling plans is the sampling strategy. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three

  17. Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; McGlashan, T H; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2001-01-01

    -year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed......Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing......-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis. System variables and first results from the four...

  18. Using trading strategies to detect phase transitions in financial markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forró, Z; Woodard, R; Sornette, D

    2015-04-01

    We show that the log-periodic power law singularity model (LPPLS), a mathematical embodiment of positive feedbacks between agents and of their hierarchical dynamical organization, has a significant predictive power in financial markets. We find that LPPLS-based strategies significantly outperform the randomized ones and that they are robust with respect to a large selection of assets and time periods. The dynamics of prices thus markedly deviate from randomness in certain pockets of predictability that can be associated with bubble market regimes. Our hybrid approach, marrying finance with the trading strategies, and critical phenomena with LPPLS, demonstrates that targeting information related to phase transitions enables the forecast of financial bubbles and crashes punctuating the dynamics of prices.

  19. Using trading strategies to detect phase transitions in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forró, Z.; Woodard, R.; Sornette, D.

    2015-04-01

    We show that the log-periodic power law singularity model (LPPLS), a mathematical embodiment of positive feedbacks between agents and of their hierarchical dynamical organization, has a significant predictive power in financial markets. We find that LPPLS-based strategies significantly outperform the randomized ones and that they are robust with respect to a large selection of assets and time periods. The dynamics of prices thus markedly deviate from randomness in certain pockets of predictability that can be associated with bubble market regimes. Our hybrid approach, marrying finance with the trading strategies, and critical phenomena with LPPLS, demonstrates that targeting information related to phase transitions enables the forecast of financial bubbles and crashes punctuating the dynamics of prices.

  20. Strategies for detecting and controlling electronic gaming vulnerabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, MD

    2008-01-01

    A growing feature of global gaming expansion is the recognition that developing socially responsible guidelines and infrastructure is essential to enhancing the appeal and credibility of the industry. The current financial uncertainties serve to highlight the need for monitoring at risk players, and especially to consider strategies minimising gambling harm before any who are susceptible become confirmed problem gamblers. Prevention, therefore, lies in the vigilance, adaptability and developm...

  1. Plagiarism in the Context of Education and Evolving Detection Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Seksenbayev, Bakhytzhan; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Kitas, George D

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism may take place in any scientific journals despite currently employed anti-plagiarism tools. The absence of widely acceptable definitions of research misconduct and reliance solely on similarity checks do not allow journal editors to prevent most complex cases of recycling of scientific information and wasteful, or 'predatory,' publishing. This article analyses Scopus-based publication activity and evidence on poor writing, lack of related training, emerging anti-plagiarism strategies, and new forms of massive wasting of resources by publishing largely recycled items, which evade the 'red flags' of similarity checks. In some non-Anglophone countries 'copy-and-paste' writing still plagues pre- and postgraduate education. Poor research management, absence of courses on publication ethics, and limited access to quality sources confound plagiarism as a cross-cultural and multidisciplinary phenomenon. Over the past decade, the advent of anti-plagiarism software checks has helped uncover elementary forms of textual recycling across journals. But such a tool alone proves inefficient for preventing complex forms of plagiarism. Recent mass retractions of plagiarized articles by reputable open-access journals point to critical deficiencies of current anti-plagiarism software that do not recognize manipulative paraphrasing and editing. Manipulative editing also finds its way to predatory journals, ignoring the adherence to publication ethics and accommodating nonsense plagiarized items. The evolving preventive strategies are increasingly relying on intelligent (semantic) digital technologies, comprehensively evaluating texts, keywords, graphics, and reference lists. It is the right time to enforce adherence to global editorial guidance and implement a comprehensive anti-plagiarism strategy by helping all stakeholders of scholarly communication. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  2. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter de

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project.

  3. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin

    2006-01-01

    We routinely use Biacore for affinity ranking and kinetic characterisation of diverse panels of hybridoma-derived and recombinant antibodies against a wide range of different clinically relevant antigens for diagnostic applications. Generally the analytes of interest are haptens or defined protei...... to date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection...... molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown...... that molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences...

  4. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We routinely use Biacore for affinity ranking and kinetic characterisation of diverse panels of hybridoma-derived and recombinant antibodies against a wide range of different clinically relevant antigens for diagnostic applications. Generally the analytes of interest are haptens or defined protei...... to date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection...... molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown...... that molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences...

  5. Detection and control of Ganoderma boninense: strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushiarian, Roozbeh; Yusof, Nor Azah; Dutse, Sabo Wada

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm, an economically important tree, has been one of the world's major sources of edible oil and a significant precursor of biodiesel fuel. Unfortunately, it now faces the threat of a devastating disease. Many researchers have identified Ganoderma boninense as the major pathogen that affects the oil palm tree and eventually kills it. But identification of the pathogen is just the first step. No single method has yet been able to halt the continuing spread of the disease. This paper discusses the modes of infection and transmission of Ganoderma boninense and suggests techniques for its early detection. Additionally, the paper proposes some possible ways of controlling the disease. Such measures, if implemented, could contribute significantly to the sustainability of the palm oil industry in South East Asia.

  6. Strategies for Testing Statistical and Practical Significance in Detecting DIF with Logistic Regression Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Angel M.; Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amirian, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This study examines three controversial aspects in differential item functioning (DIF) detection by logistic regression (LR) models: first, the relative effectiveness of different analytical strategies for detecting DIF; second, the suitability of the Wald statistic for determining the statistical significance of the parameters of interest; and…

  7. Targeted screening strategies to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Z Levy

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Anti-trypanosomal drug therapy can cure infected individuals, but treatment efficacy is highest early in infection. Vector control campaigns disrupt transmission of T. cruzi, but without timely diagnosis, children infected prior to vector control often miss the window of opportunity for effective chemotherapy.We performed a serological survey in children 2-18 years old living in a peri-urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and linked the results to entomologic, spatial and census data gathered during a vector control campaign. 23 of 433 (5.3% [95% CI 3.4-7.9] children were confirmed seropositive for T. cruzi infection by two methods. Spatial analysis revealed that households with infected children were very tightly clustered within looser clusters of households with parasite-infected vectors. Bayesian hierarchical mixed models, which controlled for clustering of infection, showed that a child's risk of being seropositive increased by 20% per year of age and 4% per vector captured within the child's house. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC plots of best-fit models suggest that more than 83% of infected children could be identified while testing only 22% of eligible children.We found evidence of spatially-focal vector-borne T. cruzi transmission in peri-urban Arequipa. Ongoing vector control campaigns, in addition to preventing further parasite transmission, facilitate the collection of data essential to identifying children at high risk of T. cruzi infection. Targeted screening strategies could make integration of diagnosis and treatment of children into Chagas disease control programs feasible in lower-resource settings.

  8. The Hollywood Strategy for Microlensing Detection of Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A.

    Follow the big stars! I review the theory of detection and parameter measurement of planetary systems by follow-up observations of ongoing microlensing events. Two parameters can generically be measured from the event itself: the planet/star mass ratio, $q$, and the planet/star separation in units of the Einstein ring. I emphasize the advantages of monitoring events with giant-star sources which are brighter (thus easier to monitor) and bigger (thus offering the prospect of measuring an additional parameter from finite-source effects: the proper motion $\\mu$). There is potentially a strong degeneracy between $q$ and $\\mu$. I present a simple analytic representation of this degeneracy. I then describe how it can be broken using accurate single-band photometry from observatories around the world, or optical/infrared photometry from a single site, or preferably both. Both types of observations are underway or will be soon. Monitoring of giant-star events seen toward the bulge is also the best way to determine the content and structure of the inner Galaxy.

  9. Chemometric strategy for automatic chromatographic peak detection and background drift correction in chromatographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong-Jie; Xia, Qiao-Ling; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Bing; Xie, Fu-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Ming; Wu, Hai-Long

    2014-09-12

    Peak detection and background drift correction (BDC) are the key stages in using chemometric methods to analyze chromatographic fingerprints of complex samples. This study developed a novel chemometric strategy for simultaneous automatic chromatographic peak detection and BDC. A robust statistical method was used for intelligent estimation of instrumental noise level coupled with first-order derivative of chromatographic signal to automatically extract chromatographic peaks in the data. A local curve-fitting strategy was then employed for BDC. Simulated and real liquid chromatographic data were designed with various kinds of background drift and degree of overlapped chromatographic peaks to verify the performance of the proposed strategy. The underlying chromatographic peaks can be automatically detected and reasonably integrated by this strategy. Meanwhile, chromatograms with BDC can be precisely obtained. The proposed method was used to analyze a complex gas chromatography dataset that monitored quality changes in plant extracts during storage procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anabolic agents: recent strategies for their detection and protection from inadvertent doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    According to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, anabolic agents consist of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), endogenous AAS and other anabolic agents such as clenbuterol and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Currently employed strategies for their improved detection include the prolongation of the detection windows for exogenous AAS, non-targeted and indirect analytical approaches for the detection of modified steroids (designer steroids), the athlete’s biological passport and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of the misuse of endogenous AAS, as well as preventive doping research for the detection of SARMs. The recent use of these strategies led to 4–80-fold increases of adverse analytical findings for exogenous AAS, to the detection of the misuse of new designer steroids, to adverse analytical findings of different endogenous AAS and to the first adverse analytical findings of SARMs. The strategies of the antidoping research are not only focused on the development of methods to catch the cheating athlete but also to protect the clean athlete from inadvertent doping. Within the past few years several sources of inadvertent doping with anabolic agents have been identified. Among these are nutritional supplements adulterated with AAS, meat products contaminated with clenbuterol, mycotoxin (zearalenone) contamination leading to zeranol findings, and natural products containing endogenous AAS. The protection strategy consists of further investigations in case of reasonable suspicion of inadvertent doping, publication of the results, education of athletes and development of methods to differentiate between intentional and unintentional doping. PMID:24632537

  11. Evaluating surveillance strategies for the early detection of low pathogenicity avian influenza infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Arianna; Stegeman, Arjan; Marangon, Stefano; Klinkenberg, Don

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the early detection of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses in poultry has become increasingly important, given their potential to mutate into highly pathogenic viruses. However, evaluations of LPAI surveillance have mainly focused on prevalence and not on the ability to act as an early warning system. We used a simulation model based on data from Italian LPAI epidemics in turkeys to evaluate different surveillance strategies in terms of their performance as early warning systems. The strategies differed in terms of sample size, sampling frequency, diagnostic tests, and whether or not active surveillance (i.e., routine laboratory testing of farms) was performed, and were also tested under different epidemiological scenarios. We compared surveillance strategies by simulating within-farm outbreaks. The output measures were the proportion of infected farms that are detected and the farm reproduction number (R(h)). The first one provides an indication of the sensitivity of the surveillance system to detect within-farm infections, whereas R(h) reflects the effectiveness of outbreak detection (i.e., if detection occurs soon enough to bring an epidemic under control). Increasing the sampling frequency was the most effective means of improving the timeliness of detection (i.e., it occurs earlier), whereas increasing the sample size increased the likelihood of detection. Surveillance was only effective in preventing an epidemic if actions were taken within two days of sampling. The strategies were not affected by the quality of the diagnostic test, although performing both serological and virological assays increased the sensitivity of active surveillance. Early detection of LPAI outbreaks in turkeys can be achieved by increasing the sampling frequency for active surveillance, though very frequent sampling may not be sustainable in the long term. We suggest that, when no LPAI virus is circulating yet and there is a low risk of virus introduction

  12. Evaluating surveillance strategies for the early detection of low pathogenicity avian influenza infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Comin

    Full Text Available In recent years, the early detection of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI viruses in poultry has become increasingly important, given their potential to mutate into highly pathogenic viruses. However, evaluations of LPAI surveillance have mainly focused on prevalence and not on the ability to act as an early warning system. We used a simulation model based on data from Italian LPAI epidemics in turkeys to evaluate different surveillance strategies in terms of their performance as early warning systems. The strategies differed in terms of sample size, sampling frequency, diagnostic tests, and whether or not active surveillance (i.e., routine laboratory testing of farms was performed, and were also tested under different epidemiological scenarios. We compared surveillance strategies by simulating within-farm outbreaks. The output measures were the proportion of infected farms that are detected and the farm reproduction number (R(h. The first one provides an indication of the sensitivity of the surveillance system to detect within-farm infections, whereas R(h reflects the effectiveness of outbreak detection (i.e., if detection occurs soon enough to bring an epidemic under control. Increasing the sampling frequency was the most effective means of improving the timeliness of detection (i.e., it occurs earlier, whereas increasing the sample size increased the likelihood of detection. Surveillance was only effective in preventing an epidemic if actions were taken within two days of sampling. The strategies were not affected by the quality of the diagnostic test, although performing both serological and virological assays increased the sensitivity of active surveillance. Early detection of LPAI outbreaks in turkeys can be achieved by increasing the sampling frequency for active surveillance, though very frequent sampling may not be sustainable in the long term. We suggest that, when no LPAI virus is circulating yet and there is a low risk of virus

  13. Erythropoietin abuse and erythropoietin gene doping: detection strategies in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Papailiou, Joanna; Kandarakis, Stylianos A; Andreopoulos, Anastasios; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P

    2005-01-01

    The administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) increases the maximum oxygen consumption capacity, and is therefore abused as a doping method in endurance sports. The detection of erythropoietin (EPO) abuse is based on direct pharmacological and indirect haematological approaches, both of which have several limitations. In addition, current detection methods cannot cope with the emerging doping strategies of EPO mimicry, analogues and gene doping, and thus novel detection strategies are urgently needed. Direct detection methods for EPO misuse can be either pharmacological approaches that identify exogenous substances based on their physicochemical properties, or molecular methods that recognise EPO transgenes or gene transfer vectors. Since direct detection with molecular methods requires invasive procedures, it is not appropriate for routine screening of large numbers of athletes. In contrast, novel indirect methods based on haematological and/or molecular profiling could be better suited as screening tools, and athletes who are suspect of doping would then be submitted to direct pharmacological and molecular tests. This article reviews the current state of the EPO doping field, discusses available detection methods and their shortcomings, outlines emerging pharmaceutical and genetic technologies in EPO misuse, and proposes potential directions for the development of novel detection strategies.

  14. Accelerometer and Camera-Based Strategy for Improved Human Fall Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Houacine, Amrane

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of detecting human falls using anomaly detection. Detection and classification of falls are based on accelerometric data and variations in human silhouette shape. First, we use the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring scheme to detect a potential fall in the accelerometric data. We used an EWMA to identify features that correspond with a particular type of fall allowing us to classify falls. Only features corresponding with detected falls were used in the classification phase. A benefit of using a subset of the original data to design classification models minimizes training time and simplifies models. Based on features corresponding to detected falls, we used the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to distinguish between true falls and fall-like events. We apply this strategy to the publicly available fall detection databases from the university of Rzeszow’s. Results indicated that our strategy accurately detected and classified fall events, suggesting its potential application to early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations and its capability for classification of detected falls. Comparison of the classification results using the EWMA-based SVM classifier method with those achieved using three commonly used machine learning classifiers, neural network, K-nearest neighbor and naïve Bayes, proved our model superior.

  15. Accelerometer and Camera-Based Strategy for Improved Human Fall Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2016-10-29

    In this paper, we address the problem of detecting human falls using anomaly detection. Detection and classification of falls are based on accelerometric data and variations in human silhouette shape. First, we use the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring scheme to detect a potential fall in the accelerometric data. We used an EWMA to identify features that correspond with a particular type of fall allowing us to classify falls. Only features corresponding with detected falls were used in the classification phase. A benefit of using a subset of the original data to design classification models minimizes training time and simplifies models. Based on features corresponding to detected falls, we used the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to distinguish between true falls and fall-like events. We apply this strategy to the publicly available fall detection databases from the university of Rzeszow’s. Results indicated that our strategy accurately detected and classified fall events, suggesting its potential application to early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations and its capability for classification of detected falls. Comparison of the classification results using the EWMA-based SVM classifier method with those achieved using three commonly used machine learning classifiers, neural network, K-nearest neighbor and naïve Bayes, proved our model superior.

  16. Computing Optimal Mixed Strategies for Terrorist Plot Detection Games with the Consideration of Information Leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Li MingChu; Yang Zekun; Lu Kun; Guo Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The terrorist’s coordinated attack is becoming an increasing threat to western countries. By monitoring potential terrorists, security agencies are able to detect and destroy terrorist plots at their planning stage. Therefore, an optimal monitoring strategy for the domestic security agency becomes necessary. However, previous study about monitoring strategy generation fails to consider the information leakage, due to hackers and insider threat. Such leakage events may lead to failure of watch...

  17. Label free luminescence strategy for sensitive detection of ATP using aptamer-Ru(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, Eththilu [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa Univesity, Karaikudi 630003, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628216, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramesh, Pandian [UCIBIO-REQUIMTE, Departmento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [Department of Physical Che mistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-07-15

    A simple and sensitive aptamer-based luminescence strategy for ATP detection is developed using Ru(II) complexes as probe molecule. It is based on the fact that Ru(II)-dppz complexes show the light switching behavior with DNA aptamers and found to show significant luminescence spectral change on the addition of ATP molecules. The binding efficiencies of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP are calculated and compared. The structural change of aptamer is also studied using circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. Moreover, the binding nature of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP is demonstrated by computational techniques. The proposed strategy was successfully applied to the detection of ATP.

  18. Label free luminescence strategy for sensitive detection of ATP using aptamer-Ru(II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Eththilu; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Ramdass, Arumugam; Ramesh, Pandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-01-01

    A simple and sensitive aptamer-based luminescence strategy for ATP detection is developed using Ru(II) complexes as probe molecule. It is based on the fact that Ru(II)-dppz complexes show the light switching behavior with DNA aptamers and found to show significant luminescence spectral change on the addition of ATP molecules. The binding efficiencies of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP are calculated and compared. The structural change of aptamer is also studied using circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques. Moreover, the binding nature of aptamer with ATP, ADP and AMP is demonstrated by computational techniques. The proposed strategy was successfully applied to the detection of ATP.

  19. Detection and Tracking Strategies for Autonomous Aerial Refuelling Tasks Based on Monocular Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection and tracking strategies based on monocular vision are proposed for autonomous aerial refuelling tasks. The drogue attached to the fuel tanker aircraft has two important features. The grey values of the drogue's inner part are different from the external umbrella ribs, as shown in the image. The shape of the drogue's inner dark part is nearly circular. According to crucial prior knowledge, the rough and fine positioning algorithms are designed to detect the drogue. Particle filter based on the drogue's shape is proposed to track the drogue. A strategy to switch between detection and tracking is proposed to improve the robustness of the algorithms. The inner dark part of the drogue is segmented precisely in the detecting and tracking process and the segmented circular part can be used to measure its spatial position. The experimental results show that the proposed method has good performance in real-time and satisfied robustness and positioning accuracy.

  20. Contamination Detection and Mitigation Strategies for Unsymmetric Dimethylhydrazine/Nitrogen Tetroxide Non-Combustion Product Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Baker, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Dimethylamine and nitrite, which are non-combustion reaction products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, can contaminate spacesuits during extra-vehicular activity (EVA) operations. They can react with water in the International Space Station (ISS) airlock to form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a carcinogen. Detection methods for assessing nitrite and dimethylamine contamination were investigated. The methods are based on color-forming reactions in which intensity of color is proportional to concentration. A concept color detection kit using a commercially available presumptive field test for methamphetamine coupled with nitrite test strips was developed and used to detect dimethylamine and nitrite. Contamination mitigation strategies were also developed.

  1. Rapid detection of AAC(6')-Ib-cr production using a MALDI-TOF MS strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, C-A; Tan, R N; Hennequin, C; Beyrouthy, R; Bonnet, R; Robin, F

    2016-12-01

    Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms have become increasingly prevalent among Enterobacteriaceae strains since the 1990s. Among these mechanisms, AAC(6')-Ib-cr is the most difficult to detect. Different detection methods have been developed, but they require expensive procedures such as Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction, or the time-consuming phenotypic method of Wachino. In this study, we describe a simple matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) method which can be easily implemented in clinical laboratories that use the MALDI-TOF technique for bacterial identification. We tested 113 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, of which 64 harbored the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene. We compared two MALDI-TOF strategies, which differed by their norfloxacin concentration (0.03 vs. 0.5 g/L), and the method of Wachino with the PCR and sequencing strategy used as the reference. The MALDI-TOF strategy, performed with 0.03 g/L norfloxacin, and the method of Wachino yielded the same high performances (Se = 98 %, Sp = 100 %), but the turnaround time of the MALDI-TOF strategy was faster (<5 h), simpler, and inexpensive (<1 Euro). Our study shows that the MALDI-TOF strategy has the potential to become a major method for the detection of many different enzymatic resistance mechanisms.

  2. Proof-testing strategies induced by dangerous detected failures of safety-instrumented systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yiliu; Rausand, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Some dangerous failures of safety-instrumented systems (SISs) are detected almost immediately by diagnostic self-testing as dangerous detected (DD) failures, whereas other dangerous failures can only be detected by proof-testing, and are therefore called dangerous undetected (DU) failures. Some items may have a DU- and a DD-failure at the same time. After the repair of a DD-failure is completed, the maintenance team has two options: to perform an insert proof test for DU-failure or not. If an insert proof test is performed, it is necessary to decide whether the next scheduled proof test should be postponed or performed at the scheduled time. This paper analyzes the effects of different testing strategies on the safety performance of a single channel of a SIS. The safety performance is analyzed by Petri nets and by approximation formulas and the results obtained by the two approaches are compared. It is shown that insert testing improves the safety performance of the channel, but the feasibility and cost of the strategy may be a hindrance to recommend insert testing. - Highlights: • Identify the tests induced by detected failures. • Model the testing strategies following DD-failures. • Propose analytical formulas for effects of strategies. • Simulate and verify the proposed models.

  3. A Strategy for Detection of Inconsistency in Evaluation of Essay Type Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Archana; Chaudhary, Banshi D.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of evaluation of essay type answer books involving multiple evaluators for courses with large number of enrollments is likely to be affected due to heterogeneity in experience, expertise and maturity of evaluators. In this paper, we present a strategy to detect anomalies in evaluation of essay type answers by multiple evaluators based…

  4. Development of cost effective fenceline monitoring approaches to support advanced leak detection and repair strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost-effective fence line and process monitoring systems to support advanced leak detection and repair (LDAR) strategies can enhance protection of public health, facilitate worker safety, and help companies realize cost savings by reducing lost product. The U.S. EPA Office of Re...

  5. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547 give a mean relative difference of −32.4 ± (56.3 %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (−50 to +100 %.

  6. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del, E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.cat

    2016-03-17

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  7. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  8. A Real-Time Lift Detection Strategy for a Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baojun; Grazi, Lorenzo; Lanotte, Francesco; Vitiello, Nicola; Crea, Simona

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive lifting of heavy loads increases the risk of back pain and even lumbar vertebral injuries to workers. Active exoskeletons can help workers lift loads by providing power assistance, and therefore reduce the moment and force applied on L5/S1 joint of human body when performing lifting tasks. However, most existing active exoskeletons for lifting assistance are unable to automatically detect user's lift movement, which limits the wide application of active exoskeletons in factories. In this paper, we propose a simple but effective lift detection strategy for exoskeleton control. This strategy uses only exoskeleton integrated sensors, without any extra sensors to capture human motion intentions. This makes the lift detection system more practical for applications in manufacturing environments. Seven healthy subjects participated in this research. Three different sessions were carried out, two for training and one for testing the algorithm. In the two training sessions, subjects were asked to wear a hip exoskeleton, controlled in transparent mode, and perform repetitive lifting and a locomotion circuit; lifting was executed with different techniques. The collected data were used to train the lift detection model. In the testing session, the exoskeleton was controlled in order to deliver torque to assist the lifting action, based on the lift detection made by the trained algorithm. The across-subject average accuracy of lift detection during online test was 97.97 ± 1.39% with subject-dependent model. Offline, the algorithm was trained with data acquired from all subjects to verify its performance for subject-independent detection, and an accuracy of 97.48 ± 1.53% was achieved. In addition, timeliness of the algorithm was quantitatively evaluated and the time delay was exoskeleton in assisting subjects in performing load lifting tasks. These results validate the promise of applying the proposed lift detection strategy for exoskeleton control aiming at lift

  9. Computing Optimal Mixed Strategies for Terrorist Plot Detection Games with the Consideration of Information Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MingChu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The terrorist’s coordinated attack is becoming an increasing threat to western countries. By monitoring potential terrorists, security agencies are able to detect and destroy terrorist plots at their planning stage. Therefore, an optimal monitoring strategy for the domestic security agency becomes necessary. However, previous study about monitoring strategy generation fails to consider the information leakage, due to hackers and insider threat. Such leakage events may lead to failure of watching potential terrorists and destroying the plot, and cause a huge risk to public security. This paper makes two major contributions. Firstly, we develop a new Stackelberg game model for the security agency to generate optimal monitoring strategy with the consideration of information leakage. Secondly, we provide a double-oracle framework DO-TPDIL for calculation effectively. The experimental result shows that our approach can obtain robust strategies against information leakage with high feasibility and efficiency.

  10. Detecting gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries with a network of detectors: Coherent versus coincident strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We compare two strategies of multidetector detection of compact binary inspiral signals, namely, the coincidence and the coherent. For simplicity we consider here two identical detectors having the same power spectral density of noise, that of initial LIGO, located in the same place and having the same orientation. We consider the cases of independent noise as well as that of correlated noise. The coincident strategy involves separately making two candidate event lists, one for each detector, and from these choosing those pairs of events from the two lists which lie within a suitable parameter window, which then are called coincidence detections. The coherent strategy on the other hand involves combining the data phase coherently, so as to obtain a single network statistic which is then compared with a single threshold. Here we attempt to shed light on the question as to which strategy is better. We compare the performances of the two methods by plotting the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for the two strategies. Several of the results are obtained analytically in order to gain insight. Further we perform numerical simulations in order to determine certain parameters in the analytic formulae and thus obtain the final complete results. We consider here several cases from the relatively simple to the astrophysically more relevant in order to establish our results. The bottom line is that the coherent strategy although more computationally expensive in general than the coincidence strategy, is superior to the coincidence strategy--considerably less false dismissal probability for the same false alarm probability in the viable false alarm regime

  11. Credit Card Fraud Detection: A Realistic Modeling and a Novel Learning Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pozzolo, Andrea; Boracchi, Giacomo; Caelen, Olivier; Alippi, Cesare; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2017-09-14

    Detecting frauds in credit card transactions is perhaps one of the best testbeds for computational intelligence algorithms. In fact, this problem involves a number of relevant challenges, namely: concept drift (customers' habits evolve and fraudsters change their strategies over time), class imbalance (genuine transactions far outnumber frauds), and verification latency (only a small set of transactions are timely checked by investigators). However, the vast majority of learning algorithms that have been proposed for fraud detection rely on assumptions that hardly hold in a real-world fraud-detection system (FDS). This lack of realism concerns two main aspects: 1) the way and timing with which supervised information is provided and 2) the measures used to assess fraud-detection performance. This paper has three major contributions. First, we propose, with the help of our industrial partner, a formalization of the fraud-detection problem that realistically describes the operating conditions of FDSs that everyday analyze massive streams of credit card transactions. We also illustrate the most appropriate performance measures to be used for fraud-detection purposes. Second, we design and assess a novel learning strategy that effectively addresses class imbalance, concept drift, and verification latency. Third, in our experiments, we demonstrate the impact of class unbalance and concept drift in a real-world data stream containing more than 75 million transactions, authorized over a time window of three years.

  12. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the United States of America in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools.

  13. Economic Analysis of Alternative Strategies for Detection of ALK Rearrangements in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Shivang; Ray, David; Stein, Karen; Zhang, Jie; Koduru, Prasad; Fogt, Franz; Wellman, Axel; Wat, Ricky; Mathews, Charles

    2016-01-06

    Identification of alterations in ALK gene and development of ALK-directed therapies have increased the need for accurate and efficient detection methodologies. To date, research has focused on the concordance between the two most commonly used technologies, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, inter-test concordance reflects only one, albeit important, aspect of the diagnostic process; laboratories, hospitals, and payors must understand the cost and workflow of ALK rearrangement detection strategies. Through literature review combined with interviews of pathologists and laboratory directors in the U.S. and Europe, a cost-impact model was developed that compared four alternative testing strategies-IHC only, FISH only, IHC pre-screen followed by FISH confirmation, and parallel testing by both IHC and FISH. Interviews were focused on costs of reagents, consumables, equipment, and personnel. The resulting model showed that testing by IHC alone cost less ($90.07 in the U.S., $68.69 in Europe) than either independent or parallel testing by both FISH and IHC ($441.85 in the U.S. and $279.46 in Europe). The strategies differed in cost of execution, turnaround time, reimbursement, and number of positive results detected, suggesting that laboratories must weigh the costs and the clinical benefit of available ALK testing strategies.

  14. Aggressive active case detection: a malaria control strategy based on the Brazilian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Cameron

    2005-02-01

    Since 1996, the Brazilian Ministry of Health has adopted a malaria control strategy known as aggressive active case detection (AACD) in which most or all members of every community are tested and treated for malaria on a monthly basis. The strategy attempts to identify and treat cases of asymptomatic malaria, which, if untreated, continue to transmit the infection. Malaria remains uncontrolled because almost all health care systems in the world rely on passive case detection: the treatment of only symptomatic cases of malaria. Research has shown conclusively that asymptomatic cases exist in any population where malaria transmission is stable and incidence is high: therefore passive case detection simply will not succeed in breaking the cycle of transmission. Numerous case studies show that malaria has been successfully controlled on a regional or national level by mass blood surveys. AACD is an effective malaria control strategy if used in conjunction with other methods, especially when (1) an effective treatment exists, (2) influx of potential carriers of the infection can be monitored, and (3) people are inclined to cooperate with monthly blood testing. AACD requires access to rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), microscopy supplies, extensive human resources, and prompt, affordable, and effective treatment. AACD is compared to PCD in terms of clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness in a case study of malaria in the Brazilian Yanomami Indians. Where it is feasible, AACD could drastically reduce the incidence of malaria and should be an integral part of the World Health Organization's Roll Back Malaria strategy.

  15. Dual-signal amplification strategy for ultrasensitive chemiluminescence detection of PDGF-BB in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun-Tao; Wang, Hui; Ren, Shu-Wei; Chen, Yong-Hong; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Many efforts have been made toward the achievement of high sensitivity in capillary electrophoresis coupled with chemiluminescence detection (CE-CL). This work describes a novel dual-signal amplification strategy for highly specific and ultrasensitive CL detection of human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) using both aptamer and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified gold nanoparticles (HRP-AuNPs-aptamer) as nanoprobes in CE. Both AuNPs and HRP in the nanoprobes could amplify the CL signals in the luminol-H2 O2 CL system, owing to the excellent catalytic behavior of AuNPs and HRP in the CL system. Meanwhile, the high affinity of aptamer modified on the AuNPs allows detection with high specificity. As proof-of-concept, the proposed method was employed to quantify the concentration of PDGF-BB from 0.50 to 250 fm with a detection limit of 0.21 fm. The applicability of the assay was further demonstrated in the analysis of PDGF-BB in human serum samples with acceptable accuracy and reliability. The result of this study exhibits distinct advantages, such as high sensitivity, good specificity, simplicity, and very small sample consumption. The good performances of the proposed strategy provide a powerful avenue for ultrasensitive detection of rare proteins in biological sample, showing great promise in biochemical analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Optimal Attack Strategies Subject to Detection Constraints Against Cyber-Physical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuan; Kar, Soummya; Moura, Jose M. F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies an attacker against a cyberphysical system (CPS) whose goal is to move the state of a CPS to a target state while ensuring that his or her probability of being detected does not exceed a given bound. The attacker’s probability of being detected is related to the nonnegative bias induced by his or her attack on the CPS’s detection statistic. We formulate a linear quadratic cost function that captures the attacker’s control goal and establish constraints on the induced bias that reflect the attacker’s detection-avoidance objectives. When the attacker is constrained to be detected at the false-alarm rate of the detector, we show that the optimal attack strategy reduces to a linear feedback of the attacker’s state estimate. In the case that the attacker’s bias is upper bounded by a positive constant, we provide two algorithms – an optimal algorithm and a sub-optimal, less computationally intensive algorithm – to find suitable attack sequences. Lastly, we illustrate our attack strategies in numerical examples based on a remotely-controlled helicopter under attack.

  17. An integrated strategy combining DNA walking and NGS to detect GMOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Papazova, Nina; De Loose, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; Ruttink, Tom; Roosens, Nancy H

    2017-10-01

    Recently, we developed a DNA walking system for the detection and characterization of a broad spectrum of GMOs in routine analysis of food/feed matrices. Here, we present a new version with improved throughput and sensitivity by coupling the DNA walking system to Pacific Bioscience® Next-generation sequencing technology. The performance of the new strategy was thoroughly assessed through several assays. First, we tested its detection and identification capability on grains with high or low GMO content. Second, the potential impacts of food processing were investigated using rice noodle samples. Finally, GMO mixtures and a real-life sample were analyzed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed strategy in routine GMO analysis. In all tested samples, the presence of multiple GMOs was unambiguously proven by the characterization of transgene flanking regions and the combinations of elements that are typical for transgene constructs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Double Displacement: an Improved Bioorthogonal Reaction Strategy for Templated Nucleic Acid Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinbaum, Daniel J.; Miller, Gregory P.; Kool, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Quenched autoligation probes have been employed previously in a target-templated nonenzymatic ligation strategy for detecting nucleic acids in cells by fluorescence. A common source of background signal in such probes is undesired reaction with water and other cellular nucleophiles. Here we describe a new class of self-ligating probes, double displacement (DD) probes, that rely on two displacement reactions to fully unquench a nearby fluorophore. Three potential double displacement architectu...

  19. Network analysis to detect common strategies in Italian foreign direct investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, G.; Giovannetti, G.; Ricchiuti, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we reconstruct and discuss the network of Italian firms investing abroad, exploiting information from complex network analysis. This method, detecting the key nodes of the system (both in terms of firms and countries of destination), allows us to single out the linkages among firms without ex-ante priors. Moreover, through the examination of affiliates’ economic activity, it allows us to highlight different internationalization strategies of “leaders” in different manufacturing sectors.

  20. JRC GMO-Matrix: a web application to support Genetically Modified Organisms detection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Petrillo, Mauro; Bonfini, Laura; Gatto, Francesco; Rosa, Sabrina; Patak, Alexandre; Kreysa, Joachim

    2014-12-30

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the current state of the art technique for DNA-based detection of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). A typical control strategy starts by analyzing a sample for the presence of target sequences (GM-elements) known to be present in many GMOs. Positive findings from this "screening" are then confirmed with GM (event) specific test methods. A reliable knowledge of which GMOs are detected by combinations of GM-detection methods is thus crucial to minimize the verification efforts. In this article, we describe a novel platform that links the information of two unique databases built and maintained by the European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, one containing the sequence information of known GM-events and the other validated PCR-based detection and identification methods. The new platform compiles in silico determinations of the detection of a wide range of GMOs by the available detection methods using existing scripts that simulate PCR amplification and, when present, probe binding. The correctness of the information has been verified by comparing the in silico conclusions to experimental results for a subset of forty-nine GM events and six methods. The JRC GMO-Matrix is unique for its reliance on DNA sequence data and its flexibility in integrating novel GMOs and new detection methods. Users can mine the database using a set of web interfaces that thus provide a valuable support to GMO control laboratories in planning and evaluating their GMO screening strategies. The platform is accessible at http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmomatrix/ .

  1. Economic Analysis of Alternative Strategies for Detection of ALK Rearrangements in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivang Doshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of alterations in ALK gene and development of ALK-directed therapies have increased the need for accurate and efficient detection methodologies. To date, research has focused on the concordance between the two most commonly used technologies, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry (IHC. However, inter-test concordance reflects only one, albeit important, aspect of the diagnostic process; laboratories, hospitals, and payors must understand the cost and workflow of ALK rearrangement detection strategies. Through literature review combined with interviews of pathologists and laboratory directors in the U.S. and Europe, a cost-impact model was developed that compared four alternative testing strategies—IHC only, FISH only, IHC pre-screen followed by FISH confirmation, and parallel testing by both IHC and FISH. Interviews were focused on costs of reagents, consumables, equipment, and personnel. The resulting model showed that testing by IHC alone cost less ($90.07 in the U.S., $68.69 in Europe than either independent or parallel testing by both FISH and IHC ($441.85 in the U.S. and $279.46 in Europe. The strategies differed in cost of execution, turnaround time, reimbursement, and number of positive results detected, suggesting that laboratories must weigh the costs and the clinical benefit of available ALK testing strategies.

  2. A strategy to objectively evaluate the necessity of correcting detected target deviations in image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Narra, Venkat; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2007-01-01

    Image guided radiotherapy technologies are being increasingly utilized in the treatment of various cancers. These technologies have enhanced the ability to detect temporal and spatial deviations of the target volume relative to planned radiation beams. Correcting these detected deviations may, in principle, improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the target. However, in many situations, a clinical decision has to be made as to whether it is necessary to correct some of the deviations since the relevant dosimetric impact may or may not be significant, and the corresponding corrective action may be either impractical or time consuming. Ideally this decision should be based on objective and reproducible criteria rather than subjective judgment. In this study, a strategy is proposed for the objective evaluation of the necessity of deviation correction during the treatment verification process. At the treatment stage, without any alteration from the planned beams, the treatment beams should provide the desired dose coverage to the geometric volume identical to the planning target volume (PTV). Given this fact, the planned dose distribution and PTV geometry were used to compute the dose coverage and PTV enclosure of the clinical target volume (CTV) that was detected from imaging during the treatment setup verification. The spatial differences between the detected CTV and the planning CTV are essentially the target deviations. The extent of the PTV enclosure of the detected CTV as well as its dose coverage were used as criteria to evaluate the necessity of correcting any of the target deviations. This strategy, in principle, should be applicable to any type of target deviations, including both target deformable and positional changes and should be independent of how the deviations are detected. The proposed strategy was used on two clinical prostate cancer cases. In both cases, gold markers were implanted inside the prostate for the purpose of treatment setup

  3. Enhanced change detection performance reveals improved strategy use in avid action video game players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kait; Fleck, Mathias S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that avid action video game players (VGPs) outperform non-video game players (NVGPs) on a variety of attentional and perceptual tasks. However, it remains unknown exactly why and how such differences arise; while some prior research has demonstrated that VGPs' improvements stem from enhanced basic perceptual processes, other work indicates that they can stem from enhanced attentional control. The current experiment used a change-detection task to explore whether top-down strategies can contribute to VGPs' improved abilities. Participants viewed alternating presentations of an image and a modified version of the image and were tasked with detecting and localizing the changed element. Consistent with prior claims of enhanced perceptual abilities, VGPs were able to detect the changes while requiring less exposure to the change than NVGPs. Further analyses revealed this improved change detection performance may result from altered strategy use; VGPs employed broader search patterns when scanning scenes for potential changes. These results complement prior demonstrations of VGPs' enhanced bottom-up perceptual benefits by providing new evidence of VGPs' potentially enhanced top-down strategic benefits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Satoko; Ohtsuka, Masahiko; Mibu, Akemi; Karikomi, Masato; Sakata, Hitomi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions

  5. NEW APPROACHES IN DECEPTION DETECTION II. ACTIVE INTERVIEWING STRATEGIES AND CONTEXTUAL INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Masip

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analytical evidence shows that behavioural indicators of deception are scant, poorly diagnostic and inconsistent. This has yielded a shift in deception detection research. Rather than passively scrutinising the communication sender to find tell-tale behavioural indicators of deception, the deception judge needs to (a adopt an active role by using interviewing techniques specifically designed to detect deception, or (b focus on contextual (rather than behavioural deception cues. In the previous paper (Masip & Herrero, 2015a, we reviewed the antecedents of this change in focus, as well as the theoretical grounding of the new approaches. Here we describe specific interviewing strategies for detecting deception, as well as the (still scant research on contextual deception indicia. In doing this, we hope to offer the reader a detailed perspective on the recent developments in this specific area of psychology and law.

  6. A new method to detect long term trends of methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O total columns measured within the NDACC ground-based high resolution solar FTIR network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Total columns measured with the ground-based solar FTIR technique are highly variable in time due to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics in the atmosphere above the measurement station. In this paper, a multiple regression model with anomalies of air pressure, total columns of hydrogen fluoride (HF and carbon monoxide (CO and tropopause height are used to reduce the variability in the methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O total columns to estimate reliable linear trends with as small uncertainties as possible. The method is developed at the Harestua station (60° N, 11° E, 600 m a.s.l. and used on three other European FTIR stations, i.e. Jungfraujoch (47° N, 8° E, 3600 m a.s.l., Zugspitze (47° N, 11° E, 3000 m a.s.l., and Kiruna (68° N, 20° E, 400 m a.s.l.. Linear CH4 trends between 0.13 ± 0.01-0.25 ± 0.02 % yr−1 were estimated for all stations in the 1996-2009 period. A piecewise model with three separate linear trends, connected at change points, was used to estimate the short term fluctuations in the CH4 total columns. This model shows a growth in 1996–1999 followed by a period of steady state until 2007. From 2007 until 2009 the atmospheric CH4 amount increases between 0.57 ± 0.22–1.15 ± 0.17 % yr−1. Linear N2O trends between 0.19 ± 0.01–0.40 ± 0.02 % yr−1 were estimated for all stations in the 1996-2007 period, here with the strongest trend at Harestua and Kiruna and the lowest at the Alp stations. From the N2O total columns crude tropospheric and stratospheric partial columns were derived, indicating that the observed difference in the N2O trends between the FTIR sites is of stratospheric origin. This agrees well with the N2O measurements by the SMR instrument onboard the Odin satellite showing the highest trends at Harestua, 0.98 ± 0.28 % yr−1, and considerably smaller trends at lower latitudes, 0.27 ± 0.25 % yr−1. The multiple regression model was compared with two other trend methods, the ordinary linear

  7. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  8. Pain and sensory detection threshold response to acupuncture is modulated by coping strategy and acupuncture sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeungchan; Napadow, Vitaly; Park, Kyungmo

    2014-09-01

    Acupuncture has been shown to reduce pain, and acupuncture-induced sensation may be important for this analgesia. In addition, cognitive coping strategies can influence sensory perception. However, the role of coping strategy on acupuncture modulation of pain and sensory thresholds, and the association between acupuncture sensation and these modulatory effects, is currently unknown. Electroacupuncture (EA) was applied at acupoints ST36 and GB39 of 61 healthy adults. Different coping conditions were experimentally designed to form an active coping strategy group (AC group), who thought they could control EA stimulation intensity, and a passive coping strategy group (PC group), who did not think they had such control. Importantly, neither group was actually able to control EA stimulus intensity. Quantitative sensory testing was performed before and after EA, and consisted of vibration (VDT), mechanical (MDT), warm (WDT), and cold (CDT) detection thresholds, and pressure (PPT), mechanical (MPT), heat (HPT) and cold (CPT) pain thresholds. Autonomic measures (e.g. skin conductance response, SCR) were also acquired to quantify physiological response to EA under different coping conditions. Subjects also reported the intensity of any acupuncture-induced sensations. Coping strategy was induced with successful blinding in 58% of AC subjects. Compared to PC, AC showed greater SCR to EA. Under AC, EA reduced PPT and CPT. In the AC group, improved pain and sensory thresholds were correlated with acupuncture sensation (VDTchange vs. MI: r=0.58, CDTchange vs. tingling: r=0.53, CPTchange vs. tingling; r=0.55, CPTchange vs. dull; r=0.55). However, in the PC group, improved sensory thresholds were negatively correlated with acupuncture sensation (CDTchange vs. intensity sensitization: r=-0.52, WDTchange vs. fullness: r=-0.57). Our novel approach was able to successfully induce AC and PC strategies to EA stimulation. The interaction between psychological coping strategy and

  9. Elastin-like polypeptide switches: A design strategy to detect multimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandhukia, Jugal P; Brill, Dab A; Kouhi, Aida; Pastuszka, Martha K; MacKay, J Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Elastin-Like Polypeptides (ELPs) reversibly phase separate in response to changes in temperature, pressure, concentration, pH, and ionic species. While powerful triggers, biological microenvironments present a multitude of more specific biological cues, such as antibodies, cytokines, and cell-surface receptors. To develop better biosensors and bioresponsive drug carriers, rational strategies are required to sense and respond to these target proteins. We recently reported that noncovalent association of two ELP fusion proteins to a "chemical inducer of dimerization" small molecule (1.5 kDa) induces phase separation at physiological temperatures. Having detected a small molecule, here we present the first evidence that ELP multimerization can also detect a much larger (60 kDa) protein target. To demonstrate this strategy, ELPs were biotinylated at their amino terminus and mixed with tetrameric streptavidin. At a stoichiometric ratio of [4:1], two to three biotin-ELPs associate with streptavidin into multimeric complexes with an apparent K d of 5 nM. The increased ELP density around a streptavidin core strongly promotes isothermal phase separation, which was tuned to occur at physiological temperature. This phase separation reverses upon saturation with excess streptavidin, which only favors [1:1] complexes. Together, these findings suggest that ELP association with multimeric biomolecules is a viable strategy to deliberately engineer ELPs that respond to multimeric protein substrates. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. Perceptual strategies of pigeons to detect a rotational centre--a hint for star compass learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Alert

    Full Text Available Birds can rely on a variety of cues for orientation during migration and homing. Celestial rotation provides the key information for the development of a functioning star and/or sun compass. This celestial compass seems to be the primary reference for calibrating the other orientation systems including the magnetic compass. Thus, detection of the celestial rotational axis is crucial for bird orientation. Here, we use operant conditioning to demonstrate that homing pigeons can principally learn to detect a rotational centre in a rotating dot pattern and we examine their behavioural response strategies in a series of experiments. Initially, most pigeons applied a strategy based on local stimulus information such as movement characteristics of single dots. One pigeon seemed to immediately ignore eccentric stationary dots. After special training, all pigeons could shift their attention to more global cues, which implies that pigeons can learn the concept of a rotational axis. In our experiments, the ability to precisely locate the rotational centre was strongly dependent on the rotational velocity of the dot pattern and it crashed at velocities that were still much faster than natural celestial rotation. We therefore suggest that the axis of the very slow, natural, celestial rotation could be perceived by birds through the movement itself, but that a time-delayed pattern comparison should also be considered as a very likely alternative strategy.

  11. GROUND-BASED TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Mooij, E. J. W. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); López-Morales, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Karjalainen, R.; Hrudkova, M. [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, La Palma (Spain); Jayawardhana, Ray, E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca [Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2 m class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ∼700 and ∼250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190{sub −0.0027}{sup +0.0023} from the 2013 observations and 0.0200{sub −0.0018}{sup +0.0017} from the 2014 observations. The two data sets combined result in a radius ratio of 0.0198{sub −0.0014}{sup +0.0013}. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-sized telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite around bright stars. We expect it also will be possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.

  12. Damage detection strategies for aircraft shell-like structures based on propagation guided elastic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A; Ostachowicz, W; Krawczuk, M

    2011-01-01

    Damage of aircraft structural elements in any form always present high risks. Failures of these elements can be caused by various reasons including material fatigue or impact leading to damage initiation and growth. Detection of these failures at their earliest stage of development, estimation of their size and location, are one of the most crucial factors for each damage detection method. Structural health monitoring strategies based on propagation of guided elastic waves in structures and wave interaction with damage related discontinuities are very promising tools that offer not only damage detection capabilities, but are also meant to provide precise information about the state of the structures and their remaining lifetime. Because of that various techniques are employed to simulate and mimic the wave-discontinuity interactions. The use of various types of sensors, their networks together with sophisticated contactless measuring techniques are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Certain results of numerical simulations obtained by the use of the spectral finite element method are presented by the authors and related with propagation of guided elastic waves in shell-type aircraft structures. Two types of structures are considered: flat 2D panels with or without stiffeners and 3D shell structures. The applicability of two different damage detection approaches is evaluated in order to detect and localise damage in these structures. Selected results related with the use of laser scanning vibrometry are also presented and discussed by the authors.

  13. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  14. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3XQ (United Kingdom); Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste I-34014 (Italy); Boettger, D. [Department of Astronomy, Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2 (Canada); Cukierman, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Delabrouille, J. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Univ Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Obs de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Dobbs, M.; Gilbert, A. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0G4 (Canada); Ducout, A.; Feeney, S. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Feng, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine (United States); and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  15. Object-Based Change Detection in Urban Areas: The Effects of Segmentation Strategy, Scale, and Feature Space on Unsupervised Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Object-based change detection (OBCD has recently been receiving increasing attention as a result of rapid improvements in the resolution of remote sensing data. However, some OBCD issues relating to the segmentation of high-resolution images remain to be explored. For example, segmentation units derived using different segmentation strategies, segmentation scales, feature space, and change detection methods have rarely been assessed. In this study, we have tested four common unsupervised change detection methods using different segmentation strategies and a series of segmentation scale parameters on two WorldView-2 images of urban areas. We have also evaluated the effect of adding extra textural and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI information instead of using only spectral information. Our results indicated that change detection methods performed better at a medium scale than at a fine scale where close to the pixel size. Multivariate Alteration Detection (MAD always outperformed the other methods tested, at the same confidence level. The overall accuracy appeared to benefit from using a two-date segmentation strategy rather than single-date segmentation. Adding textural and NDVI information appeared to reduce detection accuracy, but the magnitude of this reduction was not consistent across the different unsupervised methods and segmentation strategies. We conclude that a two-date segmentation strategy is useful for change detection in high-resolution imagery, but that the optimization of thresholds is critical for unsupervised change detection methods. Advanced methods need be explored that can take advantage of additional textural or other parameters.

  16. Direct Detection of Protein Biomarkers in Human Fluids Using Site-Specific Antibody Immobilization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Soler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Design of an optimal surface biofunctionalization still remains an important challenge for the application of biosensors in clinical practice and therapeutic follow-up. Optical biosensors offer real-time monitoring and highly sensitive label-free analysis, along with great potential to be transferred to portable devices. When applied in direct immunoassays, their analytical features depend strongly on the antibody immobilization strategy. A strategy for correct immobilization of antibodies based on the use of ProLinker™ has been evaluated and optimized in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. Special effort has been focused on avoiding antibody manipulation, preventing nonspecific adsorption and obtaining a robust biosurface with regeneration capabilities. ProLinker™-based approach has demonstrated to fulfill those crucial requirements and, in combination with PEG-derivative compounds, has shown encouraging results for direct detection in biological fluids, such as pure urine or diluted serum. Furthermore, we have implemented the ProLinker™ strategy to a novel nanoplasmonic-based biosensor resulting in promising advantages for its application in clinical and biomedical diagnosis.

  17. A decentralized receptance-based damage detection strategy for wireless smart sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Shinae; Spencer Jr, Billie F; Sim, Sung-Han

    2012-01-01

    Various structural health monitoring strategies have been proposed recently that can be implemented in the decentralized computing environment intrinsic to wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). Many are based on changes in the experimentally determined flexibility matrix for the structure under consideration. However, the flexibility matrix contains only static information; much richer information is available by considering the dynamic flexibility, or receptance, of the structure. Recently, the stochastic dynamic damage locating vector (SDDLV) method was proposed based on changes of dynamic flexibility matrices employing centrally collected output-only measurements. This paper investigates the potential of the SDDLV method for implementation on a network of wireless smart sensors, where a decentralized, hierarchical, in-network processing approach is used to address issues of scalability of the SDDLV algorithm. Two approaches to aggregate results are proposed that provide robust estimates of damage locations. The efficacy of the developed strategy is first verified using wired sensors emulating a wireless sensor network. Subsequently, the decentralized damage detection strategy is implemented on MEMSIC’s Imote2 smart sensor platform and validated experimentally on a laboratory scale truss bridge. (paper)

  18. Direct detection of protein biomarkers in human fluids using site-specific antibody immobilization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Alvarez, Mar; Otte, Marinus A; Sepulveda, Borja; Lechuga, Laura M

    2014-01-29

    Design of an optimal surface biofunctionalization still remains an important challenge for the application of biosensors in clinical practice and therapeutic follow-up. Optical biosensors offer real-time monitoring and highly sensitive label-free analysis, along with great potential to be transferred to portable devices. When applied in direct immunoassays, their analytical features depend strongly on the antibody immobilization strategy. A strategy for correct immobilization of antibodies based on the use of ProLinker™ has been evaluated and optimized in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. Special effort has been focused on avoiding antibody manipulation, preventing nonspecific adsorption and obtaining a robust biosurface with regeneration capabilities. ProLinker™-based approach has demonstrated to fulfill those crucial requirements and, in combination with PEG-derivative compounds, has shown encouraging results for direct detection in biological fluids, such as pure urine or diluted serum. Furthermore, we have implemented the ProLinker™ strategy to a novel nanoplasmonic-based biosensor resulting in promising advantages for its application in clinical and biomedical diagnosis.

  19. Role of data aggregation in biosurveillance detection strategies with applications from ESSENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkom, Howard S; Elbert, Y; Feldman, A; Lin, J

    2004-09-24

    Syndromic surveillance systems are used to monitor daily electronic data streams for anomalous counts of features of varying specificity. The monitored quantities might be counts of clinical diagnoses, sales of over-the-counter influenza remedies, school absenteeism among a given age group, and so forth. Basic data-aggregation decisions for these systems include determining which records to count and how to group them in space and time. This paper discusses the application of spatial and temporal data-aggregation strategies for multiple data streams to alerting algorithms appropriate to the surveillance region and public health threat of interest. Such a strategy was applied and evaluated for a complex, authentic, multisource, multiregion environment, including >2 years of data records from a system-evaluation exercise for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA). Multivariate and multiple univariate statistical process control methods were adapted and applied to the DARPA data collection. Comparative parametric analyses based on temporal aggregation were used to optimize the performance of these algorithms for timely detection of a set of outbreaks identified in the data by a team of epidemiologists. The sensitivity and timeliness of the most promising detection methods were tested at empirically calculated thresholds corresponding to multiple practical false-alert rates. Even at the strictest false-alert rate, all but one of the outbreaks were detected by the best method, and the best methods achieved a 1-day median time before alert over the set of test outbreaks. These results indicate that a biosurveillance system can provide a substantial alerting-timeliness advantage over traditional public health monitoring for certain outbreaks. Comparative analyses of individual algorithm results indicate further achievable improvement in sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Individual differences in attention strategies during detection, fine discrimination, and coarse discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Elizabeth A.; Serences, John T.; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Interacting with the environment requires the ability to flexibly direct attention to relevant features. We examined the degree to which individuals attend to visual features within and across Detection, Fine Discrimination, and Coarse Discrimination tasks. Electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were measured to an unattended peripheral flickering (4 or 6 Hz) grating while individuals (n = 33) attended to orientations that were offset by 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 90° from the orientation of the unattended flicker. These unattended responses may be sensitive to attentional gain at the attended spatial location, since attention to features enhances early visual responses throughout the visual field. We found no significant differences in tuning curves across the three tasks in part due to individual differences in strategies. We sought to characterize individual attention strategies using hierarchical Bayesian modeling, which grouped individuals into families of curves that reflect attention to the physical target orientation (“on-channel”) or away from the target orientation (“off-channel”) or a uniform distribution of attention. The different curves were related to behavioral performance; individuals with “on-channel” curves had lower thresholds than individuals with uniform curves. Individuals with “off-channel” curves during Fine Discrimination additionally had lower thresholds than those assigned to uniform curves, highlighting the perceptual benefits of attending away from the physical target orientation during fine discriminations. Finally, we showed that a subset of individuals with optimal curves (“on-channel”) during Detection also demonstrated optimal curves (“off-channel”) during Fine Discrimination, indicating that a subset of individuals can modulate tuning optimally for detection and discrimination. PMID:23678013

  1. Damage detection methodology on beam-like structures based on combined modal Wavelet Transform strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Roger; Lopez, Lautaro

    2018-05-01

    Different approaches on the detection of damages based on dynamic measurement of structures have appeared in the last decades. They were based, amongst others, on changes in natural frequencies, modal curvatures, strain energy or flexibility. Wavelet analysis has also been used to detect the abnormalities on modal shapes induced by damages. However the majority of previous work was made with non-corrupted by noise signals. Moreover, the damage influence for each mode shape was studied separately. This paper proposes a new methodology based on combined modal wavelet transform strategy to cope with noisy signals, while at the same time, able to extract the relevant information from each mode shape. The proposed methodology will be then compared with the most frequently used and wide-studied methods from the bibliography. To evaluate the performance of each method, their capacity to detect and localize damage will be analyzed in different cases. The comparison will be done by simulating the oscillations of a cantilever steel beam with and without defect as a numerical case. The proposed methodology proved to outperform classical methods in terms of noisy signals.

  2. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  3. Ground-Based Telescope Parametric Cost Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis, The model includes both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, other significant factors include primary mirror radius of curvature and diffraction limited wavelength. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e.. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter are derived. This analysis indicates that recent mirror technology advances have indeed reduced the historical telescope cost curve.

  4. False-positive reduction in CAD mass detection using a competitive classification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lihua; Zheng Yang; Zhang Lei; Clark, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    High false-positive (FP) rate remains to be one of the major problems to be solved in CAD study because too many false-positively cued signals will potentially degrade the performance of detecting true-positive regions and increase the call-back rate in CAD environment. In this paper, we proposed a novel classification method for FP reduction, where the conventional 'hard' decision classifier is cascaded with a 'soft' decision classification with the objective to reduce false-positives in the cases with multiple FPs retained after the 'hard' decision classification. The 'soft' classification takes a competitive classification strategy in which only the 'best' ones are selected from the pre-classified suspicious regions as the true mass in each case. A neural network structure is designed to implement the proposed competitive classification. Comparative studies of FP reduction on a database of 79 images by a 'hard' decision classification and a combined 'hard'-'soft' classification method demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed classification strategy. For example, for the high FP sub-database which has only 31.7% of total images but accounts for 63.5% of whole FPs generated in single 'hard' classification, the FPs can be reduced for 56% (from 8.36 to 3.72 per image) by using the proposed method at the cost of 1% TP loss (from 69% to 68%) in whole database, while it can only be reduced for 27% (from 8.36 to 6.08 per image) by simply increasing the threshold of 'hard' classifier with a cost of TP loss as high as 14% (from 69% to 55%). On the average in whole database, the FP reduction by hybrid 'hard'-'soft' classification is 1.58 per image as compared to 1.11 by 'hard' classification at the TP costs described above. Because the cases with high dense tissue are of higher risk of cancer incidence and false-negative detection in mammogram screening, and usually generate more FPs in CAD detection, the method proposed in this paper will be very helpful in improving

  5. Digital mammography: Signal-extraction strategies for computer-aided detection of microcalcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.P.; Doi, K.; Metz, C.E.; Vyborny, C.J.; Lam, K.L.; Schmidt, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors found that the structured background of a mammogram can be removed effectively by either a difference-image technique (using a matched filter in combination with a median filter, a contrast-reversal filter, or a box-rim filter) or a visual response filter alone. Locally adaptive gray-level thresholding and region-growing techniques can then be employed to extract microcalcifications from the processed image. Signals are further distinguished from noise or artifacts by their size, contrast, and clustering properties. The authors studied the dependence of the detectability of microcalcifications on the various signal-extraction strategies. Potential application of the computer-aided system to mammography is assessed by its performance on clinical mammograms

  6. Serum sample containing endogenous antibodies interfering with multiple hormone immunoassays. Laboratory strategies to detect interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena García-González

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endogenous antibodies (EA may interfere with immunoassays, causing erroneous results for hormone analyses. As (in most cases this interference arises from the assay format and most immunoassays, even from different manufacturers, are constructed in a similar way, it is possible for a single type of EA to interfere with different immunoassays. Here we describe the case of a patient whose serum sample contains EA that interfere several hormones tests. We also discuss the strategies deployed to detect interference. Subjects and methods: Over a period of four years, a 30-year-old man was subjected to a plethora of laboratory and imaging diagnostic procedures as a consequence of elevated hormone results, mainly of pituitary origin, which did not correlate with the overall clinical picture. Results: Once analytical interference was suspected, the best laboratory approaches to investigate it were sample reanalysis on an alternative platform and sample incubation with antibody blocking tubes. Construction of an in-house ‘nonsense’ sandwich assay was also a valuable strategy to confirm interference. In contrast, serial sample dilutions were of no value in our case, while polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation gave inconclusive results, probably due to the use of inappropriate PEG concentrations for several of the tests assayed. Conclusions: Clinicians and laboratorians must be aware of the drawbacks of immunometric assays, and alert to the possibility of EA interference when results do not fit the clinical pattern. Keywords: Endogenous antibodies, Immunoassay, Interference, Pituitary hormones, Case report

  7. Structural health monitoring strategy for detection of interlaminar delamination in composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaegebeur, N; Micheau, P; Masson, P; Maslouhi, A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a structural health monitoring strategy for detecting interlaminar delamination in a carbon fiber reinforced polymer structure using Lamb waves is proposed. The delamination is simulated by inserting a Teflon tape between two transverse plies and the Lamb wave generation and measurement is enabled by using piezoceramic elements. The Lamb wave theoretical propagation and through thickness strain distribution are studied, in order to determine the optimal configuration of the final system in terms of mode and frequency selection, and piezoceramic sizing and spacing, for detection of cross-sectional delamination. Pitch and catch measurements are performed by comparing wave propagations for different frequencies and along damaged and undamaged paths of the structure, and the analysis of results is performed using the reassigned short time Fourier transform. It appears that in the low frequency range (below 300 kHz), the A0 mode is sensitive to the damage, while in the high frequency range, S1 and A1 modes are both very sensitive to the damage while the propagation of the S0 mode is not affected very much

  8. Investigating the Applicability of Upstream Detection Strategy at Pedestrian Signalised Crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti A Hassan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the UK, the Puffin crossing has provision to extend pedestrian green time for those who take longer to cross. However, even at such a pedestrian friendly facility, the traffic signal control is usually designed to minimise vehicle delay while providing the crossing facility. This situation is rather contrary to the current policies to encourage walking. It is this inequity that has prompted the need to re-examine the traffic control of signalised crossings to provide more benefit to both pedestrians and vehicles. In this context, this paper explores the possibility of implementing an Upstream Detection strategy at a Puffin crossing to provide a user friendly crossing. The study has been carried out by simulating a mid-block Puffin crossing for various detector distances and a number of combinations of pedestrian and traffic flows. This paper presents the simulation results and recommends the situations at which Upstream Detection would be suitable.

  9. A Comprehensive Strategy for Accurate Mutation Detection of the Highly Homologous PMS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianli; Dai, Hongzheng; Feng, Yanming; Tang, Jia; Chen, Stella; Tian, Xia; Gorman, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Eric S; Hansen, Terah A A; Wang, Jing; Plon, Sharon E; Zhang, Victor Wei; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2015-09-01

    Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 underlie the cancer susceptibility syndrome, Lynch syndrome. However, accurate molecular testing of PMS2 is complicated by a large number of highly homologous sequences. To establish a comprehensive approach for mutation detection of PMS2, we have designed a strategy combining targeted capture next-generation sequencing (NGS), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and long-range PCR followed by NGS to simultaneously detect point mutations and copy number changes of PMS2. Exonic deletions (E2 to E9, E5 to E9, E8, E10, E14, and E1 to E15), duplications (E11 to E12), and a nonsense mutation, p.S22*, were identified. Traditional multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing approaches cannot differentiate the origin of the exonic deletions in the 3' region when PMS2 and PMS2CL share identical sequences as a result of gene conversion. Our approach allows unambiguous identification of mutations in the active gene with a straightforward long-range-PCR/NGS method. Breakpoint analysis of multiple samples revealed that recurrent exon 14 deletions are mediated by homologous Alu sequences. Our comprehensive approach provides a reliable tool for accurate molecular analysis of genes containing multiple copies of highly homologous sequences and should improve PMS2 molecular analysis for patients with Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fowl adenovirus serotype 4: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic detection, and vaccine strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P H; Zheng, P P; Zhang, T F; Wen, G Y; Shao, H B; Luo, Q P

    2017-08-01

    Fowl adenovirus (FAdV) serotype-4 is highly pathogenic for chickens, especially for broilers aged 3 to 5 wk, and it has emerged as one of the foremost causes of economic losses to the poultry industry in the last 30 years. The liver is a major target organ of FAdV-4 infections, and virus-infected chickens usually show symptoms of hydropericardium syndrome. The virus is very contagious, and it is spread both vertically and horizontally. It can be isolated from infected liver homogenates and detected by several laboratory diagnostic methods (including an agar gel immunodiffusion test, indirect immunofluorescence assays, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, restriction endonuclease analyses, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, and high-resolution melting-curve analyses). Although inactivated vaccines have been deployed widely to control the disease, attenuated live vaccines and subunit vaccines also have been developed, and they are more attractive vaccine candidates. This article provides a comprehensive review of FAdV-4, including its epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic detection, and vaccine strategies. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Optimal search strategies for detecting cost and economic studies in EMBASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes R Brian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Economic evaluations in the medical literature compare competing diagnosis or treatment methods for their use of resources and their expected outcomes. The best evidence currently available from research regarding both cost and economic comparisons will continue to expand as this type of information becomes more important in today's clinical practice. Researchers and clinicians need quick, reliable ways to access this information. A key source of this type of information is large bibliographic databases such as EMBASE. The objective of this study was to develop search strategies that optimize the retrieval of health costs and economics studies from EMBASE. Methods We conducted an analytic survey, comparing hand searches of journals with retrievals from EMBASE for candidate search terms and combinations. 6 research assistants read all issues of 55 journals indexed by EMBASE for the publishing year 2000. We rated all articles using purpose and quality indicators and categorized them into clinically relevant original studies, review articles, general papers, or case reports. The original and review articles were then categorized for purpose (i.e., cost and economics and other clinical topics and depending on the purpose as 'pass' or 'fail' for methodologic rigor. Candidate search strategies were developed for economic and cost studies, then run in the 55 EMBASE journals, the retrievals being compared with the hand search data. The sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the search strategies were calculated. Results Combinations of search terms for detecting both cost and economic studies attained levels of 100% sensitivity with specificity levels of 92.9% and 92.3% respectively. When maximizing for both sensitivity and specificity, the combination of terms for detecting cost studies (sensitivity increased 2.2% over the single term but at a slight decrease in specificity of 0.9%. The maximized combination of terms

  12. Computer-aided detection of breast masses: Four-view strategy for screening mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jun; Chan Heangping; Zhou Chuan; Wu Yita; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Helvie, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    . The improvement was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001) by JAFROC analysis. Conclusions: The four-view information fusion approach that emulates radiologists' reading strategy significantly improves the performance of breast mass detection of the CAD system in comparison with the single-view approach.

  13. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water: proposition of a strategy and evaluation in Champagne-Ardenne Region, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Aubert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is a vehicle for disseminating human and veterinary toxoplasmosis due to oocyst contamination. Several outbreaks of toxoplasmosis throughout the world have been related to contaminated drinking water. We have developed a method for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water and we propose a strategy for the detection of multiple waterborne parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia. Water samples were filtered to recover Toxoplasma oocysts and, after the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts by immunofluorescence, as recommended by French norm procedure NF T 90-455, the samples were purified on a sucrose density gradient. Detection of Toxoplasma was based on PCR amplification and mouse inoculation to determine the presence and infectivity of recovered oocysts. After experimental seeding assays, we determined that the PCR assay was more sensitive than the bioassay. This strategy was then applied to 482 environmental water samples collected since 2001. We detected Toxoplasma DNA in 37 environmental samples (7.7%, including public drinking water; however, none of them were positive by bioassay. This strategy efficiently detects Toxoplasma oocysts in water and may be suitable as a public health sentinel method. Alternative methods can be used in conjunction with this one to determine the infectivity of parasites that were detected by molecular methods.

  14. Ground-based Polarization Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols and the Correlation between Polarization Degree and PM2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chen; Zhengqiang, Li; Weizhen, Hou; Yisong, Xie; Donghui, Li; Kaitao, Li; Ying, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The ground-based polarization remote sensing adds the polarization dimension information to traditional intensity detection, which provides a new method to detect atmospheric aerosols properties. In this paper, the polarization measurements achieved by a new multi-wavelength sun photometer, CE318-DP, are used for the ground-based remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols. In addition, a polarized vector radiative transfer model is introduced to simulate the DOLP (Degree Of Linear Polarization) under different sky conditions. At last, the correlative analysis between mass density of PM 2.5 and multi-wavelength and multi-angular DOLP is carried out. The result shows that DOLP has a high correlation with mass density of PM 2.5 , R 2 >0.85. As a consequence, this work provides a new method to estimate the mass density of PM 2.5 by using the comprehensive network of ground-based sun photometer

  15. Cyber attack analysis on cyber-physical systems: Detectability, severity, and attenuation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Cheolhyeon

    Security of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) against malicious cyber attacks is an important yet challenging problem. Since most cyber attacks happen in erratic ways, it is usually intractable to describe and diagnose them systematically. Motivated by such difficulties, this thesis presents a set of theories and algorithms for a cyber-secure architecture of the CPS within the control theoretic perspective. Here, instead of identifying a specific cyber attack model, we are focused on analyzing the system's response during cyber attacks. Firstly, we investigate the detectability of the cyber attacks from the system's behavior under cyber attacks. Specifically, we conduct a study on the vulnerabilities in the CPS's monitoring system against the stealthy cyber attack that is carefully designed to avoid being detected by its detection scheme. After classifying three kinds of cyber attacks according to the attacker's ability to compromise the system, we derive the necessary and sufficient conditions under which such stealthy cyber attacks can be designed to cause the unbounded estimation error while not being detected. Then, the analytical design method of the optimal stealthy cyber attack that maximizes the estimation error is developed. The proposed stealthy cyber attack analysis is demonstrated with illustrative examples on Air Traffic Control (ATC) system and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation system applications. Secondly, in an attempt to study the CPSs' vulnerabilities in more detail, we further discuss a methodology to identify potential cyber threats inherent in the given CPSs and quantify the attack severity accordingly. We then develop an analytical algorithm to test the behavior of the CPS under various cyber attack combinations. Compared to a numerical approach, the analytical algorithm enables the prediction of the most effective cyber attack combinations without computing the severity of all possible attack combinations, thereby greatly reducing the

  16. Prognostic investigation of galvanic corrosion precursors in aircraft structures and their detection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robin; Kim, Tae Hee; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-04-01

    Aluminum alloys have been the dominant materials for aerospace construction in the past fifty years due to their light weight, forming and alloying, and relative low cost in comparison to titanium and composites. However, in recent years, carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and honeycomb materials have been used in aircrafts in the quest to attain lower weight, high temperature resistance, and better fuel efficiency. When these two materials are coupled together, the structural strength of the aircraft is unparalleled, but this comes at a price, namely galvanic corrosion. Previous experimental results have shown that when CFRP composite materials are joined with high strength aluminum alloys (AA7075-T6 or AA2024-T3), galvanic corrosion occurs at the material interfaces, and the aluminum is in greater danger of corroding, particularly since carbon and aluminum are on the opposite ends of the galvanic series. In this paper, we explore the occurrence of the recognizable precursors of galvanic corrosion when CFRP plate is coupled to an aluminum alloy using SS-304 bolts and exposed to environmental degradation, which creates significant concerns for aircraft structural reliability. The galvanic corrosion software package, BEASY, is used to simulate the growth of corrosion in the designed specimen after which a microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique is explored to detect corrosion defects that appear at the interface of this galvanic couple. This paper also explores a loaded waveguide technique to determine the dielectric constant of the final corrosion product at the Q-band millimeter-wave frequency range (33-50 GHz), as this can be an invaluable asset in developing early detection strategies.

  17. Usual normalization strategies for gene expression studies impair the detection and analysis of circadian patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Diego de Siqueira; Barbosa, Mayara Rodrigues; Coimbra, Daniel Gomes; Dos Santos, José Luiz Araújo; Costa, Ellyda Fernanda Lopes; Koike, Bruna Del Vechio; Alexandre Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Andrade, Tiago Gomes

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that transcriptomes from different tissues present circadian oscillations. Therefore, the endogenous variation of total RNA should be considered as a potential bias in circadian studies of gene expression. However, normalization strategies generally include the equalization of total RNA concentration between samples prior to cDNA synthesis. Moreover, endogenous housekeeping genes (HKGs) frequently used for data normalization may exhibit circadian variation and distort experimental results if not detected or considered. In this study, we controlled experimental conditions from the amount of initial brain tissue samples through extraction steps, cDNA synthesis, and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) to demonstrate a circadian oscillation of total RNA concentration. We also identified that the normalization of the RNA's yield affected the rhythmic profiles of different genes, including Per1-2 and Bmal1. Five widely used HKGs (Actb, Eif2a, Gapdh, Hprt1, and B2m) also presented rhythmic variations not detected by geNorm algorithm. In addition, the analysis of exogenous microRNAs (Cel-miR-54 and Cel-miR-39) spiked during RNA extraction suggests that the yield was affected by total RNA concentration, which may impact circadian studies of small RNAs. The results indicate that the approach of tissue normalization without total RNA equalization prior to cDNA synthesis can avoid bias from endogenous broad variations in transcript levels. Also, the circadian analysis of 2 -Cycle threshold (Ct) data, without HKGs, may be an alternative for chronobiological studies under controlled experimental conditions.

  18. The design, development, and test of balloonborne and groundbased lidar systems. Volume 3: Groundbased lidar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, O.; Aurilio, G.; Bucknam, R. D.; Hurd, A. G.; Robertie, N. F.

    1991-06-01

    This is Volume 3 of a three volume final report on the design, development and test of balloonborne and groundbased lidar systems. Volume 1 describes the design and fabrication of a balloonborne CO2 coherent payload to measure the 10.6 micrometers backscatter from atmospheric aerosols as a function of altitude. Volume 2 describes the August 1987 flight test of Atmospheric Balloonborne Lidar Experiment, ABLE 2. In this volume we describe groundbased lidar development and measurements. A design was developed for installation of the ABLE lidar in the GL rooftop dome. A transportable shed was designed to house the ABLE lidar at the various remote measurement sites. Refurbishment and modification of the ABLE lidar were completed to permit groundbased lidar measurements of clouds and aerosols. Lidar field measurements were made at Ascension Island during SABLE 89. Lidar field measurements were made at Terciera, Azores during GABLE 90. These tasks have been successfully completed, and recommendations for further lidar measurements and data analysis have been made.

  19. A Study on the Model of Detecting the Variation of Geomagnetic Intensity Based on an Adapted Motion Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available By simulating the geomagnetic fields and analyzing thevariation of intensities, this paper presents a model for calculating the objective function ofan Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUVgeomagnetic navigation task. By investigating the biologically inspired strategies, the AUV successfullyreachesthe destination duringgeomagnetic navigation without using the priori geomagnetic map. Similar to the pattern of a flatworm, the proposed algorithm relies on a motion pattern to trigger a local searching strategy by detecting the real-time geomagnetic intensity. An adapted strategy is then implemented, which is biased on the specific target. The results show thereliabilityandeffectivenessofthe proposed algorithm.

  20. Novel Detection Strategy To Rapidly Evaluate the Efficacy of Antichlamydial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xian, Yuqi; Gao, Leiqiong; Elaasar, Hiba; Wang, Yao; Tauhid, Lamiya; Hua, Ziyu; Shen, Li

    2017-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections present a major heath burden worldwide. The conventional method used to detect C. trachomatis is laborious. In the present study, a novel strategy was utilized to evaluate the impact of antimicrobial agents on the growth of C. trachomatis and its expression of ompA promoter-driven green fluorescence protein (GFP). We demonstrate that this GFP reporter system gives a robust fluorescent display of C. trachomatis growth in human cervical epithelial cells and, further, that GFP production directly correlates to changes in ompA expression following sufficient exposure to antimicrobials. Validation with azithromycin, the first-line macrolide drug used for the treatment of C. trachomatis infection, highlights the advantages of this method over the traditional method because of its simplicity and versatility. The results indicate both that ompA is highly responsive to antimicrobials targeting the transcription and translation of C. trachomatis and that there is a correlation between changing GFP levels and C. trachomatis growth. This proof-of-concept study also reveals that the ompA-GFP system can be easily adapted to rapidly assess antimicrobial effectiveness in a high-throughput format. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Parenting styles and coping strategies among patients with early detected and treated congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Campos, María L; Musso, Mariel; Keselman, Ana; Gruñeiro, Laura; Bergadá, Ignacio; Chiesa, Ana

    2018-04-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH), as any chronic disease, has an impact on the parent-child relationship and on the child's resources to cope with conflicting situations. To describe parenting styles according to the perception of children with CH and their coping strategies. Children aged 9-10 years who had CH detected by newborn screening and had received adequate treatment and a group without CH (control group). The Argentine Coping Questionnaire, the Argentine Scale for the Perception of Parent Relations, and the comprehension subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children III (WISC III) were used. Results were compared using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Sixty children with CH were included; they perceived that their mothers exercised a strict control and that their fathers showed more acceptance. They sought more support and became paralyzed more often in conflicting situations than the 60 children without CH. These findings may be associated with a higher level of dependence. They should be taken into consideration in CH care. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  2. Detecting small attractors of large Boolean networks by function-reduction-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiben; Shen, Liangzhong; Shang, Xuequn; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-04-01

    Boolean networks (BNs) are widely used to model gene regulatory networks and to design therapeutic intervention strategies to affect the long-term behaviour of systems. A central aim of Boolean-network analysis is to find attractors that correspond to various cellular states, such as cell types or the stage of cell differentiation. This problem is NP-hard and various algorithms have been used to tackle it with considerable success. The idea is that a singleton attractor corresponds to n consistent subsequences in the truth table. To find these subsequences, the authors gradually reduce the entire truth table of Boolean functions by extending a partial gene activity profile (GAP). Not only does this process delete inconsistent subsequences in truth tables, it also directly determines values for some nodes not extended, which means it can abandon the partial GAPs that cannot lead to an attractor as early as possible. The results of simulation show that the proposed algorithm can detect small attractors with length p = 4 in BNs of up to 200 nodes with average indegree K = 2.

  3. Breaking the color barrier - a multi-selective antibody reporter offers innovative strategies of fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eugenio; Jarvik, Jonathan W

    2017-08-01

    A novel bi-partite fluorescence platform exploits the high affinity and selectivity of antibody scaffolds to capture and activate small-molecule fluorogens. In this report, we investigated the property of multi-selectivity activation by a single antibody against diverse cyanine family fluorogens. Our fluorescence screen identified three cell-impermeant fluorogens, each with unique emission spectra (blue, green and red) and nanomolar affinities. Most importantly, as a protein fusion tag to G-protein-coupled receptors, the antibody biosensor retained full activity - displaying bright fluorogen signals with minimal background on live cells. Because fluorogen-activating antibodies interact with their target ligands via non-covalent interactions, we were able to perform advanced multi-color detection strategies on live cells, previously difficult or impossible with conventional reporters. We found that by fine-tuning the concentrations of the different color fluorogen molecules in solution, a user may interchange the fluorescence signal (onset versus offset), execute real-time signal exchange via fluorogen competition, measure multi-channel fluorescence via co-labeling, and assess real-time cell surface receptor traffic via pulse-chase experiments. Thus, here we inform of an innovative reporter technology based on tri-color signal that allows user-defined fluorescence tuning in live-cell applications. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  5. Back Translation: An Emerging Sophisticated Cyber Strategy to Subvert Advances in "Digital Age" Plagiarism Detection and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael; Sheridan, Lynnaire

    2015-01-01

    Advances have been made in detecting and deterring the student plagiarism that has accompanied the uptake and development of the internet. Many authors from the late 1990s onwards grappled with plagiarism in the digital age, presenting articles that were provoking and established the foundation for strategies to address cyber plagiarism, including…

  6. Ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies in capillary electrophoresis: determination of naphthalene sulphonates in river water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, S.J.; Isberg, I.C.K.; Gooijer, C.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Velthorst, N.H.

    1998-01-01

    Various UV-laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for capillary electrophoresis (CE) are compared, i.e. two UV-laser systems (a pulsed laser providing up to 25 mW of tunable emission, applied at 280, 290 and 325 nm, and a continuous wave (cw) laser providing up to 100 mW of 257 nm emission)

  7. Assessment of NASA airborne laser altimetry data using ground-based GPS data near Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Hawley, Robert L.; Lutz, Eric R.; Studinger, Michael; Sonntag, John G.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Andrews, Lauren C.; Neumann, Thomas A.

    2017-03-01

    A series of NASA airborne lidars have been used in support of satellite laser altimetry missions. These airborne laser altimeters have been deployed for satellite instrument development, for spaceborne data validation, and to bridge the data gap between satellite missions. We used data from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys of an 11 km long track near Summit Station, Greenland, to assess the surface-elevation bias and measurement precision of three airborne laser altimeters including the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS), and the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL). Ground-based GPS data from the monthly ground-based traverses, which commenced in 2006, allowed for the assessment of nine airborne lidar surveys associated with ATM and LVIS between 2007 and 2016. Surface-elevation biases for these altimeters - over the flat, ice-sheet interior - are less than 0.12 m, while assessments of measurement precision are 0.09 m or better. Ground-based GPS positions determined both with and without differential post-processing techniques provided internally consistent solutions. Results from the analyses of ground-based and airborne data provide validation strategy guidance for the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) elevation and elevation-change data products.

  8. Multiple strategies to improve sensitivity, speed and robustness of isothermal nucleic acid amplification for rapid pathogen detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux Bertrand

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades the rapid growth of molecular diagnostics (based on either traditional PCR or isothermal amplification technologies meet the demand for fast and accurate testing. Although isothermal amplification technologies have the advantages of low cost requirements for instruments, the further improvement on sensitivity, speed and robustness is a prerequisite for the applications in rapid pathogen detection, especially at point-of-care diagnostics. Here, we describe and explore several strategies to improve one of the isothermal technologies, helicase-dependent amplification (HDA. Results Multiple strategies were approached to improve the overall performance of the isothermal amplification: the restriction endonuclease-mediated DNA helicase homing, macromolecular crowding agents, and the optimization of reaction enzyme mix. The effect of combing all strategies was compared with that of the individual strategy. With all of above methods, we are able to detect 50 copies of Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA in just 20 minutes of amplification using a nearly instrument-free detection platform (BESt™ cassette. Conclusions The strategies addressed in this proof-of-concept study are independent of expensive equipments, and are not limited to particular primers, targets or detection format. However, they make a large difference in assay performance. Some of them can be adjusted and applied to other formats of nucleic acid amplification. Furthermore, the strategies to improve the in vitro assays by maximally simulating the nature conditions may be useful in the general field of developing molecular assays. A new fast molecular assay for Neisseria gonorrhoeae has also been developed which has great potential to be used at point-of-care diagnostics.

  9. Improved security detection strategy in quantum secure direct communication protocol based on four-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Nie, Jin-Rui; Li, Rui-Fan [Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing (China). School of Computer; Jing, Bo [Beijing Univ. of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing (China). School of Computer; Beijing Institute of Applied Meteorology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Computer Science

    2012-06-15

    To enhance the efficiency of eavesdropping detection in the quantum secure direct communication protocol, an improved quantum secure direct communication protocol based on a four-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state is presented. In the protocol, the four-particle GHZ state is used to detect eavesdroppers, and quantum dense coding is used to encode the message. In the security analysis, the method of entropy theory is introduced, and two detection strategies are compared quantitatively by using the constraint between the information that the eavesdroppers can obtain and the interference that has been introduced. If the eavesdropper wants to obtain all the information, the detection rate of the quantum secure direct communication using an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pair block will be 50% and the detection rate of the presented protocol will be 87%. At last, the security of the proposed protocol is discussed. The analysis results indicate that the protocol proposed is more secure than the others. (orig.)

  10. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15

    the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical

  11. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction-dependent fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is beneficial for evaluating the repairing process of DNA lesions. Here, toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR)-dependent fluorescent strategy was constructed for sensitive detection of UDG activity. A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe with two uracil bases and a trigger sequence were designed. A hairpin probe with toehold domain was designed, and a reporter probe was also designed. Under the action of UDG, two uracil bases were removed from ssDNA probe, generating apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. Then, the AP sites could inhibit the TSDR between ssDNA probe and hairpin probe, leaving the trigger sequence in ssDNA probe still free. Subsequently, the trigger sequence was annealed with the reporter probe, initiating the polymerization and nicking amplification reaction. As a result, numerous G-quadruplex (G4) structures were formed, which could bind with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) to generate enhanced fluorescent signal. In the absence of UDG, the ssDNA probe could hybridize with the toehold domain of the hairpin probe to initiate TSDR, blocking the trigger sequence, and then the subsequent amplification reaction would not occur. The proposed strategy was successfully implemented for detecting UDG activity with a detection limit of 2.7×10 -5 U/mL. Moreover, the strategy could distinguish UDG well from other interference enzymes. Furthermore, the strategy was also applied for detecting UDG activity in HeLa cells lysate with low effect of cellular components. These results indicated that the proposed strategy offered a promising tool for sensitive quantification of UDG activity in UDG-related function study and disease prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SCIENTIFIC EFFICIENCY OF GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-01-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to 7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  13. Double displacement: An improved bioorthogonal reaction strategy for templated nucleic acid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbaum, Daniel J; Miller, Gregory P; Kool, Eric T

    2010-06-16

    Quenched autoligation probes have been employed previously in a target-templated nonenzymatic ligation strategy for detecting nucleic acids in cells by fluorescence. A common source of background signal in such probes is the undesired reaction with water and other cellular nucleophiles. Here, we describe a new class of self-ligating probes, double displacement (DD) probes, that rely on two displacement reactions to fully unquench a nearby fluorophore. Three potential double displacement architectures, all possessing two fluorescence quencher/leaving groups (dabsylate groups), were synthesized and evaluated for templated reaction with nucleophile (phosphorothioate) probes both in vitro and in intact bacterial cells. All three DD probe designs provided substantially better initial quenching than a single-Dabsyl control. In isothermal templated reactions in vitro, double displacement probes yielded considerably lower background signal than previous single displacement probes; investigation into the mechanism revealed that one dabsylate acts as a sacrificial leaving group, reacting nonspecifically with water, but yielding little signal because another quencher group remains. Templated reaction with the specific nucleophile probe is required to activate a signal. The double displacement probes provided a ca. 80-fold turn-on signal and yielded a 2-4-fold improvement in signal/background over single Dabsyl probes. The best-performing probe architecture was demonstrated in a two-color, FRET-based two-allele discrimination system in vitro and was shown to be capable of discriminating between two closely related species of bacteria differing by a single nucleotide at an rRNA target site.

  14. Improved nonlinear fault detection strategy based on the Hellinger distance metric: Plug flow reactor monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Madakyaru, Muddu; Sun, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fault detection has a vital role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. This paper proposes an innovative multivariate fault detection method that can be used for monitoring

  15. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-01-01

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  16. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-01

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements. Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken. This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  17. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  18. Detecting Learning Strategies with Analytics: Links with Self-Reported Measures and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Jovanovic, Jelena; Pardo, Abelardo; Dawson, Shane

    2017-01-01

    The use of analytic methods for extracting learning strategies from trace data has attracted considerable attention in the literature. However, there is a paucity of research examining any association between learning strategies extracted from trace data and responses to well-established self-report instruments and performance scores. This paper…

  19. Enhanced surveillance strategies for detecting and monitoring chronic wasting disease in free-ranging cervids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide wildlife management agencies with the foundation upon which they can build scientifically rigorous and cost-effective surveillance and monitoring programs for chronic wasting disease (CWD) or refine their existing programs. The first chapter provides an overview of potential demographic and spatial risk factors of susceptible wildlife populations that may be exploited for CWD surveillance and monitoring. The information contained in this chapter explores historic as well as recent developments in our understanding of CWD disease dynamics. It also contains many literature references for readers who may desire a more thorough review of the topics or CWD in general. The second chapter examines methods for enhancing efforts to detect CWD on the landscape where it is not presently known to exist and focuses on the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the surveillance program. Specifically, it describes the means of exploiting current knowledge of demographic and spatial risk factors, as described in the first chapter, through a two-stage surveillance scheme that utilizes traditional design-based sampling approaches and novel statistical methods to incorporate information about the attributes of the landscape, environment, populations and individual animals into CWD surveillance activities. By accounting for these attributes, efficiencies can be gained and cost-savings can be realized. The final chapter is unique in relation to the first two chapters. Its focus is on designing programs to monitor CWD once it is discovered within a jurisdiction. Unlike the prior chapters that are more detailed or prescriptive, this chapter by design is considerably more general because providing comprehensive direction for creating monitoring programs for jurisdictions without consideration of their monitoring goals, sociopolitical constraints, or their biological systems, is not possible. Therefore, the authors draw upon their collective

  20. A strategy for selective detection based on interferent depleting and redox cycling using the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Feng; Yan Jiawei; Lu Miao; Zhou Yongliang; Yang Yang; Mao Bingwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel strategy based on a combination of interferent depleting and redox cycling is proposed for the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes. → The strategy break up the restriction of selectively detecting a species that exhibits reversible reaction in a mixture with one that exhibits an irreversible reaction. → The electrodes enhance the current signal by redox cycling. → The electrodes can work regardless of the reversibility of interfering species. - Abstract: The fabrication, characterization and application of the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes for selective detection are demonstrated. The electrodes, fabricated by lithographic microfabrication technology, are composed of a planar film electrode and a 32 x 32 recessed microdisk array electrode. Different from commonly used redox cycling operating mode for array configurations such as interdigitated array electrodes, a novel strategy based on a combination of interferent depleting and redox cycling is proposed for the electrodes with an appropriate configuration. The planar film electrode (the plane electrode) is used to deplete the interferent in the diffusion layer. The recessed microdisk array electrode (the microdisk array), locating within the diffusion layer of the plane electrode, works for detecting the target analyte in the interferent-depleted diffusion layer. In addition, the microdisk array overcomes the disadvantage of low current signal for a single microelectrode. Moreover, the current signal of the target analyte that undergoes reversible electron transfer can be enhanced due to the redox cycling between the plane electrode and the microdisk array. Based on the above working principle, the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes break up the restriction of selectively detecting a species that exhibits reversible reaction in a mixture with one that exhibits an irreversible reaction, which is a limitation of single redox cycling operating mode. The

  1. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  2. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation of signal detection model parameters for the assessment of two-stage diagnostic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, R B; Dondériz, I C; Pérez Abalo, M C

    1992-08-01

    The methodology of Receiver Operating Characteristic curves based on the signal detection model is extended to evaluate the accuracy of two-stage diagnostic strategies. A computer program is developed for the maximum likelihood estimation of parameters that characterize the sensitivity and specificity of two-stage classifiers according to this extended methodology. Its use is briefly illustrated with data collected in a two-stage screening for auditory defects.

  4. OBSERVATIONAL SELECTION EFFECTS WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik [LIGO, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world; though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  5. OBSERVATIONAL SELECTION EFFECTS WITH GROUND-BASED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E.; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world; though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  6. New Developments in Error Detection and Correction Strategies for Critical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; Label, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The presentation will cover a variety of mitigation strategies that were developed for critical applications. An emphasis is placed on strengths and weaknesses per mitigation technique as it pertains to different Field programmable gate array (FPGA) device types.

  7. SU-F-J-197: A Novel Intra-Beam Range Detection and Adaptation Strategy for Particle Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M; Jiang, S; Shao, Y; Lu, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In-vivo range detection/verification is crucial in particle therapy for effective and safe delivery. The state-of-art techniques are not sufficient for in-vivo on-line range verification due to conflicts among patient dose, signal statistics and imaging time. We propose a novel intra-beam range detection and adaptation strategy for particle therapy. Methods: This strategy uses the planned mid-range spots as probing beams without adding extra radiation to patients. Such choice of probing beams ensures the Bragg peaks to remain inside the tumor even with significant range variation from the plan. It offers sufficient signal statistics for in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) due to high positron activity of therapeutic dose. The probing beam signal can be acquired and reconstructed using in-beam PET that allows for delineation of the Bragg peaks and detection of range shift with ease of detection enabled by single-layered spots. If the detected range shift is within a pre-defined tolerance, the remaining spots will be delivered as the original plan. Otherwise, a fast re-optimization using range-shifted beamlets and accounting for the probing beam dose is applied to consider the tradeoffs posed by the online anatomy. Simulated planning and delivery studies were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques. Results: Simulations with online range variations due to shifts of various foreign objects into the beam path showed successful delineation of the Bragg peaks as a result of delivering probing beams. Without on-line delivery adaptation, dose distribution was significantly distorted. In contrast, delivery adaptation incorporating detected range shift recovered well the planned dose. Conclusion: The proposed intra-beam range detection and adaptation utilizing the planned mid-range spots as probing beams, which illuminate the beam range with strong and accurate PET signals, is a safe, practical, yet effective approach to address range

  8. An enzyme-free strategy for ultrasensitive detection of adenosine using a multipurpose aptamer probe and malachite green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Tang, Xian; Zhou, Bin; Xue, Jin-Hua; Liu, Hui; Liu, Shan-Du; Cao, Jin-Xiu; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Si-Han

    2015-08-05

    We report on an enzyme-free and label-free strategy for the ultrasensitive determination of adenosine. A novel multipurpose adenosine aptamer (MAAP) is designed, which serves as an effective target recognition probe and a capture probe for malachite green. In the presence of adenosine, the conformation of the MAAP is converted from a hairpin structure to a G-quadruplex. Upon addition of malachite green into this solution, a noticeable enhancement of resonance light scattering was observed. The signal response is directly proportional to the concentration of adenosine ranging from 75 pM to 2.2 nM with a detection limit of 23 pM, which was 100-10,000 folds lower than those obtained by previous reported methods. Moreover, this strategy has been applied successfully for detecting adenosine in human urine and blood samples, further proving its reliability. The mechanism of adenosine inducing MAAP to form a G-quadruplex was demonstrated by a series of control experiments. Such a MAAP probe can also be used to other strategies such as fluorescence or spectrophotometric ones. We suppose that this strategy can be expanded to develop a universal analytical platform for various target molecules in the biomedical field and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection and monitoring of volatile and semivolatile pollutants in soil through different sensing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    -continuous information about soil pollution conditions and evolutions, suitable for unskilled employees, on the basis of three different levels of contaminations and alarms. That probe might be then a suitable tool for decision makers about environmental risk assessment. Finally, an EN device has also been recently applied to detect microbial activity and biomass in soil. Then, the described sensing strategies might be successfully used to both monitor the presence of pollutants and their dynamics during and after remediation processes, in order to validate the effectiveness of the specific techniques applied in contaminated sites, and evaluate the recovery of soil metabolic activities and active microbial biomass.

  10. Nest site selection by Kentish plover suggests a trade-off between nest-crypsis and predator detection strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Gómez-Serrano

    Full Text Available Predation is one of the main causes of adult mortality and breeding failure for ground-nesting birds. Micro-habitat structure around nests plays a critical role in minimizing predation risk. Plovers nest in sites with little vegetation cover to maximize the incubating adult visibility, but many studies suggest a trade-off between nest-crypsis and predator detection strategies. However, this trade-off has not been explored in detail because methods used so far do not allow estimating the visibility with regards to critical factors such as slope or plant permeability to vision. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Kentish plovers select exposed sites according to a predator detection strategy, and the hypothesis that more concealed nests survive longer according to a crypsis strategy. To this end, we obtained an accurate estimation of the incubating adult's field of vision through a custom built inverted periscope. Our results showed that plovers selected nest sites with higher visibility than control points randomly selected with regards to humans and dogs, although nests located in sites with higher vegetation cover survived longer. In addition, the flushing distance (i.e., the distance at which incubating adults leave the nest when they detect a potential predator decreased with vegetation cover. Consequently, the advantages of concealing the nest were limited by the ability to detect predators, thus indirectly supporting the existence of the trade-off between crypsis and predator detection. Finally, human disturbance also constrained nest choice, forcing plovers to move to inland sites that were less suitable because of higher vegetation cover, and modulated flushing behavior, since plovers that were habituated to humans left their nests closer to potential predators. This constraint on the width of suitable breeding habitat is particularly relevant for the conservation of Kentish Plover in sand beaches, especially under the current context of

  11. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  12. High throughput screening strategies and technology platforms for detection of pathogens: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally, foodborne pathogens are a major public health concern. In this chapter, we provide a broad description of the problem of food-borne diseases and current and future detection technologies for food safety assurance and prevention of foodborne illnesses. Current detection approaches include s...

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of MR Imaging-guided Strategies for Detection of Prostate Cancer in Biopsy-Naive Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Shivani; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Ponsky, Lee E; Lu, Ziang; Griswold, Mark A; Gulani, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of multiparametric diagnostic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examination followed by MR imaging-guided biopsy strategies in the detection of prostate cancer in biopsy-naive men presenting with clinical suspicion of cancer for the first time. Materials and Methods A decision-analysis model was created for biopsy-naive men who had been recommended for prostate biopsy on the basis of abnormal digital rectal examination results or elevated prostate-specific antigen levels (age groups: 41-50 years, 51-60 years, and 61-70 years). The following three major strategies were evaluated: (a) standard transrectal ultrasonography (US)-guided biopsy; (b) diagnostic MR imaging followed by MR imaging-targeted biopsy, with no biopsy performed if MR imaging findings were negative; and (c) diagnostic MR imaging followed by MR imaging-targeted biopsy, with a standard biopsy performed when MR imaging findings were negative. The following three MR imaging-guided biopsy strategies were further evaluated in each MR imaging category: (a) biopsy with cognitive guidance, (b) biopsy with MR imaging/US fusion guidance, and (c) in-gantry MR imaging-guided biopsy. Model parameters were derived from the literature. The primary outcome measure was net health benefit (NHB), which was measured as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained or lost by investing resources in a new strategy compared with a standard strategy at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50 000 per QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. Results Noncontrast MR imaging followed by cognitively guided MR biopsy (no standard biopsy if MR imaging findings were negative) was the most cost-effective approach, yielding an additional NHB of 0.198 QALY compared with the standard biopsy approach. Noncontrast MR imaging followed by in-gantry MR imaging-guided biopsy (no standard biopsy if MR imaging findings were negative) led to the

  15. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Kiefer, Michael; Lossow, Stefan; Gomez, R. Michael; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Lainer, Martin; Forkman, Peter; Christensen, Ole Martin; Oh, Jung Jin; Hartogh, Paul; Anderson, John; Bramstedt, Klaus; Dinelli, Bianca M.; Garcia-Comas, Maya; Hervig, Mark; Murtagh, Donal; Raspollini, Piera; Read, William G.; Rosenlof, Karen; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II), we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards) and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically ˜ 1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0-1 % yr-1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr-1 and 0.7 % yr-1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr-1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii) and -0.1 % yr-1 (at Lauder, New Zealand).

  16. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Nedoluha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere–troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II, we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically  ∼  1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0–1 % yr−1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr−1 and 0.7 % yr−1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr−1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii and −0.1 % yr−1 (at Lauder, New Zealand.

  17. Rapid classification of pharmaceutical ingredients with Raman spectroscopy using compressive detection strategy with PLS-DA multivariate filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci Maltaş, Derya; Kwok, Kaho; Wang, Ping; Taylor, Lynne S; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2013-06-01

    Identifying pharmaceutical ingredients is a routine procedure required during industrial manufacturing. Here we show that a recently developed Raman compressive detection strategy can be employed to classify various widely used pharmaceutical materials using a hybrid supervised/unsupervised strategy in which only two ingredients are used for training and yet six other ingredients can also be distinguished. More specifically, our liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) based compressive detection instrument is trained using only the active ingredient, tadalafil, and the excipient, lactose, but is tested using these and various other excipients; microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, titanium (IV) oxide, talc, sodium lauryl sulfate and hydroxypropyl cellulose. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) is used to generate the compressive detection filters necessary for fast chemical classification. Although the filters used in this study are trained on only lactose and tadalafil, we show that all the pharmaceutical ingredients mentioned above can be differentiated and classified using PLS-DA compressive detection filters with an accumulation time of 10ms per filter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Two neural network based strategies for the detection of a total instantaneous blockage of a sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Martinez, Sinuhe; Messai, Nadhir; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe; Nuzillard, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The total instantaneous blockage (TIB) of an assembly in the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is investigated. Such incident could appear as an abnormal rise in temperature on the assemblies neighbouring the blockage. Its detection relies on a dataset of temperature measurements of the assemblies making up the core of the French Phenix Nuclear Reactor. The data are provided by the French Commission of Atomic and Alternatives Energies (CEA). Here, two strategies are proposed depending on whether the sensor measurement of the suspected assembly is reliable or not. The proposed methodology implements a time-lagged feed-forward neural (TLFFN) Network in order to predict the one-step-ahead temperature of a given assembly. The incident is declared if the difference between the predicted process and the actual one exceeds a threshold. In these simulated conditions, the method is efficient to detect small gradients as expected in reality. - Highlights: • We study the total instantaneous blockage (TIB) of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. • The TIB symptom is simulated as an abrupt rise on temperature (0.1–1 °C/s). • The goal is to improve the early detection of the incident. • Two strategies laying on neural networks are proposed. • TIB is detected in 3 s for 1 °C/s and 18–21 s for 0.1 °C/s

  19. A new islanding detection technique for multiple mini hydro based on rate of change of reactive power and load connecting strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghari, J.A.; Mokhlis, H.; Bakar, A.H.A.; Karimi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The requirement of DG interconnection with existing power system is discussed. • Various islanding detection techniques are discussed with their merits and demerits. • New islanding detection strategy is proposed for multiple mini hydro type DGs. • The proposed strategy is based on dq/dt and load connecting strategy. • The effectiveness of strategy is verified on various other cases. - Abstract: The interconnection of distributed generation (DG) into distribution networks is undergoing a rapid global expansion. It enhances the system’s reliability, while simultaneously reduces pollution problems related to the generation of electrical power. To fully utilize the benefits of DGs, certain technical issues need to be addressed. One of the most important issues in this context is islanding detection. This paper presents a new islanding detection technique that is suitable for multiple mini-hydro type DG units. The proposed strategy is based on the rate of change of reactive power and load connecting strategy to detect islanding within the system. For a large power mismatch, islanding is detected by rate of change of reactive power only. However, for a close power mismatch, the rate of change of reactive power initiates a load connecting strategy, which in turn alters the load on the distribution network. This load variation in the distribution network causes a variation in the rate of change of reactive power, which is utilized to distinguish islanding and other events. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy is effective in detecting islanding occurrence in a distribution network

  20. Microchip-based ELISA strategy for the detection of low-level disease biomarker in serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yun; Wang Huixiang; Huang Jingyu; Yang Jie; Liu Baohong [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Pengyuan, E-mail: pyyang@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2009-09-14

    A simple and sensitive method has been proposed to determine a trace level of {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips coupled with electrochemical detection system. The PMMA microchannels have been modified with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) containing abundant NH{sub 2} groups to covalently immobilize AFP monoclonal antibody. Afterward, the antigen AFP and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated AFP antibody can sequentially bind through antigen-antibody specific interaction. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal fluorescence microscope (CFFM) were utilized to characterize the surface topography and protein immobilization after modification. Coupled with three-electrode electrochemical detection system, the immunochip can perform the detection limit of AFP down to 1 pg mL{sup -1}, and achieve a detectable linear concentration range of 1-500 pg mL{sup -1} by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The on-chip immunoassay platform can not only provide rapid and sensitive detection for target proteins but also be resistant to non-specific adsorption of proteins, which contributes to the detection of low-level protein in real sample. Finally, AFP existing in healthy human serum was detected to demonstrate the utility of the immunochip. The result shows that the proposed approach is feasible and has the potential application in clinical analysis and diagnosis.

  1. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  2. Improved Data-based Fault Detection Strategy and Application to Distillation Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu

    2017-01-31

    Chemical and petrochemical processes require continuous monitoring to detect abnormal events and to sustain normal operations. Furthermore, process monitoring enhances productivity, efficiency, and safety in process industries. Here, we propose an innovative statistical approach that exploits the advantages of multiscale partial least squares (MSPLS) models and generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) tests for fault detection in processes. Specifically, we combine an MSPLS algorithm with wavelet analysis to create our modeling framework. Then, we use GLR hypothesis testing based on the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the MSPLS model to improve fault detection. We use simulated distillation column data to evaluate the MSPLS-based GLR chart. Results show that our MSPLS-based GLR method is more powerful than the PLS-based Q and GLR method and MSPLS-based Q method, especially in early detection of small faults with abrupt or incipient behavior.

  3. Improved Data-based Fault Detection Strategy and Application to Distillation Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu; Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Chemical and petrochemical processes require continuous monitoring to detect abnormal events and to sustain normal operations. Furthermore, process monitoring enhances productivity, efficiency, and safety in process industries. Here, we propose an innovative statistical approach that exploits the advantages of multiscale partial least squares (MSPLS) models and generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) tests for fault detection in processes. Specifically, we combine an MSPLS algorithm with wavelet analysis to create our modeling framework. Then, we use GLR hypothesis testing based on the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the MSPLS model to improve fault detection. We use simulated distillation column data to evaluate the MSPLS-based GLR chart. Results show that our MSPLS-based GLR method is more powerful than the PLS-based Q and GLR method and MSPLS-based Q method, especially in early detection of small faults with abrupt or incipient behavior.

  4. Synergistic electron transfer effect-based signal amplification strategy for the ultrasensitive detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiujun; Chen, Xiaogen; Liu, Dan; Wu, Cuiyan; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2018-05-15

    The selective and sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) is of great significance for the identification of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease from the perspective of molecular diagnostics. So far, most of DA fluorescence sensors are based on the electron transfer from the fluorescence nanomaterials to DA-quinone. However, the limited electron transfer ability of the DA-quinone affects the level of detection sensitivity of these sensors. In this work, based on the DA can reduce Ag + into AgNPs followed by oxidized to DA-quinone, we developed a novel silicon nanoparticles-based electron transfer fluorescent sensor for the detection of DA. As electron transfer acceptor, the AgNPs and DA-quinone can quench the fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles effectively through the synergistic electron transfer effect. Compared with traditional fluorescence DA sensors, the proposed synergistic electron transfer-based sensor improves the detection sensitivity to a great extent (at least 10-fold improvement). The proposed sensor shows a low detection limit of DA, which is as low as 0.1 nM under the optimal conditions. This sensor has potential applicability for the detection of DA in practical sample. This work has been demonstrated to contribute to a substantial improvement in the sensitivity of the sensors. It also gives new insight into design electron transfer-based sensors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Detective Questions: A Strategy for Improving Inference-Making in Children With Mild Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fernández, Gracia

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent problems in reading comprehension is the difficulty in making inferences from the text, especially for students with mild disabilities (i.e., children with learning disabilities or with high-functioning autism). It is essential, therefore, that educators include the teaching of reading strategies to improve their students'…

  6. Optimal surveillance strategy for invasive species management when surveys stop after detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Hauser, Cindy E; McCarthy, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Invasive species are a cause for concern in natural and economic systems and require both monitoring and management. There is a trade-off between the amount of resources spent on surveying for the species and conducting early management of occupied sites, and the resources that are ultimately spent in delayed management at sites where the species was present but undetected. Previous work addressed this optimal resource allocation problem assuming that surveys continue despite detection until the initially planned survey effort is consumed. However, a more realistic scenario is often that surveys stop after detection (i.e., follow a "removal" sampling design) and then management begins. Such an approach will indicate a different optimal survey design and can be expected to be more efficient. We analyze this case and compare the expected efficiency of invasive species management programs under both survey methods. We also evaluate the impact of mis-specifying the type of sampling approach during the program design phase. We derive analytical expressions that optimize resource allocation between monitoring and management in surveillance programs when surveys stop after detection. We do this under a scenario of unconstrained resources and scenarios where survey budget is constrained. The efficiency of surveillance programs is greater if a "removal survey" design is used, with larger gains obtained when savings from early detection are high, occupancy is high, and survey costs are not much lower than early management costs at a site. Designing a surveillance program disregarding that surveys stop after detection can result in an efficiency loss. Our results help guide the design of future surveillance programs for invasive species. Addressing program design within a decision-theoretic framework can lead to a better use of available resources. We show how species prevalence, its detectability, and the benefits derived from early detection can be considered.

  7. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP.

  8. Matrix-Matching as an Improvement Strategy for the Detection of Pesticide Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, Géraldine; Raynaud, Christine; Capblancq, Sophie; Simon, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    More than 90% of the pesticides residues in apples are located in the peel. We developed a gas chromatography/ion trap tandem mass spectrometry method for investigating all detectable residues in the peel of 3 apple varieties. Sample preparation is based on the use of the Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe method on the whole fruit, the flesh, and the peel. Pesticide residues were quantified with solvent-matched and matrix-matched standards, by spiking apple sample extracts. Matrix effects dependent on the type of extract (fruit, flesh, or peel) and the apple variety were detected. The best data processing methods involved normalizing matrix effect rates by matrix-matched internal/external calibration. Boscalid, captan, chlorpyrifos, fludioxonil, and pyraclostrobin were the most frequently detected pesticides. However, their concentrations in the whole fruit were below European maximum residue levels. Despite negative matrix effects, the residues in peel were detected at concentrations up to 10 times higher than those in whole fruits. Consequently, other pesticide residues present at concentrations below the limit of quantification in the whole fruit were detected in the peel. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. The strategies of DNA immobilization and hybridization detection mechanism in the construction of electrochemical DNA sensor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahwarhar Izuan Abdul Rashid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, electrochemical deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sensor has recently emerged as promising alternative clinical diagnostic devices especially for infectious disease by exploiting DNA recognition events and converting them into an electrochemical signal. This is because the existing DNA diagnostic method possesses certain drawbacks such as time-consuming, expensive, laborious, low selectivity and sensitivity. DNA immobilization strategies and mechanism of electrochemical detection are two the most important aspects that should be considered before developing highly selective and sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor. Here, we focus on some recent strategies for DNA probes immobilization on the surface of electrochemical transducer such as adsorption, covalent bonding and Avidin/Streptavidin-Biotin interaction on the electrode surface for specific interaction with its complementary DNA target. A numerous approach for DNA hybridization detection based electrochemical technique that frequently used including direct DNA electrochemical detection and label based electrochemical (redox-active indicator, enzyme label and nanoparticles were also discussed in aiming to provide general guide for the design of electrochemical DNA sensor. We also discussed the challenges and suggestions to improve the application of electrochemical DNA sensor at point-care setting. Keywords: Electrochemical DNA sensor, DNA immobilization, DNA hybridization, Electrochemical mechanism

  10. New strategies to produce and detect singlet oxygen in a cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gollmer, Anita

    2012-01-01

    of the general methodology to generate and detect singlet oxygen is currently of great importance in order to better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in photo-induced cell death. From a mechanistic perspective, experiments performed at the level of a single cell provide unique insight......Singlet oxygen, the first excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, plays a major role in oxygen-dependent photo-induced cell death. In such systems, singlet oxygen is generally produced in a photosensitized process wherein light is absorbed by a molecule (the so-called sensitizer) which......, and that is the perspective of this study. Although the direct optical detection of singlet oxygen by its near IR phosphorescence is the ideal way to monitor this species, it suffers from the problem of weak signal intensity. Fluorescent probes can be a more sensitive way to detect singlet oxygen. The photochemical behavior...

  11. Strategies for Early Outbreak Detection of Malaria in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekorchuk, D.; Gebrehiwot, T.; Mihretie, A.; Awoke, W.; Wimberly, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional epidemiological approaches to early detection of disease outbreaks are based on relatively straightforward thresholds (e.g. 75th percentile, standard deviations) estimated from historical case data. For diseases with strong seasonality, these can be modified to create separate thresholds for each seasonal time step. However, for disease processes that are non-stationary, more sophisticated techniques are needed to more accurately estimate outbreak threshold values. Early detection for geohealth-related diseases that also have environmental drivers, such as vector-borne diseases, may also benefit from the integration of time-lagged environmental data and disease ecology models into the threshold calculations. The Epidemic Prognosis Incorporating Disease and Environmental Monitoring for Integrated Assessment (EPIDEMIA) project has been integrating malaria case surveillance with remotely-sensed environmental data for early detection, warning, and forecasting of malaria epidemics in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, and has five years of weekly time series data from 47 woredas (districts). Efforts to reduce the burden of malaria in Ethiopia has been met with some notable success in the past two decades with major reduction in cases and deaths. However, malaria remains a significant public health threat as 60% of the population live in malarious areas, and due to the seasonal and unstable transmission patterns with cyclic outbreaks, protective immunity is generally low which could cause high morbidity and mortality during the epidemics. This study compared several approaches for defining outbreak thresholds and for identifying a potential outbreak based on deviations from these thresholds. We found that model-based approaches that accounted for climate-driven seasonality in malaria transmission were most effective, and that incorporating a trend component improved outbreak detection in areas with active malaria elimination efforts. An advantage of these early

  12. Analytical strategy for the detection of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltrán, M.C.; Althaus, R.L.; Molina, A.; Berruga, M.I.; Molina, M.P.

    2015-07-01

    The use of antibiotics to treat mastitis and other infectious diseases in dairy sheep and goats is a widespread practice nowadays that can, when not properly applied, result in the contamination of the milk supply. Spanish legislation establishes the control of the presence of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk using screening methods that detect, at least, beta-lactam drugs. Microbial inhibitor tests using Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis and specific receptor-binding assays are most widely employed for this purpose. The detection rates of screening tests routinely used in Spain have been calculated considering the frequency of use of veterinary drugs commonly applied in ovine and caprine livestock to treat and prevent mastitis as well as the test sensitivity toward these substances at safety levels. In general, the use of a single test allows detecting 62.8-82.4% of the antibiotics employed. For sheep milk, the total detection range achieved with microbial tests was significantly higher than that reached with rapid receptor tests. However, no significant differences between the two types of methods were found when goat's milk was analysed. In both types of milk, the simultaneous use of two screening tests with a different analytical basis increases the total detection range significantly, reaching values ≥ 90% in some cases (81.5-90.1% for sheep and 84.7-92.6% for goats). However, the periodical use of screening tests able to detect quinolones, macrolides or aminoglycosides would be recommended to carry out more efficient screening and ensure the safety of milk and dairy products from sheep and goats. (Author)

  13. Analytical strategy for the detection of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Beltrán

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics to treat mastitis and other infectious diseases in dairy sheep and goats is a widespread practice nowadays that can, when not properly applied, result in the contamination of the milk supply. Spanish legislation establishes the control of the presence of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk using screening methods that detect, at least, beta-lactam drugs. Microbial inhibitor tests using Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis and specific receptor-binding assays are most widely employed for this purpose. The detection rates of screening tests routinely used in Spain have been calculated considering the frequency of use of veterinary drugs commonly applied in ovine and caprine livestock to treat and prevent mastitis as well as the test sensitivity toward these substances at safety levels. In general, the use of a single test allows detecting 62.8-82.4% of the antibiotics employed. For sheep milk, the total detection range achieved with microbial tests was significantly higher than that reached with rapid receptor tests. However, no significant differences between the two types of methods were found when goat’s milk was analysed. In both types of milk, the simultaneous use of two screening tests with a different analytical basis increases the total detection range significantly, reaching values ≥ 90% in some cases (81.5-90.1% for sheep and 84.7-92.6% for goats. However, the periodical use of screening tests able to detect quinolones, macrolides or aminoglycosides would be recommended to carry out more efficient screening and ensure the safety of milk and dairy products from sheep and goats.

  14. Analytical strategy for the detection of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltrán, M.C.; Althaus, R.L.; Molina, A.; Berruga, M.I.; Molina, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics to treat mastitis and other infectious diseases in dairy sheep and goats is a widespread practice nowadays that can, when not properly applied, result in the contamination of the milk supply. Spanish legislation establishes the control of the presence of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk using screening methods that detect, at least, beta-lactam drugs. Microbial inhibitor tests using Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis and specific receptor-binding assays are most widely employed for this purpose. The detection rates of screening tests routinely used in Spain have been calculated considering the frequency of use of veterinary drugs commonly applied in ovine and caprine livestock to treat and prevent mastitis as well as the test sensitivity toward these substances at safety levels. In general, the use of a single test allows detecting 62.8-82.4% of the antibiotics employed. For sheep milk, the total detection range achieved with microbial tests was significantly higher than that reached with rapid receptor tests. However, no significant differences between the two types of methods were found when goat's milk was analysed. In both types of milk, the simultaneous use of two screening tests with a different analytical basis increases the total detection range significantly, reaching values ≥ 90% in some cases (81.5-90.1% for sheep and 84.7-92.6% for goats). However, the periodical use of screening tests able to detect quinolones, macrolides or aminoglycosides would be recommended to carry out more efficient screening and ensure the safety of milk and dairy products from sheep and goats. (Author)

  15. Pulsation of IU Per from the Ground-based and ‘Integral’ Photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundra E.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available IU Per is an eclipsing semi-detached binary with a pulsating component. Using our own ground-based, as well as INTEGRAL satellite photometric observations in the B and V passbands, we derived geometrical and physical parameters of this system. We detected the short-term variations of IU Per in the residuals of brightness after the subtraction of synthetic light curves. Analysis of these residuals enabled us to characterize and localize the source of short-term variations as the pulsations of the primary component typical to δ Scuti-type stars.

  16. [Real-time detection of quality of Chinese materia medica: strategy of NIR model evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-sheng; Shi, Xin-yuan; Xu, Bing; Dai, Xing-xing; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-07-01

    The definition of critical quality attributes of Chinese materia medica ( CMM) was put forward based on the top-level design concept. Nowadays, coupled with the development of rapid analytical science, rapid assessment of critical quality attributes of CMM was firstly carried out, which was the secondary discipline branch of CMM. Taking near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as an example, which is a rapid analytical technology in pharmaceutical process over the past decade, systematic review is the chemometric parameters in NIR model evaluation. According to the characteristics of complexity of CMM and trace components analysis, a multi-source information fusion strategy of NIR model was developed for assessment of critical quality attributes of CMM. The strategy has provided guideline for NIR reliable analysis in critical quality attributes of CMM.

  17. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  18. A multidimensional strategy to detect polypharmacological targets in the absence of structural and sequence homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Jacob D; Amaro, Rommie E; Xie, Lei; Urbaniak, Michael D; Ferguson, Michael A J; Haapalainen, Antti; Chen, Zhijun; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Wunder, Frank; Bourne, Philip E; McCammon, J Andrew

    2010-01-22

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Polypharmacology, which focuses on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. The rational design of drugs that act via polypharmacological mechanisms can produce compounds that exhibit increased therapeutic potency and against which resistance is less likely to develop. Additionally, identifying multiple protein targets is also critical for side-effect prediction. One third of potential therapeutic compounds fail in clinical trials or are later removed from the market due to unacceptable side effects often caused by off-target binding. In the current work, we introduce a multidimensional strategy for the identification of secondary targets of known small-molecule inhibitors in the absence of global structural and sequence homology with the primary target protein. To demonstrate the utility of the strategy, we identify several targets of 4,5-dihydroxy-3-(1-naphthyldiazenyl)-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid, a known micromolar inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase 1. As it is capable of identifying potential secondary targets, the strategy described here may play a useful role in future efforts to reduce drug side effects and/or to increase polypharmacology.

  19. Different strategies for the detection of bioagents using electrochemical and photoelectrochemical genosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voccia, Diego; Bettazi, Francesca; Palchetti, Ilaria

    2015-10-01

    In recent years various kinds of biosensors for the detection of pathogens have been developed. A genosensor consists in the immobilization, onto the surface of a chosen transducer, of an oligonucleotide with a specific base sequence called capture probe. The complementary sequence (the analytical target, i.e. a specific sequence of the DNA/RNA of the pathogen) present in the sample is recognized and captured by the probe through the hybridization reaction. The evaluation of the extent of the hybridization allows one to confirm whether the sample contains the complementary sequence of the probe or not. Electrochemical transducers have received considerable attention in connection with the detection of DNA hybridization. Moreover, recently, with the emergence of novel photoelectrochemically active species and new detection schemes, photoelectrochemistry has resulted in substantial progress in its analytical performance for biosensing applications. In this paper, some examples of electrochemical genosensors for multiplexed pathogen detection are shown. Moreover, the preliminary experiments towards the development of a photoelectrochemical genosensor using a TiO2 - nanocrystal-modified ITO electrode are discussed.

  20. A net fishing enrichment strategy for colorimetric detection of E. coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strict regulatory requirements for pathogen monitoring in food systems to ensure safety demands that the detection method can recognize small numbers of pathogens. Although significant efforts on the development of biosensors have been reported with marked improvement in sensitivity, appropriate...

  1. Efficient strategy for detecting gene × gene joint action and its application in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Won, Sungho; Kwon, Min-Seok; Mattheisen, Manuel; Park, Suyeon; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke; Cichon, Sven; Ophoff, Roel; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Baur, Max; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofmann, A.; Lange, Christoph; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don H.; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new approach to detect gene × gene joint action in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for case-control designs. This approach offers an exhaustive search for all two-way joint action (including, as a special case, single gene action) that is computationally feasible at the

  2. Improved nonlinear fault detection strategy based on the Hellinger distance metric: Plug flow reactor monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-03-18

    Fault detection has a vital role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. This paper proposes an innovative multivariate fault detection method that can be used for monitoring nonlinear processes. The proposed method merges advantages of nonlinear projection to latent structures (NLPLS) modeling and those of Hellinger distance (HD) metric to identify abnormal changes in highly correlated multivariate data. Specifically, the HD is used to quantify the dissimilarity between current NLPLS-based residual and reference probability distributions obtained using fault-free data. Furthermore, to enhance further the robustness of these methods to measurement noise, and reduce the false alarms due to modeling errors, wavelet-based multiscale filtering of residuals is used before the application of the HD-based monitoring scheme. The performances of the developed NLPLS-HD fault detection technique is illustrated using simulated plug flow reactor data. The results show that the proposed method provides favorable performance for detection of faults compared to the conventional NLPLS method.

  3. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    2016-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including low-dose CT (FDG-PET) and three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) may have additional value. This paper reviews the role of these novel imaging tools in the field of PHV obstruction and endocarditis.For acquired PHV obstruction, MDCT is of additional value in mechanical PHVs to differentiate pannus from thrombus as well as to dynamically study leaflet motion and opening/closing angles. For biological PHV obstruction, additional imaging is not beneficial as it does not change patient management. When performed on top of 2D-TTE/TEE, MDCT has additional value for the detection of both vegetations and pseudoaneurysms/abscesses in PHV endocarditis. FDG-PET has no complementary value for the detection of vegetations; however, it appears more sensitive in the early detection of pseudoaneurysms/abscesses. Furthermore, FDG-PET enables the detection of metastatic and primary extra-cardiac infections. Evidence for the additional value of 3D-TEE is scarce.As clinical implications are major, clinicians should have a low threshold to perform additional MDCT in acquired mechanical PHV obstruction. For suspected PHV endocarditis, both FDG-PET and MDCT have complementary value.

  4. A review of analytical strategies for the detection of endogenous' steroid abuse in food production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarth, J.P.; Kay, J.; Teale, P.; Akre, C.; Bizec, le B.; Brabander, de H.F.; Vanhaecke, L.; Ginkel, van L.A.; Points, J.

    2012-01-01

    Detection of the abuse of synthetic steroids in food production is nowadays relatively straightforward using modern techniques such as gas or liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS or LC-MS/MS, respectively). However, proving the abuse of endogenous (or naturally occurring)

  5. NAIMA: target amplification strategy allowing quantitative on-chip detection of GMOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Dany; Dobnik, David; Hamels, Sandrine; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a novel multiplex quantitative DNA-based target amplification method suitable for sensitive, specific and quantitative detection on microarray. This new method named NASBA Implemented Microarray Analysis (NAIMA) was applied to GMO detection in food and feed, but its application can be extended to all fields of biology requiring simultaneous detection of low copy number DNA targets. In a first step, the use of tailed primers allows the multiplex synthesis of template DNAs in a primer extension reaction. A second step of the procedure consists of transcription-based amplification using universal primers. The cRNA product is further on directly ligated to fluorescent dyes labelled 3DNA dendrimers allowing signal amplification and hybridized without further purification on an oligonucleotide probe-based microarray for multiplex detection. Two triplex systems have been applied to test maize samples containing several transgenic lines, and NAIMA has shown to be sensitive down to two target copies and to provide quantitative data on the transgenic contents in a range of 0.1-25%. Performances of NAIMA are comparable to singleplex quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, NAIMA amplification is faster since 20 min are sufficient to achieve full amplification.

  6. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds from four ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Winker, D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2010-05-27

    Ground-based lidar and CALIOP datasets gathered over four mid-latitude sites, two US and two French sites, are used to evaluate the consistency of cloud macrophysical and optical property climatologies that can be derived by such datasets. The consistency in average cloud height (both base and top height) between the CALIOP and ground datasets ranges from -0.4km to +0.5km. The cloud geometrical thickness distributions vary significantly between the different datasets, due in part to the original vertical resolutions of the lidar profiles. Average cloud geometrical thicknesses vary from 1.2 to 1.9km, i.e. by more than 50%. Cloud optical thickness distributions in subvisible, semi-transparent and moderate intervals differ by more than 50% between ground and space-based datasets. The cirrus clouds with 2 optical thickness below 0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class. The differences in average cloud base altitude between ground and CALIOP datasets of 0.0-0.1 km, 0.0-0.2 km and 0.0-0.2 km can be attributed to irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without low-level clouds in ground-based data, respectively. The cloud geometrical thicknesses are not affected by irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, while up to 0.0-0.2 km and 0.1-0.3 km differences can be attributed to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without lowlevel clouds in ground-based data, respectively.

  7. Soil remediation: New strategy by the combine of F.I.S. H. and Geo-Radar Tele detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbi, C.; Mengs, G.; Gonzalez Motalvo, D.; Martin, M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important targets in bioremediation to treat contaminated soils is the developing of new technologies. In this project we have developed a new strategy to eliminate in situ pollutants from hydrocarbons contaminated soils, supported with two specific techniques: FISH and Geo-Radar tele detection. With these techniques we try to delimit the pollutants distribution is oil, and to develop DNA and PNA biosensors with high specificity to evaluate the natural attenuation soil capacity using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). (Author)

  8. Soil remediation: New strategy by the combine of F.I.S. H. and Geo-Radar Tele detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbi, C.; Mengs, G.; Gonzalez Motalvo, D.; Martin, M.

    2009-07-01

    One of the most important targets in bioremediation to treat contaminated soils is the developing of new technologies. In this project we have developed a new strategy to eliminate in situ pollutants from hydrocarbons contaminated soils, supported with two specific techniques: FISH and Geo-Radar tele detection. With these techniques we try to delimit the pollutants distribution is oil, and to develop DNA and PNA biosensors with high specificity to evaluate the natural attenuation soil capacity using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). (Author)

  9. Development of a variable structure-based fault detection and diagnosis strategy applied to an electromechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsden, S. Andrew; Kirubarajan, T.

    2017-05-01

    Signal processing techniques are prevalent in a wide range of fields: control, target tracking, telecommunications, robotics, fault detection and diagnosis, and even stock market analysis, to name a few. Although first introduced in the 1950s, the most popular method used for signal processing and state estimation remains the Kalman filter (KF). The KF offers an optimal solution to the estimation problem under strict assumptions. Since this time, a number of other estimation strategies and filters were introduced to overcome robustness issues, such as the smooth variable structure filter (SVSF). In this paper, properties of the SVSF are explored in an effort to detect and diagnosis faults in an electromechanical system. The results are compared with the KF method, and future work is discussed.

  10. Ground-based measurements of ionospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Daniel; Chum, Jaroslav

    2018-05-01

    Different methods are used to research and monitor the ionospheric dynamics using ground measurements: Digisonde Drift Measurements (DDM) and Continuous Doppler Sounding (CDS). For the first time, we present comparison between both methods on specific examples. Both methods provide information about the vertical drift velocity component. The DDM provides more information about the drift velocity vector and detected reflection points. However, the method is limited by the relatively low time resolution. In contrast, the strength of CDS is its high time resolution. The discussed methods can be used for real-time monitoring of medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances. We conclude that it is advantageous to use both methods simultaneously if possible. The CDS is then applied for the disturbance detection and analysis, and the DDM is applied for the reflection height control.

  11. Universal, colorimetric microRNA detection strategy based on target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonkyung; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kang, Shinyoung; Kim, Hansol; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we developed a novel, label-free, and enzyme-free strategy for the colorimetric detection of microRNA (miRNA), which relies on a target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement (TMSD) reaction. The system employs a detection probe that specifically binds to the target miRNA and sequentially releases a catalyst strand (CS) intended to trigger the subsequent TMSD reaction. Thus, the presence of target miRNA releases the CS that mediates the formation of an active G-quadruplex DNAzyme which is initially caged and inactivated by a blocker strand. In addition, a fuel strand that is supplemented for the recycling of the CS promotes another TMSD reaction, consequently generating a large number of active G-quadruplex DNAzymes. As a result, a distinct colorimetric signal is produced by the ABTS oxidation promoted by the peroxidase mimicking activity of the released G-quadruplex DNAzymes. Based on this novel strategy, we successfully detected miR-141, a promising biomarker for human prostate cancer, with high selectivity. The diagnostic capability of this system was also demonstrated by reliably determining target miR-141 in human serum, showing its great potential towards real clinical applications. Importantly, the proposed approach is composed of separate target recognition and signal transduction modules. Thus, it could be extended to analyze different target miRNAs by simply redesigning the detection probe while keeping the same signal transduction module as a universal signal amplification unit, which was successfully demonstrated by analyzing another target miRNA, let-7d.

  12. Developing optimal search strategies for detecting clinically sound prognostic studies in MEDLINE: an analytic survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes R Brian

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical end users of MEDLINE have a difficult time retrieving articles that are both scientifically sound and directly relevant to clinical practice. Search filters have been developed to assist end users in increasing the success of their searches. Many filters have been developed for the literature on therapy and reviews but little has been done in the area of prognosis. The objective of this study is to determine how well various methodologic textwords, Medical Subject Headings, and their Boolean combinations retrieve methodologically sound literature on the prognosis of health disorders in MEDLINE. Methods An analytic survey was conducted, comparing hand searches of journals with retrievals from MEDLINE for candidate search terms and combinations. Six research assistants read all issues of 161 journals for the publishing year 2000. All articles were rated using purpose and quality indicators and categorized into clinically relevant original studies, review articles, general papers, or case reports. The original and review articles were then categorized as 'pass' or 'fail' for methodologic rigor in the areas of prognosis and other clinical topics. Candidate search strategies were developed for prognosis and run in MEDLINE – the retrievals being compared with the hand search data. The sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the search strategies were calculated. Results 12% of studies classified as prognosis met basic criteria for scientific merit for testing clinical applications. Combinations of terms reached peak sensitivities of 90%. Compared with the best single term, multiple terms increased sensitivity for sound studies by 25.2% (absolute increase, and increased specificity, but by a much smaller amount (1.1% when sensitivity was maximized. Combining terms to optimize both sensitivity and specificity achieved sensitivities and specificities of approximately 83% for each. Conclusion Empirically derived

  13. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  14. Evaluation of Three Hydration Strategies in Detection Dogs Working in a Hot Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. Otto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity in hot environments can increase the risk of heat stress or heat stroke in dogs. Heat tolerance is influenced by acclimatization to the environment, physical fitness, and hydration state. Three common strategies to promote hydration in working dogs are free access to water (W, oral electrolyte solutions (OESs, and administration of subcutaneous fluids (SQs. None of these methods have been compared for safety or efficacy in a working environment. In a cross-over design, seven vehicle-screening canines were randomly assigned to each of the three hydration strategies during working shifts at the Sarita, TX checkpoint. Physical, behavioral, and biochemical parameters were collected before, during, and after a work shift (mean 5.7 ± 0.8 h. Dogs were given 10 mL/kg oral W, 10 mL/kg chicken flavored OES, or 15 mL/kg of SQs initially followed by controlled access to W or OES. The dogs drank 15.61 ± 4.47 mL/kg/h of W and OES when in the OES group, compared to 7.04 ± 3.42 and 5.56 ± 4.40 mL of W, for the W and SQ groups, respectively. The median environmental temperature was 84.8°F (29.3°C. The median humidity was 70%. Based on mixed effects linear modeling, dogs in the OES and SQ groups had significantly higher total CO2, and lower packed cell volume and total plasma protein at the end of the day. Creatinine increased a small but significant amount in the SQ group and decreased in the OES group. Searching behaviors were independent of hydration strategy but highly related to the dog specific factors of sex, breed, and activity level. Under conditions of controlled activity in moderate heat and humidity, dogs accustomed to the work and the environment were more likely to increase fluid consumption and hydration when provided a flavored OES. Potential benefits of OES and SQ were indirect and no adverse effects were documented for any of the hydration strategies tested.

  15. Growth hormone doping in sports: a critical review of use and detection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Gerhard P

    2012-04-01

    GH is believed to be widely employed in sports as a performance-enhancing substance. Its use in athletic competition is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, and athletes are required to submit to testing for GH exposure. Detection of GH doping is challenging for several reasons including identity/similarity of exogenous to endogenous GH, short half-life, complex and fluctuating secretory dynamics of GH, and a very low urinary excretion rate. The detection test currently in use (GH isoform test) exploits the difference between recombinant GH (pure 22K-GH) and the heterogeneous nature of endogenous GH (several isoforms). Its main limitation is the short window of opportunity for detection (~12-24 h after the last GH dose). A second test to be implemented soon (the biomarker test) is based on stimulation of IGF-I and collagen III synthesis by GH. It has a longer window of opportunity (1-2 wk) but is less specific and presents a variety of technical challenges. GH doping in a larger sense also includes doping with GH secretagogues and IGF-I and its analogs. The scientific evidence for the ergogenicity of GH is weak, a fact that is not widely appreciated in athletic circles or by the general public. Also insufficiently appreciated is the risk of serious health consequences associated with high-dose, prolonged GH use. This review discusses the GH biology relevant to GH doping; the virtues and limitations of detection tests in blood, urine, and saliva; secretagogue efficacy; IGF-I doping; and information about the effectiveness of GH as a performance-enhancing agent.

  16. One-Port Electronic Detection Strategies for Improving Sensitivity in Piezoelectric Resonant Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxu Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a one-port mechanical resonance detection scheme utilized on a piezoelectric thin film driven silicon circular diaphragm resonator and discusses the limitations to such an approach in degenerate mode mass detection sensors. The sensor utilizes degenerated vibration modes of a radial symmetrical microstructure thereby providing both a sense and reference mode allowing for minimization of environmental effects on performance. The circular diaphragm resonator was fabricated with thickness of 4.5 µm and diameter of 140 µm. A PZT thin film of 0.75 µm was patterned on the top surface for the purposes of excitation and vibration sensing. The device showed a resonant frequency of 5.8 MHz for the (1, 1 mode. An electronic interface circuit was designed to cancel out the large static and parasitic capacitance allowing for electrical detection of the mechanical vibration thereby enabling the frequency split between the sense and reference mode to be measured accurately. The extracted motional current, proportional to the vibration velocity, was fed back to the drive to effectively increase the Q factor, and therefore device sensitivity, by more than a factor of 8. A software phase-locked loop was implemented to automatically track the resonant frequencies to allow for faster and accurate resonance detection. Results showed that by utilizing the absolute mode frequencies as an indication of sensor temperature, the variation in sensor temperature due to the heating from the drive electronics was accounted for and led to an ultimate measurement sensitivity of 2.3 Hz.

  17. An empirical strategy to detect bacterial transcript structure from directional RNA-seq transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; MacKenzie, Keith D; White, Aaron P

    2015-05-07

    As sequencing costs are being lowered continuously, RNA-seq has gradually been adopted as the first choice for comparative transcriptome studies with bacteria. Unlike microarrays, RNA-seq can directly detect cDNA derived from mRNA transcripts at a single nucleotide resolution. Not only does this allow researchers to determine the absolute expression level of genes, but it also conveys information about transcript structure. Few automatic software tools have yet been established to investigate large-scale RNA-seq data for bacterial transcript structure analysis. In this study, 54 directional RNA-seq libraries from Salmonella serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) 14028s were examined for potential relationships between read mapping patterns and transcript structure. We developed an empirical method, combined with statistical tests, to automatically detect key transcript features, including transcriptional start sites (TSSs), transcriptional termination sites (TTSs) and operon organization. Using our method, we obtained 2,764 TSSs and 1,467 TTSs for 1331 and 844 different genes, respectively. Identification of TSSs facilitated further discrimination of 215 putative sigma 38 regulons and 863 potential sigma 70 regulons. Combining the TSSs and TTSs with intergenic distance and co-expression information, we comprehensively annotated the operon organization in S. Typhimurium 14028s. Our results show that directional RNA-seq can be used to detect transcriptional borders at an acceptable resolution of ±10-20 nucleotides. Technical limitations of the RNA-seq procedure may prevent single nucleotide resolution. The automatic transcript border detection methods, statistical models and operon organization pipeline that we have described could be widely applied to RNA-seq studies in other bacteria. Furthermore, the TSSs, TTSs, operons, promoters and unstranslated regions that we have defined for S. Typhimurium 14028s may constitute valuable resources that can be used for

  18. Detection of MPL mutations by a novel allele-specific PCR-based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Larissa V; Weigelin, Helmut C; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2013-11-01

    MPL mutation testing is recommended in patients with suspected primary myelofibrosis or essential thrombocythemia who lack the JAK2 V617F mutation. MPL mutations can occur at allelic levels below 15%, which may escape detection by commonly used mutation screening methods such as Sanger sequencing. We developed a novel multiplexed allele-specific PCR assay capable of detecting most recurrent MPL exon 10 mutations associated with primary myelofibrosis and essential thrombocythemia (W515L, W515K, W515A, and S505N) down to a sensitivity of 2.5% mutant allele. Test results were reviewed from 15 reference cases and 1380 consecutive specimens referred to our laboratory for testing. Assay performance was compared to Sanger sequencing across a series of 58 specimens with MPL mutations. Positive cases consisted of 45 with W515L, 6 with S505N, 5 with W515K, 1 with W515A, and 1 with both W515L and S505N. Seven cases had mutations below 5% that were undetected by Sanger sequencing. Ten additional cases had mutation levels between 5% and 15% that were not consistently detected by sequencing. All results were easily interpreted in the allele-specific test. This assay offers a sensitive and reliable solution for MPL mutation testing. Sanger sequencing appears insufficiently sensitive for robust MPL mutation detection. Our data also suggest the relative frequency of S505N mutations may be underestimated, highlighting the necessity for inclusion of this mutation in MPL test platforms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. One-Port Electronic Detection Strategies for Improving Sensitivity in Piezoelectric Resonant Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongxu; Hedley, John; Keegan, Neil; Spoors, Julia; Gallacher, Barry; McNeil, Calum

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a one-port mechanical resonance detection scheme utilized on a piezoelectric thin film driven silicon circular diaphragm resonator and discusses the limitations to such an approach in degenerate mode mass detection sensors. The sensor utilizes degenerated vibration modes of a radial symmetrical microstructure thereby providing both a sense and reference mode allowing for minimization of environmental effects on performance. The circular diaphragm resonator was fabricated with thickness of 4.5 µm and diameter of 140 µm. A PZT thin film of 0.75 µm was patterned on the top surface for the purposes of excitation and vibration sensing. The device showed a resonant frequency of 5.8 MHz for the (1, 1) mode. An electronic interface circuit was designed to cancel out the large static and parasitic capacitance allowing for electrical detection of the mechanical vibration thereby enabling the frequency split between the sense and reference mode to be measured accurately. The extracted motional current, proportional to the vibration velocity, was fed back to the drive to effectively increase the Q factor, and therefore device sensitivity, by more than a factor of 8. A software phase-locked loop was implemented to automatically track the resonant frequencies to allow for faster and accurate resonance detection. Results showed that by utilizing the absolute mode frequencies as an indication of sensor temperature, the variation in sensor temperature due to the heating from the drive electronics was accounted for and led to an ultimate measurement sensitivity of 2.3 Hz. PMID:27792154

  20. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10 –9 to 10 –7 Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  1. Evaluating Monitoring Strategies to Detect Precipitation-Induced Microbial Contamination Events in Karstic Springs Used for Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Besmer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of microbial drinking water quality is a key component for ensuring safety and understanding risk, but conventional monitoring strategies are typically based on low sampling frequencies (e.g., quarterly or monthly. This is of concern because many drinking water sources, such as karstic springs are often subject to changes in bacterial concentrations on much shorter time scales (e.g., hours to days, for example after precipitation events. Microbial contamination events are crucial from a risk assessment perspective and should therefore be targeted by monitoring strategies to establish both the frequency of their occurrence and the magnitude of bacterial peak concentrations. In this study we used monitoring data from two specific karstic springs. We assessed the performance of conventional monitoring based on historical records and tested a number of alternative strategies based on a high-resolution data set of bacterial concentrations in spring water collected with online flow cytometry (FCM. We quantified the effect of increasing sampling frequency and found that for the specific case studied, at least bi-weekly sampling would be needed to detect precipitation events with a probability of >90%. We then proposed an optimized monitoring strategy with three targeted samples per event, triggered by precipitation measurements. This approach is more effective and efficient than simply increasing overall sampling frequency. It would enable the water utility to (1 analyze any relevant event and (2 limit median underestimation of peak concentrations to approximately 10%. We conclude with a generalized perspective on sampling optimization and argue that the assessment of short-term dynamics causing microbial peak loads initially requires increased sampling/analysis efforts, but can be optimized subsequently to account for limited resources. This offers water utilities and public health authorities systematic ways to evaluate and optimize their

  2. Strategies for detection of transfusion-transmitted viruses eluding identification by conventional serologic tests. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.

    1983-01-01

    The unavailability of serological tests for detection of several not yet characterized infectious agents transmitted by blood transfusion or by blood products prompted the development of alternative tests based on utilization of labeled nucleic acid probes specific for genomes of each of these agents. The prerequisite for the preparation of such probes is the demonstration in human plasma of nucleic acid sequences distinct from those present in host DNA or in genes of already characterized viruses occurring in plasma of infected individuals. To accomplish this, ultrasensitive tests for nucleic acids not dependent on their base sequence are needed. The authors describe a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for picogram quantities of DNA. Plasma (serum) specimens are treated with proteinase K in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and extracted with phenol. Nucleic acids are precipitated with ethanol in the presence of dextran (mol.wt. approx. 5X10 5 ) as carrier. Subsequently, DNA from the redissolved samples is adsorbed onto polylysine-coated wells of microtiter plates and detected by a double-antibody RIA using anti-DNA autoantibodies from NZB/NZW mice and 125 I-labelled antibodies to mouse immunoglobulins. DNA which did not hybridize with human DNA was detected by this method in sera containing hepatitis B virus used as a model system. (Auth.)

  3. A sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for ATP detection based on exonuclease III-assisted signal amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ting; Shu, Huawei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-03-03

    A target-induced structure-switching electrochemical aptasensor for sensitive detection of ATP was successfully constructed which was based on exonuclease III-catalyzed target recycling for signal amplification. With the existence of ATP, methylene blue (MB) labeled hairpin DNA formed G-quadruplex with ATP, which led to conformational changes of the hairpin DNA and created catalytic cleavage sites for exonuclease III (Exo III). Then the structure-switching DNA hybridized with capture DNA which made MB close to electrode surface. Meanwhile, Exo III selectively digested aptamer from its 3'-end, thus G-quadruplex structure was destroyed and ATP was released for target recycling. The Exo III-assisted target recycling amplified electrochemical signal significantly. Fluorescence experiment was performed to confirm the structure-switching process of the hairpin DNA. In fluorescence experiment, AuNPs-aptamer conjugates were synthesized, AuNPs quenched fluorescence of MB, the target-induced structure-switching made Exo III digested aptamer, which restored fluorescence. Under optimized conditions, the proposed aptasensor showed a linear range of 0.1-20 nM with a detection limit of 34 pM. In addition, the proposed aptasensor had good stability and selectivity, offered promising choice for the detection of other small molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. IVS Combination Center at BKG - Robust Outlier Detection and Weighting Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; Lösler, M.

    2012-12-01

    Outlier detection plays an important role within the IVS combination. Even if the original data is the same for all contributing Analysis Centers (AC), the analyzed data shows differences due to analysis software characteristics. The treatment of outliers is thus a fine line between keeping data heterogeneity and elimination of real outliers. Robust outlier detection based on the Least Median Square (LMS) is used within the IVS combination. This method allows reliable outlier detection with a small number of input parameters. A similar problem arises for the weighting of the individual solutions within the combination process. The variance component estimation (VCE) is used to control the weighting factor for each AC. The Operator-Software-Impact (OSI) method takes into account that the analyzed data is strongly influenced by the software and the responsible operator. It allows to make the VCE more sensitive to the diverse input data. This method has already been set up within GNSS data analysis as well as the analysis of troposphere data. The benefit of an OSI realization within the VLBI combination and its potential in weighting factor determination has not been investigated before.

  5. A New Strategy to Reduce Influenza Escape: Detecting Therapeutic Targets Constituted of Invariance Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenicity of the different flu species is a real public health problem worldwide. To combat this scourge, we established a method to detect drug targets, reducing the possibility of escape. Besides being able to attach a drug candidate, these targets should have the main characteristic of being part of an essential viral function. The invariance groups that are sets of residues bearing an essential function can be detected genetically. They consist of invariant and synthetic lethal residues (interdependent residues not varying or slightly varying when together. We analyzed an alignment of more than 10,000 hemagglutinin sequences of influenza to detect six invariance groups, close in space, and on the protein surface. In parallel we identified five potential pockets on the surface of hemagglutinin. By combining these results, three potential binding sites were determined that are composed of invariance groups located respectively in the vestigial esterase domain, in the bottom of the stem and in the fusion area. The latter target is constituted of residues involved in the spring-loaded mechanism, an essential step in the fusion process. We propose a model describing how this potential target could block the reorganization of the hemagglutinin HA2 secondary structure and prevent viral entry into the host cell.

  6. Optimizing detection of noble gas emission at a former UNE site: sample strategy, collection, and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, R.; Olsen, K.; Hayes, J. C.; Emer, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests may be first detected by seismic or air samplers operated by the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization). After initial detection of a suspicious event, member nations may call for an On-Site Inspection (OSI) that in part, will sample for localized releases of radioactive noble gases and particles. Although much of the commercially available equipment and methods used for surface and subsurface environmental sampling of gases can be used for an OSI scenario, on-site sampling conditions, required sampling volumes and establishment of background concentrations of noble gases require development of specialized methodologies. To facilitate development of sampling equipment and methodologies that address OSI sampling volume and detection objectives, and to collect information required for model development, a field test site was created at a former underground nuclear explosion site located in welded volcanic tuff. A mixture of SF-6, Xe127 and Ar37 was metered into 4400 m3 of air as it was injected into the top region of the UNE cavity. These tracers were expected to move towards the surface primarily in response to barometric pumping or through delayed cavity pressurization (accelerated transport to minimize source decay time). Sampling approaches compared during the field exercise included sampling at the soil surface, inside surface fractures, and at soil vapor extraction points at depths down to 2 m. Effectiveness of various sampling approaches and the results of tracer gas measurements will be presented.

  7. Development and validation of an integrated DNA walking strategy to detect GMO expressing cry genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Vandamme, Julie; Herman, Philippe; Roosens, Nancy H C

    2018-06-27

    Recently, an integrated DNA walking strategy has been proposed to prove the presence of GMO via the characterisation of sequences of interest, including their transgene flanking regions and the unnatural associations of elements in their transgenic cassettes. To this end, the p35S, tNOS and t35S pCAMBIA elements have been selected as key targets, allowing the coverage of most of GMO, EU authorized or not. In the present study, a bidirectional DNA walking method anchored on the CryAb/c genes is proposed with the aim to cover additional GMO and additional sequences of interest. The performance of the proposed bidirectional DNA walking method anchored on the CryAb/c genes has been evaluated in a first time for its feasibility using several GM events possessing these CryAb/c genes. Afterwards, its sensitivity has been investigated through low concentrations of targets (as low as 20 HGE). In addition, to illustrate its applicability, the entire workflow has been tested on a sample mimicking food/feed matrices analysed in GMO routine analysis. Given the successful assessment of its performance, the present bidirectional DNA walking method anchored on the CryAb/c genes can easily be implemented in GMO routine analysis by the enforcement laboratories and allows completing the entire DNA walking strategy in targeting an additional transgenic element frequently found in GMO.

  8. Threshold-selecting strategy for best possible ground state detection with genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lässig, Jörg; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2009-04-01

    Genetic algorithms are a standard heuristic to find states of low energy in complex state spaces as given by physical systems such as spin glasses but also in combinatorial optimization. The paper considers the problem of selecting individuals in the current population in genetic algorithms for crossover. Many schemes have been considered in literature as possible crossover selection strategies. We show for a large class of quality measures that the best possible probability distribution for selecting individuals in each generation of the algorithm execution is a rectangular distribution over the individuals sorted by their energy values. This means uniform probabilities have to be assigned to a group of the individuals with lowest energy in the population but probabilities equal to zero to individuals which are corresponding to energy values higher than a fixed cutoff, which is equal to a certain rank in the vector sorted by the energy of the states in the current population. The considered strategy is dubbed threshold selecting. The proof applies basic arguments of Markov chains and linear optimization and makes only a few assumptions on the underlying principles and hence applies to a large class of algorithms.

  9. Event detection and exception handling strategies in the ASDEX Upgrade discharge control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treutterer, W.; Neu, G.; Rapson, C.; Raupp, G.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Event detection and exception handling is integrated in control system architecture. •Pulse control with local exception handling and pulse supervision with central exception handling are strictly separated. •Local exception handling limits the effect of an exception to a minimal part of the controlled system. •Central Exception Handling solves problems requiring coordinated action of multiple control components. -- Abstract: Thermonuclear plasmas are governed by nonlinear characteristics: plasma operation can be classified into scenarios with pronounced features like L and H-mode, ELMs or MHD activity. Transitions between them may be treated as events. Similarly, technical systems are also subject to events such as failure of measurement sensors, actuator saturation or violation of machine and plant operation limits. Such situations often are handled with a mixture of pulse abortion and iteratively improved pulse schedule reference programming. In case of protection-relevant events, however, the complexity of even a medium-sized device as ASDEX Upgrade requires a sophisticated and coordinated shutdown procedure rather than a simple stop of the pulse. The detection of events and their intelligent handling by the control system has been shown to be valuable also in terms of saving experiment time and cost. This paper outlines how ASDEX Upgrade's discharge control system (DCS) detects events and handles exceptions in two stages: locally and centrally. The goal of local exception handling is to limit the effect of an unexpected or asynchronous event to a minimal part of the controlled system. Thus, local exception handling facilitates robustness to failures but keeps the decision structures lean. A central state machine deals with exceptions requiring coordinated action of multiple control components. DCS implements the state machine by means of pulse schedule segments containing pre-programmed waveforms to define discharge goal and control

  10. Event detection and exception handling strategies in the ASDEX Upgrade discharge control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treutterer, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Treutterer@ipp.mpg.de; Neu, G.; Rapson, C.; Raupp, G.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Event detection and exception handling is integrated in control system architecture. •Pulse control with local exception handling and pulse supervision with central exception handling are strictly separated. •Local exception handling limits the effect of an exception to a minimal part of the controlled system. •Central Exception Handling solves problems requiring coordinated action of multiple control components. -- Abstract: Thermonuclear plasmas are governed by nonlinear characteristics: plasma operation can be classified into scenarios with pronounced features like L and H-mode, ELMs or MHD activity. Transitions between them may be treated as events. Similarly, technical systems are also subject to events such as failure of measurement sensors, actuator saturation or violation of machine and plant operation limits. Such situations often are handled with a mixture of pulse abortion and iteratively improved pulse schedule reference programming. In case of protection-relevant events, however, the complexity of even a medium-sized device as ASDEX Upgrade requires a sophisticated and coordinated shutdown procedure rather than a simple stop of the pulse. The detection of events and their intelligent handling by the control system has been shown to be valuable also in terms of saving experiment time and cost. This paper outlines how ASDEX Upgrade's discharge control system (DCS) detects events and handles exceptions in two stages: locally and centrally. The goal of local exception handling is to limit the effect of an unexpected or asynchronous event to a minimal part of the controlled system. Thus, local exception handling facilitates robustness to failures but keeps the decision structures lean. A central state machine deals with exceptions requiring coordinated action of multiple control components. DCS implements the state machine by means of pulse schedule segments containing pre-programmed waveforms to define discharge goal and control

  11. A Dynamic Model for the Evaluation of Aircraft Engine Icing Detection and Control-Based Mitigation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Donald L.; Rinehart, Aidan W.; Jones, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Aircraft flying in regions of high ice crystal concentrations are susceptible to the buildup of ice within the compression system of their gas turbine engines. This ice buildup can restrict engine airflow and cause an uncommanded loss of thrust, also known as engine rollback, which poses a potential safety hazard. The aviation community is conducting research to understand this phenomena, and to identify avoidance and mitigation strategies to address the concern. To support this research, a dynamic turbofan engine model has been created to enable the development and evaluation of engine icing detection and control-based mitigation strategies. This model captures the dynamic engine response due to high ice water ingestion and the buildup of ice blockage in the engines low pressure compressor. It includes a fuel control system allowing engine closed-loop control effects during engine icing events to be emulated. The model also includes bleed air valve and horsepower extraction actuators that, when modulated, change overall engine operating performance. This system-level model has been developed and compared against test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine undergoing engine icing studies in an altitude test facility and also against outputs from the manufacturers customer deck. This paper will describe the model and show results of its dynamic response under open-loop and closed-loop control operating scenarios in the presence of ice blockage buildup compared against engine test cell data. Planned follow-on use of the model for the development and evaluation of icing detection and control-based mitigation strategies will also be discussed. The intent is to combine the model and control mitigation logic with an engine icing risk calculation tool capable of predicting the risk of engine icing based on current operating conditions. Upon detection of an operating region of risk for engine icing events, the control mitigation logic will seek to change the

  12. A study of redundancy management strategy for tetrad strap-down inertial systems. [error detection codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Schmidt, S. F.; Carestia, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms were developed that attempt to identify which sensor in a tetrad configuration has experienced a step failure. An algorithm is also described that provides a measure of the confidence with which the correct identification was made. Experimental results are presented from real-time tests conducted on a three-axis motion facility utilizing an ortho-skew tetrad strapdown inertial sensor package. The effects of prediction errors and of quantization on correct failure identification are discussed as well as an algorithm for detecting second failures through prediction.

  13. Comparison of fecal pooling strategies for detection of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, S L B; Ritter, C; Dohoo, I; Keefe, G P; Barkema, H W

    2018-05-23

    In herds with typical moderate to low within-herd prevalence, testing for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the infectious agent of Johne's disease, will be more cost-effective if individual fecal samples are cultured in composite pools. However, sensitivity to classify a pool containing 1 or more positive individual samples as positive may depend on pool size and number of individual positive samples within a pool. Fecal samples collected from 994 dairy cows sampled at slaughter were cultured to detect MAP. Culturing was done both individually and as composite pooled samples using the TREK ESP Culture System II broth medium (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Trek Diagnostic Systems Inc., Cleveland, OH). Composite samples consisted of pools containing feces from 3, 5, 8, 10, or 15 cows. The number of individual fecal culture-positive cows within each pool ranged from 0 to 4. Culture of individual fecal samples detected MAP in 36 (3.6%) of the 994 cows. Individual samples that were detected within the first 50 d by TREK ESP Culture System II were more likely to lead to a positive pool result. In total, 840 pooled fecal samples were examined for presence of MAP, and of those, 272 pools actually contained feces from fecal culture-positive cows. The crude sensitivity (proportion of pools that contained at least 1 fecal-positive cow that tested positive) for pools of 3, 5, 8, 10, and 15 was 47, 67, 44, 59, and 39%, respectively. Across pools, an increase of the number of fecal culture-positive samples from 1 to 2 enhanced overall crude sensitivity from 44 to 71%. However, sensitivity did not further increase for pools with 3 or 4 fecal culture-positive samples (63 and 60%, respectively). Additionally, a simulation analysis assessing probability of pooled fecal samples being positive in herds of 50 and 100 cows was conducted. The simulation assumed that 1, 2, or 5 cows per herd were MAP fecal culture-positive and that pools of 5 and 10 were used. This low

  14. Sample preparation strategies for food and biological samples prior to nanoparticle detection and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Löschner, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) proved to be necessary for trouble shooting of results obtained from AFFF-LS-ICP-MS. Aqueous and enzymatic extraction strategies were tested for thorough sample preparation aiming at degrading the sample matrix and to liberate the AgNPs from chicken meat into liquid suspension. The resulting...... AFFF-ICP-MS fractograms, which corresponded to the enzymatic digests, showed a major nano-peak (about 80 % recovery of AgNPs spiked to the meat) plus new smaller peaks that eluted close to the void volume of the fractograms. Small, but significant shifts in retention time of AFFF peaks were observed...... for the meat sample extracts and the corresponding neat AgNP suspension, and rendered sizing by way of calibration with AgNPs as sizing standards inaccurate. In order to gain further insight into the sizes of the separated AgNPs, or their possible dissolved state, fractions of the AFFF eluate were collected...

  15. A plasmonic colorimetric strategy for visual miRNA detection based on hybridization chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jie; Wang, Jingsheng; Guo, Jinyang; Gao, Huiguang; Han, Kun; Jiang, Chengmin; Miao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a novel colorimetric strategy for miRNA analysis is proposed based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-mediated localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) variation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). miRNA in the sample to be tested is able to release HCR initiator from a solid interface to AgNPs colloid system by toehold exchange-mediated strand displacement, which then triggers the consumption of fuel strands with single-stranded tails for HCR. The final produced long nicked double-stranded DNA loses the ability to protect AgNPs from salt-induced aggregation. The stability variation of the colloid system can then be monitored by recording corresponding UV-vis spectrum and initial miRNA level is thus determined. This sensing system involves only four DNA strands which is quite simple. The practical utility is confirmed to be excellent by employing different biological samples.

  16. Modeling ground-based timber harvesting systems using computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux

    2001-01-01

    Modeling ground-based timber harvesting systems with an object-oriented methodology was investigated. Object-oriented modeling and design promote a better understanding of requirements, cleaner designs, and better maintainability of the harvesting simulation system. The model developed simulates chainsaw felling, drive-to-tree feller-buncher, swing-to-tree single-grip...

  17. The COROT ground-based archive and access system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, E.; González-Riestra, R.; Catala, C.; Baglin, A.

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of the COROT ground-based archive and access system is presented here. The system has been developed at LAEFF and it is based on the experience gained at Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental (LAEFF) with the INES (IUE Newly Extracted System) Archive.

  18. Detecting epileptic seizure with different feature extracting strategies using robust machine learning classification techniques by applying advance parameter optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Lal

    2018-06-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder produced due to abnormal excitability of neurons in the brain. The research reveals that brain activity is monitored through electroencephalogram (EEG) of patients suffered from seizure to detect the epileptic seizure. The performance of EEG detection based epilepsy require feature extracting strategies. In this research, we have extracted varying features extracting strategies based on time and frequency domain characteristics, nonlinear, wavelet based entropy and few statistical features. A deeper study was undertaken using novel machine learning classifiers by considering multiple factors. The support vector machine kernels are evaluated based on multiclass kernel and box constraint level. Likewise, for K-nearest neighbors (KNN), we computed the different distance metrics, Neighbor weights and Neighbors. Similarly, the decision trees we tuned the paramours based on maximum splits and split criteria and ensemble classifiers are evaluated based on different ensemble methods and learning rate. For training/testing tenfold Cross validation was employed and performance was evaluated in form of TPR, NPR, PPV, accuracy and AUC. In this research, a deeper analysis approach was performed using diverse features extracting strategies using robust machine learning classifiers with more advanced optimal options. Support Vector Machine linear kernel and KNN with City block distance metric give the overall highest accuracy of 99.5% which was higher than using the default parameters for these classifiers. Moreover, highest separation (AUC = 0.9991, 0.9990) were obtained at different kernel scales using SVM. Additionally, the K-nearest neighbors with inverse squared distance weight give higher performance at different Neighbors. Moreover, to distinguish the postictal heart rate oscillations from epileptic ictal subjects, and highest performance of 100% was obtained using different machine learning classifiers.

  19. Detecting and Responding to a Dengue Outbreak: Evaluation of Existing Strategies in Country Outbreak Response Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Harrington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dengue outbreaks are occurring with increasing frequency and intensity. Evidence-based epidemic preparedness and effective response are now a matter of urgency. Therefore, we have analysed national and municipal dengue outbreak response plans. Methods. Thirteen country plans from Asia, Latin America and Australia, and one international plan were obtained from the World Health Organization. The information was transferred to a data analysis matrix where information was extracted according to predefined and emerging themes and analysed for scope, inconsistencies, omissions, and usefulness. Findings. Outbreak response planning currently has a considerable number of flaws. Outbreak governance was weak with a lack of clarity of stakeholder roles. Late timing of responses due to poor surveillance, a lack of combining routine data with additional alerts, and lack of triggers for initiating the response weakened the functionality of plans. Frequently an outbreak was not defined, and early response mechanisms based on alert signals were neglected. There was a distinct lack of consideration of contextual influences which can affect how an outbreak detection and response is managed. Conclusion. A model contingency plan for dengue outbreak prediction, detection, and response may help national disease control authorities to develop their own more detailed and functional context specific plans.

  20. Efficient strategy for detecting gene × gene joint action and its application in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sungho; Kwon, Min-Seok; Mattheisen, Manuel; Park, Suyeon; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke; Cichon, Sven; Ophoff, Roel; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Baur, Max; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofmann, A; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new approach to detect gene × gene joint action in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for case-control designs. This approach offers an exhaustive search for all two-way joint action (including, as a special case, single gene action) that is computationally feasible at the genome-wide level and has reasonable statistical power under most genetic models. We found that the presence of any gene × gene joint action may imply differences in three types of genetic components: the minor allele frequencies and the amounts of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium may differ between cases and controls, and between the two genetic loci the degree of linkage disequilibrium may differ between cases and controls. Using Fisher's method, it is possible to combine the different sources of genetic information in an overall test for detecting gene × gene joint action. The proposed statistical analysis is efficient and its simplicity makes it applicable to GWASs. In the current study, we applied the proposed approach to a GWAS on schizophrenia and found several potential gene × gene interactions. Our application illustrates the practical advantage of the proposed method. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. A dimension reduction strategy for improving the efficiency of computer-aided detection for CT colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Wang, Huafeng; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2013-02-01

    Various types of features, e.g., geometric features, texture features, projection features etc., have been introduced for polyp detection and differentiation tasks via computer aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) for computed tomography colonography (CTC). Although these features together cover more information of the data, some of them are statistically highly-related to others, which made the feature set redundant and burdened the computation task of CAD. In this paper, we proposed a new dimension reduction method which combines hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) for false positives (FPs) reduction task. First, we group all the features based on their similarity using hierarchical clustering, and then PCA is employed within each group. Different numbers of principal components are selected from each group to form the final feature set. Support vector machine is used to perform the classification. The results show that when three principal components were chosen from each group we can achieve an area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics of 0.905, which is as high as the original dataset. Meanwhile, the computation time is reduced by 70% and the feature set size is reduce by 77%. It can be concluded that the proposed method captures the most important information of the feature set and the classification accuracy is not affected after the dimension reduction. The result is promising and further investigation, such as automatically threshold setting, are worthwhile and are under progress.

  2. Strategies for improving early detection and diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane PA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pearse A Keane,1 Gabriella de Salvo,2 Dawn A Sim,1 Srini Goverdhan,2 Rupesh Agrawal,1 Adnan Tufail1 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: Treatment of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD has been revolutionized by the introduction of such agents as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. As a result, the incidence of legal blindness occurring secondary to AMD has fallen dramatically in recent years in many countries. While these agents have undoubtedly been successful in reducing visual impairment and blindness, patients with neovascular AMD typically lose some vision over time, and often lose the ability to read, drive, or perform other important activities of daily living. Efforts are therefore under way to develop strategies that allow for earlier detection and treatment of this disease. In this review, we begin by providing an overview of the rationale for, and the benefits of, early detection and treatment of neovascular AMD. To achieve this, we begin by providing an overview of the pathophysiology and natural history of choroidal neovascularization, before reviewing the evidence from both clinical trials and “real-world” outcome studies. We continue by highlighting an area that is often overlooked: the importance of patient education and awareness for early AMD detection. We conclude the review by reviewing an array of both established and emerging technologies for early detection of choroidal neovascularization, ranging from Amsler chart testing, to hyperacuity testing, to advanced imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography. Keywords: Amsler, detection, choroidal neovascularization, hyperacuity, optical coherence tomography

  3. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive microRNA detection based on isothermal exponential amplification and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hou, Ting; Wu, Min; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in many biological processes, and have been regarded as potential targets and biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Also, to meet the big challenge imposed by the characteristics of miRNAs, such as small size and vulnerability to enzymatic digestion, it is of great importance to develop accurate, sensitive and simple miRNA assays. Herein, we developed a label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive miRNA detection by combining isothermal exponential amplification and the unique features of SYBR Green I (SG) and graphene oxide (GO), in which SG gives significantly enhanced fluorescence upon intercalation into double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs), and GO selectively adsorbs miRNA, single-stranded DNA and SG, to protect miRNA from enzymatic digestion, and to quench the fluorescence of the adsorbed SG. In the presence of the target miRNA, the ingeniously designed hairpin probe (HP) is unfolded and the subsequent polymerization and strand displacement reaction takes place to initiate the target recycling process. The newly formed dsDNAs are then recognized and cleaved by the nicking enzyme, generating new DNA triggers with the same sequence as the target miRNA, which hybridize with intact HPs to initiate new extension reactions. As a result, the circular exponential amplification for target miRNA is achieved and large amount of dsDNAs are formed to generate significantly enhanced fluorescence upon the intercalation of SG. Thus sensitive and selective fluorescence miRNA detection is realized, and the detection limit of 3 fM is obtained. Besides, this method exhibits additional advantages of simplicity and low cost, since expensive and tedious labeling process is avoided. Therefore, the as-proposed label-free fluorescence strategy has great potential in the applications in miRNA-related clinical practices and biochemical researches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.

  5. Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  6. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2005-09-20

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  7. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2007-09-25

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  8. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

    2011-09-13

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  9. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.; Sandoval, Marisa N.

    2011-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  10. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  11. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F [Editor

    2010-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  12. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

    2006-09-19

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  13. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2010-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  14. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  15. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  16. Selective and Sensitive Detection of Cyanide Based on the Displacement Strategy Using a Water-Soluble Fluorescent Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ming; Hao, Yuanqiang; Wang, Zhaoyang; Han, Guo-Cheng; Qu, Lingbo

    2016-01-01

    A water-soluble fluorescent probe (C-GGH) was used for the highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide (CN−) in aqueous media based on the displacement strategy. Due to the presence of the recognition unit GGH (Gly-Gly-His), the probe C-GGH can coordinate with Cu2+ and consequently display ON-OFF type fluorescence response. Furthermore, the in situ formed nonfluorescent C-GGH-Cu2+ complex can act as an effective OFF-ON type fluorescent probe for sensing CN− anion. Due to the strong binding affinity of CN− to Cu2+, CN− can extract Cu2+ from C-GGH-Cu2+ complex, leading to the release of C-GGH and the recovery of fluorescent emission of the system. The probe C-GGH-Cu2+ allowed detection of CN− in aqueous solution with a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.017 μmol/L which is much lower than the maximum contaminant level (1.9 μmol/L) for CN− in drinking water set by the WHO (World Health Organization). The probe also displayed excellent specificity for CN− towards other anions, including F−, Cl−, Br−, I−, SCN−, PO4 3−, N3 −, NO3 −, AcO−, SO4 2−, and CO3 2−. PMID:26881185

  17. Selective and Sensitive Detection of Cyanide Based on the Displacement Strategy Using a Water-Soluble Fluorescent Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming La

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble fluorescent probe (C-GGH was used for the highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide (CN− in aqueous media based on the displacement strategy. Due to the presence of the recognition unit GGH (Gly-Gly-His, the probe C-GGH can coordinate with Cu2+ and consequently display ON-OFF type fluorescence response. Furthermore, the in situ formed nonfluorescent C-GGH-Cu2+ complex can act as an effective OFF-ON type fluorescent probe for sensing CN− anion. Due to the strong binding affinity of CN− to Cu2+, CN− can extract Cu2+ from C-GGH-Cu2+ complex, leading to the release of C-GGH and the recovery of fluorescent emission of the system. The probe C-GGH-Cu2+ allowed detection of CN− in aqueous solution with a LOD (limit of detection of 0.017 μmol/L which is much lower than the maximum contaminant level (1.9 μmol/L for CN− in drinking water set by the WHO (World Health Organization. The probe also displayed excellent specificity for CN− towards other anions, including F−, Cl−, Br−, I−, SCN−, PO43-, N3-, NO3-, AcO−, SO42-, and CO32-.

  18. Establishment of a universal and rational gene detection strategy through three-way junction-based remote transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yidan; Lu, Baiyang; Zhu, Zhentong; Li, Bingling

    2018-01-21

    The polymerase chain reaction and many isothermal amplifications are able to achieve super gene amplification. Unfortunately, most commonly-used transduction methods, such as dye staining and Taqman-like probing, still suffer from shortcomings including false signals or difficult probe design, or are incompatible with multi-analysis. Here a universal and rational gene detection strategy has been established by translating isothermal amplicons to enzyme-free strand displacement circuits via three-way junction-based remote transduction. An assistant transduction probe was imported to form a partial hybrid with the target single-stranded nucleic acid. After systematic optimization the hybrid could serve as an associative trigger to activate a downstream circuit detector via a strand displacement reaction across the three-way junction. By doing so, the detection selectivity can be double-guaranteed through both amplicon-transducer recognition and the amplicon-circuit reaction. A well-optimized circuit can be immediately applied to a new target detection through simply displacing only 10-12 nt on only one component, according to the target. More importantly, this property for the first time enables multi-analysis and logic-analysis in a single reaction, sharing a single fluorescence reporter. In an applicable model, trace amounts of Cronobacter and Enterobacteria genes have been clearly distinguished from samples with no bacteria or one bacterium, with ultra-high sensitivity and selectivity.

  19. 2D Hybrid Nanomaterials for Selective Detection of NO2 and SO2 Using "Light On and Off" Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aimin; Liu, Rui; Peng, Xiao; Chen, Qiaofen; Wu, Jianmin

    2017-10-25

    In order to distinguish NO 2 and SO 2 gas with one sensor, we designed a paper chip assembled with a 2D g-C 3 N 4 /rGO stacking hybrid fabricated via a layer-by-layer self-assembly approach. The g-C 3 N 4 /rGO hybrid exhibited a remarkable photoelectric property due to the construction of a van der Waals heterostructure. For the first time, we have been able to selectively detect NO 2 and SO 2 gas using a "light on and off" strategy. Under the "light off" condition, the g-C 3 N 4 /rGO sensor exhibited a p-type semiconducting behavior with a low detection limit of 100 ppb of NO 2 , but with no response toward SO 2 . In contrast, the sensor showed n-type semiconducting behavior which could detect SO 2 at concentration as low as 2 ppm under UV light irradiation. The effective electron transfer among the 2D structure of g-C 3 N 4 and rGO nanosheets as well as highly porous structures could play an important role in gas sensing. The different sensing mechanisms at "light on and off" circumstances were also investigated in detail.

  20. Comparing the outcomes of two strategies for colorectal tumor detection: policy-promoted screening program versus health promotion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Min; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Chang, Hung-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Hung; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Shih, Chia-Hui

    2013-06-01

    The Taiwanese government has proposed a population-based colorectal tumor detection program for the average-risk population. This study's objectives were to understand the outcomes of these screening policies and to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. We compared two databases compiled in one medical center. The "policy-promoted cancer screening" (PPS) database was built on the basis of the policy of the Taiwan Bureau of National Health Insurance for cancer screening. The "health promotion service" (HPS) database was built to provide health check-ups for self-paid volunteers. Both the PPS and HPS databases employ the immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) and colonoscopy for colorectal tumor screening using different strategies. A comparison of outcomes between the PPS and HPS included: (1) quality indicators-compliance rate, cecum reaching rate, and tumor detection rate; and (2) validity indicators-sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for detecting colorectal neoplasms. A total of 10,563 and 1481 individuals were enrolled in PPS and HPS, respectively. Among quality indicators, there was no statistically significant difference in the cecum reaching rate between PPS and HPS. The compliance rates were 56.1% for PPS and 91.8% for HPS (p performance. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Extraction and Refinement Strategy for Detection of Autism in 18-Month-Olds: A Guarantee of Higher Sensitivity and Specificity in the Process of Mass Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hideo; Shimizu, Yasuo; Nitto, Yukari; Imai, Miho; Ozawa, Takeshi; Iwasa, Mitsuaki; Shiga, Keiko; Hira, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Background: For early detection of autism, it is difficult to maintain an efficient level of sensitivity and specificity based on observational data from a single screening. The Extraction and Refinement (E&R) Strategy utilizes a public children's health surveillance program to produce maximum efficacy in early detection of autism. In the…

  2. Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ground-Based Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) data set measures atmospheric water vapor using ground-based...

  3. Newborn hearing screening and strategy for early detection of hearing loss in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubíková, Janka; Kabátová, Zuzana; Pavlovcinová, Gabriela; Profant, Milan

    2009-04-01

    More than 80% of permanent hearing losses (HL) in children are congenital. Newborn hearing screening (NHS) is the best method for early detection of suspected hearing loss. If the NHS is not universal more than 30% permanent hearing losses are not identified. There are various methods of NHS: otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE, DPOAE) and automatic auditory brainstem response (AABR). After hearing screening, and when hearing loss is suspected, tympanometry and audiological methods then used for determination of hearing threshold; these include ABR, ASSR or/and behavioral methods. The goal of this study is to evaluate the influence of UNHS on the early detection of hearing loss in children before and after the implementation of obligatory universal newborn hearing screening in Slovakia, and also on the etiologic evaluation of hearing impaired infants identified by screening. In Slovakia NHS started in 1998 and was provided in ENT departments. From May 1, 2006 UNHS has been mandatory in Slovakia, using two stages TEOAE in all newborn departments in Slovakia (64 newborn departments). In year 2005--42% of newborns in Slovakia were screened, in 2006--66% newborns and in 2007--94, 99% (three small newborn departments do not yet have equipment for OAE screening). For determination of hearing thresholds ASSR are used in two ENT departments and ABR in the other four ENT departments. Comparing the number of identified cases with bilateral severe permanent HL or deafness before and after UNHS, 22.8% more cases of PHL were identified in the first year of UNHS. Also the average age of diagnosis of PHL was lower. In the year 2007, 94% of newborns were screened. We found 0.947/1000 newborns with bilateral severe PHL (35.9%) more than before UNHS). After audiologic and etiologic assessment of the 76 infants who failed screening, 5 (6.58%) were found to have normal hearing, 16 (22.54%) had unilateral and 55 (77.46%) had bilateral SNHL. A non-syndromic genetic cause was present in 25

  4. Investigations on fabricating strategies and utilization of rare earth based multicomponent oxide powders in radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Seema; Pitale, S.S.; Banthia, S.; Ghosh, M.; Tyagi, M.; Sen, S.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Materials containing rare earths demonstrate a broad field of applications as high energy radiation detectors, mainly due to their fascinating optical properties. Currently, Ce 3+ -doped rare earth silicates and garnets dominate the scintillator market because they show a high light yield, fast decay time, and high chemical stability. Moreover, the emission wavelength of silicates (410-440 nm) matches the wavelength sensitivity of conventional PMTs while, Si-photo-detector readouts are possible with garnets (emission near 550 nm). The composition, structure and phase of rare earth silicates are rather complex. For example, there are many phases like oxyorthosilicate R 2 SiO 5 , disilicate R 2 Si 2 O 7 , hexagonal R x (SiO 4 ) 6 O 2 oxyapatite etc (where R= Rare earth element). The controlled synthesis of single phase rare earth silicates and garnets nanomaterials is not easy and can only be reached with precisely controlled experimental conditions. In this work, we provide a broad overview of our recent scientific developments linked to a few aspects of synthesizing cerium activated rare earth based silicates and garnet materials, namely Gd 2 SiO 5 :Ce 3+ , Gd 4.67 (SiO 4 ) 3 O, Gd 2 Si 2 O 7 :Ce 3+ and Gd 3 Al x Ga 1-x O 12 :Ce 3+ (where 0≤x≤5) exploiting the advantages of solution combustion, chemical co-precipitation and hydrothermal techniques. A brief summary of results based on synthesis strategy adopted, composition, size shape and corresponding luminescence features of Gd based compounds are tabulated. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) features of compounds listed. Efforts towards finding new properties and new materials will be continued and several applications, in particular energy-conversion and scintillator detectors, will benefit from these rare earth materials

  5. High-yield exfoliation of graphene using ternary-solvent strategy for detecting volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Lin; Zhang, Zhijun; Yang, Woo-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great progress in the theory and experimental verification we made in past decade, the practical application of graphene is still hindered by the lack of efficient, economical, scalable, ease-processing exfoliation method. Herein, we propose a facile, low-cost, and efficient liquid-phase exfoliation process using low boiling-temperature solvent mixture to fabricate few-layer graphene in large scale. The Hansen solubility parameter theory was applied to help optimize the composition of solvent mixture. Aqueous-based ternary-solvent mixture, for the first time, was adapted to exfoliate graphene. We demonstrate that the exfoliation efficiency using ternary-solvent mixture surpasses that from binary-solvent approach. The final product concentration after optimization was over 260 μg/ml. The concentrated graphene dispersion was used to fabricate gas sensor for detecting volatile organic gases. Taking advantage of large surface area, large number of adsorption sites, and well-preserved basal plane, the mass-produced graphene nanosheets exhibited promising sensing potential toward ethanol and methanol vapors.

  6. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  7. An In Depth Look at Lightning Trends in Hurricane Harvey using Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, J.

    2017-12-01

    This research combines satellite measurements of lightning in Hurricane Harvey with ground-based lightning measurements to get a better sense of the total lightning occurring in the hurricane, both intra-cloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG), and how it relates to the intensification and weakening of the tropical system. Past studies have looked at lightning trends in hurricanes using the space based Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) or ground-based lightning detection networks. However, both of these methods have drawbacks. For instance, LIS was in low earth orbit, which limited lightning observations to 90 seconds for a particular point on the ground; hence, continuous lightning coverage of a hurricane was not possible. Ground-based networks can have a decreased detection efficiency, particularly for ICs, over oceans where hurricanes generally intensify. With the launch of the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on the GOES-16 satellite, researchers can study total lightning continuously over the lifetime of a tropical cyclone. This study utilizes GLM to investigate total lightning activity in Hurricane Harvey temporally; this is augmented with spatial analysis relative to hurricane structure, similar to previous studies. Further, GLM and ground-based network data are combined using Bayesian techniques in a new manner to leverage the strengths of each detection method. This methodology 1) provides a more complete estimate of lightning activity and 2) enables the derivation of the IC:CG ratio (Z-ratio) throughout the time period of the study. In particular, details of the evolution of the Z-ratio in time and space are presented. In addition, lightning stroke spatiotemporal trends are compared to lightning flash trends. This research represents a new application of lightning data that can be used in future study of tropical cyclone intensification and weakening.

  8. Search Strategy of Detector Position For Neutron Source Multiplication Method by Using Detected-Neutron Multiplication Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative definition of a neutron multiplication factor, detected-neutron multiplication factor kdet, is produced for the neutron source multiplication method..(NSM). By using kdet, a search strategy of appropriate detector position for NSM is also proposed. The NSM is one of the practical subcritical measurement techniques, i.e., the NSM does not require any special equipment other than a stationary external neutron source and an ordinary neutron detector. Additionally, the NSM method is based on steady-state analysis, so that this technique is very suitable for quasi real-time measurement. It is noted that the correction factors play important roles in order to accurately estimate subcriticality from the measured neutron count rates. The present paper aims to clarify how to correct the subcriticality measured by the NSM method, the physical meaning of the correction factors, and how to reduce the impact of correction factors by setting a neutron detector at an appropriate detector position

  9. Development of a Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring Network for the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent, high-quality measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg are necessary in order to better understand Hg emissions, transport, and deposition on a global scale. Although the number of atmospheric Hg monitoring stations has increased in recent years, the available measurement database is limited and there are many regions of the world where measurements have not been extensively performed. Long-term atmospheric Hg monitoring and additional ground-based monitoring sites are needed in order to generate datasets that will offer new insight and information about the global scale trends of atmospheric Hg emissions and deposition. In the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a coordinated global observational network for atmospheric Hg is being established. The overall research strategy of GMOS is to develop a state-of-the-art observation system able to provide information on the concentration of Hg species in ambient air and precipitation on the global scale. This network is being developed by integrating previously established ground-based atmospheric Hg monitoring stations with newly established GMOS sites that are located both at high altitude and sea level locations, as well as in climatically diverse regions. Through the collection of consistent, high-quality atmospheric Hg measurement data, we seek to create a comprehensive assessment of atmospheric Hg concentrations and their dependence on meteorology, long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric emissions.

  10. Capillary gel electrophoresis-coupled aptamer enzymatic cleavage protection strategy for the simultaneous detection of multiple small analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Sandrine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Fiore, Emmanuelle; Ravelet, Corinne; Guieu, Valérie; Peyrin, Eric

    2014-05-06

    This novel, multi small-analyte sensing strategy is the result of combining the target-induced aptamer enzymatic protection approach with the CGE-LIF (capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence) technique. The implemented assay principle is based on an analysis of the phosphodiesterase I (PDE I)-mediated size variation of a fluorescein-labeled aptamer (FApt), the enzyme catalyzing the removal of nucleotides from DNA in the 3' to 5' direction. In the absence of the target, the unfolded aptamer was enzymatically cleaved into short DNA fragments. Upon target binding, the DNA substrate was partially protected against enzymatic hydrolysis. The amount of bound aptamer remaining after the exonuclease reaction was proportional to the concentration of the target. The CGE technique, which was used to determine the separation of FApt species from DNA digested products, permitted the quantification of adenosine (A), ochratoxin A (O), and tyrosinamide (T) under the same optimized enzymatic conditions. This assay strategy was subsequently applied to the simultaneous detection of A, O, and T in a single capillary under buffered conditions using corresponding FApt probes of different lengths (23, 36, and 49 nucleotides, respectively). Additionally, the detection of these three small molecules was successfully achieved in a complex medium (diluted, heat-treated human serum) showing a good recovery. It is worth noting that the multiplexed analysis was accomplished for targets with different charge states by using aptamers possessing various structural features. This sensing platform constitutes a rationalized and reliable approach with an expanded potential for a high-throughput determination of small analytes in a single capillary.

  11. Compact binary coalescences in the band of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2010-01-01

    As the ground-based gravitational-wave telescopes LIGO, Virgo and GEO 600 approach the era of first detections, we review the current knowledge of the coalescence rates and the mass and spin distributions of merging neutron-star and black-hole binaries. We emphasize the bi-directional connection between gravitational-wave astronomy and conventional astrophysics. Astrophysical input will make possible informed decisions about optimal detector configurations and search techniques. Meanwhile, rate upper limits, detected merger rates and the distribution of masses and spins measured by gravitational-wave searches will constrain astrophysical parameters through comparisons with astrophysical models. Future developments necessary to the success of gravitational-wave astronomy are discussed.

  12. Status and plans for future generations of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2003-01-01

    Several medium- to large-scale ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave antennas have been constructed around the world. Although these antennas of the first generation could detect gravitational waves within a few years, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of the detectors significantly with advanced technologies to ensure more frequent detection of gravitational waves. Stronger seismic isolation and reduction of thermal noise, especially using cryogenic mirrors, are among the most important technologies that can lead us to the realization of advanced detectors. Some of the advanced technologies are already implemented in some of the existing detectors and others are currently being investigated for the future-generation detectors such as advanced LIGO, LCGT, upgrade of GEO600, AIGO, and EURO. We expect that such advanced detectors will eventually open a new window to the universe and establish a new field, 'gravitational wave astronomy'

  13. An automated tuberculosis screening strategy combining X-ray-based computer-aided detection and clinical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I.; Philipsen, Rick H. H. M.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Dawson, Rodney; Theron, Grant; Dheda, Keertan; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Lack of human resources and radiological interpretation expertise impair tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes in TB-endemic countries. Computer-aided detection (CAD) constitutes a viable alternative for chest radiograph (CXR) reading. However, no automated techniques that exploit the additional clinical information typically available during screening exist. To address this issue and optimally exploit this information, a machine learning-based combination framework is introduced. We have evaluated this framework on a database containing 392 patient records from suspected TB subjects prospectively recruited in Cape Town, South Africa. Each record comprised a CAD score, automatically computed from a CXR, and 12 clinical features. Comparisons with strategies relying on either CAD scores or clinical information alone were performed. Our results indicate that the combination framework outperforms the individual strategies in terms of the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (0.84 versus 0.78 and 0.72), specificity at 95% sensitivity (49% versus 24% and 31%) and negative predictive value (98% versus 95% and 96%). Thus, it is believed that combining CAD and clinical information to estimate the risk of active disease is a promising tool for TB screening.

  14. How ground-based observations can support satellite greenhouse gas retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. H.; Tans, P. P.; Sweeney, C.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    Global society will eventually accelerate efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in a variety of ways. These would likely involve international treaties, national policies, and regional strategies that will affect a number of economic, social, and environmental sectors. Some strategies will work better than others and some will not work at all. Because trillions of dollars will be involved in pursuing greenhouse gas emission reductions - through realignment of energy production, improvement of efficiencies, institution of taxes, implementation of carbon trading markets, and use of offsets - it is imperative that society be given all the tools at its disposal to ensure the ultimate success of these efforts. Providing independent, globally coherent information on the success of these efforts will give considerable strength to treaties, policies, and strategies. Doing this will require greenhouse gas observations greatly expanded from what we have today. Satellite measurements may ultimately be indispensable in achieving global coverage, but the requirements for accuracy and continuity of measurements over time are demanding if the data are to be relevant. Issues such as those associated with sensor drift, aging electronics, and retrieval artifacts present challenges that can be addressed in part by close coordination with ground-based and in situ systems. This presentation identifies the information that ground-based systems provide very well, but it also looks at what would be deficient even in a greatly expanded surface system, where satellites can fill these gaps, and how on-going, ground and in situ measurements can aid in addressing issues associated with accuracy, long-term continuity, and retrieval artifacts.

  15. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  16. Automatic Barometric Updates from Ground-Based Navigational Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-12

    ro fAutomatic Barometric Updates US Department from of Transportation Ground-Based Federal Aviation Administration Navigational Aids Office of Safety...tighter vertical spacing controls , particularly for operations near Terminal Control Areas (TCAs), Airport Radar Service Areas (ARSAs), military climb and...E.F., Ruth, J.C., and Williges, B.H. (1987). Speech Controls and Displays. In Salvendy, G., E. Handbook of Human Factors/Ergonomics, New York, John

  17. A cascade amplification strategy based on rolling circle amplification and hydroxylamine amplified gold nanoparticles enables chemiluminescence detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Tonghuan; Yang, Taoyi; Jin, Nan; Zhao, Yanjun; Fan, Aiping

    2014-08-07

    A highly sensitive and selective chemiluminescent (CL) biosensor for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was developed by taking advantage of the ATP-dependent enzymatic reaction (ATP-DER), the powerful signal amplification capability of rolling circle amplification (RCA), and hydroxylamine-amplified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The strategy relies on the ability of ATP, a cofactor of T4 DNA ligase, to trigger the ligation-RCA reaction. In the presence of ATP, the T4 DNA ligase catalyzes the ligation reaction between the two ends of the padlock probe, producing a closed circular DNA template that initiates the RCA reaction with phi29 DNA polymerase and dNTP. Therein, many complementary copies of the circular template can be generated. The ATP-DER is eventually converted into a detectable CL signal after a series of processes, including gold probe hybridization, hydroxylamine amplification, and oxidative gold metal dissolution coupled with a simple and sensitive luminol CL reaction. The CL signal is directly proportional to the ATP level. The results showed that the detection limit of the assay is 100 pM of ATP, which compares favorably with those of other ATP detection techniques. In addition, by taking advantage of ATP-DER, the proposed CL sensing system exhibits extraordinary specificity towards ATP and could distinguish the target molecule ATP from its analogues. The proposed method provides a new and versatile platform for the design of novel DNA ligation reaction-based CL sensing systems for other cofactors. This novel ATP-DER based CL sensing system may find wide applications in clinical diagnosis as well as in environmental and biomedical fields.

  18. An N-targeting real-time PCR strategy for the accurate detection of spring viremia of carp virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ling; Xiao, Yu; He, Zhengkan; Gao, Longying

    2016-03-01

    Spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) is a highly pathogenic agent of several economically important Cyprinidae fish species. Currently, there are no effective vaccines or drugs for this virus, and prevention of the disease mostly relies on prompt diagnosis. Previously, nested RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detection methods based on the glycoprotein gene G have been developed. However, the high genetic diversity of the G gene seriously limits the reliability of those methods. Compared with the G gene, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the nucleoprotein gene N is more conserved. Furthermore, studies in other members of the Rhabdoviridae family reveals that their gene transcription level follows the order N>P>M>G>L, indicating that an N gene based RT-PCR should have higher sensitivity. Therefore, two pairs of primers and two corresponding probes targeting the conserved regions of the N gene were designed. RT-qPCR assays demonstrated all primers and probes could detect phylogenetically distant isolates specifically and efficiently. Moreover, in artificially infected fish, the detected copy numbers of the N gene were much higher than those of the G gene in all tissues, and both the N and G gene copy numbers were highest in the kidney and spleen. Testing in 1100 farm-raised fish also showed that the N-targeting strategy was more reliable than the G-targeting methods. The method developed in this study provides a reliable tool for the rapid diagnosis of SVCV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ground-based VHE γ ray astronomy with air Cherenkov imaging telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The history of astronomy has been one of the scientific discovery following immediately the introduction of new technology. In this report, we will review shortly the basic development of the atmospheric air Cherenkov light detection technique, particularly the imaging telescope technique, which in the last years led to the firm establishment of a new branch in experimental astronomy, namely ground-based very high-energy (VHE) γ ray astronomy. Milestones in the technology and in the analysis of imaging technique will be discussed. The design of the 17 m diameter MAGIC Telescope, being currently under construction, is based on the development of new technologies for all its major parts and sets new standards in the performance of the ground-based γ detectors. MAGIC is one of the next major steps in the development of the technique being the first instrument that will allow one to carry out measurements also in the not yet investigated energy gap i.e. between 10 and 300 GeV

  20. A New Technique to Observe ENSO Activity via Ground-Based GPS Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit

    In an attempt to study the effects of global climate change in the tropics for improving global climate model, this paper aims to detect the ENSO events, especially El Nino phase by using ground-based GPS receivers. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) obtained from the Global Positioning System (GPS) Meteorology measurements in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) are used to connect their response to El Niño activity. The data gathered from four selected stations over the Southeast Asia, namely PIMO (Philippines), KUAL (Malaysia), NTUS (Singapore) and BAKO (Indonesia) for the year of 2009/2010 were processed. A strong correlation was observed for PIMO station with a correlation coefficient of -0.90, significantly at the 99 % confidence level. In general, the relationship between GPS PWV and SSTa at all stations on a weekly basis showed with a negative correlation. The negative correlation indicates that during the El Niño event, the PWV variation was in decreased trend. Decreased trend of PWV value is caused by a dry season that affected the GPS signals in the ocean-atmospheric coupling. Based on these promising results, we can propose that the ground-based GPS receiver is capable used to monitor ENSO activity and this is a new prospective method that previously unexplored.

  1. A general sensing strategy for detection of Fe{sup 3+} by using amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots as fluorescent probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qi [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, and Institute of Applied Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong, Shanxi, 037009 (China); Song, Jinping, E-mail: songjphxsxdt@163.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, and Institute of Applied Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong, Shanxi, 037009 (China); Institute of Environmental Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, 030006 (China); Wang, Shangzhi; Yang, Jie; Guo, Yong [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, and Institute of Applied Chemistry, Shanxi Datong University, Datong, Shanxi, 037009 (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, 030006 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Three kinds of amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized through acylation and amination reactions. The as-synthesized GQDs can emit strong blue fluorescence. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} will cause obvious fluorescence quenching of the three kinds of GQDs. Based on these, a general sensing strategy for detection of Fe{sup 3+} was successfully developed. - Highlights: • Amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized through acylation and amination reactions. • The presence of Fe{sup 3+} will cause obvious fluorescence quenching of the three kinds of GQDs. • A general sensing strategy for Fe{sup 3+} detection was successfully developed. • The proposed sensing strategy can successfully detect Fe{sup 3+} in real water sample. - Abstract: Amino acid-modified graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized through acylation and amination reactions. The as-synthesized GQDs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. A general sensing strategy for detection of Fe{sup 3+} was successfully developed. The detection limit can reach as low as 50 nM. Moreover, the proposed sensing system was successfully employed to detect Fe{sup 3+} in real water sample, and satisfactory results were obtained. This work will open up new avenues to develop potential applications of GQDs materials in environmental monitoring.

  2. A novel electrochemical sensing strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of Salmonella by rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dan; Yan, Yurong; Lei, Pinhua; Shen, Bo [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Cheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); The Center for Clinical Molecular Medical detection, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Ju, Huangxian [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ding, Shijia, E-mail: dingshijia@163.com [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics (Ministry of Education), College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2014-10-10

    A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. - Highlights: • This paper presented a novel sensing strategy for the rapid and ultrasensitive detection for Salmonella. • Combination of rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe is the first time for Salmonella electrochemical detection. • The method displayed excellent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella. • The fabricated biosensor was successfully applied to detect Salmonella in milk samples. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. The target DNA could be specifically captured by probe 1 on the sensing interface. Then the circularization mixture was added to form a typical sandwich structure. In the presence of dNTPs and phi29 DNA polymerase, the RCA was initiated to produce micrometer-long single-strand DNA. Finally, the detection probe (DNA–AuNPs) could recognize RCA product to produce enzymatic electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve of synthetic target DNA had good linearity from 10 aM to 10 pM with a detection limit of 6.76 aM (S/N = 3). The developed method had been successfully applied to detect Salmonella as low as 6 CFU mL{sup −1} in real milk sample. This proposed strategy showed great potential for clinical diagnosis, food safety and environmental monitoring.

  3. A novel electrochemical sensing strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of Salmonella by rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Dan; Yan, Yurong; Lei, Pinhua; Shen, Bo; Cheng, Wei; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2014-01-01

    A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. - Highlights: • This paper presented a novel sensing strategy for the rapid and ultrasensitive detection for Salmonella. • Combination of rolling circle amplification and DNA–AuNPs probe is the first time for Salmonella electrochemical detection. • The method displayed excellent sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella. • The fabricated biosensor was successfully applied to detect Salmonella in milk samples. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing strategy was developed for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Salmonella by combining the rolling circle amplification with DNA–AuNPs probe. The target DNA could be specifically captured by probe 1 on the sensing interface. Then the circularization mixture was added to form a typical sandwich structure. In the presence of dNTPs and phi29 DNA polymerase, the RCA was initiated to produce micrometer-long single-strand DNA. Finally, the detection probe (DNA–AuNPs) could recognize RCA product to produce enzymatic electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the calibration curve of synthetic target DNA had good linearity from 10 aM to 10 pM with a detection limit of 6.76 aM (S/N = 3). The developed method had been successfully applied to detect Salmonella as low as 6 CFU mL −1 in real milk sample. This proposed strategy showed great potential for clinical diagnosis, food safety and environmental monitoring

  4. Clinical development of a failure detection-based online repositioning strategy for prostate IMRT--Experiments, simulation, and dosimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wu; Qian Jianguo; Hancock, Steven L.; Xing, Lei; Luxton, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate clinic-ready adaptive imaging protocols for online patient repositioning (motion tracking) during prostate IMRT using treatment beam imaging supplemented by minimal, as-needed use of on-board kV. Methods: The authors examine the two-step decision-making strategy: (1) Use cine-MV imaging and online-updated characterization of prostate motion to detect target motion that is potentially beyond a predefined threshold and (2) use paired MV-kV 3D localization to determine overthreshold displacement and, if needed, reposition the patient. Two levels of clinical implementation were evaluated: (1) Field-by-field based motion correction for present-day linacs and (2) instantaneous repositioning for new-generation linacs with capabilities of simultaneous MV-kV imaging and remote automatic couch control during treatment delivery. Experiments were performed on a Varian Trilogy linac in clinical mode using a 4D motion phantom programed with prostate motion trajectories taken from patient data. Dosimetric impact was examined using a 2D ion chamber array. Simulations were done for 536 trajectories from 17 patients. Results: Despite the loss of marker detection efficiency caused by the MLC leaves sometimes obscuring the field at the marker's projected position on the MV imager, the field-by-field correction halved (from 23% to 10%) the mean percentage of time that target displacement exceeded a 3 mm threshold, as compared to no intervention. This was achieved at minimal cost in additional imaging (average of one MV-kV pair per two to three treatment fractions) and with a very small number of repositionings (once every four to five fractions). Also with low kV usage (∼2/fraction), the instantaneous repositioning approach reduced overthreshold time by more than 75% (23% to 5%) even with severe MLC blockage as often encountered in current IMRT and could reduce the overthreshold time tenfold (to <2%) if the MLC blockage problem were relieved. The

  5. Clinical development of a failure detection-based online repositioning strategy for prostate IMRT--experiments, simulation, and dosimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu; Qian, Jianguo; Hancock, Steven L; Xing, Lei; Luxton, Gary

    2010-10-01

    To implement and evaluate clinic-ready adaptive imaging protocols for online patient repositioning (motion tracking) during prostate IMRT using treatment beam imaging supplemented by minimal, as-needed use of on-board kV. The authors examine the two-step decision-making strategy: (1) Use cine-MV imaging and online-updated characterization of prostate motion to detect target motion that is potentially beyond a predefined threshold and (2) use paired MV-kV 3D localization to determine overthreshold displacement and, if needed, reposition the patient. Two levels of clinical implementation were evaluated: (1) Field-by-field based motion correction for present-day linacs and (2) instantaneous repositioning for new-generation linacs with capabilities of simultaneous MV-kV imaging and remote automatic couch control during treatment delivery. Experiments were performed on a Varian Trilogy linac in clinical mode using a 4D motion phantom programed with prostate motion trajectories taken from patient data. Dosimetric impact was examined using a 2D ion chamber array. Simulations were done for 536 trajectories from 17 patients. Despite the loss of marker detection efficiency caused by the MLC leaves sometimes obscuring the field at the marker's projected position on the MV imager, the field-by-field correction halved (from 23% to 10%) the mean percentage of time that target displacement exceeded a 3 mm threshold, as compared to no intervention. This was achieved at minimal cost in additional imaging (average of one MV-kV pair per two to three treatment fractions) and with a very small number of repositionings (once every four to five fractions). Also with low kV usage (approximation 2/fraction), the instantaneous repositioning approach reduced overthreshold time by more than 75% (23% to 5%) even with severe MLC blockage as often encountered in current IMRT and could reduce the overthreshold time tenfold (to < 2%) if the MLC blockage problem were relieved. The information

  6. Clinical development of a failure detection-based online repositioning strategy for prostate IMRT--Experiments, simulation, and dosimetry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Wu; Qian Jianguo; Hancock, Steven L.; Xing, Lei; Luxton, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States) and Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate clinic-ready adaptive imaging protocols for online patient repositioning (motion tracking) during prostate IMRT using treatment beam imaging supplemented by minimal, as-needed use of on-board kV. Methods: The authors examine the two-step decision-making strategy: (1) Use cine-MV imaging and online-updated characterization of prostate motion to detect target motion that is potentially beyond a predefined threshold and (2) use paired MV-kV 3D localization to determine overthreshold displacement and, if needed, reposition the patient. Two levels of clinical implementation were evaluated: (1) Field-by-field based motion correction for present-day linacs and (2) instantaneous repositioning for new-generation linacs with capabilities of simultaneous MV-kV imaging and remote automatic couch control during treatment delivery. Experiments were performed on a Varian Trilogy linac in clinical mode using a 4D motion phantom programed with prostate motion trajectories taken from patient data. Dosimetric impact was examined using a 2D ion chamber array. Simulations were done for 536 trajectories from 17 patients. Results: Despite the loss of marker detection efficiency caused by the MLC leaves sometimes obscuring the field at the marker's projected position on the MV imager, the field-by-field correction halved (from 23% to 10%) the mean percentage of time that target displacement exceeded a 3 mm threshold, as compared to no intervention. This was achieved at minimal cost in additional imaging (average of one MV-kV pair per two to three treatment fractions) and with a very small number of repositionings (once every four to five fractions). Also with low kV usage ({approx}2/fraction), the instantaneous repositioning approach reduced overthreshold time by more than 75% (23% to 5%) even with severe MLC blockage as often encountered in current IMRT and could reduce the overthreshold time tenfold (to <2%) if the MLC blockage problem were

  7. A Failure Detection Strategy for Intrafraction Prostate Motion Monitoring With On-Board Imagers for Fixed-Gantry IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wu; Luxton, Gary; Xing Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop methods to monitor prostate intrafraction motion during fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy using MV treatment beam imaging together with minimal kV imaging for a failure detection strategy that ensures prompt detection when target displacement exceeds a preset threshold. Methods and Materials: Real-time two-dimensional (2D) marker position in the MV image plane was obtained by analyzing cine-MV images. The marker's in-line movement, and thus its time-varying three-dimensional (3D) position, was estimated by combining the 2D projection data with a previously established correlative relationship between the directional components of prostate motion. A confirmation request for more accurate localization using MV-kV triangulation was triggered when the estimated prostate displacement based on the cine-MV data was greater than 3 mm. An interventional action alert followed on positive MV-kV confirmation. To demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method, simulation studies of conventional-fraction intensity-modulated radiotherapy sessions were done using 536 Calypso-measured prostate trajectories from 17 radiotherapy patients. Results: A technique for intrafraction prostate motion management has been developed. The technique, using 'freely available' cine-MV images and minimum on-board kV imaging (on average 2.5 images/fraction), successfully limited 3D prostate movement to within a range of 3 mm relative to the MV beam for 99.4% of the total treatment time. On average, only approximately one intervention/fraction was needed to achieve this level of accuracy. Conclusion: Instead of seeking to accurately and continuously localize the prostate target as existing motion tracking systems do, the present technique effectively uses cine-MV data to provide a clinically valuable way to minimize kV usage, while maintaining high targeting accuracy.

  8. A Rapid Label-Free Fluorescent Aptasensor PicoGreen-Based Strategy for Aflatoxin B₁ Detection in Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Dou, Xiaowen; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Meifeng; Zhao, Ming; OuYang, Zhen; Kong, Dandan; Antonio, F Logrieco; Yang, Meihua

    2018-02-28

    Aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) is a very hazardous carcinogen, readily contaminating foodstuffs and traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) that has inspired increasing health concerns due to dietary exposure. Colloidal nanocrystals have been proposed as optical labels for aptasensor assembly, but these typically require tedious multistep conjugation and suffer from unsatisfactory robustness when used for complex matrices. In the present study, we report a rapid and sensitive method for screening for trace AFB₁ levels in TCMs using a label-free fluorescent aptasensor PicoGreen dye-based strategy. Using PicoGreen to selectively measure complementary double-stranded DNA, fluorescence enhancement due to dsDNA is 'turned off' in the presence of AFB₁ due binding of aptamer target over complementary sequence. Self-assembly of a label-free fluorescent aptasensor based on AFB₁ aptamer and PicoGreen dye was performed. Due to competition between the complementary sequence and AFB₁ target, this rapid method was capable of highly sensitive and selective screening for AFB₁ in five types of TCMs. This proposed approach had a limit of detection as low as 0.1 μg·L -1 and good linearity with a range of 0.1-10 μg·L -1 (0.1-10 ppb). Among the 20 samples tested, 6 batches were found to be contaminated with AFB₁ using this method, which was confirmed using sophisticated liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. The results of this study indicate the developed method has the potential to be a simple, quick, and sensitive tool for detecting AFB₁ in TCMs.

  9. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  10. Discovery of cryptophycin-1 and BCN-183577: examples of strategies and problems in the detection of antitumor activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, T H; Valeriote, F A; Demchik, L; Lowichik, N; Polin, L; Panchapor, C; Pugh, S; White, K; Kushner, J; Rake, J; Wentland, M; Golakoti, T; Hetzel, C; Ogino, J; Patterson, G; Moore, R

    1997-01-01

    Historically, many new anticancer agents were first detected in a prescreen; usually consisting of a molecular/biochemical target or a cellular cytotoxicity assay. The agent then progressed to in vivo evaluation against transplanted human or mouse tumors. If the investigator had a large drug supply and ample resources, multiple tests were possible, with variations in tumor models, tumor and drug routes, dose-decrements, dose-schedules, number of groups, etc. However, in most large programs involving several hundred in vivo tests yearly, resource limitations and drug supply limitations have usually dictated a single trial. Under such restrictive conditions, we have implemented a flexible in vivo testing protocol. With this strategy, the tumor model is dictated by in vitro cellular sensitivity; drug route by water solubility (with water soluble agents injected intravenously); dosage decrement by drug supply, dose-schedule by toxicities encountered, etc. In this flexible design, many treatment parameters can be changed during the course of treatment (e.g., dose and schedule). The discovery of two active agents are presented (Cryptophycin-1, and Thioxanthone BCN 183577). Both were discovered by the intravenous route of administration. Both would have been missed if they were tested intraperitoneally, the usual drug route used in discovery protocols. It is also likely that they would have been missed with an easy to execute fixed protocol design, even if injected i.v.

  11. Using Gaia as an Astrometric Tool for Deep Ground-based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.; Schriefer, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Gaia DR1 positions are used to astrometrically calibrate three epochs' worth of Subaru SuprimeCam images in the fields of globular cluster NGC 2419 and the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Distortion-correction ``maps'' are constructed from a combination of offset dithers and reference to Gaia DR1. These are used to derive absolute proper motions in the field of NGC 2419. Notably, we identify the photometrically-detected Monoceros structure in the foreground of NGC 2419 as a kinematically-cold population of stars, distinct from Galactic-field stars. This project demonstrates the feasibility of combining Gaia with deep, ground-based surveys, thus extending high-quality astrometry to magnitudes beyond the limits of Gaia.

  12. Lidar to lidar calibration of Ground-based Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  13. Disulfide-induced self-assembled targets : A novel strategy for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs via unmodified gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shokri, Ehsan; Hosseini, Morteza; Davari, Mehdi D.; Ganjali, Mohammad R.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2017-01-01

    A modified non-cross-linking gold-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) aggregation strategy has been developed for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs based on self-assembling target species in the presence of thiolated probes. Two complementary thiol-modified probes, each of which specifically

  14. Disulfide-induced self-assembled targets: A novel strategy for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs via unmodified gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shokri, E. (Ehsan); M. Hosseini (Morteza); Davari, M.D. (Mehdi D.); Ganjali, M.R. (Mohammad R.); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); F. Rezaee (Farhad)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA modified non-cross-linking gold-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) aggregation strategy has been developed for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs based on self-assembling target species in the presence of thiolated probes. Two complementary thiol- modified probes, each of which

  15. Comparison of monthly nighttime cloud fraction products from MODIS and AIRS and ground-based camera over Manila Observatory (14.64N, 121.07E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacal, G. F. B.; Lagrosas, N.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud detection nowadays is primarily achieved by the utilization of various sensors aboard satellites. These include MODIS Aqua, MODIS Terra, and AIRS with products that include nighttime cloud fraction. Ground-based instruments are, however, only secondary to these satellites when it comes to cloud detection. Nonetheless, these ground-based instruments (e.g., LIDARs, ceilometers, and sky-cameras) offer significant datasets about a particular region's cloud cover values. For nighttime operations of cloud detection instruments, satellite-based instruments are more reliably and prominently used than ground-based ones. Therefore if a ground-based instrument for nighttime operations is operated, it ought to produce reliable scientific datasets. The objective of this study is to do a comparison between the results of a nighttime ground-based instrument (sky-camera) and that of MODIS Aqua and MODIS Terra. A Canon Powershot A2300 is placed ontop of Manila Observatory (14.64N, 121.07E) and is configured to take images of the night sky at 5min intervals. To detect pixels with clouds, the pictures are converted to grayscale format. Thresholding technique is used to screen pixels with cloud and pixels without clouds. If the pixel value is greater than 17, it is considered as a cloud; otherwise, a noncloud (Gacal et al., 2016). This algorithm is applied to the data gathered from Oct 2015 to Oct 2016. A scatter plot between satellite cloud fraction in the area covering the area 14.2877N, 120.9869E, 14.7711N and 121.4539E and ground cloud cover is graphed to find the monthly correlation. During wet season (June - November), the satellite nighttime cloud fraction vs ground measured cloud cover produce an acceptable R2 (Aqua= 0.74, Terra= 0.71, AIRS= 0.76). However, during dry season, poor R2 values are obtained (AIRS= 0.39, Aqua & Terra = 0.01). The high correlation during wet season can be attributed to a high probability that the camera and satellite see the same clouds

  16. Aptamer Recognition Induced Target-Bridged Strategy for Proteins Detection Based on Magnetic Chitosan and Silver/Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jincan; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-11-03

    Poor selectivity and biocompability remain problems in applying surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for direct detection of proteins due to similar spectra of most proteins and overlapping Raman bands in complex mixtures. To solve these problems, an aptamer recognition induced target-bridged strategy based on magnetic chitosan (MCS) and silver/chitosan nanoparticles (Ag@CS NPs) using SERS was developed for detection of protein benefiting from specific affinity of aptamers and biocompatibility of chitosan (CS). In this process, one aptamer (or antibody) modified MCS worked as capture probes through the affinity binding site of protein. The other aptamer modified Raman report molecules encapsulated Ag@CS NPs were used as SERS sensing probes based on the other binding site of protein. The sandwich complexes of aptamer (antibody)/protein/aptamer were separated easily with a magnet from biological samples, and the concentration of protein was indirectly reflected by the intensity variation of SERS signal of Raman report molecules. To explore the universality of the strategy, three different kinds of proteins including thrombin, platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB) and immunoglobulin E (lgE) were investigated. The major advantages of this aptamer recognition induced target-bridged strategy are convenient operation with a magnet, stable signal expressing resulting from preventing loss of report molecules with the help of CS shell, and the avoidance of slow diffusion-limited kinetics problems occurring on a solid substrate. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy, the method was applied to detection of PDGF BB in clinical samples. The limit of detection (LOD) of PDGF BB was estimated to be 3.2 pg/mL. The results obtained from human serum of healthy persons and cancer patients using the proposed strategy showed good agreement with that of the ELISA method but with wider linear range, more convenient operation, and lower cost. The proposed

  17. Dual Recognition Strategy for Specific and Sensitive Detection of Bacteria Using Aptamer-Coated Magnetic Beads and Antibiotic-Capped Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan; Yu, Mengqun; Fu, Fei; Han, Weiye; Li, Gan; Xie, Jianping; Song, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Song, Erqun

    2016-01-05

    Food poisoning and infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (SA) are serious public health concerns. A method of specific, sensitive, and rapid detection of such bacteria is essential and important. This study presents a strategy that combines aptamer and antibiotic-based dual recognition units with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection to achieve specific and sensitive quantification of SA in authentic specimens and in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria. Aptamer-coated magnetic beads (Apt-MB) were employed for specific capture of SA. Vancomycin-stabilized fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs@Van) were prepared by a simple one-step process and used for sensitive quantification of SA in the range of 32-10(8) cfu/mL with the detection limit of 16 cfu/mL via a fluorescence intensity measurement. And using this strategy, about 70 cfu/mL of SA in complex samples (containing 3 × 10(8) cfu/mL of other different contaminated bacteria) could be successfully detected. In comparison to prior studies, the developed strategy here not only simplifies the preparation procedure of the fluorescent probes (AuNCs@Van) to a great extent but also could sensitively quantify SA in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria directly with good accuracy. Moreover, the aptamer and antibiotic used in this strategy are much less expensive and widely available compared to common-used antibodies, making it cost-effective. This general aptamer- and antibiotic-based dual recognition strategy, combined with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection of trace bacteria, shows great potential application in monitoring bacterial food contamination and infectious diseases.

  18. Comparing distinct ground-based lightning location networks covering the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Schmeits, Maurice; Beekhuis, Hans; Poelman, Dieter; Evers, Läslo; Smets, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Lightning can be detected using a ground-based sensor network. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) monitors lightning activity in the Netherlands with the so-called FLITS-system; a network combining SAFIR-type sensors. This makes use of Very High Frequency (VHF) as well as Low Frequency (LF) sensors. KNMI has recently decided to replace FLITS by data from a sub-continental network operated by Météorage which makes use of LF sensors only (KNMI Lightning Detection Network, or KLDN). KLDN is compared to the FLITS system, as well as Met Office's long-range Arrival Time Difference (ATDnet), which measures Very Low Frequency (VLF). Special focus lies on the ability to detect Cloud to Ground (CG) and Cloud to Cloud (CC) lightning in the Netherlands. Relative detection efficiency of individual flashes and lightning activity in a more general sense are calculated over a period of almost 5 years. Additionally, the detection efficiency of each system is compared to a ground-truth that is constructed from flashes that are detected by both of the other datasets. Finally, infrasound data is used as a fourth lightning data source for several case studies. Relative performance is found to vary strongly with location and time. As expected, it is found that FLITS detects significantly more CC lightning (because of the strong aptitude of VHF antennas to detect CC), though KLDN and ATDnet detect more CG lightning. We analyze statistics computed over the entire 5-year period, where we look at CG as well as total lightning (CC and CG combined). Statistics that are considered are the Probability of Detection (POD) and the so-called Lightning Activity Detection (LAD). POD is defined as the percentage of reference flashes the system detects compared to the total detections in the reference. LAD is defined as the fraction of system recordings of one or more flashes in predefined area boxes over a certain time period given the fact that the reference detects at least one

  19. Laser Guidestar Satellite for Ground-based Adaptive Optics Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites and Astronomical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, W. A.; Cahoy, K.; Males, J.; Carlton, A.; Yoon, H.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time observation and monitoring of geostationary (GEO) satellites with ground-based imaging systems would be an attractive alternative to fielding high cost, long lead, space-based imagers, but ground-based observations are inherently limited by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to help ground telescopes achieve diffraction-limited seeing. AO systems have historically relied on the use of bright natural guide stars or laser guide stars projected on a layer of the upper atmosphere by ground laser systems. There are several challenges with this approach such as the sidereal motion of GEO objects relative to natural guide stars and limitations of ground-based laser guide stars; they cannot be used to correct tip-tilt, they are not point sources, and have finite angular sizes when detected at the receiver. There is a difference between the wavefront error measured using the guide star compared with the target due to cone effect, which also makes it difficult to use a distributed aperture system with a larger baseline to improve resolution. Inspired by previous concepts proposed by A.H. Greenaway, we present using a space-based laser guide starprojected from a satellite orbiting the Earth. We show that a nanosatellite-based guide star system meets the needs for imaging GEO objects using a low power laser even from 36,000 km altitude. Satellite guide star (SGS) systemswould be well above atmospheric turbulence and could provide a small angular size reference source. CubeSatsoffer inexpensive, frequent access to space at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems, and are now being deployed to geostationary orbits and on interplanetary trajectories. The fundamental CubeSat bus unit of 10 cm cubed can be combined in multiple units and offers a common form factor allowing for easy integration as secondary payloads on traditional launches and rapid testing of new technologies on-orbit. We describe a 6U CubeSat SGS measuring 10 cm x 20 cm x

  20. Enhancing our Understanding of Snowfall Modes with Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, C.; Kulie, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Bliven, L. F.; Wood, N.

    2016-12-01

    Snowfall can be broadly categorized into deep and shallow events based on the vertical distribution of the precipitating ice. Remotely sensed data refine these precipitation categories and aid in discerning the underlying macro- and microphysical mechanisms. The unique patterns in the remotely sensed instruments observations can potentially connect distinct modes of snowfall to specific processes. Though satellites can observe and recognize these patterns in snowfall, these measurements are limited - particularly in cases of shallow and light precipitation, as the snow may be too close to the surface or below the detection limits of the instrumentation. By enhancing satellite measurements with ground-based instrumentation, whether with limited-term field campaigns or long-term strategic sites, we can further our understanding and assumptions about different snowfall modes and how they are measured from spaceborne instruments. Presented are three years of data from a ground-based instrument suite consisting of a MicroRain Radar (MRR; optimized for snow events) and a Precipitation Imaging Package (PIP). These instruments are located at the Marquette, Michigan National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office to: a) use coincident meteorological measurements and observations to enhance our understanding of the thermodynamic drivers and b) showcase these instruments in an operational setting to enhance forecasts of shallow snow events. Three winters of MRR and PIP measurements are partitioned, based on meteorological surface observations, into two-dimensional histograms of reflectivity and particle size distribution data. These statistics improve our interpretation of deep versus shallow precipitation. Additionally, these statistical techniques are applied to similar datasets from Global Precipitation Measurement field campaigns for further insight into cloud and precipitation macro- and microphysical processes.

  1. Computer-aided mathematical analysis of probability of intercept for ground-based communication intercept system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Chul

    1989-09-01

    We develop a mathematical analysis model to calculate the probability of intercept (POI) for the ground-based communication intercept (COMINT) system. The POI is a measure of the effectiveness of the intercept system. We define the POI as the product of the probability of detection and the probability of coincidence. The probability of detection is a measure of the receiver's capability to detect a signal in the presence of noise. The probability of coincidence is the probability that an intercept system is available, actively listening in the proper frequency band, in the right direction and at the same time that the signal is received. We investigate the behavior of the POI with respect to the observation time, the separation distance, antenna elevations, the frequency of the signal, and the receiver bandwidths. We observe that the coincidence characteristic between the receiver scanning parameters and the signal parameters is the key factor to determine the time to obtain a given POI. This model can be used to find the optimal parameter combination to maximize the POI in a given scenario. We expand this model to a multiple system. This analysis is conducted on a personal computer to provide the portability. The model is also flexible and can be easily implemented under different situations.

  2. Embedded Prompting May Function as Embedded Punishment: Detection of Unexpected Behavioral Processes within a Typical Preschool Teaching Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Nicole A.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes an unexpected behavioral process that influenced behavior during the teaching of concepts to a 4-year-old girl. The efficacy of and preference for three strategies that varied in teacher directedness were assessed in a multielement design and concurrent-chains arrangement, respectively. The strategy that involved the most…

  3. Developmental Strategy For Effective Sampling To Detect Possible Nutrient Fluxes In Oligotrophic Coastal Reef Waters In The Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, W. G.; Corredor, J. E.; Ko, D.; Zika, R. G.; Mooers, C. N.

    2008-05-01

    The increasing effort to develop the coastal ocean observing system (COOS) in various institutions has gained momentum due to its high value to climate, environmental, economic, and health issues. The stress contributed by nutrients to the coral reef ecosystem is among many problems that are targeted to be resolved using this system. Traditional nutrient sampling has been inadequate to resolve issues on episodic nutrient fluxes in reef regions due to temporal and spatial variability. This paper illustrates sampling strategy using the COOS information to identify areas that need critical investigation. The area investigated is within the Puerto Rico subdomain (60-70oW, 15-20oN), and Caribbean Time Series (CaTS), World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), Intra-America Sea (IAS) ocean nowcast/forecast system (IASNFS), and other COOS-related online datasets are utilized. Nutrient profile results indicate nitrate is undetectable in the upper 50 m apparently due to high biological consumption. Nutrients are delivered in Puerto Rico particularly in the CaTS station either via a meridional jet formed from opposing cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies or wind-driven upwelling. The strong vertical fluctuation in the upper 50 m demonstrates a high anomaly in temperature and salinity and a strong cross correlation signal. High chlorophyll a concentration corresponding to seasonal high nutrient influx coincides with higher precipitation accumulation rates and apparent riverine input from the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers during summer (August) than during winter (February) seasons. Non-detectability of nutrients in the upper 50 m is a reflection of poor sampling frequency or the absence of a highly sensitive nutrient analysis method to capture episodic events. Thus, this paper was able to determine the range of depths and concentrations that need to be critically investigated to determine nutrient fluxes, nutrient sources, and climatological factors that can affect nutrient delivery

  4. Reconstruction of Sky Illumination Domes from Ground-Based Panoramas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubard, F.; Lelégard, L.; Brédif, M.; Paparoditis, N.; Briottet, X.

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of the sky illumination is important for radiometric corrections and for computer graphics applications such as relighting or augmented reality. We propose an approach to compute environment maps, representing the sky radiance, from a set of ground-based images acquired by a panoramic acquisition system, for instance a mobile-mapping system. These images can be affected by important radiometric artifacts, such as bloom or overexposure. A Perez radiance model is estimated with the blue sky pixels of the images, and used to compute additive corrections in order to reduce these radiometric artifacts. The sky pixels are then aggregated in an environment map, which still suffers from discontinuities on stitching edges. The influence of the quality of estimated sky radiance on the simulated light signal is measured quantitatively on a simple synthetic urban scene; in our case, the maximal error for the total sensor radiance is about 10%.

  5. RECONSTRUCTION OF SKY ILLUMINATION DOMES FROM GROUND-BASED PANORAMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Coubard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the sky illumination is important for radiometric corrections and for computer graphics applications such as relighting or augmented reality. We propose an approach to compute environment maps, representing the sky radiance, from a set of ground-based images acquired by a panoramic acquisition system, for instance a mobile-mapping system. These images can be affected by important radiometric artifacts, such as bloom or overexposure. A Perez radiance model is estimated with the blue sky pixels of the images, and used to compute additive corrections in order to reduce these radiometric artifacts. The sky pixels are then aggregated in an environment map, which still suffers from discontinuities on stitching edges. The influence of the quality of estimated sky radiance on the simulated light signal is measured quantitatively on a simple synthetic urban scene; in our case, the maximal error for the total sensor radiance is about 10%.

  6. LROC Investigation of Three Strategies for Reducing the Impact of Respiratory Motion on the Detection of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules in SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyczynski, Mark S.; Gifford, Howard C.; Dey, Joyoni; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E.; Segars, W. Paul; King, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of three motion reducing strategies in diminishing the degrading impact of respiratory motion on the detection of small solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) in single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in comparison to a standard clinical acquisition and the ideal case of imaging in the absence of respiratory motion. To do this nonuniform rational B-spline cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantoms based on human-volunteer CT studies were generated spanning the respiratory cycle for a normal background distribution of Tc-99 m NeoTect. Similarly, spherical phantoms of 1.0-cm diameter were generated to model small SPN for each of the 150 uniquely located sites within the lungs whose respiratory motion was based on the motion of normal structures in the volunteer CT studies. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data from these. Normal and single-lesion containing SPECT projection sets with a clinically realistic Poisson noise level were created for the cases of 1) the end-expiration (EE) frame with all counts, 2) respiration-averaged motion with all counts, 3) one fourth of the 32 frames centered around EE (Quarter Binning), 4) one half of the 32 frames centered around EE (Half Binning), and 5) eight temporally binned frames spanning the respiratory cycle. Each of the sets of combined projection data were reconstructed with RBI-EM with system spatial-resolution compensation (RC). Based on the known motion for each of the 150 different lesions, the reconstructed volumes of respiratory bins were shifted so as to superimpose the locations of the SPN onto that in the first bin (Reconstruct and Shift). Five human observers performed localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) studies of SPN detection. The observer results were analyzed for statistical significance differences in SPN detection accuracy among the three correction strategies, the standard

  7. A detrimental soil disturbance prediction model for ground-based timber harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick A. Reeves; Matthew C. Reeves; Ann M. Abbott; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Mark D. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Soil properties and forest productivity can be affected during ground-based harvest operations and site preparation. The degree of impact varies widely depending on topographic features and soil properties. Forest managers who understand site-specific limits to ground-based harvesting can alter harvest method or season to limit soil disturbance. To determine the...

  8. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  9. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China); Shi, Hanchang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Long, Feng, E-mail: longf04@ruc.edu.cn [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  10. Comparing the outcomes of two strategies for colorectal tumor detection: Policy-promoted screening program versus health promotion service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: In comparison with the outcomes of the HPS database, the screening efficacy of the PPS database is even for detecting colorectal carcinoma but is limited in detecting advanced adenoma. HPS may provide comprehensive validity indicators and will be helpful in adjusting current policies for improving screening performance.

  11. Factors influencing detection of the federally endangered Diamond Darter Crystallaria cincotta: Implications for long-term monitoring strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Austin A.; Brown, Donald J.; Welsh, Stuart A.; Thompson, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Population monitoring is an essential component of endangered species recovery programs. The federally endangered Diamond Darter Crystallaria cincotta is in need of an effective monitoring design to improve our understanding of its distribution and track population trends. Because of their small size, cryptic coloration, and nocturnal behavior, along with limitations associated with current sampling methods, individuals are difficult to detect at known occupied sites. Therefore, research is needed to determine if survey efforts can be improved by increasing probability of individual detection. The primary objective of this study was to determine if there are seasonal and diel patterns in Diamond Darter detectability during population surveys. In addition to temporal factors, we also assessed five habitat variables that might influence individual detection. We used N-mixture models to estimate site abundances and relationships between covariates and individual detectability and ranked models using Akaike's information criteria. During 2015 three known occupied sites were sampled 15 times each between May and Oct. The best supported model included water temperature as a quadratic function influencing individual detectability, with temperatures around 22 C resulting in the highest detection probability. Detection probability when surveying at the optimal temperature was approximately 6% and 7.5% greater than when surveying at 16 C and 29 C, respectively. Time of Night and day of year were not strong predictors of Diamond Darter detectability. The results of this study will allow researchers and agencies to maximize detection probability when surveying populations, resulting in greater monitoring efficiency and likely more precise abundance estimates.

  12. A ground-based near-infrared emission spectrum of the exoplanet HD 189733b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R; Deroo, Pieter; Griffith, Caitlin A; Tinetti, Giovanna; Thatte, Azam; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Bouwman, Jeroen; Crossfield, Ian J; Angerhausen, Daniel; Afonso, Cristina; Henning, Thomas

    2010-02-04

    Detection of molecules using infrared spectroscopy probes the conditions and compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. Water (H(2)O), methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and carbon monoxide (CO) have been detected in two hot Jupiters. These previous results relied on space-based telescopes that do not provide spectroscopic capability in the 2.4-5.2 microm spectral region. Here we report ground-based observations of the dayside emission spectrum for HD 189733b between 2.0-2.4 microm and 3.1-4.1 microm, where we find a bright emission feature. Where overlap with space-based instruments exists, our results are in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A feature at approximately 3.25 microm is unexpected and difficult to explain with models that assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions at the 1 bar to 1 x 10(-6) bar pressures typically sampled by infrared measurements. The most likely explanation for this feature is that it arises from non-LTE emission from CH(4), similar to what is seen in the atmospheres of planets in our own Solar System. These results suggest that non-LTE effects may need to be considered when interpreting measurements of strongly irradiated exoplanets.

  13. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  14. FINDING EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE USING GROUND-BASED HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellen, I. A. G.; Le Poole, R.; Brogi, M.; Birkby, J.; De Kok, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals, making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor of three smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter τ Boötis b, albeit such a star will be orders of magnitude fainter. We show that if Earth-like planets are common, the planned extremely large telescopes can detect oxygen within a few dozen transits. Ultimately, large arrays of dedicated flux-collector telescopes equipped with high-dispersion spectrographs can provide the large collecting area needed to perform a statistical study of life-bearing planets in the solar neighborhood.

  15. Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  16. Defining a strategy to evaluate cervical cancer prevention and early detection in the era of HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Roberta I; Miller, Anthony B; Pasut, George; Mai, Verna

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the short-, medium- and long-term requirements of a strategy to evaluate the impact of HPV immunization and to define a framework to facilitate planning and evaluation. This strategy was developed in Ontario from January to August 2008. Literature review was completed to assess existing material relevant to vaccine evaluation, and HPV vaccine specifically. Scientists and epidemiologists within our organization attended meetings to brainstorm and identify key requirements for vaccine evaluation. Other selected internal and external experts were consulted to review preliminary lists of potential indicators and questions for inclusion in an evaluation strategy. Results are reported in three sections--literature review, proposed evaluation framework and data requirements. The first vaccine evaluation strategy that integrates primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer is presented. Among women who are neither screened nor immunized, customized interventions will be required to ensure that they are aware of potential risks and benefits. This evaluation strategy may serve as a useful outline for jurisdictions in Canada and elsewhere. This new paradigm of combined primary and secondary intervention will encourage cooperation for effective evaluation of an integrated approach for control of cervical cancer and other HPV-related disease.

  17. A novel double staining strategy for improved detection of testicular carcinoma in situ cells in human semen samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Kristensen, D M; Almstrup, K

    2012-01-01

    by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridisation in urogenital epithelia, which may interfere with detection of CIS cells in semen. In addition to OCT3/4, the expression of AP-2¿ and NANOG or their variants was detected in urogenital epithelia, while other CIS markers, including PLAP/alkaline phosphatase were absent...... of CIS cells in semen. In conclusion, transcription factors related to pluripotency and undifferentiated state of cells, which most likely have several variants or modifications, are unexpectedly detected using currently available antibodies in urogenital epithelial cells which may be shed into semen...

  18. Elution strategies for reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of sucrose alkanoate regioisomers with charged aerosol detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Aleksander; Pedersen, Lars Haastrup

    2013-01-01

    A broad range of elution strategies for RP-HPLC analysis of sucrose alkanoate regioisomers with CAD was systematically evaluated. The HPLC analyses were investigated using design-of-experiments methodology and analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression modelling. Isocratic elutions, ...

  19. A design for a ground-based data management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambird, Barbara A.; Lavine, David

    1988-01-01

    An initial design for a ground-based data management system which includes intelligent data abstraction and cataloging is described. The large quantity of data on some current and future NASA missions leads to significant problems in providing scientists with quick access to relevant data. Human screening of data for potential relevance to a particular study is time-consuming and costly. Intelligent databases can provide automatic screening when given relevent scientific parameters and constraints. The data management system would provide, at a minimum, information of availability of the range of data, the type available, specific time periods covered together with data quality information, and related sources of data. The system would inform the user about the primary types of screening, analysis, and methods of presentation available to the user. The system would then aid the user with performing the desired tasks, in such a way that the user need only specify the scientific parameters and objectives, and not worry about specific details for running a particular program. The design contains modules for data abstraction, catalog plan abstraction, a user-friendly interface, and expert systems for data handling, data evaluation, and application analysis. The emphasis is on developing general facilities for data representation, description, analysis, and presentation that will be easily used by scientists directly, thus bypassing the knowledge acquisition bottleneck. Expert system technology is used for many different aspects of the data management system, including the direct user interface, the interface to the data analysis routines, and the analysis of instrument status.

  20. Use of ground-based wind profiles in mesoscale forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of recent uses of ground-based wind profile data in mesoscale forecasting. Some of the applications are in real time, and some are after the fact. Not all of the work mentioned here has been published yet, but references are given wherever possible. As Gage and Balsley (1978) point out, sensitive Doppler radars have been used to examine tropospheric wind profiles since the 1970's. It was not until the early 1980's, however, that the potential contribution of these instruments to operational forecasting and numerical weather prediction became apparent. Profiler winds and radiosonde winds compare favorably, usually within a few m/s in speed and 10 degrees in direction (see Hogg et al., 1983), but the obvious advantage of the profiler is its frequent (hourly or more often) sampling of the same volume. The rawinsonde balloon is launched only twice a day and drifts with the wind. In this paper, I will: (1) mention two operational uses of data from a wind profiling system developed jointly by the Wave Propagation and Aeronomy Laboratories of NOAA; (2) describe a number of displays of these same data on a workstation for mesoscale forecasting developed by the Program for Regional Observing and Forecasting Services (PROFS); and (3) explain some interesting diagnostic calculations performed by meteorologists of the Wave Propagation Laboratory.

  1. Ground-based observations coordinated with Viking satellite measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opgenoorth, H.J.; Kirkwood, S.

    1989-01-01

    The instrumentation and the orbit of the Viking satellite made this first Swedish satellite mission ideally suited for coordinated observations with the dense network of ground-based stations in northern Scandinavia. Several arrays of complementing instruments such as magnetometers, all-sky cameras, riometers and doppler radars monitored on a routine basis the ionosphere under the magnetospheric region passed by Viking. For a large number of orbits the Viking passages close to Scandinavia were covered by the operation of specially designed programmes at the European incoherent-scatter facility (EISCAT). First results of coordinated observations on the ground and aboard Viking have shed new light on the most spectacular feature of substorm expansion, the westward-travelling surge. The end of a substorm and the associated decay of a westward-travelling surge have been analysed. EISCAT measurements of high spatial and temporal resolution indicate that the conductivities and electric fields associated with westward-travelling surges are not represented correctly by the existing models. (author)

  2. Chemiluminescent labels released from long spacer arm-functionalized magnetic particles: a novel strategy for ultrasensitive and highly selective detection of pathogen infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haowen; Liang, Wenbiao; He, Nongyue; Deng, Yan; Li, Zhiyang

    2015-01-14

    Previously, the unique advantages provided by chemiluminescence (CL) and magnetic particles (MPs) have resulted in the development of many useful nucleic acid detection methods. CL is highly sensitive, but when applied to MPs, its intensity is limited by the inner filter-like effect arising from excess dark MPs. Herein, we describe a modified strategy whereby CL labels are released from MPs to eliminate this negative effect. This approach relies on (1) the magnetic capture of target molecules on long spacer arm-functionalized magnetic particles (LSA-MPs), (2) the conjugation of streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (SA-AP) to biotinylated amplicons of target pathogens, (3) the release of CL labels (specifically, AP tags), and (4) the detection of the released labels. CL labels were released from LSA-MPs through LSA ultrasonication or DNA enzymolysis, which proved to be the superior method. In contrast to conventional MPs, LSA-MPs exhibited significantly improved CL detection, because of the introduction of LSA, which was made of water-soluble carboxymethylated β-1,3-glucan. Detection of hepatitis B virus with this technique revealed a low detection limit of 50 fM, high selectivity, and excellent reproducibility. Thus, this approach may hold great potential for early stage clinical diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  3. Evaluation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone trends over Western Europe from ground-based FTIR network observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vigouroux

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the European project UFTIR (Time series of Upper Free Troposphere observations from an European ground-based FTIR network, six ground-based stations in Western Europe, from 79° N to 28° N, all equipped with Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR instruments and part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, have joined their efforts to evaluate the trends of several direct and indirect greenhouse gases over the period 1995–2004. The retrievals of CO, CH4, C2H6, N2O, CHClF2, and O3 have been optimized. Using the optimal estimation method, some vertical information can be obtained in addition to total column amounts. A bootstrap resampling method has been implemented to determine annual partial and total column trends for the target gases. The present work focuses on the ozone results. The retrieved time series of partial and total ozone columns are validated with ground-based correlative data (Brewer, Dobson, UV-Vis, ozonesondes, and Lidar. The observed total column ozone trends are in agreement with previous studies: 1 no total column ozone trend is seen at the lowest latitude station Izaña (28° N; 2 slightly positive total column trends are seen at the two mid-latitude stations Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch (47° N, only one of them being significant; 3 the highest latitude stations Harestua (60° N, Kiruna (68° N and Ny-Ålesund (79° N show significant positive total column trends. Following the vertical information contained in the ozone FTIR retrievals, we provide partial columns trends for the layers: ground-10 km, 10–18 km, 18–27 km, and 27–42 km, which helps to distinguish the contributions from dynamical and chemical changes on the total column ozone trends. We obtain no statistically significant trends in the ground-10 km layer for five out of the six ground-based stations. We find significant positive trends for the lowermost

  4. Strategy of thunderstorm measurement with super dense ground-based observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    It's not easy to understand the inside structure and developing process of thunderstorm only with existing meteorological instruments since its horizontal extent of the storm cell is sometimes smaller than an order of 10 km while one of the densest ground network in Japan, AMEDAS, consists of sites located every 17 km in average and the resolution of meteorological radar is 1-2 km in general. Even the X-band radar realizes the resolution of 250 m or larger. Here we suggest a new super dense observation network with simple and low cost sensors that can be used for measurement both of raindrop and vertical electric field change caused by cloud-to-ground lightning discharge. This sensor consists of two aluminum plates with a diameter of 10-20 cm. We carried out an observation campaign in summer of 2013 in the foothills of Mt. Yastugatake, Yamanashi and Nagano prefectures in Japan, installing 6 plate-type sensors at a distance of about 4 km. Horizontal location, height and charge amount of each lightning discharge are estimated successfully based on the information of electric field changes at several observing sites. Moreover, it was found that the thunderstorm has a very narrow structure well smaller than 300 m that cannot be measured by any other ways, counting the positive and negative pulses caused by attachment of raindrop to the sensor plate, respectively. We plan to construct a new super dense observation network in the north Kanto region, Japan, where the lightning activity is most prominent in summer Japan, distributing more than several tens of sensors at every 4 km or shorter, such as an order of 100 m at minimum. This kind of new type network will reveal the unknown fine structures of thunderstorms and open the door for constructing real time alert system of torrential rainfall and lightning stroke especially in the city area.

  5. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  6. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel strategy for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping with SybrGreen and molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szuhai, K; Sandhaus, E; Kolkman-Uljee, SM; Lemaitre, M; Truffert, JC; Dirks, RW; Tanke, HJ; Fleuren, GJ; Schuuring, E; Raap, AK

    2001-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. For identification of the large number of different HPV types found in (pre)malignant lesions, a robust methodology is needed that combines general HPV detection with HPV genotyping. We have developed for

  8. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei; Kong, Rongmei; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS 2 ) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3′-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS 2 nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS 2 nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics. - Highlights: • A fluorescence polarization strategy for DNA glycosylase activity detection was developed. • The present method was based on WS 2 nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted signal amplification. • A high sensitivity and desirable selectivity were achieved. • This method provides a promising universal platform for DNA glycosylase

  9. GLM Proxy Data Generation: Methods for Stroke/Pulse Level Inter-Comparison of Ground-Based Lightning Reference Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Kenneth L.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Bateman, Monte G.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce useful proxy data for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) in regions not covered by VLF lightning mapping systems, we intend to employ data produced by ground-based (regional or global) VLF/LF lightning detection networks. Before using these data in GLM Risk Reduction tasks, it is necessary to have a quantitative understanding of the performance of these networks, in terms of CG flash/stroke DE, cloud flash/pulse DE, location accuracy, and CLD/CG classification error. This information is being obtained through inter-comparison with LMAs and well-quantified VLF/LF lightning networks. One of our approaches is to compare "bulk" counting statistics on the spatial scale of convective cells, in order to both quantify relative performance and observe variations in cell-based temporal trends provided by each network. In addition, we are using microsecond-level stroke/pulse time correlation to facilitate detailed inter-comparisons at a more-fundamental level. The current development status of our ground-based inter-comparison and evaluation tools will be presented, and performance metrics will be discussed through a comparison of Vaisala s Global Lightning Dataset (GLD360) with the NLDN at locations within and outside the U.S.

  10. DEM Development from Ground-Based LiDAR Data: A Method to Remove Non-Surface Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Sharma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Topography and land cover characteristics can have significant effects on infiltration, runoff, and erosion processes on watersheds. The ability to model the timing and routing of surface water and erosion is affected by the resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM. High resolution ground-based Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR technology can be used to collect detailed topographic and land cover characteristic data. In this study, a method was developed to remove vegetation from ground-based LiDAR data to create high resolution DEMs. Research was conducted on intensively studied rainfall–runoff plots on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. LiDAR data were used to generate 1 cm resolution digital surface models (DSM for 5 plots. DSMs created directly from LiDAR data contain non-surface objects such as vegetation cover. A vegetation removal method was developed which used a slope threshold and a focal mean filter method to remove vegetation and create bare earth DEMs. The method was validated on a synthetic plot, where rocks and vegetation were added incrementally. Results of the validation showed a vertical error of ±7.5 mm in the final DEM.

  11. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  12. Validation of OMI erythemal doses with multi-sensor ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina Maria; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Taylor, Michael; Kazadzis, Stelios; Arola, Antti; Koukouli, Maria Elissavet; Bais, Alkiviadis; Meleti, Chariklia; Balis, Dimitrios

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) erythemal dose rates using ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece. In the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, a Yankee Environmental System UVB-1 radiometer measures the erythemal dose rates every minute, and a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU) multi-filter radiometer provides multi-filter based irradiances that were used to derive erythemal dose rates for the period 2005-2014. Both these datasets were independently validated against collocated UV irradiance spectra from a Brewer MkIII spectrophotometer. Cloud detection was performed based on measurements of the global horizontal radiation from a Kipp & Zonen pyranometer and from NILU measurements in the visible range. The satellite versus ground observation validation was performed taking into account the effect of temporal averaging, limitations related to OMI quality control criteria, cloud conditions, the solar zenith angle and atmospheric aerosol loading. Aerosol optical depth was also retrieved using a collocated CIMEL sunphotometer in order to assess its impact on the comparisons. The effect of total ozone columns satellite versus ground-based differences on the erythemal dose comparisons was also investigated. Since most of the public awareness alerts are based on UV Index (UVI) classifications, an analysis and assessment of OMI capability for retrieving UVIs was also performed. An overestimation of the OMI erythemal product by 3-6% and 4-8% with respect to ground measurements is observed when examining overpass and noontime estimates respectively. The comparisons revealed a relatively small solar zenith angle dependence, with the OMI data showing a slight dependence on aerosol load, especially at high aerosol optical depth values. A mean underestimation of 2% in OMI total ozone columns under cloud-free conditions was found to lead to an overestimation in OMI erythemal

  13. Monitoring Hydraulic Fracturing Using Ground-Based Controlled Source Electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M. S.; Trevino, S., III; Everett, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing allows hydrocarbon production in low permeability formations. Imaging the distribution of fluid used to create a hydraulic fracture can aid in the characterization of fracture properties such as extent of plume penetration as well as fracture azimuth and symmetry. This could contribute to improving the efficiency of an operation, for example, in helping to determine ideal well spacing or the need to refracture a zone. A ground-based controlled-source electromagnetics (CSEM) technique is ideal for imaging the fluid due to the change in field caused by the difference in the conductive properties of the fluid when compared to the background. With advances in high signal to noise recording equipment, coupled with a high-power, broadband transmitter we can show hydraulic fracture extent and azimuth with minimal processing. A 3D finite element code is used to model the complete well casing along with the layered subsurface. This forward model is used to optimize the survey design and isolate the band of frequencies with the best response. In the field, the results of the modeling are also used to create a custom pseudorandom numeric (PRN) code to control the frequencies transmitted through a grounded dipole source. The receivers record the surface voltage across two grounded dipoles, one parallel and one perpendicular to the transmitter. The data are presented as the displays of amplitude ratios across several frequencies with the associated spatial information. In this presentation, we show multiple field results in multiple basins in the United States along with the CSEM theory used to create the survey designs.

  14. Space- and Ground-based Coronal Spectro-Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Bemporad, Alessandro; Rybak, Jan; Capobianco, Gerardo

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives of ultraviolet and visible-light spectro-polarimetric instrumentation for probing coronal magnetism from space-based and ground-based observatories. Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter - has been recently installed on the Lomnicky Peak Observatory 20cm Zeiss coronagraph. The preliminary results from CorMag will be presented. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-alpha, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. This presentation will describe how in future re-flights SCORE could observe the expected Hanle effect in corona with a HI Lyman-alpha polarimeter.

  15. Spectral Analysis of the Background in Ground-based, Long-slit ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1996-12-08

    Dec 8, 1996 ... Spectral Analysis of the Background in Ground-based,. Long-slit .... Figure 1 plots spectra from the 2-D array, after instrumental calibration and before correction for ..... which would merit attention and a better understanding.

  16. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Combined Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files of all distinct navigation messages...

  17. Chasing Small Exoplanets with Ground-Based Near-Infrared Transit Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, K. D.; Barentsen, G.; Vinicius, Z.; Vanderburg, A.; Coughlin, J.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Barclay, T.; Quintana, E.

    2017-11-01

    I will present results from a ground-based survey to measure the infrared radius and other properties of small K2 exoplanets and candidates. The survey is preparation for upcoming discoveries from TESS and characterization with JWST.

  18. NASA's Newest Orbital Debris Ground-based Telescope Assets: MCAT and UKIRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S.; Frith, J.; Pace, L. F.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Glesne, T.; Maeda, R.; Buckalew, B.; Nishimoto, D.; Douglas, D.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2014-09-01

    these ground-based telescope assets will yield spectral coverage ranging from 0.3 25 microns, allowing orbital debris to be studied in depth across a wider wavelength range in the visible and IR than ever previously studied by ODPO. Located on opposite sides of the world and in opposite hemispheres, they offer access to nearly the entire GEO belt on any given night, allowing immediate coverage of nearly any time-critical break-up event. By expanding the methods for surveying, detecting, and characterizing orbital debris, we can better model the debris environment and ultimately gain insight into how to mitigate potential collisions for future missions. Acknowledgments: Special thanks to Matt Bold, Rick Kendrick, the UKIRT staff, the Joint Astronomy Centre, Lockheed Martin, and the University of Arizona, for their collaborative efforts toward modifying UKIRT to boldly venture inward in space to track tiny man-made objects orbiting the Earth.

  19. A dual amplification strategy for DNA detection combining bio-barcode assay and metal-enhanced fluorescence modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Tian; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Chengzhi; Li, Na

    2014-11-11

    Silver-enhanced fluorescence was coupled with a bio-barcode assay to facilitate a dual amplification assay to demonstrate a non-enzymatic approach for simple and sensitive detection of DNA. In the assay design, magnetic nanoparticles seeded with silver nanoparticles were modified with the capture DNA, and silver nanoparticles were modified with the binding of ssDNA and the fluorescently labeled barcode dsDNA. Upon introduction of the target DNA, a sandwich structure was formed because of the hybridization reaction. By simple magnetic separation, silver-enhanced fluorescence of barcode DNAs could be readily measured without the need of a further step to liberate barcode DNAs from silver nanoparticles, endowing the method with simplicity and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 1 pM.

  20. Non-enzymolytic adenosine barcode-mediated dual signal amplification strategy for ultrasensitive protein detection using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Li, Tengfei; Shu, Chang; Ji, Shunli; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Li, Duo; Mtalimanja, Michael; Sun, Luning; Ding, Li

    2018-05-10

    A method is described for the determination of proteins with LC-MS/MS enabled by a small molecule (adenosine) barcode and based on a double-recognition sandwich structure. The coagulation protein thrombin was chosen as the model analyte. Magnetic nanoparticles were functionalized with aptamer29 (MNP/apt29) and used to capture thrombin from the samples. MNP/apt29 forms a sandwich with functionalized gold nanoparticles modified with (a) aptamer15 acting as thrombin-recognizing element and (b) a large number of adenosine as mass barcodes. The sandwich formed (MNP/apt29-thrombin-apt15/AuNP/adenosine) can ben magnetically separated from the sample. Mass barcodes are subsequently released from the sandwiched structure for further analysis by adding 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. Adenosine is then detected by LC-MS/MS as it reflects the level of thrombin with impressively amplified signal. Numerous adenosines introduced into the sandwich proportional to the target concentration further amplify the signal. Under optimized conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the thrombin concentration in the range of 0.02 nM to 10 nM, with a detection limit of 9 fM. The application of this method to the determination of thrombin in spiked plasma samples gave recoveries that ranged from 92.3% to 104.7%. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of a method for the determination of thrombin with LC-MS/MS. The method is based on a double-recognition sandwiched structure. With LC-MS/MS, mass barcodes (adenosine) are detected to quantify thrombin, which amplifies the detection signal impressively.

  1. New colorimetric and fluorometric sensing strategy based on the anisotropic growth of histidine-mediated synthesis of gold nanoclusters for iodide-specific detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Zhu, Haiyan; Yang, Xiaoming; Dou, Yao; Liu, Zhongde

    2013-04-07

    Iodide, as a biologically important anion, it remains a worthwhile yet challenging undertaking to find a sensitive and specific approach to provide a technically simple iodide detection. In this article, it was found that no other ions than iodide-induced anisotropic growth of gold nanocrystals (AuNCs) originated from a small molecule, histidine-mediated synthesis of AuNCs, were observed. Simultaneously, it is accompanied by the fluorescence quenching of AuNCs and the naked-eye visible color change. Therefore, a new colorimetric and fluorometric sensing strategy was developed for the iodide-specific detection. Compared with currently reported methods, the present one displays the advantages of the visual detection and simplicity. The quenched fluorescence and enhanced surface plasmon resonance absorbance were found to be proportional to the iodide concentration over the range of 0.8-60 and 1.2-50 μM with a detection limit (3σ) of 118 nM and 215 nM, respectively.

  2. A simplified strategy for sensitive detection of Rose rosette virus compatible with three RT-PCR chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobhal, Shefali; Olson, Jennifer D; Arif, Mohammad; Garcia Suarez, Johnny A; Ochoa-Corona, Francisco M

    2016-06-01

    Rose rosette disease is a disorder associated with infection by Rose rosette virus (RRV), a pathogen of roses that causes devastating effects on most garden cultivated varieties, and the wild invasive rose especially Rosa multiflora. Reliable and sensitive detection of this disease in early phases is needed to implement proper control measures. This study assesses a single primer-set based detection method for RRV and demonstrates its application in three different chemistries: Endpoint RT-PCR, TaqMan-quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) and SYBR Green RT-qPCR with High Resolution Melting analyses. A primer set (RRV2F/2R) was designed from consensus sequences of the nucleocapsid protein gene p3 located in the RNA 3 region of RRV. The specificity of primer set RRV2F/2R was validated in silico against published GenBank sequences and in-vitro against infected plant samples and an exclusivity panel of near-neighbor and other viruses that commonly infect Rosa spp. The developed assay is sensitive with a detection limit of 1fg from infected plant tissue. Thirty rose samples from 8 different states of the United States were tested using the developed methods. The developed methods are sensitive and reliable, and can be used by diagnostic laboratories for routine testing and disease management decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies to Increase Cancer Detection: Review of True-Positive and False-Negative Results at Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Susan P.; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Conant, Emily F.

    2016-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) represents a valuable addition to breast cancer screening by decreasing recall rates while increasing cancer detection rates. The increased accuracy achieved with DBT is due to the quasi–three-dimensional format of the reconstructed images and the ability to “scroll through” breast tissue in the reconstructed images, thereby reducing the effect of tissue superimposition found with conventional planar digital mammography. The margins of both benign and malignant lesions are more conspicuous at DBT, which allows improved lesion characterization, increased reader confidence, and improved screening outcomes. However, even with the improvements in accuracy achieved with DBT, there remain differences in breast cancer conspicuity by mammographic view. Early data suggest that breast cancers may be more conspicuous on craniocaudal (CC) views than on mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. While some very laterally located breast cancers may be visualized on only the MLO view, the increased conspicuity of cancers on the CC view compared with the MLO view suggests that DBT screening should be performed with two-view imaging. Even with the improved conspicuity of lesions at DBT, there may still be false-negative studies. Subtle lesions seen on only one view may be discounted, and dense and/or complex tissue patterns may make some cancers occult or extremely difficult to detect. Therefore, radiologists should be cognizant of both perceptual and cognitive errors to avoid potential pitfalls in lesion detection and characterization. ©RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27715711

  4. Silver nanoclusters-assisted ion-exchange reaction with CdTe quantum dots for photoelectrochemical detection of adenosine by target-triggering multiple-cycle amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Tan, Lu; Gao, Xiaoshan; Jie, Guifen; Huang, Tingyu

    2018-07-01

    Herein, we successfully devised a novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) platform for ultrasensitive detection of adenosine by target-triggering cascade multiple cycle amplification based on the silver nanoparticles-assisted ion-exchange reaction with CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In the presence of target adenosine, DNA s1 is released from the aptamer and then hybridizes with hairpin DNA (HP1), which could initiate the cycling cleavage process under the reaction of nicking endonuclease. Then the product (DNA b) of cycle I could act as the "DNA trigger" of cycle II to further generate a large number of DNA s1, which again go back to cycle I, thus a cascade multiple DNA cycle amplification was carried out to produce abundant DNA c. These DNA c fragments with the cytosine (C)-rich loop were captured by magnetic beads, and numerous silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) were synthesized by AgNO 3 and sodium borohydride. The dissolved AgNCs released numerous silver ions which could induce ion exchange reaction with the CdTe QDs, thus resulting in greatly amplified change of photocurrent for target detection. The detection linear range for adenosine was 1.0 fM ~10 nM with the detection limit of 0.5 fM. The present PEC strategy combining cascade multiple DNA cycle amplification and AgNCs-induced ion-exchange reaction with QDs provides new insight into rapid, and ultrasensitive PEC detection of different biomolecules, which showed great potential for detecting trace amounts in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative conventional- and quantum dot-labelling strategies for LPS binding site detection in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Londiwe Siphephise Mgcina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is recognized as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP and not only induces an innate immune response in plants, but also stimulates the development of characteristic defense responses. However, identification and characterization of a cell surface LPS-receptor/binding site, as described in mammals, remains elusive in plants. As an amphiphilic, macromolecular lipoglycan, intact LPS potentially contains three MAMP-active regions, represented by the O-polysaccharide chain, the core and the lipid A. Binding site studies with intact labelled LPS were conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and quantified using flow cytometry fluorescence changes. Qdots, which allow non-covalent, hydrophobic labelling were used as a novel strategy in this study and compared to covalent, hydrophilic labelling with Alexa 488. Affinity for LPS-binding sites was clearly demonstrated by concentration-, temperature- and time-dependent increases in protoplast fluorescence following treatment with the labelled LPS. Moreover, this induced fluorescence increase was convincingly reduced following pre-treatment with excess unlabeled LPS, thereby indicating reversibility of LPS binding. Inhibition of the binding process is also reported using endo- and exocytosis inhibitors. Here, we present evidence for the anticipated presence of LPS-specific binding sites in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and furthermore propose Qdots as a more sensitive LPS-labelling strategy in comparison to the conventional Alexa 488 hydrazide label for binding studies.

  6. An RNA-Seq strategy to detect the complete coding and non-coding transcriptome including full-length imprinted macro ncRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Huang

    Full Text Available Imprinted macro non-protein-coding (nc RNAs are cis-repressor transcripts that silence multiple genes in at least three imprinted gene clusters in the mouse genome. Similar macro or long ncRNAs are abundant in the mammalian genome. Here we present the full coding and non-coding transcriptome of two mouse tissues: differentiated ES cells and fetal head using an optimized RNA-Seq strategy. The data produced is highly reproducible in different sequencing locations and is able to detect the full length of imprinted macro ncRNAs such as Airn and Kcnq1ot1, whose length ranges between 80-118 kb. Transcripts show a more uniform read coverage when RNA is fragmented with RNA hydrolysis compared with cDNA fragmentation by shearing. Irrespective of the fragmentation method, all coding and non-coding transcripts longer than 8 kb show a gradual loss of sequencing tags towards the 3' end. Comparisons to published RNA-Seq datasets show that the strategy presented here is more efficient in detecting known functional imprinted macro ncRNAs and also indicate that standardization of RNA preparation protocols would increase the comparability of the transcriptome between different RNA-Seq datasets.

  7. Terrain Commander: Unattended Ground-Based Surveillance System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steadman, Bob

    2000-01-01

    .... Terrain Commander OASIS provides next generation target detection, classification, and tracking through smart sensor fusion of beamforming acoustic, seismic, passive infrared, and magnetic sensors...

  8. Strategies for the early detection of drug-induced hepatic steatosis in preclinical drug safety evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacher, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in the liver. Although relatively benign, simple steatosis can eventually lead to the development of steatohepatitis, a more serious condition characterized by fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventual liver failure if the underlying cause is not eliminated. According to the 'two hit' theory of steatohepatitis, the initial hit involves fat accumulation in the liver, and a second hit leads to inflammation and subsequent tissue injury. Because some xenobiotics target liver fatty acid metabolism, especially mitochondrial β-oxidation, it is important to avoid potential drug candidates that can contribute to either the initiation of liver steatosis or progression to the more injurious steatohepatitis. The gold standard for the detection of these types of hepatic effects is histopathological examination of liver tissue. In animal studies, these examinations are slow, restricted to a single sampling time, and limited tissue sections. Recent literature suggests that rapid in vitro screening methods can be used early in the drug R and D process to identify compounds with steatotic potential. Further, progress in the identification of potential serum or plasma protein biomarkers for these liver changes may provide additional in vivo tools to the preclinical study toxicologist. This review summarizes recent developments for in vitro screening and in vivo biomarker detection for steatotic drug candidates.

  9. Power allocation for target detection in radar networks based on low probability of intercept: A cooperative game theoretical strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2017-08-01

    Distributed radar network systems have been shown to have many unique features. Due to their advantage of signal and spatial diversities, radar networks are attractive for target detection. In practice, the netted radars in radar networks are supposed to maximize their transmit power to achieve better detection performance, which may be in contradiction with low probability of intercept (LPI). Therefore, this paper investigates the problem of adaptive power allocation for radar networks in a cooperative game-theoretic framework such that the LPI performance can be improved. Taking into consideration both the transmit power constraints and the minimum signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) requirement of each radar, a cooperative Nash bargaining power allocation game based on LPI is formulated, whose objective is to minimize the total transmit power by optimizing the power allocation in radar networks. First, a novel SINR-based network utility function is defined and utilized as a metric to evaluate power allocation. Then, with the well-designed network utility function, the existence and uniqueness of the Nash bargaining solution are proved analytically. Finally, an iterative Nash bargaining algorithm is developed that converges quickly to a Pareto optimal equilibrium for the cooperative game. Numerical simulations and theoretic analysis are provided to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Nanoparticle-functionalized nucleic acids: A strategy for amplified electrochemical detection of some single-base mismatches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahangar, Laleh Enayati [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrgardi, Masoud A., E-mail: m.mehrgardi@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In this study, nanoparticle-functionalized nucleic acids were employed to improve the sensitivity of electrochemical DNA biosensors that make capable them to detect different types of single-base mismatches (SBMs), including thermodynamically stable ones. The present biosensor was constructed by the immobilization of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) on the surface of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) via SH-functionalized DNA. A redox probe of 2-mercapto-1-methyl imidazole (MMI), which has different electrochemical behavior on Pt-NP and CPE, was used. This behavior helps to overcome the pinhole effect in DNA hybridization biosensors. Additionally, in the present biosensor, the positioning of the redox probe under the SBM in DNA, which decreases the sensitivity of most DNA biosensors, did not contribute to the observed electrochemical signal.

  11. Nanoparticle-functionalized nucleic acids: A strategy for amplified electrochemical detection of some single-base mismatches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahangar, Laleh Enayati; Mehrgardi, Masoud A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, nanoparticle-functionalized nucleic acids were employed to improve the sensitivity of electrochemical DNA biosensors that make capable them to detect different types of single-base mismatches (SBMs), including thermodynamically stable ones. The present biosensor was constructed by the immobilization of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) on the surface of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) via SH-functionalized DNA. A redox probe of 2-mercapto-1-methyl imidazole (MMI), which has different electrochemical behavior on Pt-NP and CPE, was used. This behavior helps to overcome the pinhole effect in DNA hybridization biosensors. Additionally, in the present biosensor, the positioning of the redox probe under the SBM in DNA, which decreases the sensitivity of most DNA biosensors, did not contribute to the observed electrochemical signal.

  12. Unenhanced breast MRI (STIR, T2-weighted TSE, DWIBS): An accurate and alternative strategy for detecting and differentiating breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Moschetta, Marco

    2015-10-01

    To assess the role of STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences for detecting and characterizing breast lesions and to compare unenhanced (UE)-MRI results with contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI and histological findings, having the latter as the reference standard. Two hundred eighty consecutive patients (age range, 27-73 years; mean age±standard deviation (SD), 48.8±9.8years) underwent MR examination with a diagnostic protocol including STIR, T2-weighted TSE, THRIVE and DWIBS sequences. Two radiologists blinded to both dynamic sequences and histological findings evaluated in consensus STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences and after two weeks CE-MRI images searching for breast lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy for UE-MRI and CE-MRI were calculated. UE-MRI results were also compared with CE- MRI. UE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 94%, 79%, 86%, 79% and 94%, respectively. CE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 98%, 83%, 90%, 84% and 98%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between UE-MRI and CE-MRI was found. Breast UE-MRI could represent an accurate diagnostic tool and a valid alternative to CE-MRI for evaluating breast lesions. STIR and DWIBS sequences allow to detect breast lesions while T2-weighted TSE sequences and ADC values could be useful for lesion characterization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence on the interferometry due to the instability of ground-based synthetic aperture radar work platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Gang; Wei, Guohua; Wang, Xu; Kong, Ming

    2018-03-01

    There has been increased interest over several decades for applying ground-based synthetic aperture radar (GB-SAR) for monitoring terrain displacement. GB-SAR can achieve multitemporal surface deformation maps of the entire terrain with high spatial resolution and submilimetric accuracy due to the ability of continuous monitoring a certain area day and night regardless of the weather condition. The accuracy of the interferometric measurement result is very important. In this paper, the basic principle of InSAR is expounded, the influence of the platform's instability on the interferometric measurement results are analyzed. The error sources of deformation detection estimation are analyzed using precise geometry of imaging model. Finally, simulation results demonstrates the validity of our analysis.

  14. Folic Acid Targeting for Efficient Isolation and Detection of Ovarian Cancer CTCs from Human Whole Blood Based on Two-Step Binding Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Liju; Li, Fulai; Huang, Xiaolin; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Xiong, Yonghua; Fu, Fen; Xu, Hengyi

    2018-04-25

    Studies regarding circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have great significance for cancer prognosis, treatment monitoring, and metastasis diagnosis. However, due to their extremely low concentration in peripheral blood, isolation and enrichment of CTCs are the key steps for early detection. To this end, targeting the folic acid receptors (FRs) on the CTC surface for capture with folic acid (FA) using bovine serum albumin (BSA)-tether for multibiotin enhancement in combination with streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs-SA) was developed for ovarian cancer CTC isolation. The streptavidin-biotin-system-mediated two-step binding strategy was shown to capture CTCs from whole blood efficiently without the need for a pretreatment process. The optimized parameters for this system exhibited an average capture efficiency of 80%, which was 25% higher than that of FA-decorated magnetic nanoparticles based on the one-step CTC separation method. Moreover, the isolated cells remained highly viable and were cultured directly without detachment from the MNPs-SA-biotin-CTC complex. Furthermore, when the system was applied for the isolation and detection of CTCs in ovarian cancer patients' peripheral blood samples, it exhibited an 80% correlation with clinical diagnostic criteria. The results indicated that FA targeting, in combination with BSA-based multibiotin enhancement magnetic nanoparticle separation, is a promising tool for CTC enrichment and detection of early-stage ovarian cancer.

  15. Blowing snow detection from ground-based ceilometers : Application to East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; Lhermitte, S.L.M.; Lenaerts, Jan T M; Schween, Jan H.; Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Blowing snow impacts Antarctic ice sheet surface mass balance by snow redistribution and sublimation. However, numerical models poorly represent blowing snow processes, while direct observations are limited in space and time. Satellite retrieval of blowing snow is hindered by clouds and only the

  16. A highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptasensor for staphylococcal enterotoxin B detection based on exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Wang, Hongxin; Wang, Zhouping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive FRET aptasensor was developed for staphylococcal enterotoxin B determination. •SEB was recognized by SEB aptamer with high affinity and specificity. •The Mn 2+ doped NaYF 4 :Yb/Er UCNPs used as donor to quencher dye (BHQ 3 ) in new FRET. •The fluorescence intensity was prominently amplified using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) bioassay was developed to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), a low molecular exotoxin, using an aptamer-affinity method coupled with upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs)-sensing, and the fluorescence intensity was prominently enhanced using an exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy. To construct this aptasensor, both fluorescence donor probes (complementary DNA 1 –UCNPs) and fluorescence quencher probes (complementary DNA 2 –Black Hole Quencher 3 (BHQ 3 )) were hybridized to an SEB aptamer, and double-strand oligonucleotides were fabricated, which quenched the fluorescence of the UCNPs via FRET. The formation of an aptamer–SEB complex in the presence of the SEB analyte resulted in not only the dissociation of aptamer from the double-strand DNA but also both the disruption of the FRET system and the restoration of the UCNPs fluorescence. In addition, the SEB was liberated from the aptamer–SEB complex using exonuclease I, an exonuclease specific to single-stranded DNA, for analyte recycling by selectively digesting a particular DNA (SEB aptamer). Based on this exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling strategy, an amplified fluorescence intensity could be produced using different SEB concentrations. Using optimized experimental conditions produced an ultrasensitive aptasensor for the detection of SEB, with a wide linear range of 0.001–1 ng mL −1 and a lower detection limit (LOD) of 0.3 pg mL −1 SEB (at 3σ). The fabricated aptasensor was used to measure SEB in a

  17. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Kong, Rongmei [The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 (China); Zhang, Liangliang, E-mail: liangzhang319@163.com [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China); Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources of Education Ministry, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, 541004 (China)

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3′-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS{sub 2} nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS{sub 2} nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics. - Highlights: • A fluorescence polarization strategy for DNA glycosylase activity detection was developed. • The present method was based on WS{sub 2} nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted signal amplification. • A high sensitivity and desirable selectivity were achieved. • This method provides a promising universal platform for DNA

  18. New Tobacco and Tobacco-Related Products: Early Detection of Product Development, Marketing Strategies, and Consumer Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Yvonne Cm; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Havermans, Anne; Talhout, Reinskje

    2018-05-28

    A wide variety of new tobacco and tobacco-related products have emerged on the market in recent years. To understand their potential implications for public health and to guide tobacco control efforts, we have used an infoveillance approach to identify new tobacco and tobacco-related products. Our search for tobacco(-related) products consists of several tailored search profiles using combinations of keywords such as "e-cigarette" and "new" to extract information from almost 9000 preselected sources such as websites of online shops, tobacco manufacturers, and news sites. Developments in e-cigarette design characteristics show a trend toward customization by possibilities to adjust temperature and airflow, and by the large variety of flavors of e-liquids. Additionally, more e-cigarettes are equipped with personalized accessories, such as mobile phones, applications, and Bluetooth. Waterpipe products follow the trend toward electronic vaping. Various heat-not-burn products were reintroduced to the market. Our search for tobacco(-related) products was specific and timely, though advances in product development require ongoing optimization of the search strategy. Our results show a trend toward products resembling tobacco cigarettes vaporizers that can be adapted to the consumers' needs. Our search for tobacco(-related) products could aid in the assessment of the likelihood of new products to gain market share, as a possible health risk or as an indicator for the need on independent and reliable information of the product to the general public. ©Yvonne CM Staal, Suzanne van de Nobelen, Anne Havermans, Reinskje Talhout. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 28.05.2018.

  19. AprioriGWAS, a new pattern mining strategy for detecting genetic variants associated with disease through interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingrun; Long, Quan; Ott, Jurg

    2014-06-01

    Identifying gene-gene interaction is a hot topic in genome wide association studies. Two fundamental challenges are: (1) how to smartly identify combinations of variants that may be associated with the trait from astronomical number of all possible combinations; and (2) how to test epistatic interaction when all potential combinations are available. We developed AprioriGWAS, which brings two innovations. (1) Based on Apriori, a successful method in field of Frequent Itemset Mining (FIM) in which a pattern growth strategy is leveraged to effectively and accurately reduce search space, AprioriGWAS can efficiently identify genetically associated genotype patterns. (2) To test the hypotheses of epistasis, we adopt a new conditional permutation procedure to obtain reliable statistical inference of Pearson's chi-square test for the [Formula: see text] contingency table generated by associated variants. By applying AprioriGWAS to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) data, we found that: (1) angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1) and four retinal genes interact with Complement Factor H (CFH). (2) GO term "glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic process" was enriched in AMD interacting genes. The epistatic interactions newly found by AprioriGWAS on AMD data are likely true interactions, since genes interacting with CFH are retinal genes, and GO term enrichment also verified that interaction between glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and CFH plays an important role in disease pathology of AMD. By applying AprioriGWAS on Bipolar disorder in WTCCC data, we found variants without marginal effect show significant interactions. For example, multiple-SNP genotype patterns inside gene GABRB2 and GRIA1 (AMPA subunit 1 receptor gene). AMPARs are found in many parts of the brain and are the most commonly found receptor in the nervous system. The GABRB2 mediates the fastest inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. GRIA1 and GABRB2 are relevant to mental disorders supported by multiple

  20. Computational reduction strategies for the detection of steady bifurcations in incompressible fluid-dynamics: Applications to Coanda effect in cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitton, Giuseppe; Quaini, Annalisa; Rozza, Gianluigi

    2017-09-01

    We focus on reducing the computational costs associated with the hydrodynamic stability of solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for a Newtonian and viscous fluid in contraction-expansion channels. In particular, we are interested in studying steady bifurcations, occurring when non-unique stable solutions appear as physical and/or geometric control parameters are varied. The formulation of the stability problem requires solving an eigenvalue problem for a partial differential operator. An alternative to this approach is the direct simulation of the flow to characterize the asymptotic behavior of the solution. Both approaches can be extremely expensive in terms of computational time. We propose to apply Reduced Order Modeling (ROM) techniques to reduce the demanding computational costs associated with the detection of a type of steady bifurcations in fluid dynamics. The application that motivated the present study is the onset of asymmetries (i.e., symmetry breaking bifurcation) in blood flow through a regurgitant mitral valve, depending on the Reynolds number and the regurgitant mitral valve orifice shape.

  1. An improved strategy for skin lesion detection and classification using uniform segmentation and feature selection based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Muhammad; Attique Khan, Muhammad; Sharif, Muhammad; Lali, Ikram Ullah; Saba, Tanzila; Iqbal, Tassawar

    2018-02-21

    Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin cancer with highest mortality rate. However, the annihilation in early stage implies a high survival rate therefore, it demands early diagnosis. The accustomed diagnosis methods are costly and cumbersome due to the involvement of experienced experts as well as the requirements for highly equipped environment. The recent advancements in computerized solutions for these diagnoses are highly promising with improved accuracy and efficiency. In this article, we proposed a method for the classification of melanoma and benign skin lesions. Our approach integrates preprocessing, lesion segmentation, features extraction, features selection, and classification. Preprocessing is executed in the context of hair removal by DullRazor, whereas lesion texture and color information are utilized to enhance the lesion contrast. In lesion segmentation, a hybrid technique has been implemented and results are fused using additive law of probability. Serial based method is applied subsequently that extracts and fuses the traits such as color, texture, and HOG (shape). The fused features are selected afterwards by implementing a novel Boltzman Entropy method. Finally, the selected features are classified by Support Vector Machine. The proposed method is evaluated on publically available data set PH2. Our approach has provided promising results of sensitivity 97.7%, specificity 96.7%, accuracy 97.5%, and F-score 97.5%, which are significantly better than the results of existing methods available on the same data set. The proposed method detects and classifies melanoma significantly good as compared to existing methods. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin; Gao, Tangling; Yao, Tai; Han, Jiecai; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Qiong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C_3N_4 as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe"3"+ detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe"3"+ ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  3. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gao, Tangling [Institute of Petrochemistry, Heilongjiang Academy of Sciences, Harbin 150040 (China); Yao, Tai [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Jiecai [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Zhengbin, E-mail: hanzhengbin@hit.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Zhihua [Liaoning Key Materials Laboratory for Railway, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Wu, Qiong [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe{sup 3+} detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe{sup 3+} ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  4. Ground-based remote sensing of HDO/H2O ratio profiles: introduction and validation of an innovative retrieval approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.

    2006-10-01

    We propose an innovative approach for analysing ground-based FTIR spectra which allows us to detect variabilities of lower and middle/upper tropospheric HDO/H2O ratios. We show that the proposed method is superior to common approaches. We estimate that lower tropospheric HDO/H2O ratios can be detected with a noise to signal ratio of 15% and middle/upper tropospheric ratios with a noise to signal ratio of 50%. The method requires the inversion to be performed on a logarithmic scale and to introduce an inter-species constraint. While common methods calculate the isotope ratio posterior to an independent, optimal estimation of the HDO and H2O profile, the proposed approach is an optimal estimator for the ratio itself. We apply the innovative approach to spectra measured continuously during 15 months and present, for the first time, an annual cycle of tropospheric HDO/H2O ratio profiles as detected by ground-based measurements. Outliers in the detected middle/upper tropospheric ratios are interpreted by backward trajectories.

  5. Detecting Slow Deformation Signals Preceding Dynamic Failure: A New Strategy For The Mitigation Of Natural Hazards (SAFER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Sergio; Colombero, Chiara; Comina, Cesare; Ferrero, Anna Maria; Mandrone, Giuseppe; Umili, Gessica; Fiaschi, Andrea; Saccorotti, Gilberto

    2015-04-01

    Rock slope monitoring is a major aim in territorial risk assessment and mitigation. The high velocity that usually characterizes the failure phase of rock instabilities makes the traditional instruments based on slope deformation measurements not applicable for early warning systems. The use of "site specific" microseismic monitoring systems, with particular reference to potential destabilizing factors, such as rainfalls and temperature changes, can allow to detect pre-failure signals in unstable sectors within the rock mass and to predict the possible acceleration to the failure. We deployed a microseismic monitoring system in October 2013 developed by the University of Turin/Compagnia San Paolo and consisting of a network of 4 triaxial 4.5 Hz seismometers connected to a 12 channel data logger on an unstable patch of the Madonna del Sasso, Italian Western Alps. The initial characterization based on geomechanical and geophysical tests allowed to understand the instability mechanism and to design a 'large aperture' configuration which encompasses the entire unstable rock and can monitor subtle changes of the mechanical properties of the medium. Stability analysis showed that the stability of the slope is due to rock bridges. A continuous recording at 250 Hz sampling frequency (switched in March 2014 to 1 kHz for improving the first arrival time picking and obtain wider frequency content information) and a trigger recording based on a STA/LTA (Short Time Average over Long Time Average) detection algorithm have been used. More than 2000 events with different waveforms, duration and frequency content have been recorded between November 2013 and March 2014. By inspecting the acquired events we identified the key parameters for a reliable distinction among the nature of each signal, i.e. the signal shape in terms of amplitude, duration, kurtosis and the frequency content in terms of range of maximum frequency content, frequency distribution in spectrograms. Four main

  6. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Felipe, S.; Tortajada-Genaro, L.A.; Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A., E-mail: amaquieira@qim.upv.es

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Recombinase polymerase amplification is a powerful DNA method operating at 40 °C. •The combination RPA–ELISA gives excellent performances for high-throughput analysis. •Screening of food safety threats has been done using standard laboratory equipment. •Allergens, GMOs, bacteria, and fungi have been successfully determined. -- Abstract: Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR–ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA–ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40 °C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5′-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA–ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA–ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings.

  7. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Felipe, S.; Tortajada-Genaro, L.A.; Puchades, R.; Maquieira, A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Recombinase polymerase amplification is a powerful DNA method operating at 40 °C. •The combination RPA–ELISA gives excellent performances for high-throughput analysis. •Screening of food safety threats has been done using standard laboratory equipment. •Allergens, GMOs, bacteria, and fungi have been successfully determined. -- Abstract: Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR–ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA–ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40 °C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5′-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA–ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA–ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings

  8. Detecting Slow Deformation Signals Preceding Dynamic Failure: A New Strategy For The Mitigation Of Natural Hazards (SAFER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, S.; Colombero, C.; Comina, C.; Umili, G.

    2015-12-01

    Rock slope monitoring is a major aim in territorial risk assessment and mitigation. The use of "site specific" microseismic monitoring systems can allow to detect pre-failure signals in unstable sectors within the rock mass and to predict the possible acceleration to the failure. To this aim multi-scale geophysical methods can provide a unique tool for an high-resolution imaging of the internal structure of the rock mass and constraints on the physical state of the medium. We present here a cross-hole seismic tomography survey coupled with laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements and determination of physical properties on rock samples to characterize the damaged and potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW, Italy). Results allowed to achieve two main advances, in terms of obtaining: i) a lithological interpretation of the velocity field obtained at the site, ii) a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granite (weathering and anisotropy) of the cliff. A microseismic monitoring system developed by the University of Turin/Compagnia San Paolo, consisting of a network of 4 triaxial geophones (4.5 Hz) connected to a 12-channel data logger, has been deployed on the unstable granitic cliff. More than 2000 events with different waveforms, duration and frequency content were recorded between November 2013 and July 2014. By inspecting the acquired events we identified the key parameters for a reliable distinction among the nature of each signal, i.e. the signal shape (in terms of amplitude, duration, kurtosis) and the frequency content (maximum frequency content and frequency distribution). Four main classes of recorded signals can be recognised: microseismic events, regional earthquakes, electrical noises and calibration signals, and unclassified events (probably grouping rockfalls, quarry blasts, other anthropic and natural sources of seismic noise).

  9. Design of a multi-model observer-based estimator for Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI strategy: application to a chemical reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chetouani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a FDI strategy for nonlinear dynamic systems. It shows a methodology of tackling the fault detection and isolation issue by combining a technique based on the residuals signal and a technique using the multiple Kalman filters. The usefulness of this combination is the on-line implementation of the set of models, which represents the normal mode and all dynamics of faults, if the statistical decision threshold on the residuals exceeds a fixed value. In other cases, one Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is enough to estimate the process state. After describing the system architecture and the proposed FDI methodology, we present a realistic application in order to show the technique's potential. An algorithm is described and applied to a chemical process like a perfectly stirred chemical reactor functioning in a semi-batch mode. The chemical reaction used is an oxido reduction one, the oxidation of sodium thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer Morgenstern et al.(2008. However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR Bais et al.(2015. Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere Erickson et al.(2015, especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle Hader et al.(2007. It can affect phytoplankton productivity Smith and Cullen(1995. This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007. Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014, which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009. Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E, in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993 and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016

  11. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Kévin; Portafaix, Thierry; Brogniez, Colette; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Bencherif, Hassan; Morel, Béatrice; Pazmino, Andrea; Metzger, Jean Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Duflot, Valentin; Goloub, Philippe; Long, Charles N.

    2018-01-01

    Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR) is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer (Morgenstern et al., 2008). However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR (Bais et al., 2015). Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere (Erickson et al., 2015), especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle (Hader et al., 2007). It can affect phytoplankton productivity (Smith and Cullen, 1995). This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007). Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014), which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009). Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E), in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993) and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016. Only

  12. Profound Effect of Profiling Platform and Normalization Strategy on Detection of Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs – A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Swanhild U.; Kaiser, Sebastian; Wagner, Carola; Thirion, Christian; Pfaffl, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    differential miRNA expression detection as well as (iii) increase inter-platform concordance. Results showed the successful adoption of loessM and generalized procrustes analysis to one-color miRNA profiling experiments. PMID:22723911

  13. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water, long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere to 8 km (in the upper troposphere and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model. We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  14. Ground-based remote sensing of tropospheric water vapour isotopologues within the project MUSICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; González, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; García, O. E.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gomez-Pelaez, A.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Dohe, S.; Blumenstock, T.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Strong, K.; Weaver, D.; Palm, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Warneke, T.; Notholt, J.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.; Jones, N.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Smale, D.; Robinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Within the project MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water), long-term tropospheric water vapour isotopologue data records are provided for ten globally distributed ground-based mid-infrared remote sensing stations of the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change). We present a new method allowing for an extensive and straightforward characterisation of the complex nature of such isotopologue remote sensing datasets. We demonstrate that the MUSICA humidity profiles are representative for most of the troposphere with a vertical resolution ranging from about 2 km (in the lower troposphere) to 8 km (in the upper troposphere) and with an estimated precision of better than 10%. We find that the sensitivity with respect to the isotopologue composition is limited to the lower and middle troposphere, whereby we estimate a precision of about 30‰ for the ratio between the two isotopologues HD16O and H216O. The measurement noise, the applied atmospheric temperature profiles, the uncertainty in the spectral baseline, and the cross-dependence on humidity are the leading error sources. We introduce an a posteriori correction method of the cross-dependence on humidity, and we recommend applying it to isotopologue ratio remote sensing datasets in general. In addition, we present mid-infrared CO2 retrievals and use them for demonstrating the MUSICA network-wide data consistency. In order to indicate the potential of long-term isotopologue remote sensing data if provided with a well-documented quality, we present a climatology and compare it to simulations of an isotope incorporated AGCM (Atmospheric General Circulation Model). We identify differences in the multi-year mean and seasonal cycles that significantly exceed the estimated errors, thereby indicating deficits in the modeled atmospheric water cycle.

  15. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  16. Ground-based solar radio observations of the August 1972 events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhonsle, R.V.; Degaonkar, S.S.; Alurkar, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based observations of the variable solar radio emission ranging from few millimetres to decametres have been used here as a diagnostic tool to gain coherent phenomenological understanding of the great 2, 4 and 7 August, 1972 solar events in terms of dominant physical processes like generation and propagation of shock waves in the solar atmosphere, particle acceleration and trapping. Four major flares are selected for detailed analysis on the basis of their ability to produce energetic protons, shock waves, polar cap absorptions (PCA) and sudden commencement (SC) geomagnetic storms. A comparative study of their radio characteristics is made. Evidence is seen for the pulsations during microwave bursts by the mechanism similar to that proposed by McLean et al. (1971), to explain the pulsations in the metre wavelength continuum radiation. It is suggested that the multiple peaks observed in some microwave bursts may be attributable to individual flares occurring sequentially due to a single initiating flare. Attempts have been made to establish identification of Type II bursts with the interplanetary shock waves and SC geomagnetic storms. Furthermore, it is suggested that it is the mass behind the shock front which is the deciding factor for the detection of shock waves in the interplantary space. It appears that more work is necessary in order to identify which of the three moving Type IV bursts (Wild and Smerd, 1972), namely, advancing shock front, expanding magnetic arch and ejected plasma blob serves as the piston-driver behind the interplanetary shocks. The existing criteria for proton flare prediction have been summarized and two new criteria have been proposed. (Auth.)

  17. Rates for parallax-shifted microlensing events from ground-based observations of the galactic bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalter, A.; Kamionkowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    The parallax effect in ground-based microlensing (ML) observations consists of a distortion to the standard ML light curve arising from the Earth's orbital motion. This can be used to partially remove the degeneracy among the system parameters in the event timescale, t 0 . In most cases, the resolution in current ML surveys is not accurate enough to observe this effect, but parallax could conceivably be detected with frequent follow-up observations of ML events in progress, providing the photometric errors are small enough. We calculate the expected fraction of ML events where the shape distortions will be observable by such follow-up observations, adopting Galactic models for the lens and source distributions that are consistent with observed microlensing timescale distributions. We study the dependence of the rates for parallax-shifted events on the frequency of follow-up observations and on the precision of the photometry. For example, we find that for hourly observations with typical photometric errors of 0.01 mag, 6% of events where the lens is in the bulge, and 31% of events where the lens is in the disk (or ∼10% of events overall), will give rise to a measurable parallax shift at the 95% confidence level. These fractions may be increased by improved photometric accuracy and increased sampling frequency. While long-duration events are favored, the surveys would be effective in picking out such distortions in events with timescales as low as t 0 ∼20 days. We study the dependence of these fractions on the assumed disk mass function and find that a higher parallax incidence is favored by mass functions with higher mean masses. Parallax measurements yield the reduced transverse speed, v, which gives both the relative transverse speed and lens mass as a function of distance. We give examples of the accuracies with which v may be measured in typical parallax events. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Validation of MOPITT carbon monoxide using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer data from NDACC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Rebecca R.; Deeter, Merritt N.; Worden, Helen M.; Gille, John; Edwards, David P.; Hannigan, James W.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Griffith, David W. T.; Smale, Dan; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Sussmann, Ralf; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Langerock, Bavo

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument provides the longest continuous dataset of carbon monoxide (CO) from space. We perform the first validation of MOPITT version 6 retrievals using total column CO measurements from ground-based remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTSs). Validation uses data recorded at 14 stations, that span a wide range of latitudes (80° N to 78° S), in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). MOPITT measurements are spatially co-located with each station, and different vertical sensitivities between instruments are accounted for by using MOPITT averaging kernels (AKs). All three MOPITT retrieval types are analyzed: thermal infrared (TIR-only), joint thermal and near infrared (TIR-NIR), and near infrared (NIR-only). Generally, MOPITT measurements overestimate CO relative to FTS measurements, but the bias is typically less than 10 %. Mean bias is 2.4 % for TIR-only, 5.1 % for TIR-NIR, and 6.5 % for NIR-only. The TIR-NIR and NIR-only products consistently produce a larger bias and lower correlation than the TIR-only. Validation performance of MOPITT for TIR-only and TIR-NIR retrievals over land or water scenes is equivalent. The four MOPITT detector element pixels are validated separately to account for their different uncertainty characteristics. Pixel 1 produces the highest standard deviation and lowest correlation for all three MOPITT products. However, for TIR-only and TIR-NIR, the error-weighted average that includes all four pixels often provides the best correlation, indicating compensating pixel biases and well-captured error characteristics. We find that MOPITT bias does not depend on latitude but rather is influenced by the proximity to rapidly changing atmospheric CO. MOPITT bias drift has been bound geographically to within ±0.5 % yr-1 or lower at almost all locations.

  19. Characterizing GEO Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentations Using Ground-based and Telescopic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.; Reyes, J. A.

    In a continued effort to better characterize the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) environment, NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while the Transtage fragmented a third time in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in low Earth orbit. To better assess and characterize these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that it was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to continue material analysis and historical documentation. The Transtage has undergone two separate spectral measurement campaigns to characterize the reflectance spectroscopy of historical aerospace materials. These data have been incorporated into the NASA Spectral Database, with the goal of using telescopic data comparisons for potential material identification. A Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system scan also has been completed and a scale model has been created for use in the Optical Measurement Center (OMC) for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements. An historical overview of the Titan IIIC Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  20. Three surveillance strategies for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in hospitalized patients: detection of colonization efficiency and a cost-effectiveness model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Todd A; Hacek, Donna M; Stroupe, Kevin T; Collins, Susan M; Peterson, Lance R

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and detection sensitivity associated with three active surveillance strategies for the identification of patients harboring vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) to determine which is the most medically and economically useful. Culture for VRE from 200 consecutive stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile culture. Following this, risk factors were assessed for patients whose culture yielded VRE, and a cost-effectiveness evaluation was performed using a decision analytic model with a probabilistic analysis. A 688-bed, tertiary-care facility in Chicago, Illinois, with approximately 39,000 annual admissions, 7,000 newborn deliveries, 56,000 emergency department visits, and 115,000 home care and 265,000 outpatient visits. All stool specimens submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory for C. difficile culture from hospital inpatients. From 200 stool samples submitted for C. difficile testing, we identified 5 patients with VRE in non-high-risk areas not screened as part of our routine patient surveillance. Medical record review revealed that all 5 had been hospitalized within the prior 2 years. Three of 5 had a history of renal impairment. The strategy that would involve screening the greatest number of patients (all those with a history of hospital admission in the prior 2 years) resulted in highest screening cost per patient admitted (dollars 2.48), lower per patient admission costs (dollars 480), and the best survival rates. An expanded VRE surveillance program that encompassed all patients hospitalized within the prior 2 years was a cost-effective screening strategy compared with a more traditional one focused on high-risk units.

  1. Interface-Targeting Strategy Enables Two-Photon Fluorescent Lipid Droplet Probes for High-Fidelity Imaging of Turbid Tissues and Detecting Fatty Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lifang; Tian, Minggang; Feng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Ruoyao; Li, Xuechen; Liu, Zhiqiang; He, Xiuquan; Sun, Jing Zhi; Yu, Xiaoqiang

    2018-04-04

    Lipid droplets (LDs) with unique interfacial architecture not only play crucial roles in protecting a cell from lipotoxicity and lipoapoptosis but also closely relate with many diseases such as fatty liver and diabetes. Thus, as one of the important applied biomaterials, fluorescent probes with ultrahigh selectivity for in situ and high-fidelity imaging of LDs in living cells and tissues are critical to elucidate relevant physiological and pathological events as well as detect related diseases. However, available probes only utilizing LDs' waterless neutral cores but ignoring the unique phospholipid monolayer interfaces exhibit low selectivity. They cannot differentiate neutral cores of LDs from intracellular other lipophilic microenvironments, which results in extensively cloud-like background noise and severely limited their bioapplications. Herein, to design LD probes with ultrahigh selectivity, the exceptional interfacial architecture of LDs is considered adequately and thus an interface-targeting strategy is proposed for the first time. According to the novel strategy, we have developed two amphipathic fluorescent probes (N-Cy and N-Py) by introducing different cations into a lipophilic fluorophore (nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)). Consequently, their cationic moiety precisely locates the interfaces through electrostatic interaction and simultaneously NBD entirely embeds into the waterless core via hydrophobic interaction. Thus, high-fidelity and background-free fluorescence imaging of LDs are expectably realized in living cells in situ. Moreover, LDs in turbid tissues like skeletal muscle slices have been clearly imaged (up to 82 μm depth) by a two-photon microscope. Importantly, using N-Cy, we not only intuitively monitored the variations of LDs in number, size, and morphology but also clearly revealed their abnormity in hepatic tissues resulting from fatty liver. Therefore, these unique probes provide excellent imaging tools for elucidating LD

  2. Estimation of High-Frequency Earth-Space Radio Wave Signals via Ground-Based Polarimetric Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolen, Steve; Chandrasekar, V.

    2002-01-01

    Expanding human presence in space, and enabling the commercialization of this frontier, is part of the strategic goals for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. Future near-Earth and planetary missions will support the use of high-frequency Earth-space communication systems. Additionally, increased commercial demand on low-frequency Earth-space links in the S- and C-band spectra have led to increased interest in the use of higher frequencies in regions like Ku and Ka-band. Attenuation of high-frequency signals, due to a precipitating medium, can be quite severe and can cause considerable disruptions in a communications link that traverses such a medium. Previously, ground radar measurements were made along the Earth-space path and compared to satellite beacon data that was transmitted to a ground station. In this paper, quantitative estimation of the attenuation along the propagation path is made via inter-comparisons of radar data taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and ground-based polarimetric radar observations. Theoretical relationships between the expected specific attenuation (k) of spaceborne measurements with ground-based measurements of reflectivity (Zh) and differential propagation phase shift (Kdp) are developed for various hydrometeors that could be present along the propagation path, which are used to estimate the two-way path-integrated attenuation (PIA) on the PR return echo. Resolution volume matching and alignment of the radar systems is performed, and a direct comparison of PR return echo with ground radar attenuation estimates is made directly on a beam-by-beam basis. The technique is validated using data collected from the TExas and Florida UNderflights (TEFLUN-B) experiment and the TRMM large Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA) campaign. Attenuation estimation derived from this method can be used for strategiC planning of communication systems for

  3. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLONASS Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS) Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files)...

  4. Ground-Based Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes Associated with Downward-Directed Lightning Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, J.; Abbasi, R.; Krehbiel, P. R.; LeVon, R.; Remington, J.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs) have been observed in satellite-borne gamma ray detectors for several decades, starting with the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray observatory in 1994. TGFs consist of bursts of upwards of 1018 primary gamma rays, with a duration of up to a few milliseconds, originating in the Earth's atmosphere. More recent observations have shown that satellite-observed TGFs are generated in upward-propagating negative leaders of intracloud lightning, suggesting that they may be sensitive to the processes responsible for the initial lightning breakdown. Here, we present the first evidence that TGFs are also produced at the beginning of negative cloud-to-ground flashes, and that they may provide a new window through which ground-based observatories may contribute to understanding the breakdown process. The Telescope Array Surface Detector (TASD) is a 700 square kilometer cosmic ray observatory, an array of 507 3m2 scintillators on a 1.2 km grid. The array is triggered and read out when at least three adjacent detectors observe activity within an 8 μs window. Following the observation of bursts of anomalous TASD triggers, lasting a few hundred microseconds and correlated with local lightning activity, a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and slow electric field antenna were installed at the TASD site in order to study the effect. From data obtained between 2014 and 2016, correlated observations were obtained for ten -CG flashes. In 9 out of 10 cases, bursts of up to five anomalous triggers were detected during the first ms of the flash, as negative breakdown was descending into lower positive storm charge. The triggers occurred when the LMA-detected VHF radiation sources were at altitudes between 1.5 to 4.5 km AGL. The tenth flash was initiated by an unusually energetic leader that reached the ground in 2.5 ms and produced increasingly powerful triggers down to about 500 m AGL. While the TASD is not optimized for individual gamma ray detection

  5. Metrology of ground-based satellite validation: co-location mismatch and smoothing issues of total ozone comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verhoelst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons with ground-based correlative measurements constitute a key component in the validation of satellite data on atmospheric composition. The error budget of these comparisons contains not only the measurement errors but also several terms related to differences in sampling and smoothing of the inhomogeneous and variable atmospheric field. A versatile system for Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs, named OSSSMOSE, is used here to quantify these terms. Based on the application of pragmatic observation operators onto high-resolution atmospheric fields, it allows a simulation of each individual measurement, and consequently, also of the differences to be expected from spatial and temporal field variations between both measurements making up a comparison pair. As a topical case study, the system is used to evaluate the error budget of total ozone column (TOC comparisons between GOME-type direct fitting (GODFITv3 satellite retrievals from GOME/ERS2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A, and ground-based direct-sun and zenith–sky reference measurements such as those from Dobsons, Brewers, and zenith-scattered light (ZSL-DOAS instruments, respectively. In particular, the focus is placed on the GODFITv3 reprocessed GOME-2A data record vs. the ground-based instruments contributing to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. The simulations are found to reproduce the actual measurements almost to within the measurement uncertainties, confirming that the OSSE approach and its technical implementation are appropriate. This work reveals that many features of the comparison spread and median difference can be understood as due to metrological differences, even when using strict co-location criteria. In particular, sampling difference errors exceed measurement uncertainties regularly at most mid- and high-latitude stations, with values up to 10 % and more in extreme cases. Smoothing difference errors only

  6. A novel strategy for dual-channel detection of metallothioneins and mercury based on the conformational switching of functional chimera aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Xue, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Bin; Cao, Jin-Xiu; Chen, Si-Han; Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Huang, Yan-Qin

    2015-03-25

    A novel strategy for dual-channel detection of metallothioneins (MTs) and Hg(2+) has been proposed. In the absence of Hg(2+), the functional chimera aptamer (FCA) designed can form an intact G-quadruplex with flexibility, which was demonstrated to have peroxidase-like activities upon hemin binding. In the presence of Hg(2+), the formation of T-Hg(2+)-T complex results in the conformational switching of FCA, which lost the peroxidase-like activities and cannot catalyze the oxidation of ABTS by H2O2. Upon addition of MTs in this solution, MTs could interact with Hg(2+) to form a MTs-Hg(2+) complex, leading to the recovery of the G-quadruplex DNAzyme. The color and absorbance of the sensing system were also changed accordingly. In the optimizing condition, ΔA was directly proportional to the concentration ranging from 8.84 nM to 1.0 μM for Hg(2+), and 7.82 nM to 0.462 μM for MTs with the detection limits of 2.65 nM and 2.34 nM, respectively. The proposed dual-channel method avoids the label steps in common methods, and allows direct analysis of the samples without costly instruments, and is reliable, inexpensive and sensitive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In-season monitoring of hip and groin strength, health and function in elite youth soccer: Implementing an early detection and management strategy over two consecutive seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, Martin; Thorborg, Kristian; Welvaert, Marijke; Pizzari, Tania

    2018-03-14

    The primary purpose of this study was to describe an early detection and management strategy when monitoring in-season hip and groin strength, health and function in soccer. Secondly to compare pre-season to in-season test results. Longitudinal cohort study. Twenty-seven elite male youth soccer players (age: 15.07±0.73years) volunteered to participate in the study. Monitoring tests included: adductor strength, adductor/abductor strength ratio and hip and groin outcome scores (HAGOS). Data were recorded at pre-season and at 22 monthly intervals in-season. Thresholds for alerts to initiate further investigations were defined as any of the following: adductor strength reductions >15%, adductor/abductor strength ratio time-point one (ptime-loss were classified minimal or mild. In-season monitoring aimed at early detection and management of hip and groin strength, health and function appears promising. Hip and groin strength, health and function improved quickly from pre-season to in-season in a high-risk population for ongoing hip and groin problems. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a monoclonal antibody against the left wing of ciguatoxin CTX1B: thiol strategy and detection using a sandwich ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Katsutoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Fujii, Ikuo; Hirama, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a form of food poisoning caused by the ingestion of a variety of reef fish that have accumulated trace amounts of ciguatoxins produced by dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus through the food chain. CFP affects more than 50,000 people each year. The extremely low level of the causative neurotoxins, ciguatoxins, in fish has hampered the preparation of antibodies for detecting the toxins. In this paper, we describe a thiol strategy for synthesizing a keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-conjugate (20) of the ABCDE-ring fragment of the Pacific ciguatoxins, CTX1B (1) and 54-deoxyCTX1B (4). We succeeded in producing a monoclonal antibody (3G8) against the left wings of these ciguatoxins by immunizing mice with the hapten-KLH conjugate (20) as the synthetic antigen. The most promising mAb, 3G8, does not cross-react with other related marine toxins. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing 3G8 and the previously prepared monoclonal antibody (8H4) enabled us to detect 1 specifically at less than 0.28 ng/mL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  10. The mysterious mid-latitude ionosphere of Saturn via ground-based observations of H3+: ring rain and other drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, J.; Moore, L.; Stallard, T.; Melin, H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Oliversen, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the "ring rain" which falls on Saturn from the rings also leaves an imprint on the low-latitude upper-atmosphere. Specifically, the ionospheric-bound H3+ ion appeared to emit brightest where water products are known to fall. Here we show the first re-detections of the imprint of "ring rain" on Saturn's ionosphere, using ground-based Keck telescope data from 2013 and 2014. We have also found that the emission from low-latitudes decreases dramatically from 2011 to 2013, implying a planetary cooling over the time period, but we are unaware of the mechanism of this cooling at present.

  11. Review of commonly used remote sensing and ground-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review provides an overview of the use of remote sensing data, the development of spectral reflectance indices for detecting plant water stress, and the usefulness of field measurements for ground-truthing purposes. Reliable measurements of plant water stress over large areas are often required for management ...

  12. Broadly Applicable Strategy for the Fluorescence Based Detection and Differentiation of Glutathione and Cysteine/Homocysteine: Demonstration in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqiang; Luo, Hongchen; Liu, Xingjiang; Foley, James W; Song, Xiangzhi

    2016-04-05

    Glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), and homocysteine (Hcy) are small biomolecular thiols that are present in all cells and extracellular fluids of healthy mammals. It is well-known that each plays a separate, critically important role in human physiology and that abnormal levels of each are predictive of a variety of different disease states. Although a number of fluorescence-based methods have been developed that can detect biomolecules that contain sulfhydryl moieties, few are able to differentiate between GSH and Cys/Hcy. In this report, we demonstrate a broadly applicable approach for the design of fluorescent probes that can achieve this goal. The strategy we employ is to conjugate a fluorescence-quenching 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD) moiety to a selected fluorophore (Dye) through a sulfhydryl-labile ether linkage to afford nonfluorescent NBD-O-Dye. In the presence of GSH or Cys/Hcy, the ether bond is cleaved with the concomitant generation of both a nonfluorescent NBD-S-R derivative and a fluorescent dye having a characteristic intense emission band (B1). In the special case of Cys/Hcy, the NBD-S-Cys/Hcy cleavage product can undergo a further, rapid, intramolecular Smiles rearrangement to form a new, highly fluorescent NBD-N-Cys/Hcy compound (band B2); because of geometrical constraints, the GSH derived NBD-S-GSH derivative cannot undergo a Smiles rearrangement. Thus, the presence of a single B1 or double B1 + B2 signature can be used to detect and differentiate GSH from Cys/Hcy, respectively. We demonstrate the broad applicability of our approach by including in our studies members of the Flavone, Bodipy, and Coumarin dye families. Particularly, single excitation wavelength could be applied for the probe NBD-OF in the detection of GSH over Cys/Hcy in both aqueous solution and living cells.

  13. Disulfide-induced self-assembled targets: A novel strategy for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs via unmodified gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Ehsan; Hosseini, Morteza; Davari, Mehdi D.; Ganjali, Mohammad R.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2017-04-01

    A modified non-cross-linking gold-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) aggregation strategy has been developed for the label free colorimetric detection of DNAs/RNAs based on self-assembling target species in the presence of thiolated probes. Two complementary thiol- modified probes, each of which specifically binds at one half of the target introduced SH groups at both ends of dsDNA. Continuous disulfide bond formation at 3‧ and 5‧ terminals of targets leads to the self-assembly of dsDNAs into the sulfur- rich and flexible products with different lengths. These products have a high affinity for the surface of Au-NPs and efficiently protect the surface from salt induced aggregation. To evaluate the assay efficacy, a small part of the citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome was targeted, leading to a detection limit of about 5 × 10-9 mol.L-1 over a linear ranged from 20 × 10-9 to 10 × 10-7 mol.L-1. This approach also exhibits good reproducibility and recovery levels in the presence of plant total RNA or human plasma total circulating RNA extracts. Self-assembled targets can be then sensitively distinguished from non-assembled or mismatched targets after gel electrophoresis. The disulfide reaction method and integrating self-assembled DNAs/RNAs targets with bare AuNPs as a sensitive indicator provide us a powerful and simple visual detection tool for a wide range of applications.

  14. A Novel Strategy for Detection and Enumeration of Circulating Rare Cell Populations in Metastatic Cancer Patients Using Automated Microfluidic Filtration and Multiplex Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jesus M Magbanua

    Full Text Available Size selection via filtration offers an antigen-independent approach for the enrichment of rare cell populations in blood of cancer patients. We evaluated the performance of a novel approach for multiplex rare cell detection in blood samples from metastatic breast (n = 19 and lung cancer patients (n = 21, and healthy controls (n = 30 using an automated microfluidic filtration and multiplex immunoassay strategy. Captured cells were enumerated after sequential staining for specific markers to identify circulating tumor cells (CTCs, circulating mesenchymal cells (CMCs, putative circulating stem cells (CSCs, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs. Preclinical validation experiments using cancer cells spiked into healthy blood demonstrated high recovery rate (mean = 85% and reproducibility of the assay. In clinical studies, CTCs and CMCs were detected in 35% and 58% of cancer patients, respectively, and were largely absent from healthy controls (3%, p = 0.001. Mean levels of CTCs were significantly higher in breast than in lung cancer patients (p = 0.03. Fifty-three percent (53% of cancer patients harbored putative CSCs, while none were detectable in healthy controls (p<0.0001. In contrast, CECs were observed in both cancer and control groups. Direct comparison of CellSearch® vs. our microfluidic filter method revealed moderate correlation (R2 = 0.46, kappa = 0.47. Serial blood analysis in breast cancer patients demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring circulating rare cell populations over time. Simultaneous assessment of CTCs, CMCs, CSCs and CECs may provide new tools to study mechanisms of disease progression and treatment response/resistance.

  15. A Novel Strategy for Detection and Enumeration of Circulating Rare Cell Populations in Metastatic Cancer Patients Using Automated Microfluidic Filtration and Multiplex Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Pugia, Michael; Lee, Jin Sun; Jabon, Marc; Wang, Victoria; Gubens, Matthew; Marfurt, Karen; Pence, Julia; Sidhu, Harwinder; Uzgiris, Arejas; Rugo, Hope S; Park, John W

    2015-01-01

    Size selection via filtration offers an antigen-independent approach for the enrichment of rare cell populations in blood of cancer patients. We evaluated the performance of a novel approach for multiplex rare cell detection in blood samples from metastatic breast (n = 19) and lung cancer patients (n = 21), and healthy controls (n = 30) using an automated microfluidic filtration and multiplex immunoassay strategy. Captured cells were enumerated after sequential staining for specific markers to identify circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating mesenchymal cells (CMCs), putative circulating stem cells (CSCs), and circulating endothelial cells (CECs). Preclinical validation experiments using cancer cells spiked into healthy blood demonstrated high recovery rate (mean = 85%) and reproducibility of the assay. In clinical studies, CTCs and CMCs were detected in 35% and 58% of cancer patients, respectively, and were largely absent from healthy controls (3%, p = 0.001). Mean levels of CTCs were significantly higher in breast than in lung cancer patients (p = 0.03). Fifty-three percent (53%) of cancer patients harbored putative CSCs, while none were detectable in healthy controls (p<0.0001). In contrast, CECs were observed in both cancer and control groups. Direct comparison of CellSearch® vs. our microfluidic filter method revealed moderate correlation (R2 = 0.46, kappa = 0.47). Serial blood analysis in breast cancer patients demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring circulating rare cell populations over time. Simultaneous assessment of CTCs, CMCs, CSCs and CECs may provide new tools to study mechanisms of disease progression and treatment response/resistance.

  16. Exoplanets -New Results from Space and Ground-based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, Stephane

    The exploration of the outer solar system and in particular of the giant planets and their environments is an on-going process with the Cassini spacecraft currently around Saturn, the Juno mission to Jupiter preparing to depart and two large future space missions planned to launch in the 2020-2025 time frame for the Jupiter system and its satellites (Europa and Ganymede) on the one hand, and the Saturnian system and Titan on the other hand [1,2]. Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is the only other object in our Solar system to possess an extensive nitrogen atmosphere, host to an active organic chemistry, based on the interaction of N2 with methane (CH4). Following the Voyager flyby in 1980, Titan has been intensely studied from the ground-based large telescopes (such as the Keck or the VLT) and by artificial satellites (such as the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope) for the past three decades. Prior to Cassini-Huygens, Titan's atmospheric composition was thus known to us from the Voyager missions and also through the explorations by the ISO. Our perception of Titan had thus greatly been enhanced accordingly, but many questions remained as to the nature of the haze surrounding the satellite and the composition of the surface. The recent revelations by the Cassini-Huygens mission have managed to surprise us with many discoveries [3-8] and have yet to reveal more of the interesting aspects of the satellite. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system has been an extraordinary success for the planetary community since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion (SOI) in July 2004 and again the very successful probe descent and landing of Huygens on January 14, 2005. One of its main targets was Titan. Titan was revealed to be a complex world more like the Earth than any other: it has a dense mostly nitrogen atmosphere and active climate and meteorological cycles where the working fluid, methane, behaves under Titan conditions the way that water does on

  17. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  18. Development of a real-time detection strategy for process monitoring during nuclear fuel reprocessing using the UREX+3a method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S.; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → HPGe detectors are suitable for UREX+3a real-time spectroscopy. → HPGe N-type detectors may be suitable for a reprocessing facility. → Gamma ray self-shielding does not occur for pipe diameters less than 2 in. - Abstract: Reprocessing nuclear fuel is becoming more viable in the United States due to the anticipated increase in construction of nuclear power plants, the growing stockpile of existing used nuclear fuel, and a public desire to reduce the amount of this fuel. A new reprocessing facility will likely have state of the art controls and monitoring methods to safeguard special nuclear materials, as well as to provide real-time monitoring for process control. The focus of this research was to create a proof of concept to enable the development of a detection strategy that uses well established gamma and neutron measurement methods to characterize samples from the Uranium Extraction Plus 3a (UREX+3a) reprocessing method using a variety of detector types and measurement times. A facility that implemented real-time gamma detection equipment could improve product quality control and provide additional benefits, such as waste volume reduction. In addition to the spectral analyses, it was determined by Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) simulations that there is no noticeable self-shielding for internal pipe diameters less than 5.08 cm, indicating that no self-shielding correction factors are needed. Further, it was determined that High Purity Germanium (HPGe) N-type detectors have the high gamma ray energy resolution and neutron damage resistance that would be required in a reprocessing facility. Finally, the gamma ray spectra for the measured samples were simulated using MCNP and then the model was extended to predict the responses from an actual reprocessing scenario from UREX+3a applied to fuel that had a decay time of 3 years. The 3-year decayed fuel was more representative of commercially reprocessed fuel than the acquired UREX+3a

  19. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC to validate the satellite data products. The overall FTIR and CrIS total columns have a positive correlation of r  =  0.77 (N  =  218 with very little bias (a slope of 1.02. Binning the comparisons by total column amounts, for concentrations larger than 1.0  ×  1016 molecules cm−2, i.e. ranging from moderate to polluted conditions, the relative difference is on average ∼ 0–5 % with a standard deviation of 25–50 %, which is comparable to the estimated retrieval uncertainties in both CrIS and the FTIR. For the smallest total column range (< 1.0  × 1016 molecules cm−2 where there are a large number of observations at or near the CrIS noise level (detection limit the absolute differences between CrIS and the FTIR total columns show a slight positive column bias. The CrIS and FTIR profile comparison differences are mostly within the range of the single-level retrieved profile values from estimated retrieval uncertainties, showing average differences in the range of  ∼ 20 to 40 %. The CrIS retrievals typically show good vertical sensitivity down into the boundary layer which typically peaks at  ∼ 850 hPa (∼ 1.5 km. At this level the median absolute difference is 0.87 (std  =  ±0.08 ppb, corresponding to a median relative difference of 39 % (std  =  ±2 %. Most of the absolute and relative profile comparison differences are in the range of the estimated retrieval uncertainties. At the surface, where CrIS typically has lower sensitivity, it tends to overestimate in low-concentration conditions and underestimate

  20. Reconciling Ground-Based and Space-Based Estimates of the Frequency of Occurrence and Radiative Effect of Clouds around Darwin, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protat, Alain; Young, Stuart; McFarlane, Sally A.; L' Ecuyer, Tristan; Mace, Gerald G.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Long, Charles N.; Berry, Elizabeth; Delanoe, Julien

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate whether estimates of the cloud frequency of occurrence and associated cloud radiative forcing as derived from ground-based and satellite active remote sensing and radiative transfer calculations can be reconciled over a well instrumented active remote sensing site located in Darwin, Australia, despite the very different viewing geometry and instrument characteristics. It is found that the ground-based radar-lidar combination at Darwin does not detect most of the cirrus clouds above 10 km (due to limited lidar detection capability and signal obscuration by low-level clouds) and that the CloudSat radar - Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) combination underreports the hydrometeor frequency of occurrence below 2 km height, due to instrument limitations at these heights. The radiative impact associated with these differences in cloud frequency of occurrence is large on the surface downwelling shortwave fluxes (ground and satellite) and the top-of atmosphere upwelling shortwave and longwave fluxes (ground). Good agreement is found for other radiative fluxes. Large differences in radiative heating rate as derived from ground and satellite radar-lidar instruments and RT calculations are also found above 10 km (up to 0.35 Kday-1 for the shortwave and 0.8 Kday-1 for the longwave). Given that the ground-based and satellite estimates of cloud frequency of occurrence and radiative impact cannot be fully reconciled over Darwin, caution should be exercised when evaluating the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions in large-scale models and limitations of each set of instrumentation should be considered when interpreting model-observations differences.

  1. ForestCrowns: a software tool for analyzing ground-based digital photographs of forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee; Phillip A. Araman

    2013-01-01

    Canopy coverage is a key variable used to characterize forest structure. In addition, the light transmitted through the canopy is an important ecological indicator of plant and animal habitat and understory climate conditions. A common ground-based method used to document canopy coverage is to take digital photographs from below the canopy. To assist with analyzing...

  2. Estimating and validating ground-based timber harvesting production through computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux

    2003-01-01

    Estimating ground-based timber harvesting systems production with an object oriented methodology was investigated. The estimation model developed generates stands of trees, simulates chain saw, drive-to-tree feller-buncher, swing-to-tree single-grip harvester felling, and grapple skidder and forwarder extraction activities, and analyzes costs and productivity. It also...

  3. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  4. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, E.; Shephard, M.W.; Palm, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Capps, S.; Lutsch, E.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.W.; Ortega, I.; Toon, G.C.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.; Jones, N.; Smale, D.; Siemons, J.; Hrpcek, K.; Tremblay, D.; Schaap, M.; Notholt, J.; Willem Erisman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder) fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR) column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the

  5. A cost-performance model for ground-based optical communications receiving telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, J. R.; Robinson, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical cost-performance model for a ground-based optical communications receiving telescope is presented. The model considers costs of existing telescopes as a function of diameter and field of view. This, coupled with communication performance as a function of receiver diameter and field of view, yields the appropriate telescope cost versus communication performance curve.

  6. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  7. Ground-based forest harvesting effects on soil physical properties and Douglas-fir growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian Ares; Thomas A. Terry; Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Barry L. Flaming

    2005-01-01

    Soil properties and forest productivity can be affected by heavy equipment used for harvest and site preparation but these impacts vary greatly with site conditions and operational practices. We assessed the effects of ground-based logging on soil physical properties and subsequent Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb) Franco] growth on a highly...

  8. Overview of Boundary Layer Clouds Using Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, B.; Dong, X.; Wu, P.; Qiu, S.

    2017-12-01

    A comprehensive summary of boundary layer clouds properties based on our few recently studies will be presented. The analyses include the global cloud fractions and cloud macro/micro- physical properties based on satellite measurements using both CERES-MODIS and CloudSat/Caliposo data products,; the annual/seasonal/diurnal variations of stratocumulus clouds over different climate regions (mid-latitude land, mid-latitude ocean, and Arctic region) using DOE ARM ground-based measurements over Southern great plain (SGP), Azores (GRW), and North slope of Alaska (NSA) sites; the impact of environmental conditions to the formation and dissipation process of marine boundary layer clouds over Azores site; characterizing Arctice mixed-phase cloud structure and favorable environmental conditions for the formation/maintainess of mixed-phase clouds over NSA site. Though the presentation has widely spread topics, we will focus on the representation of the ground-based measurements over different climate regions; evaluation of satellite retrieved cloud properties using these ground-based measurements, and understanding the uncertainties of both satellite and ground-based retrievals and measurements.

  9. Magnetoseismology ground-based remote sensing of Earth's magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Frederick W

    2013-01-01

    Written by a researcher at the forefront of the field, this first comprehensive account of magnetoseismology conveys the physics behind these movements and waves, and explains how to detect and investigate them. Along the way, it describes the principles as applied to remote sensing of near-Earth space and related remote sensing techniques, while also comparing and intercalibrating magnetoseismology with other techniques. The example applications include advanced data analysis techniques that may find wider used in areas ranging from geophysics to medical imaging, and remote sensing using radar systems that are of relevance to defense surveillance systems. As a result, the book not only reviews the status quo, but also anticipates new developments. With many figures and illustrations, some in full color, plus additional computational codes for analysis and evaluation. Aimed at graduate readers, the text assumes knowledge of electromagnetism and physical processes at degree level, but introductory chapters wil...

  10. Multisatellite and ground-based observations of transient ULF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Takahashi, K.; Erlandson, R.E.; Luehr, H.; Marklund, G.T.; Block, L.P.; Blomberg, L.G.; Lepping, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    A unique alignment of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE and Viking satellites with respect to the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross has provided an opportunity to study transient ULF pulsations associated with variations in solar wind plasma density observed by the IMP 8 satellite. These observations were acquired during a relatively quiet period on April 24, 1986, during the Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study (PROMIS) period. An isolated 4-mHz (4-min period) pulsation was detected on the ground which was associated with transverse magnetic field oscillations observed by Viking at a ∼ 2-R E altitude above the auroral zone and by CCE at ∼ 8-R E in the equatorial plane on nearly the same flux tube. CCE detected a compressional oscillation in the magnetic field with twice the period (∼ 10 min) of the transverse waves, and with a waveform nearly identical to an isolated oscillation in the solar wind plasma density measured by IMP 8. The authors conclude that the isolated 10-min oscillation in solar wind plasma density produced magnetic field compression oscillations inside the magnetosphere at the same frequency which also enhanced resonant oscillations at approximately twice the frequency that were already present. The ground magnetic field variations are due to ionospheric Hall currents driven by the electric field of the standing Alfven waves. The time delay between surface and satellite data acquired at different local times supports the conclusion that the periodic solar wind density variation excites a tailward traveling large-scale magnetosphere wave train which excites local field line resonant oscillations. They conclude that these transient magnetic field variations are not associated with magnetic field reconnection or flux transfer events

  11. Integrated hierarchical geo-environmental survey strategy applied to the detection and investigation of an illegal landfill: A case study in the Campania Region (Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Cavuoto, Giuseppe; Punzo, Michele; Tarallo, Daniela; Casazza, Marco; Guarriello, Silvio Marco; Lega, Massimiliano

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes an approach to detect and investigate the main characteristics of a solid waste landfill through the integration of geological, geographical and geophysical methods. In particular, a multi-temporal analysis of the landfill morphological evolution was carried out using aerial and satellite photos, since there were no geological and geophysical data referring to the study area. Subsequently, a surface geophysical prospection was performed through geoelectric and geomagnetic methods. In particular, the combination of electrical resistivity, induced polarization and magnetic measurements removed some of the uncertainties, generally associated with a separate utilization of these techniques. This approach was successfully tested to support the Prosecutor Office of Salerno (S Italy) during a specific investigation about an illegal landfill. All the collected field data supported the reconstruction of the site-specific history, while the real quarry geometry and site geology were defined. Key elements of novelty of this method are the combination and the integration of different methodological approaches, as the parallel and combined use of satellite, aerial and in-situ collected data, that were validated in a real investigation and that revealed the effectiveness of this strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A new modeling strategy for third-order fast high-performance liquid chromatographic data with fluorescence detection. Quantitation of fluoroquinolones in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Bortolato, Santiago A; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2015-03-01

    Matrix augmentation is regularly employed in extended multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS), as applied to analytical calibration based on second- and third-order data. However, this highly useful concept has almost no correspondence in parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of third-order data. In the present work, we propose a strategy to process third-order chromatographic data with matrix fluorescence detection, based on an Augmented PARAFAC model. The latter involves decomposition of a three-way data array augmented along the elution time mode with data for the calibration samples and for each of the test samples. A set of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices, measured at different chromatographic elution times for drinking water samples, containing three fluoroquinolones and uncalibrated interferences, were evaluated using this approach. Augmented PARAFAC exploits the second-order advantage, even in the presence of significant changes in chromatographic profiles from run to run. The obtained relative errors of prediction were ca. 10 % for ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and danofloxacin, with a significant enhancement in analytical figures of merit in comparison with previous reports. The results are compared with those furnished by MCR-ALS.

  13. Close-up of primary and secondary asteroseismic CoRoT targets and the ground-based follow-up observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytterhoeven, K; Poretti, E; Rainer, M; Mantegazza, L [INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory, Via E. Bianchi 46, 23807 Merate (Italy); Zima, W; Aerts, C; Morel, T; Lefever, K [Institute of Astronomy, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Miglio, A [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique de l' Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Amado, P J; MartIn-Ruiz, S [Instituto de AstrofIsica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Mathias, P; Valtier, J C [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, GEMINI, CNRS, Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Paparo, M; Benkoe, J M [Konkoly Observatory, PO Box 67, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: katrien.uytterhoeven@brera.inaf.it

    2008-10-15

    To optimise the science results of the asteroseismic part of the CoRoT satellite mission a complementary simultaneous ground-based observational campaign is organised for selected CoRoT targets. The observations include both high-resolution spectroscopic and multicolour photometric data. We present the preliminary results of the analysis of the ground-based observations of three targets. A line-profile analysis of 216 high-resolution FEROS spectra of the {delta} Sct star HD 50844 reveals more than ten pulsation frequencies in the frequency range 5-18 d{sup -1}, including possibly one radial fundamental mode (6.92 d{sup -1}). Based on more than 600 multi-colour photometric datapoints of the {beta} Cep star HD 180642, spanning about three years and obtained with different telescopes and different instruments, we confirm the presence of a dominant radial mode {nu}{sub 1} = 5.48695 d{sup -1}, and detect also its first two harmonics. We find evidence for a second mode {nu}{sub 2} = 0.3017 d{sup -1}, possibly a g-mode, and indications for two more frequencies in the 7-8 d{sup -1} domain. From Stromgren photometry we find evidence for the hybrid 5 Sct/{gamma} Dor character of the F0 star HD 44195, as frequencies near 3 d{sup -1} and 21 d{sup -1} are detected simultaneously in the different filters.

  14. Simulated JWST/NIRISS Spectroscopy of Anticipated TESS Planets and Selected Super-Earths Discovered from K2 and Ground-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Dana; Albert, Loic; Deming, Drake

    2017-01-01

    The 2018 launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), coupled with the 2017 launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), heralds a new era in Exoplanet Science, with TESS projected to detect over one thousand transiting sub-Neptune-sized planets (Ricker et al, 2014), and JWST offering unprecedented spectroscopic capabilities. Sullivan et al (2015) used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the properties of the planets that TESS is likely to detect, and published a catalog of 962 simulated TESS planets. Prior to TESS launch, the re-scoped Kepler K2 mission and ground-based surveys such as MEarth continue to seek nearby Earth-like exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf host stars. The exoplanet community will undoubtedly employ JWST for atmospheric characterization follow-up studies of promising exoplanets, but the targeted planets for these studies must be chosen wisely to maximize JWST science return. The goal of this project is to estimate the capabilities of JWST’s Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS)—operating with the GR700XD grism in Single Object Slitless Spectrography (SOSS) mode—during observations of exoplanets transiting their host stars. We compare results obtained for the simulated TESS planets, confirmed K2-discovered super-Earths, and exoplanets discovered using ground-based surveys. By determining the target planet characteristics that result in the most favorable JWST observing conditions, we can optimize the choice of target planets in future JWST follow-on atmospheric characterization studies.

  15. A multi-sensor study of the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on orogrpahic clouds and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Binod

    This dissertation examines reflectivity data from three different radar systems, as well as airborne and ground-based in situ particle imaging data, to study the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on orographic clouds and precipitation formed over the mountains in southern Wyoming. The data for this study come from the AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation (ASCII) field campaign conducted over the Sierra Madre mountains in 2012 (ASCII-12) and over the Medicine Bow mountains in 2013 (ASCII-13) in the context of the Wyoming Weather Modification Pilot Project (WWMPP). The campaigns were supported by a network of ground-based instruments, including a microwave radiometer, two profiling Ka-band Micro Rain Radars (MRRs), a Doppler on Wheels (DOW), rawinsondes, a Cloud Particle Imager, and a Parsivel disdrometer. The University of Wyoming King Air with profiling Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) conducted nine successful flights in ASCII-12, and eight flights in ASCII-13. WCR profiles from these flights are combined with those from seven other flights, which followed the same geographically-fixed pattern in 2008-09 (pre-ASCII) over the Medicine Bow range. All sampled storms were relatively shallow, with low-level air forced over the target mountain, and cold enough to support ice initiation by silver iodide (AgI) nuclei in cloud. Three detailed case studies are conducted, each with different atmospheric conditions and different cloud and snow growth properties: one case (21 Feb 2012) is stratiform, with strong winds and cloud droplets too small to enable snow growth by accretion (riming). A second case (13 Feb 2012) contains shallow convective cells. Clouds in the third case study (22 Feb 2012) are stratiform but contain numerous large droplets (mode ~35 microm in diameter), large enough for ice particle growth by riming. These cases and all others, each with a treated period following an untreated period, show that a clear seeding signature is not immediately apparent

  16. Effect of eccentricity on searches for gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries in ground-based detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Duncan A.; Zimmerman, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Inspiralling compact binaries are expected to circularize before their gravitational-wave signals reach the sensitive frequency band of ground-based detectors. Current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries using the LIGO and Virgo detectors therefore use circular templates to construct matched filters. Binary formation models have been proposed which suggest that some systems detectable by the LIGO-Virgo network may have non-negligible eccentricity. We investigate the ability of the restricted 3.5 post-Newtonian order TaylorF2 template bank, used by LIGO and Virgo to search for gravitational waves from compact binaries with masses M≤35M · , to detect binaries with nonzero eccentricity. We model the gravitational waves from eccentric binaries using the x-model post-Newtonian formalism proposed by Hinder et al.[I. Hinder, F. Hermann, P. Laguna, and D. Shoemaker, arXiv:0806.1037v1]. We find that small residual eccentricities (e 0 · · . For eccentricities e 0 > or approx. 0.1, the loss in matched filter signal-to-noise ratio due to eccentricity can be significant and so templates which include eccentric effects will be required to perform optimal searches for such systems.

  17. Remote Sensing of Sonoran Desert Vegetation Structure and Phenology with Ground-Based LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B. Sankey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  18. Technical Note: New ground-based FTIR measurements at Ile de La Réunion: observations, error analysis, and comparisons with independent data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Senten

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based high spectral resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR solar absorption spectroscopy is a powerful remote sensing technique to obtain information on the total column abundances and on the vertical distribution of various constituents in the atmosphere. This work presents results from two FTIR measurement campaigns in 2002 and 2004, held at Ile de La Réunion (21° S, 55° E. These campaigns represent the first FTIR observations carried out at a southern (subtropical site. They serve the initiation of regular, long-term FTIR monitoring at this site in the near future. To demonstrate the capabilities of the FTIR measurements at this location for tropospheric and stratospheric monitoring, a detailed report is given on the retrieval strategy, information content and corresponding full error budget evaluation for ozone (O3, methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, carbon monoxide (CO, ethane (C2H6, hydrogen chloride (HCl, hydrogen fluoride (HF and nitric acid (HNO3 total and partial column retrievals. Moreover, we have made a thorough comparison of the capabilities at sea level altitude (St.-Denis and at 2200 m a.s.l. (Maïdo. It is proved that the performances of the technique are such that the atmospheric variability can be observed, at both locations and in distinct altitude layers. Comparisons with literature and with correlative data from ozone sonde and satellite (i.e., ACE-FTS, HALOE and MOPITT measurements are given to confirm the results. Despite the short time series available at present, we have been able to detect the seasonal variation of CO in the biomass burning season, as well as the impact of particular biomass burning events in Africa and Madagascar on the atmospheric composition above Ile de La Réunion. We also show that differential measurements between St.-Denis and Maïdo provide useful information about the concentrations in the boundary layer.

  19. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  20. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval based on ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, F. M.; Hendrick, F.; Pinardi, G.; Fayt, C.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2013-12-01

    A retrieval approach has been developed to derive tropospheric NO2 vertical column amounts from ground-based zenith-sky measurements of scattered sunlight. Zenith radiance spectra are observed in the visible range by the BIRA-IASB Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument and analyzed by the DOAS technique, based on a least-squares spectral fitting. In recent years, this technique has shown to be a well-suited remote sensing tool for monitoring atmospheric trace gases. The retrieval algorithm is developed and validated based on a two month dataset acquired from June to July 2009 in the framework of the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Once fully operational, the retrieval approach can be applied to observations from stations of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The obtained tropospheric vertical column amounts are compared with the multi-axis retrieval from the BIRA-IASB MAX-DOAS instrument and the retrieval from a zenith-viewing only SAOZ instrument (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales), owned by Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS). First results show a good agreement for the whole time series with the multi-axis retrieval (R = 0.82; y = 0.88x + 0.30) as well as with the SAOZ retrieval (R = 0.85; y = 0.76x + 0.28 ). Main error sources arise from the uncertainties in the determination of tropospheric and stratospheric air mass factors, the stratospheric NO2 abundances and the residual amount in the reference spectrum. However zenith-sky measurements have been commonly used over the last decades for stratospheric monitoring, this study also illustrates the suitability for retrieval of tropospheric column amounts. As there are long time series of zenith-sky acquisitions available, the developed approach offers new perspectives with regard to the use of observations from the NDACC

  1. Characterization of large instabilities displacements using Ground-Based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, L.; Kristensen, L.; Derron, M.-H.; Michoud, C.; Blikra, L. H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    A master thesis in progress at the Lausanne University (IGAR) in cooperation with the Åknes/Tafjord Early Warning Centre in Norway aims to characterize various instabilities displacements using Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar system (GB-InSAR). The main goal is to evaluate the potential of GB-InSAR to determine displacement velocities and mechanical behaviours of several large rock instabilities in Norway. GB-InSAR data are processed and interpreted for three case studies. The first test site is the unstable complex area of Mannen located in the Romsdalen valley (Møre og Romsdal county), threatening infrastructures and potentially able to cause a debacle event downstream. Its total volume is estimated to 15-25 mill m3. Mannen instability is monitored permanently with GB-InSAR since February 2010 and shows displacements towards the radar up to -8 mm per month during the most sensitive period. Børa area located on the southwest side of Mannen instability shows also some signs of activity. It monitored temporarily between August and October 2011 and could help to understand the behaviour of Mannen site. The second, Indre Nordnes rockslide in Lyngenfjord (Troms county), is directly located above an important fjord in North Norway causing a significant risk of tsunami. The volume is estimated to be around 10-15 mill m3. The site was monitored temporarily between June and August 2011. The data show displacements towards the radar up to -12 mm in 2 weeks. The third case concerns rock falls along the road between Oppdølsstranda and Sunndalsøra (Møre og Romsdal county). Even if the volume of rock is less important than the first two cases, rock falls are an important problem for the road 70 underneath. Several campaigns are done between beginning of 2010 and end of 2011. In June 2011 an important rock fall occurs in an area where significant movements were previously detected by GB-InSAR. In order to understand the behaviour of these

  2. First retrievals of methane isotopologues from FTIR ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Whitney; Strong, Kimberly; Walker, Kaley; Buzan, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane concentrations have reached a new high at 1845 ± 2 ppb, accounting for an increase of 256 % since pre-industrial times (WMO, 2016). In the last ten years, methane has been on the rise again at rates of ˜0.3%/year (e.g., Bader et al., 2016), after a period of stabilization of about 5 years. This recent increase is not fully understood due to remaining uncertainties in the methane budget, influenced by numerous anthropogenic and natural emission sources. In order to examine the cause(s) of this increase, we focus on the two main methane isotopologues, i.e. CH3D and 13CH4. Both CH3D and 13CH4 are emitted in the atmosphere with different ratio depending on the emission processes involved. As heavier isotopologues will react more slowly than 12CH4, each isotopologue will be depleted from the atmosphere at a specific rate depending on the removal process. Methane isotopologues are therefore good tracers of the methane budget. In this contribution, the first development and optimization of the retrieval strategy of CH3D as well as the preliminary tests for 13CH4 will be presented and discussed , using FTIR (Fourier Transform infrared) solar spectra collected at the Eureka (80.05 ˚ N, -86.42 ˚ E, 610 m a.s.l.) and Toronto (43.66˚ N, -79.4˚ E, 174 m a.s.l.) ground-based sites. Mixing ratio vertical profiles from a Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM v.4, Marsh et al., 2013) simulation developed by Buzan et al. (2016) are used as a priori inputs. A discussion on the type of regularization constraints used for the retrievals will be presented as well as an evaluation of available spectroscopy (primarily the different editions of the HITRAN database, see Rothman et al., 2013 and references therein). The uncertainties affecting the retrieved columns as well as information content evaluation will be discussed in order to assess the best strategy to be employed based on its altitude sensitivity range and complete error budget. Acknowledgments

  3. Switch-on fluorescent strategy based on crystal violet-functionalized CdTe quantum dots for detecting L-cysteine and glutathione in water and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhen; Chen, Ligang

    2017-10-01

    The concentration of L-cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) is closely related to the critical risk of various diseases. In our study, a new rapid method for the determination of Cys and GSH in water and urine samples has been developed using a fluorescent probe technique, which was based on crystal violet (CV)-functionalized CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The original QDs emitted fluorescence light, which was turned off upon adding CV. This conjugation of CV and QDs could be attributed to electrostatic interaction between COO - of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) on the surface of QDs and N + of CV in aqueous solution. In addition, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) also occurred between CdTe QDs and CV. After adding Cys or GSH to the solution, Cys or GSH exhibited a stronger binding preference toward Cd 2+ than Cd 2+ -MPA, which disturbed the interaction between MPA and QDs. Thus, most MPA was able to be separated from the surface of QDs because of the participation of Cys or GSH. Then, the fluorescence intensity of the CdTe QDs was enhanced. Good linear relationships were obtained in the range of 0.02-40 μg mL -1 and 0.02-50 μg mL -1 , and the detection limits were calculated as 10.5 ng mL -1 and 8.2 ng mL -1 , for Cys and GSH, respectively. In addition, the concentrations of biological thiols in water and urine samples were determined by the standard addition method using Cys as the standard; the quantitative recoveries were in the range of 97.3-105.8%, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 2.5 to 3.7%. The method had several unique properties, such as simplicity, lower cost, high sensitivity, and environmental acceptability. Graphical abstract Crystal violet-functionalized CdTe quantum dots for detecting L-cysteine and glutathione with switch-on fluorescent strategy.

  4. A Manual Transportable Instrument Platform for Ground-Based Spectro-Directional Observations (ManTIS and the Resultant Hyperspectral Field Goniometer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Buchhorn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and technically describes a new field spectro-goniometer system for the ground-based characterization of the surface reflectance anisotropy under natural illumination conditions developed at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI. The spectro-goniometer consists of a Manual Transportable Instrument platform for ground-based Spectro-directional observations (ManTIS, and a hyperspectral sensor system. The presented measurement strategy shows that the AWI ManTIS field spectro-goniometer can deliver high quality hemispherical conical reflectance factor (HCRF measurements with a pointing accuracy of ±6 cm within the constant observation center. The sampling of a ManTIS hemisphere (up to 30° viewing zenith, 360° viewing azimuth needs approx. 18 min. The developed data processing chain in combination with the software used for the semi-automatic control provides a reliable method to reduce temporal effects during the measurements. The presented visualization and analysis approaches of the HCRF data of an Arctic low growing vegetation showcase prove the high quality of spectro-goniometer measurements. The patented low-cost and lightweight ManTIS instrument platform can be customized for various research needs and is available for purchase.

  5. An exploration of counterfeit medicine surveillance strategies guided by geospatial analysis: lessons learned from counterfeit Avastin detection in the US drug supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Mackey, Tim K

    2014-12-02

    To explore healthcare policy and system improvements that would more proactively respond to future penetration of counterfeit cancer medications in the USA drug supply chain using geospatial analysis. A statistical and geospatial analysis of areas that received notices from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about the possibility of counterfeit Avastin penetrating the US drug supply chain. Data from FDA warning notices were compared to data from 44 demographic variables available from the US Census Bureau via correlation, means testing and geospatial visualisation. Results were interpreted in light of existing literature in order to recommend improvements to surveillance of counterfeit medicines. This study analysed 791 distinct healthcare provider addresses that received FDA warning notices across 30,431 zip codes in the USA. Statistical outputs were Pearson's correlation coefficients and t values. Geospatial outputs were cartographic visualisations. These data were used to generate the overarching study outcome, which was a recommendation for a strategy for drug safety surveillance congruent with existing literature on counterfeit medication. Zip codes with greater numbers of individuals age 65+ and greater numbers of ethnic white individuals were most correlated with receipt of a counterfeit Avastin notice. Geospatial visualisations designed in conjunction with statistical analysis of demographic variables appeared more capable of suggesting areas and populations that may be at risk for undetected counterfeit Avastin penetration. This study suggests that dual incorporation of statistical and geospatial analysis in surveillance of counterfeit medicine may be helpful in guiding efforts to prevent, detect and visualise counterfeit medicines penetrations in the US drug supply chain and other settings. Importantly, the information generated by these analyses could be utilised to identify at-risk populations associated with demographic characteristics

  6. Unexpectedly high leprosy seroprevalence detected using a random surveillance strategy in midwestern Brazil: A comparison of ELISA and a rapid diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Marco Andrey C; de Paula, Natália A; Gomes, Ciro M; Vernal, Sebastian; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Lugão, Helena B; de Abreu, Marilda M M; Botini, Patrícia; Duthie, Malcolm S; Spencer, John S; Soares, Rosa Castália F R; Foss, Norma T

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy diagnosis is mainly based on clinical evaluation, although this approach is difficult, especially for untrained physicians. We conducted a temporary campaign to detect previously unknown leprosy cases in midwestern Brazil and to compare the performance of different serological tests. A mobile clinic was stationed at the main bus terminal in Brasília, Brazil. Volunteers were quizzed and given a clinical exam to allow categorization as either patients, known contacts of patients or non-contacts, and blood was collected to determine anti-PGL-I and anti-LID-1 antibody titers by ELISA and by the NDO-LID rapid test. New cases of leprosy and the impact of performing this broad random surveillance strategy were evaluated. Accuracy values and concordance between the test results were evaluated among all groups. Four hundred thirty-four individuals were evaluated, and 44 (10.1%) were diagnosed with leprosy. Borderline forms were the most frequent presentation. Both tests presented higher positivity in those individuals with multibacillary disease. Serological tests demonstrated specificities arround 70% for anti-PGL-1 and anti-LID ELISA; and arround 40% for NDO-LID. Sensitivities ranged from 48 to 62%. A substantial agreement between NDO-LID and ELISA with concomitant positive results was found within leprosy patients (Kappa index = 0.79 CI95% 0.36-1.22). The unexpectedly high leprosy prevalence in this population indicates ongoing community-based exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigens and high rates of subclinical infection. All tests showed low specificity and sensitivity values and therefore cannot be considered for use as stand-alone diagnostics. Rather, considering their positivity among MB patients and non-patients, these tests can be considered effective tools for screening and identifying individuals at high risk who might benefit from regular monitoring.

  7. Big data managing in a landslide early warning system: experience from a ground-based interferometric radar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Intrieri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A big challenge in terms or landslide risk mitigation is represented by increasing the resiliency of society exposed to the risk. Among the possible strategies with which to reach this goal, there is the implementation of early warning systems. This paper describes a procedure to improve early warning activities in areas affected by high landslide risk, such as those classified as critical infrastructures for their central role in society. This research is part of the project LEWIS (Landslides Early Warning Integrated System: An Integrated System for Landslide Monitoring, Early Warning and Risk Mitigation along Lifelines. LEWIS is composed of a susceptibility assessment methodology providing information for single points and areal monitoring systems, a data transmission network and a data collecting and processing center (DCPC, where readings from all monitoring systems and mathematical models converge and which sets the basis for warning and intervention activities. The aim of this paper is to show how logistic issues linked to advanced monitoring techniques, such as big data transfer and storing, can be dealt with compatibly with an early warning system. Therefore, we focus on the interaction between an areal monitoring tool (a ground-based interferometric radar and the DCPC. By converting complex data into ASCII strings and through appropriate data cropping and average, and by implementing an algorithm for line-of-sight correction, we managed to reduce the data daily output without compromising the capability for performing.

  8. Big data managing in a landslide early warning system: experience from a ground-based interferometric radar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrieri, Emanuele; Bardi, Federica; Fanti, Riccardo; Gigli, Giovanni; Fidolini, Francesco; Casagli, Nicola; Costanzo, Sandra; Raffo, Antonio; Di Massa, Giuseppe; Capparelli, Giovanna; Versace, Pasquale

    2017-10-01

    A big challenge in terms or landslide risk mitigation is represented by increasing the resiliency of society exposed to the risk. Among the possible strategies with which to reach this goal, there is the implementation of early warning systems. This paper describes a procedure to improve early warning activities in areas affected by high landslide risk, such as those classified as critical infrastructures for their central role in society. This research is part of the project LEWIS (Landslides Early Warning Integrated System): An Integrated System for Landslide Monitoring, Early Warning and Risk Mitigation along Lifelines. LEWIS is composed of a susceptibility assessment methodology providing information for single points and areal monitoring systems, a data transmission network and a data collecting and processing center (DCPC), where readings from all monitoring systems and mathematical models converge and which sets the basis for warning and intervention activities. The aim of this paper is to show how logistic issues linked to advanced monitoring techniques, such as big data transfer and storing, can be dealt with compatibly with an early warning system. Therefore, we focus on the interaction between an areal monitoring tool (a ground-based interferometric radar) and the DCPC. By converting complex data into ASCII strings and through appropriate data cropping and average, and by implementing an algorithm for line-of-sight correction, we managed to reduce the data daily output without compromising the capability for performing.

  9. Stratospheric OClO and NO2 measured by groundbased UV/Vis-spectroscopy in Greenland in January and February 1990 and 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A.; Perner, D.

    1994-01-01

    Groundbased UV/Vis-spectroscopy of zenith scattered sunlight was performed at Sondre Stromfjord (Greenland) during Jan/Feb 1990 and Jan/Feb 1991. Considerable amounts of OClO were observed during both campaigns. Maximum OClO vertical column densities at 92 deg solar zenith angle (SZA) were 7.4 x 10(exp 13) molec/sq cm in 1990 and 5.7 x 10(exp 13) molec/sq cm in 1991 (chemical enhancement is included in the calculation of the air mass factor (AMF)). A threshold seems to exist for OClO detection: OClO was detected on every day when the potential vorticity at the 475 K level of potential temperature was higher than 35 x 10(exp -6)Km(exp 2)kg(exp -1)s(exp -1). NO2 vertical columns lower than 1 x 10(exp 15) molec/sq cm were frequently observed in both winters.

  10. Potential use of SERS-assisted theranostic strategy based on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposites for bio-detection, MRI, and magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yu; Lei, Sheng-lan [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Lu, Jian-hua [Department of Electronic Science, College of Physical Science and Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); He, Yuan [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen, Zhi-wei, E-mail: chenzhiwei@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, College of Physical Science and Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Ren, Lei, E-mail: renlei@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhou, Xi [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Fire Retardant Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-07-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-assisted theranostic strategy was designed based on a synthesized multifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposite. This theranostic strategy was used for free prostate specific antigen (free-PSA) detection, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic hyperthermia. The lowest protein concentration detected was 1 ng mL{sup −1}, and the limit of detection (LOD) of the calculated PSA was 0.75 ng mL{sup −1}. Then, MRI was carried out to visualize the tumor cell. Lastly, magnetic hyperthermia was employed and revealed a favorable killing effect for the tumor cells. Thus, this SERS-assisted strategy based on a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposite showed great advantages in theranostic treatment. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell composite can be used for specific protein detection, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia therapy. - Highlights: • We designed a SERS-assisted theranostic strategy based on the mutifunctional nanocomposites using gold shelled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au nanoparticles with theranostics and SERS for early diagnosis of PSA were reported for the first time. • The LOD of detection for PSA was lowed as 0.75 ng mL{sup −1}, and the total detection time was shorten to less than 1 h. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters had spin-spin (T{sub 2}) contrast enhancement and increased magnetic response. • Gold nanoshells supplied excellent chemical stability, biocompatibility, better heating property for magnetic hyperthermia.

  11. Coordinated ground-based, low altitude satellite and Cluster observations on global and local scales during a transient post-noon sector excursion of the magnetospheric cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Opgenoorth

    Full Text Available On 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern magnetospheric mantle in close conjunction to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and approached the post-noon dayside magnetopause over Green-land between 13:00 and 14:00 UT. During that interval, a sudden reorganisation of the high-latitude dayside convection pattern occurred after 13:20 UT, most likely caused by a direction change of the Solar wind magnetic field. The result was an eastward and poleward directed flow-channel, as monitored by the SuperDARN radar network and also by arrays of ground-based magnetometers in Canada, Greenland and Scandinavia. After an initial eastward and later poleward expansion of the flow-channel between 13:20 and 13:40 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft, and the field line footprints covered by the eastward looking scan cycle of the Söndre Strömfjord incoherent scatter radar were engulfed by cusp-like precipitation with transient magnetic and electric field signatures. In addition, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar detected strong transient effects of the convection reorganisation, a poleward moving precipitation, and a fast ion flow-channel in association with the auroral structures that suddenly formed to the west and north of the radar. From a detailed analysis of the coordinated Cluster and ground-based data, it was found that this extraordinary transient convection pattern, indeed, had moved the cusp precipitation from its former pre-noon position into the late post-noon sector, allowing for the first and quite unexpected encounter of the cusp by the Cluster spacecraft. Our findings illustrate the large amplitude of cusp dynamics even in response to moderate solar wind forcing. The global ground-based data proves to be an invaluable tool to monitor the dynamics and width of the affected magnetospheric regions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric cusp, ionosphere, reconnection, convection flow-channel, Cluster, ground-based observations

  12. Space debris removal using a high-power ground-based laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, D.K.

    1993-12-31

    The feasibility and practicality of using a ground-based laser (GBL) to remove artificial space debris is examined. Physical constraints indicate that a reactor-pumped laser (RPL) may be best suited for this mission, because of its capabilities for multimegawatt output long run-times, and near-diffraction-limited initial beams. Simulations of a laser-powered debris removal system indicate that a 5-MW RPL with a 10-meter-diameter beam director and adaptive optics capabilities can deorbit 1-kg debris from space station altitudes. Larger debris can be deorbited or transferred to safer orbits after multiple laser engagements. A ground-based laser system may be the only realistic way to access and remove some 10,000 separate objects, having velocities in the neighborhood of 7 km/sec, and being spatially distributed over some 10{sup 10} km{sup 3} of space.

  13. A new signal-on method for the detection of protein based on binding-induced strategy and photoinduced electron transfer between Ag nanoclusters and split G-quadruplex-hemin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai@jsinm.org; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Xie, Minhao

    2015-08-05

    Proteins play important roles in biological and cellular processes. The levels of proteins can be useful biomarkers for cellular events or disease diagnosis, thus the method for sensitive and selective detection of proteins is imperative to proteins express, study, and clinical diagnosis. Herein, we report a “signal-on” platform for the assay of protein based on binding-induced strategy and photoinduced electron transfer between Ag nanoclusters and split G-quadruplex-hemin complexes. By using biotin as the affinity ligand, this simple protocol could sensitively detect streptavidin with a detection limit down to 10 pM. With the use of an antibody as the affinity ligand, a method for homogeneous fluorescence detection of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) was also proposed with a detection limit of 10 pM. The one-step and wash-free assay showed good selectivity. Its high sensitivity, acceptable accuracy, and satisfactory versatility of analytes led to various applications in bioanalysis. - Highlights: • AgNCs have great potential for application in biomedicine. • Binding of two affinity ligands can result in binding-induced DNA assemblies. • PET can be happened between DNA/AgNCs and G-quadruplex/hemin complexes. • A platform for the detection of proteins was proposed by using PET and binding-induced strategy.

  14. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    parameter uncertainty decreased significantly when TLRG data was included in the inversion. The forced infiltration experiment caused changes in unsaturated zone storage, which were monitored using TLRG and ground-penetrating radar. A numerical unsaturated zone model was subsequently conditioned on both......Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between...

  15. Testing a ground-based canopy model using the wind river canopy crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Van Pelt; Malcolm P. North

    1999-01-01

    A ground-based canopy model that estimates the volume of occupied space in forest canopies was tested using the Wind River Canopy Crane. A total of 126 trees in a 0.25 ha area were measured from the ground and directly from a gondola suspended from the crane. The trees were located in a low elevation, old-growth forest in the southern Washington Cascades. The ground-...

  16. Depolarization ratio of polar stratospheric clouds in coastal Antarctica: comparison analysis between ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar and space-borne CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Córdoba-Jabonero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs play an important role in polar ozone depletion, since they are involved in diverse ozone destruction processes (chlorine activation, denitrification. The degree of that ozone reduction is depending on the type of PSCs, and hence on their occurrence. Therefore PSC characterization, mainly focused on PSC-type discrimination, is widely demanded. The backscattering (R and volume linear depolarization (δV ratios are the parameters usually used in lidar measurements for PSC detection and identification. In this work, an improved version of the standard NASA/Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL-4, which includes a built-in depolarization detection module, has been used for PSC observations above the coastal Antarctic Belgrano II station (Argentina, 77.9° S 34.6° W, 256 m a.s.l. since 2009. Examination of the MPL-4 δV feature as a suitable index for PSC-type discrimination is based on the analysis of the two-channel data, i.e., the parallel (p- and perpendicular (s- polarized MPL signals. This study focuses on the comparison of coincident δV-profiles as obtained from ground-based MPL-4 measurements during three Antarctic winters with those reported from the space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite in the same period (83 simultaneous cases are analysed for 2009–2011 austral winter times. Three different approaches are considered for the comparison analysis between both lidar profile data sets in order to test the degree of agreement: the correlation coefficient (CC, as a measure of the relationship between both PSC vertical structures; the mean differences together with their root mean square (RMS values found between data sets; and the percentage differences (BIAS, parameter also used in profiling comparisons between CALIOP and other ground-based lidar systems. All of them are examined as a function

  17. Study of the unknown hemisphere of mercury by ground-based astronomical facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2011-08-01

    The short exposure method proved to be very productive in ground-based observations of Mercury. Telescopic observations with short exposures, together with computer codes for the processing of data arrays of many thousands of original electronic photos, make it possible to improve the resolution of images from ground-based instruments to almost the diffraction limit. The resulting composite images are comparable with images from spacecrafts approaching from a distance of about 1 million km. This paper presents images of the hemisphere of Mercury in longitude sectors 90°-180°W, 215°-350°W, and 50°-90°W, including, among others, areas not covered by spacecraft cameras. For the first time a giant S basin was discovered in the sector of longitudes 250°-290°W, which is the largest formation of this type on terrestrial planets. Mercury has a strong phase effects. As a result, the view of the surface changes completely with the change in the planetary phase. But the choice of the phase in the study using spacecrafts is limited by orbital characteristics of the mission. Thus, ground-based observations of the planet provide a valuable support.

  18. Further Studies of Forest Structure Parameter Retrievals Using the Echidna® Ground-Based Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, A. H.; Yao, T.; Zhao, F.; Yang, X.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Li, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Culvenor, D.; Jupp, D.; Newnham, G.; Lovell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ongoing work with the Echidna® Validation Instrument (EVI), a full-waveform, ground-based scanning lidar (1064 nm) developed by Australia's CSIRO and deployed by Boston University in California conifers (2008) and New England hardwood and softwood (conifer) stands (2007, 2009, 2010), confirms the importance of slope correction in forest structural parameter retrieval; detects growth and disturbance over periods of 2-3 years; provides a new way to measure the between-crown clumping factor in leaf area index retrieval using lidar range; and retrieves foliage profiles with more lower-canopy detail than a large-footprint aircraft scanner (LVIS), while simulating LVIS foliage profiles accurately from a nadir viewpoint using a 3-D point cloud. Slope correction is important for accurate retrieval of forest canopy structural parameters, such as mean diameter at breast height (DBH), stem count density, basal area, and above-ground biomass. Topographic slope can induce errors in parameter retrievals because the horizontal plane of the instrument scan, which is used to identify, measure, and count tree trunks, will intersect trunks below breast height in the uphill direction and above breast height in the downhill direction. A test of three methods at southern Sierra Nevada conifer sites improved the range of correlations of these EVI-retrieved parameters with field measurements from 0.53-0.68 to 0.85-0.93 for the best method. EVI scans can detect change, including both growth and disturbance, in periods of two to three years. We revisited three New England forest sites scanned in 2007-2009 or 2007-2010. A shelterwood stand at the Howland Experimental Forest, Howland, Maine, showed increased mean DBH, above-ground biomass and leaf area index between 2007 and 2009. Two stands at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, suffered reduced leaf area index and reduced stem count density as the result of an ice storm that damaged the stands. At one stand, broken tops were

  19. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  20. A Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm for Ice-sheet Radar Echograms Applied to Ground-Based Near-Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana, Vincent De Paul; Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Ruth, Julia; Studinger, Michael; Harbeck, Jeremy P.

    2014-01-01

    Snow accumulation over an ice sheet is the sole mass input, making it a primary measurement for understanding the past, present, and future mass balance. Near-surface frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radars image isochronous firn layers recording accumulation histories. The Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm (SAMPA) was designed and developed to trace annual accumulation layers in polar firn from both airborne and ground-based radars. The SAMPA algorithm is based on the Radon transform (RT) computed by blocks and angular orientations over a radar echogram. For each echogram's block, the RT maps firn segmented-layer features into peaks, which are picked using amplitude and width threshold parameters of peaks. A backward RT is then computed for each corresponding block, mapping the peaks back into picked segmented-layers. The segmented layers are then connected and smoothed to achieve a final layer pick across the echogram. Once input parameters are trained, SAMPA operates autonomously and can process hundreds of kilometers of radar data picking more than 40 layers. SAMPA final pick results and layer numbering still require a cursory manual adjustment to correct noncontinuous picks, which are likely not annual, and to correct for inconsistency in layer numbering. Despite the manual effort to train and check SAMPA results, it is an efficient tool for picking multiple accumulation layers in polar firn, reducing time over manual digitizing efforts. The trackability of good detected layers is greater than 90%.

  1. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  2. Optical and geometrical properties of cirrus clouds in Amazonia derived from 1 year of ground-based lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Diego A.; Barja, Boris; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Seifert, Patric; Baars, Holger; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Artaxo, Paulo

    2017-03-01

    Cirrus clouds cover a large fraction of tropical latitudes and play an important role in Earth's radiation budget. Their optical properties, altitude, vertical and horizontal coverage control their radiative forcing, and hence detailed cirrus measurements at different geographical locations are of utmost importance. Studies reporting cirrus properties over tropical rain forests like the Amazon, however, are scarce. Studies with satellite profilers do not give information on the diurnal cycle, and the satellite imagers do not report on the cloud vertical structure. At the same time, ground-based lidar studies are restricted to a few case studies. In this paper, we derive the first comprehensive statistics of optical and geometrical properties of upper-tropospheric cirrus clouds in Amazonia. We used 1 year (July 2011 to June 2012) of ground-based lidar atmospheric observations north of Manaus, Brazil. This dataset was processed by an automatic cloud detection and optical properties retrieval algorithm. Upper-tropospheric cirrus clouds were observed more frequently than reported previously for tropical regions. The frequency of occurrence was found to be as high as 88 % during the wet season and not lower than 50 % during the dry season. The diurnal cycle shows a minimum around local noon and maximum during late afternoon, associated with the diurnal cycle of precipitation. The mean values of cirrus cloud top and base heights, cloud thickness, and cloud optical depth were 14.3 ± 1.9 (SD) km, 12.9 ± 2.2 km, 1.4 ± 1.1 km, and 0.25 ± 0.46, respectively. Cirrus clouds were found at temperatures down to -90 °C. Frequently cirrus were observed within the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which are likely associated to slow mesoscale uplifting or to the remnants of overshooting convection. The vertical distribution was not uniform, and thin and subvisible cirrus occurred more frequently closer to the tropopause. The mean lidar ratio was 23.3 ± 8.0 sr. However, for

  3. The bistatic radar capabilities of the Medicina radiotelescopes in space debris detection and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, S.; Pupillo, G.; Salerno, E.; Pluchino, S.; di Martino, M.

    2010-03-01

    An accurate measurement of the position and trajectory of the space debris fragments is of primary importance for the characterization of the orbital debris environment. The Medicina Radioastronomical Station is a radio observation facility that is here proposed as receiving part of a ground-based space surveillance system for detecting and tracking space debris at different orbital regions (from Low Earth Orbits up to Geostationary Earth Orbits). The proposed system consists of two bistatic radars formed by the existing Medicina receiving antennas coupled with appropriate transmitters. This paper focuses on the current features and future technical development of the receiving part of the observational setup. Outlines of possible transmitting systems will also be given together with the evaluation of the observation strategies achievable with the proposed facilities.

  4. Exploring the relationship between monitored ground-based and satellite aerosol measurements over the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garland, Rebecca M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This project studied the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite, and ground-based monitored particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations measured...

  5. Information Technology Management: Select Controls for the Information Security of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Communications Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Truex, Kathryn M; Lamar, Karen J; Leighton, George A; Woodruff, Courtney E; Brunetti, Tina N; Russell, Dawn M

    2006-01-01

    ... to the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Communications Network should read this report to reduce the risk of interruption, misuse, modification, and unauthorized access to information in the system...